WorldWideScience

Sample records for united world college

  1. The Enduring Effects of a United World College (UWC) Education as Seen through a Graduate's Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumagari, Maki Ito

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, the United World Colleges (UWC), which consist of 13 pre-university educational institutions across the world, have become a distinctive global education brand. UWC is frequently referred to as the only example of a purely ideology-driven international education model based on the school's adherence to certain key…

  2. The Enduring Effects of a United World College Education as Seen through a Graduate's Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumagari, Maki Ito

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a study that examined evidence of the enduring effects of United World Colleges (UWC) education, arguably the only purely ideology-driven international education model. The study adopted an interpretive phenomenological analysis of an autoethnography by a UWC graduate. The study found that the graduate has incubated her own…

  3. Unit 148 - World Wide Web Basics

    OpenAIRE

    133, CC in GIScience; Yeung, Albert K.

    2000-01-01

    This unit explains the characteristics and the working principles of the World Wide Web as the most important protocol of the Internet. Topics covered in this unit include characteristics of the World Wide Web; using the World Wide Web for the dissemination of information on the Internet; and using the World Wide Web for the retrieval of information from the Internet.

  4. World Assessment Unit Geological Characterizations, 2000 World Petroleum Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapfile includes arcs and polygons that describe U.S. Geological Survey defined petroleum resource Assessment Units of the World. Each assessment unit is...

  5. Uniting the paper and digital worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Keri

    2008-01-01

    Digital pen and paper technologies are increasingly popular in vertical markets such as health care, but the broad market of everyday consumers remains untapped. In the past year, several developers targeting that market have focused on notetakers-whether journalists, lawyers, or students-in the hope of uniting the paper and digital worlds.

  6. College of Engineering robotics students win awards around the world

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2007-01-01

    Students from the Virginia Tech College of Engineering's Robotics and Mechanics Laboratory have traveled the United States and abroad this summer, winning a number of honors for robotics research and development.

  7. Computers in the World of College English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannheimer, Charlotte

    This sabbatical report surveys some computer software presently being developed, already in use, and/or available, and describes computer use in several Massachusetts colleges. A general introduction to computers, word processors, artificial intelligence, and computer assisted instruction is provided, as well as a discussion of what computers can…

  8. A Whole 'Nother World: Students Navigating Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardenhire-Crooks, Alissa; Collado, Herbert; Ray, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    MDRC's Opening Doors Demonstration is measuring the effects of various combinations of curricular reforms, enhanced academic advising, and increased financial aid intended to increase the persistence and improve the academic achievement of students at six community colleges across the United States. To determine the impact of the Opening Doors…

  9. History of College Zoology Textbooks in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Margaret Crespo

    Studied were the characteristics and changes of textbooks used in college zoology instruction in the United States and the relationship of these findings to the development of college zoology instruction. The authors' professional backgrounds, the textbook audience, and the status of zoology and college education at the time each book was written…

  10. Transformations of units and world's geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Quirós, I

    2000-01-01

    The issue of the transformations of units is treated, mainly, in a geometrical context. Spacetime singularities are shown to be a consequence of a wrong choice of the geometrical formulation of the laws of gravitation. This result is discussed, in particular, for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. It is also shown that Weyl geometry is a consistent framework for the formulation of the gravitational laws since the basic laws on which this geometry rests are invariant under the one-parameter Abelian group of units transformations studied in the paper. Riemann geometry does not fulfill this requirement. Arguments are given that point at Weyl geometry as a geometry implicitly containing the quantum effects of matter. The notion of geometrical relativity is presented. This notion may represent a natural extension of general relativity to include invariance under the group of units transformations.

  11. Population patterns in World's administrative units

    CERN Document Server

    Fontanelli, Oscar; Cocho, Germinal; Li, Wentian

    2016-01-01

    While there has been an extended discussion concerning city population distribution, little has been said about administrative units. Even though there might be a correspondence between cities and administrative divisions, they are conceptually different entities and the correspondence breaks as artificial divisions form and evolve. In this work we investigate the population distribution of second level administrative units for 150 countries and propose the Discrete Generalized Beta Distribution (DGBD) rank-size function to describe the data. After testing the goodness of fit of this two parameter function against power law, which is the most common model for city population, DGBD is a good statistical model for 73% of our data sets and better than power law in almost every case. Particularly, DGBD is better than power law for fitting country population data. The fitted parameters of this function allow us to construct a phenomenological characterization of countries according to the way in which people are d...

  12. Real-World Units in the Conceptual Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Blanca; Pierson, Bo Hyun

    2014-01-01

    During an eight-week series of investigations, a class of third-grade students learned how interactions between forces are used to advance technology in their world. This five-part forces and interaction unit was led by a guiding question: How does engineering and design work in the world, and how does it affect our lives? As they explored this…

  13. Units 005-007 - The World in Spatial Terms

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This unit has two primary segments: Unit 006 - Human Cognition of the Spatial World and Unit 007 - Asking Geographic Questions. The first section sets the scene by differentiationg between objects and processes and by  using fundamental understanding of the spatial world to provide a necessary knowledge  base for GIS. The second section builds on the knowledge base to demonstrate how specific  knowledge about objects and spatial relations among them can be unpacked by the  mechanism of asking...

  14. United States and world energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, L.L.; Baird, L.M.; Varanini, E.E. III (eds.)

    1982-01-01

    This volume examines the economic, political, and social implications of the oil-dependence dilemma facing the United States. Most of the contributors are energy consultants in the public or private sector. Their analyses of the changing oil situation and its impact on other energy policies reflect either an international, national, or regional perspective with a unique combination of pragmatic insights and academic analyses of these complex issues. While examining the various aspects of the energy dependence dilemma presented here, one critical theme will probably recur to the reader. That is, given the inadequate nature of the US response to the 1973 and 1979 shortfalls in foreign oil supplies, how will we manage the projected future shortages in foreign oil supplies. The 18 papers of this volume were presented at a conference at Los Angeles in July 1980 and cosponsored by the University of Southern California and the California Energy Commission; a separate abstract was prepared for each paper. See also EAPA 7:3231 and Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) 6:18036.

  15. Empowering the Self, Creating Worlds: Lesbian and Gay Latina/o College Students' Identity Negotiation in Figured Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena-Talamantes, Abraham E.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from Holland, Lachicotte, Skinner, and Cain's (1998) identity theory, this study sought to understand how six self-identified lesbian and gay Latina/o college students negotiated their sexual and ethnic identities. Participants identified two equally flawed dimensions, the hometown and college figured worlds, from which they sought an…

  16. Empowering the Self, Creating Worlds: Lesbian and Gay Latina/o College Students' Identity Negotiation in Figured Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena-Talamantes, Abraham E.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from Holland, Lachicotte, Skinner, and Cain's (1998) identity theory, this study sought to understand how six self-identified lesbian and gay Latina/o college students negotiated their sexual and ethnic identities. Participants identified two equally flawed dimensions, the hometown and college figured worlds, from which they sought an…

  17. Reliability of Power Units in Poland and the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Paska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of a power system’s subsystems is the generation subsystem consisting of power units, the reliability of which to a large extent determines the reliability of the power system and electricity supply to consumers. This paper presents definitions of the basic indices of power unit reliability used in Poland and in the world. They are compared and analysed on the basis of data published by the Energy Market Agency (Poland, NERC (North American Electric Reliability Corporation – USA, and WEC (World Energy Council. Deficiencies and the lack of a unified national system for collecting and processing electric power equipment unavailability data are also indicated.

  18. The United States Army War College: Time for a Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    complex and ambiguous ( VUCA ) environment” or “wicked problem” worthy of considerable analysis. This paper analyzes the current USAWC construct and...College. Hughes authored a chapter “Professors in the Colonels’ World ” in a 2010 book entitled Military Culture and Education. There he attacked the...attend. This has created a PME system that is “out of balance” that must be corrected. He uses historical references to World War II and post Vietnam

  19. China's Propaganda in the United States during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Kuo-jen

    Drawing data from a variety of sources, a study was undertaken to place China's propaganda activities in the United States during World War II into a historical perspective. Results showed that China's propaganda efforts consisted of official and unofficial activities and activities directed toward overseas Chinese. The official activities were…

  20. Essay Review: College Sports since World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, John

    2011-01-01

    Scholarly writing on college sports gets better as the problems of college sports get worse. This does not mean that the authors are causing the problems. Rather, the excesses and ills of college sports, past and present, provide such fertile data that historians of higher education enjoy a perverse embarrassment of research riches. This maxim is…

  1. How Community Colleges Can Work for World Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The important contributions that community colleges make to American society are well known and documented, but many people may not be aware of the huge influence that community colleges are having overseas. The U.S. model of the two-year college with a vocational emphasis is being exported, and foreign institutions that focus on career education…

  2. The Child-Friendly Healthcare Initiative (CFHI): Healthcare provision in accordance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Child Advocacy International. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development of the World Health Organization (WHO). Royal College of Nursing (UK). Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (UK). United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southall, D P; Burr, S; Smith, R D; Bull, D N; Radford, A; Williams, A; Nicholson, S

    2000-11-01

    Although modern medical technology and treatment regimens in well-resourced countries have improved the survival of sick or injured children, most of the world's families do not have access to adequate health care. Many hospitals in poorly resourced countries do not have basic water and sanitation, a reliable electricity supply, or even minimal security. The staff, both clinical and nonclinical, are often underpaid and sometimes undervalued by their communities. In many countries there continues to be minimal, if any, pain control, and the indiscriminate use of powerful antibiotics leads to a proliferation of multiresistant pathogens. Even in well-resourced countries, advances in health care have not always been accompanied by commensurate attention to the child's wider well-being and sufficient concerns about their anxieties, fears, and suffering. In accordance with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child,(1) the proposals set out in this article aim to develop a system of care that will focus on the physical, psychological, and emotional well-being of children attending health care facilities, particularly as inpatients. To develop in consultation with local health care professionals and international organizations, globally applicable standards that will help to ensure that practices in hospitals and health centers everywhere respect children's rights, not only to survival and avoidance of morbidity, but also to their protection from unnecessary suffering and their informed participation in treatment. Child Advocacy International will liase closely with the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) in the implementation of the pilot scheme in 6 countries. In hospitals providing maternity and newborn infant care, the program will be closely linked with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative of WHO/UNICEF that aims to strengthen support for

  3. Pamplin College faculty listed among the world's top 50 tourism scholars

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2009-01-01

    The world's top 50 tourism scholars include hospitality and tourism management faculty at Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business, according to a study published recently in "Tourism Management" journal.

  4. World Peace and the College: The Presidential Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snavely, Guy E.

    2004-01-01

    There are some notable gestures to inculcate the "will to peace." General approval by all the nations of the world seems now to be given to the World Court. The League of Nations, though not approved officially by the U.S., is generally admitted as approaching the ideal of its originator, the Commander-in-Chief of U.S. forces during the World War.…

  5. Grave New World? Workplace Skills for Today's College Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Today's college graduates face an uncertain and demanding job market in which they are likely to encounter evolving skill needs, reduced hiring, and heightened competition from experienced laid off workers and globally available labor. These realities underscore the importance expressed by educators and practitioners of identifying attributes new…

  6. Gender Differences in Promotion Experiences at Two Elite Private Liberal Arts Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berheide, Catherine White; Christenson, Lisa; Linden, Rena; Bray, Una

    2013-01-01

    In colleges and universities throughout the United States, women are underrepresented at the rank of full professor. This national pattern holds true at two highly selective small private liberal arts colleges in the Northeast, one formerly a men's college and the other formerly a women's college. Analysis of personnel data at the former women's…

  7. Invisible colleges in the adult education research world

    OpenAIRE

    Staffan Larsson

    2010-01-01

    Invisible colleges - researchers’ networks of communicating academic work - are power-generating actors shaping research fields. A key question concerns the relation between local research communities and their dependence on global actors. A key arena is articles and citations in academic journals. An actor-network-inspired empirical investigation of the geographical origin of articles and references in the journal “Studies in the Education of Adults” and a check of references to journals in ...

  8. Invisible colleges in the adult education research world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Larsson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Invisible colleges - researchers’ networks of communicating academic work - are power-generating actors shaping research fields. A key question concerns the relation between local research communities and their dependence on global actors. A key arena is articles and citations in academic journals. An actor-network-inspired empirical investigation of the geographical origin of articles and references in the journal “Studies in the Education of Adults” and a check of references to journals in “Adult Education Quarterly” was made. The origin of articles and study objects in the International journal of Lifelong education was also analysed. Some conclusions can be drawn from the material. One is the heavy impact of “real” geographical location, i.e. the origins of texts and references are located in very specific areas on the map, i.e. in spite of the possibilities of cyberspace and global mobility. Another conclusion is the unilateral relation between an Anglo-American centre and a periphery in the distribution systems of texts. Adult education is faced with a contradictory situation between culturing invisible colleges in adult education and getting resources in the emerging economy of publications and citations through membership in other invisible colleges.

  9. Parental Involvement with College Students in Germany, Hong Kong, Korea, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Cheng, Yen-Pi; Kim, Kyungmin; Fung, Helene H.; Han, Gyounghae; Lang, Frieder R.; Lee, Wonkyung; Wagner, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Rates of college attendance have increased throughout the world. This study asked whether students across nations experience high involvement with parents (frequent contact and support) and how satisfied they are with parental involvement. College students from four major Western and Asian economies participated: Germany (n = 458), Hong Kong (n = 276), Korea (n = 257), and the United States (n = 310). Consistent with solidarity theory, students across nations reported frequent contact with parents and receiving several forms of social support (e.g., practical, emotional, and advice) every month. Multilevel models revealed Asian students received more frequent parental support than German or US students, but were less satisfied with that support. Students in Hong Kong resided with parents more often and gave more support to parents than students in other cultures. Discussion focuses on cultural (i.e., filial obligation) and structural (i.e., coresidence) factors explaining parental involvement. PMID:27594722

  10. The United Nations Framework Classification for World Petroleum Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Blystad, P.; Young, E.D.; Slavov, S.; Heiberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The United Nations has developed an international framework classification for solid fuels and minerals (UNFC). This is now being extended to petroleum by building on the joint classification of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), the World Petroleum Congresses (WPC) and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG). The UNFC is a 3-dimansional classification. This: Is necessary in order to migrate accounts of resource quantities that are developed on one or two of the axes to the common basis; Provides for more precise reporting and analysis. This is particularly useful in analyses of contingent resources. The characteristics of the SPE/WPC/AAPG classification has been preserved and enhanced to facilitate improved international and national petroleum resource management, corporate business process management and financial reporting. A UN intergovernmental committee responsible for extending the UNFC to extractive energy resources (coal, petroleum and uranium) will meet in Geneva on October 30th and 31st to review experiences gained and comments received during 2003. A recommended classification will then be delivered for consideration to the United Nations through the Committee on Sustainable Energy of the Economic Commission for Europe (UN ECE).

  11. Mental disorders among college students in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Randy P.; Alonso, Jordi; Axinn, William G.; Cuijpers, Pim; Ebert, David D.; Green, Jennifer Greif; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Liu, Howard; Mortier, Philippe; Nock, Matthew K.; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie; Sampson, Nancy A.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Andrade, Laura H.; Benjet, Corina; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Elie G.; Kiejna, Andrzej; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; McGrath, John J.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Pennell, Beth-Ellen; Scott, Kate; ten Have, Margreet; Torres, Yolanda; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Zarkov, Zahari; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Background Although mental disorders are significant predictors of educational attainment throughout the entire educational career, most research on mental disorders among students has focused on the primary and secondary school years. Methods The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were used to examine the associations of mental disorders with college entry and attrition by comparing college students (n = 1,572) and nonstudents in the same age range (18–22; n = 4,178), including nonstudents who recently left college without graduating (n = 702) based on surveys in 21 countries (4 low/lower-middle income, 5 upper middle-income, 1 lower-middle or upper-middle at the times of two different surveys, and 11 high income). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence and age-of-onset of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavioural and substance disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Results One-fifth (20.3%) of college students had 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI disorders. 83.1% of these cases had pre-matriculation onsets. Disorders with pre-matriculation onsets were more important than those with post-matriculation onsets in predicting subsequent college attrition, with substance disorders and, among women, major depression the most important such disorders. Only 16.4% of students with 12-month disorders received any 12-month healthcare treatment for their mental disorders. Conclusions Mental disorders are common among college students, have onsets that mostly occur prior to college entry, in the case of pre-matriculation disorders are associated with college attrition, and are typically untreated. Detection and effective treatment of these disorders early in the college career might reduce attrition and improve educational and psychosocial functioning. PMID:27484622

  12. One College, One World: A Small Town Community College and the Impact of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is a highly contested notion of the rapid changes taking place through the movement of labor, capital, communications, and information transcending all previous notions of borders and similarly defined territories. Historically, community college missions have been limited by their district borders. This study presents findings from…

  13. Survey of Developmental Mathematics Courses at Colleges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, James; And Others

    A 40-item questionnaire designed to investigate the variety and scope of developmental mathematics courses (DMC) offered at colleges and universities throughout the United States was administered to a selected sample of two- and four-year colleges in October 1974. The 104 respondents represented 21 states. Most (58%) of the colleges responding…

  14. Coal reserves in the United States and around the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubert, K.; Masudi, H.

    1995-03-01

    There is an urgent need to examine the role that coal might play in meeting world energy needs during the next 20 years. Oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) can no longer be relied upon to provide expanding supplies of energy, even with rapidly rising prices. Neither can nuclear energy be planned on for rapid expansion worldwide until present uncertainties about it are resolved. Yet, the world`s energy needs will continue to grow, even with vigorous energy conservation programs and with optimistic rates of expansion in the use of solar energy. Coal already supplies 25% of the world`s energy, its reserves are vast, and it is relatively inexpensive. This study, with the aid of reports from the World Coal Study (WOCOL) examines the needs for coal on a global scale, its availability past and present, and its future prospects.

  15. 2016 World Federation of Chiropractic/Association of Chiropractic Colleges Education Conference proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In October 2016, the World Federation of Chiropractic and Association of Chiropractic Colleges Education Conference was held in Montreal, Canada. This summary provides the titles of the contributed presentations. The full set of abstracts for this meeting are published online at www.journalchiroed.com as an exclusively electronic publication that is part of volume 30, issue 2 (October 2016) of the Journal of Chiropractic Education. PMID:27749117

  16. In Search of Our Past: Units in Women's History. World History Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Suzanne, Ed.; And Others

    This junior high school level student manual contains three units on the role of women in world history. The units, designed to supplement what is customarily taught in world history courses at this level, are entitled Women Under Feudalism: Western Europe and China, Women in the Industrial Revolution, and Women in Change: 20th Century Women in…

  17. Italian in the Colleges and Universities of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Antonio, Comp.; Adorno, Elvira, Ed.

    This comprehensive guide to Italian study programs in American colleges, universities, specialized schools, and study abroad programs contains five major sections: (1) colleges, universities, and specialized schools offering introductory courses, minor, major, M.A., and Ph.D. programs; (2) colleges and universities offering graduate programs…

  18. Perspectives on the World: International Education Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallner, Pam; And Others

    This publication is a compilation of lessons and unit plans developed by teachers of the Bexley, Ohio City School District through an international education program. Sample lesson plans include: "Giant Pandas from China" (Grade 1); "Haiku Writing" (Grade 4); and "Treasures--Ancient Civilizations of Ohio" (Grade 7). Unit plans include: Civil…

  19. Communities Around the World. The Trobriand Islanders. Teacher's Resource Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    The unit is another in the series developed from materials produced and field tested by the Project Social Studies Curriculum Center. The Trobriand society was chosen for study in this resource unit for upper elementary grades because its economic system illustrates the importance of reciprocal relationships which continue to be very important in…

  20. Fast food perceptions: a pilot study of college students in Spain and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rachel; Dundes, Lauren

    2008-09-01

    Comparing survey data of college students from Spain and the United States provides insight into how perceptions about fast food are culture and gender-specific. More American college males (61%) considered value (amount of food for the money) to be a priority than did other respondents (35%) and relatively few American college males (29%) cited nutritional status as important (versus 60% of other college respondents). Convenience of fast food is more important to Americans (69%) than Spaniards (48%) while more Spanish college students (49%) than Americans (18%) objected to the proliferation of fast food establishments in their own countries.

  1. Efforts to Define College Readiness in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patelis, Thanos; Camara, Wayne; Wiley, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Presented at the 11th International Conference on Education (ICE) in 2009. This presentation provides an overview of the College Board and its efforts to develop college readiness indicators. The information provided includes a conceptual overview of the indicators and the research and development components in the development and validation of…

  2. The Quality of Life for the World's Population: A Unit on Bioethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Arthur; Constan, Phyllis

    1976-01-01

    A bioethics unit aimed at taking biology out of the laboratory and classroom and into the world. An experience in which students not only begin to understand reasons for making decisions, but also understand how values change. (Author/EB)

  3. The United States and World Energy: A Discussion Paper, Department of State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph Stuart

    This publication is a summary of the world energy situation and its impact on the United States. A brief review of some interrelated diplomatic, commercial, and technical aspects of the energy crisis and their implications for the U.S. and its foreign policy is presented first. Next, discussions of world supplies, uses and problems with different…

  4. Marianne Wahnschaff Ballester's Personal Experiences: United States, World War Two, Soviet Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paula Popow

    This family history recounts the life and personal experiences of Marianne Wahnschaff Ballester who was born in the United States in 1929 to German parents. Marianne and her mother spent the World War II years in Stassfurt, Germany, and returned to the United States in 1946. The overview of her life includes a reunion with her father, attendance…

  5. Some concepts of favorability for world-class-type uranium deposits in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, H.H.

    1981-03-01

    An account is given of concepts of favorability of geologic environments in the eastern United States for uranium deposits of several major types existing elsewhere in the world. The purpose is to convey some initial ideas about the interrelationships of the geology of the eastern United States and the geologic settings of certain of these world-class deposits. The study and report include consideration of uranium deposits other than those generally manifesting the geologic, geochemical and genetic characteristics associated with the conventional sandstone-type ores of the western United States.

  6. Cigarette Smoking among Korean International College Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jaesin; Seo, Dong-Chul; Nelson, Toben F.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective and Participants: This study explored (1) the prevalence of cigarette smoking among South Korean international college students in the United States, (2) differences in smoking between on- and off-campus living arrangements, and (3) predictors of an increase in smoking over time in the United States Methods: An online survey was…

  7. Examining the Adjustment Problems of Kenyan International Students Attending Colleges and Universities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokua, Rodgers Nyandieka

    2012-01-01

    The literature on international students from Africa, and particularly Kenya, is very limited despite the significant number of Kenyan international students attending colleges and universities in the United States. Therefore, the intent of this study was to examine the adjustment problems of Kenyan international students in the United States. The…

  8. Comparison of Home Advantage in College and Professional Team Sports in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Richard; Gómez, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Home advantage in seven American college team sports (baseball, basketball, football, hockey, lacrosse, soccer and women's basketball) was compared with professional leagues in the United States for the same sports and for the same time period. A total of 81,063 college games and 22,477 professional games were analyzed for the four seasons 2006-07 to 2009-10. There was a significant home advantage, as measured by home winning percentage, in all sports, both college and professional. The overall home advantage in college sports was significantly greater than in professional sports (pbaseball, basketball, and hockey (all prules of college soccer allow more substitution and hence greater coach intervention than in professional soccer, a factor that could also be reducing home advantage.

  9. Brundtland's World Health Organization: a test case for United Nations reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, A

    1999-01-01

    Gro Harlem Brundtland, who became Director General of the World Health Organization in July 1998, has created a small revolution at the WHO headquarters in Geneva. She is in the process of changing how WHO works, how it interacts with other parts of the United Nations system, and how it enlists ministries, whole governments, universities, and other private organizations to improve health in the world. Here, the Editor describes the reorganization, the new people and resources, and prospects for setting a precedent in United Nations reform.

  10. Brundtland's World Health Organization: A Test Case for United Nations Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Gro Harlem Brundtland, who became Director General of the World Health Organization in July 1998, has created a small revolution at the WHO headquarters in Geneva. She is in the process of changing how WHO works, how it interacts with other parts of the United Nations system, and how it enlists ministries, whole governments, universities, and other private organizations to improve health in the world. Here, the Editor describes the reorganization, the new people and resources, and prospects for setting a precedent in United Nations reform. Imagesp30-ap31-ap39-a PMID:9925169

  11. Cigarette smoking among Korean international college students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jaesin; Seo, Dong-Chul; Nelson, Toben F; Lohrmann, David K

    2013-01-01

    This study explored (1) the prevalence of cigarette smoking among South Korean international college students in the United States, (2) differences in smoking between on- and off-campus living arrangements, and (3) predictors of an increase in smoking over time in the United States An online survey was completed by 1,201 students at 52 4-year US universities (34% response rate). The overall smoking prevalence was 43.5%. The smoking rate (29.0%) of female students was higher than that (4%) of female college students in South Korea. Sex, living place, living situation, length of stay as a student in the United States, home smoking rules, campus-wide tobacco-free policies, and levels of acculturative stress, anxiety, and depression were significantly associated with an increase in smoking (p students on US college campuses, targeted prevention efforts for these students may be warranted.

  12. Coastline Community College World Trade Center Institute Business and International Education Program. Final Performance Report: A Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Chet; Secord, Debra A.

    Under a Title VI-B grant, California's Coastline Community College (CCC) conducted a needs assessment survey establishing a database of international training needs, developed five courses and 10 workshops in international business, and formed the World Trade Center Institute (WTCI). This report provides information on the activities and…

  13. "It's a Whole New World": A Qualitative Exploration of College Students' Definitions of and Strategies for College Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Toews, Michelle L.; Sevin, Tessara; Purswell, Katherine E.

    2008-01-01

    This study used focus group interviews to explore 22 students' definitions of and strategies for college success. Students' narratives revealed their definitions of success were multifaceted and encompassed how they were doing academically, their degree of social integration, and their perceived ability to navigate the college environment. In…

  14. The Road to United States Involvement in World War I: A Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan to teach students about the events leading to the U.S. entry into World War I. Explains that the students pretend to be U.S. senators and debate whether the United States should enter the war. Includes handouts for use with this lesson. (CMK)

  15. Simple Exhibits, Effective Learning: Presenting the United Farm Workers' Experience on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golodner, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of an online exhibit about the history of the United Farm Workers union that was created on the World Wide Web by the Walter P. Reuther Library/Archives of Labor and Urban History. Discusses Web design, hypertext links, and ease of navigation. (Author/LRW)

  16. How efficient can an emergency unit be? A perfect world model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baboolal, Kesh; Griffiths, Jeff D; Knight, Vincent A; Nelson, Andrew V; Voake, Cheryl; Williams, Janet E

    2012-12-01

    Various approaches have been used to identify possible routes for improvement of patient flow within an emergency unit (EU). One such approach is to use simulation to create a 'real world' model of an EU and carry out various tests to gauge ways of improvement. This paper proposes a novel approach in which simulation is used to create a 'perfect world model'. The EU at a major UK hospital is modelled not as it is, but as it could be. The 'efficiency gap' between the 'perfect world' and the 'real world' demonstrates how operational research can be used effectively to identify the location of bottlenecks in the current 'whole hospital' patient pathway and can be used in the planning and managing of hospital resources to ensure the most effective use of those resources.

  17. Performance Incentives and Public College Accountability in the United States: A Quarter Century Policy Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, E. Grady; Johnson, Betty Dandridge

    2010-01-01

    The allocation of funds to public colleges based on performance criteria rather than activity or enrolment criteria is often described as performance funding. In the United States, performance funding policies have become a frequently used instrument of higher education accountability. The history of such policies, however, is a complex one, with…

  18. Using State Student Unit Record Data to Increase Community College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewell, Peter; Jenkins, Davis

    2008-01-01

    This chapter examines lessons learned by states that are using student unit record (SUR) data to improve outcomes for community college students and recommends steps states can take to strengthen their use of SUR databases to benefit students and communities. (Contains 1 exhibit.)

  19. The Levels of Decision Making in Multi-Unit Community College Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Thomas C.; Creswell, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a survey of 33 multi-unit community colleges designed to determine the relationship between (1) the levels at which decisions were made in nine selected areas; (2) institutional size and history; and (3) the number of system-level personnel. Discusses the implications of the findings for practice. (AYC)

  20. Positive Workplace Dynamics: A Qualitative Exploration of Exceptional Performance in Community College Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, R. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This companion dissertation reports the findings of applied case study research on four community college organizational units that consistently meet or exceed standard performance measures. In addition, prior ample evidence confirmed that performance extended significantly beyond what might be explained by available tangible resources alone. The…

  1. The Levels of Decision Making in Multi-Unit Community College Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Thomas C.; Creswell, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a survey of 33 multi-unit community colleges designed to determine the relationship between (1) the levels at which decisions were made in nine selected areas; (2) institutional size and history; and (3) the number of system-level personnel. Discusses the implications of the findings for practice. (AYC)

  2. Loren Pope Touted "No Name" Colleges in a Brand-Name World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles Loren Pope, a college consultant and a former education editor at "The New York Times" who touted "no name" colleges and called the nation's most famous university, Harvard University, a rip-off. In his influential book "Colleges That Change Lives" (Penguin, 1996), Mr. Pope profiled 40 institutions--most of them small…

  3. Men's body depilation: an exploratory study of United States college students' preferences, attitudes, and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basow, Susan A; O'Neil, Katherine

    2014-09-01

    Young men in Western cultures frequently engage in body depilation practices, but little is known regarding how such bodies are perceived. This exploratory study asked United States college students (N=238) to view six pictures of the same male body with different amounts of visible body hair and to indicate which body was most sexually attractive to themselves, to most men, and to most women. Both men and women chose a relatively hairless male body as the most sexually attractive. Women, however, thought men would choose a hairier body than men actually did. Most of the men reduced or removed body hair, especially from the pubic area. Questionnaire responses indicated that men and women had similar attitudes toward men's body hair, with both hair reduction and hair retention being socially acceptable. Men's body depilation, while still optional, may be becoming normative, at least among United States college students.

  4. Real-world data in the United Kingdom: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Laura; Lambrelli, Dimitra; Wasiak, Radek; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2016-06-24

    Real-world data is that collected outside the constraints of controlled clinical trials and is increasingly informing decision-making in healthcare. The landscape of real-world data in the United Kingdom is set to evolve over the coming months as the government plans to build on databases currently in place by collecting patient data from all family practices and linking this information with hospital records. This initiative, called care.data, has the potential to be an invaluable resource. However, the programme has been criticized on grounds of data privacy, which has led to an extended delay in its implementation and the expectation that a large number of people will opt out. Opt-outs may introduce substantial biases to the dataset, and understanding how to account for these presents a significant challenge for researchers. For the scope and quality of real-world evidence in the United Kingdom to be realised, and for this information to be used effectively, it is essential to address this challenge.

  5. WORLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    1. THE UNITED STATES U.S. President Barack Obama, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President of the Palestinian National Authority Mahmoud Abbas confer during trilateral negotiations on Middle East peace on September 22 in New York

  6. A Single-Unit Design Structure and Gender Differences in the Swimming World Championships

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Four 50 meter male/female finals - the freestyle, butterfly, breaststroke, and backstroke - swum during individual events at the Swimming World Championships (SWCs) can be defined in four clusters. The aim of the present study was to use a single-unit design structure, in which the swimmer was defined at only one scale, to evaluate gender differences in start reaction times among elite swimmers in 50 m events. The top six male and female swimmers in the finals of four swimming stroke final ev...

  7. A foot in both worlds: education and the transformation of Chinese medicine in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Although insufficiently studied, schools of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provide substantial insight into the transformation of medicine in the United States. Scholars have suggested that the increasing acceptance of CAM is due to its alignment with biomedical models of professionalization, education, research, and practice. At West Coast University, students of acupuncture and Oriental medicine learn to straddle both Western and Eastern medical worlds through an increasingly science-oriented curriculum and the inculcation of professional values associated with West Coast University's emphasis upon integration with Western medicine as a means of achieving professional status and legitimacy vis-à-vis the dominant biomedical paradigm. The implications of integration with biomedicine for the identity of Chinese medicine are discussed: from the perspective of critical medical anthropology, integration reproduces biomedical hegemony; paving the way toward co-optation of Chinese medicine, the subordination of its practitioners, and, ultimately, the constraint of medical pluralism in the United States.

  8. Province, Total Petroleum System and Assessment Unit Boundaries from the 2009-2011 World Petroleum Resources Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The boundaries illustrated by these Assessment Units are the result of geologic studies conducted by the World Petroleum Resources Project, 2009-2011 (Project). The...

  9. New world origins for haemoparasites infecting United Kingdom grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), as revealed by phylogenetic analysis of bartonella infecting squirrel populations in England and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, K J; Ellis, B A; Birtles, R J; Durden, L A; Lello, J; Begon, M; Bennett, M

    2002-12-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of bartonella have suggested divergence between bartonellae that infect mammals native to the Old and New Worlds. We characterized bartonella isolated from Eastern grey squirrels (Sciurius carolinensis) in the United States and from grey and red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in the United Kingdom by nucleotide sequence comparison (gltA and groEL). Isolates from grey squirrels in the United States and the United Kingdom were identical, and most similar to Bartonella vinsonii, a species associated with New World rodents. A single and novel bartonella genotype was obtained from all 12 red squirrel isolates. Although grey squirrels were first introduced into the United Kingdom over 125 years ago, they continue to be infected solely by the bartonella associated with grey squirrels native to the United States. These results illustrate that exotic species may be accompanied by the introduction and maintenance, over many generations, of their microparasites.

  10. The influence of world view on African-American college students' decisions to study science: An interpretive investigation of four cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradford F.

    In the United States, African Americans are underrepresented among employed Ph.D. holding scientists; they comprise less than 2% of the scientific population and 12% of the United States population. Educational theorists, focusing on the career choices of African Americans as the cause of underrepresentation, have identified many factors that are associated with the underrepresentation of African Americans in science. Some of these factors are: lack of interest in science, poor academic preparation, high interest in social-oriented careers, poor educational and career planning, unfavorable images of scientists, impoverished family backgrounds, and lack of confidence in ability. This plethora of factors indicates that there is yet equivocation in literature as to the cause of underrepresentation. The objective of this study is to deepen current understanding, by providing explanations for the career decisions of African American students. Adopting a theoretical framework which maintains that human behavior is directed by world view and that world view is shaped by environment, the present study seeks to analyze the world view contents of three African American college students: two science majors and one non-science major. The aim of this study is to analyze the world view contents of the students to identify the salient world view images and assumptions that influence their career decisions. The research employs interpretive methodology and a case study design. Primary methods of data collection are interview and interview analysis. The dissertation reports the results of interviews, which include explanations for each respondent's career decisions; and the influence of three factors (expectation of monetary gain, the impact of role models, and respondents' level of self-confidence in ability) on the respondents' career decisions. Findings indicate that the science major has a greater capacity, than the non-science majors, to accommodate world view images and

  11. Narcissism and United States' culture: The view from home and around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua D; Maples, Jessica L; Buffardi, Laura; Cai, Huajian; Gentile, Brittany; Kisbu-Sakarya, Yasemin; Kwan, Virginia S Y; LoPilato, Alex; Pendry, Louise F; Sedikides, Constantine; Siedor, Lane; Campbell, W Keith

    2015-12-01

    The issue of Americans' levels of narcissism is subject to lively debate. The focus of the present research is on the perception of national character (PNC) of Americans as a group. In Study 1, American adults (N = 100) rated Americans as significantly more narcissistic than they perceived themselves and acquaintances. In Study 2, this finding was replicated with American college students (N = 322). PNC ratings of personality traits and externalizing behaviors revealed that Americans were perceived as disagreeable and antisocial as well. In Study 3, we examined the broader characteristics associated with PNC ratings (N = 183). Americans rated the typical American as average on a variety of characteristics (e.g., wealth, education, health, likability) and PNC ratings of narcissism were largely unrelated to these ratings. In Study 4 (N = 1,202) Americans rated PNCs for different prespecified groups of Americans; as expected, PNC ratings of narcissism differed by gender, age, and occupational status such that American males, younger Americans, and Americans working in high-visibility and status occupations were seen as more narcissistic. In Study 5 (N = 733), citizens of 4 other world regions (Basque Country, China, England, Turkey) rated members of their own region as more narcissistic than they perceived themselves, but the effect sizes were smaller than those found in the case of Americans' perceptions of Americans. Additionally, members of these other regions rated Americans as more narcissistic than members of their own region. Finally, in Study 6, participants from around the world (N = 377) rated Americans as more narcissistic, extraverted, and antagonistic than members of their own countries. We discuss the role that America's position as a global economic and military power, paired with a culture that creates and reifies celebrity figures, may play in leading to perceptions of Americans as considerably narcissistic.

  12. Horizontal and vertical individualism and collectivism among college students in the United States, Taiwan, and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, J S

    2001-10-01

    Among college students in the United States, Taiwan, and Argentina, the author examined the strength of 4 cultural patterns (horizontal collectivism, vertical collectivism, horizontal individualism, vertical individualism; H. C. Triandis, 1995). A 3-group confirmatory factor analysis established the measurement equivalence among the 3 samples before the comparison. The Taiwanese and the Argentine samples were more vertically collectivist than the U.S. sample. The U.S. and the Taiwanese samples were more vertically individualistic than the Argentine sample. The U.S. sample was more horizontally individualistic than the Argentine sample, which, in turn, was more horizontally individualistic than the Taiwanese sample.

  13. Undocumented College Students in the United States: In-State Tuition Not Enough to Ensure Four-Year Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Dylan; Chellman, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    Using restricted-access data from one of the largest urban public university systems in the United States--where many undocumented students are eligible for in-state tuition--we review the literature on undocumented college students in the United States and provide a comparison of the performance of undocumented students to that of U.S. citizens…

  14. Social Studies: Economics, International Relations, and Political Science. Latin American Curriculum Units for Junior and Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, William P.; Baldwin, Emily

    These three self-contained units of study will help community college students learn about the economics, international relations, and politics of Latin America. Each unit can be used independently and contains introductory notes for instructors, student materials, and a bibliography. Students are expected to read and discuss the reading…

  15. The Real Virtual World: Connectivity and Techno-Mediation in the Lives of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standlee, Alecea

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the way in which techno-mediated communication technologies, such as social media, text messaging, and virtual communities are used to negotiate, establish and maintain interpersonal relationships among college students. Using in-depth interview and online participant observation, I explore the relationship between…

  16. Connection and Community: Diné College Emphasizes Real-World Experience in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Summer Research Enhancement Program (SREP) at Diné College provides students with a solid foundation of public health research methods and includes a hands-on internship in their home community to test their newly acquired skills while enhancing the communities' health. Focusing on health issues prioritized by Navajo health leaders, from…

  17. The Real Virtual World: Connectivity and Techno-Mediation in the Lives of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standlee, Alecea

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the way in which techno-mediated communication technologies, such as social media, text messaging, and virtual communities are used to negotiate, establish and maintain interpersonal relationships among college students. Using in-depth interview and online participant observation, I explore the relationship between…

  18. Business as Usual or Brave New World? A College President's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Nannerl O.

    1986-01-01

    The Sloan Foundation's New Liberal Arts Program aims to make a fundamental transformation in the liberal arts curriculum, by infusing applied mathematics and technological literacy. The program is examined by the president of Wellesley College in the context of current philosophical and practical constraints in higher education. (MSE)

  19. The Association between Mental Health and Violence among a Nationally Representative Sample of College Students from the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Schwartz

    Full Text Available Recent violent attacks on college campuses in the United States have sparked discussions regarding the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and the perpetration of violence among college students. While previous studies have examined the potential association between mental health problems and violent behavior, the overall pattern of findings flowing from this literature remain mixed and no previous studies have examined such associations among college students.The current study makes use of a nationally representative sample of 3,929 college students from the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC to examine the prevalence of seven violent behaviors and 19 psychiatric disorder diagnoses tapping mood, anxiety, personality, and substance use disorders. Associations between individual and composite psychiatric disorder diagnoses and violent behaviors were also examined. Additional analyses were adjusted for the comorbidity of multiple psychiatric diagnoses.The results revealed that college students were less likely to have engaged in violent behavior relative to the non-student sample, but a substantial portion of college students had engaged in violent behavior. Age- and sex-standardized prevalence rates indicated that more than 21% of college students reported at least one violent act. In addition, more than 36% of college students had at least one diagnosable psychiatric disorder. Finally, the prevalence of one or more psychiatric disorders significantly increased the odds of violent behavior within the college student sample.These findings indicate that violence and psychiatric disorders are prevalent on college campuses in the United States, though perhaps less so than in the general population. In addition, college students who have diagnosable psychiatric disorders are significantly more likely to engage in various forms of violent behavior.

  20. United States foreign oil policy since World War 1 : for profits and security. 2 ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, S.J.

    2005-07-01

    This book provided a historical context for United States global oil politics, with a focus on the goals, accomplishments and challenges of United States foreign oil policy, as well as on the relationship between the state and private sectors. This second edition has integrated developments in global politics since the end of the Cold War. It was suggested that many factors have provided the context for oil policy formation: a succession of crises in Iran since the 1950s; 2 wars in Iraq; U.S. intervention in Afghanistan; the threat of international terrorism since September 11, 2001; ongoing conflicts between Israel and the Arab nations in the Middle East; political instability in Saudi Arabia and in Venezuela and the trend towards trade and investment liberalization in Latin America in the 1990s. In addition, the emergence of oil sands reserves in Canada and other sources of non-conventional oil were discussed. Nationalism and oil policies in the Depression and World War 2 were examined. The structure of decision-making in oil policies was examined. Domestic and offshore resources were reviewed, and an outline of international agreements and relationships was presented. Issues concerning OPEC countries and the Iranian Revolution were examined. It was concluded that the United States has become more and not less vulnerable, despite its military strength. The author suggested that the main policy challenge to the United States may well be the tension between its commitment to Israel and its determination to avoid alienating the Arab oil-producing states. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Critical load analysis in hazard assessment of metals using a Unit World Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Nilima; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Diamond, Miriam L

    2011-09-01

    A Unit World approach has been used extensively to rank chemicals for their hazards and to understand differences in chemical behavior. Whereas the fate and effects of an organic chemical in a Unit World Model (UWM) analysis vary systematically according to one variable (fraction of organic carbon), and the chemicals have a singular ranking regardless of environmental characteristics, metals can change their hazard ranking according to freshwater chemistry, notably pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Consequently, developing a UWM approach for metals requires selecting a series of representative freshwater chemistries, based on an understanding of the sensitivity of model results to this chemistry. Here we analyze results from a UWM for metals with the goal of informing the selection of appropriate freshwater chemistries for a UWM. The UWM loosely couples the biotic ligand model (BLM) to a geochemical speciation model (Windermere Humic Adsorption Model [WHAM]) and then to the multi-species fate transport-speciation (Transpec) model. The UWM is applied to estimate the critical load (CL) of cationic metals Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, using three lake chemistries that vary in trophic status, pH, and other parameters. The model results indicated a difference of four orders of magnitude in particle-to-total dissolved partitioning (K(d)) that translated into minimal differences in fate because of the short water residence time used. However, a maximum 300-fold difference was calculated in Cu toxicity among the three chemistries and three aquatic organisms. Critical loads were lowest (greatest hazard) in the oligotrophic water chemistry and highest (least hazard) in the eutrophic water chemistry, despite the highest fraction of free metal ion as a function of total metal occurring in the mesotrophic system, where toxicity was ameliorated by competing cations. Water hardness, DOC, and pH had the greatest influence on CL, because of the influence of these factors on aquatic

  2. Meteorologists from the University of Tokyo: Their Exodus to the United States Following World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John M.

    1993-07-01

    The emigration of 11 young Japanese meteorologists to the United States following World War II is investigated. Their move is examined with the benefit of a historical backdrop that includes a study of the socioeconomic conditions in Japan and the education that they received at the University of Tokyo. Oral histories and letters of reminiscence from these scientists are used with standard source material to reconstruct the conditions of postwar Japan. The principal results of the study are that 1) these scientists were among the intellectual elite, because of the rigorous screening process in the Japanese educational system; 2) their scientific education was fundamentally grounded in traditional physics and a wide range of geophysical sciences; 3) they all experienced austere living conditions and poor job prospects in the war-torn Japanese economy; and 4) they made a strong scientific connection with U.S. researchers in the areas of numerical experimentation and numerical weather prediction, which facilitated their move to the United States.

  3. China, Japan, and the United States in World War II: The Relinquishment of Unequal Treaties in 1943

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine how the United States transformed its foreign policy to promote China as an “equal state” in international politics during World War II, with focus on the process of the American relinquishment of its unequal treaties with China in 1943. In particular, it concentrates on analyzing the conflicts between the United States and Japan in the process of relinquishment. By examining the rivalry between the United States and Japan in the social warfare – propaganda – we can see that the relinquishment of the unequal treaties in 1943 not only marked a historical turning point in America’s China policy, but also had a great impact on the transformation of East Asian politics in World War II and its influence in the world politics.

  4. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-06-13

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340-350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys.

  5. Statistics of Petroleum Exploration in the World Outside the United States and Canada Through 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.; Glovier, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    Future oil and gas supplies depend, in part, on the reserves that are expected to be added through exploration and new discoveries. This Circular presents a summary of the statistics and an analysis of petroleum exploration in the world outside the United States and Canada (the study area) through 2001. It updates U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1096 (by E.D. Attanasi and D.H. Root, 1993) and expands coverage of the statistics to areas where drilling and discovery data have recently become available. These new areas include China, the formerly Communist countries of Eastern Europe, and the countries that once were part of the former Soviet Union in Europe and Asia. Data are presented by country but are organized by petroleum provinces delineated by the U.S. Geological Survey World Energy Assessment Team (USGS Digital Data Series DDS?60, published in 2000). The data and analysis are presented in maps and graphs, providing a visual summary of the exploration maturity of an area. The maps show the delineated prospective areas and explored areas through 2001; explored areas have a drilling density that would rule out the occurrence of undetected large petroleum accumulations. Graphs summarize the exploration yields in terms of cumulative recoverable discovered oil and gas by delineated prospective area. From 1992 through 2001 in areas outside the United States and Canada, the delineated prospective area expanded at a rate of about 50,000 square miles per year while the explored area grew at the rate of about 11,000 square miles per year. The delineated prospective area established by 1970 contains about 75 percent of the oil discovered to date in the study area. This area is slightly less than 40 percent of the delineated prospective area established through 2001. Maps and graphs show the extension of the delineated prospective area to deepwater areas offshore of Brazil and West Africa. From 1991 through 2000, offshore discoveries accounted for 59 percent of the oil

  6. A Single-Unit Design Structure and Gender Differences in the Swimming World Championships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkar, Svetlana; Issurin, Vladimir B.; Verbitsky, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Four 50 meter male/female finals - the freestyle, butterfly, breaststroke, and backstroke - swum during individual events at the Swimming World Championships (SWCs) can be defined in four clusters. The aim of the present study was to use a single-unit design structure, in which the swimmer was defined at only one scale, to evaluate gender differences in start reaction times among elite swimmers in 50 m events. The top six male and female swimmers in the finals of four swimming stroke final events in six SWCs were analyzed. An unpaired t-test was used. The p-values were evaluated using Neo-Fisherian significance assessments (Hurlbert and Lombardi, 2012). For the freestyle, gender differences in the start reaction times were positively identified for five of the six SWCs. For the backstroke, gender differences in the start reaction times could be dismissed for five of the six SWCs. For both the butterfly and breaststroke, gender differences in the start reaction times yielded inconsistent statistical differences. Pooling all swimmers together (df = 286) showed that an overall gender difference in the start reaction times could be positively identified: p = 0.00004. The contrast between the gender differences in start reaction times between the freestyle and backstroke may be associated with different types of gender adaptations to swimming performances. When the natural groupings of swimming stroke final events were ignored, sacrificial pseudoreplication occurred, which may lead to erroneous statistical differences. PMID:25414754

  7. A Single-Unit Design Structure and Gender Differences in the Swimming World Championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkar Svetlana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Four 50 meter male/female finals - the freestyle, butterfly, breaststroke, and backstroke - swum during individual events at the Swimming World Championships (SWCs can be defined in four clusters. The aim of the present study was to use a single-unit design structure, in which the swimmer was defined at only one scale, to evaluate gender differences in start reaction times among elite swimmers in 50 m events. The top six male and female swimmers in the finals of four swimming stroke final events in six SWCs were analyzed. An unpaired t-test was used. The p-values were evaluated using Neo-Fisherian significance assessments (Hurlbert and Lombardi, 2012. For the freestyle, gender differences in the start reaction times were positively identified for five of the six SWCs. For the backstroke, gender differences in the start reaction times could be dismissed for five of the six SWCs. For both the butterfly and breaststroke, gender differences in the start reaction times yielded inconsistent statistical differences. Pooling all swimmers together (df = 286 showed that an overall gender difference in the start reaction times could be positively identified: p = 0.00004. The contrast between the gender differences in start reaction times between the freestyle and backstroke may be associated with different types of gender adaptations to swimming performances. When the natural groupings of swimming stroke final events were ignored, sacrificial pseudoreplication occurred, which may lead to erroneous statistical differences

  8. Making War Work for Industry: The United Alkali Company's Central Laboratory During World War One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The creation of the Central Laboratory immediately after the United Alkali Company (UAC) was formed in 1890, by amalgamating the Leblanc alkali works in Britain, brought high expectations of repositioning the company by replacing its obsolete Leblanc process plant and expanding its range of chemical products. By 1914, UAC had struggled with few exceptions to adopt new technologies and processes and was still reliant on the Leblanc process. From 1914, the Government would rely heavily on its contribution to the war effort. As a major heavy-chemical manufacturer, UAC produced chemicals for explosives and warfare gases, while also trying to maintain production of many essential chemicals including fertilisers for homeland consumption. UAC's wartime effort was led by the Central Laboratory, working closely with the recently established Engineer's Department to develop new process pathways, build new plant, adapt existing plant, and produce the contracted quantities, all as quickly as possible to meet the changing battlefield demands. This article explores how wartime conditions and demands provided the stimulus for the Central Laboratory's crucial R&D work during World War One.

  9. YOUNG CITY, BIG P Shenzhen Universiade unites the world's young people through

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU LINTAO

    2011-01-01

    With none of the usual hoop-la,no fireworks,no grand perfonnances by celebrities and supersars,the Shenzhen Summer Universiade lowered the curtain on a big party tor youth and college students on August 23.

  10. The World Calls for a Strong United Nations—In Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the UN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    On September 14-16, 2005, the 2005 World Summit, UN’s largest summit meeting of heads of state and government in the new century, was held. 170 heads of state and government out of 191 member states gathered at the UN headquarters in New York, celebrating the 60th anniversary of the United

  11. Progressive Reformers and the Democratic Origins of Citizenship Education in the United States during the First World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Kathryn L.

    2013-01-01

    The birth of formal citizenship education in the United States emerged in the context of mass immigration, the Progressive Movement, and the First World War. Wartime citizenship education has been chastised for its emphasis on patriotism and loyalty, and while this is a trend, historians have minimised the ways in which the democratic goals of the…

  12. Progressive Reformers and the Democratic Origins of Citizenship Education in the United States during the First World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Kathryn L.

    2013-01-01

    The birth of formal citizenship education in the United States emerged in the context of mass immigration, the Progressive Movement, and the First World War. Wartime citizenship education has been chastised for its emphasis on patriotism and loyalty, and while this is a trend, historians have minimised the ways in which the democratic goals of the…

  13. America in World War II: An Analysis of History Textbooks from England, Japan, Sweden, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stuart; Nicholls, Jason

    2005-01-01

    This study examined how textbooks from England, Japan, Sweden, and the United States portray America's role in World War II. Analysis of the central story lines revealed that historical information purveyed to students in different nations varies considerably. Accordingly, U.S. textbooks emphasize the significant and pre-eminent role that the…

  14. How to Make Your College No. 1 in "U.S. News & World Report"...and Lose Your Integrity in the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    The annual "America's Best Colleges" issue of "U.S. News & World Report" is to the news magazine what the annual "Swimsuit" issue is to "Sports Illustrated." Both are best sellers that make big money for their publishers. And both succeed because they are sexy, glamorous, superficial and largely without redeeming social value. But "America's Best…

  15. Artful Teaching and Learning: The Bank Street Developmental-Interaction Approach at Midtown West School. Teaching for a Changing World: The Graduates of Bank Street College of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Sam; Park, Soyoung; Lit, Ira

    2015-01-01

    This case study is one of five publications from the larger study, "Teaching for a Changing World: The Graduates of Bank Street College of Education." Established in 1989, Midtown West is a New York City public elementary school serving approximately 350 students from kindergarten through grade five. With the support of Tony Alvarado,…

  16. Conceptions of Power among Senior Women Administrators at Liberal Arts Colleges in the Upper Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in senior-level leadership positions in higher education institutions, and their experiences are underrepresented in research about leadership and power in higher education. This qualitative study engaged women senior administrators at liberal arts colleges in the Upper Midwestern United States to better understand how…

  17. Career Plans and Gender-Role Attitudes of College Students in the United States, Japan, and Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Yasuko; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines attitudes about careers and gender roles for 156 college students from the United States, 621 from Japan, and 157 from Slovenia. A factor analysis indicates that career values form different factors within each country and gender. In all three countries, women are less traditional in gender role attitudes than men. (SLD)

  18. Relationships Between Centralization/Decentralization and Organizational Effectiveness in Urban Multi-Unit Community College Systems. A Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, John A.; Rossmeier, Joseph G.

    In January 1972, 3,320 faculty members and administrators at 12 urban multicampus community college districts were asked to indicate their perceptions of the distribution of decision-making authority and influence among six organizational levels (the board of trustees, the district administration, the unit administration, deans, department…

  19. When Iron Crumbles: Berlin and the Wall. A Social Studies Unit Recommended for Grades 9-12 and Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Adrian; And Others

    This unit, designed for use with high school and community college students, uses primary materials, literature, and interactive lesson plans to present the city of Berlin (Germany) as a case study of some of the 20th century's most significant events. In lesson 1, students take a pre-test, view a video about the Berlin Wall, and discuss the kinds…

  20. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 1): Integrating Knowledge, education, and action for a better world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental sciences/studies movement, with more than 1000 programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, is unified by a common interest-ameliorating environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. Unfortunately, environmental programs have struggled in their efforts to integrate knowledge across disciplines and educate students to become sound problem solvers and leaders. We examine the environmental program movement as a policy problem, looking at overall goals, mapping trends in relation to those goals, identifying the underlying factors contributing to trends, and projecting the future. We argue that despite its shared common interest, the environmental program movement is disparate and fragmented by goal ambiguity, positivistic disciplinary approaches, and poorly rationalized curricula, pedagogies, and educational philosophies. We discuss these challenges and the nature of the changes that are needed in order to overcome them. In a subsequent article (Part 2) we propose specific strategies for improvement. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  1. The Effects of Student Involvement and College Environment on Students' Learning and Living Experience at World-Class Research Universities in China: A Comparative Case Study of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roy Yew-Hung

    2011-01-01

    This comparative research examined the effects of student involvement and college environment on students' learning and living experience delivered by two aspiring world-class universities in Hong Kong and Shanghai. Few studies have shown how the levels of student involvement and college environment can benefit students at world-class institution.…

  2. Policy Considerations for Enhancing Student Access and Persistence in a World in Which Tuition Keeps Rising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2007-01-01

    The United States no longer leads the world in college completion rates. Inequality in college access rates by income have barely narrowed over the last 25 to 30 years and inequality in college completion rates have narrowed even less. The groups in the population that are growing the most rapidly are those that have historically been…

  3. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Matthew

    This paper develops scenarios of future rare-earth-magnet metal (neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium) consumption in the permanent magnets used in wind turbines and hybrid electric vehicles. The scenarios start with naive base-case scenarios for growth in wind-turbine and hybrid-electric-vehicle sales over the period 2011 to 2020, using historical data for each good. These naive scenarios assume that future growth follows time trends in historical data and does not depend on any exogenous variable. Specifically, growth of each technological market follows historical time trends, and the amount of rare earths used per unit of technology remains fixed. The chosen reference year is 2010. Implied consumptions of the rare earth magnet metals are calculated from these scenarios. Assumptions are made for the material composition of permanent magnets, the market share of permanent-magnet wind turbines and vehicles, and magnet weight per unit of technology. Different scenarios estimate how changes in factors like the material composition of magnets, growth of the economy, and the price of a substitute could affect future consumption. Each scenario presents a different method for reducing rare earth consumption and could be interpreted as potential policy choices. In 2010, the consumption (metric tons, rare-earth-oxide equivalent) of each rare-earth-magnet metal was as follows. Total neodymium consumption in the world for both technologies was 995 tons; dysprosium consumption was 133 tons; terbium consumption was 50 tons; praseodymium consumption was zero tons. The base scenario for wind turbines shows there could be strong, exponential growth in the global wind turbine market. New U.S. sales of hybrid vehicles would decline (in line with the current economic recession) while non-U.S. sales increase through 2020. There would be an overall increase in the total amount of magnetic rare earths consumed in the world. Total consumption of each rare earth in the short

  4. Environmental Sustainability Practices in Publicly Supported Two-Year Colleges in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Michael J.; Webster, Ann H.

    2013-01-01

    In September of 2012, a mixed methods exploratory research study was conducted from among the 270 presidents of public two-year colleges in the 11-state region accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. The purpose of the study was to examine the environmental sustainability practices used at these…

  5. Student Support towards War in College Students from Different Religiously Affiliated Colleges in the Midwest of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a study of student attitudes towards war. To study the impact that the type of university attended has on a student's level of support for war and attitudes towards war a 15-question survey on moral disengagement in support of military actions based on one developed by McAlister was given to college students attending Quaker,…

  6. THE ROLE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN THE POST-COLD WAR WORLD: A GLOBAL LEADER OR HEGEMON?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Jonev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors of this paper deal with the role of the USA in the post-Cold War world and their position from the standpoint of relevant indicators and theoretical considerations. This work also refers to path that the United States took from isolationism to the world domination and considers justification of the position of the USA in the period after the Cold War from the point of hegemonic stability theories, while at the end indicates the diversity of understanding of contemporary thinkers regarding the position of the United States as the hegemon or rather “just” a global leader. This paper does not prejudge the final definition of the position of the USA in international relations, but aims to launch discussions on the necessity and justification of the existence of such vision on a global scale.

  7. 大学生目标追求的入世出世心理调查分析%The College Students' Psychological Status of Going into the Undergraduates World or Leaving the Mundane World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何金宏

    2011-01-01

    465 undergraduate students were surveyed with the Scale of Going into the World and Leaving the World by using the stratified random sampling method.Questionnaire recovered after use SPSS19.0 data management and statistics.Results show that the college students' psychological status of going into is stronger than that of leaving the mundane world.Factors such as different degree,grade level,family upbringing and family economic situation have different dramatic influences on college students' pursuit of psychological status of going into the of undergraduates world or leaving the mundane world.%采取分层随机抽样方法,抽取465名在校大学生进行问卷调查。问卷回收后,使用SPSS19.0进行数据管理与统计。大学生目标追求的入世心理比出世心理要强;不同学历、成绩水平、家庭教养方式和家庭经济情况对大学生目标追求的入世出世心理,具有不同程度的显著差异。

  8. United States Foreign Policy RE: The Third World - The Economic Dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    India, Peru , Jordan and Liberia are prime examples of this class of Third World nations. The remaining 200 million with whose plight thanks to...should also insist on internal reforms to ensure that: - the people are the recipients of the aid - that private entrepreneurs can produce, sell and...of the high import taxes , subsidies to domestic (U.S.) producers, and unpredictable import quotas 75 caused a ripple effect on the world market system

  9. Conduct and Support of Amphibious Operations from United States Submarines in World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    could not have completed this project without the help and support of my family , the Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC) faculty, the...Carlson, the founding commanding officer of the Second Marine Raider Battalion. Blankfort conducted extensive interviews with Carlson, his family , and many...the ship‘s trim. Limiting movement to fifteen men at a time reduced this affect on the boat‘s angle, but also doubled mealtime .188

  10. Assessment of full-time faculty preceptors by colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L; Zerilli, Tina

    2012-10-12

    To identify the manner in which colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and Puerto Rico assess full-time faculty preceptors. Directors of pharmacy practice (or equivalent title) were invited to complete an online, self-administered questionnaire. Seventy of the 75 respondents (93.3%) confirmed that their college or school assessed full-time pharmacy faculty members based on activities related to precepting students at a practice site. The most commonly reported assessment components were summative student evaluations (98.5%), type of professional service provided (92.3%), scholarly accomplishments (86.2%), and community service (72.3%). Approximately 42% of respondents indicated that a letter of evaluation provided by a site-based supervisor was included in their assessment process. Some colleges and schools also conducted onsite assessment of faculty members. Most colleges and schools of pharmacy assess full-time faculty-member preceptors via summative student assessments, although other strategies are used. Given the important role of preceptors in ensuring students are prepared for pharmacy practice, colleges and schools of pharmacy should review their assessment strategies for full-time faculty preceptors, keeping in mind the methodologies used by other institutions.

  11. Improving College Access in the United States: Barriers and Policy Responses. NBER Working Paper No. 21781

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Lindsay C.; Scott-Clayton, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic gaps in college enrollment and attainment have widened over time, despite increasing returns to postsecondary education and significant policy efforts to improve access. We describe the barriers that students face during the transition to college and review the evidence on potential policy solutions. We focus primarily on research…

  12. Current Planning for the Development of Public Junior Colleges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Earle Dee

    This report of 38 studies from 22 states includes the analysis and synthesis of statements of policy and program scop", conclusions and recommendations, needs for services, criteria for establishing new junior colleges, and procedures for improving state-wide coordination. Twelve conclusions are presented regarding the role of junior colleges in…

  13. Survey of Research Resources in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, John M.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of research resources in 24 veterinary colleges in the US and Canada reports information on university-wide research facilities, college-wide research facilities, personnel, and instrumentation resources. Corporate research resource management was compared with university research resource management. The survey form is outlined.…

  14. Examining the Prevalence of Self-Reported Foodborne Illnesses and Food Safety Risks among International College Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyonga, Agnes Ngale; Eighmy, Myron A.; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Foodborne illness and food safety risks pose health threats to everyone, including international college students who live in the United States and encounter new or unfamiliar foods. This study assessed the prevalence of self-reported foodborne illness among international college students by cultural regions and length of time in the United…

  15. Peace Begins with Me--Celebrating United Nations World Peace Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jeanette E.

    2009-01-01

    By integrating the concept of peace into the school curriculum, children can be taught that peaceful resolution of conflicts is a desirable goal for them, personally, as well as the world at large. Staff members at Orange-Ulster School in Monroe, New York, took on the challenge of integrating the concept of peace into the curriculum. They soon…

  16. Traumatic Brain and Spinal Cord Fatalities Among High School and College Football Players - United States, 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Kristen L; Yau, Rebecca K; Register-Mihalik, Johna; Marshall, Stephen W; Thomas, Leah C; Wolf, Susanne; Cantu, Robert C; Mueller, Frederick O; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2017-01-06

    An estimated 1.1 million high school and 75,000 college athletes participate in tackle football annually in the United States. Football is a collision sport; traumatic injuries are frequent (1,2), and can be fatal (3). This report updates the incidence and characteristics of deaths caused by traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury (4) in high school and college football and presents illustrative case descriptions. Information was analyzed from the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research (NCCSIR). During 2005-2014, a total of 28 deaths (2.8 deaths per year) from traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries occurred among high school (24 deaths) and college football players (four deaths) combined. Most deaths occurred during competitions and resulted from tackling or being tackled. All four of the college deaths and 14 (58%) of the 24 high school deaths occurred during the last 5 years (2010-2014) of the 10-year study period. These findings support the need for continued surveillance and safety efforts (particularly during competition) to ensure proper tackling techniques, emergency planning for severe injuries, availability of medical care onsite during competitions, and assessment that it is safe to return to play following a concussion.

  17. United States Naval War College, 1919-1941: An Institutional Response to Naval Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    X-Zi&*m& ^*^**s?WJ»«!gi!«33l«^^ _ 38 30 31 College building. In the weeks ahead, the Sims’ and their children , together with their household...entering." al, p. 235. 51 Naval War College, Outline History, Supplement 1, 1937-1938, pp. 2-3; Suplement 4, 1940-1941, p. 3. *m mm ^*3?^:-*ej£s,! ;1

  18. Communities Around the World. A Village in India. Teacher's Resource Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    This resource unit was developed from materials produced and field tested by the Project Social Studies Curriculum Center. It was designed to make progress toward the development of the following objectives: 1) conceptual: globalism, geographic location, diversity, interrelationships, change, cultural use of the environment, economics, culture,…

  19. Adolescent Worlds and Literacy Practices on the United States-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article presents partial results of an ethnographic study about literacy practices among adolescents living near the United States-Mexico border. The students became involved in literacy practices with their friends and family at home. These practices were related to the adolescents' interests in popular culture such as reading magazines or…

  20. College Students’ Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence: A Comparative Study of Japan, China, and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toan Thanh Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of cross-cultural differences between the United States, Japan, and China in perceptions of male to female intimate partner violence, and in the extent to which gender and traditional attitudes toward women related to these perceptions. College students (n = 943 read two fictitious scenarios describing marital and dating violence. MANOVA results showed gender differences in the perceptions of violence between the three countries. Male participants had more traditional attitudes toward women and placed more blame on female victims. The magnitude of the difference between women’s and men’s scores was much smaller for Japanese students than for American and Chinese students. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses demonstrated that the effects of respondent gender were reduced when traditional attitudes toward women were taken into account. Differences in beliefs about appropriate gender roles still exist among college students in these countries and may be related to socially tolerant attitudes toward violence against women.

  1. Pathology of Haemonchus contortus in New World camelids in the southeastern United States: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Erin E; Garner, Bridget C; Williamson, Lisa H; Storey, Bob E; Sakamoto, Kaori

    2016-03-01

    Most small ruminant farms in tropical climates are plagued by Haemonchus contortus, a hematophagous, abomasal parasite. Heavy burdens of this parasite can cause anemia, hypoproteinemia, weight loss, and mortality in susceptible animals. Haemonchus contortus is becoming a major health concern in New World camelids as well, namely llamas (Llama glama) and alpacas (Vicugna pacos), yet little research has been conducted regarding its prevalence or pathology in these species. Herein, we present a retrospective review of llamas and alpacas that were admitted to The University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Athens Diagnostic Laboratory between the years 2002 and 2013. Antemortem fecal egg count (FEC) estimates performed on 30 alpacas were negatively correlated with hematocrit, hemoglobin, and red blood cell count. Total protein was not significantly correlated with FEC. On postmortem examination, 55 of 198 camelids, including 2 from the aforementioned antemortem review, were infected with H. contortus, with llamas (42.6%) having a significantly higher infection rate than alpacas (22.2%). In 15.7% of the total cases, the parasite was the major cause of death. Common gross lesions included peritoneal, thoracic, and pericardial effusions, visceral pallor, subcutaneous edema, and serous atrophy of fat. Histologic lesions included centrilobular hepatic necrosis, hepatic atrophy, lymphoplasmacytic inflammation of the mucosa of the third gastric compartment (C3), extramedullary hematopoiesis in both the liver and spleen, and the presence of nematodes in C3. Our study emphasizes the importance of H. contortus diagnosis and herd monitoring in New World camelids, particularly llamas.

  2. The world economic crisis and the children: United States case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C A; Coulter, E J; Schorr, L B; Fine, A; Adams-Taylor, S

    1985-01-01

    This is a review of the United States experience with issues of child health and services as they relate to changes in economic trends. No existing data systems are entirely adequate for reporting on the current health status of children. An important consideration for the monitoring of children's health in the United States is the status of subgroups such as those who are disadvantaged for reasons of poverty, discrimination or geographic isolation. Ample evidence confirms that children living in poverty suffer adverse health consequences and that the proportion of children living in poverty in the United States has increased steadily since 1975 and dramatically since 1981. Most measures of health status and health risks for children show steady improvements throughout the 1970s. The exercise of public responsibility for financing and providing essential services and supports held constant or improved during this period, especially during the recession of 1974-75. The health status and risks for children since 1981 appear to be adversely affected which must be attributed to a combination of circumstances that include serious recession, increased poverty rates for households with children and diminished health benefits and social support services. These findings suggest that when either local or widespread economic reversals are anticipated, health services and social supports for children need to be expanded rather than contracted.

  3. Phylogenetic autocorrelation and evolutionary diversity of Carnivora (Mammalia in Conservation Units of the New World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Mundim Tôrres

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main concerns of Conservation Biology is the identification of priority areas for conservation, and the development of quantitative methods is important to achieve this task. Many phylogenetic diversity indexes and higher-taxon approaches have been used in this context. In this study, Faith's phylogenetic indexes and the number of evolutionary independent lineages of Carnivora were calculated at the average patch level based on phylogenetic autocorrelation analysis of phenotypic traits, in 18 conservation units in America (frequently National Parks. Despite controversies about the hierarchical level to be adopted, the characters included in this study suggest that the family level produces independent units for the analysis of phenotypic diversity in Carnivora. A positive correlation between species richness and the number of evolutionary independent lineages appeared (r = 0.67; P < 0.05, showing that this is a valid criterion to priorize conservation areas. Faith's phylogenetic diversity index is also highly correlated with species richness (r = 0.87; P < 0.05, as well as with the number of evolutionary independent lineages (r = 0.89; P < 0.05. Thus, the conservation units with more species have also more evolutionary information to be preserved.

  4. Firm size distribution and mobility of the top 500 firms in China, the United States and the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinzhong; Xu, Qi; Chen, Qinghua; Wang, Yougui

    2013-07-01

    This paper considers the macroscopic and microscopic statistical features of the top 500 firms in China, the United States and the world, denoted as China 500 (CH500), Fortune 500 (US500) and Fortune Global 500 (FG500). From a macroscopic perspective, the firm size distribution of each category, when measured by revenue, is steadily distributed over the observed period, even during periods of financial crises. As is evidenced by the Gini coefficient, divergences between firm scales are most significant for the CH500. From a microscopic perspective, the underlying micro-dynamics are volatile and often turbulent due to the exit and entry of firms as well as shifts in their revenues and ranks. Such fluctuations, or mobility, are visualized in rank/revenue/share clocks. We also propose a revenue/rank/share mobility index that is a quantitative measurement of mobility. Among these, we find that the share mobility acts as an effective indicator of economic status; where there is a share mobility spike, there is an ailing economy. The share mobility indexes indicate that the 2008 Financial Crisis had little impact on the Chinese economy, while it triggered violent changes in the top 500 firms in the United States and the world.

  5. THE HUMAN RIGHTS APPROACH TO MARKETS IN THE WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION, UNITED NATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehari Fisseha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the shadow of World War II’s end, unprecedented discourse regarding international human rights was birthed from knowledge regarding the gross abuses that took place and subsequent shock that the civilized world had no international legislation in place to counter similar, future atrocities. In 1948, the International Labour Organization (ILO adopted the Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise Convention while, in the same year, the United Nations (UN adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights [Swepston 1998, p.169]. The comparatively younger World Trade Organization (WTO has been both condemned and heralded for its handling, and lack thereof, of human rights violations. In the formidable wake of globalisation, all three organizations have had to bind their human rights policies to economics, thereby enhancing the interconnectivity of the entities and, by extension, international policy. The following, critical comment explores the history and current state of UN, ILO, and WTO human rights’ approaches to market policy, affording particular attention to recommendations for amending the policies in order to foster greater cohesion and address one of the most pressing human rights issues of the twenty-first century.

  6. Report on the United Nations World Assembly on Aging. Based on a Follow-Up Conference (Tampa, Florida, December 7, 1983).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Halaine-Sherin, Ed.

    This document reports the proceedings of a United Nations World Assembly on Aging follow-up conference. Presented are the following: "International Exchange Center on Gerontology: The Organization and Its Mission"; "Preface" (Sheppard); "Welcoming Telegram" (Shuman); "Overview of the World Assembly on Aging"…

  7. The Performance of the World Health Organization's WHOQOL-BREF in Assessing the Quality of Life of Thai College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaigang; Kay, Noy S.; Nokkaew, Nattiporn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the performance of the Thai-version of WHOQOL-BREF in assessing the quality of life (QoL) among Thai college students. The psychometric properties of WHOQOL-BREF were assessed in this study. The self-administered WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was applied. A total of 407 Thai college students (male age = 20.5…

  8. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  9. The Transition from a University College to a University: A United Kingdom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, Brian; Hill, Doug; Sharp, John

    2015-01-01

    As a result of policy changes, nearly all university colleges in the UK have been redesignated as universities. This transition was studied in one such institution using semi-structured interviews with a representative sample of six academic staff and the transcripts subjected to a thematic analysis. This analysis identified three themes: staying…

  10. International Comparisons of Inclusive Instruction among College Faculty in Spain, Canada, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Allison; Vukovic, Boris; Sala-Bars, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Across the globe, students with disabilities have been increasing in prevalence in higher education settings. Thus, it has become more urgent for college faculty to have a broad awareness of disability and inclusive teaching practices based on the tenets of Universal Design. In this study, we examined faculty attitudes toward disability-related…

  11. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  12. In Praise of Weakness: Chartering, the University of the United States, and Dartmouth College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trow, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that U.S. higher education has been broadly successful in serving its society in large part because colleges and universities were created under conditions of weakness, both academic and financial. Also explores the impact of the failure to establish a national university, as well as the ground-breaking decision of the Supreme Court in the…

  13. Internationalization Efforts in United States Community Colleges: A Comparative Analysis of Urban, Suburban, and Rural Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Natalie J.

    2011-01-01

    With community colleges educating up to one-half of all U.S. undergraduates, more focus on internationalization is warranted in order to ensure student competitiveness in today's global labor pool. This ex post facto study of 2006 survey data from the American Council on Education (ACE) found a low level of internationalization occurring at most…

  14. A Longitudinal Investigation of Dropout from College in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitani, Terry T.; DesJardins, Stephen L.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the timing of dropout by college students over a 5-year period. Found that factors that affect student dropout often have effects that change over time. For instance, students who receive financial aid generally have lower dropout rates than non-aided students, but dropout rates vary depending on the amount and timing of student…

  15. Study Abroad during College: Comparison between China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Guo, Fei; You, You

    2017-01-01

    Study abroad can be a life-changing experience, but evidence of its effectiveness is mixed. We examine the experience of studying abroad at colleges in the US and China, which are the largest receiving and sending countries of international students respectively. Using data from two comparable national surveys that follow the same design, we…

  16. Content Analysis of Conceptually Based Physical Education in Southeastern United States Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Suzanne Ellen; Greene, Leon; Satinsky, Sonya; Neuberger, John

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to explore PE in higher education through the offering of traditional activity- and skills-based physical education (ASPE) and conceptually-based physical education (CPE) courses, and to conduct an exploratory content analysis on the CPE available to students in randomized colleges and universities in the…

  17. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  18. Engendering world conferences: the international women's movement and the United Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M A

    1995-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of how women's groups internationally have shaped UN and World Conferences for Women, the changes in the relationship between women's nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the UN over time, and effective strategies for putting the women's agenda on international agendas. The article focuses on three recent UN conferences: the Rio conference on the environment, the Vienna conference on human rights, and the Cairo conference on population. The UN Decade for Women reshaped the international women's movement by including new players and by increasing the number and types of women's groups, particularly in developing countries. Women's NGOs learned how to operate on a global scale and to gain attention. New NGO alliances and networks were formed that were cross-regional and crossed North-South divisions. An increasing number of women's groups contributed to national and international policy-making situations. Women's groups were successful in receiving international and national recognition because of the effort expended to become well prepared in collecting, knowing, and analyzing their facts and in building broad-based coalitions. The key strategies that were used in participating effectively in the conference preparatory process and formal policy-making groups involved five types of activities: 1) NGOs mounted global campaigns on a variety of issues having to do with women's rights and women's involvement in the process; 2) NGOs held multiple strategic planning meetings and built coalitions and consensus at all levels; 3) women's NGOs drafted policy documents, resolutions, treaties, protocols, conventions, and platform documents; 4) women's NGOs gained seating on official delegations by publishing reports, holding meetings, and lobbying and nominating women as representatives; and 5) women's NGOs formed caucuses that met at a daily time and place for holding dialogues with official delegates and policy-makers.

  19. Coral reproduction in the world's warmest reefs: southern Persian Gulf (Dubai, United Arab Emirates)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, A. G.; Baird, A. H.; Cavalcante, G. H.

    2011-06-01

    Despite extensive research on coral reproduction from numerous geographic locations, there remains limited knowledge within the Persian Gulf. Given that corals in the Persian Gulf exist in one of the most stressful environments for reef corals, with annual variations in sea surface temperature (SST) of 12°C and maximum summer mean SSTs of 36°C, understanding coral reproductive biology in the Gulf may provide clues as to how corals may cope with global warming. In this study, we examined six locally common coral species on two shallow reef sites in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE), in 2008 and 2009 to investigate the patterns of reproduction, in particular the timing and synchrony of spawning. In total, 71% colonies in April 2008 and 63% colonies in April 2009 contained mature oocytes. However, the presence of mature gametes in May indicated that spawning was potentially split between April and May in all species. These results demonstrate that coral reproduction patterns within this region are highly seasonal and that multi-species spawning synchrony is highly probable. Acropora downingi, Cyphastrea microphthalma and Platygyra daedalea were all hermaphroditic broadcast spawners with a single annual gametogenic cycle. Furthermore, fecundity and mature oocyte sizes were comparable to those in other regions. We conclude that the reproductive biology of corals in the southern Persian Gulf is similar to other regions, indicating that these species have adapted to the extreme environmental conditions in the southern Persian Gulf.

  20. Problems on World Ancient History Teaching and Research in Colleges%高校世界古代史教学和研究的几个问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎

    2013-01-01

    世界古代史是世界历史的重要组成部分,阐述的是前资本主义人类文明发展的全过程,囊括种族、地域、时间等多重内容,是高校历史学本科的主干科目之一。目前,国内多数高校世界古代史教学中存在着忽视“中国古代史”的讲授、缺乏阐释各地区之间历史发展的横向联系,单向教学,历史分期观念相对滞后,文明多样性发展的呈现不足,世界历史是一个联系的整体,各地区之间是相互联系的。%World Ancient History, as an important part of World History, discusses the whole process of the pre-capitalist civilization de-velopment, including multiple contents of races, regions and time, which is one of the main subjects of history in colleges. At present, there are the phenomena that the teaching of World Ancient History in most of domestic colleges has neglected the lecturing of Chinese Ancient History and the interpretation of lateral ties between different regions is lack, the unidirectional teaching, the lagging concept and the insufficient diversity of civilization development. The history of the world is a whole thing, in which each area is interrelated.

  1. Validating the Concept of COPD Control: A Real-world Cohort Study from the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibber, Anjan; Chisholm, Alison; Soler-Cataluña, Juan José; Alcazar, Bernardino; Price, David; Miravitlles, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The concept of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) control has been developed to inform therapeutic decision-making. We explored the validity of a definition of COPD control in a representative population of patients with COPD in the United Kingdom. Electronic medical records and linked COPD questionnaire data from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database were used to characterize control status. Patients were aged ≥40 years, with spirometry-confirmed COPD, current or ex-smokers, and continuous records throughout the study period. Control was evaluated based on COPD stability and patients' (i) clinical features or (ii) COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score over a three-month baseline period and linked to time to first exacerbation. Of 2788 eligible patients, 2511 (90%) had mild/moderate COPD and 277 (10%) had severe/very severe COPD based on Body Mass Index, Obstruction, Dyspnoea, Exacerbations (BODEx) cut-off of 4. Within the mild/moderate cohort, 4.5% of patients were controlled at baseline according to clinical features and 21.5% according to CAT threshold of 10. Within the severe/very severe cohort, no patients were controlled at baseline according to the proposed clinical features and 8.3% were controlled according to CAT threshold of 20. Compared with uncontrolled patients, time to first exacerbation was longer for controlled patients with mild/moderate COPD but not for those with severe/very severe COPD. Lowering the BODEx threshold for severity classification to 2 increased the number of patients achieving control. CAT scores were not good predictors of the risk of future exacerbation. With the proposed definition, very few patients were defined as controlled.

  2. Summary of developed and potential waterpower of the United States and other countries of the world, 1955-62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Loyd L.

    1964-01-01

    Estimates of potential waterpower and historical data on waterpower developments in various parts of the world are assembled in this report. Salient characteristics of the period studied, 1955-62, include increased use of the underground powerhouse, multiple -purpose developments, and use of storage (including pumped storage) to increase the value of waterpower for peaking purposes. High-voltage long-distance transmission has been improved, especially in the United States, Sweden, and the U.S.S.R., and generating facilities tend to be larger than ever before. Asia leads the continents in total potential waterpower; Europe is first in use of waterpower. In rate of increase of waterpower installations and in percent of hydroelectric to total installations Africa is first among the continents. The 1955-62 period saw a great increase in per capita consumption of electric energy. Norway leads all countries with annual consumption of about 9,000 kwhr per capita. Waterpower development was carried on in a majority of the countries of the world and in most of them at an accelerated rate.

  3. The war is a racket! The emergence of the libertarian discourse about world war I in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre M. da Fonseca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available "It is not a coincidence that the century of war coincided with the century of central banking,” wrote Ron Paul, the libertarian candidate "sensation" for the presidential elections in 2008 and 2012, in the book End the Fed. This discussion explores in short, the powerful pamphlet by Major General Smedley Butler, "War is a Racket", demonstrating, specifically, who profited economically and who, in turn, bore the weight and violence of WW1, assuming that a war is never fought with the acquiescence of the population. However, this monograph goes further, looking for a reinterpretation of the official American history of the First World War through the lens of libertarian discourse. The aim is thus to understand, from another perspective, the fundamental cause of the paradigm shift from nonintervention to intervention taking place during this war, linking it to the project which led to the creation of the League of Nations and the growing importance of the US in the world. Finally, a fundamental connection will be established, exploring the theories argued in the book A Foreign Policy of Freedom, between the policies of Woodrow Wilson and the foreign policy of the United States throughout the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st.

  4. Beliefs and Attitudes Associated With Hookah Smoking Among a United States College Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinasek, Mary P; Haddad, Linda G; Wheldon, Christopher W; Barnett, Tracey E

    2017-03-01

    This study explores the differences among smokers of waterpipe tobacco in a college population to better inform campaigns to curb waterpipe use. Participants included undergraduate and graduate students attending a liberal arts university in Florida. E-mail-based, cross-sectional surveys were collected in 2 sequential years. The majority of respondents (64%) reported having ever smoked a hookah, even if just 1-2 puffs. Of those who had ever smoked a hookah, 34% reported smoking a hookah within the previous 30 d. Constructs from the theory of reasoned action were all correlated with smoking behavior. The range of beliefs endorsed by smokers were more strongly associated with hookah-related attitudes compared with subjective norms. Concerns about health were stronger among never-smokers. Young adult college students continue to engage in waterpipe tobacco smoking at high rates. Campaigns need to focus on subsets of smokers and nonsmokers, independently. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  5. KNOWLEDGE AND PERCEPTION OF TURKEY IN A COLLEGE IN THE UNITED STATES

    OpenAIRE

    YUVACI, Abdullah; BOWLES, William Wayne

    2015-01-01

    This study is an attempt to explore to what degree students from an American college are knowledgeable of Turkey and how they perceive the country. The paper also explores why some students are more likely than others to have a positive view of Turkey. Although these students represent neither the American public nor American university students as a whole, understanding their knowledge and perception of Turkey may help us gain insight into the country’s distinguishability and overall image i...

  6. Is it Really a Man's World? Black Men in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy-Wagner, Valerie C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to improve the Black science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline have focused on historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs); however, this work generally fails to acknowledge men. This article characterized Black male receipts of bachelor's degrees from HBCUs in STEM fields between 1981 and 2009 using a…

  7. Living in a World with Eyeballs: How Women Make Meaning of Body Image in the College Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Chrystal Ann

    2013-01-01

    Negative body image is pervasive among traditional, college-age women and takes a heavy toll on women's economic, personal, and political lives. Previous research has indicated that a large percentage of women hold negative views of their body. Women embarking on higher education are not exempt from these negative views. Conversely, college…

  8. Living in a World with Eyeballs: How Women Make Meaning of Body Image in the College Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Chrystal Ann

    2013-01-01

    Negative body image is pervasive among traditional, college-age women and takes a heavy toll on women's economic, personal, and political lives. Previous research has indicated that a large percentage of women hold negative views of their body. Women embarking on higher education are not exempt from these negative views. Conversely, college…

  9. Operative and technological management of super-large united power grids: lessons of major world's blackouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkis, K.; Kreslins, V.; Mutule, A.

    2014-02-01

    Power system (PS) blackouts still persist worldwide, evidencing that the existing protective structures need to be improved. The discussed requirements and criteria to be met for joint synchronous operation of large and super-large united PSs should be based on close co-ordination of operative and technological management of all PSs involved in order to ensure secure and stable electricity supply and minimise or avoid the threat of a total PS blackout. The authors analyse the July 2012 India blackout - the largest power outage in history, which affected over 620 million people, i.e. half of India's population and spread across its 22 states. The analysis is of a general character, being applicable also to similar blackouts that have occurred in Europe and worldwide since 2003. The authors summarise and develop the main principles and methods of operative and technological management aimed at preventing total blackouts in large and super-large PSs. Neskatoties uz sasniegumiem elektroenerģētikas jomā un energosistēmu nepārtrauktu modernizāciju, pasaulē regulāri notiek sabrukumu avārijas. Rakstā apskatīti lielu un superlielu energosistēmu apvienību savstarpējas sinhronas darbības nodrošinājuma prasības un kritēriji, kas pamatojas uz operatīvās un tehnoloģiskās vadības ciešu koordināciju starp energosistēmām. Savstarpējas sinhronas darbības nodrošinājuma prasībām un kritērijiem ir izšķiroša nozīme, lai panāktu elektroapgādes drošumu un stabilitāti katrā energosistēmā, kas darbojas apvienotas energosistēmas sastāvā. Šo prasību un kritēriju ievērošana sekmē totālo avāriju izcelšanās iespēju samazināšanu un to novēršanu. Indijas 2012.gada totālo avāriju un citu analogo avāriju Eiropā un Amerikā analīze un izvērtējums laika posmā no 2003.gada, deva iespēju apkopot un izstrādāt lielu un superlielu energosistēmu operatīvās un tehnoloģiskās vadības principus un metodoloģiju, lai novērstu vai

  10. Connecting College Learners with Rural Entrepreneurship Opportunities: The Rural Entrepreneurship Teaching Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Barbara J.; Niehm, Linda S.; Stoel, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    The Rural Entrepreneurship Teaching Unit (RETU) is designed to acquaint university retailing and hospitality majors with rural entrepreneurship opportunities. The unit is an outcome of a federal grant focused on the contribution of the local retail sector to rural community resilience. The RETU integrates knowledge regarding rural development,…

  11. Designating Earth's Moon as a United Nations World Heritage Site - Permanently Protected from Commercial or Military Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes that Earth's Moon, in its entirety, be designated a United Nations World Heritage Site (WHS), permanently protected from any and all commercial or military utilization and reserved exclusively for scientific and aesthetic purposes. The paper discusses: 1) the extraordinary importance of the Moon for science, culture, and religion - past, present and future; 2) the history of proposals to exploit the Moon for commercial and military purposes and the shortcomings of this colonial, exploitation paradigm; and 3) the necessity, policy mechanisms, and political dynamics of designating the Moon as a World Heritage Site, permanently protected from commercial and/or military uses. The first part of the paper discusses the extraordinary importance of the Moon as it exists today - as a scientific laboratory, a source of beauty and inspiration throughout human evolution, a source for artistic expression, and as an object that is considered sacred by many cultures. Next, the paper traces the history of specific proposals for the exploitation of the Moon for commercial and/or military purposes - including plans by the U.S. Air Force in 1959 to detonate a nuclear explosion on the Moon, proposals to strip-mine the lunar regolith for helium-3 and rocket-fuel hydrogen; construction of solar power plants to transmit energy to Earth, and proposals to use the lunar surface as a billboard upon which to project commercial advertisements visible from Earth. The profound ethical, legal, and scientific shortcomings of this exploitation paradigm are described as an emerging Extraterrestrial Manifest Destiny that we have a collective obligation to challenge and constrain. The paper proposes that space exploration be infused with an ethical commitment to compassion, reverence, conservation, and non-interference to abiotic and biotic systems alike; as opposed to the expansion and extraterrestrial imposition of the colonization, exploitation, domination, and despoliation

  12. Path Selection of College World History Teaching Value and Characteristics Teaching Reform%高校世界史教学的价值与特色化教学改革的路径选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李加洞

    2015-01-01

    高校世界史教学是大学生认识曾经和今天世界的一个重要手段和重要组成部分.高校世界史教学能够培养当代大学生的国际、战略视野,培养大学生的爱国情操,使学生树立完整的历史观和现实观.高校世界史教学应以当今的世界为蓝本,以世界史教学的中国化为核心,以世界史教学的民族化、边疆化为重点和特色,走出一条特色鲜明的高校世界史教学路径.%College World History Teaching is an important means and an important part of students' understanding of once and today's world. Universities teaching world history of contemporary college students to cultivate an international, strategic vi-sion, cultivate patriotism college students, to enable students to establish a complete view of history and of reality. Universities teaching world history in today's world should be modeled to World History Teaching Chinese as the core, to the teaching of world history nationalization, as the focus and characteristics of frontier, out of a world with a distinctive characteristics of his-tory teaching path.

  13. Promoting the health of Europeans in a rapidly changing world: a historical study of the implementation of World Health Organisation policies by the Nursing and Midwifery Unit, European Regional Office, 1970-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Christine; Wagner, Lis

    2011-01-01

    HALLETT C and WAGNER L. Nursing Inquiry 2011; 18: 359-368 Promoting the health of Europeans in a rapidly changing world: a historical study of the implementation of World Health Organisation policies by the Nursing and Midwifery Unit, European Regional Office, 1970-2003 The World Health...... Organisation (WHO) was inaugurated in 1948. Formed in a period of post-war devastation, WHO aimed to develop and meet goals that would rebuild the health of shattered populations. The historical study reported here examined the work of the Nursing and Midwifery Unit (NMU) of WHO's European Regional Office...... in the work of the NMU of the European Regional Office of WHO. One of the strongest of these was a drive to develop and promote the nursing profession within the countries of the European Region. The second was the promulgation and implementation of the positive public health strategies of WHO, particularly...

  14. Adolescent brain development and underage drinking in the United States: identifying risks of alcohol use in college populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveri, Marisa M

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol use typically is initiated during adolescence, a period that coincides with critical structural and functional maturation of the brain. Brain maturation and associated improvements in decision making continue into the third decade of life, reaching a plateau within the period referred to as emerging adulthood (18-24 years). This particular period covers that of traditionally aged college students, and includes the age (21 years) when alcohol consumption becomes legal in the United States. This review highlights neurobiological evidence indicating the vulnerabilities of the emerging-adult brain to the effects of alcohol. Factors increasing the risks associated with underage alcohol use include the age group's reduced sensitivity to alcohol sedation and increased sensitivity to alcohol-related disruptions in memory. On the individual level, factors increasing those risks are a positive family history of alcoholism, which has a demonstrated effect on brain structure and function, and emerging comorbid psychiatric conditions. These vulnerabilities-of the age group, in general, as well as of particular individuals-likely contribute to excessive and unsupervised drinking in college students. Discouraging alcohol consumption until neurobiological adulthood is reached is important for minimizing alcohol-related disruptions in brain development and decision-making capacity, and for reducing the negative behavioral consequences associated with underage alcohol use.

  15. Taking forward the World TB Day 2016 theme 'Unite to End Tuberculosis' for the WHO Africa Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumi, Francine; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Macete, Eusebio; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global emergency, with an estimated 9.6 million new TB cases worldwide reported in 2014. Twenty-eight percent of these cases were in the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa Region, where the annual case detection rate was 281 per 100000 population-more than double the global average of 133 per 100000. Of the 9.6 million people who developed TB, an estimated 1.2 million (12%) were HIV-positive, and the Africa Region accounted for 74% of these cases. Three million people with TB remain undiagnosed and untreated. Globally, an estimated 480000 had multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Whilst of the African countries, only South Africa has reported a high prevalence of MDR-TB, it is likely that all of Sub-Saharan Africa has an unreported high load of drug-resistant TB. Tragically, in 2014, only 48% of individuals diagnosed with MDR-TB had successful treatment and an estimated 190000 people died of MDR-TB. Of the global TB funding gap of US$ 0.8 billion, the largest funding gap was in the Africa Region, amounting to US$ 0.4 billion in 2015. The MDR-TB pandemic in particular now threatens to devastate entire regions and may fundamentally alter the life-expectancy and demographic profile of many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The theme designated for this year's World TB Day, March 24, 2016, is 'Unite to End TB'. From the Africa Region, there is an urgent need to seriously address the political, economic, and social factors that influence host-Mycobacterium tuberculosis interactions and result in disease. Recent political and funder initiatives that provide renewed hope for the alleviation of Africa's TB and TB/HIV problems are discussed.

  16. United States of America Department of Health and Human Services support for advancing influenza vaccine manufacturing in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Michael L; Bright, Rick A

    2011-07-01

    Since 2005, the Government of the United States of America has provided more than US$ 50 million to advance influenza vaccine development in low-resourced countries. This programme has provided a unique opportunity for the US Government to develop a comprehensive view of, and to understand better the challenges and future needs for influenza vaccines in the developing world. The funding for this programme has been primarily through a cooperative agreement with the World Health Organization (WHO) to support directly its capacity-building grants to government-owned or -supported vaccine manufacturers in developing countries. A second cooperative agreement with the Program for Appropriate Technologies in Health (PATH) was initiated to accelerate the completion of a current Good Manufacturing Practice cGMP production facility, along with supporting facilities to obtain a reliable source of eggs, and to conduct clinical trials of influenza vaccine manufactured in Vietnam. This mechanism of utilizing cooperative agreements to support capacity-building for vaccine development in low-resourced settings has been novel and unique and has yielded fruitful returns on minimal investment. The information derived from this programme helps to clarify not only the development challenges for influenza vaccines and how the United States may assist in meeting those challenges, but also other vaccine development issues common to manufacturers in developing countries. While building the initial capacity to produce influenza vaccines can be a straightforward exercise, the sustainability of the enterprise and expansion of subsequent markets will be the key to future usefulness. There is hope for expansion of the global influenza vaccine market. Ongoing burden of disease studies are elucidating the impact of influenza infections, particularly in children, and more countries will take note and respond accordingly, since respiratory diseases are now the number one killer of children under

  17. The background to the proposition that plankton be used as food in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P G

    2011-01-01

    Food shortages, particularly of proteins, in Britain during the Second World War led to the suggestion re-surfacing that marine plankton might be harvested on an industrial scale first as human food, then turning to its potential use as a supplement to stock and poultry feed. The notion emanated in the United Kingdom from Sir John Graham Kerr, at Glasgow University. He encouraged Alister Hardy, at Hull, to develop the idea and the natural testing ground was the Clyde Sea Area (given the extensive history of plankton research at Millport). Unpublished documents from the archives of the Scottish Association for Marine Science shed new light on the interactions behind the scenes of this project between Kerr, Hardy and the Millport Marine Station's then director, Richard Elmhirst. Elmhirst, who was sceptical about the feasibility of the plan from the outset, went along with it; not least as a way of attracting welcome research funding during lean times but also, doubtless, regarding it as his patriotic duty in case the proposal proved worthwhile.

  18. Future Utilization of the Continuing Education Unit in Conferences, Institutes, Short Courses, Workshops, Seminars, and Special Training Programs Within the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, John A., Jr.

    The study forecasts the utilization of the Continuing Education Unit (CEU) in conferences, institutes, short courses, workshops, seminars, and special training programs within the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. (A CEU is defined as 10 contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience.) The methodology…

  19. Utilization of the Continuing Education Unit in Conferences, Institutions, Short Courses, Workshops, Seminars, and Special Training Programs within the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, John Augustus, Jr.

    Recognizing the need for a uniform method of measurement to apply to non-degree adult education programs, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools incorporated the Continuing Education Unit (CEU) for use December 1, 1971. The purpose of this study was to forecast the utilization of the CEU in these programs within the Southern Association…

  20. The Complex Life Experience of First-Generation College Students Who Are Working Adults in the Appalachian Region of the United States: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Deborah Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study was to describe and understand the complexity of life experiences for first-generation college students or recent graduates who are working adults in the Central and South-Central Appalachian region of the United States in light of the construct resilience and how purposefully selected…

  1. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  2. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Knowledge and Stigma Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder among College Students in Lebanon and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Rita; Daou, Nidal; DeNigris, Danielle; Shane-Simpson, Christina; Brooks, Patricia J.; Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Although misconceptions associated with ASD are apparent worldwide, they may differ across cultures. This study compares knowledge and stigma associated with ASD in a country with limited autism resources, Lebanon, and a country with substantial autism resources, the United States (US). College students in the US (N = 346) and Lebanon (N = 329)…

  3. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  4. Effects of Peer Instruction on State College Student Achievement in an Introductory Biology Unit in Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Holly Nicole

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Peer Instruction (PI) in a state college biology classroom. Students discussed biological concepts in the area of genetics among their peers during class time. Conceptual questions were delivered to the student in the form of ConcepTests, conceptual questions designed to uncover students' misconceptions in the material. Students first answered a question projected from the computer to an overhead screen on their own. Depending on the percentage of students that answered correctly, students then discussed their answers with their peers (PI). These discussions allowed students to uncover their misunderstandings in the material by asking them to think about what they know and what they don't know. Students' initial and secondary responses to the related questions gave the instructor a real time instant view of the collective class' conceptual understanding of concepts being covered. This study was a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest, control group design. The sample consisted of 134 students enrolled in General Biology (BSCC 1010) a Eastern Florida State College (EFSC) in Palm Bay, Florida. Both control N = 62 and experimental groups N = 72 were comprised of whole intact classes during the Fall 2014 semester. The control groups received traditional lecture content during the course of the study. They had access to conceptual questions but they were not used in a Peer Instruction format during class time. A statistical analysis was conducted after the completion of pre-tests and posttests during the Fall 2014 semester. Although there was an increase in test scores in the experimental group compared to the control, the results were not significant with p = 0.0687 at an alpha level of .05. No significant difference was found in retention p= 0.5954, gender p = 0.4487 or past science coursework p = 0.6695 between classes that engaged in PI and classes that were taught in traditional lecture-based classes. There

  5. A Child's Right: A Safe and Secure World. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Educating for Peace Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Dorothy; And Others

    This document is a curriculum that serves as an introduction to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Designed for the upper elementary and middle grades 5-10, the curriculum has students "adopt" an infant from another region of the world, taking personal responsibility for their new brother or sister. This…

  6. Information as Power: An Anthology of Selected United States Army War College Student Papers. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    DPKO). The DPKO Best Practices Unit ( BPU ) “…has begun to generate the sort of timely, mission-analytic reporting that UN Headquarters, operations...and mission contributors have long needed.”15 “The BPU not only provides a repository for lessons learned but also facilitates their incorporation...the Department of State’s Office of the Coordinator for Stability and Reconstruction (S/CRS), USAID, USIP, CSIS, NIJ, and the UN’s DPKO- BPU . Also

  7. Humanistic Elements in the Educational Practice at a United States Sub-Baccalaureate Technical College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schmidtke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humanism has never been able to establish a firm place in technical education, which remains predominantly pragmatist in response to industry needs, certification requirements and educational standardisation. However, after a period of decline, humanism has made somewhat of a comeback as part of the movement toward student-centred education. Research conducted at a technical college showed that although . This research indicated that including humanistic elements in educational practice will enable instructors to be more effective in helping students to develop skills in relation to team work, problem-solving, systems improvement, lifelong learning and other areas that are becoming increasingly necessary for success in the workplace. The include a constructivist approach with a focus on contextual teaching and learning using situated cognition, cognitive apprenticeships, anchored instruction and authentic assessment. At the same time, some suggestions for improving professional development for teachers by using a Gestalt approach along with self-study in the context of learning communities have been discussed.

  8. Developmental/remedial sciences at community colleges in five states in the central part of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramore, Tricia L.

    Phipps (1998) emphasized interinstitutional collaboration among colleges to share and replicate best practices and ideas as a strategy to improve the effectiveness of developmental/remedial education, but Johnson (2001) noted a lack of communication between science educators and developmental educators. The purposes of this mixed methods study were (a) to identify and examine the characteristics of developmental/remedial sciences as it existed in the 2006-2007 academic year in terms of organization, structure, instructional practices, and curriculum as offered at community colleges in five states in the central part of the United States; and (b) to develop a set of guidelines for community college faculty and administrators to use in making decisions about whether or not to offer developmental/remedial sciences and identify the general steps to follow in implementation. The study was conducted in four phases which involved two surveys, subsequent interviews with leaders at three institutions selected for case study, and guideline development. Developmental/remedial sciences were offered at few institutions. At those institutions where they were offered, however, nearly half offered courses and multiple support services, but did not define their offerings as a program. Some developmental education best practices were adopted (such as integrating study skills with science content in courses and using a variety of instructional strategies), but many, including goals and assessment, were omitted. Interviewees indicated the need for developmental/remedial sciences would continue in the future. Guidelines to use in determining whether to offer developmental/remedial sciences included the following: (1) adopt an attitude of quality improvement; (2) look to faculty as a #1 resource; (3) assess what is currently offered in the sciences and ask if it works; (4) know what you are remediating; (5) start a conversation between the academic department and support services staff

  9. Addressing the Mental Health Problems of Chinese International College Students in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies unique mental health problems experienced by Chinese international students in the United States. The uniqueness of these problems suggests the need to address them independently from other Chinese and international student communities. First, an overview of the common sources of mental health problems and specific stressors these students face is provided. This article then develops culturally sensitive programming recommendations to improve collaborative efforts between health providers, mental health social workers, faculty, and academic staff within universities to serve these students more effectively.

  10. Short- and Long-Term Validity of High School GPA for Admission to Colleges outside the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hattami, Abdulghani

    2014-01-01

    High school GPA is the only admission criterion that is currently used by many colleges in Yemen to select their potential students. Its predictive validity was investigated to ensure the accuracy of the admission decisions in these colleges. The relationship between students' persistence in the 4 years of college and high school GPA was studied…

  11. Review of Online Programming Characteristics and Pricing at Private Not-for-Profit Two Year Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Online programming has expanded greatly within higher education and much attention has been spent on public two year colleges (more commonly known as community colleges) and both private and public four year institutions. This research seeks to expand understanding of the small market of private not-for-profit two year colleges within the United…

  12. Top Tips for Senior Leaders in Schools and Colleges: How to Provide Meaningful Experience of the World of Work for Young People as Part of 16 to 19 Study Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Foundation for Educational Research, 2015

    2015-01-01

    A core part of 16 to 19 study programmes is the provision of work experience for all young people. It is increasingly recognised that young people need to develop their employability skills, alongside qualifications, in preparation for the world of work and securing a job. This top tips guide offers advice to schools and colleges wishing to…

  13. Trends of Students of the College of Basic Science towards Teaching the Course of Athletics and Health by Using Computer Technology in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University (WISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Ibrahim Abdul Ghani; Khawaldeh, Mohammad Falah Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Study aimed at identifying the trends of the students of basic sciences College in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University towards teaching health and sport course by using computer technology as a teaching method, and to identify also the impact of the variables of academic level and the gender on the students' trends. The study…

  14. Physical Aggression and Mindfulness among College Students: Evidence from China and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The link between trait mindfulness and several dimensions of aggression (verbal, anger and hostility has been documented, while the link between physical aggression and trait mindfulness remains less clear. Method: We used two datasets: one United States sample from 300 freshmen males from Clemson University, South Carolina and a Chinese sample of 1516 freshmen students from Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. Multiple regressions were conducted to examine the association between mindfulness (measured by Mindful Attention and Awareness Scale (MAAS and each of the four subscales of aggression. Results: Among the Clemson sample (N = 286, the mindfulness scale had a significant negative association with each of the four subscales of aggression: Hostility: β = −0.62, p < 0.001; Verbal: β = −0.37, p < 0.001; Physical: β = −0.29, p < 0.001; Anger: β = −0.44, p < 0.001. Among the Shanghai male subsample, the mindfulness scale had a significant negative association with each of the four subscales of aggression: Hostility: β = −0.57, p < 0.001; Verbal: β = −0.37, p < 0.001; Physical: β = −0.35, p < 0.001; Anger: β = −0.58, p < 0.001. Among the Shanghai female subsample (N = 512, the mindfulness scale had a significant negative association with each of the four subscales of aggression: Hostility: β = −0.62, p < 0.001; Verbal: β = −0.41, p < 0.001; Physical: β = −0.52, p < 0.001; and Anger: β = −0.64, p < 0.001. Discussion: Our study documents the negative association between mindfulness and physical aggression in two non-clinical samples. Future studies could explore whether mindfulness training lowers physical aggression among younger adults.

  15. Challenges and Opportunities for the Use of Medications to Treat Opioid Addiction in the United States and Other Nations of the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrino, Mark W; Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Samuels, Paul N; Maremmani, Icro

    2015-01-01

    There has been a well documented increase in the use and abuse of prescription opioids and heroin in the United States and other parts of the world. There has also been an increasing focus to increase access to the use of medications (methadone, buprenorphine, Naltrexone/Vivitrol) for opioid addicted individuals under legal supervision. As policymakers engage in strategic initiatives to better prevent and effectively treat chronic opioid addiction, both in the United States and other countries, there are a number of unintended consequences, complicating how best to increase access to effective treatment.

  16. A Support Model for Students with Learning Disabilities in Higher Education : A Study at Landmark College in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    片岡, 美華; KATAOKA, Mika

    2008-01-01

    Landmark College specializes in students with learning disabilities and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorders. The college provides support for students both in their academic learning and social life by specialist staff. This support includes help with reading and learning and guidance on how to complete assignments, choose themes, plan research and review literature. This support is structured and run by the Academic advisors and Coaching staff in the college. In addition, the Reside...

  17. Finishing the First Lap: The Cost of First Year Student Attrition in America's Four Year Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Obama administration is calling for the United States to regain its status as the nation with the highest concentration of college-educated adults in the world. In response to this challenge, the president, governors, foundations, individual campuses, and many others are pursuing a "college completion agenda" that aims to get more students…

  18. Curriculum Initiatives in the United States, Germany and Japan for World-Class Education in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniawski, Z. T.; Bieniawski, Stefan R.

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes a research study performed to assess curriculum changes in engineering education. Discusses the implications of the various curriculum strategies and initiatives and identifies the necessary socio-technological ingredients for world-class education of engineers. (DDR)

  19. How Visual Imagery Contributed to College: A Case of How Visual Imagery Contributes to a College Algebra Student's Understanding of the Concept of Function in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Rebekah M.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation utilized the qualitative case study method. Seventy-one College Algebra students were given a mathematical processing instrument. This testing device measured a student's preference for visual thinking. Two students were purposefully selected using the instrument. The visual mathematical learner (VL) was discussed in this…

  20. Black and Hispanic Immigrants' Resilience against Negative-Ability Racial Stereotypes at Selective Colleges and Universities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jayanti; Lynch, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotype threat is a widely supported theory for understanding the racial achievement gap in college grade performance. However, today's minority college students are increasingly of immigrant origins, and it is unclear whether two dispositional mechanisms that may increase susceptibility to stereotype threat are applicable to immigrants. We use…

  1. Black and Hispanic Immigrants' Resilience against Negative-Ability Racial Stereotypes at Selective Colleges and Universities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jayanti; Lynch, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotype threat is a widely supported theory for understanding the racial achievement gap in college grade performance. However, today's minority college students are increasingly of immigrant origins, and it is unclear whether two dispositional mechanisms that may increase susceptibility to stereotype threat are applicable to immigrants. We use…

  2. Developments in Instruction in Selected Four Year College Reading Improvement Programs Throughout the United States, 1950-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Virginia Pearl Hymes

    The purpose of this study was to examine the organization, program format and duration of college reading improvement instructional programs (CRIPs) in selected four-year American colleges and universities from 1950-1974, and to gather information which is vital to effective curricula and planning for higher education in the area of reading…

  3. Social context and sexual intercourse among first-year students at selective colleges and universities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E

    2015-07-01

    Most examinations of sexual behavior ignore social context. Using panel data from the National Longitudinal Study of Freshmen, a panel study of 3924 students at 28 selective colleges and universities, I examine how institutional and peer-group characteristics influence the incidence of sexual intercourse among students during their freshman year. Students who enter college as virgins are more likely to have sexual intercourse on campuses where women comprise a higher proportion of the campus population and on campuses that are more academically rigorous. Students who had sex prior to college are less likely to have sex in college when campuses are more residential. Moreover, having friends who value religion and partying affects the likelihood that a student will have sex irrespective of their prior virginity status. These findings highlight the importance of social context for sexual behavior among college students and in the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rising to the Challenge: Hispanic College Graduation Rates as a National Priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Andrew P.; Schneider, Mark; Carey, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama has called for the United States to reclaim its position as the nation with the highest concentration of adults with postsecondary degrees in the world. Given the changing demographics of the United States, this target cannot be achieved without increasing the rate at which Hispanic students obtain a college degree. In this…

  5. The Effects of China Entering the World Trade Organization on the United States’ Wireless Telecommunication Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    School of Economics and Management Working Papers (Asia Pacific Press, 2000), page 8. 32 Ibid. 33 Ibid., pg 9. 34 Drysdale, Peter and Ligang Song...Drysdale, Peter and Ligang Song, China’s Entry to the World Trade Organization: Strategic Issues and Quantitative Assessment (New York, NY

  6. HIV/STI associated risk behaviors among self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender college students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Lisa L; Nicholson, Thomas J; Kerby, Molly B; Lu, Ning

    2003-10-01

    An Internet survey was conducted during the 2001-2002 academic year to examine the health risk behaviors, including HIV/STI associated behaviors, of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) college students in the United States. A total of 450 LGBT college students completed the entire online survey. Most respondents attended a 4-year (96.9%), coeducational (98.6%), non-religiously affiliated (87.5%), public (68.6%) institution. Eighty-nine percent reported having sex with someone of the same sex and 45% had multiple (6 or more) sex partners during their lifetime. Most reported using a condom consistently during penile-vaginal (61%) and anal sex (63%). However, only 4% used a condom or other barrier consistently during oral sex and 28% used a condom or other barrier during their last sexual encounter. Injection drug use and needle-sharing behavior was low (2.1% and 1.1%, respectively). Comparisons with heterosexual college students' HIV/STI associated risk behaviors are included. Results may be useful for HIV/STI prevention programs targeting LGBT college students.

  7. A Classification of the Nature of Mortality Data Underlying the Estimates for the 2004 and 2006 United Nations’ World Population Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Luy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of mortality conditions and trends is a sophisticated task for most populations in the world, above all for those of developing countries. After two decades of intensive discussion and derivation of specific estimation tools for these populations, the use of indirect estimation techniques seems largely forgotten among those who are not forced to apply them. However, for the majority of developing countries these methods are still the main and often the only available estimation tool. In order to systematise the available data and applied estimation techniques, we developed a five-scale classification of the nature of mortality data and assigned all countries with more than 100,000 inhabitants to the corresponding groups. The classification is based on three sources of information regarding the nature of mortality data, the analytical reports of the 2004 and 2006 revisions of the United Nations’ World Population Prospects and the methods and data descriptions of the 2006 Global Burden of Disease Study. Although the information provided by our classification is purely descriptive rather than giving a detailed overview of the specific methods and approaches, the contents of this paper should be of interest to politicians and scientists using the United Nations’ World Population Prospects as well as to scholars who teach and learn about indirect demographic estimation techniques.

  8. 'The Best Health Care Delivery System in the World'? Women's health and maternity/newborn care trends in Philadelphia, PA, United States-1997-2011: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, William F; Guidera, Mamie; Janis, Jaclyn

    2013-10-01

    Despite being ranked number one globally in terms of health care cost per capita, the United States (US) has ranked as low as 37th in the world in terms of health care system performance. This poor performance for one of the most developed nations in the world has been reflected in the underachieved attempts of the multiple US health care systems at improving maternal and newborn health, according to the goals set in 2000 by the United Nations with Millennium Development Goals (MDG's) 5: Improve Maternal Health, and 4: Reduce Child Mortality. This paper will examine the progress, or lack thereof, over a period of 15 years of the fifth largest urban area in the US - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - in its delivery of health care to pregnant women and their newborns. Using data collected from national, state, and city health agencies, trends concerning pregnancy care will be presented and compared to the target goals of MDG-5 and MDG-4, as well as Healthy People 2020, a US government-based initiative to improve health care of all Americans. Findings will demonstrate that urban areas such as Philadelphia are on a path of not reaching goals that have been set by the United Nations and the US government, and by some indicators are moving away in a negative direction from these goals.

  9. The Shared Burden: United States-French Coalition Operations in the European Theater of World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    General Charles De Gaulle , leader of the Free French, felt strongly enough on this matter that he threatened Eisenhower with removing the French forces...French leadership, and in particular de Gaulle , these goals remained at the forefront throughout the war. De Gaulle wanted to place France in the best...position possible in the post-war world. De Gaulle had to seamlessly replace the Vichy regime and their German handlers with a government capable of

  10. Assessment of potential additions to conventional oil and gas resources of the world (outside the United States) from reserve growth, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, Timothy R.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, Phil A.; Ryder, Robert T.; Gautier, Donald L.; Verma, Mahendra K.; Le, Phuong A.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources resulting from reserve growth for discovered fields outside the United States that have reported in-place oil and gas volumes of 500 million barrels of oil equivalent or greater. The mean volumes were estimated at 665 billion barrels of crude oil, 1,429 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 16 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. These volumes constitute a significant portion of the world's oil and gas resources.

  11. Becoming In/Competent Learners in the United States: Refugee Students' Academic Identities in the Figured World of Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aydin

    2014-01-01

    A practice-based dialectic theory of identity was used in this study to explore the cultural-historical context of an urban charter school in which a group of newly arrived Muslim Turk refugee students' academic identities were formed. The school, located in the Southwestern United States, was founded by a global Islamist movement. Ethnographic…

  12. Globalisation and Education in the Postcolonial World: The Conundrum of the Higher Education System of the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden-Leahy, Sheila M.

    2009-01-01

    Occupying a crucial economic role in supporting capitalism through the supply of oil, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a very-high income, early-development stage nation with high annual economic growth levels but low levels of labour market participation by its citizens. The national higher education system was established in 1977 and offers a…

  13. Idea-Centered Laboratory Science (I-CLS), [Unit] C, How a Scientist Expects His World To Behave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deventer, William C.; Duyser, Lucille

    The major ideas of this unit are: consistency and uniformity, cause and effect, and parsimony. Laboratory experiences consist of investigations into: projecting expectations, moon and stars, the relationships among different kinds of change (daily, monthly, annual temperature changes), force and motion, chemical reactions, superstitions, origin of…

  14. India: General Survey Unit for World Civilization Course Curriculum Project. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1997 (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Victoria

    This unit is intended to provide high school students with a general knowledge of the history and culture of India. Lessons include: (1) "Early India"; (2) "Indian Civilization 1500 BC - 500 AD: Hinduism"; (3) "Buddhism"; (4) "Indian Empires"; (5) "Indian Empires, Continued"; (6)…

  15. Historical temperature and salinity data collected from 1896-04-22 to 1961-03-26 from the World Ocean and provided by United Kingdom hydrographic office (NODC Accession 0073673)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature and salinity data collected from 1896-04-22 to 1961-03-26 from the World Ocean. Data were digitized from cards provided by United Kingdom...

  16. College Students Understanding of Production Management and Master Production Schedule through Using a Real World Tool, Complimented with Company Tours and In- Class Visits, Provides an Excellent Learning Experience at Farmingdale State College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Anne O'Sullivan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing is playing a significant role in its re-shoring into America. Companies are grappling with ways to obtain that competitive advantage by distinguishing themselves through their intellectual capabilities, process improvements, technology, people, shop floor management and information flows. The purpose of this paper is to describe the effort at Farmingdale State College to educate our students in understanding Production Management and Master Production Schedule (MPS. We are trying to prepare students for entry into the workforce. By using a Real world ERP tool in the classroom while complimenting this learning with touring local manufacturers who use this tool and having production control experts in our classrooms. [1] The opportunity presents itself for these students to visit real world manufacturers using the same tool these students use in the classroom, the Infor Visual ERP. Each semester students go to a local manufacturer to see how the product is made and the ERP system is used to make it. Each semester a subject matter expert, SME, in manufacturing comes into the class and talks about how they use their ERP to perform their functional responsibilities. Students go into these companies and sit down with these Production Manufacturing and IT SME's to see how they use the modules in their ERP system from estimating, Production Management, MPS to delivery and payment. From the manufacturing window to the Master Schedule Window students learn from these companies SME's just how they perform their functions, how they use this tool. Then that is replicated this in the classroom lab assignments for students to better understand Production Management, scheduling and work order integrity. They identify the desired schedule (forecast and populate a Master Production Schedule. They create a BOM with work orders adding operations and material. The Production Management/Control is the function of directing or regulating the movement of

  17. BLACK AND HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS’ RESILIENCE AGAINST NEGATIVE ABILITY RACIAL STEREOTYPES AT SELECTIVE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN THE UNITED STATES*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jayanti; Lynch, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Stereotype threat is a widely supported theory for understanding the racial achievement gap in college grade performance. However, today’s minority college students are increasingly of immigrant origins, and it is unclear whether two dispositional mechanisms that may increase susceptibility to stereotype threat are applicable to immigrants. We use survey data to examine whether and how negative ability stereotypes affect the grades of 1,865 first, second, and third generation or higher (domestic) minority students at 28 selective American colleges. Structural equation model results indicate that first generation immigrants are highly-resistant to both dispositional identity threat mechanisms we consider. Second generation immigrants experience only certain dispositional elements of identity threat. Drawing on research in social psychology, we suggest immigrants tend to resist stereotype threat in part due to the primacy of their immigrant identities and their connectedness to the opportunity structure of mainstream society. PMID:24077577

  18. Translating sexual assault prevention from a college campus to a United States military installation: piloting the know-your-power bystander social marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J; Stapleton, Jane G

    2012-05-01

    One population that shares both similar and different characteristics with traditional college-age students is the U.S. Military. Similarities include a high concentration of 18- to 26-year-olds dealing with new found independence, peer pressure, and the presence of social norms that support violence and hypermasculinity. Sexual violence is a major public health problem in the United States, and because of the similarities in the age group of college and military populations, the problems regarding sexual violence in both constituencies have been well-documented. In the current pilot study we seek to add to both current knowledge about and promising practices of translating prevention strategies from one target audience to another. We describe how we translated, administered, and evaluated a bystander intervention social marketing campaign focused on sexual assault prevention that had been found to significantly affect attitude change on a college campus for a U.S. Army installation in Europe. In addition to demonstrating the process of translating prevention strategies across target audiences, findings from this pilot study contribute to the evaluation data on the effectiveness of sexual violence prevention strategies implemented with members of the U.S. Military. From our analysis, we see that research participants indicate that the degree to which the images resonate with them and the familiarity of the context (i.e., social self-identification) significantly effect the participants' personal responsibility for reducing sexual assault, confidence in acting as a bystander, and reported engagement as a bystander.

  19. Synoptic tool for reporting of hematological and lymphoid neoplasms based on World Health Organization classification and College of American Pathologists checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winters Sharon B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synoptic reporting, either as part of the pathology report or replacing some free text component incorporates standardized data elements in the form of checklists for pathology reporting. This ensures the pathologists make note of these findings in their reports, thereby improving the quality and uniformity of information in the pathology reports. Methods The purpose of this project is to develop the entire set of elements in the synoptic templates or "worksheets" for hematologic and lymphoid neoplasms using the World Health Organization (WHO Classification and the College of American Pathologists (CAP Cancer Checklists. The CAP checklists' content was supplemented with the most updated classification scheme (WHO classification, specimen details, staging as well as information on various ancillary techniques such as cytochemical studies, immunophenotyping, cytogenetics including Fluorescent In-situ Hybridization (FISH studies and genotyping. We have used a digital synoptic reporting system as part of an existing laboratory information system (LIS, CoPathPlus, from Cerner DHT, Inc. The synoptic elements are presented as discrete data points, so that a data element such as tumor type is assigned from the synoptic value dictionary under the value of tumor type, allowing the user to search for just those cases that have that value point populated. Results These synoptic worksheets are implemented for use in our LIS. The data is stored as discrete data elements appear as an accession summary within the final pathology report. In addition, the synoptic data can be exported to research databases for linking pathological details on banked tissues. Conclusion Synoptic reporting provides a structured method for entering the diagnostic as well as prognostic information for a particular pathology specimen or sample, thereby reducing transcription services and reducing specimen turnaround time. Furthermore, it provides accurate and

  20. Thomas Edison State College and Colorado State University: Using Cutting-Edge Technology to Enhance CE Unit Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Henry; Powell, Albert, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Edison State College (TESC) and Colorado State University (CSU) offer significant contrasts in institutional culture, student demographics, faculty and institutional priorities and approaches to distance education course development and delivery. This article offers case studies showing that widely disparate program design and delivery…

  1. Comparisons of Gambling and Alcohol Use among College Students and Noncollege Young People in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Grace M.; Welte, John W.; Hoffman, Joseph H.; Tidwell, Marie-Cecile O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Gambling and alcohol use were compared for college and noncollege young adults in the US population. Participants: Participants were 1,000 respondents aged 18 to 21. Methods: Data were analyzed from a representative household sample of US young people aged 14 to 21 years old. Telephone interviews were conducted between August 2005 and…

  2. Comparisons of Gambling and Alcohol Use among College Students and Noncollege Young People in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Grace M.; Welte, John W.; Hoffman, Joseph H.; Tidwell, Marie-Cecile O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Gambling and alcohol use were compared for college and noncollege young adults in the US population. Participants: Participants were 1,000 respondents aged 18 to 21. Methods: Data were analyzed from a representative household sample of US young people aged 14 to 21 years old. Telephone interviews were conducted between August 2005 and…

  3. Deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit is an effective method for maintaining neck mobility and muscular endurance in college students with forward head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Yeon

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of deep cervical flexor training on maintaining forward head posture, muscular endurance, and cervical mobility. It also examined the effectiveness of deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty college students were recruited and randomly assigned to groups that underwent either deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit (experimental group, n=10) or conventional deep cervical flexor training (control group, n=10). The craniovertebral angle of each subject was measured with a lateral-view picture. Neck mobility was assessed using a cervical range of motion device and muscular endurance was measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. Both groups performed conventional deep cervical flexor exercises three times a week for six weeks. The experimental group underwent a pressure biofeedback unit training was 5 to10 minutes/day, thrice a week. [Results] Cervical range of motion in the experimental group increased significantly between the end of training and the end of the four week detraining period, compared to that in control group. [Conclusion] Deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit is a useful method for maintaining neck mobility and muscular endurance in people with forward head posture.

  4. Low-carbon off-grid electrification for rural areas in the United Kingdom: Lessons from the developing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadoo, Annabel, E-mail: aly21@cam.ac.uk [Centre for Sustainable Development, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Gormally, Alexandra [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Cruickshank, Heather [Centre for Sustainable Development, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Low-carbon off-grid electrification for rural areas is becoming increasingly popular in the United Kingdom. However, many developing countries have been electrifying their rural areas in this way for decades. Case study fieldwork in Nepal and findings from United Kingdom based research will be used to examine how developed nations can learn from the experience of developing countries with regard to the institutional environment and delivery approach adopted in renewable energy off-grid rural electrification. A clearer institutional framework and more direct external assistance during project development are advised. External coordinators should also engage the community in a mobilization process a priori to help alleviate internal conflicts of interest that could later impede a project. - Highlights: > Development of community renewable energy projects in the UK is commended. > The UK can benefit from the experience of successful programmes in Nepal. > A clearer institutional framework and more direct external assistance is required. > External coordinators should engage the community in a mobilization process.

  5. Brazil-United States Military Relations in the Early Post-World War II Era Brazil-United States Military Relations in the Early Post-World War II Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonny Davis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As estreitas relações militares entre o Brasil e os Estados Unidos deterioraram-se no período imediatamente após à II Guerra Mundial. As divisões associadas à Guerra Fria criaram pressões nacionais e internacionais que levaram a um relacionamento menos preciso e sempre reativo entre os dois gigantes do hemisfério. Quando havia uma convergência de metas, as relações militares refletiam a cooperação amistosa anterior. Quando divergências políticas e institucionais sobre questões bilaterais emergiam, o Brasil recusava-se a seguir a liderança norte-americana. Em larga medida, a política externa no pós-guerra obrigou o Brasil a desenvolver confiança e habilidade para acabar com a prática tradicional de agir como subordinado de um poderoso protetor. O processo começou com a assistência norte-americana para a criação da Escola Superior de Guerra e culminou em 1977 com o fim das relações militares com os EUA (com a denúncia do acordo militar com os EUA. Dessa forma, o Brasil conquistou parte do seu antigo desejo de grandeza.The close military relations between the Brazil and the United States underwent strains in the early post-war era. Cold War divisions created national and international pressures that led to a less precise and often reactive relationship between the hemisphere giants. When there was a convergence of goals, military relations reflected the previous smooth cooperation. When political and institutional divisiveness emerged in the officer corps over bilateral issues, Brazil refused to follow the U.S. lead. To a large degree, the post-war foreign policy forced Brazil and its military establishment to develop the confidence and ability to end the traditional practice of acting as a surrogate for a more powerful patron. The process began with U.S. assistance in creating the Escola Superior de Guerra and culminated in 1977 with the end of formal military relations with the United States. In so doing, Brazil

  6. United States Responses to Japanese Wartime Inhuman Experimentation after World War II: National Security and Wartime Exigency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard; Leonard, Sarah E.; Nie, Jing-Bao; Weindling, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In 1945-46, representatives of the United States government made similar discoveries in both Germany and Japan, unearthing evidence of unethical experiments on human beings that could be viewed as war crimes. The outcomes in the two defeated nations, however, were strikingly different. In Germany, the U.S., influenced by the Canadian physician John Thompson, played a key role in bringing Nazi physicians to trial and publicizing their misdeeds. In Japan, the U.S. played an equally key role in concealing information about the biological warfare experiments and securing immunity from prosecution for the perpetrators. The greater force of appeals to national security and wartime exigency help to explain these different outcomes. PMID:24534743

  7. Cultivating a Hospitable Imagination: Re-Eenvisioning the World Literature Curriculum through a Cosmopolitan Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Suzanne S.

    2014-01-01

    When world literature as a subject was introduced to schools and colleges in the United States during the 1920s, its early curriculum was premised on the notion of bounded territoriality which assumes that identities of individuals, cultures, and nation-states are fixed, determinable, and independent. The intensification of global mobility in an…

  8. A cross-cultural examination of the mediating role of family support and parental advice quality on the relationship between family communication patterns and first-year college student adjustment in the United States and Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Dorrance Hall, Elizabeth; McNallie, Jenna; Custers, Kathleen; Timmermans, Elisabeth; Wilson, Steven R; Van den Bulck, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how college students’ family communication environments influence their adjustment during the first year of college in two distinct cultures: Belgium (n = 513) and the United States (n = 431). Three structural equation models were tested to determine the mediating effects of (a) perceived family support, (b) quality of academic advice from parents, and (c) quality of social advice from parents on associations between family communication patterns (FCPs) and student adju...

  9. The use of energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications by United States college students to enhance athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyte, Christopher O; Albert, Donald; Heard, Kennon J

    2013-06-01

    While the use of performance enhancing substances by professional, collegiate, and Olympic athletes is well described, the rate of use in the general population is not well studied. We explored the use of energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications for the enhancement of athletic performance among college students using an ongoing survey system. We conducted a multi-round online questionnaire collecting data from self-identified students at two-year colleges, four-year colleges, online courses, or technical schools at least part-time during the specified sampling period. The sample is obtained through the use of a survey panel company in which respondents voluntarily register. Survey data were collected from December, 2010 through August, 2011. Subjects who reported participating in athletics were asked if they used any of the following substances to enhance athletic performance (1) energy drinks (2) dietary supplements (3) prescription medications within the last year. Data were analyzed from October, 2011 through January, 2012. There were 462 college students who responded to the survey reporting they participate in sports at various levels. Of these, 397 (85.9 %) responded that within the last year they used energy drinks, dietary supplements, or prescription medications to enhance athletic performance. Energy drinks had the highest prevalence (80.1 %), followed by dietary supplements (64.1 %) and prescription medications (53.3 %). Use was most prevalent amongst intercollegiate athletes (89.4 %) followed by club (88.5 %) and intermural (82.1 %) participants. The vast majority of survey respondents reported using energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications within the last year for athletic performance enhancement.

  10. 论大学世界古代史课程中有关中国史内容的教学——以《世界史·古代史编》为中心%On the Teaching of Contents about Chinese History in College World Ancient History Course --Taking the Ancient History Part of World History as the Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爽

    2012-01-01

    《]世界史.古代史编》是按照世界古代史的时间断限,以全球史观的视野,来选择对世界历史和世界文明发展产生重要影响的中国史内容。对于《古代史编》中编写的中国史内容教授要详略得当,充分利用现有研究成果,才能使学生深刻认识中国在世界历史中的位置和作用,从而使学生具备全球史观。%From the view of global history and according to the time boundary of world ancient history, Ancient History Part of World History selects teaching contents about Chinese history which have important influences on world history and the development of world civilization. In the teaching of contents about Chinese history in An- cient History Part of World History, teachers should make full use of existing research results with proper details and summaries, in order to make college students deeply understand the position and action of China in world his- tory, thus to improve the students' global view of history.

  11. Replace the Electoral College with the ECP System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Charles Henry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The reason for the birth of the Electoral College in the United State emerged from a genuine concern for legitimate and authentic representation of we the people granted by the people. Notwithstanding, the Electoral College as operated in a contemporary world is without foundation for furtherance of such cause. Arguably, not only is the Electoral College process antiquated but also it represents a farce to the mandate it justifiably seeks. Of the prevailing 50 states, 48 make the Electoral College a mockery of its purpose by offering the candidate all the Electoral College votes for those states. Only two states attempt at preserving the rationale for the Electoral College. The time has come for a transformational departure from the Electoral College to a system that offer electoral college points (ECP by congressional districts equal to the number of Electoral College votes and thus restoring the legitimacy of the peoples representative. NB: The term minority is used throughout this paper to mean ≤ 49% of potential or actual votes in an election.

  12. [The national strategies for suicide prevention by the United Nation/World Health Organization and the present situation of suicide in the East Asia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshitomo; Takahashi, Sho; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Rira

    2014-01-01

    We discussed "Prevention of suicide: Guidelines for the formulation and implementation of national strategies" formulated by the United Nations and the World Health Organization in 1996 and the present situation of suicide in the East Asia. Although much public attention has been paid to a high suicide rate of Japan in the world, the increasing tendency of suicide rates have been found in other East Asian countries as well. For example the Republic of Korea shows a recent suicide rate higher than 30 per 100,000, which surpasses the suicide rate of Japan. Facing the fact, various measures for suicide prevention have been conducted. The UN guidelines for suicide prevention point out that these strategies should be discussed to meet each country's need for more appropriate suicide prevention. The Japanese government had the Basic Law on Suicide Prevention enforced in 2006 to implement measures that society must tackle because various social factors are behind suicides. In recent years, some countries in the East Asia also show increasing suicide rates, which attract the society's serious concern. The rapid economic growth and globalization have led to personnel cut, performance-based compensation, and the widening gap between the rich and the poor and the society cannot maintain the conventional employment system. In addition, socio-economic changes have brought collapse of the original societal and familial system, which might have existed behind the increase of suicide in this region.

  13. Fermentation. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  14. Fermentation. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  15. College or University?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NancySteinbach; 邹国如

    2005-01-01

    Colleges and universities have a lot in common. They prepare young aduhs for work.They provide a greater understanding of the world and its past. And they help students learn to value the arts and sciences.

  16. The emergence of computer science instructional units in American colleges and universities (1950--1975): A history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Susan Elaine

    The purpose and scope of this dissertation is to investigate the origins and development of academic computer science units in American higher education and examine the intent and structure of their curricula. Specifically the study examines selected undergraduate and graduate curricula that developed from 1950 to 1975. This dissertation examines several of the earliest academic units formed and the issues surrounding their formation. This study examines some of the variety of courses and programs that existed among the early computer science programs. The actual titles of the units varied but they shared a common overreaching goal to study computers. The departments formed in various methods and some units were a subset of other departments. Faculties of these new units were often comprised of faculty members from various other disciplines. This dissertation is an exploration of the connections between a variety of diverse institutions and the new computer science discipline that formed from these early academic roots. While much has been written about the history of hardware and software development and the individual pioneers in the relatively new computer science discipline, the history of the academic units was documented primarily based on individual institutions. This study uses a wider lens to examine the patterns of these early academic units as they formed and became computer science units. The successes of these early pioneers resulted in a proliferation of academic computer programs in the following decades. The curricular debates continue as the number and purposes of these programs continue to expand. This dissertation seeks to provide useful information for future curricular decisions by examining the roots of the academic computer science units.

  17. Toward a generation free of tuberculosis: TB disease and infection in individuals of college age in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N S; Flood-Bryzman, A; Jeffries, C; Scott, J

    2017-08-11

    To assess the magnitude of active TB disease and latent TB infection (LTBI) in young adults of college age. Individuals who were aged 18-24 years in 2011 were used as a proxy for college students. Active TB cases reported to the 2011 US National TB Surveillance System (NTSS) were included. LTBI prevalence was calculated from the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The 2011 American Community Survey was used to calculate population denominators. Analyses were stratified by nativity. Active TB disease incidence among persons aged 18-24 years was 2.82/100,000, 18.8/100,000 among foreign-born individuals and 0.9/100,000 among US-born individuals. In 2011, 878 TB cases were reported; 629 (71.6%) were foreign-born. LTBI prevalence among persons of 18-24 years was 2.5%: 8.7% and 1.3% among foreign-born and US-born, respectively. Active screening and treatment programs for foreign-born young adults could identify TB cases earlier and provide an opportunity for prevention efforts.

  18. Hopelessness and Suicidal Behavior among Chinese, Thai and Korean College Students and Predictive Effects of the World Health Organization's WHOQOL-BREF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Noy; Li, Kaigang; Xiao, Xia; Nokkaew, Nattiporn; Park, Bock-Hee

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of suicide behavior and to examine the association between hopeless feelings, suicidal behavior and components of the WHO Quality-of-Life-BREF instrument among college students (n = 1,217) in China, Thailand, and Korea. Results showed 3.7% Thai, 10% Chinese, and 13.2% Korean students…

  19. Level of the Environmental Risks' Awareness of Water Shortage for the Educational Sciences College's Student-Teachers at the World Islamic Sciences and Education University in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebous, Tahani

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the degree of awareness of environmental risks of water shortage of students-teachers in the majors of Classroom teachers, Counseling and Special education in the Education Sciences College at WISE and their degree of awareness according to major and gender. The sample of the study which was selected randomly…

  20. Level of the Environmental Risks' Awareness of Water Shortage for the Educational Sciences College's Student-Teachers at the World Islamic Sciences and Education University in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebous, Tahani

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the degree of awareness of environmental risks of water shortage of students-teachers in the majors of Classroom teachers, Counseling and Special education in the Education Sciences College at WISE and their degree of awareness according to major and gender. The sample of the study which was selected randomly…

  1. Navigating New Worlds: A Real-Time Look at How Successful and Non-Successful First-Generation College Students Negotiate Their First Semesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Erik E.

    2012-01-01

    This study of fifteen first generation American college freshmen documents their initial semester with a focus on factors and dispositions contributing to eventual success or failure. Students were identified prior to campus arrival, allowing for immediate and real-time data collection as they were experiencing the beginning of their college…

  2. Studies in Higher Education in England and Scotland with Suggestions for Universities and Colleges in the United States. Bulletin, 1917, No. 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, George Edwin

    1917-01-01

    The object of this study is to point out facts and tendencies in higher education in Great Britain by which American universities and colleges can profit. Since May, 1913, the compiler of the bulletin has visited 56 institutions, of which 18 have been universities, 14 university colleges, and 24 colleges and technical and agricultural colleges and…

  3. Our World Their World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisco, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Build, create, make, blog, develop, organize, structure, perform. These are just a few verbs that illustrate the visual world. These words create images that allow students to respond to their environment. Visual culture studies recognize the predominance of visual forms of media, communication, and information in the postmodern world. This…

  4. Our World Their World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisco, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Build, create, make, blog, develop, organize, structure, perform. These are just a few verbs that illustrate the visual world. These words create images that allow students to respond to their environment. Visual culture studies recognize the predominance of visual forms of media, communication, and information in the postmodern world. This…

  5. Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard's departure from the Medical College of Virginia: incompatible science or incompatible social views in pre-Civil War southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joseph C; Ho, Stephen V

    2011-01-01

    Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard was one of the most colorful characters in modern physiology. His scientific methods of self-experimentation and animal vivisection led to many great observations, including the eponymous syndrome of hemisection of the spinal cord. Despite his renown, he stayed but one year in his first major academic post. Details of his sojourn at the Medical College of Virginia (now part of Virginia Commonwealth University) in Richmond were divined from perusal of archival material, letters, and from the available literature. His notoriety in the field of physiology landed him a post at the Medical College of Virginia in 1854 as the chair of physiology. During a brief time here, he was able to publish his landmark monograph of 1855 on the pathways of the spinal cord "Experimental and Clinical Researches on the Physiology and Pathology of the Spinal Cord." He had a near-death experience while experimenting on himself to determine the function of the skin. It was rumored that his English was poor, his lectures unintelligible, and his scientific methods disturbing to the neighbors and that for those reasons he was asked to vacate his post. Personal communications and other accounts indicate a different view: his mixed-blood heritage and his views on slavery were unpopular in the pre-Civil War southern United States. These disparate viewpoints lend an insight into the life and career of this pioneer in modern medicine and experimental design and to the clash of science and social views.

  6. 基于小世界网络的大学生社交网络模型研究%Research of College Students' social network model of small-world networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林晓

    2015-01-01

    随着大学生社交网络使用的日趋频繁,有关大学生社交网络应用的研究也日益增多,本文采用在复杂网络研究中运用广泛的小世界网络理论,通过分析大学生社交网络的静态网络统计量,提出一种构造简单的大学生社交网络模型,并对其小世界特性进行了验证。%With the development of College Students' social network,the research on College Students' social network applications are increasing,Based on the deep research of WS and NW small-world network,put forward a new kind of simple structure social network model,through the analysis of the static network statistics, verify its small world properties.

  7. General Education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science College Courses Serve as a Vehicle for Improving Science Literacy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, E.

    2011-10-01

    Every year approximately 500,000 undergraduate college students take a general education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science (EASS) course in the Unites States. For the majority of these students this will be their last physical science course in life. This population of students is incredibly important to the science literacy of the United States citizenry and to the success of the STEM career pipeline. These students represent future scientists, technologists, business leaders, politicians, journalists, historians, artists, and most importantly, policy makers, parents, voters, and teachers. A significant portion of these students are taught at minority serving institutions and community colleges and often are from underserved and underrepresented groups, such as women and minorities. Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona have been developing and conducting research on the effectiveness of instructional strategies and materials that are explicitly designed to challenge students' naïve ideas and intellectually engage their thinking at a deep level in the traditional lecture classroom. The results of this work show that dramatic improvement in student understanding can be made from increased use of interactive learning strategies. These improvements are shown to be independent of institution type or class size, but appear to be strongly influenced by the quality of the instructor's implementation. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies.

  8. Do International Studies Students Have a Broader Global Awareness than Other College Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Soto, William; Tajalli, Hassan; Villarreal, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Common knowledge seem to suggest that international studies (IS) programs are at the forefront of helping their students better understand the world beyond United States borders. The purpose of this study is to test the proposition that IS students have a greater global awareness than other college students. Method: Hanvey's (1976) five…

  9. College Students' Spontaneous Self-Concept: The Effect of Culture among Respondents in Hong Kong, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Michael H.; Cheung, Tak-Sing

    1983-01-01

    The Twenty Statements Test was administered to university students in Japan, the United States, and Hong Kong to assess cultural influences on self-concept. Numerous cultural differences were found in the frequency of categories and subcategories used for self-statements and in the level of self-esteem. (AOS)

  10. ITALIAN LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE EFFORTS IN THE UNITED STATES AND THE TEACHER OF ITALIAN IN AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FISHMAN, JOSHUA A.

    A STRONG INFLUENCE ON THE NATURE OF ITALIAN INSTRUCTION TODAY IN THE UNITED STATES IS THE FACT THAT ITALO-AMERICANS SHOW LESS ORGANIZED INTEREST IN THEIR LANGUAGE THAN DO OTHER ETHNIC GROUPS, AS EVIDENCED BY COMPARING NEWSPAPER PUBLICATIONS IN DIFFERENT MOTHER TONGUES, RADIO LANGUAGE PROGRAMS, AND LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATIONS WHERE, IN EACH…

  11. The Core Curricula of Information Systems Undergraduate Programs: A Survey of AACSB-Accredited Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    The author examines the present state of information systems undergraduate programs in the United States. He reviewed 516 institutions and collected data on 234 institutions offering information systems (IS) undergraduate programs. Of seven core courses required by the IS 2010 curriculum model, four are required by more than 50% of the programs,…

  12. Assessing the Impact of Socio-Economic Inequities on College Enrolment: Emerging Differences in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal Aswad, Noor; Vidican, Georgeta; Samulewicz, Diana

    2011-01-01

    As the United Arab Emirates diversifies its economy towards knowledge-based industries, maximising the participation of the national workforce, particularly women, in the science, engineering and technology fields is of utmost importance. To accomplish this, identifying the factors that lead students to select their degree programme, as well as…

  13. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast ...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  14. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  15. Relationships among Just-world belief, optimism and life satisfaction In colleges%大学生公正世界信念、乐观与生活满意度的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐晓栋; 张庆华; 李晓辉; 龚玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship among just-world belief,optimism and life satisfaction in colleges.Methods According to convenience sampling principle,370 colleges were selected and assessed with the just world scale for college students (JWS),satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) and the life orientation test-revised (LOT-R) ;and data were analyzed using correlation analysis and regression analysis.Results ①The scores of just-world belief,optimism and life satisfaction were (3.22 ± 0.46),(3.50 ± 0.57),and (3.70 ± 1.21),all of which were higher than middle points.②The scores of just-world belief were positive correlated with the scores of optimism and life satisfaction (r =0.44,0.36,P < 0.01),and the scores of optimism also were positive correlated with life satisfaction(r =0.38,P < 0.01).③ The just-world belief and optimism can positively predict life satisfaction directly(β =0.24,0.29,P < 0.01),and the two factors had interaction(β=0.09,P< 0.05).Among optimistic students,life satisfaction of low just-world belief ones were much worse than that of high just world belief ones.However,among pessimistic students,the differences of life satisfaction between high and low just-world belief ones became little.Conclusion Just-world belief of colleges has significant predictive effect on life satisfaction,and the two factors had interaction.%目的 探讨大学生公正世界信念及乐观对生活满意度的共同影响.方法 采用方便取样的方式抽取370名大学生,用大学生公正世界信念量表(Just World Scale for College Students,JWS)、生活满意度量表(satisfaction with life scale,SWLS)和生活定向量表(The Life Orientation Test-revised,LOT-R)进行测查;采用相关分析、回归分析等方法对数据进行统计分析.结果 ①大学生公正世界信念、乐观及生活满意度的得分均在中点以上[分别为(3.22±0.46)分,(3.50±0.57)分,(3.70±1.21)分].②大学生公正世界信念与乐观、生

  16. Development and validation of the Acculturative Stress Scale for Chinese College Students in the United States (ASSCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jieru

    2016-04-01

    Chinese students are the biggest ethnic group of international students in the United States. This study aims to develop a reliable and valid scale to accurately measure their acculturative stress. A 72-item pool was sent online to Chinese students and a five-factor scale of 32 items was generated by exploratory factor analysis. The five factors included language insufficiency, social isolation, perceived discrimination, academic pressure, and guilt toward family. The Acculturative Stress Scale for Chinese Students demonstrated high reliability and initial validity by predicting depression and life satisfaction. It was the first Chinese scale of acculturative stress developed and validated among a Chinese student sample in the United States. In the future, the scale can be used as a diagnostic tool by mental health professionals and a self-assessment tool by Chinese students. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between elderly suicide rates and the human development index: a cross-national study of secondary data from the World Health Organization and the United Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajit

    2009-02-01

    Elderly suicides rates are associated with socio-economic status and life expectancy. Although suicide rates in younger people are associated with both higher and lower levels of educational attainment, little is known about this association in the elderly. The relationship between Human Development Index (HDI)--a composite index measuring average achievements on three basic dimensions of human development (life expectancy, educational attainment and socio-economic status)--and elderly suicide rates was examined in a cross-national study utilizing secondary data from the World Health Organization and the United Nations. There was a significant curvilinear (inverted U-shaped curve) relationship between elderly suicide rates in males and the HDI, fitting the quadratic equation y = a + bx - cx2. A similar curvilinear relationship was observed in females, but the significance level only approached 0.05. A model with four sequential stages was proposed to explain the findings: (i) low elderly suicide rate--low human development society; (ii) high elderly suicide rate--low human development society; (iii) high elderly suicide rate--high human development society; and (iv) low elderly suicide rate--high human development society.

  18. Status of the implementation of the World Health Organization multimodal hand hygiene strategy in United States of America health care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegranzi, Benedetta; Conway, Laurie; Larson, Elaine; Pittet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) launched a multimodal strategy and campaign in 2009 to improve hand hygiene practices worldwide. Our objective was to evaluate the implementation of the strategy in United States health care facilities. Methods From July through December 2011, US facilities participating in the WHO global campaign were invited to complete the Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework online, a validated tool based on the WHO multimodal strategy. Results Of 2,238 invited facilities, 168 participated in the survey (7.5%). A detailed analysis of 129, mainly nonteaching public facilities (80.6%), showed that most had an advanced or intermediate level of hand hygiene implementation progress (48.9% and 45.0%, respectively). The total Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework score was 36 points higher for facilities with staffing levels of infection preventionists > 0.75/100 beds than for those with lower ratios (P = .01) and 41 points higher for facilities participating in hand hygiene campaigns (P = .002). Conclusion Despite the low response rate, the survey results are unique and allow interesting reflections. Whereas the level of progress of most participating facilities was encouraging, this may reflect reporting bias, ie, better hospitals more likely to report. However, even in respondents, further improvement can be achieved, in particular by embedding hand hygiene in a stronger institutional safety climate and optimizing staffing levels dedicated to infection prevention. These results should encourage the launch of a coordinated national campaign and higher participation in the WHO global campaign. PMID:24581011

  19. Prevalence and causes of visual impairment according to World Health Organization and United States criteria in an aged, urban Scandinavian population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Helena; Vinding, T; Nielsen, N V

    2001-01-01

    eligible persons, 946 (96.9%) could be examined. Information about best-corrected visual acuity (VA) was obtained from 944 cooperative persons (96.7%). METHODS: Data from the Copenhagen City Eye Study were used to assess the cause-specific prevalence of visual impairment as defined by the World Health...... Organization (WHO) (VA worse than 20/60-20/400 in the better eye) and the criteria used most commonly in the United States (VA worse than 20/40 but better than 20/200 in the better eye). Eligible subjects underwent an extensive ophthalmologic examination at The National University Hospital of Denmark. MAIN...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Best-corrected VA and primary causes of visual impairment. RESULTS: The prevalence of low vision according to the WHO definition ranged from 2.6% in subjects aged 70 to 74 years to 4.8% in subjects 75 to 80 years of age, with an age-adjusted relative prevalence of 1.58%. Using the U...

  20. Insulin Pump and CGM Usage in the United States and Germany: Results of a Real-World Survey With 985 Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John; Roberts, Ruth; Weber, Dietmar; Faber-Heinemann, Gabriele; Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-06-12

    This survey collected and evaluated user responses about routine tasks and preferences regarding insulin pumps and infusion sets (IIS) with comparison of intercountry differences between the United States (US) and Germany (GER), chosen for their large insulin pump populations. A total of 985 subjects (534 US, 451 GER; 60% female) with type 1 diabetes on pump therapy anonymously answered 20 pump-related questions. US subjects also answered 11 questions about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) usage. Length of use of insulin cartridges is shorter in US than in GER, mean (SD) 4.3 (5.0) versus 5.3 (3.2) days (P insulin cartridges (7.3% for >3 days vs. 7.7% for pump wearers stated that they were "very satisfied" with their pump (49% US vs. 45% GER, ns). However, 98% would recommend the pump to others (95% vs. 93%, ns). Analysis of CGM questions showed that 297 (60%) of 496 US responders currently wore one. Of these, 84% said they would recommend CGM to others. CGM wearers who stated they were "very satisfied" with their CGM had lower HbA1c than those who said they were "partly satisfied" (6.9% vs. 7.2%). This survey shows interesting differences in real-world use of insulin pumps in 2 large markets, and suggests areas where insulin pumps and CGMs might be improved. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Shared Decision Making in Intensive Care Units: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Alexander A.; Davidson, Judy E.; Morrison, Wynne; Danis, Marion; White, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Shared decision-making (SDM) is endorsed by critical care organizations, however there remains confusion about what SDM is, when it should be used, and approaches to promote partnerships in treatment decisions. The purpose of this statement is to define SDM, recommend when SDM should be used, identify the range of ethically acceptable decision-making models, and present important communication skills. Methods The American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) and American Thoracic Society (ATS) Ethics Committees reviewed empirical research and normative analyses published in peer-reviewed journals to generate recommendations. Recommendations approved by consensus of the full Ethics Committees of ACCM and ATS were included in the statement. Main Results Six recommendations were endorsed: 1) Definition: Shared decision-making is a collaborative process that allows patients, or their surrogates, and clinicians to make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient’s values, goals, and preferences. 2) Clinicians should engage in a SDM process to define overall goals of care (including decisions regarding limiting or withdrawing life-prolonging interventions) and when making major treatment decisions that may be affected by personal values, goals, and preferences. 3) Clinicians should use as their “default” approach a SDM process that includes three main elements: information exchange, deliberation, and making a treatment decision. 4) A wide range of decision-making approaches are ethically supportable including patient- or surrogate-directed and clinician-directed models. Clinicians should tailor the decision-making process based on the preferences of the patient or surrogate. 5) Clinicians should be trained in communication skills. 6) Research is needed to evaluate decision-making strategies. Conclusions Patient and surrogate preferences for decision-making roles regarding value

  2. Conference on the Trend in Income Inequality in the U.S. Part I, Trends in Inequality of Well-Offness in the United States since World War II. Part 2, Conference Overview: Conceptual Issues, Data Issues, and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Michael K.; Danziger, Sheldon

    The first part of this document summarizes the current state of knowledge on trends in inequality of economic well-being in the United States since World War II. It surveys alternative answers to the often asked question: Has inequality in the U.S. increased, decreased, or remained roughly the same over a period of time? Intelligent laymen, and…

  3. Marketing the College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossin, Ernest

    This document is one of three texts which comprise the written components of The Responsive College Programme dissemination materials. The program is designed to help colleges in the United Kingdom market themselves and their courses effectively, and this volume, which is freestanding and directed at both the general reader and the specialist,…

  4. Incorporating Yoga into College Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher M.; Puig, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Yoga has become increasingly popular in the United States, and college counselors should be familiar with this practice due to its popularity among college students. This article provides a brief overview of yoga and research on its benefits for mental health concerns often experienced by college students. Additionally, it addresses methods of…

  5. Incorporating Yoga into College Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher M.; Puig, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Yoga has become increasingly popular in the United States, and college counselors should be familiar with this practice due to its popularity among college students. This article provides a brief overview of yoga and research on its benefits for mental health concerns often experienced by college students. Additionally, it addresses methods of…

  6. 医学专业大学生公正世界信念与亲社会行为的关系%Relationship between just world belief and pro-social behavior of the medical professional college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海丽; 郑佳莹; 耿楠楠; 张李斌

    2016-01-01

    ①目的探讨医学专业大学生公正世界信念和亲社会行为之间的关系。②方法采用公正信念量表、亲社会行为量表与自编讨论题对华北理工大学265名医学专业大学生进行问卷调查。③结果年级及家庭教养方式在公正世界信念总分及三个因子方面差异无统计学意义。是否独生子女与公正世界信念的内在公正因子的差异有统计学意义(t =2.728,P <0.05)。年级和家庭教养方式在亲社会行为总分与情绪性、依从、利他、匿名性、公开性及紧急性六个维度方面差异无统计学意义。是否独生子女在亲社会行为的利他性和紧急性两个维度上差异有统计学意义(t =-2.739,-3.014,P <0.05)。医学专业大学生公正世界信念总分与亲社会行为总分有显著正相关(r =0.301,P <0.05)。④结论医学专业大学生公正世界信念越高,其亲社会行为越高。%Objective To explore the relationship between just world beliefs and pro-social behav-ior of the medical professional college students.Methods A total of 265 medical professional college students were investigated by the Fair Beliefs Scale,Pro-social Behavior Scale and the Self-made Prob-lem.Results There were no significant difference among the just world belief total score and the three factors scores about family rearing patterns and grades.There was significant difference between whether the one child and the inner justice factor of just world beliefs (t =2.728,P <0.05).There were no significant difference among pro-social behavior total scores,emotional,compliance,altruistic, anonymous,openness and urgency the six dimensions about grade and family rearing style,There were significant difference between altruistic and urgency on whether the one child(t =-2.739,-3.014,P <0.05).There were significant positive correlation between just world belief scores and pro-social behav-ior scores.Conclusion The

  7. United Nations/World Health Organization Meeting on Socio-Economic Determinants and Consequences of Mortality, Mexico City, 19-25 June 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the United Nations/World Health Organization (WHO) Meeting on Socioeconomic Determinants and Consequences of Mortality, held in Mexico City in June 1979, were the following: to review the knowledge of differential mortality and to identify gaps in the understanding of its socioeconomic determinants and consequences; to discuss the methodological and technical problems associated with data collection and analysis; to consider the policy implications of the findings presented and to promote studies on the implications of socioeconomic differentials in mortality on social policy and international development strategies; to formulate recommendations and guidelines for the utilization of the 1980 round of population censuses for in-depth studies of mortality differentials; and to stimulate national and international research on differential mortality. Participants discussed the state of knowledge of socioeconomic differentials and determinants of mortality and described the socioeconomic measures available, the methods of data collection and analysis used, and the findings themselves. A number of characteristics had been employed in the study of differential mortality, and these could be grouped under the following headings: occupation; education; housing; income, wealth; family size; and place of residence. The techniques or methods used to analyze mortality were direct and indirect methods, and these are examined. Inequalities in mortality were found to be closely associated with inequalities in social and economic conditions. Any effort to reduce or remove those inequalities would have to be based on a clear understanding of their causes and interrelationships in order to succeed. Participants indicated a desire to see a resurgence of mortality research, and some research suggestions are outlined.

  8. World law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  9. The relationship of prejudicial attitudes to psychological, social, and physical well-being within a sample of college students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Khanh T; Holmberg, Michelle D; Ho, Ivy K; Haynes, Michelle C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of prejudicial attitudes to psychological, social, and physical well-being among 495 college students in the Northeast region of the United States. Prejudicial attitudes included racism, sexism, homophobia, physical disability bias, weight/body-size bias, and anti-immigrant sentiment. As a secondary objective, we examined the associations among the various forms of prejudice and their relationship to key demographic and personal characteristics. We also examined the associations between psychological, social, and physical well-being. The results indicated that specific forms of prejudice, especially racism and sexism, were negative correlates of psychological, social, and/or physical well-being. The results also indicated that there may exist a prejudicial syndrome, linking diverse forms of prejudice. Furthermore, poor functioning in one area of well-being (e.g., psychological health) is related to poor functioning in other areas of well-being (social and physical health). Overall, this study provides important implications for future research and prevention programs in the area of prejudice and well-being.

  10. Effects of resistance training on muscle strength, endurance, and motor unit according to ciliary neurotrophic factor polymorphism in male college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ae-Rim; Hong, Sang-Min; Shin, Yun-A

    2014-09-01

    Changes in muscle mass and strength across the adult age span are variable and related to the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) genotype. In particular, a single CNTF haplotype (1357 G→A) is important for neuronal and muscular developments and may be associated with muscle strength response to resistance training. We examined whether CNTF genotype differentially influences the effect of resistance training on neuromuscular improvement in male college students. Resistance training of the upper extremities comprised 3 sets at 75%-85% intensity per 1 repetition maximum, 3 times a week, for a total of 8 weeks. We measured isokinetic muscle function of the elbow joint with regard to strength (60°/s) and endurance (180°/s) by using an isokinetic dynamometer. The biceps brachii (BB) and brachioradialis muscles were studied using surface electromyography with spike-triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP) area. After resistance training, the SMUP of the BB increased significantly at 60°/s (p muscle strength and endurance may have resulted directly from resistance training rather than from genetic factors related to nerves in muscle tissue. Key PointsResistance training improves muscle strength and endurance in young men.This improvement in muscular strength and endurance is irrespective of CNTF genotypes.

  11. Book Review: Dyson, A. H. (1993. The social worlds of children learning to write in an urban primary school. New York: Teacher College Press.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragasit Sitthitikul

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available To conclude, Dyson had clearly developed the research themes based on what she observed from the children’s literacy learning experiences to show how their worldviews were developed through their meaning-making negotiations and constructions with people around them. She was very deliberate and detailed in explaining the literacy world of children. She had done a very good job in associating children’s literate behaviors with Bakhtin’s concept of language as social dialogues Geertz’s concept of “imaginative universe”.

  12. Preparing and Developing Community College International Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, Rosalind Latiner; Valeau, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership training for future senior United States (US) community college leaders is an ongoing focus of US community college education. Leadership training is also a focus of US university international educators. Community college literature has assumed that full-time positions at community colleges devoted to overseeing and implementing…

  13. World law

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, Harold J.; Robert W. Woodruff; James Barr Ames

    1999-01-01

    In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the ...

  14. Worlds Fantastic, Worlds Familiar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2017-02-01

    Introduction; 1. Mercury: the hottest little place; 2. Venus: an even hotter place; 3. Mars: the abode of life?; 4. Asteroids and comets: sweat the small stuff; 5. Galileo's treasures: worlds of fire and ice; 6. Enceladus: an active iceball in space; 7. Titan: an Earth in deep freeze?; 8. Iapetus and its friends: the weirdest 'planets' in the Solar System; 9. Pluto: the first view of the 'third zone'; 10. Earths above: the search for exoplanets and life in the universe; Epilogue; Glossary; Acknowledgements; Index.

  15. Use of Expedited Partner Therapy for Sexually Transmitted Diseases in College and University Health Centers in the United States, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ryan; Martinez, Nina; Roberts, Craig; Habel, Melissa A; Leino, E Victor; Leichliter, Jami S

    2015-10-01

    We examined expedited partner therapy for chlamydia and gonorrhea in college and university health centers by institutional and policy characteristics. Expedited partner therapy awareness and use was low (44.1% used), did not differ by institutional characteristics, and differed by policy environment. Our findings suggest missed opportunities for sexually transmitted disease prevention in college and university health centers.

  16. Legal Ages for Purchase and Consumption of Alcohol and Heavy Drinking among College Students in Canada, Europe, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Adrienne; Frye, Laurie; Bauerle, Jennifer; Turner, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy drinking and associated negative consequences remain a serious problem among college students. In a secondary analysis of data from two published study, the authors examine the correlation between minimum legal age to purchase and/or consume alcohol and rates of heavy drinking among college students in 22 countries. The published studies use…

  17. Emotional Intelligence and Deans: Exploring the Nature of the Emotional Intelligence of Community College Deans in the Southeastern Region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maundu, Irene Kasungwa

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is an essential aspect of community college administration. Community colleges are currently facing numerous challenges such as: above average retirement rates for administrators, funding and limited government support, diverse student populations, changes in technology, shift in teaching to student-centered learning, and steep…

  18. Balance of academic responsibilities of clinical track pharmacy faculty in the United States: a survey of select American College of Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Research Network Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutescu, Edith A; Engle, Janet P; Bathija, Sacheeta; Grim, Shellee A; Chan, Juliana; Mucksavage, Jeffrey J; Ohler, Kirsten H; Tesoro, Eljim P; Thielke, James J; Shapiro, Nancy L; Donnelly, Andrew J; Garofalo, John; DiDomenico, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    To characterize the balance of clinical and academic responsibilities of clinical track pharmacy faculty in the United States and evaluate organizational structures that promote satisfactory balance between these responsibilities. Prospective cross-sectional survey. A 22-item online survey was developed and distributed via Qualtrics software. Clinical faculty members of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Adult Medicine, Ambulatory Care, Cardiology, Critical Care, Gastrointestinal/Liver/Nutrition, Immunology/Transplantation, Infectious Disease, and Pediatrics Practice and Research Networks (PRNs) were invited to participate via the PRN electronic mailing list. The survey comprised questions related to demographics, organizational structure, and balance of clinical and academic responsibilities. A total of 344 participants responded to some or all of the survey questions. The demographics were relatively equally balanced between faculty at state and private academic institutions, academic rank, and practice setting. Expected and actual effort allocations were similar for each of the clinical and academic responsibilities, with direct patient care and clinical teaching representing more than 50% effort allocation cumulatively. Clinical faculty at state institutions devoted a larger proportion of time to clinical service, whereas clinical faculty at private institutions devoted a greater proportion of time to didactic teaching. When asked about time constraints, 157 (69.8%) of the 225 survey participants responding to this question did not believe they had sufficient time to fulfill their nonclinical academic needs. Clinical faculty who were provided "protected time" away from clinical service had a significantly more favorable opinion of this question. Most of the clinical track pharmacy faculty indicated that they have insufficient time to fulfill their nonclinical academic responsibilities. Provision of protected time may alleviate some of these time

  19. RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY SCREENING OF 500 INFANTS IN A LEVEL II NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT AT A MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN KARNATAKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is the leading cause of infant blindness and predominantly affects premature, low birth weight babies.1 India and other middle-income countries are said to be suffering from the ‘third epidemic’. ROP is multi-factorial and early detection and treatment of threshold ROP with timely laser treatment results in excellent outcome.3-8 OBJECTIVES: 1. To determine the yield of ROP in a level II neonatal intensive care unit (NICU at a Government Medical College Hospital in Mandya district. 2. To determine disease characteristics and outcome of treatment. METHODOLOGY: The study is a prospective analysis of infants admitted during March 1st 2009 and November 30th, 2011(33 months at the NICU of Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences (MIMS Hospital. All infants weighing

  20. Effects of Resistance Training on Muscle Strength, Endurance, and Motor Unit According to Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Polymorphism in Male College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae-Rim Hong, Sang-Min Hong, Yun-A Shin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in muscle mass and strength across the adult age span are variable and related to the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF genotype. In particular, a single CNTF haplotype (1357 G→A is important for neuronal and muscular developments and may be associated with muscle strength response to resistance training. We examined whether CNTF genotype differentially influences the effect of resistance training on neuromuscular improvement in male college students. Resistance training of the upper extremities comprised 3 sets at 75%–85% intensity per 1 repetition maximum, 3 times a week, for a total of 8 weeks. We measured isokinetic muscle function of the elbow joint with regard to strength (60°/s and endurance (180°/s by using an isokinetic dynamometer. The biceps brachii (BB and brachioradialis muscles were studied using surface electromyography with spike-triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP area. After resistance training, the SMUP of the BB increased significantly at 60°/s (p < 0.05, but no difference in the CNTF genotype was observed. The SMUP of the BB at 180°/s increased significantly in the GG/AA genotype group compared with that in the GA genotype group (p < 0.05. The average power of the elbow flexor at 180°/s increased significantly after resistance training (p < 0.05, but again, no difference in the CNTF genotype was observed. Thus, improvements in muscle strength and endurance may have resulted directly from resistance training rather than from genetic factors related to nerves in muscle tissue.

  1. Natural Dyes. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  2. Clay Pots. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  3. Methane Digestors. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  4. Impact of the Manning, Training, and Utilization of Black Combat Units during World War II on the Racial Integration of the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ability, schooling and education, socioeconomic class and cultural background. The AGCT classified personnel into five groups based on score...permission to station black soldiers within their borders. These governments included the British West Indies, Australia, Chile , Venezuela and Panama...soldiers for valor and the platoon received the Distinguished Unit Citation, becoming the first black unit to achieve this recognition.119 In December

  5. College mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Şengül, Caner

    2016-01-01

    College Mechanics QueBank has been designed to be different, enthusiastic, interesting and helpful to you. Therefore, it is not just a test bank about mechanics but also it is like a compass in order to find your way in mechanics Each chapter in this book is put in an order to follow a hierarchy of the mechanics topics; from vectors to simple harmonic motion. Throughout the book there are many multiple choice and long answer questions for you to solve. They have been created for YGS, LYS, SAT, IB or other standardized exams in the world because mechanics has no boundaries and so Physics has no country. Learn the main principle of each chapter and explore the daily life applications. Then you can start to solve the questions by planning a problem solving method carefully. Finally, enjoy solving the questions and discover the meachanics of the universe once more.

  6. Experimentation on prisoners by the Japanese during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdwood, Ronald H

    1985-08-24

    Girdwood, president of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, recounts his experience in assessing and treating newly released Allied prisoners in the Far East during World War II. Although he had been posted to various locales and had interviewed many prison camp survivors, he had not heard direct accounts of germ warfare experiments allegedly performed by the Japanese on American, British, and Australian prisoners until they were reported on a British television program, Unit 731, on 13 August 1985. While poor medical care, abuse, and malnutrition were known, information about biological warfare disclosed on the television program was evidently not known to British, Indian, or Australian authorities until the war's end.

  7. Supplemental Colleges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Supplemental Colleges layer attempts to capture additional Post Secondary Education campuses of colleges and universities associated with a single campus listed...

  8. Sexual Assault Supportive Attitudes: Rape Myth Acceptance and Token Resistance in Greek and Non-Greek College Students From Two University Samples in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canan, Sasha N; Jozkowski, Kristen N; Crawford, Brandon L

    2016-03-03

    Colleges are rape-prone cultures with high rates of sexual victimization. Fraternities' and sororities' relationships with sexual assault are consistent themes in literature focusing on sexual violence among college students. Previous research suggests that fraternity men are more likely to endorse rape-supportive attitudes compared with non-Greek men or sorority women. The present study examines rape-supportive attitudes as well as rape and sexual assault victimization in college students with a focus on gender and Greek-life (i.e., involvement in fraternities or sororities) status variables. College students (N = 1,002) completed a survey including the Token Resistance to Sex Scale (TRSS), Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale-Short Form (IRMA-S), and items related to past experiences of nonconsensual sex. Two regression models tested predictors of token resistance and rape myth acceptance. Chi-square analyses tested between-group differences of experiencing rape and sexual assault. Gender (p rape myth acceptance than any other group. Chi-square analyses indicate women more frequently report experiences of rape (χ(2) = 25.57, df = 1, p rape myth acceptance and token resistance by Greeks, who influence college party culture, could be contributing to a culture conducive to rape. Findings demonstrate a continued need for interventions focused on shifting sociocultural dynamics (e.g., traditional roles and sexual scripting) on college campuses.

  9. Petition Signed by Thomas A. Edison for Sunday Openings at the World's Columbian Exposition. The Constitution Community: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Linda

    In 1893, in just 184 days, 28 million people, about one-third of the U.S. population, visited the World's Colombian Exposition in Chicago (Illinois). This lesson focuses on petitioning the federal government, peaceably assembling, and exercising freedom of speech and religion, all of which are protected by the First Amendment to the U.S.…

  10. Adherence to a healthy diet according to the world health organization guidelines and all-cause mortality in elderly adults from europe and the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, N.; Geelen, A.; Streppel, M.T.; Groot, L.C.P.G.M. de; Orfanos, P.; Hooven, E.H. van den; Pikhart, H.; Boffetta, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; Bobak, M.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Kee, F.; Franco, O.H.; Park, Y.; Hallmans, G.; Tjonneland, A.; May, A.M.; Pajak, A.; Malyutina, S.; Kubinova, R.; Amiano, P.; Kampman, E.; Feskens, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has formulated guidelines for a healthy diet to prevent chronic diseases and postpone death worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the association between the WHO guidelines, measured using the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI), and all-cause mortality in elderly

  11. The Top Three Valor Awards and the United States Marine Corps: A Study from World War I to Present Day Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    feat was achieved for actions in the Banana Wars in Central America, in World War II (WWII) and in the Korean War. To receive the Navy Cross the... shelling , had more casualties due to explosives such as artillery, land mines, and grenades than to small-arms fire according to the Office of the

  12. Maneuvering the Islamist-Secularist Divide in the Arab World: How the United States Can Preserve Its Interests and Values in an Increasingly Polarized Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    demonstrations against En-Nahda. Some Islamist leaders like Morsi blamed “ rem - nants of the former regimes” for much of this agita- tion. While there is an...and in the first half of 1945, and non-fascist Italians want- ed to show the outside world that Italians themselves could take charge of their...the anti-fascist coalition. The Italian Communist Party, because of its prominent role in 26 the anti-German and anti- Italian fascist resistance

  13. Becoming In/Competent Learners in the United States: Refugee Students' Academic Identities in the Figured World of Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aydin

    2014-01-01

    A practice-based dialectic theory of identity was used in this study to explore the cultural-historical context of an urban charter school in which a group of newly arrived Muslim Turk refugee students' academic identities were formed. The school, located in the Southwestern United States, was founded by a global Islamist movement.…

  14. “Out of Germany”: Flossenbürg Concentration Camp, Jakub’s World (2005, and the Commemoration of the Holocaust in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Stephanie Szlezák

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay addresses survivor stories as formulations of Holocaust memory in the U.S. More specifically, it focuses on the former concentration camp at Flossenbürg in southern Germany. Compared to places like Dachau and Buchenwald in Germany or Auschwitz and Treblinka in Poland, Flossenbürg is often absent from or—if present at all—marginalized in the public and scholarly discourse of Holocaust memory. The heavily autobiographical novel Jakub’s World (2005 tells the story of Jakub Szabmacher, a Jewish boy who is taken from his home in Poland by the Nazis and is eventually interned at Flossenbürg. He survives many months of deprivation and hardship in the concentration camp until U.S. forces liberate it in April 1945; orphaned and homeless, he eventually relocates to the U.S., yet returns to the site of his suffering many times. Reading the book against the backdrop of ongoing debates about Holocaust memory in the U.S., this essay explores structural and plot elements in the book that complicate both a Jewish identity derived from victimhood and the notion of liberation as the moment of ultimate redemption. Both Jakub’s World and the Flossenbürg Concentration Camp Memorial as sites of memory actively partake in the commemoration of the Holocaust, offering narratives that not only complicate the notion of World War II as the “Good War” but also reveal the transnational dimension of memories of the Holocaust. Neither the stories and memories of survivors of the Holocaust at Flossenbürg, nor the visitors to the present-day memorial site, nor the characters central to the memoir can be framed, addressed, or understood in the context of national boundaries.

  15. Trends in College Pricing, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Board, New York, NY.

    This report, based on the College Board's Annual Survey of Colleges, provides updated information on tuition and other expenses associated with attending public and private nonprofit institutions of postsecondary education in the United States in the 2002-2003 academic year. The annual survey is distributed to more than 2,900 postsecondary…

  16. Did Better Colleges Bring Better Jobs? Estimating the Effects of College Quality on Initial Employment for College Graduates in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    The unemployment problem of college students in China has drawn much attention from academics and society. Using the 2011 College Student Labor Market (CSLM) survey data from Tsinghua University, this paper estimated the effects of college quality on initial employment, including employment status and employment unit ownership for fresh college…

  17. An interdependent world

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金碚

    2009-01-01

    The financial crisis that first struck the United States is unfolding into a worldwide economic recession.When the U.S.coughs,the world catches a cold,now a once-in-acentury cold.This is unexpected to most people,including most economists.It is often said that everything in the

  18. The Rise of the Commuter Student: Changing Patterns of College Attendance for Students Living at Home in the United States, 1960-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongbin; Rury, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: American higher education witnessed rapid expansion during the period between 1960 and 1980, as colleges and universities welcomed millions of new students. During the period, the proportion of 19- and 20-year-old students living in dormitories, rooming houses, or other group quarters fell from more than 40% to slightly less…

  19. Mental Health Stigma and Self-Concealment as Predictors of Help-Seeking Attitudes among Latina/o College Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Hadrian; Masuda, Akihiko; Swartout, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined whether mental health stigma and self-concealment are uniquely related to various dimensions of attitudes toward seeking professional psychological services (i.e., help-seeking attitudes) in Latina/o college students. Data from 129 Latina/o undergraduates (76% female) were used in the analysis. Results revealed that mental…

  20. A Review of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and HPV Vaccine-Related Attitudes and Sexual Behaviors among College-Aged Women in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine-related attitudes among college-aged women and the relationship between HPV vaccine uptake and subsequent sexual behaviors. Methods: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar searches were performed from 2006, the date after the first HPV vaccine became available, to…

  1. A Link to the Future: A Pilot Study Look at How Historically Black Colleges and Universities with Journalism and Mass Communications Units Use the Internet in Recruiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jerry, II

    2012-01-01

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have had the ability to recruit African-American students since the 1860s by stressing a sense of inclusion and family through their mission statements and community outreach. There was little to no competition for African-American students from predominantly white institutions until integration…

  2. Translating Sexual Assault Prevention from a College Campus to a United States Military Installation: Piloting the Know-Your-Power Bystander Social Marketing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J.; Stapleton, Jane G.

    2012-01-01

    One population that shares both similar and different characteristics with traditional college-age students is the U.S. Military. Similarities include a high concentration of 18- to 26-year-olds dealing with new found independence, peer pressure, and the presence of social norms that support violence and hypermasculinity. Sexual violence is a…

  3. Mental Health Stigma and Self-Concealment as Predictors of Help-Seeking Attitudes among Latina/o College Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Hadrian; Masuda, Akihiko; Swartout, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined whether mental health stigma and self-concealment are uniquely related to various dimensions of attitudes toward seeking professional psychological services (i.e., help-seeking attitudes) in Latina/o college students. Data from 129 Latina/o undergraduates (76% female) were used in the analysis. Results revealed that mental…

  4. Translating Sexual Assault Prevention from a College Campus to a United States Military Installation: Piloting the Know-Your-Power Bystander Social Marketing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J.; Stapleton, Jane G.

    2012-01-01

    One population that shares both similar and different characteristics with traditional college-age students is the U.S. Military. Similarities include a high concentration of 18- to 26-year-olds dealing with new found independence, peer pressure, and the presence of social norms that support violence and hypermasculinity. Sexual violence is a…

  5. Asian International Students' College Experiences at Universities in the United States: Relationship between Perceived Quality of Personal Contact and Self-Reported Gains in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined associations between Asian international students' perceived quality of contact with faculty, administrative personnel and other students, and self-reported gains in areas identified in "College Students Experience Questionnaire." The sample included 705 Asian students from 25 research universities across the United…

  6. [An Analysis of El Camino College Students According to Their Majors, Perceptions of Academic Relevancy, and Unit and Grade Point Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Jerry

    These three separate studies of students at El Camino College (California) discuss their majors, perceptions of academic relevancy, and grade point characteristics. Sub-groups of students (freshman/sophomore, full-time/part-time) are compared according to their major divisions (physical sciences, fine arts, natural sciences, etc.) and also…

  7. A Review of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and HPV Vaccine-Related Attitudes and Sexual Behaviors among College-Aged Women in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine-related attitudes among college-aged women and the relationship between HPV vaccine uptake and subsequent sexual behaviors. Methods: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar searches were performed from 2006, the date after the first HPV vaccine became available, to…

  8. Emergency Contraceptive Pill (ECP) Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States: Changes since ECP Went Over-the-Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers since ECP went over-the-counter (OTC) in 2006. Related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved, contraindications, follow-up procedures, methods of advertising, and staff attitudes, were…

  9. Cross-Cultural Validity of the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised on the College Students in the United States and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Kamile Bahar

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the cultural validity of the almost perfect scale-revised (APS-R) with 300 Turkish and 300 American and international college students. First, the validity of the original APS-R was conducted on American students and international students. Hence, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) offered two-factor scale to be consistent…

  10. The Female Image in the Literature of the Soviet Union and the United States in World War II%苏美二战文学中的女性形象

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭志清

    2015-01-01

    在世界文学的发展史上,战争对文学产生的影响浸入文学作品的创作中,改变着文学作品的内涵及所表达的思想价值。第二次世界大战波及众多国家,特别是对美国和苏联的文学产生了深远的影响,这两个国家的作家立足战争,分析和反思战争中的各种因素,创作出了一系列优秀的文学作品。这些文学作品中不同程度地塑造了战争中的女性形象。本文通过阐述第二次世界大战中苏美文学的创作概况,结合具体的作品分析苏美二战文学中的女性形象,比较并总结苏美二战文学中的女性形象。%In the history of world literature,the literature from the impact of war on in literature changes the meaning of literary works and the ideological value of expression.The second world war spread to many countries,especially the far -reaching im-pact on the American and Soviet literature,the two countries based on the analysis of various factors of war writers and reflec-tion in the war,which created a series of outstanding literary works.These literary works in different degree shaped the image of women in the war.This paper describes the creation of the Second World War in Soviet literature,combining with the specif-ic works analysis of female images in the literature of the Soviet Union and the United States in World War II.It compares and summarizes the female images in the literature of the Soviet Union and the United States in World War II.

  11. Nonwaged peasants in the modern world-system: African households as dialectical units of capitalist exploitation and indigenous resistance, 1890-1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma A. Dunaway

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Colonialism did not transform African peasants into waged labor.A majority of peasants worked as forced laborers, often unpaid, and they returned to their agricultural household labor as soon as they completed work assignments mandated by the colonizers. Colonial Africans resided in mixed livelihood households in which nonwaged labor forms (both free and unfree predominated, and very few became dependent on wages. For a majority of colonial Africans, informal sector activities, tenancy,sharecropping, and subsistence production on communal plots were not temporary nonwaged forms on an inevitable path toward proletarianization.Wage earning was not the primary mechanism through which thesehouseholds were integrated into the modern world-system. Instead, these households primarily provided nonwaged labors to capitalist commodity chains that, in turn, extracted surpluses from them and externalized costs of production to them.

  12. The New Solar System: China’s Evolving Solar Industry and Its Implications for Competitive Solar Power in the United States and the World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Jeffrey [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Reicher, Dan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Sun, Xiaojing [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Pollock, Caitlin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Solar power is undergoing a revolution. Over the past decade, an energy source as old as the planet and theoretically all but limitless has plummeted in cost and begun in some places to be harnessed in large volume. This dynamic is disrupting the modern energy system and, as energy disruptions always do, rattling the geopolitical order. In the process, the industry that produces the equipment to convert sunlight into electricity is simultaneously reeling, consolidating, and surging. These twin transformations—one of the global energy system, one of the global solar industry—carry profound implications for national economies and for the planet. At the center of both transformations sits China. The New Solar System illuminates key and little- understood changes that are remaking the solar enterprise—in China and thus in the world. Based on this analysis, it recommends changes in U.S. solar policy—particularly timely with a new U.S. administration and Congress—that would put solar power on a more economically sensible path toward environmentally significant growth. The New Solar System does not seek to enable any country to beat another in the global solar industry. It seeks instead to help all countries find their most effective places. By better understanding and playing to their comparative strengths in the solar business, countries would achieve two key objectives. They would reduce the cost for the world of scaling up solar power. And they would be better positioned to fashion policies that maximized the long-term benefit to their own economies from solar’s global growth.

  13. Superhabitable Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host star...

  14. Reauthorization of the Tribally Controlled Community College Assistance Act of 1978. Hearing on S. 2167 To Reauthorize the Tribally Controlled College Assistance Act of 1978 and the Navajo Community College Act [and on] S. 2213 To Increase the Federal Contribution to the Tribally Controlled Community College Endowment Program, before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session (Bismarck, North Dakota, April 9, 1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    Testimony on two bills dealing with federal funding for American Indian tribally controlled colleges is reported. Introduced by Senator John McCain (Arizona), S. 2167 seeks to reauthorize the Tribally Controlled Community College Assistance Act of 1978 and the Navajo Community College Act. Introduced by Senator Kent Conrad (North Dakota), S. 2213…

  15. Food and My World: My Health My World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Denk, James; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World Series. It explores environmental issues, focusing on food and the environment. The unit includes (1) an activities guide for teachers entitled, "Food and My World," which presents activity-based lessons that entice students to discover concepts in…

  16. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part I. Targeting quality improvement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-02-01

    The business community has developed strategies to ensure the quality of the goods or services they produce and to improve the management of multidisciplinary work teams. With modification, many of these techniques can be imported into intensive care units (ICUs) to improve clinical operations and patient safety. In Part I of a three-part ATS Seminar series, we argue for adopting business management strategies in ICUs and set forth strategies for targeting selected quality improvement initiatives. These tools are relevant to health care today as focus is placed on limiting low-value care and measuring, reporting, and improving quality. In the ICU, the complexity of illness and the need to standardize processes make these tools even more appealing. Herein, we highlight four techniques to help prioritize initiatives. First, the "80/20 rule" mandates focus on the few (20%) interventions likely to drive the majority (80%) of improvement. Second, benchmarking--a process of comparison with peer units or institutions--is essential to identifying areas of strength and weakness. Third, root cause analyses, in which structured retrospective reviews of negative events are performed, can be used to identify and fix systems errors. Finally, failure mode and effects analysis--a process aimed at prospectively identifying potential sources of error--allows for systems fixes to be instituted in advance to prevent negative outcomes. These techniques originated in fields other than health care, yet adoption has and can help ICU managers prioritize issues for quality improvement.

  17. Colleges and Cable Franchising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Neal D.

    After noting issues of audience appeal and financial and philosophical support for educational broadcasting, this paper urges community colleges to play an active role in the process of cable franchising. The paper first describes a cable franchise as a contract between a government unit and the cable television (CATV) company which specifies what…

  18. College Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    College life involves excitement, along with new challenges, risks, and responsibilities. You are meeting new people, learning ... stay healthy and safe while you're in college: Eat a balanced diet Get enough sleep Get ...

  19. Lead poisoning in cattle, horses, cats, and dogs as reported by 11 colleges of veterinary medicine in the United States and Canada from July, 1968, through June 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priester, W.A.; Hayes, H.M.

    1974-04-01

    During the 4-year period July 1, 1968, through June 30, 1972, 162 diagnoses of lead poisoning in domesticated animals were made at 11 colleges of veterinary medicine in the US and Canada. Although significant differences were not seen in relative frequency of lead poisoning among the 4 years included, there were significant differences between the 11 schools; however, a regular pattern of geographic distribution was not identified.

  20. Effects of Resistance Training on Muscle Strength, Endurance, and Motor Unit According to Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Polymorphism in Male College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ae-Rim Hong, Sang-Min Hong, Yun-A Shin

    2014-01-01

    Changes in muscle mass and strength across the adult age span are variable and related to the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) genotype. In particular, a single CNTF haplotype (1357 G→A) is important for neuronal and muscular developments and may be associated with muscle strength response to resistance training. We examined whether CNTF genotype differentially influences the effect of resistance training on neuromuscular improvement in male college students. Resistance training of the uppe...

  1. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  2. College Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Harmful and Underage College Drinking Drinking affects college students, their families, and college communities at large. Researchers estimate that ... heavy drinking and alcohol-related consequences because of student expectations and social pressures at the start of the academic year. How ...

  3. College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Marisa; Galvan-De Leon, Vanessa; Solis, Judith; Mundy, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    During the 79th Texas Legislature, the bill "Advancement of College Readiness in Curriculum" was passed (THECB). As a response to this, high schools and colleges have combined forming an early college high school. The result of this union was a program that condensed the time it took to complete both the high school diploma and up to two…

  4. Virtual Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Novák, František

    2009-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis is focused on highlighting the development of virtual worlds. The paper summarizes the evolution of virtual reality. Current virtual worlds are compared in fundamental aspects, such as sociology, economics and education. Social sphere describes the interaction in virtual reality and its specialities. Economical sphere is focused on comparison of real and virtual economies, including their economic indicators. Educational sphere describes the sciences, which are best usea...

  5. Space exploration and world peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, C.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of using space exploration as an instrument in procuring world peace is studied. Suggestions for obtaining such a peace, utilizing space programs, include removal of worldwide educational and communication barriers, building of an emotionally and socially stable society, creation of a unit or whole world rather than the mine and yours concept, and reevaluation and reorientation of human relations and values.

  6. Authentic Learning and Alien Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sara D.; Watt, Keith; Gleim, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Glendale Community College has developed a laboratory course and observing program which provides non-science majors with opportunities to perform authentic science in a community college setting. The program is designed around experiential learning which allows students to meaningfully construct concepts within contexts that involve real-world problems that are relevant to the learner. Students learn observational astronomy and data analysis techniques by observing exoplanet transits using 8-inch Celestron telescopes. The exoplanet data gathered and analyzed by the students is contributed to the exoplanet database. This poster presents an overview of the program and highlights early educational results.

  7. Collapse of a Multinational State: The Case of Yugoslavia. A Curriculum Unit for History and Social Studies. Recommended for Grades 9 through Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Reinhold; And Others

    This curriculum unit teaches students about nationalism within the context of Europe and is designed to help better understand the history of Yugoslavia and why Yugoslavia fell apart. The unit focuses on Yugoslavia as a multinational state and how the federation was organized during different historical time periods. There are three lessons in the…

  8. Nationalism and Identity in a European Context. A Curriculum Unit for History and Social Studies Recommended for Grades 9-Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Reinhold

    This unit is designed to help students better understand the concept of nationalism and the powerful influence it has on group sentiments today. Nationalism can be a positive or negative force, providing avenues for either inclusion or exclusion of peoples. The unit focuses on the basic concepts of nationalism and identity by drawing upon historic…

  9. Collapse of a Multinational State: The Case of Yugoslavia. A Curriculum Unit for History and Social Studies. Recommended for Grades 9 through Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Reinhold; And Others

    This curriculum unit teaches students about nationalism within the context of Europe and is designed to help better understand the history of Yugoslavia and why Yugoslavia fell apart. The unit focuses on Yugoslavia as a multinational state and how the federation was organized during different historical time periods. There are three lessons in the…

  10. The historical evolution and stage-specific characteristics of college physical education in the United States%美国大学体育的历史沿革及阶段性特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    边宇; 刘明; 吕红芳

    2013-01-01

    By generalizing, analyzing and systemizing literature data about the history of physical education in the United States, the authors concluded that the historical evolution of college physical education in the United States can be divided into three stages, namely, formation stage, localization stage and diversification stage. The character-istics of the formation stage were scientized, diversified, and de-religion;the characteristic of the localization stage was the legalization of “Americanized” fundamental appeals, systemized philosophical foundations and sports competitions;the characteristics of the diversification stage were repeated and government dominated. The source of power for the historical evolution of college physical education in the United States was the changing of physical education ideology;the overall trend of stage-specific characteristics was the evolution from instrumental values to ontological values.%  通过对美国体育史文献的归纳、分析与整理,认为美国大学体育的历史沿革可分为形成、本土化和多元化3个阶段。形成阶段的特征是科学化、多样化和去宗教化;本土化阶段的特征是“美国化”根本诉求、系统化的哲学基础和体育竞赛的法制化;多元化阶段的特征是反复化和政府化。美国大学体育历史沿革的动力来源是体育思想的转变,阶段性特征的整体趋势是从工具价值到本体价值的演进。

  11. The paradox of cooling streams in a warming world: regional climate trends do not parallel variable local trends in stream temperature in the Pacific continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi, Ivan; Johnson, Sherri; Dunham, Jason B.; Haggerty, Roy; Hockman-Wert, David

    2012-01-01

    Temperature is a fundamentally important driver of ecosystem processes in streams. Recent warming of terrestrial climates around the globe has motivated concern about consequent increases in stream temperature. More specifically, observed trends of increasing air temperature and declining stream flow are widely believed to result in corresponding increases in stream temperature. Here, we examined the evidence for this using long-term stream temperature data from minimally and highly human-impacted sites located across the Pacific continental United States. Based on hypothesized climate impacts, we predicted that we should find warming trends in the maximum, mean and minimum temperatures, as well as increasing variability over time. These predictions were not fully realized. Warming trends were most prevalent in a small subset of locations with longer time series beginning in the 1950s. More recent series of observations (1987-2009) exhibited fewer warming trends and more cooling trends in both minimally and highly human-influenced systems. Trends in variability were much less evident, regardless of the length of time series. Based on these findings, we conclude that our perspective of climate impacts on stream temperatures is clouded considerably by a lack of long-termdata on minimally impacted streams, and biased spatio-temporal representation of existing time series. Overall our results highlight the need to develop more mechanistic, process-based understanding of linkages between climate change, other human impacts and stream temperature, and to deploy sensor networks that will provide better information on trends in stream temperatures in the future.

  12. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  13. Comparison of values of traditionally measured venous bicarbonate with calculated arterial bicarbonate in intensive care unit patients of a hospital in a third-world country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheeda Nargis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Measurement of serum or plasma bicarbonate (HCO3− from a sample of peripheral venous blood is routinely practiced in hospital patient managements. HCO3− status can also be obtained by a simple calculation during blood gas analysis requiring arterial blood as sample which is cumbersome for both patient and doctor. This study compared the measured bicarbonate levels with calculated arterial values in intensive care unit (ICU patients to determine whether traditionally measured venous HCO3− and calculated HCO3− values [from arterial blood gas (ABG analyzers] can be used interchangeably. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. A total of 56 adult patients with diverse medical conditions, presenting at the ICU of the health centre were enrolled in this study when deemed by the treating physician to have an ABG analysis. Arterial and venous samples were taken as close in time as possible for gas analysis and routine blood tests. Results: The HCO3− levels from ABG and traditionally measured serum showed acceptably narrow 95% limits of agreement using the Bland-Altman method. Conclusions: More widely prescribed venous HCO3− measurements can also be a useful substitute for an expensive ABG analyzer in resource-constrained health care sectors when required. However, accuracy of venous blood in assessment of additional ABG parameters is yet to be discovered.

  14. Annual costs of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors using real-world data in a commercially insured population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabert, Vernon F; Watson, Crystal; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Goodman, Seth; Fox, Kathleen M; Harrison, David J

    2012-01-01

    . Based on this analysis of real-world use of TNF-inhibitors among patients in nationwide clinical practice settings, the annual TNF-inhibitor cost per treated patient was lowest for etanercept across all indications.

  15. Standards for nurse staffing in critical care units determined by: The British Association of Critical Care Nurses, The Critical Care Networks National Nurse Leads, Royal College of Nursing Critical Care and In-flight Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Kate; Wren, Ian; Baldwin, Andrea; St Ledger, Una; Gibson, Vanessa; Goodman, Sheila; Walsh, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Since 1967 the gold standard for nurse staffing levels in intensive care and subsequently critical care units has been one nurse for each patient. However, critical care has changed substantially since that time and in recent years this standard has been challenged. Previously individual nursing organisations such as the British Association of Critical Care Nurses (BACCN) and the Royal College of Nursing have produced guidance on staffing levels for critical care units. This paper represents the first time all three UK Professional Critical Care Associations have collaborated to produce standards for nurse staffing in critical care units. These standards have evolved from previous works and are endorsed by BACCN, Critical Care Networks National Nurse Leads Group (CC3N) and the Royal College of Nursing Critical Care and In-flight Forum. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the much more detailed document 'Standards for Nurse Staffing in Critical Care', which can be found on the BACCN web site at www.baccn.org.uk. The full paper has extensively reviewed the evidence, whereas this short paper provides essential detail and the 12 standard statements. Representation was sort from each of the critical care associations. The authors extensively reviewed the literature using the terms: (1) critical care nursing, (2) nursing, (3) nurse staffing, (4) skill mix, (5) adverse events, (6) health care assistants and critical care, (7) length of stay, (8) critical care, (9) intensive care, (10) technology, (11) infection control. Comprehensive review of the evidence has culminated in 12 standard statements endorsed by BACCN, CC3N and the Royal College of Nursing Critical Care and In-flight Forum. The standards act as a reference for nursing staff, managers and commissioners associated with critical care to provide and support safe patient care. The review of the evidence has shown that the contribution of nursing can be difficult to measure and consequently support

  16. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part II. Quality-improvement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    The success of quality-improvement projects relies heavily on both project design and the metrics chosen to assess change. In Part II of this three-part American Thoracic Society Seminars series, we begin by describing methods for determining which data to collect, tools for data presentation, and strategies for data dissemination. As Avedis Donabedian detailed a half century ago, defining metrics in healthcare can be challenging; algorithmic determination of the best type of metric (outcome, process, or structure) can help intensive care unit (ICU) managers begin this process. Choosing appropriate graphical data displays (e.g., run charts) can prompt discussions about and promote quality improvement. Similarly, dashboards/scorecards are useful in presenting performance improvement data either publicly or privately in a visually appealing manner. To have compelling data to show, ICU managers must plan quality-improvement projects well. The second portion of this review details four quality-improvement tools-checklists, Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen. Checklists have become commonplace in many ICUs to improve care quality; thinking about how to maximize their effectiveness is now of prime importance. Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen are techniques that use multidisciplinary teams to organize thinking about process improvement, formalize change strategies, actualize initiatives, and measure progress. None originated within healthcare, but each has been used in the hospital environment with success. To conclude this part of the series, we demonstrate how to use these tools through an example of improving the timely administration of antibiotics to patients with sepsis.

  17. ABCs in College English Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李利文

    2011-01-01

    As is known to us all, human beings are always brought under control by such many things as the hormone in our body, the mood produced in our brain and the external world, which leads us to a topic of how to create an atmosphere for the undergraduates to fit well in with the college English education. In our teaching management, the ABCs about college English education works as an assistant. Here, ABCs about college English education refer to some fundamental skills with regard to the undergraduates English education. The ABCs, which always encourage students' involvement, would work effectively if teachers understand them well.

  18. The World Science Festival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmino, J.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) New York City in the late 20th century rose to be a planetary capital for the sciences, not just astronomy. This growth was mainly in the academic sector but a parallel growth occurred in the public and home field. With the millennium crossing, scientists in New York agitated for a celebration of the City as a place for a thriving science culture. In 2008 they began World Science Festival. 2011 is the fourth running, on June 1-5, following the AAVSO/AAS meetings. World Science Festival was founded by Dr. Brian Greene, Columbia University, and is operated through the World Science Foundation. The Festival is "saturation science" all over Manhattan in a series of lectures, shows, exhibits, performances. It is staged in "science" venues like colleges and musea, but also in off-science spaces like theaters and galleries. It is a blend from hard science, with lectures like those by us astronomers, to science-themed works of art, dance, music. Events are fitted for the public, either for free or a modest fee. While almost all events are on Manhattan, effort has been made to geographically disperse them, even to the outer boroughs. The grand finale of World Science Festival is a street fair in Washington Square. Science centers in booths, tents, and pavilions highlight their work. In past years this fair drew 100,000 to 150,000 visitors. The entire Festival attracts about a quarter-million attendees. NYSkies is a proud participant at the Washington Square fair. It interprets the "Earth to the Universe" display, debuting during IYA-2009. Attendance at "Earth..." on just the day of the fair plausibly is half of all visitors in America. The presentation shows the scale and scope of World Science Festival, its relation to the City, and how our astronomers work with it.

  19. United Front Work on Returned Chinese Brains in Colleges and Universities under New Situation%新形势下做好高校留学归国人员统战工作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴飞; 张海芳

    2016-01-01

    The returned brains are the new focus of the united front work at present .The features of re‐turned brains in colleges and universities were analyzed ,and then the measures of the united front work on the returned Chinese brains were elaborated as follows :strengthening political guidance so as to consoli‐date the ideological and political foundation ,upholding people‐oriented principle so as to create a good en‐vironment for exploiting their talents ,establishing a sound mechanism of the united front work on the re‐turned brains ,strengthening the cultivation of representatives and lead them to participate politics and so‐ciety .%当前,留学归国人员是统战工作新的着力点。分析新形势下高校留学归国人员的特点,进一步阐述了做好高校留学归国人员统战工作的措施与对策:加强政治引领,夯实思想政治基础;坚持以人为本,为留学归国人员施展才华创造良好环境;建立健全留学归国人员统战工作载体和机制;加强代表性人士的培养,引导他们参与政治和社会生活。

  20. World Englishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张严心; 周丽

    2014-01-01

    In the current days, the search for information and the need for global communication have already promoted English from being the language of people in different countries as the international language. This essay will give some arguments about the inevitability of variety of world Englishes and its characteristics, and then explain that what Standard English is and examples about the standards in English.

  1. A Partnership for a Community College in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrink, Carmen L.; Whitford, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes the results of case study research on a partnership between a community college in the United States and a university in Chile that attempted to develop the first community college system in Chile.

  2. Context, "Cuckoo's Nest," and the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The community college is an excellent place for the creation of a special, more empowering learning context. Unlike the university, where students are supposed to adjust to the world of scholarly erudition, the community college is the crazy academic brother that has the freedom to be different and to liberate students to build upon their own…

  3. [The concept of the organ, as a hierarchal unit of human body, and its place in teaching histology at the medical university and medical college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miadelets, O D; Miadelets, N Ia; Miadelets, V O

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the methodological aspects of teaching histology at the medical university and medical college. The authors raise the issue of the necessity of teaching of the topic "Introduction to Special Histology" and the inclusion of the appropriate chapter into the textbooks. This is important for the students, as the formation of the general concepts of organ structure and function, components, and classification will aid in the further study of specific organs during the course of Special Histology. The authors describe their own experience in teaching of the section, dedicated to the general regularities of organ structure, present some definitions and classifications that are used by them for a number of years.

  4. Factors associated with smoking frequency among current waterpipe smokers in the United States: Findings from the National College Health Assessment II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, M Rifat; Salloum, Ramzi G; Islam, Farahnaz; Ortiz, Kasim S; Kates, Frederick R; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    Some waterpipe smokers exhibit nicotine dependent behaviors such as increased use over time and inability to quit, placing them at high risk of adverse health outcomes. This study examines the determinants of dependence by measuring frequency of use among current waterpipe smokers using a large national U.S. Data were drawn from four waves (Spring/Fall 2009 and Spring/Fall 2010) of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment datasets. The sample was restricted to students who smoked a waterpipe at least once in the past 30 days (N=19,323). Ordered logistic regression modeled the factors associated with higher frequency of waterpipe smoking. Among current waterpipe smokers, 6% used a waterpipe daily or almost daily (20-29 days). Daily cigarette smokers were at higher odds of smoking a waterpipe at higher frequencies compared with non-smokers of cigarettes (OR=1.81; 95% CI=1.61-2.04). There was a strong association between daily cigar smoking and higher frequency of waterpipe smoking (OR=7.77; 95% CI=5.49-11.02). Similarly, students who used marijuana had higher odds of smoking a waterpipe at higher frequencies (OR=1.57; 95% CI=1.37-1.81). Daily consumers of other addictive substances are at a higher risk of intensive waterpipe smoking and thus higher risk of waterpipe dependence. Intervention programs must incorporate methods to reduce waterpipe dependence and subsequently prevent its deleterious health effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. "World-Mindedness": The Lisle Fellowship and the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in…

  6. "World-Mindedness": The Lisle Fellowship and the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in particular,…

  7. "World-Mindedness": The Lisle Fellowship and the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in…

  8. Practice and Cognition to Strengthen College Students' Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wanbin

    2009-01-01

    College students' ideological morality always is the hotspot concerned by various circles of the society, and to strengthen and improve the ideological and moral education in colleges, continually enhance the pertinence and actual effect of the moral education, help college students to dissolve their worldly confusion in moral culture, further…

  9. Liberal Arts Colleges in the Tumultuous 1940s: Institutional Identity and the Challenges of War and Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Jordan R.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the experiences of four private, liberal arts colleges--Dartmouth College, Earlham College, Franklin & Marshall College, and Swarthmore College--before, during, and after World War II to identify the adaptive policies implemented to meet the challenges that accompanied the war and its aftermath. Identification of these…

  10. Advisory Councils for Business Colleges: Composition and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Dee Ann; Elbert, Dennis J.; Moser, Steven

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge facing business colleges is keeping up with the rapid changes in the business world. Business advisory councils provide an important link between business colleges and the business world. This study was conducted to gather data on the composition and utilization of these councils. The results reveal that there is widespread use…

  11. Plants and Medicines. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  12. The World Soil Museum: education and advocacy on soils of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, Stephan; Land, Hiske

    2013-04-01

    The World Soil Museum (WSM) in Wageningen, is part of ISRIC World Soil Information and was founded in 1966 on request of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the International Soil Science Society. The World Soil Museum has a collection of over 1100 soil profiles from more than 70 countries. This soil profiles are vertical sections and show the composition, layering and structure of the soil. The collection is unique in the world and includes a significant number of soil profiles from the Netherlands. The Dutch soil collection is important for serving broader visitor groups, as some visitors, such as secondary school classes, are specifically interested in the Dutch landscape and soils. Broadly speaking, the World Soil Museum has five functions: (i) education and courses, (ii) research, (iii) information and edutainment, (iv) social function, and (v) a real museum function (Art). The World Soil Museum (World Soil Museum) is well known in national and international circles soil and the English name has almost 1,000 references on the Internet. The World Soil Museum is visited by about 1000 people a year, mainly university and college students from Western Europe. Other visitor groups that have found their way to the museum are students from disciplines broader then soil science, such as geography and rural development. Secondary school classes visit the museum for geography classes. The uniqueness and the value of the collection of soil profiles (soil monoliths) and associated collections, such as soil samples, hand pieces, thin sections, slides, is emphasized by the fact ISRIC is the only World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils) within the World Data System of the International Council of Science (ICSU). The collection provides an insight in and overview of the diversity of soils in the world, their properties and their limitations and possibilities for use. A new building is under construction for the WSM, which is

  13. Study guide for college algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, James W; Shapiro, Arnold

    1981-01-01

    Study Guide for College Algebra is a supplemental material for the basic text, College Algebra. Its purpose is to make the learning of college algebra and trigonometry easier and enjoyable.The book provides detailed solutions to exercises found in the text. Students are encouraged to use the study guide as a learning tool during the duration of the course, a reviewer prior to an exam, a reference book, and as a quick overview before studying a section of the text. The Study Guide and Solutions Manual consists of four major components: basic concepts that should be learned from each unit, what

  14. A Historical Analysis of Basic Air Force Doctrine Education within the United States States Air Force Air Command and Staff College, 1947-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    doctrine, especially joint doctrine. Because of this we make mistakes. I believe that the Air Force needs to develop a formal doctrinallo education...jresenteo arguments for all three points of view, but ne was particularly critical of tne educacional system within tae United States military. He said tnat...leveIls cioles may very w/conflict of response formalized according to conflict: general war, tactical nuclear war, conventional war, war of counter

  15. Sophie's World

    OpenAIRE

    Nadja Dobnik

    1999-01-01

    ln this contribution, the author of­ fers a description of the book Zofia's World, by the Norwegian professor of philosophy, Jostein Gaarder, a work which is treated in literary theory mainly as an interesting post-modernist novel, since it would appear to be a presentation of the history of philosophy in the popular form of a novel. The author of this paper, however, sees far more in the book, which is indeed an exceptional philosophy textbook for independent study. It is, really, a correspo...

  16. UNESCO: Bridging Three World-Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    deJong-Lambert, William

    2006-01-01

    The history of international education is intimately connected to the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union during the second half of the twentieth century. Graduate programs established at colleges and universities in the United States were the outgrowth of a need to create cosmopolitan experts, capable of demonstrating the…

  17. Comparative Study on Effectiveness of First Attack Tactics between China and United States in 2011 Women World Cup%2011年女排世界杯中、美一攻战术效果比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐金根

    2012-01-01

    Through using the method of literature review and video analysis, this paper makes analysis on first at-tack tactics between China and United States in 2011 women's Volleyball World Cup. The results show that the Chinese team and the American team use the fixed 3 receivers. The attack on the Chinese team to attack tactics for dominant, but the main setter at the front, it is difficult to play the advantage of attack tactics. The United States team attack tactics, the two offenses are more balanced, no obvious weak point of attack. In spiking with protec-tion, American team up to protect players are 3 receiving member served in personnel collocation, is superior to the Chinese team.%运用文献资料法和录像解析法,分析2011女排世界杯中关一攻战术情况。结果表明:中国队和美国队都采用固定3人接发球。进攻上中国队以战术攻为主导,但主二传处于前排时,难以发挥战术进攻的优势。美国队战术攻,强攻两种进攻方式较为均衡,没明显弱的进攻点。在扣球跟上保护方面,美国队跟上保护队员都是3名接发球队员充当,在人员搭配上优于中国队。

  18. 美国大学生公民教育的经验与启示%Experience of and enlightenment from college students'citizen education in the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武青青; 张雪蓉

    2012-01-01

    Citizen education in the United States is more mature. It has reasonable and standard education con- tent and unique teaching approaches. What's more, it can implement effectively service learning. Drawing from A- merican experience, we can improve the effectiveness of Chinese college students'citizen education in the following terms: enriching the education content by increasing citizen knowledge, training citizen skills and cultivating citizen consciousness; clarifying college students'citizen education goals from developing citizen subjectivity, political par- ticipation and morality; and setting up reasonable curriculum and strengthening social practice.%美国的公民教育比较成熟,具有合理规范的教育内容,教育方式独特,能有效实施服务学习等特点。借鉴美国公民教育的经验,可以从以下方面提高我国当代大学生公民教育的有效性:通过传授公民知识、训练公民技能和培育公民意识来丰富公民教育的内容;从培养公民的主体性、政治参与性和道德性三个方面明确大学生公民教育目标;合理设置大学生公民教育的课程,加强社会实践环节。

  19. Pulling Rank: A Plan to Help Students with College Choice in an Age of Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Lloyd

    2008-01-01

    Colleges and universities are "ranksteering"--driving under the influence of popular college rankings systems like "U.S. News and World Report's" Best Colleges. This article examines the criticisms of college rankings and describes how a group of education leaders is honing a plan to end the tyranny of the ratings game and better help students and…

  20. Virtual World Astrosociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    2010-01-01

    This essay introduces the opportunity for theory development and even empirical research on some aspects of astrosociology through today's online virtual worlds. The examples covered present life on other planets or in space itself, in a manner that can be experienced by the user and where the user's reactions may simulate to some degree future human behavior in real extraterrestrial environments: Tabula Rasa, Anarchy Online, Entropia Universe, EVE Online, StarCraft and World of Warcraft. Ethnographic exploration of these computerized environments raises many questions about the social science both of space exploration and of direct contact with extraterrestrials. The views expressed in this essay do not necessarily represent the views of the National Science Foundation or the United States.

  1. An audit of obstetric admissions to intensive care unit in a medical college hospital of central India: lessons in preventing maternal morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Jain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The spectrum of causes leading to maternal morbidity and mortality may be well reflected in the clinical profile of obstetric patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. An audit of these patients may help in devising intervention strategies and implementing preventive measures. This is expected to contribute to the ongoing concerted multipronged efforts towards reducing maternal mortality as a step towards the millennium development goals. The aim was to study the clinical and demographic profile of antenatal and postpartum women requiring admission to the ICU, the interventions required in these women and the final outcome. The overall goal is to identify the contributing factors towards maternal morbidity and mortality. Methods: A retrospective analysis of hospital records of all antenatal, post-abortal and postpartum women admitted to the ICU at People's hospital, Bhopal over a period of 3 years (June 2011 to May 2014. Results: A total of 157 records were identified and analyzed: 22 (14% antenatal, seven (4% post-abortion, 114 (73% postpartum, and 14(9% post-laparotomy women. The mean age was 25 years (Range 18-38 years; SD 4.49, two thirds being from rural areas. Majority (78% had no earlier visit. The gestational age at admission to ICU ranged from 6-43 weeks (Mean 31 weeks; SD 9.06. One third (24% of patients had severe anemia, 18 patients needed ventilation, 25 required inotropic support, 4 required dialysis and 17 underwent surgical intervention. Blood or blood component therapy was needed in 60% cases with total blood units transfused being 225. The average duration of stay in intensive care unit was 79 hours. Analyzing as organ-system dysfunctions: Cardiovascular dysfunction (22%, hematological (20%, hepatic (16%, neurological (11%, septicemia (11%, renal (9%. There were 19 maternal deaths. Conclusions: Maternal anemia and consequences still contribute significantly to maternal morbidity. Non-utilization of

  2. Green Richland: Building Sustainable Local and World Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Carole N.

    2008-01-01

    This article shares the college's experiences and the lessons learned in the creation of the GREENRichland Program and the other approaches to building sustainability. These programs directly support the college's vision to be the best place to learn, teach, and build sustainable local and world community. This discussion features details…

  3. Recueil des legislations linguistiques dans le monde. Tome VI: La Colombie, les Etats-Unis, le Mexique, Porto Rico at les traites internationaux (Record of World Language-Related Legislation. Volume VI: Colombia, the United States, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and International Treaties).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jacques, Ed.; Maurais, Jacques, Ed.

    The volume is one of a series of six listing language-related legislation around the world. It contains the texts, in French, of laws of Colombia, the United States federal and some state governments (California, Florida, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and New York), Mexico, and Puerto Rico, and those relating to international…

  4. The World in Our Own Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David W.

    This paper considers the student population in the two year college, their problems, and the factors affecting their success. Stress, among these students, takes all kinds of different forms and is derived from all kinds of different sources. Today's students live in a world of casual isolation and anonymity; they do not have the family ties that…

  5. 世界大学城协作的高职英语写作教学模式研究%Vocational College English Writing Teaching Model of the World University City Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨高云

    2012-01-01

    本研究以高职英语写作教学为目标,世界大学城为支撑,尝试基于世界大学城的高职学生英语写作能力的培养,试图探索一种新型的高职英语写作教学模式。%Vocational teaching of English writing, the world university city as the support, try the world university city students' English writing ability, trying to explore a new type of vocational English writing teaching mode.

  6. Food Safety Tips for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Food Safety Tips for College Students When students pack up ...

  7. Mental Health and Substance Use of Sexual Minority College Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Davoren, Ann Kearns

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assess the mental health and substance use of sexual minority collegiate student-athletes in the United States, as compared with heterosexual college students and heterosexual student-athletes. Participants: Undergraduate students (N = 196,872) who completed the American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment…

  8. The Role of Collectivism among Latino American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Irving; So, Dominicus; McNaughton-Cassill, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to explain the lower Latino college graduation rate, the current study focuses on collectivism in kin and nonkin helping situations. The sample comprised 60 students at a 4-year college in the southwestern United States. Results revealed significance between ethnicity and nonkin collectivism: Latino American college students were…

  9. Typology of State-Level Community College Governance Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jeffrey A.; Friedel, Janice Nahra

    2017-01-01

    Despite having a well-documented history about community colleges across the United States, relatively few discussions have covered state-level governance structures. To understand the typology of state community college governance structures, it must first be recognized that community college governance is characterized as a complex web of…

  10. 一战后美国对中东欧的粮食外交%The United States" Food Diplomacy toward the Central and Eastern Europe after World War I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐振伟

    2011-01-01

    一战后,美国在赫伯特·胡佛的领导下通过美国粮食署对中东欧国家开展了大规模的粮食外交,其针对的对象不仅包括战败国德国,也包括东欧新独立国家。美国推行的粮食外交一方面出于维护其在欧洲利益的需要,使欧洲建立代议制民主政体,从而抵制苏俄社会主义的影响和渗透,另一方面也出于经济和人道主义的考虑。美国的粮食外交部分地实现了自己的目标,也产生了深远的影响。%The United States conducted large - scale food diplomacy by WFP under the leadership of Herbert Hoover after World War I, which targeted not only the defeated Germany, but also the newly independent countries in the Eastern Eu- rope. The USA implemented the food diplomacy on the one hand for the maintenance of U. S. diplomatic interests in Eu- rope to make the establishment of regime of representative democracy in Europe, to resist the impact of the socialist Soviet Union, on the other hand for the economic and humanitarian reasons, which achieved their goals partially, also had a pro- found impact.

  11. World knowledge affects prediction as quickly as selectional restrictions: Evidence from the visual world paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Evelyn; Warren, Tessa; Dickey, Michael Walsh

    There has been considerable debate regarding the question of whether linguistic knowledge and world knowledge are separable and used differently during processing or not (Hagoort, Hald, Bastiaansen, & Petersson, 2004; Matsuki et al., 2011; Paczynski & Kuperberg, 2012; Warren & McConnell, 2007; Warren, McConnell, & Rayner, 2008). Previous investigations into this question have provided mixed evidence as to whether violations of selectional restrictions are detected earlier than violations of world knowledge. We report a visual-world eye-tracking study comparing the timing of facilitation contributed by selectional restrictions versus world knowledge. College-aged adults (n=36) viewed photographs of natural scenes while listening to sentences. Participants anticipated upcoming direct objects similarly regardless of whether facilitation was provided by only world knowledge or a combination of selectional restrictions and world knowledge. These results suggest that selectional restrictions are not available earlier in comprehension than world knowledge.

  12. Witches in the Atlantic World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslaw, Elaine

    2003-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan that focuses on witchcraft in the Atlantic world. Describes each of the four sections of the lesson that encompasses learning about terms and religious views on witchcraft to the history of witchcraft in New England, in the United States, and the Salem (Massachusetts) witchcraft trials. (CMK)

  13. Water research for the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Halem, D.

    2013-01-01

    Let’s start with the United Nations Millennium Development Goals Report 2012. Remember the target? Halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Thanks to China and India the world has met the drinking water target in 2010, b

  14. Iowa and World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the children's quarterly magazine, "The Goldfinch," focuses on World War I. A brief discussion of how the United States came to enter the War is followed by a discussion of propaganda. An article on the use of posters to encourage citizens to participate in the war effort is illustrated with reproductions of several of…

  15. The real world: BME graduates reflect on whether universities are providing adequate preparation for a career in industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Let's face it: In the United States, a college degree isn't what it used to be. These days, 46% of recent college graduates consider themselves underemployed and in jobs that do not require their college degrees--degrees that have already cost many of these grads and their families hundreds of thousands of dollars in student loans, with no promise of a job and salary to pay those loans back. But engineering majors are said to be outliers. Engineering as a field is widely considered one of, if not the most, lucrative academic paths for students seeking well-paid employment immediately following college. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that nearly 40% of the 45 most highly paid professions that require only a bachelor's degree are in engineering. Salaries for all biomedical engineers, entry level or not, are among the highest, with a median pay of US$86,960. And engineering departments at colleges are not shy to advertise these numbers: the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Texas, Austin, declares on its Web page that, "electing to graduate with a major in biomedical engineering opens the door to an ever-growing amount of job opportunities," citing a 72%, ten-year job growth forecast. Boston University's program cites U.S. News and World Report's claim that BME is the country's fastest-growing occupation.

  16. On the Application of Pareto Principle to the Construction of World -Class University:A Case Study on State Key College of India%帕累托法则在创建世界一流大学中的应用--以印度国家重点学院为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张园园

    2013-01-01

      帕累托法则揭示了一条普遍规律,即80%的回报、产出和结果,总是来自于20%的投入、努力和原因。印度政府将高等教育经费向国家重点学院倾斜的政策,使得印度理工学院等大学及学院在短时间内跻身世界一流大学之列。本文从微观经济学的视角分析印度国家重点学院的特点和优势,论述如何在高等教育领域合理运用帕累托法则,为我国建设世界一流大学提供必要的理论依据。%The Pareto Principle reveals a universal law, namely, 80% return, output and result always come from the 20% invest-ments, effort and reason. The Indian government policy in favor of state key colleges in higher education funding makes Indian In-stitute of Technology and other universities stand among the list of world-class universities in a short period of time. From the perspective of microeconomics, this paper analyzes the charac-teristics and advantages of the Indian state key colleges, discuss-es how to reasonably use Pareto Principle in the field of higher e-ducation, aiming to provide necessary theoretical basis for build-ing world-class universities in China.

  17. Biculturalism among Indigenous College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Colton D.

    2011-01-01

    "Indigenous" college students in both Canada and the United States have the lowest rates of obtaining postsecondary degrees, and their postsecondary dropout rates are higher than for any other minority (Freeman & Fox, 2005; Mendelson, 2004; Reddy, 1993). There has been very little research done to uncover possible reasons for such…

  18. Wu Yifang and Ginling College

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    ON the 26th of June in 1945, Wu Yifang, the only female member of a nine-person Chinese delegation, signed the United Nations Charter on behalf of the Chinese nation. During her stay in America, Wu Yifang, President of Ginling College in Nanjing made a wonderful speech in fluent English describing the period when Japanese imperialists invaded China,

  19. College algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Kolman, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    College Algebra, Second Edition is a comprehensive presentation of the fundamental concepts and techniques of algebra. The book incorporates some improvements from the previous edition to provide a better learning experience. It provides sufficient materials for use in the study of college algebra. It contains chapters that are devoted to various mathematical concepts, such as the real number system, the theory of polynomial equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, and the geometric definition of each conic section. Progress checks, warnings, and features are inserted. Every chapter c

  20. WORLD MERCHANDISE TRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei MĂRGULESCU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is mainly based on the most recent statistical data of the World Trade Organization and some aspects related to the evolution of world merchandise trade, in terms of volume and value, in 2015. The volume of world merchandise trade continued to grow slowly in 2015 while the dollar value of it declined sharply as exports fell 14 per cent to US$ 16 trillion, down from US$ 19 trillion in the previous year. It presents also the contribution of the volume change and of the change in unit values (which account for fluctuations in prices and exchange rates to the value trade growth (in current dollar terms. The discrepancy between trade growth in 2015 in terms of volume and value was mostly attributable to swings in commodity prices and exchange rates The course of economic globalization is also shortly looked on based on some data and considerations of Credit Suisse analysts. Three different scenarios were taken into account in this respect. First one in which globalization continues in the form we know it over the past thirty years, second one in which a multipolar world is a better representation of the state of affairs and third, a scenario in which globalization ends due to the rise of anti-globalization political movements. The second scenario seems to provide a better reflection of reality today, despite the fact that a certain slowdown is observable when taking into account the diminishing growth rate of physical trade, the slower penetration of foreign assets of the developed market companies and signs of reshoring of some business back home. Globalization remains intact in terms of consumption and marketing patterns, while companies seem more reluctant to invest abroad.

  1. NASA World Wind: Infrastructure for Spatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The world has great need for analysis of Earth observation data, be it climate change, carbon monitoring, disaster response, national defense or simply local resource management. To best provide for spatial and time-dependent information analysis, the world benefits from an open standards and open source infrastructure for spatial data. In the spirit of NASA's motto "for the benefit of all" NASA invites the world community to collaboratively advance this core technology. The World Wind infrastructure for spatial data both unites and challenges the world for innovative solutions analyzing spatial data while also allowing absolute command and control over any respective information exchange medium.

  2. The Study of Geography in an Interdependent World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saueressig-Schreuder, Yda

    The importance of restructuring the discipline of geography and enhancing its role in the precollege curriculum as part of a global approach to education is emphasized in this paper. International education is seen as an essential part of high school and college education in an increasingly interdependent world. The oil crisis, the world economic…

  3. Peace and World Order Studies: A Curriculum Guide. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Gordon, Ed.; And Others

    The third edition of this guide will help college and university educators design and update courses and learn about new resources in world order studies. The guide begins with three essays that set forth the rationale, methodology, and content of world order studies. The opening essay critiques traditional social science and argues for a more…

  4. The Impact of Human Capital and Selected Job Rewards on Community College Faculty Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Frankie W.; Akroyd, Duane

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges accommodate nearly half of all United States college students. Increased reliance upon community colleges is driven by the current economic downturn, rising costs of higher education, and changing expectations for today's workforce requiring advanced skill sets. Community colleges offer more affordable options for broader…

  5. The University College: Responding to the Needs of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jerry J.

    2005-01-01

    Colleges and universities are being challenged to meet the diverse needs of the increasing numbers of adult learners enrolling in developmental education courses. Some administrators have responded to this challenge with administrative units called University Colleges. These units are infrequently discussed in the literature. This article briefly…

  6. How America Saved Italy and the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    normalcy, specifically the International Monetary Fund and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.145 This meant that America would...How America Saved Italy and the World A Monograph by MAJ Kwame O. Boateng United States Army School of Advanced Military Studies United...DATES COVERED (From - To) July 2014 – May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE How America Saved Italy and the World 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  7. Savior of the World Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The credit crunch and generally tightened monetary policy caused by the subprime crisis in the United States are still being widely assessed around the globe.Worries are that a further downturn of the U.S.market in the coming year will intensify cash flow shortages and spur more economic losses,resulting in a complete decline of the U.S.market and therefore slowing down the world economy.Another theory has surfaced assuming that China and the United States are the double-barreled engines of the world economy.As China’s influence spreads,it will have to complement the United States to rid the world of this crisis. Ding Yifan,Deputy Director of the Institute of World Development under the Development Research Center of the State Council,has made clear China’s growing impact on the global economy.However,as Ding wrote to the Global Times,a Beijing-based daily publication,the knockdown effect of the mortgage crisis is apparent,and emerging markets look even more vulnerable because of it.Excerpts follow:

  8. Global Experiential and Didactic Education Opportunities at US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeb, David R; Overman, Robert A; Sleath, Betsy L; Joyner, Pamela U

    2016-02-25

    To assess the characteristics of global experiential and didactic education offerings in the pharmacy curricula. A 2-stage web-based review of US colleges and schools of pharmacy identified country locations of international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE), globally focused didactic courses, and whether these offerings were interprofessional. Schools were contacted to confirm their offerings and were asked about student participation and demand. Sixty-four percent of responding schools confirmed an international APPE offering in 67 different countries with an average graduating class participation of 6.1%. Forty-seven percent of responding schools confirmed a globally focused course offering with an average graduating class participation of 13.1%. Almost two thirds of international APPEs and a majority of courses were designated as interprofessional. Student demand did not outweigh supply for either. Colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States are continuing to develop global education opportunities for students in the classroom and throughout the world.

  9. Drug errors and related interventions reported by United States clinical pharmacists: the American College of Clinical Pharmacy practice-based research network medication error detection, amelioration and prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Grace M; Touchette, Daniel R; Marinac, Jacqueline S

    2013-03-01

    To describe and evaluate drug errors and related clinical pharmacist interventions. Cross-sectional observational study with an online data collection form. American College of Clinical Pharmacy practice-based research network (ACCP PBRN). A total of 62 clinical pharmacists from the ACCP PBRN who provided direct patient care in the inpatient and outpatient practice settings. Clinical pharmacist participants identified drug errors in their usual practices and submitted online error reports over a period of 14 consecutive days during 2010. The 62 clinical pharmacists submitted 924 reports; of these, 779 reports from 53 clinical pharmacists had complete data. Drug errors occurred in both the inpatient (61%) and outpatient (39%) settings. Therapeutic categories most frequently associated with drug errors were systemic antiinfective (25%), hematologic (21%), and cardiovascular (19%) drugs. Approximately 95% of drug errors did not result in patient harm; however, 33 drug errors resulted in treatment or medical intervention, 6 resulted in hospitalization, 2 required treatment to sustain life, and 1 resulted in death. The types of drug errors were categorized as prescribing (53%), administering (13%), monitoring (13%), dispensing (10%), documenting (7%), and miscellaneous (4%). Clinical pharmacist interventions included communication (54%), drug changes (35%), and monitoring (9%). Approximately 89% of clinical pharmacist recommendations were accepted by the prescribers: 5% with drug therapy modifications, 28% due to clinical pharmacist prescriptive authority, and 56% without drug therapy modifications. This study provides insight into the role clinical pharmacists play with regard to drug error interventions using a national practice-based research network. Most drug errors reported by clinical pharmacists in the United States did not result in patient harm; however, severe harm and death due to drug errors were reported. Drug error types, therapeutic categories, and

  10. World Food Prospects for the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Addresses world hunger issues and the increasing world population. Sees continued imbalance between supply and demand. Points out Europe and the United States are dealing with surplus production, whereas developing nations continue to import needed food. Argues solving hunger problems requires eliminating poverty through development programs.…

  11. 75 FR 75617 - World AIDS Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8609 of November 30, 2010 World AIDS Day, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation On this World AIDS Day, as we approach the thirtieth year of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, we reflect on the many Americans and others around the globe lost to this devastating...

  12. Investment Returns of the Shanghai World Expo?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yong; Wang Xi

    2010-01-01

    For China, Shanghai World Expo is the biggest international carnival after Beijing Olympic Games. It was nearly 150 years ago when the first World Expo was held in United Kingdom in 1851, and now it's China's turn to be the host country to exhibit the future development of mankind.

  13. Target Cultural Issues in College English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Xin

    2016-01-01

    With the passage time, China has been playing a increasingly important role in world stage, so what a current college English classroom needs is not a mere mastery of English language, but an overall understanding of target culture. In order to at-tain this goal, analysis concerning the current situation of target cultural teaching in college English teaching classroom should be done, and suggestions about target cultural teaching in college English teaching classroom should be put forward. By doing so, students will not only improve their linguistic competence, but also will enhance their inter-cultural performance.

  14. The USGS World Energy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The world has recently experienced rapid change to market-driven economies and increasing reliance on petroleum supplies from areas of political instability. The interplay of unprecedented growth of the global population, increasing worldwide energy demand, and political instability in two major petroleum exporting regions (the former Soviet Union and the Middle East) requires that the United States maintains a current, reliable, objective assessment of the world's energy resources. The need is compounded by the environmental implications of rapid increases in coal use in the Far East and international pressure on consumption of fossil fuels.

  15. Population and the World Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, S

    1973-12-01

    The World Bank Group regards excessive population growth as the single greatest obstacle to economic and social advance in the underdeveloped world. Since 1969 the Bank and the International Development Agency have provided countries with technical assistance through education, fact-finding, and analysis and given 65.7 million dollars for population projects. These projects, in India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, and Malaysia provide training centers, population education, research, and evaluation as well as actual construction of clinics and mobile units. Because population planning touches sensitive areas of religion, caste, race, morality, and politics, the involved nation's political commitment to plan population growth is critical to the success of any program.

  16. Use of Technology in College and University English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bethany; Lassmann, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Many forms of technology are available to college and university instructors. Technology has become an important part of today's world and an important part of instruction in various classrooms. Many may see technology as reasonable to use in a science, mathematics, or art class. In this paper, different types of technology used in college and…

  17. Food from Learning; The International Extension College 1971-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, Hilary, Ed.

    The International Extension College (IEC), which exists to make knowledge available to the Third World about distance teaching and its relevance, is discussed. So far most of the work of the IEC has been in Africa. By setting up three colleges, and working with others it has begun to show how distance teaching with the use of print materials,…

  18. Gay Students: The Latest Outreach Target at Many Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Today's colleges strive for diversity in order to enrich students' personal development, perspectives, and real-world knowledge. While colleges have been trying to recruit students of different races for decades, they are now expanding their perspective of what true diversity entails. LGBT students, due to their orientation, often have different…

  19. Use of Technology in College and University English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bethany; Lassmann, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Many forms of technology are available to college and university instructors. Technology has become an important part of today's world and an important part of instruction in various classrooms. Many may see technology as reasonable to use in a science, mathematics, or art class. In this paper, different types of technology used in college and…

  20. Swine Flu Threatens the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic spreads from Mexico to other countries at an alarming rate How serious is the swine flu? It is so sensitive that the White House had to reassure reporters that U.S. President Barack Obama is still in good health after visiting Mexico in mid-April. Besides the United States and Canada, swine flu cases have appeared in Europe and Asia. The world now faces a "public health emergency of

  1. Sustainability in a multipolar world

    OpenAIRE

    Basha i Novosejt, A.; Weterings, R.; Ridder, M De; Frinking, E.

    2010-01-01

    In its 30-Year Update of the well-known publication ‘The Limits to growth’ the Club of Rome stressed that the once debated notion of a physically limited world growth is becoming apparent in many well-documented studies. Three decades ago, the Brundtland Commission on Development and Environment initiated an international momentum to secure the needs of both present and future generations through a joint policy agenda for sustainable development. Institutions such as the United Nations played...

  2. Depressive Symptomatology and College Persistence among African American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Güler; Horne, Sharon G; Owens, Archandria C; Armstrong, Aisha P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between depressive symptomatology and college outcomes among African American students, as well as to determine whether these relationships were moderated by gender and type of university. Participants included 569 African American first-year students attending two public universities in the Southeast United States: a historically Black college/university (HBCU) and a predominantly White institution (PWI). Using a longitudinal study design, data were collected at three time points. Results indicated that, after adjusting for the effects of the control variables (gender, type of institution, high school GPA, participation in on-campus activities, institutional and goal commitments), depressive symptomatology present in the first semester of college was associated with increased likelihood of dropping out of college before the end of the second year of college. The relationship between these two variables was mediated by first-year cumulative GPA. Results also indicated that the hypothesized relationships did not vary as a function of gender and the university type.

  3. College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Facts for Families Guide College Students with ADHD No. 111; Updated December 2013 Many students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) attend college. College students with ADHD face ...

  4. Square Pegs, Round Holes: An Exploration of Teaching Methods and Learning Styles of Millennial College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regina M.

    2012-01-01

    In an information-saturated world, today's college students desire to be engaged both in and out of their college classrooms. This mixed-methods study sought to explore how replacing traditional teaching methods with engaged learning activities affects millennial college student attitudes and perceptions about learning. The sub-questions…

  5. Shattering world assumptions: A prospective view of the impact of adverse events on world assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Eric R; Boals, Adriel

    2016-05-01

    Shattered Assumptions theory (Janoff-Bulman, 1992) posits that experiencing a traumatic event has the potential to diminish the degree of optimism in the assumptions of the world (assumptive world), which could lead to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder. Prior research assessed the assumptive world with a measure that was recently reported to have poor psychometric properties (Kaler et al., 2008). The current study had 3 aims: (a) to assess the psychometric properties of a recently developed measure of the assumptive world, (b) to retrospectively examine how prior adverse events affected the optimism of the assumptive world, and (c) to measure the impact of an intervening adverse event. An 8-week prospective design with a college sample (N = 882 at Time 1 and N = 511 at Time 2) was used to assess the study objectives. We split adverse events into those that were objectively or subjectively traumatic in nature. The new measure exhibited adequate psychometric properties. The report of a prior objective or subjective trauma at Time 1 was related to a less optimistic assumptive world. Furthermore, participants who experienced an intervening objectively traumatic event evidenced a decrease in optimistic views of the world compared with those who did not experience an intervening adverse event. We found support for Shattered Assumptions theory retrospectively and prospectively using a reliable measure of the assumptive world. We discuss future assessments of the measure of the assumptive world and clinical implications to help rebuild the assumptive world with current therapies. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. The Evolution of College Residence Halls in the United States%美国高校宿舍教育的历史分析:宿舍与人才培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐波; 苍玉权

    2014-01-01

    美国高校学生宿舍从早期承担的生活功能、管理功能,到近50年才开拓的教育功能,走过了漫长的历史。殖民时期,受英国牛津剑桥模式的影响,采用住宿学院制,宿舍主要作用是代替父母监督;内战结束后至19世纪后期,受德国大学影响,认为为学生提供宿舍没有意义;19世纪后期至20世纪中期,伴随赠地学院的发展,宿舍建设再次兴起,这个时期宿舍主要作用是为学生提供生活服务;20世纪60年代以后,宿舍教育功能被广泛认可,开始有目的地设计宿舍教育环境,宿舍成为学生课堂教育与非课堂教育的衔接,成为促进学生全面发展的教育资源。%Collegiate housing has been in existence for more than 300 years in the United States. During the early period, American residence halls followed the English residential college model of Oxford and Cambridge with the function of supervision. Between 1850 and the late nineteenth century, influenced by the German university model, residence halls were denounced as inappropriate and a waste of money in American universities. Between the late nineteenth century and the mid-twentieth century, trends in American higher education once again encouraged the construction of residence halls. Since 1960s, to extend learning outside of the classroom, student affairs educators have infused programmatic curriculums and strategic management techniques into the residential experience.

  7. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics pre-college outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E.; Bacon, L.; Copper, K.; Hansen, L. J.; Sanchez, M.; Aiaa Precollege Outreach Committee

    Throughout the United States school child perceive science technology engineering and mathematics STEM as difficult boring and often irrelevant subjects The possible reasons for this problem are endlessly debated however the economic social and overall national importance of producing graduates who are technically literate and enthusiastic in their support of a rational scientific world should motivate many scientific and engineering societies around the world to develop outreach programs aimed at children ages 5-18 and corresponding support programs aimed at schools and teachers covering kindergarten through 12 th grade The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics AIAA is among those organizations that have identified the need to educate students and teachers about STEM current events and their direct affects on the United States population a way that motivates both to get more involved The AIAA has established a pre-college outreach program that has several major elements that will be described in this paper These elements include a pre-college Educator Associate Membership program a program to award small development grants to class room teachers and Educator of the Year awards and recognition program mechanisms for sharing and encouraging innovative local support programs and two national workshop events The first workshop event Passport to the Future is held annually in conjunction with the Joint Propulsion Conference It is intended to provide summertime training in Aerospace science education to classroom

  8. A Comparative Study of the Principles Governing Criminal Responsibility in the Major Legal Systems of the World (England, United States, Germany, France, Denmark, Russia, China, and Islamic legal tradition)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elewa Badar, Mohamed; Marchuk, Iryna

    2013-01-01

    in selected legal jurisdictions, this study reveals the common legal features pertinent to the concept of crime that are shared by the major legal systems of the world. Particular attention has been given to the thorny and much debated area of the subjective element of a crime and the standards employed...... in such major legal systems....

  9. Shanghai Highlight: World Expo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2009-01-01

    @@ The proposals regarding the Shanghai Expo attracted the World Expo committee great concern. During the two sessions, the Shanghai World Expo organizer promised that they will play more active role in holding the expo. Though the world is suffering the global crisis, the organizer be-lieved that this is a rare opportunity and as the World Expo 2010 to be held in Shanghai could help China overcome economic dif-ficulties and lift the world out of the crisis shadow.

  10. Aerospace Training. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace is an economic powerhouse that generates jobs and fuels our economy. Washington's community and technical colleges produce the world-class employees needed to keep it that way. With about 1,250 aerospace-related firms employing more than 94,000 workers, Washington has the largest concentration of aerospace expertise in the nation. To…

  11. Community College Students Truly Live the Magic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about the Disney Theme Parks & Resorts College Program. The program attracts a variety of students each year from different backgrounds, major and career goals to the Walt Disney World Resort outside of Orlando, Florida, for a semester of living, learning and earning. The program has provided a foundation for thousands of…

  12. Other Worlds, Other Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbury, Susan; Gould, R. R.

    2011-05-01

    The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics is developing a two-to-three week NSF-funded program for middle and high school students using telescope-based investigations of real world cutting edge scientific questions. The goal is to reveal and enhance students' understanding of core concepts in the physical sciences as well as to develop their proficiency in the practice of scientific inquiry. Specifically, students and teachers are joining scientists in the search for habitable worlds by exploring transiting exoplanets. Using robotic telescopes, image processing software and simulations, students take images and then measure the brightness of their target star to create a portrait of a transiting planet including how large it is; the tilt of its orbit; how far it is from its star and what its environment might be like. Once classes collect and analyze their own data, they can begin to compare, combine, and communicate their findings with others in the community. Interactive models help students predict what they might expect to find and interpret what they do find. During the past two years, the Center for Astrophysics has tested the concept in fifty middle-and high-school classrooms, enrichment classes and after school science clubs in 13 states across the United States. To date, astronomy, earth science, and physics students have successfully detected Jupiter-sized planets transiting stars such as TRES-3, HATP-10, and HATP-12. Preliminary results indicate that learning of core concept did occur. Gains in content were most significant in middle school students as this project delivered new information to them while it served primarily as a review of concepts and application of skills for advanced placement classes. A significant change also occurred in students’ self reported knowledge of exoplanets. There was also an increase in students’ awareness of exoplanets and attitudes about science after participating in this project.

  13. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions…

  14. Mediating Factors of Personal Wellbeing in Gifted College Students: Early-College Entrants and Honors College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANETTE K. BOAZMAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Many educational, behavioral, dietary, safety, and other factors influence the wellbeing of adolescents around the world (Currieet al., 2008. Previous studies examined multiple adolescent subpopulations, but none looked at academically advanced students.In this study, the Personal Wellbeing Index (International Wellbeing Group, 2005 was used to assess the wellbeing of 213 giftedcollege students who entered university in either an early-college-entrance program or entered at normal ages and were acceptedinto an honors college. One hundred twenty-two participants were students from the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science(TAMS. TAMS is an early-college entrance program allowing gifted students to enter college after their sophomore (secondyear of high school, approximately 15 to 16 years old at the time of entrance to the University. Ninety-one participants werestudents who attended the UNT Honors College. Honors College students are gifted students who enter college at a traditionalage in America, after high school graduation (18 to 19 years old. This study also examined the participants’ general self-efficacy,beliefs about of intelligence, hope, gratitude, religiosity, and resiliency; and assessed any mediating effects they had on personalwellbeing in the high-ability college students. Data analysis included latent transition, general linear model, repeated measures,and regression. Results of the study revealed that dispositional mood and hope-agency were significantly related to the developmentof personal wellbeing for high-ability students during their first year of college regardless of age. Knowledge of psychologicalconstructs that are facilitative of the positive personal wellbeing helps parents, teachers, administrators, and counselors preparegifted students for success in college and beyond.

  15. Nuclear power world report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-07-15

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  16. A Policy Analysis of Missouri Community College Residence Hall Discipline Policies with an Analysis of Changes in the State Fair Community College Residence Hall Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgour, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States have long been known as institutions of equal opportunity and affordable education. One facet of student life appearing at more and more community colleges is the addition of residence halls. Still, the number of community colleges with on-campus living is relatively small, and for the campuses with…

  17. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition.

  18. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  19. Surviving Math, Surviving College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    According to a 2000 community college study by Miami Dade College (FL) President Emeritus Robert McCabe, 41 percent of students entering community colleges are underprepared in at least one basic skill area. A three-year study of community college students, published in 2009 by the National Center for Education Statistics, reported that 41 percent…

  20. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  1. The Teaching of Italian in Institutions of Higher Learning in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istituto Italiano di Cultura, New York, NY.

    This booklet contains a list of institutions of higher learning in the United States and Canada which teach Italian. Italian is taught, according to the booklet, in 383 colleges and universities in the United States (including 28 community or junior colleges), and in 15 colleges and universities in Canada. Other information includes the number of…

  2. Studying in the United Kingdom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Beijing Review:The United Kingdom has many top universities in the world. Could you please tell us how many inter-national students are enrolled in UK institutes of higher learning and how many are from China?

  3. Study guide for college algebra and trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, James W; Shapiro, Arnold

    1981-01-01

    Study Guide for College Algebra and Trigonometry is a supplement material to the basic text, College Algebra and Trigonometry. It is written to assist the student in learning mathematics effectively.The book provides detailed solutions to exercises found in the text. Students are encouraged to use these solutions to find a way to approach a problem. The Study Guide and Solutions Manual consists of four major components: basic concepts that should be learned from each unit, what was learned upon completion of each unit, solutions to selected problems, and a short chapter quiz, including the ans

  4. The Application of Interactive Teaching Method in Higher-vocational College English Teaching--Textbook Fun with English Book 2,Section 2,Unit 1 Text A as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖旺兰

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of interactive teaching on students’cooperative ability,competitive ability,positive emotion and creativity as well as their integrated language capability,thereby promoting the effective implementation of interactive teaching method in higher-vocational college English class.

  5. The Application of Interactive Teaching Method in Higher-vocational College English Teaching——Textbook Fun with English Book 2,Section 2,Unit 1 Text A as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖旺兰

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of interactive teaching on students’ cooperative ability,competitive ability,positive emotion and creativity as well as their integrated language capability,thereby promoting the effective implementation of interactive teaching method in higher-vocational college English class.

  6. Toward a World of Peace: People Create Alternatives. Proceedings of the International Conference on Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies in the United Nations Year of Peace, 1986 (1st, Suva, Fiji, August 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Jeanette P., Ed.; Stewart, Robert A. C., Ed.

    This book is a review of the 1986 United Nations International Year of Peace conducted at an international conference in Fiji. The theme of the conference was "People Create Alternatives," and the issues of conflict resolution and avoiding global destruction were addressed. Specific topics discussed were: (1) "Theories and…

  7. Recognized by the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China Danxia gets added to world heritage list as a natural site On August 1,2010,UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee inscribed China Danxia as a natural site in the world heritage list at its 34th session held from July 25 to August 3 this year in Brasilia,capital of Brazil.

  8. Recueil des legislations linguistiques dans le monde. Tome V: l'Algerie, l'Autriche, la Chine, le Danemark, la Finlande, la Hongrie, l'ile de Malte, le Maroc, la Norvege, la Nouvelle-Zelande, les Pays-Bas, le Royaume-Uni, la Tunisie, la Turquie, l'ex-URSS (Record of World Language-Related Legislation. Volume V: Algeria, Austria, China, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Malta, Morocco, Norway, New Zealand, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Tunisia, Turkey, the former USSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jacques, Ed.; Maurais, Jacques, Ed.

    The volume is one of a series of six listing language-related legislation around the world. It contains the texts, in French, of laws of Algeria, Austria, China, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Malta, Morocco, Norway, New Zealand, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Tunisia, Turkey, and the former Soviet Union. The laws concern official languages,…

  9. Implementation of NIAAA College Drinking Task Force recommendations: how are colleges doing 6 years later?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Toben F; Toomey, Traci L; Lenk, Kathleen M; Erickson, Darin J; Winters, Ken C

    2010-10-01

    In 2002, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) College Drinking Task Force issued recommendations to reduce heavy drinking by college students, but little is known about implementation of these recommendations. Current discussion about best strategies to reduce student drinking has focused more on lowering the minimum legal drinking age as advocated by a group of college and university presidents called the Amethyst Initiative than the NIAAA recommendations. A nationally representative survey of administrators was conducted at 351 4-year colleges in the United States to ascertain familiarity with and progress toward implementation of NIAAA recommendations. Implementation was compared by enrollment size, public or private status, and whether the school president signed the Amethyst Initiative. Administrators at most colleges were familiar with NIAAA recommendations, although more than 1 in 5 (22%) were not. Nearly all colleges use educational programs to address student drinking (98%). Half the colleges (50%) offered intervention programs with documented efficacy for students at high risk for alcohol problems. Few colleges reported that empirically supported, community-based alcohol control strategies including conducting compliance checks to monitor illegal alcohol sales (33%), instituting mandatory responsible beverage service (RBS) training (15%), restricting alcohol outlet density (7%), or increasing the price of alcohol (2%) were operating in their community. Less than half the colleges with RBS training and compliance checks in their communities actively participated in these interventions. Large colleges were more likely to have RBS training and compliance checks, but no differences in implementation were found across public/private status or whether the college president signed the Amethyst Initiative. Many colleges offer empirically supported programs for high-risk drinkers, but few have implemented other strategies recommended by

  10. Public-Private Honors Success at Community Colleges of Spokane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the steep budget cuts in recent years, and how this has affected the number of honors students that can be served at community colleges in the United States. This was true in Spokane, Washington, where, prior to working with "American Honors," community colleges had struggled for many years to provide…

  11. Lived Experiences of Low Socioeconomic Millennial Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics and needs of college students across the United States are ever-changing. As Millennial generation students, born between 1982 and 2003 (Howe & Strauss, 2000), attend college, unique characteristics are present. Commonalities within the Millennial generation have been identified; however, socioeconomic status can impact a…

  12. Should College Campuses become Tobacco Free without an Enforcement Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-free campuses are a great public health initiative. "Healthy People 2020" and "Healthy Campus 2020" address tobacco use and young adults including college students. Sources indicate that of the more than 6,000 colleges and universities in the United States, less than 800 are either smoke free or tobacco free. An increasing number of…

  13. Global Preparedness and Human Resources: College and Corporate Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikson, T. K.; Law, S. A.

    A research study explored the human resource implications of the emerging economic globalism, including the following questions: How is globalism understood by corporations and colleges in the United States? What are the perceived human resource implications of globalism? and What are corporations and colleges doing today to meet these human…

  14. Efficiency in the Community College Sector: Stochastic Frontier Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Belfield, Clive

    2017-01-01

    This paper estimates technical efficiency scores across the community college sector in the United States. Using stochastic frontier analysis and data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System for 2003-2010, we estimate efficiency scores for 950 community colleges and perform a series of sensitivity tests to check for robustness. We…

  15. Faculty Perspectives on Diversity at a Rural Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James C.

    2009-01-01

    As the United States has become progressively more diverse in rural areas, America's higher education system has wrestled to comprehend and resolve issues related to diversity in higher education. Community colleges enrolled nearly 50% of culturally diverse college students (Cohen & Brawer, 2002) because they often afford the only points of…

  16. Applying Cultura in the Community College Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Blanca E.

    2015-01-01

    Latino students represent the fastest-growing population in the state of California, the United States, and the California Community College (CCC) system. Unfortunately, compared to other ethnic groups, Latino community college students continue to lag academically. Given the importance of counseling services and the scarce research related to…

  17. African American College Students: Literacy of Depression and Help Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Kim L.; Wimsatt, Maureen; Simpson, Gaynell Marie; Martin, Fayetta; Nelson, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a serious public health concern in the United States affecting almost 18.8 million adults. It is a common mental disorder in college students, with estimates of 1 in 4 "experiencing an episode by age 24." African American college students are at an elevated risk for depression due to racism, stress, sleep deprivation, and lack of…

  18. Mind the Gap: Political Science Education in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanus, Alixandra B.; O'Connor, Karen; Weakley, Jon L.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges occupy a growing role in the American education system. Their unique cross-section of students poses a challenge for teachers of political science. This paper uses information from a survey completed by over 2,000 students at 20 colleges and universities across the United States to shed light on some of the most significant…

  19. The Declining Significance of Race in College Admissions Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodsky, Eric; Kalogrides, Demetra

    2008-01-01

    Using 18 years of data from more than 1,300 four-year colleges and universities in the United States, we investigate the extent to which institutional characteristics and contextual factors influence the propensity of colleges to indicate that they engage in affirmative action in their admissions decisions. Consideration of race/ethnicity in…

  20. Listening and Reading Proficiency Levels of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirner, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines listening and reading proficiency levels of U.S. college foreign language students at major milestones throughout their undergraduate career. Data were collected from more than 3,000 participants studying seven languages at 21 universities and colleges across the United States. The results show that while listening…

  1. Faculty Attitudes and Knowledge Regarding College Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniatecki, Jessica L.; Perry, Holly B.; Snell, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of students with disabilities (SWD) at colleges and universities in the United States has increased significantly in recent years, yet many of these students continue to encounter significant barriers that can have a profound impact on their college experience. Salient factors that contribute to the challenging climate for SWD include…

  2. Lived Experiences of Low Socioeconomic Millennial Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics and needs of college students across the United States are ever-changing. As Millennial generation students, born between 1982 and 2003 (Howe & Strauss, 2000), attend college, unique characteristics are present. Commonalities within the Millennial generation have been identified; however, socioeconomic status can impact a…

  3. Applying Cultura in the Community College Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Blanca E.

    2015-01-01

    Latino students represent the fastest-growing population in the state of California, the United States, and the California Community College (CCC) system. Unfortunately, compared to other ethnic groups, Latino community college students continue to lag academically. Given the importance of counseling services and the scarce research related to…

  4. Sexual Orientation Differences in HIV Testing Motivation among College Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Daniel N.; Samsa, Gregory P.; McKellar, Mehri S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate sexual orientation differences in college men's motivations for HIV testing. Participants: 665 male college students in the Southeastern United States from 2006 to 2014. Methods: Students completed a survey on HIV risk factors and testing motivations. Logistic regressions were conducted to determine the differences…

  5. Variation across Hispanic Immigrant Generations in Parent Social Capital, College-Aligned Actions, and Four-Year College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sarah; Ream, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Not beginning college at a four-year institution has been demonstrated as one key obstacle to equitable rates of bachelor's degree attainment among Hispanic individuals in the United States. Drawing on nationally representative longitudinal data and social capital theory, this research investigates the process of four-year college enrollment among…

  6. The Relationship of Size to Current Expense of Education in California Single-College Public Junior College Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, William Albert

    This study was an investigation of unit costs during the 1966-67 school year for single-college, California public junior college districts. The relationships between institutional size and total current expense of education, expenditures in seven major budget classifications, and expenditures in certain combinations of budgetary classes were…

  7. How much has the world changed?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Feng

    2006-01-01

    @@ The U. S. president responded quickly to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Confronted by a changing world, the United States had to implement new strategies in order to deal with problems of the post- 9/11 era, one of these strategies being its war on terrorism. Bush's policy at home and abroad, in particular the strategic transformation of international security is based on an assessment that the world has changed. How much has the world changed over the past five years and in what way? The answers to these questions are keys to understand the current international situation.

  8. Education in the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱富奎

    2009-01-01

    As might be expected,educational institutions in the United States reflect the nation's basic values,especially the ideal of equality of opportunity.From elementary school through college,Americans believe that everyone deserves an equal opportunity to get a good education.

  9. Tractor Safety. Unit A-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Vernon D.; Backlund, Paul

    This document is a teacher's guide for a unit in tractor and machinery safety for college freshmen. It is intended to be used for 10 hours of instruction for freshmen who are intending to work on or around machinery. Safety hazards directly and indirectly related to many types of machinery are covered in addition to tractors. The objectives of the…

  10. New World View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    This chapter reports the wide range of ideas in a pair of major scientific conference meetings held inside the most popular virtual world, World of Warcraft (WoW), May 9 and May 10, 2008, plus the challenges of organizing these online events. More than a hundred scholars and scientists contributed to each session, the first covering research on World of Warcraft, and the second examining how virtual worlds fit into the larger world of human experience. A third session, held on May 11, was the starting point for the concluding chapter of this volume. This chapter describes how WoW and other virtual worlds can be used as laboratories for studying human behavior, using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and the affordances of virtual worlds can be used to support scientific communication (Bainbridge 2007, in press).

  11. Effects of Immigration on Selected Health Risk Behaviors of Black College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenya, Sonjia; Brodsky, Mitchell; Divale, William; Allegrante, John P.; Fullilove, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    The authors administered the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey to 1,219 college students who were attending a historically Black college located in New York City. They assessed the US-born Black students and Black students who emigrated to the United States for differences in risky sexual behaviors, risky dietary behaviors, and physical…

  12. An Exploration of First-Generation College Students' Career Development Beliefs and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Kevin A.; Caperton, William; Kaiser, Dakota; Pruitt, Nathan T.; White, Heather; Hall, Eric

    2015-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) represent a large proportion of individuals seeking higher education in the United States; yet this population does not perform as well academically as, and persist to graduation at lower rates than, their peers who have more familial context for the college-going experience. Completing a college degree is…

  13. Reserve Recruiting and the College Market: Is a New Educational Benefit Needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Beth; Loughran, David

    2005-01-01

    Rising college enrollment may put college attendance in direct competition with the reserve components. Individuals can easily join a reserve unit while attending college because reservists are generally only obligated to drill one weekend per month and two weeks during the summer. However, reserve participation entails an increasingly high risk…

  14. Reserve Recruiting and the College Market: Is a New Educational Benefit Needed? Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Beth; Loughran, David

    2005-01-01

    Rising college enrollment may put college attendance in direct competition with the reserve components. Individuals can easily join a reserve unit while attending college because reservists are generally only obligated to drill one weekend per month and two weeks during the summer. However, reserve participation entails an increasingly high risk…

  15. Lessons Learned: How Early College High Schools Offer a Pathway for High School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniuka, Theodore Stefan; Vickers, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, Early College High Schools Initiative became a reality across the United States for students and educators looking for ways to improve student graduation rates, college attendance, and overall student achievement. This mixed method case study found that (a) the early college high school environment supported the academic success of…

  16. Social Disorganization Theory and Crime Rates on California Community College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravalin, Tamara; Tevis, Tenisha

    2017-01-01

    Recent media attention concerning the escalation of crime on college campuses has created a sense of urgency to address how crime will impact the largest community college system in the United States, California Community Colleges. Crime can deter academic success and social engagement. This study utilizes social disorganization theory to examine…

  17. Decisions and Barriers to First-in-Family College Student Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Garrett B.

    2013-01-01

    United States Government scrutiny of enrollment practices at for-profit colleges has caused significant decreases in profitability at career colleges. The phenomenological problem explored in this study was the declining enrollment at career colleges. Systems theory and Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory formed the conceptual framework for…

  18. Decisions and Barriers to First-in-Family College Student Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Garrett B.

    2013-01-01

    United States Government scrutiny of enrollment practices at for-profit colleges has caused significant decreases in profitability at career colleges. The phenomenological problem explored in this study was the declining enrollment at career colleges. Systems theory and Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory formed the conceptual framework for this…

  19. Social Disorganization Theory and Crime Rates on California Community College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravalin, Tamara; Tevis, Tenisha

    2017-01-01

    Recent media attention concerning the escalation of crime on college campuses has created a sense of urgency to address how crime will impact the largest community college system in the United States, California Community Colleges. Crime can deter academic success and social engagement. This study utilizes social disorganization theory to examine…

  20. Organizational Adaptation of Liberal Arts Colleges during the Great Recession of 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbun, Ashlie Junot; Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2016-01-01

    The study we report here explored how private liberal arts colleges adapted to the Great Recession of 2007. We examined institutional changes at three private liberal arts colleges and their effects on the institutions' operations. For this multiple-case study we analyzed data from three colleges in the southeastern region of the United States;…

  1. A Faculty Short Course on Improving College Teaching at Escuela Agricola Panamericana, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; Beeman, Carl E.

    A short course on improving college teaching at Escuela Agricola Panamericana (EAP), in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, is discussed. Two University of Florida college faculty members were engaged by the United States Information Agency to conduct the 2-week course for EAP college faculty. Course objectives included: identifying the role of the teacher and…

  2. A Faculty Short Course on Improving College Teaching at Escuela Agricola Panamericana, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; Beeman, Carl E.

    A short course on improving college teaching at Escuela Agricola Panamericana (EAP), in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, is discussed. Two University of Florida college faculty members were engaged by the United States Information Agency to conduct the 2-week course for EAP college faculty. Course objectives included: identifying the role of the teacher and…

  3. A Brave New World: Understanding the Net Generation through Their Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohnes, Sarah; Wilber, Dana J.; Kinzer, Charles K.

    2008-01-01

    College today is part of a brave new world, populated by the technologically literate young people of the Net Generation. In this article, the authors offer two vignettes of Net Gen students, taken from their research, to provide portraits of college students' everyday technology use. These vignettes, which report technology practices and beliefs…

  4. Tasks Design and Enlightenment of Swiss Primary School English Textbook—The Analysis of Tasks on Unit Five of Young World in Grade Five%瑞士小学英语教材中任务设计与启示——以Young World教材五年级第五单元任务为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常耀元; 姚宝梁

    2015-01-01

    近年来国内外许多学者和教师倡导使用任务型教学的理念,很多教材也直接采用'任务'来设计活动.通过对瑞士小学英语Young World教材五年级的第五单元食物和节日(Unit5 Food and Festival)的分析,任务设计要考虑学习者的需求和程度,结合教学型任务和真实型任务,调控任务的难度,帮助学生顺利的实施任务.%Many scholars and teachers introduce task-based language teaching in English teaching,and many English textbooks are designed based on tasks.After analyzing the tasks in Grade five on Unit Five in Young World,some points were found to help students achieve the task,which are the designer should consider the needs and development levels of the students,the connection between pedagogic tasks and real-world tasks,the adjustment of the task difficulty.

  5. CLEP college mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Mel

    2012-01-01

    Earn College Credit with REA's Test Prep for CLEP* College Mathematics Everything you need to pass the exam and get the college credit you deserve.CLEP* is the most popular credit-by-examination program in the country, accepted by more than 2,900 colleges and universities. For over 15 years, REA has helped students pass the CLEP* exam and earn college credit while reducing their tuition costs. Our test prep for CLEP* College Mathematics and the free online tools that come with it, allow you to create a personalized CLEP* study plan that can be customized to fit you: your schedule, your lea

  6. Silencing cinema: film censorship around the world

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Why does oppression by censorship affect the film industry far more frequently than any other mass media? "Silencing Cinema" brings together the key issues and authors to examine instances of film censorship throughout the world. Including essays by some of today's leading film historians, the book offers groundbreaking historical research on film censorship in major film production countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia/Soviet Union, India, China, and Nigeria, amo...

  7. Studying in the United Kingdom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The United Kingdom is among the world leaders in recruiting international students.Joanna Burke,Cultural Counselor in the Cultural and Education Section of the British Embassy in China,recently spoke about international students,especially Chinese students in the United Kingdom,with Beijing Review reporter Wang Hairong.

  8. World news; Actualite international

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-06-01

    The 21. of April 2005, was held in Paris the 6. international petroleum meeting whose main theme was: the supply and demand. The participants of this summit have in majority argued for a greater opening of the productive countries to the international investments which are indispensable to face with a world demand of oil in full expansion. Total has announced the approval by the British authorities of the development of the gas and condensates deposit of north Forvie, located at about 440 km at the nord-east of Aberdeen. Technip and Kerr-McGee Oil and Gas Corp., have received the prestigious price of the Offshore Technology Conference 2005. The Norway and the United Kingdom have signed a cooperation treaty for stimulating the development of petroleum and natural gas deposits in North sea. The petroleum groups Royal Dutch Shell and ExxonMobil think to sale their shares in three fields in the North sea. Total and Lubrifin, one of the main manufacturers and distributors of lubricants and greases on the Romanian market, have just finalize an agreement for the establishment of a common firm: Total Lubrifin. The IEA has published a study for the governments to rapidly reduce the petroleum consumption in transports in the case of crisis or breakdown of the supply. In order to avoid an accident risk which could have disastrous environmental consequences, by the important transit in the Bosphore pass, a plan (dating from 1995) provides that the petroleum of the Caspian sea transiting by the Russian harbour of Novorossiisk, on North sea, be conveyed by sea way to the Bulgarian harbour of Bourgas, to be transported by pipeline on 320 km to the Alexandroupolis harbour. Vladimir Poutine has received last April to the Kremlin John Browne, general director of the British firm BP, came ask for its investment in Russia in the common firm: TNK-BP. The Algerian petroleum firm Sonatrach is in the 12. world place among the hundred first petroleum firms in the world. Shell Ivory Coast

  9. Higher Education and World War II. IHE Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Cameron

    The January 1994 issue of "The Annals" of the American Academy of Political and Social Science provides an overview of thought and discussion concerning the role of colleges and universities during World War II and in the postwar era. Edited by T. R. McConnell and Malcolm Willey, the issue contained articles by educators, most of whom became more…

  10. Affordances for Second Language Learning in "World of Warcraft"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Paul S.; Black, Rebecca W.; van Es, Elizabeth; Warschauer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    What are the affordances of online gaming environments for second language learning and socialization? To answer this question, this qualitative study examines two college-age Spanish learners' experiences participating in the Spanish language version of the massively multi-player online game "World of Warcraft." Using data culled from participant…

  11. Portal: Your Door to World Languages and Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Don; Lawton, Rachele

    2009-01-01

    Portal: Your Door to World Languages and Cultures was a series of public cultural events, in a variety of formats, created through a new partnership between the credit and continuing education (noncredit) foreign language programs at the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC). Portal was designed to cultivate interest in foreign languages…

  12. Making Connections to the "Real World": A Model Building Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibe, Shusaku; Underwood, Bret

    2009-01-01

    Classroom activities that include the process of model building, in which students build simplified physical representations of a system, have the potential to help students make meaningful connections between physics and the real world. We describe a lesson designed with this intent for an introductory college classroom that engages students in…

  13. Affordances for Second Language Learning in "World of Warcraft"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Paul S.; Black, Rebecca W.; van Es, Elizabeth; Warschauer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    What are the affordances of online gaming environments for second language learning and socialization? To answer this question, this qualitative study examines two college-age Spanish learners' experiences participating in the Spanish language version of the massively multi-player online game "World of Warcraft." Using data culled from participant…

  14. The retention of first-generation college students in STEM: An extension of Tinto's longitudinal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uche, Ada Rosemary

    In the current technologically advanced global economy, the role of human capital and education cannot be over-emphasized. Since almost all great inventions in the world have a scientific or technological foundation, having a skilled workforce is imperative for any nation's economic growth. Currently, large segments of the United States' population are underrepresented in the attainment of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) degrees, and in the STEM professions. Scholars, educators, policy-makers, and employers are concerned about the decline in student enrollment and graduation from STEM disciplines. This trend is especially problematic for first-generation college students. This study uses both quantitative and qualitative methods to assess the factors that predict the retention of first-generation college students in the STEM majors. It employs Tinto's longitudinal model (1993) as a conceptual framework to predict STEM retention for first-generation college students. The analysis uses the Beginning Post-secondary Students study (BPS 04/09) data and Roots of STEM qualitative data to investigate the role of first-generation status in STEM major retention. Results indicate that upper levels of achievement in high school math have a significant effect on first-generation status in STEM outcomes.

  15. 76 FR 11935 - Death of Army Corporal Frank W. Buckles, the Last Surviving American Veteran of World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Surviving American Veteran of World War I By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As... veteran of World War I, and in remembrance of the generation of American veterans of World War I, I hereby...

  16. Are Homeschoolers Prepared for College Calculus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Wade, Carol H.; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Homeschooling in the United States has grown considerably over the past several decades. This article presents findings from the Factors Influencing College Success in Mathematics (FICSMath) survey, a national study of 10,492 students enrolled in tertiary calculus, including 190 students who reported homeschooling for a majority of their high…

  17. Are Homeschoolers Prepared for College Calculus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Wade, Carol H.; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Homeschooling in the United States has grown considerably over the past several decades. This article presents findings from the Factors Influencing College Success in Mathematics (FICSMath) survey, a national study of 10,492 students enrolled in tertiary calculus, including 190 students who reported homeschooling for a majority of their high…

  18. Leadership Styles of Community College Academic Deans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypawka, William; Mallett, William; McFadden, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The future of the community college system will depend on sound leadership, and its success will rely on how well academic deans effectively direct their units. The study investigated the dean's leadership styles using Bolman and Deal's Leadership Orientation Instrument to discover their primary leadership frame with a focus on how data may be…

  19. Hibbing Community College's Community Computer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    This paper reports on the development of the Community Computer Center (CCC) at Hibbing Community College (HCC) in Minnesota. HCC is located in the largest U.S. iron mining area in the United States. Closures of steel-producing plants are affecting the Hibbing area. Outmigration, particularly of younger workers and their families, has been…

  20. College Readiness: A Guide to the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Sara; Mevs, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the education spotlight in the United States has shifted from focusing on high school graduation to postsecondary success. This shift in attention has been accompanied by a wealth of policies and initiatives aimed at preparing students to enter and succeed in college, including federal competitive grants programs, schoolwide…

  1. Depression and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  2. Coping with College Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160792.html Coping With College Stress Parents can help make the transition easier for ... 5, 2016 MONDAY, Sept. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress and anxiety are common among new college students, ...

  3. American College Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... An Open Letter to the Next President: Make College Students' Health a Priority ACHA offers a three- ... and Services New ACHA Guidelines: Opioid Prescribing in College Health In response to the current opioid epidemic, ...

  4. College Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the College Women's Social Media Kit! College Women's Social Media Toolkit Use the Social Media Toolkit to ... International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & ...

  5. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach…

  6. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach…

  7. My World Indoors: My Health My World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Denk, James; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World series which explores environmental health issues. Focusing on indoor environmental health, it includes (1) an activities guide for teachers which focuses on physical science, life science, and the environment and health, presenting activity based lessons that…

  8. World Health Statistics 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The World Health Organization (WHO) collects and summarizes a wide range of quantitative data from a variety of health domains through country offices, regional offices and headquarter departments.

  9. College Risk and Return

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo Castex

    2011-01-01

    Attending college is thought of as a very profitable investment decision, as its estimated annualized return ranges from 8% to 13%. However, a large fraction of high school graduates do not enroll in college. I reconcile the observed high average returns to schooling with relatively low attendance rates when considering college as a risky investment decision. A high dropout risk has two important effects on the estimated average returns to college: selection bias and risk premium. In order to...

  10. All-College Council at Maryville College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Carolyn L.

    In May 1968, the Special Committee on Community Life and Structure of Maryville College recommended that an All-College Council be organized by January 1969. Following approval of this recommendation by the Executive Council of the Faculty, the Special Committee proposed the nomination of 15 council members who were subsequently chosen in a…

  11. West Virginia Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eldon L.; Dziagwa, Constance E.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses efforts over the past 25 years to formalize the role of West Virginia's community colleges in the context of the state's rural character and low college graduation rates. Describes a reorganization following a 1987 study by the Carnegie Foundation and state legislation designed to fine tune the colleges' mission. (10 citations) (AJL)

  12. Cyberbullying in College

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos P. Zalaquett; SeriaShia J. Chatters

    2014-01-01

    Cyberbullying is commonly presented as affecting K-12 populations. Current research suggests cyberbullying continues in college. A diverse sample of 613 university students was surveyed to study their cyberbullying experiences in high school and college. Nineteen percent of the sample reported being a victim of cyberbullying in college and 35% of this subsample reported being cyberbullied in high school. Additional fin...

  13. Community College Periodicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Eldor O.

    Drawing from an examination of community college periodicals, their availability and characteristics, the academic affiliations of contributing authors, and the topics of their articles, this paper discusses the minor role which community college periodicals appear to play. A list of 35 periodicals dealing primary with community college education…

  14. Prometheus College Bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austell, David B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on interviews conducted to assess the status of humanities instruction in North Carolina's community colleges. Includes Dallas Herring's reflections on the establishment and growth of the state's community college system. Summarizes interviews with central office representatives and two-year college managers concerning the mission and…

  15. Early College High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  16. COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIKITAS, CHRISTUS M.; AND OTHERS

    TO MEET THE STATE'S HIGHER EDUCATION NEEDS, THE NEW HAMPSHIRE JUNIOR COLLEGE COMMISSION DEVELOPED A PLAN OF (1) GRADUAL AND SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF THE STATE'S TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES, (2) SELECTIVE ADDITION OF 2-YEAR PROGRAMS AT THE STATE COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES, AND (3) ESTABLISHMENT OF A STATE…

  17. Prometheus College Bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austell, David B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on interviews conducted to assess the status of humanities instruction in North Carolina's community colleges. Includes Dallas Herring's reflections on the establishment and growth of the state's community college system. Summarizes interviews with central office representatives and two-year college managers concerning the mission and…

  18. College Access Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    College Access Marketing (CAM) is a relatively new phenomenon that seeks to positively influence the college-going rate. This report defines CAM, describes CAM examples, and discusses how CAM seeks to counter barriers to college. It explores four main elements of CAM: information, marketing, advocacy, and social mobilization. Further, it…

  19. Fieldwork Skills in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Benjamin; Lloyd, Geoffrey; Gordon, Clare; Houghton, Jacqueline; Morgan, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Virtual reality has an increasingly significant role to play in teaching and research, but for geological applications realistic landscapes are required that contain sufficient detail to prove viable for investigation by both inquisitive students and critical researchers. To create such virtual landscapes, we combine DTM data with digitally modelled outcrops in the game engine Unity. Our current landscapes are fictional worlds, invented to focus on generation techniques and the strategic and spatial immersion within a digital environment. These have proved very successful in undergraduate teaching; however, we are now moving onto recreating real landscapes for more advanced teaching and research. The first of these is focussed on Rhoscolyn, situated within the Ynys Mon Geopark on Anglesey, UK. It is a popular area for both teaching and research in structural geology so has a wide usage demographic. The base of the model is created from DTM data, both 1 m LiDAR and 5 m GPS point data, and manipulated with QGIS before import to Unity. Substance is added to the world via models of architectural elements (e.g. walls and buildings) and appropriate flora and fauna, including sounds. Texturing of these models is performed using 25 cm aerial imagery and field photographs. Whilst such elements enhance immersion, it is the use of digital outcrop models that fully completes the experience. From fieldwork, we have a library of photogrammetric outcrops that can be modelled into 3D features using free (VisualSFM and MeshLab) and non-free (AgiSoft Photoscan) tools. These models are then refined and converted in Maya to create models for better insertion into the Unity environment. The finished product is a virtual landscape; a Rhoscolyn `world' that is sufficiently detailed to provide a base not only for geological teaching and training but also for geological research. Additionally, the `Rhoscolyn World' represents a significant tool for those students who are unable to attend

  20. 76 FR 29139 - World Trade Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... States of America A Proclamation American businesses embody the ingenuity and entrepreneurship that has... services. Millions of jobs in the United States are tied to exports, and our world continues to grow more... trade agenda that emphasizes exports and domestic job growth. Last year, my Administration launched...

  1. Scenario planning: navigating through today's uncertain world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Axson, David A.J

    2011-01-01

    ... care reform in the United States. Uncertainty, volatility and risk are here to stay. The world has been transformed from a series of loosely connected, reasonably predictable economies to a complex web of relationships where the global impact of local events is felt almost instantaneously. In this climate the past is not a good predictor of the fut...

  2. 75 FR 35951 - World Refugee Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... the current Federal Refugee Resettlement Program and codified into law the right to asylum for... relief efforts and in defense of human rights has helped expand protections for countless refugees... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8538 of June 18, 2010 World Refugee Day, 2010 By the President of the United...

  3. Sudan Genocide Declaration Stirs the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    One week after Secretary of State Colin Powell declared that the killings, rapes and other atrocities committed in Darfur amount to "genocide," in mid-September the United Nations' World Health Organization issued new figures saying 6,000 to 10,000 people are dying per month there in one of Africa's worst humanitarian crises. Powell had…

  4. CRISIS FOCUS:Rebalancing the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As China fights its way out of the financial downturn, the developed world, primarily the United States and Europe, is still reeling from the recession. Despite the divergence in levels of recovery, there are common lessons that need to be learned. The key point to any

  5. Summary report UN World Summit 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fraats (Judith)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis summary report provides an overview of main discussions and outputs of the United Nations World Summit in September 2010, in particular related to information regarding partnerships. The information provided in this report are obtained through an extensive internet search. The

  6. Localization: Customizing Software for the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Inge Karsch

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Professional & Continuing Education (PCE division at University of Washington (in Seattle, United States is launching a new Certificate program this year in localization. Officially named Localization: Customizing Software for the World, the program is comprised of a 3-course intensive format that was developed in partnership with industry, professional organizations, and academia.

  7. 77 FR 72195 - World AIDS Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ..., 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation On World AIDS Day, more than 30...'s first comprehensive plan to fight the domestic epidemic. The Strategy aims to reduce new... States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution ] and the laws of...

  8. World Cultural and Scenic Areas in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    THE United Nations Educational,Scientific and Cultural Or-ganization has put ten sites in China on its list of WorldCultural and Natural Scenic Areas.China is proud of thehonor.The country has long history,brilliant culture,beautiful scenicspots,many ancient cultural sites and magnififcent ancient architec-ture.

  9. Professions for World Disarmament and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-20

    A conference entitled "Professions for World Disarmament and Development" was held in London on February 13, 1982. Messages were sent to the Secretary-General of the United Nations and to Prime Minister Thatcher expressing the concern of the 450 participants regarding the "abuse of professional skills in the preparation for nuclear war" and the consequences of today's nuclear arsenals.

  10. 77 FR 31151 - World Trade Week, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... exports play in creating jobs and growing our economy. Two years ago, my Administration launched the... individuals, families, and entire communities prosper. We are determined to do everything in our power to... global economy. Because 95 percent of the world's consumers live outside the United States, we...

  11. Educating for World Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Louise M.; Miel, Alice

    This booklet presents a variety of perspectives on educating for world cooperation. Section 1 discusses major world problems and calls for the reorientation of education as a potential solution. Section 2 deals with the design of such a reorientation and offers three approaches to teaching and curriculum development--knowing, being, and doing. In…

  12. On Observing World English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdang, Lawrence

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the current state of World English. Subjects addressed include standard accents and dialects, prejudicial attitudes toward nonstandard "local" usages, the use of English as the language of diplomacy, American influences on the language, and the fracturing of English in non-English-speaking countries around the world. (17 references) (JL)

  13. Education and World Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The impact on educational analysis of mainstream international relations (IR) theories is yet to realize its full potential. The problem of education in relation to the construction of world order is considered in relation to core developments in IR theory since the Second World War. In particular, the global architecture of education is seen as a…

  14. World Music Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Access to world music resources such as videos and sound recordings have increased with the advent of YouTube and the efforts of music educators working closely with ethnomusicologists to provide more detailed visual and audio information about various musical practices. This column discusses some world music resources available for music…

  15. Virtual World Security Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Charles Patterson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Virtual property theft is a serious problem that exists in virtual worlds. Legitimate users of these worlds invest considerable amounts of time, effort and real-world money into obtaining virtual property, but unfortunately, are becoming victims of theft in high numbers. It is reported that there are over 1 billion registered users of virtual worlds containing virtual property items worth an estimated US$50 billion dollars. The problem of virtual property theft is complex, involving many legal, social and technological issues. The software used to access virtual worlds is of great importance as they form the primary interface to these worlds and as such the primary interface to conduct virtual property theft. The security vulnerabilities of virtual world applications have not, to date, been examined. This study aims to use the process of software inspection to discover security vulnerabilities that may exist within virtual world software – vulnerabilities that enable virtual property theft to occur. Analyzing three well know virtual world applications World of Warcraft, Guild Wars and Entropia Universe, this research utilized security analysis tools and scenario testing with focus on authentication, trading, intruder detection and virtual property recovery. It was discovered that all three examples were susceptible to keylogging, mail and direct trade methods were the most likely method for transferring stolen items, intrusion detection is of critical concern to all VWEs tested, stolen items were unable to be recovered in all cases and lastly occurrences of theft were undetectable in all cases. The results gained in this study present the key problem areas which need to be addressed to improve security and reduce the occurrence of virtual property theft.

  16. Hierarchy of Needs Theory, an Important Method of Enhancing the Vitality of United Front in Colleges and Universities%需要层次理论:增强高校统战工作活力的一种重要方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂荣; 刘波

    2011-01-01

    如何增强基层统战工作活力是一个热点问题,更是因应新世纪新阶段统战工作局面的现实问题。要增强高校统战工作的活力,必须有自觉的方法论意识。运用需要层次理论,要深入把握其积极意义和不足,注意了解需要、恰当激励、积极引导的综合运用,注意布局的整体性、目标的系统性,避免流于偏失。不能教条化地搬弄套用需要层次理论。而应深入了解每个统战成员的心理需求和人格类型。%How to enhance the vitality of grassroots united front work is not only a hot issue, but also a realistic problem in response to the situation of the united front work in new century. To enhance the vitality of united front work, the conscious awareness of methodology must be equipped. To use the Hierarchy of Needs Theory calls for grasping its positive sense and insufficient in- depth, taking care of the synthesis application of understanding needs, appropriate incentives and positive guidance, paying attention to the integrity of the layout, the systematicness of the target, and avoiding to be drained in deviation. For enhancing the vitality of united front in colleges and universities, we must understand the psychological needs and personality type of each member of the united front and avoid applying the Hierarchy of Needs Theory dogmatically.

  17. The Fashion World's Harvard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Bernard

    1974-01-01

    Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), a successful community college in New York's garment district, is a fashion industry in minature. Two-thirds of the courses are technical or professional, the remaining are liberal arts and placement of graduates runs at 85-90 percent per year. (Author/PG)

  18. Open-Access Textbooks and Financial Sustainability: A Case Study on Flat World Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hilton III

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Many college students and their families are concerned about the high costs of textbooks. A company called Flat World Knowledge both gives away and sells open-source textbooks in a way it believes to be financially sustainable. This article reports on the financial sustainability of the Flat World Knowledge open-source textbook model after one year of operation.

  19. World Percussion Approaches in Collegiate Percussion Programs: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernly, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    As world percussion has grown in popularity in American colleges and universities, two main problems have emerged. The first problem is that no known source exists detailing how percussion instructors have incorporated world percussion into their collegiate teaching. A review of the literature has highlighted four main approaches to incorporating…

  20. Open-Access Textbooks and Financial Sustainability: A Case Study on Flat World Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, John, III; Wiley, David

    2011-01-01

    Many college students and their families are concerned about the high costs of textbooks. A company called Flat World Knowledge both gives away and sells open-source textbooks in a way it believes to be financially sustainable. This article reports on the financial sustainability of the Flat World Knowledge open-source textbook model after one…