WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit-based approach growing

  1. Effects of unit-based garbage pricing : A differences-in-differences approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allers, Maarten A.; Hoeben, Corine

    Using a unique 10-year dataset of all 458 Dutch municipalities, we apply a differences-in-differences approach to estimate the effect of unit-based pricing on household waste quantities and recycling. Community-level studies of unit-based pricing typically do not include fixed effects at the local

  2. Blueprint and Approach to Grow Revenue in Small Technology Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Bailetti

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines a new approach to grow the revenue of small technology companies and technology startups. We name this new approach the business ecosystem approach. The article is organized into five sections. The first section provides a blueprint to grow revenue and an inventory of growth formulas that top management teams of small technology companies and founders of startups find useful. The second section briefly defines business ecosystems, keystones and platforms. The third section describes the business ecosystem approach to grow the revenue of small technology companies and technology startups. It compares the traditional and business ecosystem approaches to growing revenue; identifies when the business ecosystem approach works better than the traditional approach; explains what small companies and startups need to do to grow revenue using the business ecosystem approach; and describes the benefits and risks of implementing the business ecosystem approach. The fourth section compares three approaches to growing revenue and highlights the differences between i business ecosystems and development communities and ii the business ecosystem approach and outsourcing. The fifth section identifies the key decisions a small technology company or technology startup needs to make to become the keystone that anchors a business ecosystem.

  3. Dealing with heterogeneous landslide information for landslide susceptibility assessment: comparing a pixel-based and slope unit-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Liesbet; Kervyn, Matthieu; Poesen, Jean; Reichenbach, Paola; Rossi, Mauro; Marchesini, Ivan; Alvioli, Massimiliano; Dewitte, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    In the Rwenzori Mountains, various multi-disciplinary data collection initiatives have resulted in a heterogeneous database counting 247 fully characterized landslides with known size and shape (polygon dataset) and 307 landslides represented as single points taken at an unknown location within the landslide body (point dataset). While the polygon dataset covers only 9% of the inhabited highlands, the point dataset extends the total inventoried area to 18% of the entire inhabited highland region. A regional susceptibility model for the total area should therefore include both information from polygon- as well as point datasets. This involves two distinct methodological challenges with regard to the use of points and polygons respectively. Firstly, the point dataset, where the location of the point within the landslide body is unknown, may not be fully representative for the spatial conditions under which the landslides occurred. Here we aim to identify a robust approach, to limit this uncertainty and maximize the point location representativeness. For this purpose, a pixel-based approach is tested and compared to a slope unit-based approach. To mimic the uncertainty related to the localization of the points, 50 random samplings of single points within each landslide were performed and then fed into a logistic regression model. The model was thus run 50 times using both the slope unit-based and the pixel-based approach. The results show that the slope unit-based alternative has an overall better performance than the pixel-based with comparable stability over the runs. Based on these results, the slope unit seems a more appropriate mapping unit for a susceptibility model based on point-data. A second significant methodological issue, when using polygon-based models, concerns the decision on when a slope unit is considered to be landslide-prone. A threshold representing the fraction of the slope unit affected by landslides above which a slope unit is assigned to be

  4. Allocation of basic health units based on the multicriteria approach: a proposition for a mediumsized city

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    Raquel Ferreira de Negreiros

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Basic Health Units (UBSs are responsible for the treatment of diseases in their initial phase. It is possible to observe that there is an investment by the Brazilian government into this kind of strategy in health policies. These kinds of actions aim to reduce the number of patients being sent to hospitals, because the low and medium priority problems can be treated at a UBS. The UBSs are related to the Family Health Program (PSF with the objective of serving the poorest population. The government must allocate these units efficiently, to improve the services and serve more people. However, this kind of decision is made by the empirical knowledge of municipal managers. This paper proposes a model to rationalize this decision process using the multiple criteria decision aid approach to allocate these units in a city in the west region of Rio Grande do Norte State, in Brazil. We can conclude that the model developed prioritizes the neighborhoods with the greatest need for healthcare, using the value system of the city’s health department.

  5. Quantum grow--a quantum dynamics sampling approach for growing potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsi, Oded; Collins, Michael A; Peskin, Uri

    2010-03-28

    A quantum sampling algorithm for the interpolation of diabatic potential energy matrices by the Grow method is introduced. The new procedure benefits from penetration of the wave packet into classically forbidden regions, and the accurate quantum mechanical description of nonadiabatic transitions. The increased complexity associated with running quantum dynamics is reduced by using approximate low order expansions of the nuclear wave function within a Multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree scheme during the Grow process. The sampling algorithm is formulated and applied for three representative test cases, demonstrating the recovery of analytic potentials by the interpolated ones, and the convergence of a dynamic observable.

  6. An iterative approach to region growing using associative memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, W. E.; Cowart, A.

    1983-01-01

    Region growing, often given as a classical example of the recursive control structures used in image processing which are often awkward to implement in hardware where the intent is the segmentation of an image at raster scan rates, is addressed in light of the postulate that any computation which can be performed recursively can be performed easily and efficiently by iteration coupled with association. Attention is given to an algorithm and hardware structure able to perform region labeling iteratively at scan rates. Every pixel is individually labeled with an identifier which signifies the region to which it belongs. Difficulties otherwise requiring recursion are handled by maintaining an equivalence table in hardware transparent to the computer, which reads the labeled pixels. A simulation of the associative memory has demonstrated its effectiveness.

  7. Medicinal plants growing in the Judea region: network approach for searching potential therapeutic targets

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    Arie Budovsky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants growing in the Judea region are widely used in traditional medicine of the Levant region. Nevertheless, they have not so far been sufficiently analyzed and their medicinal potential has not been evaluated. This study is the first attempt to fill the gap in the knowledge of the plants growing in the region. Comprehensive data mining of online botanical databases and peer-reviewed scientific literature including ethno-pharmacological surveys from the Levant region was applied to compile a full list of plants growing in the Judea region, with the focus on their medicinal applications. Around 1300 plants growing in the Judea region were identified. Of them, 25% have medicinal applications which were analyzed in this study. Screening for chemical-protein interactions, together with the network-based analysis of potential targets, will facilitate discovery and therapeutic applications of the Judea region plants. Such an approach could also be applied as an integrative platform for further searching the potential therapeutic targets of plants growing in other regions of the world.

  8. Lung Lesion Extraction Using a Toboggan Based Growing Automatic Segmentation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangdian; Yang, Caiyun; Fan, Li; Wang, Kun; Yang, Feng; Liu, Shiyuan; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The accurate segmentation of lung lesions from computed tomography (CT) scans is important for lung cancer research and can offer valuable information for clinical diagnosis and treatment. However, it is challenging to achieve a fully automatic lesion detection and segmentation with acceptable accuracy due to the heterogeneity of lung lesions. Here, we propose a novel toboggan based growing automatic segmentation approach (TBGA) with a three-step framework, which are automatic initial seed point selection, multi-constraints 3D lesion extraction and the final lesion refinement. The new approach does not require any human interaction or training dataset for lesion detection, yet it can provide a high lesion detection sensitivity (96.35%) and a comparable segmentation accuracy with manual segmentation (P > 0.05), which was proved by a series assessments using the LIDC-IDRI dataset (850 lesions) and in-house clinical dataset (121 lesions). We also compared TBGA with commonly used level set and skeleton graph cut methods, respectively. The results indicated a significant improvement of segmentation accuracy . Furthermore, the average time consumption for one lesion segmentation was under 8 s using our new method. In conclusion, we believe that the novel TBGA can achieve robust, efficient and accurate lung lesion segmentation in CT images automatically.

  9. Growing organizational capacity through a systems approach: one health network's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Richard; Capuano, Terry; Durishin, Linda Drexinger; Stern, Glen; Burke, James B

    2008-02-01

    Hospitals are reporting unexpected surges in demand for services. Lehigh Valley Hospital challenged its clinical and administrative staff to increase capacity by at least 4% per year using an interdepartmental, systemwide initiative, Growing Organizational Capacity (GOC). Following a systemwide leadership retreat that yielded more than 1,000 ideas, the initiative's principal sponsor convened a cross-functional improvement team. During a two-year period, 17 projects were implemented. Using a complex systems approach, improvement ideas "emerged" from microsystems at the points of care. Through rigorous reporting and testing of process adaptations, need, data, and people drove innovation. Hundreds of multilevel clinical and administrative staff redesigned processes and roles to increase organizational capacity. Admissions rose by 6.1%, 5.5 %, 8.7%, 5.0%, and 3.8% in fiscal years 2003 through 2007, respectively. Process enhancements cost approximately $1 million, while increased revenues attributable to increased capacity totaled $2.5 million. Multiple, coordinated, and concurrent projects created a greater impact than that possible with a single project. GOC and its success, best explained in the context of complex adaptive systems and microsystem theories, are transferrable to throughput issues that challenge efficiency and effectiveness in other health care systems.

  10. A simplified approach to calculate slurry production of growing pigs at farm level

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    Franco Tagliapietra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified approach to predict the amount of slurry produced by growing pigs at farm level is proposed. The inputs are initial (LWi and final (LWf live weights, production (t and empty (empty periods, feed consumption (FC, dry matter (DMD, N digestibilities and farm water consumption per pig (FWC. Estimates of the amount of water required (or arisen per kg of feed for the various physiological functions were estimated by running a published mathematical model using data representing the ordinary conditions of rearing. Water excretion was estimated in two ways depending on: 1 free access (ad lib to water; 2 restricted access (forced. In the first case, the proportion of water consumed (wiad lib and those excreted with the urine (wuad lib and the faeces (wfec were quantified to be 2.9, 1.72 and 0.33 kg per kg of feed, respectively. From the urinary excretions of N and minerals, obtained as the difference between the digestible nutrient intakes and the retentions, the model predicted a urinary DM content of 2.1% (by weight. In the second case, for pigs receiving drinking water in forced ratio with the feed (wiforced, the urinary production was calculated as wuforced=(wiforced+wf+wo-(wd+ws+wg+wfec+we, where wf=water content in feed (0.12 kg/kg, wo=water arising from nutrient oxidation (0.25 kg/kg, wd=water required for digestion (0.08 kg/kg, ws=water demand for protein and lipid synthesis (0.06 kg/kg, wg=water retained in body tissues (0.14 kg/kg and we=water lost through evaporation (0.96 kg/kg. Estimates of fresh slurry production (faeces+urine were regressed against the values resulting from empirical literature equations and referred to pigs fed water:feed ratios of 2.5:1, 2.9:1 and 4:1. The resulting regression (R2=0.97, with a slope close to unity (1.05, indicated that the approach can be extended to predict the farm fresh slurry production with pigs having free access to water or kept on different water:feed ratios. In agreement with

  11. Increasing certification through unit-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Cartlidge, Erica; Mahon, Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    Certification has been identified by multiple organizations as an important component and means of elevating the level of nursing care provided to patients and demonstrating to the public that the nursing staff has subspecialty knowledge. Certification may lead to improved patient satisfaction and outcomes as well as increased nurse satisfaction and retention. Despite the known potential benefits associated with certification, institutions struggle to improve certification rates. One possible method to overcome system barriers to certification is the implementation of a unit-based study course to prepare nurses for the Certified Breast Care Nurse (CBCN) examination. Data collected by an author-developed tool as one institution created and executed a unit-based study course suggest that such an approach increased certification rates and improved disease-specific knowledge and confidence among the staff, despite no official data existing on the tool's reliability and validity. Implementation of similar programs may be successful in improving certification at other institutions seeking to raise certification rates.

  12. Levels of specificity of Xylaria species associated with fungus-growing termites: a phylogenetic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.A.; Ros, V.I.D.; Beer, de Z.W.; Debets, A.J.M.; Hartog, E.; Kuyper, T.W.; Laessoe, T.; Slippers, B.; Aanen, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Fungus-growing termites live in obligate mutualistic symbiosis with species of the basidiomycete genus Termitomyces, which are cultivated on a substrate of dead plant material. When the termite colony dies, or when nest material is incubated without termites in the laboratory, fruiting bodies of the

  13. Levels of specificity of Xylaria species associated with fungus-growing termites: a phylogenetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Ros, V I D; De Beer, Z. W.

    2009-01-01

    Fungus-growing termites live in obligate mutualistic symbiosis with species of the basidiomycete genus Termitomyces, which are cultivated on a substrate of dead plant material. When the termite colony dies, or when nest material is incubated without termites in the laboratory, fruiting bodies of ...

  14. Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. productivity in different Italian growing areas: a modelling approach

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    Mario Baldini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jerusalem artichoke is considered one of the more interesting crops for inulin production. It has been used to date for the production of low calorie sweetening syrups, dietetic food enriched with fibre, medicines and cosmetics, while more recently, interesting prospects have been opening up for energy uses. The main aspects influencing its adaptability to different pedo-climatic conditions and cropping systems were analysed by implementing CSS (Cropping System Simulator, a simulation model describing crop biomass production for this specific crop. Growth analysis experimental data of plant dry matter accumulation, obtained over two years of trials (1999-2000 in different Italian growing areas (Udine, Bologna, Bari under irrigated and rain-fed conditions, were used for the parameterisation and calibration of the model. The biomass accumulation observed and simulated under rain-fed and irrigated conditions in the different growing areas is reported for the different plant organs, with good correspondence shown between simulated and measured values as reported by the statistical indices for the model calibration, particularly for biomass of tubers and leaves. The model studied, despite a simplified description of some processes, proves to represent the maximum biomass yield of Jerusalem artichoke satisfactorily, with an adequate response to the main environmental factors causing yield and biomass production variation among the years and locations. However, further model improvements are necessary in order to better represent the relationship between phenology and translocation of the assimilates between stalk and tuber during the development phases of the plant, suggesting shorter survey intervals over this growing phase.

  15. RDM: An Approach from a Modern University with a Growing Research Portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Fitt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the background work undertaken by Oxford Brookes University in assessing how best to position institutional support for Research Data Management. It further discusses the development of our University’s research data management policy and its collaborative approach to data management support. Finally, it reflects on the challenges of overseeing policy implementation and providing the required enactment infrastructure. The approach that we take is one that will hopefully be of interest to those institutions who are developing their research base and seeking to offer better data management support to researchers in a time of reduced or declining resource. Overall, we feel that the strategic and institution-wide approach that we have taken has worked well, and may be suited to institutions like ours that are less research-intensive. Finally, we feel that our approach is one that can readily be copied.

  16. Technical efficiency of Greek olive growing farms: a robust approach with panel data

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    S. Kourtesi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of technical efficiency in the agricultural sector and the influence of exogenous (environmental variables on the production process has been a major topic of economic research especially for managers and policy makers. The methological innovation of the present study involves the impact of environmental variables on efficiency and the utilization of panel data for the empirical analysis. This has been pursued using full nonparametric robust frontier techniques (the alpha-quantile estimator and a panel data set of olive growing farms in Greece from the Farm Accountancy Data Network of the EU. According to the empirical results, the ratio of owned to total land, the ratio of family to total labor, the degree of specialization, and a farm’s location have a statistically significant impact on performance, which is not constant but varies over the 2006 to 2009 period considered.

  17. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  18. A Self-Calibrating Multi-Band Region Growing Approach to Segmentation of Single and Multi-Band Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paglieroni, D W

    2002-12-20

    Image segmentation transforms pixel-level information from raw images to a higher level of abstraction in which related pixels are grouped into disjoint spatial regions. Such regions typically correspond to natural or man-made objects or structures, natural variations in land cover, etc. For many image interpretation tasks (such as land use assessment, automatic target cueing, defining relationships between objects, etc.), segmentation can be an important early step. Remotely sensed images (e.g., multi-spectral and hyperspectral images) often contain many spectral bands (i.e., multiple layers of 2D images). Multi-band images are important because they contain more information than single-band images. Objects or natural variations that are readily apparent in certain spectral bands may be invisible in 2D broadband images. In this paper, the classical region growing approach to image segmentation is generalized from single to multi-band images. While it is widely recognized that the quality of image segmentation is affected by which segmentation algorithm is used, this paper shows that algorithm parameter values can have an even more profound effect. A novel self-calibration framework is developed for automatically selecting parameter values that produce segmentations that most closely resemble a calibration edge map (derived separately using a simple edge detector). Although the framework is generic in the sense that it can imbed any core segmentation algorithm, this paper only demonstrates self-calibration with multi-band region growing. The framework is applied to a variety of AVIRIS image blocks at different spectral resolutions, in an effort to assess the impact of spectral resolution on segmentation quality. The image segmentations are assessed quantitatively, and it is shown that segmentation quality does not generally appear to be highly correlated with spectral resolution.

  19. Suitability analysis for rice growing sites using a multicriteria evaluation and GIS approach in great Mwea region, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihoro, Joseph; Bosco, Njoroge J; Murage, Hunja

    2013-12-01

    Land suitability analysis is a prerequisite to achieving optimum utilization of the available land resources. Lack of knowledge on best combination of factors that suit production of rice has contributed to the low production. The aim of this study was to develop a suitability map for rice crop based on physical and climatic factors of production using a Multi-Criteria Evaluation (MCE) & GIS approach. The study was carried out in Kirinyaga, Embu and Mberee counties in Kenya. Biophysical variables of soil, climate and topography were considered for suitability analysis. All data were stored in ArcGIS 9.3 environment and the factor maps were generated. For MCE, Pairwise Comparison Matrix was applied and the suitable areas for rice crop were generated and graduated. The current land cover map of the area was developed from a scanned survey map of the rice growing areas. According to the present land cover map, the rice cultivated area was 13,369 ha. Finally, we overlaid the land cover map with the suitability map to identify variances between the present and potential land use. The crop-land evaluation results of the present study showed that, 75% of total area currently being used was under highly suitable areas and 25% was under moderately suitable areas. The results showed that the potential area for rice growing is 86,364 ha and out of this only 12% is under rice cultivation. This research provided information at local level that could be used by farmers to select cropping patterns and suitability.

  20. A region-growing approach for automatic outcrop fracture extraction from a three-dimensional point cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zou, Lejun; Shen, Xiaohua; Ren, Yupeng; Qin, Yi

    2017-02-01

    Conventional manual surveys of rock mass fractures usually require large amounts of time and labor; yet, they provide a relatively small set of data that cannot be considered representative of the study region. Terrestrial laser scanners are increasingly used for fracture surveys because they can efficiently acquire large area, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) point clouds from outcrops. However, extracting fractures and other planar surfaces from 3D outcrop point clouds is still a challenging task. No method has been reported that can be used to automatically extract the full extent of every individual fracture from a 3D outcrop point cloud. In this study, we propose a method using a region-growing approach to address this problem; the method also estimates the orientation of each fracture. In this method, criteria based on the local surface normal and curvature of the point cloud are used to initiate and control the growth of the fracture region. In tests using outcrop point cloud data, the proposed method identified and extracted the full extent of individual fractures with high accuracy. Compared with manually acquired field survey data, our method obtained better-quality fracture data, thereby demonstrating the high potential utility of the proposed method.

  1. A Multi-Level Approach to Modeling Rapidly Growing Mega-Regions as a Coupled Human-Natural System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J. A.; Tang, W.; Meentemeyer, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    concept of our modeling approach and describe its strengths and weaknesses. We furthermore use empirical data for the states of North and South Carolina to demonstrate how the modeling framework can be applied to a large, heterogeneous study system with diverse decision-making agents. Grimm et al. (2005) Pattern-Oriented Modeling of Agent-Based Complex Systems: Lessons from Ecology. Science 310, 987-991. Liu et al. (2013) Framing Sustainability in a Telecoupled World. Ecology and Society 18(2), 26. Meentemeyer et al. (2013) FUTURES: Multilevel Simulations of Merging Urban-Rural Landscape Structure Using a Stochastic Patch-Growing Algorithm. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 103(4), 785-807.

  2. Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H: An Innovative Approach to Deliver Campus- Based Field Experiences to Pre-Entry Extension Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Penny Pennington; Weeks, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H Club was created as a pilot program for college students seeking to gain experience as non-formal youth educators, specifically serving pre-entry level Extension educators through a university-based 4-H club. Seventeen student volunteers contributed an estimated 630 hours of service to the club during spring 2011. The club…

  3. Coral Tree Nursery©: An innovative approach to growing corals in an ocean-based field nursery

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    Kenneth Nedimyer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful mariculture of stony corals has been demonstrated extensively for the past ten to fifteenyears, mostly in the tropical Pacific Ocean for the global marine ornamental aquarium market. Many differentmethods have been used to asexually fragment and grow branching stony corals, but all utilize a two-dimensionalgrow out design, primarily horizontal and affixed on some sort of disk like structure. To maximize growingsurface and take advantage of the three dimensional water column space above the sea floor, the CoralRestoration Foundation has developed a novel new technique, the Coral Tree Nursery©, which has proven to bevery effective at both increasing growth over previous methods and reducing disease and damage risks fromwave forces.

  4. The More You Know, the More You Can Grow: An Information Theoretic Approach to Growth in the Information Age

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    Martin Hilbert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In our information age, information alone has become a driver of social growth. Information is the fuel of “big data” companies, and the decision-making compass of policy makers. Can we quantify how much information leads to how much social growth potential? Information theory is used to show that information (in bits is effectively a quantifiable ingredient of growth. The article presents a single equation that allows both to describe hands-off natural selection of evolving populations and to optimize population fitness in uncertain environments through intervention. The setup analyzes the communication channel between the growing population and its uncertain environment. The role of information in population growth can be thought of as the optimization of information flow over this (more or less noisy channel. Optimized growth implies that the population absorbs all communicated environmental structure during evolutionary updating (measured by their mutual information. This is achieved by endogenously adjusting the population structure to the exogenous environmental pattern (through bet-hedging/portfolio management. The setup can be applied to decompose the growth of any discrete population in stationary, stochastic environments (economic, cultural, or biological. Two empirical examples from the information economy reveal inherent trade-offs among the involved information quantities during growth optimization.

  5. Downscaling 250-m MODIS growing season NDVI based on multiple-date landsat images and data mining approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    The satellite-derived growing season time-integrated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GSN) has been used as a proxy for vegetation biomass productivity. The 250-m GSN data estimated from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been used for terrestrial ecosystem modeling and monitoring. High temporal resolution with a wide range of wavelengths make the MODIS land surface products robust and reliable. The long-term 30-m Landsat data provide spatial detailed information for characterizing human-scale processes and have been used for land cover and land change studies. The main goal of this study is to combine 250-m MODIS GSN and 30-m Landsat observations to generate a quality-improved high spatial resolution (30-m) GSN database. A rule-based piecewise regression GSN model based on MODIS and Landsat data was developed. Results show a strong correlation between predicted GSN and actual GSN (r = 0.97, average error = 0.026). The most important Landsat variables in the GSN model are Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVIs) in May and August. The derived MODIS-Landsat-based 30-m GSN map provides biophysical information for moderate-scale ecological features. This multiple sensor study retains the detailed seasonal dynamic information captured by MODIS and leverages the high-resolution information from Landsat, which will be useful for regional ecosystem studies.

  6. Growing Pains

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Heat expands and cold contracts: it’s a simple thermodynamic rule. But when temperatures swing from 300 K to near-absolute zero, this rule can mean a contraction of more than 80 metres across the LHC’s 27-km-long cryogenic system. Keeping this growth in check are compensators (a.k.a. bellows), which shrink and stretch in response to thermodynamic changes. Leak tests and X-rays now underway in the tunnel have revealed that these “joints” might be suffering from growing pains…   This 25-μm weld crack is thought to be the cause of the helium leaks. Prior to the LS1 warm-up, CERN’s cryogenic experts knew of two points in the machine’s cryogenic distribution system that were leaking helium. Fortunately, these leaks were sufficiently small, confined to known sub-sectors of the cryogenic line and – with help from the vacuum team (TE-VSC) – could easily be compensated for. But as the machine warmed up f...

  7. A new approach to epitaxially grow high-quality GaN films on Si substrates: the combination of MBE and PLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Weijia; Zhu, Yunnong; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-04-22

    High-quality GaN epitaxial films have been grown on Si substrates with Al buffer layer by the combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technologies. MBE is used to grow Al buffer layer at first, and then PLD is deployed to grow GaN epitaxial films on the Al buffer layer. The surface morphology, crystalline quality, and interfacial property of as-grown GaN epitaxial films on Si substrates are studied systematically. The as-grown ~300 nm-thick GaN epitaxial films grown at 850 °C with ~30 nm-thick Al buffer layer on Si substrates show high crystalline quality with the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for GaN(0002) and GaN(102) X-ray rocking curves of 0.45° and 0.61°, respectively; very flat GaN surface with the root-mean-square surface roughness of 2.5 nm; as well as the sharp and abrupt GaN/AlGaN/Al/Si hetero-interfaces. Furthermore, the corresponding growth mechanism of GaN epitaxial films grown on Si substrates with Al buffer layer by the combination of MBE and PLD is hence studied in depth. This work provides a novel and simple approach for the epitaxial growth of high-quality GaN epitaxial films on Si substrates.

  8. Environmental activism and dynamics of unit-based pricing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Elbert [SEOR-ECRi and Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Room H 7-25, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands); Gradus, Raymond [Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and ECRi, De Boelelaan 1105, Room 1E-66, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-01-15

    It is well-known that unit-based pricing systems have a significant effect on the quantity of collected waste. Part of this effect may, however, result from a selection bias or environmental activism effect. Based on a pooled cross-section for the Netherlands for 1998-2005 we show that despite the correction for environmental activism the effect of the weight and bag unit-based pricing system on the quantity of waste is sizeable. Moreover, this environmental activism effect is decreasing over time, so that the most environmental friendly municipalities implement unit-based pricing systems at first. In addition, we show that the volume effects of the different unit-based pricing systems are rather stable over time. Although we find some evidence for a learning effect, nearly no evidence is found for an awareness erosion effect. This means at least that the effect of unit-based pricing does not decrease over time, which is reassuring from an environmental point of view. Pricing waste helps. (author)

  9. ELT Materials Design of a Speaking Unit based on Needs Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ai-juan; TONG Xing-hong; DU Wen-jing

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors design a speaking unit based on needs analysis following Hutchinson and Waters’(1987) model. First, the rationale in designing this unit is introduced, which involves the teaching approach adopted and relevant theo-ries in organizing the materials. Then, the teaching plan of this speaking unit is provided and some activities are designed to cre-ate an authentic and optimal situation for students to practice their speaking skill.

  10. The Mind Grows Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahy, Rina

    2012-01-01

    There is a vast supply of prior art that study models for mental processes. Some studies in psychology and philosophy approach it from an inner perspective in terms of experiences and percepts. Others such as neurobiology or connectionist-machines approach it externally by viewing the mind as complex circuit of neurons where each neuron is a primitive binary circuit. In this paper, we also model the mind as a place where a circuit grows, starting as a collection of primitive components at birth and then builds up incrementally in a bottom up fashion. A new node is formed by a simple composition of prior nodes when we undergo a repeated experience that can be described by that composition. Unlike neural networks, however, these circuits take "concepts" or "percepts" as inputs and outputs. Thus the growing circuits can be likened to a growing collection of lambda expressions that are built on top of one another in an attempt to compress the sensory input as a heuristic to bound its Kolmogorov Complexity.

  11. Paradigm shift of contamination risk of six heavy metals in tea (Camellia sinensis L.) growing soil: A new approach influenced by inorganic and organic amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Tanmoy; Bora, Krishnamoni; Paul, Ranjit Kumar; Das, Sampa; Khare, Puja; Dutta, Amrit Kumar; Boruah, Romesh Kumar

    2017-09-15

    The present study provides several contamination and ecological risk indices for selected metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn) in tea (Camellia sinensis L.; cv. S.3A/3) growing soil influenced by lower to higher doses of inorganic and organic amendments. While ecological risk indices were applied, it was observed that same treatment showed different risk levels but contamination risk status did not vary significantly. All the indices showed significant correlation with heavy metals' concentration in young shoots of tea plants. As the indices characterized experimental soils with different extents of contamination, it would be important to standardize the indices with long term experiments followed by generation of new index. Therefore, we formulated a new contamination index named as Tea Research Association Heavy Metal Contamination Index (TRAHMCI) for tea growing soils. TRAHMCI is based on the probable change of metal status in soil with progress of growth of tea plant. This could be useful to negate discrepancies arised from use of various existing metal contamination indices in tea growing soils amended with different doses of fertilizers. TRAHMCI was formulated based on individual contamination factor using statistical technique and applied to the present dataset which provided a more holistic understanding of overall tea growing soil behavior. The limitation of the developed TRAHMCI index is that, the index had not been validated for other crops in our study not to claim its effective use for crops other than tea. As already mentioned, this new index had been formulated by taking tea as the test crop with above mentioned six heavy metal contents in young shoot and made tea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An Ambition to Grow

    OpenAIRE

    Ron Kemp; R Hakkert

    2006-01-01

    This report tries to gain insight in the willingness or ambition to grow of a small business owner. The main question of this report is therefore: Which factors influence the ambition to grow a business? To examine the ambition to grow an economic and a psychological perspective is given in this study.

  13. Growing Pains (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Parents > Growing Pains Print A ... olds and, later, in 8- to 12-year-olds. Signs and Symptoms Growing pains always concentrate in the muscles , rather than ...

  14. Growing for different ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catts, Oron; Zurr, Ionat

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative biology are usually discussed in relation to biomedical research and applications. However, hand in hand with developments of this field in the biomedical context, other approaches and uses for non-medical ends have been explored. There is a growing interest in exploring spin off tissue engineering and regenerative biology technologies in areas such as consumer products, art and design. This paper outlines developments regarding in vitro meat and leather, actuators and bio-mechanic interfaces, speculative design and contemporary artistic practices. The authors draw on their extensive experience of using tissue engineering for non-medical ends to speculate about what lead to these applications and their possible future development and uses. Avoiding utopian and dystopian postures and using the notion of the contestable, this paper also mentions some philosophical and ethical consideration stemming from the use of non-medical approaches to tissue constructs. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.

  15. Semantic Units Based Event Detection in Soccer Videos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONGXiao-Feng; LIUQing-Shan; LUHan-Qing; JINHong-Liang

    2005-01-01

    A semantic unit based event detection scheme in soccer videos is proposed in this paper.The scheme can be characterized as a three-layer framework. At the lowest layer, low-level features including color, texture, edge, shape, and motion are extracted. High-level semantic events are defined at the highest layer. In order to connect low-level features and high-level semantics, we design and define some semantic units at the intermediate layer. A semantic unit is composed of a sequence of consecutives frames with the same cue that is deduced from low-level features. Based on semantic units, a Bayesian network is used to reason the probabilities of events. The experiments for shoot and card event detection in soccer videos show that the proposed method has an encouraging performance.

  16. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  17. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of growing internal iliac artery aneurysm after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Young; Kim, Shin Jung; Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  18. Proposal for loadable and erasable optical memory unit based on dual active microring optical integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunhong; Zhang, Xiaobei; Zhang, Xinliang; Huang, Dexiu

    2008-11-01

    A novel approach for loadable and erasable optical memory unit based on dual microring optical integrators is proposed and studied. The optical integrator, which can generate an optical step function for data storing, is synthesized using active media for loss compensation and a tunable phase shifter for data reading at any time. The input data into the memory is return-to-zero (RZ) signal, and the output data read from the memory is also RZ format with a narrower pulse width. An optical digital register based on the proposed optical memory unit is also investigated and simulated, which shows the potential for large scale data storage and serial-to-parallel data conversion. A great number of such memory units can be densely integrated on a photonic circuit for future large scale data storage and buffer.

  19. Assessing Wheat Frost Risk with the Support of GIS: An Approach Coupling a Growing Season Meteorological Index and a Hybrid Fuzzy Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaojie Yue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crop frost, one kind of agro-meteorological disaster, often causes significant loss to agriculture. Thus, evaluating the risk of wheat frost aids scientific response to such disasters, which will ultimately promote food security. Therefore, this paper aims to propose an integrated risk assessment model of wheat frost, based on meteorological data and a hybrid fuzzy neural network model, taking China as an example. With the support of a geographic information system (GIS, a comprehensive method was put forward. Firstly, threshold temperatures of wheat frost at three growth stages were proposed, referring to phenology in different wheat growing areas and the meteorological standard of Degree of Crop Frost Damage (QX/T 88-2008. Secondly, a vulnerability curve illustrating the relationship between frost hazard intensity and wheat yield loss was worked out using hybrid fuzzy neural network model. Finally, the wheat frost risk was assessed in China. Results show that our proposed threshold temperatures are more suitable than using 0 °C in revealing the spatial pattern of frost occurrence, and hybrid fuzzy neural network model can further improve the accuracy of the vulnerability curve of wheat subject to frost with limited historical hazard records. Both these advantages ensure the precision of wheat frost risk assessment. In China, frost widely distributes in 85.00% of the total winter wheat planting area, but mainly to the north of 35°N; the southern boundary of wheat frost has moved northward, potentially because of the warming climate. There is a significant trend that suggests high risk areas will enlarge and gradually expand to the south, with the risk levels increasing from a return period of 2 years to 20 years. Among all wheat frost risk levels, the regions with loss rate ranges from 35.00% to 45.00% account for the largest area proportion, ranging from 58.60% to 63.27%. We argue that for wheat and other frost-affected crops, it is

  20. BIOTECHNOLOGY IN FRUIT GROWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jurković

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Research studies in the area of biotechnologies in fruit growing started at the Agricultural Institute Osijek in 2006 with the establishment of the first experimental in vitro laboratory for micropropagation. The laboratory started an active research related to the Project "Biotechnological methods in fruit tree identification, selection and propagation" Project is part of program "Preservation and revitalization of grape and fruit autochthonous cultivars". The goal of this research is to determine genetic differences between autochthonous and introduced cultivars of cherry as well as cultivars and types of sour cherry, to find and optimize a method for fast recovery of clonal material. A great number of cherry cultivars and types within the population of cv. Oblacinska sour cherry exists in Croatia. A survey with the purpose of selecting autochthonous cultivars for further selection has been done in previous research. Differences have been found in a number of important agronomic traits within the populations of cv. Oblačinska sour cherry. Autochthonous cherry cultivars are suspected to be synonyms of known old cultivars which were introduced randomly and have been naturalized under a local name. Identification and description of cultivars and types of fruits is based on special visible properties which were measurable or notable. In this approach difficulties arise from the effect of non-genetic factors on expression of certain traits. Genetic-physiological problem of S allele autoincompatibility exists within cherry cultivars. Therefore it is necessary to put different cultivars in the plantation to pollinate each other. Apart form the fast and certain sort identification independent of environmental factors, biotechnological methods based on PCR enable faster virus detection compared with classical serologic methods and indexing and cover a wider range of plant pathogens including those undetectable by other methods. Thermotherapy and

  1. Data acquisition and meter unit based in wifi communication protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Cázarez Ayala

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Without doubt, the competitive fast rhythm of the industries is one of the main causes helped bring to the accelerated growth of the electronic technology and the communication. The need to develop new products with a best quality, cheaper and faster as assure and increase the quality of the products in the international markets, requires of new technologies to the metering, monitoring and control of their production processes, of which finality is to improve the processes to guaranteed their products in the market in the less time possible, the best quality and low cost for the final consumer. This work is based in the design and implementation of a Wireless Data Acquisition Unit based in WiFi protocol, which is oriented to meter, monitoring and the control of processes in the industry, commercial and the home automation applications, using one of the wirelessprotocols with the biggest acceptance in the market, with the main objective of to take advantage of the installed physical infrastructure in the place of the application, like industry, company or house. The Unit is based in the RN-131G, a Roving Network company module, which is able to work in stand-alone mode with ultralow power consummation and supporting the IEEE 802.11b/g protocols, in which is possible to achieve transfer rates of up to 11 Mbps and 54 Mbps in /b & /g specifications respectively. Whit this unit is possible to meter up to 5 analogs signals with 14 bits precision and has include a temperature and relative humidity sensors. This unit can meter two digital signals and act mean two digitals outputs, and gas include an USB port for communication and programming tasks.

  2. Applicability of a "Multi-Stage Pulse Labeling" (15)N Approach to Phenotype N Dynamics in Maize Plant Components during the Growing Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Silva, Amanda; Camberato, James J; Coram, Tristan; Filley, Timothy; Vyn, Tony J

    2017-01-01

    Highlights This work utilizes "multi-stage pulse labeling" (15)N applications, primarily during reproductive growth stages, as a phenotyping strategy to identify maize hybrids with superior N use efficiency (NUE) under low N conditions. Research using labeled isotopic N ((15)N) can precisely quantify fertilizer nitrogen (N) uptake and organ-specific N allocation in field crops such as maize (Zea mays L.). The overall research objective was to study plant N uptake patterns potentially correlated with N use efficiency (NUE) in field-grown maize hybrids using a "multi-stage pulse labeling" (15)N phenotyping strategy with an emphasis on the reproductive period. Five hybrids varying in NUE were compared under zero N fertilizer application (0N) plus a moderate rate of 112 kg N ha(-1) (112N) in 2013 (2 locations) and 2014 growing seasons. The equivalent of 3.2 (2013) to 2.1 (2014) kg of (15)N ha(-1), as labeled Ca((15)NO3)2, was injected into soil on both sides of consecutive plants at multiple stages between V14 and R5. Aboveground plant biomass was primarily collected in short-term intervals (4-6 days after each (15)N application) in both years, and following a single long-term interval (at R6 after (15)N injection at R1) in 2014. Averaged across hybrids and site-years, the moderate N rate (112N) increased absolute (15)N uptake at all stages; however, plants in the 0N treatment allocated proportionally more (15)N to reproductive organs. Before flowering, short-term recovery of (15)N ((15)Nrec) totaled ~0.30 or 0.40 kg kg(-1) of the (15)N applied, and ~50% of that accumulated (15)Nu was found in leaves and 40% in stems. After flowering, plant (15)Nrec totaled ~0.30 kg kg(-1) of (15)N applied, and an average 30% of accumulated (15)Nu was present in leaves, 17% in stems, and the remainder-usually the majority-in ears. At the R5 stage, despite a declining overall rate of (15)N uptake per GDD thermal unit, plant (15)Nrec represented ~0.25 kg kg(-1) of (15)N applied, of which

  3. The Growing Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  4. Melting ice, growing trade?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sami Bensassi; Julienne C. Stroeve; Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso; Andrew P. Barrett

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Large reductions in Arctic sea ice, most notably in summer, coupled with growing interest in Arctic shipping and resource exploitation have renewed interest in the economic potential of the Northern Sea Route (NSR...

  5. Assessing Bacterial Diversity in the Rhizosphere of Thymus zygis Growing in the Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain through Culture-Dependent and Independent Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pascual

    Full Text Available Little is known of the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of wild plant species found in natural settings. The rhizosphere bacterial community associated with wild thyme, Thymus zygis L., plants was analyzed using cultivation, the creation of a near-full length 16S rRNA gene clone library and 454 amplicon pyrosequencing. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes. Although each approach gave a different perspective of the bacterial community, all classes/subclasses detected in the clone library and the cultured bacteria could be found in the pyrosequencing datasets. However, an exception caused by inconclusive taxonomic identification as a consequence of the short read length of pyrotags together with the detection of singleton sequences which corresponded to bacterial strains cultivated from the same sample highlight limitations and considerations which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting amplicon datasets. Amplicon pyrosequencing of replicate rhizosphere soil samples taken a year later permit the definition of the core microbiome associated with Thymus zygis plants. Abundant bacterial families and predicted functional profiles of the core microbiome suggest that the main drivers of the bacterial community in the Thymus zygis rhizosphere are related to the nutrients originating from the plant root and to their participation in biogeochemical cycles thereby creating an intricate relationship with this aromatic plant to allow for a feedback ecological benefit.

  6. Assessing Bacterial Diversity in the Rhizosphere of Thymus zygis Growing in the Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain) through Culture-Dependent and Independent Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; Blanco, Silvia; García-López, Marina; García-Salamanca, Adela; Bursakov, Sergey A; Genilloud, Olga; Bills, Gerald F; Ramos, Juan L; van Dillewijn, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Little is known of the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of wild plant species found in natural settings. The rhizosphere bacterial community associated with wild thyme, Thymus zygis L., plants was analyzed using cultivation, the creation of a near-full length 16S rRNA gene clone library and 454 amplicon pyrosequencing. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes. Although each approach gave a different perspective of the bacterial community, all classes/subclasses detected in the clone library and the cultured bacteria could be found in the pyrosequencing datasets. However, an exception caused by inconclusive taxonomic identification as a consequence of the short read length of pyrotags together with the detection of singleton sequences which corresponded to bacterial strains cultivated from the same sample highlight limitations and considerations which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting amplicon datasets. Amplicon pyrosequencing of replicate rhizosphere soil samples taken a year later permit the definition of the core microbiome associated with Thymus zygis plants. Abundant bacterial families and predicted functional profiles of the core microbiome suggest that the main drivers of the bacterial community in the Thymus zygis rhizosphere are related to the nutrients originating from the plant root and to their participation in biogeochemical cycles thereby creating an intricate relationship with this aromatic plant to allow for a feedback ecological benefit.

  7. Growing skull fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlović Miljan H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Growing skull fracture or craniocerebral erosion is a rare complication of linear skull fracture in childhood. It is characterized by progressive diastatic enlargement of the fracture line, which leads to a cranial defect, dural cleft, and cerebral herniation. It is presented as a soft pulsabile scalp swelling above the fracture, with a clear cranial defect. Case report. In this paper we presented a patient, an 8-month-old boy with the growing skull fracture revealed four weeks after the injury. After the surgical treatment, the boy was in a good general condition without the presence of neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Early recognition of craniocerebral erosion is very important. Timely detection prevents further progression of the disease and the evolution of neurological impairment. Surgery is the method of choice for treating a growing skull fracture .

  8. Efficiency Effects of Unit-based Pricing Systems and Institutional Choices of Waste Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dijkgraaf (Elbert); R.H.J.M. Gradus (Raymond)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Much attention has been paid to the influence of the institutional form of waste collection on costs. We extend this literature in three directions by including the unit-based pricing system. First, we show that unit-based pricing systems are more important from a

  9. Annoyances in Growing Up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yuanchang; Ye Qing

    2007-01-01

    @@ Annoyances in growing up seem to be unavoidable. Many problems still face the Chinese power industry just climbing onto a new level of 600-GW installed capacity. It has to search practicable solutions for problems with the significant themes including structure optimization,efficiency improvement and environment protection.

  10. Growing Up with "1984."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franza, August

    1983-01-01

    Relates changing student reaction to George Orwell's "1984" over 20 years of teaching. Finds present high school students' acceptance of Orwell's bleak world vision both a sign of student honesty and a frightening indication of the growing reality of the book. (MM)

  11. Growing Old in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglind, Hans

    This document contains the bases of lectures delivered in Florida by a visiting Stockholm University sociology professor. The first chapter, "Growing Old in Sweden," includes information on the income, standard of living, and quality of services available to the elderly in that country. That information is presented within the changing…

  12. Cities on the GROW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, Richard; Meulen, Suzanne; Mol, G.; Bailey, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Cities on the Grow is a cross-disciplinary project that has been funded by Climate-KIC, an initiative of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology. It seeks to support the sustainable growth of urban food enterprises toward the implementation of more commercially viable business practices.

  13. Growing Up In Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Judith

    1981-01-01

    Offers a glimpse of a Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition of 80 photographs and selected writings by first through eighth grade children growing up in Letcher County, Kentucky. Children were guided by an artist-in-residence sponsored by the Kentucky Arts Commission and Appalshop, a multimedia cooperative. (Author/RH)

  14. How to Grow Old

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bertrand Russell

    2008-01-01

    <正>1. In spite of the title, this article will really be on how not to grow old, which, at my time of life, is a much more important subject. My first advice would be to choose your ancestors carefully. Although both my parents died young, I have done well in this respect as regards my other ancestors. My maternal grandfather, it is true, was cut off in the flower of his youth at the age of sixty-seven,

  15. Knowledge grows when shared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbæk, Mikael Karstensen

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge is one of the few commodities that don’t devalue when used. Actually knowledge grows when shared and the free online access to peer-reviewed scientific publications is a potent ingredient the process of sharing. The sharing of knowledge is facilitated by the Open Access Movement. However...... infrastructure for Open Access was launched in Ghent, Belgium. This project and initiative is facilitating the success of the Open Access Pilot in FP7 as presented earlier in this journal. In this brief article I will present some of the most interesting issues that were discussed during the first session...

  16. Growing Old in Exile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liversage, Anika; Mirdal, Gretty Mizrahi

    2017-01-01

    Some studies on immigrants and ageing focus on the question of return; others focus on how immigrants, who grow old in their countries of destination, ‘age in place’, including whether they turn to their children or to public host country provisions for care and support. However, the issues...... of return and of ageing in place may both hold significance in individual immigrants’ lives. To investigate the changing expectations of old age throughout the life course, this paper draws on longitudinal interviews with immigrant women from Turkey who live in Denmark. We focus on the function of proximity...

  17. International trade growing fast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamber, D.

    1992-01-01

    Facts and figures relating to the state of the world's coal industry are quoted from a recent report by Sheffield Energy and Resources Information Services (SERIS) entitled 'Coal companies worldwide: competition and performance indicators'. The report ranks performance by country and compares data for 1990 with that of 1985. This article selects some figures on rising exports from Chinese companies and lists top ten coal exporters and producers worldwide for 1985 and 1990. Whilst in some countries exports are growing faster than production, the overall profitability of the coal industry has deteriorated. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

  18. Efficient graphics processing unit-based voxel carving for surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober-Gecks, Antje; Zwicker, Marius; Henrich, Dominik

    2016-07-01

    A graphics processing unit (GPU)-based implementation of a space carving method for the reconstruction of the photo hull is presented. In particular, the generalized voxel coloring with item buffer approach is transferred to the GPU. The fast computation on the GPU is realized by an incrementally calculated standard deviation within the likelihood ratio test, which is applied as color consistency criterion. A fast and efficient computation of complete voxel-pixel projections is provided using volume rendering methods. This generates a speedup of the iterative carving procedure while considering all given pixel color information. Different volume rendering methods, such as texture mapping and raycasting, are examined. The termination of the voxel carving procedure is controlled through an anytime concept. The photo hull algorithm is examined for its applicability to real-world surveillance scenarios as an online reconstruction method. For this reason, a GPU-based redesign of a visual hull algorithm is provided that utilizes geometric knowledge about known static occluders of the scene in order to create a conservative and complete visual hull that includes all given objects. This visual hull approximation serves as input for the photo hull algorithm.

  19. Micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine for heating and their real operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čierny, Jaroslav; Patsch, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This article was deal with micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine. We watched problematic of real working Stirling engine. The article also contain hookup of unit constructed at University of Zilina.

  20. Growing a market economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, N.; Pryor, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents a microsimulation model of a transition economy. Transition is defined as the process of moving from a state-enterprise economy to a market economy. The emphasis is on growing a market economy starting from basic microprinciples. The model described in this report extends and modifies the capabilities of Aspen, a new agent-based model that is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories on a massively parallel Paragon computer. Aspen is significantly different from traditional models of the economy. Aspen`s emphasis on disequilibrium growth paths, its analysis based on evolution and emergent behavior rather than on a mechanistic view of society, and its use of learning algorithms to simulate the behavior of some agents rather than an assumption of perfect rationality make this model well-suited for analyzing economic variables of interest from transition economies. Preliminary results from several runs of the model are included.

  1. Melting ice, growing trade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Bensassi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large reductions in Arctic sea ice, most notably in summer, coupled with growing interest in Arctic shipping and resource exploitation have renewed interest in the economic potential of the Northern Sea Route (NSR. Two key constraints on the future viability of the NSR pertain to bathymetry and the future evolution of the sea ice cover. Climate model projections of future sea ice conditions throughout the rest of the century suggest that even under the most “aggressive” emission scenario, increases in international trade between Europe and Asia will be very low. The large inter-annual variability of weather and sea ice conditions in the route, the Russian toll imposed for transiting the NSR, together with high insurance costs and scarce loading/unloading opportunities, limit the use of the NSR. We show that even if these obstacles are removed, the duration of the opening of the NSR over the course of the century is not long enough to offer a consequent boost to international trade at the macroeconomic level.

  2. How Do Galaxies Grow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Astronomers have caught multiple massive galaxies in the act of merging about 4 billion years ago. This discovery, made possible by combining the power of the best ground- and space-based telescopes, uniquely supports the favoured theory of how galaxies form. ESO PR Photo 24/08 ESO PR Photo 24/08 Merging Galaxies in Groups How do galaxies form? The most widely accepted answer to this fundamental question is the model of 'hierarchical formation', a step-wise process in which small galaxies merge to build larger ones. One can think of the galaxies forming in a similar way to how streams merge to form rivers, and how these rivers, in turn, merge to form an even larger river. This theoretical model predicts that massive galaxies grow through many merging events in their lifetime. But when did their cosmological growth spurts finish? When did the most massive galaxies get most of their mass? To answer these questions, astronomers study massive galaxies in clusters, the cosmological equivalent of cities filled with galaxies. "Whether the brightest galaxies in clusters grew substantially in the last few billion years is intensely debated. Our observations show that in this time, these galaxies have increased their mass by 50%," says Kim-Vy Tran from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, who led the research. The astronomers made use of a large ensemble of telescopes and instruments, including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, to study in great detail galaxies located 4 billion light-years away. These galaxies lie in an extraordinary system made of four galaxy groups that will assemble into a cluster. In particular, the team took images with VIMOS and spectra with FORS2, both instruments on the VLT. From these and other observations, the astronomers could identify a total of 198 galaxies belonging to these four groups. The brightest galaxies in each group contain between 100 and 1000 billion of stars, a property that makes them comparable

  3. Growing Galaxies Gently

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    New observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, provided direct evidence that young galaxies can grow by sucking in the cool gas around them and using it as fuel for the formation of many new stars. In the first few billion years after the Big Bang the mass of a typical galaxy increased dramatically and understanding why this happened is one of the hottest problems in modern astrophysics. The results appear in the 14 October issue of the journal Nature. The first galaxies formed well before the Universe was one billion years old and were much smaller than the giant systems - including the Milky Way - that we see today. So somehow the average galaxy size has increased as the Universe has evolved. Galaxies often collide and then merge to form larger systems and this process is certainly an important growth mechanism. However, an additional, gentler way has been proposed. A European team of astronomers has used ESO's Very Large Telescope to test this very different idea - that young galaxies can also grow by sucking in cool streams of the hydrogen and helium gas that filled the early Universe and forming new stars from this primitive material. Just as a commercial company can expand either by merging with other companies, or by hiring more staff, young galaxies could perhaps also grow in two different ways - by merging with other galaxies or by accreting material. The team leader, Giovanni Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri) says: "The new results from the VLT are the first direct evidence that the accretion of pristine gas really happened and was enough to fuel vigorous star formation and the growth of massive galaxies in the young Universe." The discovery will have a major impact on our understanding of the evolution of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present day. Theories of galaxy formation and evolution may have to be re-written. The group began by selecting three very distant galaxies to see if they could find evidence

  4. [Growing old differently: Transdisciplinary perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, H-P

    2015-04-01

    Growing old differently: the phrase is intended to call something other to mind than merely the fact that images and forms of old age and aging have multiplied and diversified to an enormous extent. The suggestion put forward here is that otherness (as opposed to mere differences) should be positively reinforced. In other words, it is not just a matter of noting different forms of old age and aging but more than this, of seeking out opportunities for aging differently. In order to explore this, the article follows an older strand of theory, which has recently come to be frequently quoted in gerontology: the phenomenology of difference as reasoned analytically by Lévinas and Sartre and applied to gerontology by Améry and de Beauvoir. Here, opportunities for aging crucially depend on the way we look at it, how we observe and describe it and not least, how gerontology frames it. A distinction is made between two perspectives and their associated consequences for old age: alienation and alterity. Alienation means looking at old age above all as a disconcerting "other", as a perplexing, problematic deviation from the norm of vitality. Alterity, by contrast, refers to different options for living life in old age: options to be explored and opened up in contradistinction to cultural or academic alienation. Not least, the article appeals for diversity in scholarly approaches and for cross-disciplinary perspectives.

  5. Design of reciprocal unit based on the Newton-Raphson approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Anders Torp; Winther-Almstrup, Rasmus; Boesen, Michael

    A design of a reciprocal unit based on Newton-Raphson approximation is described and implemented. We present two different designs for single precisions where one of them is extremely fast but the trade-off is an increase in area. The solution behind the fast design is that the design is fully...

  6. Cost savings of unit-based pricing of household waste; the case of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dijkgraaf (Elbert); R.H.J.M. Gradus (Raymond)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractUsing a panel data set for Dutch municipalities we estimate effects for weight-based, bag-based, frequency-based and volume-based pricing of household waste collection. Unit-based pricing shows to be effective in reducing solid and compostable and increasing recyclable waste. Pricing has

  7. Unit-Based Acute Confusion Resource Nurse: An Educational Program To Train Staff Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Carla Gene; Onega, Lisa L.; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Mobily, Paula; Wakefield, Bonnie; Kundrat, Mary; Akins, Jackie; Wadle, Karen; Mentes, Jan; Culp, Ken; Meyer, Jean; Waterman, James

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development and evaluation of an eight-hour educational program designed to prepare staff nurses to perform in a new role, the unit-based acute confusion Resource Nurse (ACRN). Tests showed that knowledge and confidence significantly increased for participants as a result of their participation in the educational program. (Author/GCP)

  8. Unit-based clinical pharmacists' prevention of serious medication errors in pediatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Rainu; Bates, David W; Abramson, Erika L; Soukup, Jane R; Goldmann, Donald A

    2008-07-01

    Rates of serious medication errors in three pediatric inpatient units (intensive care, general medical, and general surgical) were measured before and after introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists. Error rates on the study units and similar patient care units in the same hospital that served as controls were determined during six- to eight-week baseline periods and three-month periods after the introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists (full-time in the intensive care unit [ICU] and mornings only on the general units). Nurses trained by the investigators reviewed medication orders, medication administration records, and patient charts daily to detect errors, near misses, and adverse drug events (ADEs) and determine whether near misses were intercepted. Two physicians independently reviewed and rated all data collected by the nurses. Serious medication errors were defined as preventable ADEs and nonintercepted near misses. The baseline rates of serious medication errors per 1000 patient days were 29 for the ICU, 8 for the general medical unit, and 7 for the general surgical unit. With unit-based clinical pharmacists, the ICU rate dropped to 6 per 1000 patient days. In the general care units, there was no reduction from baseline in the rates of serious medication errors. A full-time unit-based clinical pharmacist substantially decreased the rate of serious medication errors in a pediatric ICU, but a part-time pharmacist was not as effective in decreasing errors in pediatric general care units.

  9. Realization of Distribution Network Feeder Terminal Unit Based on Dual-DSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanrong Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the design proposal of distribution network monitoring unit based on dual-DSP. A detailed description of the hardware structure about the device is introduced which including signal scheduling, SPI communication, the serial human-computer communication and network communication. Also the study describes the software process about the master and slave DSPs. Then the analog precision test and the protection response test are carried out. The result shows that the design proposal is correct.

  10. Application of a Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program in critical care: the royal exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren E; Flanders, Sonya A

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the history of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) and how it is used to foster a culture of safety. CUSP involves interdisciplinary teamwork and empowers nurses at all levels to pioneer changes and develop leadership skills. A case study is presented to show how CUSP was used effectively in critical care to create a standardized handover of patients from the operating room to the intensive care unit.

  11. Growing Concerns With Workplace Incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Natasha Renee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-07-01

    Workplace incivility (WPI) is a growing issue across all public and private sectors. Occupational and environmental health nurses can educate employees and management about WPI, its risk factors and characteristics, and ways to reduce incidents of WPI.

  12. Method for growing plants aeroponically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, R W; Del Tredici, P; Torrey, J G

    1976-03-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for growing plants with their roots bathed in nutrient mist is described. The aeroponics system uses a spinner from a home humidifier to propel nutrient solution into a polyethylene-lined plywood box atop which plants are supported on plastic light-fixture "egg crating." Success in growing a number of herbaceous and woody species, including nodulated legumes and nonlegumes, is reported.

  13. Variability of growing season indices in northeast of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannayan, M.; Lakzian, A.; Gorbanzadeh, N.; Roshani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Accurate use of precipitation can be considered as one of the best options to decrease the amount of underground water extraction for agriculture in arid and semi-arid areas such as northeast of Iran. For this reason, characteristics of the growing season such as onset, cessation, and length of the growing period should be analyzed. In this paper, we have calculated growing season characteristics of five locations in northeast of Iran using 45 years historical daily weather data and employed four approaches with different calculation methods. As temperature is one of the limiting factors in irrigation-based agriculture, the first approach has been based on this factor. The three remaining approaches were based on joint rainfall and temperature approach, rainfall, evapotranspiration, and temperature approach, and the final approach was based on availability of adequate water in 0.25 m of soil profile. The calculated onset dates using second and third approaches have been based on soil water balance model and relative evapotranspiration rate, and both were evaluated also to find whether the onset is a false start occurrence or not. The results showed that, when temperature was the only limiting factor, Bojnourd station with 197 days showed the longest growing season, however, when precipitation was used along with temperature, longest growing season (124 days) was obtained for Sabzevar station. The third approach which benefits from a water balance model and is similar to rainfed conditions showed the longest growing season with 147 days for Mashhad station. When adequate soil water approach was used, Bojnourd station with 255 days showed the longest growing season. Evaluation of false start of the growing season indicated the lowest probability of false start occurrence for Mashhad compared with other locations.

  14. Explosive percolation transitions in growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. M.; Son, S.-W.; Kahng, B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent extensive studies of the explosive percolation (EP) model revealed that the EP transition is second order with an extremely small value of the critical exponent β associated with the order parameter. This result was obtained from static networks, in which the number of nodes in the system remains constant during the evolution of the network. However, explosive percolating behavior of the order parameter can be observed in social networks, which are often growing networks, where the number of nodes in the system increases as dynamics proceeds. However, extensive studies of the EP transition in such growing networks are still missing. Here we study the nature of the EP transition in growing networks by extending an existing growing network model to a general case in which m node candidates are picked up in the Achiloptas process. When m =2 , this model reduces to the existing model, which undergoes an infinite-order transition. We show that when m ≥3 , the transition becomes second order due to the suppression effect against the growth of large clusters. Using the rate-equation approach and performing numerical simulations, we also show that the exponent β decreases algebraically with increasing m , whereas it does exponentially in a corresponding static random network model. Finally, we find that the hyperscaling relations hold but in different forms.

  15. Introducing the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program for mechanically ventilated patients in Saudi Arabian Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raymond M.; Aljuaid, Maha; Aqeel, Hanan; Aboudeif, Mohammed M.; Elatwey, Shaimaa; Shehab, Rajeh; Mandourah, Yasser; Maghrabi, Khalid; Hawa, Hassan; Khalid, Imran; Qushmaq, Ismael; Latif, Asad; Chang, Bickey; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Tayar, Sultan; Al-Harbi, Khloud; Yousef, Amin; Amr, Anas A.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been major improvements to the care of mechanically ventilated patients (MVPs). Earlier initiatives used the concept of ventilator care bundles (sets of interventions), with a primary focus on reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, recent evidence has led to a more comprehensive approach: The ABCDE bundle (Awakening and Breathing trial Coordination, Delirium management and Early mobilization). The approach of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) was developed by patient safety researchers at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and is supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to improve local safety cultures and to learn from defects by utilizing a validated structured framework. In August 2015, 17 Intensive Care Units (ICUs) (a total of 271 beds) in eight hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia joined the CUSP for MVPs (CUSP 4 MVP) that was conducted in 235 ICUs in 169 US hospitals and led by the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. The CUSP 4 MVP project will set the stage for cooperation between multiple hospitals and thus strives to create a countrywide plan for the management of all MVPs in Saudi Arabia. PMID:28197216

  16. Introducing the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program for mechanically ventilated patients in Saudi Arabian Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond M Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, there have been major improvements to the care of mechanically ventilated patients (MVPs. Earlier initiatives used the concept of ventilator care bundles (sets of interventions, with a primary focus on reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, recent evidence has led to a more comprehensive approach: The ABCDE bundle (Awakening and Breathing trial Coordination, Delirium management and Early mobilization. The approach of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP was developed by patient safety researchers at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and is supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to improve local safety cultures and to learn from defects by utilizing a validated structured framework. In August 2015, 17 Intensive Care Units (ICUs (a total of 271 beds in eight hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia joined the CUSP for MVPs (CUSP 4 MVP that was conducted in 235 ICUs in 169 US hospitals and led by the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. The CUSP 4 MVP project will set the stage for cooperation between multiple hospitals and thus strives to create a countrywide plan for the management of all MVPs in Saudi Arabia.

  17. Growing Oppression, Growing Resistance : LGBT Activism and Europeanisation in Macedonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miškovska Kajevska, A.; Bilić, B.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides one of the first socio-historical overviews of the LGBT groups in Macedonia and argues that an important impetus for the proliferation of LGBT activities has been the growing state-endorsed homophobia starting from 2008. The homophobic rhetoric of the ruling parties was clearly

  18. [Growing old as a woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer-Weinmann, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Growing old as a woman. Since Diderot, a classic writer, and his friend Sophie Volland with whom he corresponded, debated the difference between the "handsome old man" and "beautiful old age", or a hypothetical "beautiful old woman", the representations of growing old have changed, to the benefit of women. Has the considerable contribution of female writers to the debate played a role? In what ways does literature, through its figurations of the ages of life, provide a valuable perspective of the contemporary mutations of the view of old age?

  19. Heat stress in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynh Thi Thanh Thuy,

    2005-01-01

    Compared to other species of farm animals, pigs are more sensitive to high environmental temperatures, because they cannot sweat and do not pant so well. Furthermore, fast-growing lean pigs generate more heat than their congeners living in the wild. This, in combination with confined housing, makes

  20. Organization of growing random networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  1. Exploring Classroom Hydroponics. Growing Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Gardening Association, Burlington, VT.

    Growing Ideas, the National Gardening Association's series for elementary, middle, and junior high school educators, helps teachers engage students in using plants and gardens as contexts for developing a deeper, richer understanding of the world around them. This volume's focus is on hydroponics. It presents basic hydroponics information along…

  2. [Rapid growing liposarcoma in retroperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, L.E.; Mynster, T.

    2008-01-01

    A 36-year-old male was admitted with a giant abdominal tumour and dyspnoea from thoracic displacement. Symptoms were one year of haemorrhoids, but complaints of growing abdomen presented only for 10 weeks. Ultrasound could not differentiate tumour from the liver, but MR scan could. A 24.2 kg...

  3. Growing an Emerging Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and grow its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…

  4. Growing Wild and Being Managed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of mobile communication and the spread of internet cafés, which are both growing rapidly in today’s Vietnam. Daily life in Vietnam is a complex mix of modern and traditional, public and private; the use of mobile phones, internet, and other communication possibilities...

  5. The growing VAO flavoprotein family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Nicole G. H.; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Fraaije, Marco W.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The VAO flavoprotein family is a rapidly growing family of oxidoreductases that favor the covalent binding of the FAD cofactor. In this review we report on the catalytic properties of some newly discovered VAO family members and their mode of flavin binding. Covalent binding of the flavin is a self-

  6. Growing Patterns: Seeing beyond Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, mathematical patterns have been acknowledged as important early components of children's development of algebraic reasoning (NCTM 2000). In particular, growing patterns have attracted significant attention as a context that helps students develop an understanding of functional relationships (Lee and Freiman 2006; Moss et…

  7. Graphics Processing Unit-Based Bioheat Simulation to Facilitate Rapid Decision Making Associated with Cryosurgery Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, Robert; Zhang, Hong; Shimada, Kenji; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the implementation of an efficient numerical technique for cryosurgery simulations on a graphics processing unit as an alternative means to accelerate runtime. This study is part of an ongoing effort to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, with prostate cryosurgery as a developmental model. The ability to perform rapid simulations of various test cases is critical to facilitate sound decision making associated with medical training. Consistent with clinical practice, the training tool aims at correlating the frozen region contour and the corresponding temperature field with the target region shape. The current study focuses on the feasibility of graphics processing unit-based computation using C++ accelerated massive parallelism, as one possible implementation. Benchmark results on a variety of computation platforms display between 3-fold acceleration (laptop) and 13-fold acceleration (gaming computer) of cryosurgery simulation, in comparison with the more common implementation on a multicore central processing unit. While the general concept of graphics processing unit-based simulations is not new, its application to phase-change problems, combined with the unique requirements for cryosurgery optimization, represents the core contribution of the current study.

  8. A rapidly growing lid lump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Su-Yin; Lee, Richard M H; Hugkulstone, Charles; Rodrigues, Ian Aureliano Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A 97-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of a rapidly growing, painless, left upper eyelid lesion. Examination revealed a large vascularised, ulcerated nodule on the left upper lid, causing significant ptosis. Wide local excision of the lesion was performed and the wound was left to heal by secondary intention. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the lesion confirmed a diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare primary malignancy of the eyelid which has significant morbidity and mortality. Although uncommon, this diagnosis should always be considered in any patient with a rapidly growing lid lump. In view of the patient's age, known dementia and family wishes, the patient was managed conservatively, with no further investigations performed. She was due to be followed up in clinic on a regular basis, but has since died from other causes. PMID:25123568

  9. Heat stress in growing pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh Thi Thanh Thuy

    2005-01-01

    Compared to other species of farm animals, pigs are more sensitive to high environmental temperatures, because they cannot sweat and do not pant so well. Furthermore, fast-growing lean pigs generate more heat than their congeners living in the wild. This, in combination with confined housing, makes it difficult for these pigs to regulate their heat balance. Heat stressed pigs have low performance, poor welfare, and, by pen fouling, they give higher emissions of odour and ammonia.Above certain...

  10. Carbonaceous Matter in Growing Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M. V.; Stangl, C. M.; Horan, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nanoparticles constitute the greatest portion of ambient aerosol loading by number. A major source of atmospheric nanoparticles is new particle formation (NPF), a gas to particle conversion process whereby clusters nucleate from gas phase precursors to form clusters on the order of one or a few nanometers and then grow rapidly to climatically relevant sizes. A substantial fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are thought to arise from NPF. In order to better predict the frequency, growth rates, and climatic impacts of NPF, knowledge of the chemical mechanisms by which nucleated nanoparticles grow is needed. The two main contributors to particle growth are (neutralized) sulfate and carbonaceous matter. Particle growth by sulfuric acid condensation is generally well understood, though uncertainty remains about the extent of base neutralization and the relative roles of ammonia and amines. Much less is known about carbonaceous matter, and field measurements suggest that nitrogen-containing species are important. In this presentation, recent work by our group will be described that uses a combination of ambient measurements, laboratory experiments and computational work to study carbonaceous matter in growing nanoparticles. These studies span a range of particle sizes from the initial adsorption of molecules onto a nanometer-size ammonium bisulfate seed cluster to reactions in particles that are large enough to support condensed-phase chemistry.

  11. Comparison of bacterial culture, polymerase chain reaction, and a mix-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Salmonella status in grow-to-finish pigs in western Canada with a Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Wendy; Waldner, Cheryl; Rajić, Andrijana; McFall, Margaret; Chow, Eva; Muckle, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Among grow-to-finish pigs from 10 herds in Alberta and Saskatchewan, 23 (16%) of 144 fecal samples were culture-positive and 40 (28%) of 144 pigs were seropositive for Salmonella. With a Bayesian model specifying dependence between the 2 tests, the sensitivity (Se) of culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was 79% to 86%, depending on the cut-off value for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Culture specificity (Sp) was assumed to be 100%; RT-PCR Sp was found to be 94%. The ELISA Se was 76% and 51% at optical density cut-off values ≥ 20% and ≥ 40%, respectively; the Sp was 94% at each cut-off value. The model showed some sensitivity to ELISA prior information, the ELISA Se being approximately 8% lower when informative prior information was specified in the model. When there was no adjustment for dependence between culture and RT-PCR, the posterior estimates for both culture and RT-PCR Se were 11% higher than with the conditional-dependence model and had considerably narrower probability intervals, which suggests that correlation between culture and PCR is important and should be adjusted for in future studies. PMID:22468029

  12. Rectified-Linear-Unit-Based Deep Learning for Biomedical Multi-label Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Ge, Ruiquan; Xiao, Xuan; Cai, Yunpeng; Wang, Guoqing; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2016-11-11

    Disease diagnosis is one of the major data mining questions by the clinicians. The current diagnosis models usually have a strong assumption that one patient has only one disease, i.e. a single-label data mining problem. But the patients, especially when at the late stages, may have more than one disease and require a multi-label diagnosis. The multi-label data mining is much more difficult than a single-label one, and very few algorithms have been developed for this situation. Deep learning is a data mining algorithm with highly dense inner structure and has achieved many successful applications in the other areas. We propose a hypothesis that rectified-linear-unit-based deep learning algorithm may also be good at the clinical questions, by revising the last layer as a multi-label output. The proof-of-concept experimental data support the hypothesis, and the community may be interested in trying more applications.

  13. Viking Disruptions or Growing Integration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindbæk, Søren Michael

    2012-01-01

    Long-distance communication has emerged as a particular focus for archaeological exploration using network theory, analysis, and modelling. Initial attempts to adapt methods from social network analysis to archaeological data have, however, struggled to produce decisive results. This paper...... of the network. The model implies that 10th century long-distance exchange in the North Sea region featured long-distance links equal to those of the Carolingian emporia trade, and represented a growth in terms of new axes of integration, above all the growing links between the Scandinavian Peninsula...

  14. Memory effect in growing trees

    OpenAIRE

    Malarz, K.; Kulakowski, K.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the structure of a growing tree preserves an information on the shape of an initial graph. For the exponential trees, evidence of this kind of memory is provided by means of the iterative equations, derived for the moments of the node-node distance distribution. Numerical calculations confirm the result and allow to extend the conclusion to the Barabasi--Albert scale-free trees. The memory effect almost disappears, if subsequent nodes are connected to the network with more than o...

  15. Universal properties of growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Derrida, B.

    2004-09-01

    Networks growing according to the rule that every new node has a probability pk of being attached to k preexisting nodes, have a universal phase diagram and exhibit power-law decays of the distribution of cluster sizes in the non-percolating phase. The percolation transition is continuous but of infinite order and the size of the giant component is infinitely differentiable at the transition (though of course non-analytic). At the transition the average cluster size (of the finite components) is discontinuous.

  16. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  17. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  18. MODTOHAFSD — A GUI based JAVA code for gravity analysis of strike limited sedimentary basins by means of growing bodies with exponential density contrast-depth variation: A space domain approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, V.; Sastry, S. Rajeswara; Ramamma, B.

    2013-07-01

    Based on the principles of modeling and inversion, two interpretation methods are developed in the space domain along with a GUI based JAVA code, MODTOHAFSD, to analyze the gravity anomalies of strike limited sedimentary basins using a prescribed exponential density contrast-depth function. A stack of vertical prisms all having equal widths, but each one possesses its own limited strike length and thickness, describes the structure of a sedimentary basin above the basement complex. The thicknesses of prisms represent the depths to the basement and are the unknown parameters to be estimated from the observed gravity anomalies. Forward modeling is realized in the space domain using a combination of analytical and numerical approaches. The algorithm estimates the initial depths of a sedimentary basin and improves them, iteratively, based on the differences between the observed and modeled gravity anomalies within the specified convergence criteria. The present code, works on Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern, reads the Bouguer gravity anomalies, constructs/modifies regional gravity background in an interactive approach, estimates residual gravity anomalies and performs automatic modeling or inversion based on user specification for basement topography. Besides generating output in both ASCII and graphical forms, the code displays (i) the changes in the depth structure, (ii) nature of fit between the observed and modeled gravity anomalies, (iii) changes in misfit, and (iv) variation of density contrast with iteration in animated forms. The code is used to analyze both synthetic and real field gravity anomalies. The proposed technique yielded information that is consistent with the assumed parameters in case of synthetic structure and with available drilling depths in case of field example. The advantage of the code is that it can be used to analyze the gravity anomalies of sedimentary basins even when the profile along which the interpretation is intended fails to

  19. Viking Disruptions or Growing Integration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindbæk, Søren Michael

    2012-01-01

    Long-distance communication has emerged as a particular focus for archaeological exploration using network theory, analysis, and modelling. Initial attempts to adapt methods from social network analysis to archaeological data have, however, struggled to produce decisive results. This paper...... demonstrates how formal network analysis can be combined with a contextual reading of evidence relating to a long-distance communication network in the past. A study of the combined distributions of ten vessel types in 152 settlement sites from the 10th century suggests the outline of the core structure...... of the network. The model implies that 10th century long-distance exchange in the North Sea region featured long-distance links equal to those of the Carolingian emporia trade, and represented a growth in terms of new axes of integration, above all the growing links between the Scandinavian Peninsula...

  20. Growing the Blockchain information infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbar, Karim; Bjørn, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present ethnographic data that unpacks the everyday work of some of the many infrastructuring agents who contribute to creating, sustaining and growing the Blockchain information infrastructure. We argue that this infrastructuring work takes the form of entrepreneurial actions......, which are self-initiated and primarily directed at sustaining or increasing the initiator’s stake in the emerging information infrastructure. These entrepreneurial actions wrestle against the affordances of the installed base of the Blockchain infrastructure, and take the shape of engaging...... or circumventing activities. These activities purposefully aim at either influencing or working around the enablers and constraints afforded by the Blockchain information infrastructure, as its installed base is gaining inertia. This study contributes to our understanding of the purpose of infrastructuring, seen...

  1. Growing bubbles rising in line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Harper

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Over many years the author and others have given theories for bubbles rising in line in a liquid. Theory has usually suggested that the bubbles will tend towards a stable distance apart, but experiments have often showed them pairing off and sometimes coalescing. However, existing theory seems not to deal adequately with the case of bubbles growing as they rise, which they do if the liquid is boiling, or is a supersaturated solution of a gas, or simply because the pressure decreases with height. That omission is now addressed, for spherical bubbles rising at high Reynolds numbers. As the flow is then nearly irrotational, Lagrange's equations can be used with Rayleigh's dissipation function. The theory also works for bubbles shrinking as they rise because they dissolve.

  2. Fast-Growing Vestibular Schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcioni, Maurizio; Taibah, Abdelkader; De Donato, Giuseppe; Piccirillo, Enrico; Russo, Alessandra; Sanna, Mario

    2000-01-01

    A case of a Jehovah's witness affected by an intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma with an extremely fast growth rate is presented. Nine months after presentation, the tumor reached 23 mm in the cerebellopontine angle. A partial removal through a retrosigmoid approach was planned. Because of the presence of a dominant high jugular bulb masquering the internal auditory canal, the intracanalicular portion of the tumor was left in place. The residual tumor grew 12 mm in 2 months. Even after a gross total removal through a middle cranial fossa approach, the tumor recurred, reaching the size of 30 mm in 17 months. A modified transcochlear approach was then performed, and the patient was free of disease at the last radiologic follow-up, 8 months after the surgery. We illustrate our strategy in treating this aggressive benign lesion with unusual behavior. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:17171109

  3. State Feedback H∞ Control of Power Units Based on an Improved Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqiang Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new state feedback H∞ control scheme is presented used in the boiler-turbine power units based on an improved particle swarm optimizing algorithm. Firstly, the nonlinear system is transformed into a linear time-varying system; then the H∞ control problem is transformed into the solution of a Riccati equation. The control effect of H∞ controller depends on the selection of matrix P, so an improved particle swarm optimizing (PSO algorithm by introducing differential evolution algorithm is used to solve the Riccati equation. The main purpose is that mutation and crossover are introduced for a new population, and the population diversity is improved. It is beneficial to eliminate stagnation caused by premature convergence, and the algorithm convergence rate is improved. Finally, the real-time optimizing of the controller parameters is realized. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that a state feedback H∞ controller can be obtained, which can ensure asymptotic stability of the system, and the double objectives of stabilizing system and suppressing the disturbance are got. The system can work well over a large range working point.

  4. Growing hairs in shorn cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília José Veríssimo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The shearing operation can provide double benefits to the cattle: they can become more heat tolerant and the tick infestation decreases. The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus causes great losses to dairy cattle, especially to the Holstein cattle because they are very susceptible to this tick. Its control is becoming each day more difficult, owing to the increasing resistance to acaricides they are acquiring. The objective of this work was to study the growing of haircoat following shearing. We made our experiment with 17 animals, 7 females and 10 males. They were shaved on the anterior third (head, neck, dewlap, scapula and arm of one side, at random. The work was performed in two steps: they were shorn for the first time on August 2nd 2012, with a size 10 blade in a clipper Oster model GoldenA5, which left the fur coat 2 mm long. Then we evaluated the hair length growing by collecting fortnightly three sample of hairs in the middle of the scapula, with  electric pliers, modified for this purpose, in both sides of the animals, sheared and non-sheared, until 30 days after this shearing. The three hair samples were put inside a little plastic bag per animal. Meanwhile, as we thought that the animals shearing had to be done closer to the skin, we decided to shear them again (in the same side shorn before, on October 2nd 2012. We changed our procedure using the same machine, but now with a blade size 30, which left the fur coat 1mm thick. After that, we collected again, fortnightly, samples of hairs on both sides during 2 months. The 10 longest hairs in the plastig bag were measured using a graph paper and the average per animal was calculated in each data and blade. A random design was applied for statistical analysis, the hair length of both sides, sheared and non sheared were compared by a two related samples tests – Wilcoxon, in a non parametric test, using the SPSSP 12.0 program, in each data within each blade. Using blade size

  5. Open Learning within Growing Businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klofsten, Magnus; Jones-Evans, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the factors behind successful enterprise policy interventions are critical in ensuring effective programme development. The aim of this paper is to analyse an academic-industry initiative in Sweden developed to support knowledge-intensive businesses in expanding their operations. Design/methodology/approach: This paper…

  6. China’s Growing Confidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Beijing Olympics have helped to promote the mutual understanding between China and the rest of the world Although we live in the information age, this does not necessarily mean that the mutual understanding between different countries is easy. When the Olympics were approaching, China was under attack from some people and organizations, but after the opening ceremony on August 8,

  7. Cryosurgical effects on growing vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, A P; Rescorla, F J; Baust, J G; Callahan, M; Davis, M; Grosfeld, J L

    1999-07-01

    Cryosurgical treatment of unresectable hepatic malignancies has proven beneficial in adults. Concerns regarding its use in children include the effect on growth and the risk of injury to adjacent structures. To test the effect of cryoablation on adjacent vascular structures in a growing animal, liquid nitrogen cryoablation was performed on a juvenile murine model. Sprague Dawley rats underwent double freeze-thaw cryoablation of the abdominal aorta with interposed liver tissue. Serial sacrifices were performed over 120 days. Comparisons were made with sham-operated controls. Overall, animal growth paralleled that of sham controls through all time points. Gross examination of aortic diameter also showed similar growth in vessel size between the groups. Histologic analysis demonstrated injury after cryoablation with smooth muscle cell vacuolization, followed by cell death. Aortic media layer collapse resulted from cellular loss, however, elastin fiber composition was maintained. Aortic patency was preserved despite evidence of cellular injury and aortic wall remodeling. An associated thermal sink effect on the opposing wall was identified. After cryoablation adjacent to the abdominal aorta in adolescent rats, vascular patency is maintained and animal growth and structural function is preserved, despite cellular injury and wall compression. These observations suggest that cryoablation may be a useful treatment adjunct in young subjects.

  8. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianyuan Chai; M Mazen Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world.However,it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate.An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer,particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma,has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States.This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population,as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and,ultimately,leads to adenocarcinoma.Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however,it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively.In fact,its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies.The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options.

  9. Case grows for climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hileman, B.

    1999-08-09

    In the four years since the IPCC stated that 'the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate', evidence for anomalous warming has become more compelling, and as a result scientists have become more concerned that human-induced climate change has already arrived. The article summarises recent extra evidence on global temperatures, carbon dioxide measurements, ice shelf breakup, coral bleaching, unstable climates and improved climate models. At the time of the Kyoto conference, the US became keen on the idea that enhancing forest and soil carbon sequestration was a good way to offset emissions reduction targets. Congress is however under the opinion on that the Kyoto protocol presents a threat to the US economy, and senate is very unlikely to ratify the protocol during the Clinton Administration. The debate as to whether the US government should mandate major emission reduction or wait for more scientific certainty may continue for a number of years, but, growing concern of scientists and the public for the harmful effects of climate change may cause a change. 4 figs., 8 photos.

  10. Growing plants on atoll soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E L; Migvar, L; Robison, W L

    2000-02-16

    Many years ago people living on atolls depended entirely on foods gathered from the sea and reefs and grown on land. Only a few plants, such as coconut (ni), Pandanus (bob), and arrowroot (mok-mok), could be grown on the lower rainfall atolls, although adequate groundwater conditions also allowed taro (iaraj, kotak, wot) to be cultivated. On higher rainfall atolls, breadfruit (ma) was a major food source, and banana (binana, kepran), lime (laim), and taros (iaraj, kotak, wot) could be grown. The early atoll populations were experts in growing plants that were vital to sustaining their nutrition requirements and to providing materials for thatch, basketry, cordage, canoe construction, flowers, and medicine. They knew which varieties of food plants grew well or poorly on their atolls, how to propagate them, and where on their atoll they grew best. They knew the uses of most native plants and what the various woods were well suited for. Many varieties of Pandanus (bob) and breadfruit (ma) grew well with high rainfall, but only a few produced well on drier atolls. Such information had been passed down through the generations although some of it has been lost in the last century. Today there are new plants and new varieties of existing plants that can be grown on atolls. There are also new materials and information on how to grow both the old and new plants more effectively. However, there are also introduced weeds and pests to control. Today, there is also an acute need to grow more of the useful plants adapted to atolls. Increasing numbers of people living on an atoll without an equal increase in income or food production stretches the available food supplies. Much has been written about the poor conditions for plant growth on atolls. As compared with many places in the world where crops are grown, however, atolls can provide some highly favorable conditions. For instance, the driving force for plant growth is sunlight, and on atolls light is abundant throughout the

  11. Pediatric Ovarian Growing Teratoma Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Rentea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian immature teratoma is a germ cell tumor that comprises less than 1% of ovarian cancers and is treated with surgical debulking and chemotherapy depending on stage. Growing teratoma syndrome (GTS is the phenomenon of the growth of mature teratoma elements with normal tumor markers during or following chemotherapy for treatment of a malignant germ cell tumor. These tumors are associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to invasive and compressive growth as well as potential for malignant transformation. Current treatment modality is surgical resection. We discuss a 12-year-old female who presented following resection of a pure ovarian immature teratoma (grade 3, FIGO stage IIIC. Following chemotherapy and resection of a pelvic/liver recurrence demonstrating mature teratoma, she underwent molecular genetics based chemotherapeutic treatment. No standardized management protocol has been established for the treatment of GTS. The effect of chemotherapeutic agents for decreasing the volume of and prevention of expansion is unknown. We review in detail the history, diagnostic algorithm, and previous reported pediatric cases as well as treatment options for pediatric patients with GTS.

  12. Menopausal women's positive experience of growing older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged.......This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged....

  13. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best news about growing pains is that they go away by morning. What Causes Growing Pains? Growing pains don't hurt around the bones or joints (the flexible parts that connect bones and let them move) — only in the muscles . For this ...

  14. Placement of effective work-in-progress limits in route-specific unit-based pull systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziengs, N.; Riezebos, J.; Germs, R.

    2012-01-01

    Unit-based pull systems control the throughput time of orders in a production system by limiting the number of orders on the shop floor. In production systems where orders can follow different routings on the shop floor, route-specific pull systems that control the progress of orders on the shop flo

  15. Placement of effective work-in-progress limits in route-specific unit-based pull systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziengs, N.; Riezebos, J.; Germs, R.

    2012-01-01

    Unit-based pull systems control the throughput time of orders in a production system by limiting the number of orders on the shop floor. In production systems where orders can follow different routings on the shop floor, route-specific pull systems that control the progress of orders on the shop

  16. Lightweight concrete masonry units based on processed granulate of corn cob as aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino, J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A research work was performed in order to assess the potential application of processed granulate of corn cob (PCC as an alternative lightweight aggregate for the manufacturing process of lightweight concrete masonry units (CMU. Therefore, CMU-PCC were prepared in a factory using a typical lightweight concrete mixture for non-structural purposes. Additionally, lightweight concrete masonry units based on a currently applied lightweight aggregate such as expanded clay (CMU-EC were also manufactured. An experimental work allowed achieving a set of results that suggest that the proposed building product presents interesting material properties within the masonry wall context. Therefore, this unit is promising for both interior and exterior applications. This conclusion is even more relevant considering that corn cob is an agricultural waste product.En este trabajo de investigación se evaluó la posible aplicación de granulado procesado de la mazorca de maiz como un árido ligero alternativo en el proceso de fabricación de unidades de mampostería de hormigón ligero. Con esta finalidad, se prepararon en una fábrica diversas unidades de mampostería no estructural con granulado procesado de la mazorca de maiz. Además, se fabricaran unidades de mampostería estándar de peso ligero basado en agregados de arcilla expandida. Este trabajo experimental permitió lograr un conjunto de resultados que sugieren que el producto de construcción propuesto presenta interesantes propiedades materiales en el contexto de la pared de mampostería. Por lo tanto, esta solución es prometedora tanto para aplicaciones interiores y exteriores. Esta conclusión es aún más relevante teniendo en cuenta que la mazorca de maíz es un producto de desecho agrícola.

  17. El Nino Continues to Grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The latest image from NASA's Jason oceanography satellite, taken during a 10-day collection cycle ending December 2, 2002, shows the Pacific dominated by two significant areas of higher-than-normal sealevel (warmer ocean temperatures). In the central equatorial Pacific, the large area of higher than normal sea surface heights(warmer than normal sea surface temperatures) associated with growing El Nino conditions has recently migrated eastward toward the coast of South America. Meanwhile, the influence of the 20- to 30-year larger than El Nino/La Nina pattern called the Pacific Decadal Oscillation continues to create warm, higher-than-normal sea-surface heights in the north Pacific that are connected in a warm horseshoe pattern with the western and southern Pacific. Sea-surface heights are a measure of how much heat is stored in the ocean below. This heat influences both present weather and future planetary climate events.The image shows red areas in the north Pacific and at the equator that are about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal; white areas indicate sea surface heights between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal. These regions contrast with the western tropical Pacific, where lower-than-normal sea levels (blue areas) have developed that are between 5 and 13 centimeters (2 and 5 inches) below normal, while purple areas range from 14 to 18 centimeters (6 to 7 inches) below normal. Along the equator, the red sea surface heights equate to sea surface temperature departures greater than one degree Celsius (two degrees Fahrenheit) and the white sea surface heights are sea surface temperatures 1.5 to 2.5 degrees Celsius(three to five degrees Fahrenheit) above normal.The U.S. portion of the Jason mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C. Research on Earth's oceans using Jason and other space-based capabilities is conducted by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise to better understand and protect our home planet.

  18. Can we grow new retina?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta K Vemuganti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Retinal degenerations and dystrophies, the major causes of genetically inherited blindness, are characterised by the death or degeneration of photoreceptors (rods and/or cones.1 Approaches to treating this disease include: a replacing the defective gene; b introducing a drug or agent that either slows down or stops the premature death of photoreceptors; c introducing electronic chips; or d replacing the damaged cells by cellular therapy. Gene therapy is aimed at counteracting the defective gene by substituting it with the normal gene in the target tissues. Though successful visual recovery has been reported with gene therapy in dog models,2-3 it remains a challenge to identify a safe and reliable way of introducing the corrective gene in humans, given that the genes need to act for the lifetime of the patient. Introduction of ‘a’ factors (such as growth factors into the eye, directly or through implants, is another novel approach to preventing or slowing premature cell death.4-5 The challenge lies in delivering the drug to the appropriate site in a safe and sustained manner. Electronic chips, similar to the ones used for audio aids, have shown exciting results in some studies, but the technology is still in its infancy.6-7

  19. PTEN at 18: Still Growing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Olena; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    Discovered in 1997, PTEN remains one of the most studied tumor suppressors. In this issue of Methods in Molecular Biology, we assembled a series of papers describing various clinical and experimental approaches to studying PTEN function. Due to its broad expression, regulated subcellular localization, and intriguing phosphatase activity, methodologies aimed at PTEN study have often been developed in the context of mutations affecting various aspects of its regulation, found in patients burdened with PTEN loss-driven tumors. PTEN's extensive posttranslational modifications and dynamic localization pose unique challenges for studying PTEN features in isolation and necessitate considerable development of experimental systems to enable controlled characterization. Nevertheless, ongoing efforts towards the development of PTEN knockout and knock-in animals and cell lines, antibodies, and enzymatic assays have facilitated a huge body of work, which continues to unravel the fascinating biology of PTEN.

  20. CONCEPT OF A SUSTAINABLE FOOD-GROWING UNIT ON MARS

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnova, Mariia

    2016-01-01

    Present thesis relies on sustainable approach and the Innovative Conceptual Engineering Design. Concept development of a food-growing unit on Mars is a part of a challenge named “Sustainable Human Habitation of Mars” stated by NASA’s Epic Challenge Joensuu educational program. The thesis is a result of my collaboration with BioMars team that represents our vision on a food-growing system, which should be able to function independently beyond the Earth. The project at hand was carried out ...

  1. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  2. An improved current control scheme for grid-connected DG unit based distribution system harmonic compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jinwei; Wei Li, Yun; Wang, Xiongfei;

    2013-01-01

    In order to utilize DG unit interfacing converters to actively compensate distribution system harmonics, this paper proposes an enhanced current control approach. It seamlessly integrates system harmonic mitigation capabilities with the primary DG power generation function. As the proposed curren...

  3. BASF's Investment in China Growing Steadily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Over the next 10 years, BASF expects the chemical markets in Asia (excluding Japan) to grow by an average of 6 percent per year,well above the global average of 3.4 percent. For fast-growing markets such as China, the chemical market is projected to grow at a rate higher than Gross Domestic Product (GDP) due to the positive outlook brought by China's entry into the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

  4. Growing Languages with Metamorphic Syntax Macros

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2002-01-01

    "From now on, a main goal in designing a language should be to plan for growth." Guy Steele: Growing a Language, OOPSLA '98 invited talk.We present our experiences with a syntax macro language which we claim forms a general abstraction mechanism for growing (domain-specific) extensions of program......"From now on, a main goal in designing a language should be to plan for growth." Guy Steele: Growing a Language, OOPSLA '98 invited talk.We present our experiences with a syntax macro language which we claim forms a general abstraction mechanism for growing (domain-specific) extensions...

  5. The Case for Unit-Based Teams: A Model for Front-line Engagement and Performance Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Paul M; Ptaskiewicz, Mark; Mipos, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Unit-based teams (UBTs)—defined as natural work groups of physicians, managers, and frontline staff who work collaboratively to solve problems, improve performance, and enhance quality—were established by the 2005 national agreement between Kaiser Permanente (KP) and the Coalition of KP Unions. They use established performance-improvement techniques and employee-engagement principles (including social-movement theory) to achieve clinical and operational goals. UBT members identify performance...

  6. Graphics processing unit-based quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Jonayat, A S M; Patel, Sanjay; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2014-09-01

    We adapt a graphics processing unit (GPU) to dynamic quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging. We demonstrate the temporal advantage of the GPU-based approach by computing the number of frames analyzed per second from SHG image videos showing varying fiber orientations. In comparison to our previously reported CPU-based approach, our GPU-based image analysis results in ∼10× improvement in computational time. This work can be adapted to other quantitative, nonlinear imaging techniques and provides a significant step toward obtaining quantitative information from fast in vivo biological processes.

  7. Growing Organic Crystals By The Czochralski Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Angela; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wang, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus grows high-quality single crystals of organic compounds by Czochralski method. In Czochralski process, growing crystal lifted from middle of molten material without touching walls. Because of low melting temperatures of organic crystals, glass vessels usable. Traditional method for inorganic semiconductors adapted to optically nonlinear organic materials.

  8. Geometric Growing Patterns: What's the Rule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Mairéad; Leavy, Aisling

    2015-01-01

    While within a geometric repeating pattern, there is an identifiable core which is made up of objects that repeat in a predictable manner, a geometric growing pattern (also called visual or pictorial growing patterns in other curricula) "is a pattern that is made from a sequence of figures [or objects] that change from one term to the next in…

  9. Magnetically controlled growing rods for scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metkar, Umesh; Kurra, Swamy; Quinzi, David; Albanese, Stephen; Lavelle, William F

    2017-02-01

    Early onset scoliosis can be both a disfiguring as well as a life threatening condition. When more conservative treatments fail, pediatric spinal surgeons are forced to consider operative interventions. Traditionally, these interventions have involved the insertion of a variety of implants into the patient with a limited number of anchor points controlling the spine. In the past, these pediatric patients have had multiple surgeries for elective lengthening of these devices to facilitate their growth while attempting to control the scoliosis. These patients often experience a physical and emotional toll from their multiple repeated surgeries. Growing spine techniques have also had a noted high complication rate due to implant dislodgement and infections. Recently, the development of non-invasively, self-lengthening growing rods has occurred. These devices have the potential to allow for the devices to be lengthened magnetically in a conscious patient in the surgeon's office. Areas covered: This review summarized previously published articles in the English literature using a key word search in PubMed for: 'magnetically controlled growing rods', 'Magec rods', 'magnetic growing rods' and 'growing rods'. Expert commentary: Magnetically controlled growing rods have an advantage over growing rods in lengthening the growing spine in the absence of repetitive surgeries.

  10. SAR Imagery Segmentation by Statistical Region Growing and Hierarchical Merging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Carvalho, E.A.; Medeiros, F.N.S.; Martins, C.I.O.; Marques, R.C.P.; Oliveira, I.N.S.

    2010-05-22

    This paper presents an approach to accomplish synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation, which are corrupted by speckle noise. Some ordinary segmentation techniques may require speckle filtering previously. Our approach performs radar image segmentation using the original noisy pixels as input data, eliminating preprocessing steps, an advantage over most of the current methods. The algorithm comprises a statistical region growing procedure combined with hierarchical region merging to extract regions of interest from SAR images. The region growing step over-segments the input image to enable region aggregation by employing a combination of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test with a hierarchical stepwise optimization (HSWO) algorithm for the process coordination. We have tested and assessed the proposed technique on artificially speckled image and real SAR data containing different types of targets.

  11. Liver Segmentation Based on Snakes Model and Improved GrowCut Algorithm in Abdominal CT Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Baochun; Ma, Zhiyuan; Zong, Mao; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel method based on Snakes Model and GrowCut algorithm is proposed to segment liver region in abdominal CT images. First, according to the traditional GrowCut method, a pretreatment process using K-means algorithm is conducted to reduce the running time. Then, the segmentation result of our improved GrowCut approach is used as an initial contour for the future precise segmentation based on Snakes model. At last, several experiments are carried out to demonstrate the performance of our proposed approach and some comparisons are conducted between the traditional GrowCut algorithm. Experimental results show that the improved approach not only has a better robustness and precision but also is more efficient than the traditional GrowCut method. PMID:24066017

  12. Microsatellite primers for fungus-growing ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Palle; Gertsch, P J; Boomsma, JJ

    2002-01-01

    developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants.......We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...

  13. Microsatellite Primers for Fungus-Growing Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen Fredsted, Palle; Gertsch, Pia J.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan (Koos)

    2002-01-01

    developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants.......We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...

  14. Microsatellite Primers for Fungus-Growing Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen Fredsted, Palle; Gertsch, Pia J.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan (Koos)

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  15. Microsatellite primers for fungus-growing ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Palle; Gertsch, P J; Boomsma, JJ

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  16. A practical and low cost microbiotest to assess the phytotoxic potential of growing media and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C.; Persoone, G.; Wever, G.

    2008-01-01

    For routine toxicity testing of composts and growing media, two different types of assays are usually applied. One approach is the use of growing trials in pots with various mixtures of the material. In extract-based tests, seeds are germinated in petri dishes and exposed to an exudate from the mate

  17. growing African giant rats Cricetomys gambianus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bolism, conductance and evaporative water loss changes in relation to physical and behavioural development in growing giant rat pups ... evaporation) into dry air was collected in a pre-weighed column of silica ..... Principles and adaptation.

  18. Initiating, growing and cracking of hydrogen blisters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xuechong; SHAN Guangbin; CHU Wuyang; SU Yanjing; GAO Kewei; QIAO Lijie; JIANG Bo; CHEN Gang; CUI Yinhui

    2005-01-01

    The growing process of a hydrogen blister in a wheel steel was observed in situ with an optical microscope, and the fracture surfaces formed from broken blisters on a wheel steel and bulk metallic glass were investigated. The initiating, growing, cracking and breaking of hydrogen blisters are as follows. Supersaturated vacancies can increase greatly during charging and gather together into a vacancy cluster (small cavity). Hydrogen atoms become hydrogen molecules in the vacancy cluster and hydrogen molecules can stabilize the vacancy cluster. The small cavity becomes the nucleus of hydrogen blister. The blister will grow with entering of vacancies and hydrogen atoms. With increasing hydrogen pressure, plastic deformation occurs first, the hydrogen blister near the surface extrudes, and then cracks initiate along the wall of the blister with further increasing hydrogen pressure. A cracked blister can grow further through propagating of cracks until it breaks.

  19. "Explosively growing" vortices of unstably stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Fedun, V.

    2016-10-01

    A new type of "explosively growing" vortex structure is investigated theoretically in the framework of ideal fluid hydrodynamics. It is shown that vortex structures may arise in convectively unstable atmospheric layers containing background vorticity. From an exact analytical vortex solution the vertical vorticity structure and toroidal speed are derived and analyzed. The assumption that vorticity is constant with height leads to a solution that grows explosively when the flow is inviscid. The results shown are in agreement with observations and laboratory experiments

  20. Growing America's Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address growing concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to create a healthier environment for current and future generations.

  1. Cosmological scalar field perturbations can grow

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, Miguel; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Torres, José M

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the small perturbations in the energy density to the homogeneous and isotropic configurations of a canonical scalar field in an expanding universe do not grow. We show that this is not true in general, and clarify the root of the misunderstanding. We revisit a simple model in which the linear perturbations grow like those in the standard cold dark matter scenario, but with the Jeans length at the scale of the Compton wavelength of the scalar particle.

  2. Method for Growing Plants Aeroponically 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, Richard W.; Del Tredici, Peter; Torrey, John G.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for growing plants with their roots bathed in nutrient mist is described. The aeroponics system uses a spinner from a home humidifier to propel nutrient solution into a polyethylene-lined plywood box atop which plants are supported on plastic light-fixture “egg crating.” Success in growing a number of herbaceous and woody species, including nodulated legumes and nonlegumes, is reported. Images PMID:16659479

  3. 甜菜碱对生长肥育猪体脂重分配的作用及机理研究%EFFECT OF BETAINE ON REPARTITION OF CARCASS FAT IN GROWING AND FINISHING PIGS AND APPROACH TO IT’S MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪以真; 许梓荣

    2001-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to investigate the effect of feeding betaine on the deposition of subcutaneous fat,carcass fat and the contents of intramusclar fat of the growing and finishing pigs and approach to mechanism of the effect by feeding experiment,determination of carcass,and liver,muscle and serum sample analysis.Trial 1 examined the effect of betaine supplementation (1000 mg/kg of diet) to the growing pigs.Forty-eight pigs(Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire,20 kg initially) were allotted to two treatments set with three replicate pens per treatments by weight and sex.Trial 2 examined the effect of feeding betaine (1500 mg/kg of diet) to the finishing pigs.Sixty pigs (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire,60 kg initially) were allotted to two treatments set with three replicate pens per treatments by weight and sex.The results showed that betaine supplementation increased the ADG of growing pigs by 13.20%(P<0.05),decreased the FCR by 7.93%(P<0.05),decreased the mean backfat depth of the growing and finishing pigs by 14.82%(P<0.05) and 14.93%(P<0.05),decreased the percentage of dissected fat of carcass by 5.76%(P>0.05) and 11.51%(P<0.05),increased the contents of intramusclar fat in longissimus dorsi(LD) of the growing and finishing pigs by 36.00%(P<0.01) and 17.66%(P<0.05) respectively.The serum analysis indicated that betaine supplementation increased the lipase activity of the growing pig and finishing pigs by 10.49%(P<0.05) and 7.50%(P=0.06),increased the FFA contents of growing and finishing pigs by 20.16%(P<0.05) and 13.43%(P<0.05) respectively.In addition,the contents of free carnitine in liver of the growing and finishing pigs fed betaine increased by 20.68%(P<0.05) and 23.53%(P<0.05) respectively.The contents of acid-insoluble carnitine,the ratio

  4. Why we cannot grow a human arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, John L

    2013-11-01

    There are several significant issues that prevent us from growing a human arm now, or within the next 10-20 years. From a tissue engineering perspective, while we can grow many of the components necessary for construction of a human arm, we can only grow them in relatively small volumes, and when scaled up to large volumes we lack the ability to develop adequate blood/nerve supply. From a genetic engineering perspective, we will probably never be able to turn on the specific genes necessary to "grow an arm" unless it is attached to a fetus and this presents enormous ethical issues related to farming of human organs and structures. Perhaps the most daunting problem facing the transplantation of a tissue engineered or transplanted arm is that of re-innervation of the structure. Since the sensory and motor nerve cells of the arm are located outside of the structure, re-innervation requires those nerves to regenerate over relatively large distances to repopulate the nervous system of the arm. This is something with which we have had little success. We can grow repair parts, but "growing an arm" presents too many insurmountable problems. The best we could possibly do with tissue engineering or genetic engineering would be the equivalent of a fetal arm and the technical problems, costs, and ethical hurdles are enormous. A more likely solution is a functional, permanent, neuroelectronically-controlled prosthesis. These are nearly a reality today.

  5. The size of the nucleus increases as yeast cells grow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Paul; Edgington, Nicholas P; Schneider, Brandt L; Rupes, Ivan; Tyers, Mike; Futcher, Bruce

    2007-09-01

    It is not known how the volume of the cell nucleus is set, nor how the ratio of nuclear volume to cell volume (N/C) is determined. Here, we have measured the size of the nucleus in growing cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of mutant yeast strains spanning a range of cell sizes revealed that the ratio of average nuclear volume to average cell volume was quite consistent, with nuclear volume being approximately 7% that of cell volume. At the single cell level, nuclear and cell size were strongly correlated in growing wild-type cells, as determined by three different microscopic approaches. Even in G1-phase, nuclear volume grew, although it did not grow quite as fast as overall cell volume. DNA content did not appear to have any immediate, direct influence on nuclear size, in that nuclear size did not increase sharply during S-phase. The maintenance of nuclear size did not require continuous growth or ribosome biogenesis, as starvation and rapamycin treatment had little immediate impact on nuclear size. Blocking the nuclear export of new ribosomal subunits, among other proteins and RNAs, with leptomycin B also had no obvious effect on nuclear size. Nuclear expansion must now be factored into conceptual and mathematical models of budding yeast growth and division. These results raise questions as to the unknown force(s) that expand the nucleus as yeast cells grow.

  6. Intensity Estimation of Spontaneous Facial Action Units Based on Their Sparsity Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Mahoor, Mohammad H

    2016-03-01

    Automatic measurement of spontaneous facial action units (AUs) defined by the facial action coding system (FACS) is a challenging problem. The recent FACS user manual defines 33 AUs to describe different facial activities and expressions. In spontaneous facial expressions, a subset of AUs are often occurred or activated at a time. Given this fact that AUs occurred sparsely over time, we propose a novel method to detect the absence and presence of AUs and estimate their intensity levels via sparse representation (SR). We use the robust principal component analysis to decompose expression from facial identity and then estimate the intensity of multiple AUs jointly using a regression model formulated based on dictionary learning and SR. Our experiments on Denver intensity of spontaneous facial action and UNBC-McMaster shoulder pain expression archive databases show that our method is a promising approach for measurement of spontaneous facial AUs.

  7. A versatile method to grow localized arrays of nanowires for highly sensitive capacitive devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antohe, V.A.; Radu, A.; Yunus, S.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to increase the detection efficiency of the capacitive sensing devices, by growing vertically aligned nanowires arrays, localized and confined on small interdigited electrodes structures. The metallic tracks are made using optical lithography, and the nanowires are reali......We propose a new approach to increase the detection efficiency of the capacitive sensing devices, by growing vertically aligned nanowires arrays, localized and confined on small interdigited electrodes structures. The metallic tracks are made using optical lithography, and the nanowires...

  8. Growing Carbon Nanotubes from Both Sides of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinlong; Li, Yilun; Gao, Caitian; Kim, Nam Dong; Fan, Xiujun; Wang, Gunuk; Peng, Zhiwei; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M

    2016-03-23

    The design and synthesis of hybrid structures between graphene and carbon nanotubes is an intriguing topic in the field of carbon nanomaterials. Here the synthesis of vertically aligned CNT carpets underneath graphene and from both sides of graphene is described with continuous ordering over a large area. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopic characterizations show that CNT carpets grow underneath graphene through a base-growth mechanism, and grow on top of graphene through a tip-growth mechanism. Good electrical contact is observed from the top CNT carpets, through the graphene layer, to the bottom CNT carpets. This sandwich-like CNT/graphene/CNT hybrid structure could provide an approach to design and fabricate multilayered graphene/CNTs materials, as well as potential applications in the fields of nanomanufacturing and energy storage.

  9. Evolution of growing black holes in axisymmetric galaxy cores

    CERN Document Server

    Fiestas, Jose; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    NBody realizations of axisymmetric collisional galaxy cores (e.g. M32, M33, NGC205, Milky Way) with embedded growing black holes are presented. Stars which approach the disruption sphere are disrupted and accreted to the black hole. We measure the zone of influence of the black hole and disruption rates in relaxation time scales. We show that secular gravitational instabilities dominate the initial core dynamics, while the black hole is small and growing due to consumption of stars. Later, the black hole potential dominates the core, and loss cone theory can be applied. Our simulations show that central rotation in galaxies can not be neglected for relaxed systems, and compare and discuss our results with the standard theory of spherically symmetric systems.

  10. Growing older in Malta: experiences of British retirees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innes, Anthea

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available International retirement migration (IRM is attracting increasing research interest. This article reports findings from an exploratory case study of 16 older people who havemoved from theUKto grow older in Malta. Data was collected using in-depth interviews drawing on a life history approach. This article builds on previous research in the IRM field by providing detailed examples of the push and pull factors influencing the decision to move to Malta and the reported positive experiences of living in Malta. The article also discusses negative impressions of life in Malta, an issue that has not been previously documented in relation to Malta. Future difficulties that the immigrants may encounter are also considered. This article contributes to the growing body of knowledge concerning the experience of IRM.

  11. Gravity sensing in tip-growing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, A; Buchen, B; Hodick, D

    1996-08-01

    In addition to the statocytes of roots and shoots, a number of tip-growing cells also sense gravity, which influences the cells' growth and development. Since these tip-growing cells are highly suitable for observations in vivo, the movement and sedimentation of their statoliths can be studied in detail. Experimental manipulation by centrifugation, drug application, optical tweezers or microgravity can be monitored by light microscopy. The statoliths are localized in distinct cytoplasmic areas by interactions with actin filaments or microtubules, and their sedimentation seems to be narrowly confined. Since gravisensing and the graviresponse take place within the same cell, the gravitropic signal transduction chain is not complicated by signal transmission between sensing and responding cells. Studies on tip-growing cells have now enabled the formulation of models explaining positive and negative gravitropism.

  12. Emergent hyperbolic geometry of growing simplicial complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of interacting complex systems, including brain functional networks, protein interactions and collaboration networks is characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such they are ideal structures to investigate the hidden geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Here we show an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display all the universal properties of real complex networks. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by dramatic changes in the n...

  13. Growing Old is Mandatory But Growing Up is Optional: An Explanation to Geriatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Smita R; Sahoo, Pradyumna Ku; Bhuyan, Sanat Ku; Misra, Satya Ranjan; Pati, Abhishek Rajan

    2014-12-01

    Growing old is an inevitable process and aging graciously requires a healthy body where oral cavity occupies an important place. Geriatric dentistry is a specialized multidisciplinary branch of general dentistry designed to provide dental services to elderly patients. The rise in life expectancy has attributed to the substantial reduction in mortality which brought about by improved health care facilities, sanitation, environmental and public health reforms coupled with better hygiene and living conditions. The goal of geriatric treatment is to achieve optimal oral health, thus enhancing overall health. This begins with a concerted effort between the patient and the healthcare and dental teams. When medical problems exist, the physician and other involved healthcare professionals should be consulted, as these diseases can affect the safety and efficacy of various dental treatments. Thus a unified approach should be followed to assist geriatric patients to maintain optimal oral health and a high quality of life. Here in, this article we have reviewed the categories geriatric patients are divided to, various aging theories, changes occurring in various systems with their effects on system along with the various dental effects and age changes in them and treatment needs and strategies' concerning the elderly population.

  14. On Self-growing Modeling for Curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Dong-zhao; ZHU Zhi-hong; ZHOU Hui-cheng; SHI Han-min

    2008-01-01

    This paperpresents a novel curoe modeling method based on controlling rules of the shaping technique.The method describes the curve based on steplength and turning angle,and the characteristics of the curve near a point.Then it introduces the process to extract" growing-rules"for 2D and 3D curves described by familiar analytical expressions and curvature-torsion expressions.Examples of selfgrowing modeling for familiar analytical curves are presented.New curves are obtained by designing the grow-rules;corresponding examples are also presented.

  15. The SGIA and the Common Growing Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentiu CIOVICA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human or virtual agents are presented in our lives daily. They serve our purposes and represent us in different many situations. Nowadays the number of virtual agents is increasing daily because they are cheaper, faster and more accurate than human agents. Our aim in this article is to define a new type of intelligent agent called SGIA – Self Growing Intelligent Agent and a new defining language for it. The SGIA agent is an intelligent agent with all the common agents’ characteristics and with other special one: that to learn and grow by itself in knowledge and size.

  16. Post liposuction infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosso, Caroline; Lienhard, Reto; Siegrist, Hans H; Malinverni, Raffaele; Clerc, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are recognized agents of surgical site infections. Recently, RGM skin and soft tissue infections have been increasingly reported. As symptoms, clinical signs and disease latency remain non-specific and microbiological detection requires targeted growth media, RGM diagnosis remains challenging for clinicians. Appropriate management is often delayed due to lack of awareness of these infections. RGM infections after plastic surgery have also been described in the setting of interventions performed in developing countries, a growing phenomenon commonly known as medical tourism. We describe a case of Mycobacterium chelonae/abscessus infection following liposuction and liposculpture procedures performed in the Dominican Republic and review the literature on this subject.

  17. Why do mayflies change their gill kinematics as they grow?

    CERN Document Server

    Chabreyrie, Rodolphe; Balaras, Elias; Kiger, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The mayfly nymph breathes under water through an oscillating array of wing-shaped tracheal gills. As the nymph grows, the kinematics of these gills change abruptly from rowing to flapping. The classical fluid dynamics approach to consider the mayfly nymph as a pumping device fails in giving clear reasons to this switch. In order to understand the whys and the hows of this switch between the two distinct kinematics, we analyze the problem under a Lagrangian viewpoint. We consider that a good Lagrangian transport that distributes and spreads water and dissolved oxygen well between and around the gills is the main goal of the gill motion. Using this Lagrangian approach we are able to provide the reason behind the switch from rowing to flapping that the mayfly nymph experiences as it grows. More precisely, recent and powerful tools from this Lagrangian approach are applied to in-sillico mayfly nymph experiments, where body shape, as well as, gill shapes, structures and kinematics are matched to those from in-vivo...

  18. Fast growing trees and energy grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, R.

    1993-12-31

    According to both the United States Department of Energy and the Department of Natural Resources Canada, the best way to produce biomass plantations is an agro-forestry system in which fast growing trees are used as a windbreak for fields of energy grasses. (TEC). 1 fig.

  19. Growing up as a Young Artist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2012-01-01

    "Growing Up as a Young Artist" is an illustrated book assignment that involves researching family scrapbooks, photo albums and films, and inquiring about family anecdotes for clues to one's artistic roots. Students creatively reflect on their early memories of imaginative events, as each page is filled with memories of creative activities they…

  20. Play Games to Grow up Bilingual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2007-01-01

    A new kind of computer game is proposed, to support the linguistic development of primary school children, growing in multilingual environments: with it players will be able to simultaneously learn multiple languages. The novel idea is to treat words in different languages as physical items, that...

  1. China Looks to Argentina to Grow Food

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ It might sound perverse for a Chinese company to go halfway round the globe to grow soya and other crops on unproductive land in a dry corner of Argentina. Yet that is what Beidahuang Group, a state-owned farm company based in the north-eastern Chinese province of Heilongjiang, is doing in the Pa-tagonian province of Rio Negro.

  2. Transport equation for growing bacterial populations (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the growing bacterial population. Each bacterium is distinguished by its degree of maturity and its maturation velocity. To complete the study in [3], we describe the bacterial profile of this population by proving that the generated semigroup possesses an asynchronous exponential growth property.

  3. Phishing - A Growing Threat to E-Commerce

    CERN Document Server

    Banday, M Tariq

    2011-01-01

    In today's business environment, it is difficult to imagine a workplace without access to the web, yet a variety of email born viruses, spyware, adware, Trojan horses, phishing attacks, directory harvest attacks, DoS attacks, and other threats combine to attack businesses and customers. This paper is an attempt to review phishing - a constantly growing and evolving threat to Internet based commercial transactions. Various phishing approaches that include vishing, spear phishng, pharming, keyloggers, malware, web Trojans, and others will be discussed. This paper also highlights the latest phishing analysis made by Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG) and Korean Internet Security Center.

  4. The Growing Rural-Urban Disparity in India: Some Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dinesh; Pathak, Minakshee

    2012-10-01

    The paper critically examines the understanding, approach and indicators that have been used to measure the degree of disparity. It is fact that disparity exists everywhere. However, this paper highlights on disparities existing between rural and urban areas. In this context, it talks about 'whyí and 'howí disparities exist between rural and urban areas. The study suggests that 'incomeí is not a sufficient indicator to capture the magnitude of disparities at any level. It is, therefore, necessary to develop some indicators representing human resource development and infrastructure facility to understand the growing rural-urban disparity in India.

  5. Spectral Distribution of Transport Operator Arising in Growing Cell Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport equation with partly smooth boundary conditions arising in growing cell populations is studied in Lp  (1approach.

  6. IntelliGrow 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, Jakob; Aaslyng, Jesper Peter Mazanti; Kalita, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    . A special emphasis will be on components that utilize local weather predictions for energy saving purposes and timing of production as well as components with photosynthesis based strategies for use of artificial light. We expect that the extension of intelligent climate control will result in better......Since 1996 a dynamic model based climate control concept (IntelliGrow) has been developed in Denmark. The aim of the system is to adjust the greenhouse climate dynamic, so that the natural resources are used as optimal as possible. The concept has been proved to work in both growth chamber...... and greenhouse experiments, with many different species of pot plants, resulting in energy savings up to 40%, depending on the outside climate. Based on the former work a new system (IntelliGrow 2.0) is being developed which offers an improved user interface and an extensible component model. The goal is to test...

  7. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  8. Impact of Growing Business on Software Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Natalja; Kajko-Mattsson, Mira

    When growing their businesses, software organizations should not only put effort into developing and executing their business strategies, but also into managing and improving their internal software development processes and aligning them with business growth strategies. It is only in this way they may confirm that their businesses grow in a healthy and sustainable way. In this paper, we map out one software company's business growth on the course of its historical events and identify its impact on the company's software production processes and capabilities. The impact concerns benefits, challenges, problems and lessons learned. The most important lesson learned is that although business growth has become a stimulus for starting thinking and improving software processes, the organization lacked guidelines aiding it in and aligning it to business growth. Finally, the paper generates research questions providing a platform for future research.

  9. GRoW Buffalo Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohm, Martha [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-04-17

    This document provides final reporting on the GRoW Home, University at Buffalo's entry to the 2015 Solar Decathlon competition in Irvine, CA. The report summarizes fundraising efforts, documents media outreach, lists online presence, analyzes the organizer's communication, describes post-competition life of the house and future employment plans for student team members. Last, it suggests improvements for future decathlons.

  10. Chinese Advanced Materials Industry Grows Rapidly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Revealed from "2005 China Annual Market Conference of Advanced Materials", the advanced materials industry in China grows rapidly, with market scale RMB ¥18.01 billion, increasing 27.7% over last year. By now, total 79 production bases of advanced materials have been built in China and constellation effect of rare earth industry has emerged. Beijing, Shenzhen and Shanghai have been developed into

  11. Growing Role of Retail in Distribution Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak Mesic

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to demonstrate the growing role of retail trade (retail) in the channels of distribution of goods both in domestic and international markets. Technical-technological development has provided great opportunities for all production of material goods, so that the focus of problem in the economic possibilities of playing shifted from production to sales opportunities, or consumption. The ultimate consumers and their needs and requirements have become a central area of study, bas...

  12. Economic Gardening and the Grow Kentucky Program

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky (CEDIK) and the Kentucky Small Business Development Center (KSBDC), launched Grow Kentucky, Kentucky’s only certified Economic Gardening program. The program helps second-stage entrepreneurial growth companies penetrate existing markets, identify new markets, monitor competitors, track industry trends, locate customer clusters, use search engine optimization/social media for marketing and various other customized research....

  13. Open Input: A New Way for Websites to Grow

    CERN Document Server

    Vasev, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of current web 2.0 and 3.0 trends, there are still a lot of websites made in web 1.0 style. These websites have fixed pages which are editable only by owner and not by community. It is normal for a lot of cases, but looks like not modern and engaging approach. Are there any ways to make these sites closer to life? This paper is devoted to open input technique, a way for websites of web 1.0 era to grow and evolve community. The idea of open input, in general, means that anybody from the web can add information to any section of the website even without registration on that website. People can add news, billboard announcements, testimonials, questions, pictures, videos etc - whatever site owner permitted. We have tested this idea in practice and have positive results approving that open input is a vital approach for collaboration on the web.

  14. Basioccipital bone osteochondroma growing into the foramen magnum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfinia, Iraj; Vahedi, Payman; Tubbs, R. Shane; Gavame, Mostafa; Vahedi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteochondroma is a common bone tumor and rarely affects the central nervous system. Although intraspinal osteochondromas are known to cause neurological deficits, intracranial osteochondromas with neurological compromise are very rare. Case Description: The authors report an exceptional case of a quadriparetic 73-year-old patient with a basioccipital bone osteochondroma growing into the foramen magnum. The embryology, differential diagnoses, and optimal management strategies are discussed. Conclusion: Although extremely rare, osteochondromas should be included in the differential diagnoses of tumors within the foramen magnum. For the tumors originating from the basioccipital bone, a simple medial suboccipital approach might suffice, while for ventral tumors, a far lateral transcondylar approach is necessary to avoid any neurovascular complications. Despite potentially catastrophic presenting symptoms, these tumors are pathologically benign and complete excision often results in long-term cure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an osteochondroma arising from the basiocciput. PMID:22439112

  15. Exposure to vibrations in wine growing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Pessina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Apart the winter period, the activity in specialized agricultural cultivations (i.e. wine- and fruit-growing is distributed for a long period of the year. Some tasks, such as pesticide distribution, are repeated several times during the growing season. On the other hand, mechanization is one of the pillars on which is based the modern agriculture management. As a consequence, in wine growing the tractor driver has to be considered a worker potentially subjected to high level of vibrations, due to the poor machinery conditions often encountered, and sometimes to the rough soil surface of the vineyard combined with the high travelling speed adopted in carrying out many operations. About vibrations, the Italian Decree 81/08 basically refers to the European Directive 2002/44/CE, that provides some very strict limits of exposure, both for whole body and hand-arm districts. In Oltrepo pavese, a large hilly area located the south part of the Pavia province (Lombardy - Italy wine growing is the main agricultural activity; for this reason, a detailed survey on the vibration levels recorded at the tractor driver’s seat was carried out, in order to ascertain the real risk to which the operators are exposed. The activity in wine growing has been classified into 6 groups of similar tasks, as follows: 1. canopy management: pruning, trimming, binding, stripping, etc.; 2. soil management: harrowing, hoeing, subsoiling etc.; 3. inter-row management: chopping of pruning , pinching, grass mowing, etc.; 4. crop protection: pesticides and fungicides distribution, sulfidation, foliar fertilization, etc.; 5. grape harvesting: manual or mechanical; 6. transport: from the vineyard to the cellar. For each group of tasks, the vibration levels on 3 the traditional axes (x, y and z were recorded, and then an exposure time was calculated for each of them, in order to ascertain the risk level in comparison to what provided by the dedicated standard. Finally, a detailed

  16. Growing media constituents determine the microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media for horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Oliver; Reheul, Dirk; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Perneel, Maaike; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico

    2016-05-01

    Vegetables and fruits are an important part of a healthy food diet, however, the eco-sustainability of the production of these can still be significantly improved. European farmers and consumers spend an estimated €15.5 billion per year on inorganic fertilizers and the production of N-fertilizers results in a high carbon footprint. We investigated if fertilizer type and medium constituents determine microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media and can be used as a next step towards a more sustainable horticulture. We demonstrated that growing media constituents showed differences in urea hydrolysis, ammonia and nitrite oxidation and in carbon dioxide respiration rate. Interestingly, mixing of the growing media constituents resulted in a stimulation of the function of the microorganisms. The use of organic fertilizer resulted in an increase in amoA gene copy number by factor 100 compared to inorganic fertilizers. Our results support our hypothesis that the activity of the functional microbial community with respect to nitrogen turnover in an organic growing medium can be improved by selecting and mixing the appropriate growing media components with each other. These findings contribute to the understanding of the functional microbial community in growing media and its potential role towards a more responsible horticulture.

  17. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  18. The Case for Unit-Based Teams: A Model for Front-line Engagement and Performance Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul M; Ptaskiewicz, Mark; Mipos, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Unit-based teams (UBTs)-defined as natural work groups of physicians, managers, and frontline staff who work collaboratively to solve problems, improve performance, and enhance quality-were established by the 2005 national agreement between Kaiser Permanente (KP) and the Coalition of KP Unions. They use established performance-improvement techniques and employee-engagement principles (including social-movement theory) to achieve clinical and operational goals. UBT members identify performance gaps and opportunities within their purview-issues they can address in the course of the day-to-day work, such as workflow or process improvement. By focusing on clear, agreed-on goals, UBTs encourage greater accountability and allow members to perform their full scope of work. UBTs are designed to deliver measurable benefits in clinical outcomes and operations, patient-experience enhancements, and physician-team performance or work life. For many physicians, UBTs will require new ways of engaging with their teams. However, evidence suggests that with organizational and physician support, these teams can achieve their goals. This article presents case examples of successful UBTs' outcomes; physicians' comments on their experience working with teams; an overview of UBTs' employee-engagement principles; and advice on how physicians can support and participate in the work of such teams.

  19. Features and heterogeneities in growing network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Luca; Cortelezzi, Michele; Yang, Bin; Marmorini, Giacomo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2012-06-01

    Many complex networks from the World Wide Web to biological networks grow taking into account the heterogeneous features of the nodes. The feature of a node might be a discrete quantity such as a classification of a URL document such as personal page, thematic website, news, blog, search engine, social network, etc., or the classification of a gene in a functional module. Moreover the feature of a node can be a continuous variable such as the position of a node in the embedding space. In order to account for these properties, in this paper we provide a generalization of growing network models with preferential attachment that includes the effect of heterogeneous features of the nodes. The main effect of heterogeneity is the emergence of an “effective fitness” for each class of nodes, determining the rate at which nodes acquire new links. The degree distribution exhibits a multiscaling behavior analogous to the the fitness model. This property is robust with respect to variations in the model, as long as links are assigned through effective preferential attachment. Beyond the degree distribution, in this paper we give a full characterization of the other relevant properties of the model. We evaluate the clustering coefficient and show that it disappears for large network size, a property shared with the Barabási-Albert model. Negative degree correlations are also present in this class of models, along with nontrivial mixing patterns among features. We therefore conclude that both small clustering coefficients and disassortative mixing are outcomes of the preferential attachment mechanism in general growing networks.

  20. Play Games to Grow up Bilingual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2008-01-01

    A new kind of computer game is proposed, to support the linguistic development of primary school children, growing in multilingual environments: with it players will be able to simultaneously learn multiple languages. The novel idea is to treat words in different languages as physical items......, that the player can collect and exchange for other words or for concrete objects. A prototype is currently under development, and it will be tested in cooperation with local schools. By design this linguistic game will also be extensible, so parents and teachers can tailor it with respect to languages...

  1. Play Games to Grow up Bilingual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2007-01-01

    A new kind of computer game is proposed, to support the linguistic development of primary school children, growing in multilingual environments: with it players will be able to simultaneously learn multiple languages. The novel idea is to treat words in different languages as physical items......, that the player can collect and exchange for other words or for concrete objects. A prototype is currently under development, and it will be tested in cooperation with local schools. By design this linguistic game will also be extensible, so parents and teachers can tailor it with respect to languages...

  2. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  3. Parallelized Seeded Region Growing Using CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjin; Lee, Hyunna; Seo, Jinwook; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Bohyoung

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for parallelizing the seeded region growing (SRG) algorithm using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) technology, with intention to overcome the theoretical weakness of SRG algorithm of its computation time being directly proportional to the size of a segmented region. The segmentation performance of the proposed CUDA-based SRG is compared with SRG implementations on single-core CPUs, quad-core CPUs, and shader language programming, using synthetic datasets and 20 body CT scans. Based on the experimental results, the CUDA-based SRG outperforms the other three implementations, advocating that it can substantially assist the segmentation during massive CT screening tests. PMID:25309619

  4. IntelliGrow 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, Jakob; Aaslyng, Jesper Peter Mazanti; Kalita, Sebastian;

    2008-01-01

    the system in full scale in five Danish commercial nurseries. The four steps to reach the goal are: 1) development of a demonstrator giving the grower advice on optimal climate control based on the IntelliGrow concept 2) testing the demonstrator at research facilities followed by tests at growers 3...... production management and resource utilization. A fast flow of knowledge from research to practice in the future will be established. Design of the concept and the first results are presented in this paper....

  5. Growing Networks with Positive and Negative Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dech, Corynne; Antwi, Shadrack; Shaw, Leah

    Scale-free networks grown via preferential attachment have been used to model real-world networks such as the Internet, citation networks, and social networks. Here we investigate signed scale-free networks where an edge represents a positive or negative connection. We present analytic results and simulation for a growing signed network model. We compare the signed network to an unsigned scale-free network. We discuss several options for preferential attachment in a signed network that could be further adapted to model the accumulation of links over time in real-world signed networks.

  6. Parallelized seeded region growing using CUDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjin; Lee, Jeongjin; Lee, Hyunna; Shin, Juneseuk; Seo, Jinwook; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Bohyoung

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for parallelizing the seeded region growing (SRG) algorithm using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) technology, with intention to overcome the theoretical weakness of SRG algorithm of its computation time being directly proportional to the size of a segmented region. The segmentation performance of the proposed CUDA-based SRG is compared with SRG implementations on single-core CPUs, quad-core CPUs, and shader language programming, using synthetic datasets and 20 body CT scans. Based on the experimental results, the CUDA-based SRG outperforms the other three implementations, advocating that it can substantially assist the segmentation during massive CT screening tests.

  7. Light colour preference of growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Szendrő

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to evaluate the light colour preference of growing rabbits placed in a free-choice cage. The experiment was carried out on 128 Pannon White growing rabbits weaned at the age of 5 weeks and placed into blocks (2m2 of four cages. The rabbits could move freely among the four cages (0.5m2 each through swing doors. The cages differed only in the colour of the light applied (white, yellow, green or blue. The lighting schedule was 16L: 8D. From 6 until 10 weeks of age, infrared video recording was performed once a week (24 hours. The number of rabbits in each cage was counted every 15 minutes. Feed consumption was measured weekly. Between 6 and 10 weeks of age the rabbits significantly preferred white light (28.0%. The preference order was the following: yellow (26.3%, blue (23.4% and green (22.3% (P<0.001. No significant differences were recorded in the feed consumption among the cages. In conclusion, the cage preference of the rabbits was slightly affected by the light colour.

  8. Management of Infections with Rapidly Growing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hwan Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infection caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM is not uncommon, andthe prevalence of RGM infection has been increasing. Clinical diagnosis is difficult becausethere are no characteristic clinical features. There is also no standard antibiotic regimenfor treating RGM infection. A small series of patients with RGM infections was studied toexamine their treatments and outcomes.Methods A total of 5 patients who had developed postoperative infections from January2009 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were initially screened using amycobacteria rapid screening test (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]-reverse blot hybridizationassay. To confirm mycobacterial infection, specimens were cultured for nontuberculousmycobacteria and analyzed by 16 S ribosomal RNA and rpoB gene PCR.Results The patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics during hospitalization,and oral antibiotics were administered after discharge. The mean duration of follow-upwas 9 months, and all patients were completely cured of infection with a regimen of acombination of antibiotics plus surgical treatment. Although none of the patients developedrecurrence, there were complications at the site of infection, including hypertrophic scarring,pigmentation, and disfigurement.Conclusions Combination antibiotic therapy plus drainage of surgical abscesses appeared tobe effective for the RGM infections seen in our patients. Although neither the exact dosagenor a standardized regimen has been firmly established, we propose that our treatment canprovide an option for the management of rapidly growing mycobacterial infection.

  9. Tracheotomy in growing rats: histological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Mônica Cecília Bochetti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare morphologically three different types of tracheotomy in growing rats, applying microsurgical technique. METHODS: EPM-1 Wistar growing rats (n=57 weighing 88gm and aged 35 days were randomized in four groups, according tracheotomy incision type (longitudinal, transverse and tracheal segment excision, and sham group. Following intramuscular anesthesia with ketamine and xylazine, the trachea was exposed and incised, according to the group, and a hand-made endotracheal cannula was inserted into the organ, under sterile conditions. This cannula was removed after 7 days, and animals have been sacrificed 30 days later. Tracheas samples were submitted to histological study, stained by hematoxylin-eosin and Masson trichrome, evaluating fibrosis, inflammatory infiltrate and epidermoid metaplasia. RESULTS: There was more frequency of inflammatory infiltrate at the tracheal epithelium in the tracheal segment excision group (87% compared to the longitudinal (40% and transverse (36% incision groups (p=0.009. Evaluating epidermoid metaplasia, tracheal segment excision and the longitudinal groups presented 33% and 40%, respectively, compared to 0% of the transverse group (p=0.03. Concerning to fibrosis, in a global comparison (p=0.1 among the three groups there was no difference, however, compared to the longitudinal group the transverse group showed lower level of fibrosis (p=0.04. Sham group did not present any relevant morphologic alterations and it was used as reference pattern. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our data show that tracheal segment excision promotes more epithelium aggression and transverse tracheal incision shows less morphologic alterations.

  10. Morphoelastic rods Part II: Growing birods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessinnes, Thomas; Moulton, Derek E.; Goriely, Alain

    2017-03-01

    The general problem of determining the shape and response of two attached growing elastic Kirchhoff rods is considered. A description of the kinematics of the individual interacting rods is introduced. Each rod has a given intrinsic shape and constitutive laws, and a map associating points on the two rods is defined. The resulting filamentary structure, a growing birod, can be seen as a new filamentary structure. This kinematic description is used to derive the general equilibrium equations for the shape of the rods under loads, or equivalently, for the new birod. It is shown that, in general, the birod is not simply a Kirchhoff rod but rather, due to the internal constraints, new effects can appear. The two-dimensional restriction is then considered explicitly and the limit for small deformation is shown to be equivalent to the classic Timsohenko bi-metallic strip problem. A number of examples and applications are presented. In particular, the problem of two attached rods with intrinsic helical shape and uniform growth is computed in detail and a host of new interesting solutions and bifurcations are observed.

  11. Features and heterogeneities in growing network models

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, Luca; Yang, Bin; Marmorini, Giacomo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2011-01-01

    Many complex networks from the World-Wide-Web to biological networks are growing taking into account the heterogeneous features of the nodes. The feature of a node might be a discrete quantity such as a classification of a URL document as personal page, thematic website, news, blog, search engine, social network, ect. or the classification of a gene in a functional module. Moreover the feature of a node can be a continuous variable such as the position of a node in the embedding space. In order to account for these properties, in this paper we provide a generalization of growing network models with preferential attachment that includes the effect of heterogeneous features of the nodes. The main effect of heterogeneity is the emergence of an "effective fitness" for each class of nodes, determining the rate at which nodes acquire new links. Beyond the degree distribution, in this paper we give a full characterization of the other relevant properties of the model. We evaluate the clustering coefficient and show ...

  12. Growing old: a psychoanalyst's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinodoz, Danielle

    2009-08-01

    With the help of clinical examples, the author shows that psychoanalysis or psychotherapy after the age of 70 can be a fascinating experience, one that enables patients to reconstruct their internal history in such a way that their final years can be given their rightful place in the overall journey through life. Often it will be a matter of going beyond the conflict between paralysing time with the illusion of keeping death at bay and taking the transient nature of life into account in order to perceive its true flavour. We can grow old passively, juxtaposing different periods of our life without linking them together, thereby creating the illusion of time without end; or we can grow old actively, integrating the different phases of our life into a coherent historical narrative. This representation of time leaves the door open for experiences which the author calls 'small seconds of eternity'. We can all experience such moments when we are deeply moved - joyfully or painfully - by something, so that we perceive another quality of time that goes beyond its chronological dimension without all the same negating it. Helping elderly people to identify these seconds of eternity and catch hold of them can be an invaluable experience for them. Perhaps we need to see our life unfold through the chronology of its different phases in order to discover, second by second, how to express on an everyday basis something of which we have had an inkling in some second of eternity.

  13. Cosmological scalar field perturbations can grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcubierre, Miguel; de la Macorra, Axel; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Torres, José M.

    2015-09-01

    It has been argued that the small perturbations to the homogeneous and isotropic configurations of a canonical scalar field in an expanding universe do not grow. We show that this is not true in general, and clarify the root of the misunderstanding. We revisit a simple model in which the zero mode of a free scalar field oscillates with high frequency around the minimum of the potential. Under this assumption the linear perturbations grow like those in the standard cold dark matter scenario, but with a Jeans length at the scale of the Compton wavelength of the scalar particle. Contrary to previous analyses in the literature our results do not rely on time averages and/or fluid identifications, and instead we solve both analytically (in terms of a well-defined series expansion) and numerically the linearized Einstein-Klein-Gordon system. Also, we use gauge-invariant fields, which makes the physical analysis more transparent and simplifies the comparison with previous works carried out in different gauges. As a byproduct of this study we identify a time-dependent modulation of the different physical quantities associated to the background as well as the perturbations with potential observational consequences in dark matter models.

  14. Growing the seeds sown by Piero Sensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Enrico

    2014-09-01

    Piero Sensi is probably known primarily for his role in the discovery of rifamycin and for developing it to be a drug of fundamental importance in the treatment of tuberculosis. He has also contributed to promote screening programs of microbial products and research approaches for antibacterial agents that have been further developed up to the present day. This paper reports a sequence of discovery approaches, failures and successes that spans for about 50 years and is still in progress.

  15. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-15

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

  16. Monitoring the Topology of Growing Dynamical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaoyan; Fu, Xinchu; Chen, Guanrong

    In this paper, topology monitoring of growing networks is studied. When some new nodes are added into a network, the topology of the network is changed, which needs to be monitored in many applications. Some auxiliary systems (network monitors) are designed to achieve this goal. Both linear feedback control and adaptive strategy are applied to designing such network monitors. Based on the Lyapunov function method via constructing a potential or energy function decreasing along any solution of the system, and the LaSalle's invariance principle, which is a generalization of the Lyapunov function method, some sufficient conditions for achieving topology monitoring are obtained. Illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method.

  17. Personal stories of growing up sexually.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, C C

    2000-01-01

    Prevention of problems related to sexuality during adolescence continues to be a major public health challenge. Describing childhood perceptions of sexuality is an important step in understanding sexual issues during adolescence. However, there is a paucity of information about sexuality in early life. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe recurrent themes in personal stories of growing up sexually. A thematic analysis with a narrative perspective was applied using the method described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Four interrelated themes pervaded the stories: parents as teachers, sex is secret, learning by experience, and first intercourse as a turning point. These findings have major implications for sexual health education and counseling in addition to further research.

  18. Growing duckweed for biofuel production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, W; Cheng, J J

    2015-01-01

    Duckweed can be utilised to produce ethanol, butanol and biogas, which are promising alternative energy sources to minimise dependence on limited crude oil and natural gas. The advantages of this aquatic plant include high rate of nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) uptake, high biomass yield and great potential as an alternative feedstock for the production of fuel ethanol, butanol and biogas. The objective of this article is to review the published research on growing duckweed for the production of the biofuels, especially starch enrichment in duckweed plants. There are mainly two processes affecting the accumulation of starch in duckweed biomass: photosynthesis for starch generation and metabolism-related starch consumption. The cost of stimulating photosynthesis is relatively high based on current technologies. Considerable research efforts have been made to inhibit starch degradation. Future research need in this area includes duckweed selection, optimisation of duckweed biomass production, enhancement of starch accumulation in duckweeds and use of duckweeds for production of various biofuels.

  19. Growing Up on an Appalachian Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holston, Ezra C; Callen, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    Background Research on centenarians to date has focused on areas with a high population of centenarians. However, there is limited literature on centenarians' perspectives about growing up on farms from the heartland of Appalachia in Eastern Tennessee. Purpose This qualitative descriptive study was designed to characterize the role of a farming childhood by exploring the viewpoints of community-dwelling centenarians who grew up on farms in south central Appalachia. Methods A qualitative descriptive design was used with a convenience sample ( n = 16). Cognitive status was determined with the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire. Demographic data were collected. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed with the Neuendorf method of content analysis. Results Main emerging themes were the farm, the family, and the environment. Conclusion The farm was at the center of these centenarians' childhood, influencing their family, community relations, and social interactions, which provided lessons that they utilized throughout their long lives.

  20. Exposure to captan in fruit growing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cock, J; Heederik, D; Kromhout, H; Boleij, J S; Hoek, F; Wegh, H; Tjoe Ny, E

    1998-03-01

    This study characterized occupational exposure to pesticides in fruit growing in The Netherlands to assess determinants of exposure. Large-scale exposure surveys were carried out during application of pesticides and during reentry activities. Data on contamination inside the fruit growers' homes were obtained, and total potential exposure for the fruit grower and his family during the growing and harvesting season was estimated. Repeated measurements on the same subject were collected to study components of exposure variability. Relative contribution of the respiratory route and different skin sites to total exposure were assessed. Captan was used as a marker for exposure. Inhalable dust exposure was measured with a personal monitor and potential dermal exposure with skin pads and hand rinsing. Dislodgeable foliar residue was measured by taking leaf punches. For respiratory exposure and potential dermal exposure, differences were observed between several tasks. Workers were categorized according to tasks performed depending on the exposure measure(s) (e.g., hands, forehead, inhalable dust) considered relevant for a specific study purpose. In general, within-worker variability of all exposure measurements was larger than between-worker variability. Variability in dermal exposure on the same body location was small relative to variability between different body locations. Differences in total exposure, including exposure inside the home, between the fruit grower and the son were small. Exposure of the wife was two to three times lower than for the fruit grower and the son. As exposure per unit of time was in the same order of magnitude for different tasks, individual time spent on these tasks is crucial for estimating total potential exposure. Repeated measurements are necessary to estimate individual exposure accurately because of the large within-worker variability.

  1. Ion Frequency Landscape in Growing Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Pietruszka

    Full Text Available It has been interesting that nearly all of the ion activities that have been analysed thus far have exhibited oscillations that are tightly coupled to growth. Here, we present discrete Fourier transform (DFT spectra with a finite sampling of tip-growing cells and organs that were obtained from voltage measurements of the elongating coleoptiles of maize in situ. The electromotive force (EMF oscillations (~ 0.1 μV were measured in a simple but highly sensitive resistor-inductor circuit (RL circuit, in which the solenoid was initially placed at the tip of the specimen and then was moved thus changing its position in relation to growth (EMF can be measured first at the tip, then at the sub-apical part and finally at the shank. The influx- and efflux-induced oscillations of Ca2+, along with H+, K+ and Cl- were densely sampled (preserving the Nyquist theorem in order to 'grasp the structure' of the pulse, the logarithmic amplitude of pulse spectrum was calculated, and the detected frequencies, which displayed a periodic sequence of pulses, were compared with the literature data. A band of life vital individual pulses was obtained in a single run of the experiment, which not only allowed the fundamental frequencies (and intensities of the processes to be determined but also permitted the phase relations of the various transport processes in the plasma membrane and tonoplast to be established. A discrete (quantised frequency spectrum was achieved for a growing plant for the first time, while all of the metabolic and enzymatic functions of the life cell cycle were preserved using this totally non-invasive treatment.

  2. Statistical validation of high-dimensional models of growing networks

    CERN Document Server

    Medo, Matus

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of models of complex networks and the current insufficient validation standards make it difficult to judge which models are strongly supported by data and which are not. We focus here on likelihood maximization methods for models of growing networks with many parameters and compare their performance on artificial and real datasets. While high dimensionality of the parameter space harms the performance of direct likelihood maximization on artificial data, this can be improved by introducing a suitable penalization term. Likelihood maximization on real data shows that the presented approach is able to discriminate among available network models. To make large-scale datasets accessible to this kind of analysis, we propose a subset sampling technique and show that it yields substantial model evidence in a fraction of time necessary for the analysis of the complete data.

  3. Growing Chinese coal use: Dramatic resource and environmental implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shealy, Malcolm, E-mail: malshealy@embarqmail.co [Senior Energy Analyst, PCI Inc., 16507 Paddock Run Road, Beaverdam, Virginia, 23015 (United States); Dorian, James P., E-mail: jamesdorian@yahoo.co [International Energy Economist, 6201 Benalder Drive, Bethesda, Maryland 20816 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Chinese coal consumption continues to rise as the country's economy and industry expand. Coal is particularly critical for China's fast-growing power sector, generating about 80% of electricity output. Notwithstanding the importance of coal and electricity, many international forecasts today underestimate their rising use in China. This paper acknowledges the current world financial crisis and assumes that Chinese GDP growth to 2025 will not again approach double-digit levels. Using the scenario analysis, this paper demonstrates that even with conservative assumptions about Chinese GDP growth and income elasticity of electric demand to 2025, the country will likely experience much higher coal demand and emit much greater volumes of carbon dioxide than forecast by various international energy agencies. The paper also analyzes how China's domestic coal reserves may be threatened within two decades, possibly affecting long-term economic growth in China, as well as world coal prices.

  4. Growing Chinese coal use Dramatic resource and environmental implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shealy, Malcolm [Senior Energy Analyst, PCI Inc., 16507 Paddock Run Road, Beaverdam, Virginia (United States); Dorian, James P. [International Energy Economist, 6201 Benalder Drive, Bethesda, Maryland 20816 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Chinese coal consumption continues to rise as the country's economy and industry expand. Coal is particularly critical for China's fast-growing power sector, generating about 80% of electricity output. Notwithstanding the importance of coal and electricity, many international forecasts today underestimate their rising use in China. This paper acknowledges the current world financial crisis and assumes that Chinese GDP growth to 2025 will not again approach double-digit levels. Using the scenario analysis, this paper demonstrates that even with conservative assumptions about Chinese GDP growth and income elasticity of electric demand to 2025, the country will likely experience much higher coal demand and emit much greater volumes of carbon dioxide than forecast by various international energy agencies. The paper also analyzes how China's domestic coal reserves may be threatened within two decades, possibly affecting long-term economic growth in China, as well as world coal prices. (author)

  5. Economic constraints - the growing challenge for Western breast cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Rene P; Lux, Michael P; Hoellthaler, Josef; Beckmann, Matthias W; Voigt, Wieland

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer care in Western countries has reached a considerable level of quality and standardization, which has contributed to the decline in breast cancer mortality. Certified Breast Cancer Centers (BCC) represent an important element of this development. Related to changes in reimbursement and growing costs, BCC face economic constraints which ultimately could endanger the achievements of the past. Thus, BCC have to optimize their care strategies from an economic perspective, particularly by increasing efficiency but also by adapting their service portfolio. This could result in competitive advantages and additional revenue by increasing case numbers and extra charges to patients. Furthermore, an intensification of collaboration with the outpatient sector resulting in an integrated and managed 'trans-sectoral' care approach which could allow to shift unprofitable procedures to the outpatient sector - in the sense of a win-win situation for both sectors and without loss of care quality - seems reasonable. Structured and specialized consulting approaches can further be a lever to fulfill economic requirements in order to avoid cuts in medical care quality for the sake of a balanced budget. In this review, economic constraints of BCC with a focus on the German healthcare system and potential approaches to ameliorate these financial burdens are being discussed.

  6. Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation by Region Growing and Constrained Spectral Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an algorithm for hierarchical image segmentation (referred to as HSEG) and its recursive formulation (referred to as RHSEG). The HSEG algorithm is a hybrid of region growing and constrained spectral clustering that produces a hierarchical set of image segmentations based on detected convergence points. In the main, HSEG employs the hierarchical stepwise optimization (HS WO) approach to region growing, which seeks to produce segmentations that are more optimized than those produced by more classic approaches to region growing. In addition, HSEG optionally interjects between HSWO region growing iterations merges between spatially non-adjacent regions (i.e., spectrally based merging or clustering) constrained by a threshold derived from the previous HSWO region growing iteration. While the addition of constrained spectral clustering improves the segmentation results, especially for larger images, it also significantly increases HSEG's computational requirements. To counteract this, a computationally efficient recursive, divide-and-conquer, implementation of HSEG (RHSEG) has been devised and is described herein. Included in this description is special code that is required to avoid processing artifacts caused by RHSEG s recursive subdivision of the image data. Implementations for single processor and for multiple processor computer systems are described. Results with Landsat TM data are included comparing HSEG with classic region growing. Finally, an application to image information mining and knowledge discovery is discussed.

  7. Growing Youth Growing Food: How Vegetable Gardening Influences Young People's Food Consciousness and Eating Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libman, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Much attention is currently being paid to rising rates of obesity, especially among youth. In this context, garden-based education can have a role in improving public health. A qualitative study conducted at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden (BBG) Children's Garden provides supporting evidence for the claim that growing vegetables can improve the…

  8. Geographically Sourcing Cocaine's Origin - Delineation of the Nineteen Major Coca Growing Regions in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallette, Jennifer R; Casale, John F; Jordan, James; Morello, David R; Beyer, Paul M

    2016-03-23

    Previously, geo-sourcing to five major coca growing regions within South America was accomplished. However, the expansion of coca cultivation throughout South America made sub-regional origin determinations increasingly difficult. The former methodology was recently enhanced with additional stable isotope analyses ((2)H and (18)O) to fully characterize cocaine due to the varying environmental conditions in which the coca was grown. An improved data analysis method was implemented with the combination of machine learning and multivariate statistical analysis methods to provide further partitioning between growing regions. Here, we show how the combination of trace cocaine alkaloids, stable isotopes, and multivariate statistical analyses can be used to classify illicit cocaine as originating from one of 19 growing regions within South America. The data obtained through this approach can be used to describe current coca cultivation and production trends, highlight trafficking routes, as well as identify new coca growing regions.

  9. Wartime diet for growing bobwhite quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, R.B.; Llewellyn, L.; Benner, M.

    1944-01-01

    Two experiments, using 784 bobwhite quail chicks, were conducted at the Patuxent Research Refuge, Bowie, Maryland, to find a growing diet that would meet wartime restrictions. In 1941 a diet containing 14 per cent sardine fish meal was formulated and gave satisfactory results from the standpoints of survival and growth. Since fish meal now is scarce, search was made for a diet without war-restricted commodities yet equal to the above-mentioned diet in feeding value. Ten diets were compared.....In the present experiments, quail fed this same diet modified by the substitution of 0.12 per cent of D-activated sterol for vitamin A and D feeding oil fortified showed the highest survival and the best live weights at the end of both the sixth and tenth weeks. They also were among the top three groups in requiring the least quantity of feed per unit of gain in weight; however, they consumed the greatest quantity of feed.....Of the other nine diets, that which seemed most promising, considering survival, live weight, and efficiency of feed utilization, was as follows (parts by weight) : Yellow corn, ground 26.08...Millet, ground 10.00...Alfalfa leaf meal, dehydrated 7.50...Soybean oil meal, solvent-processed 50.00...Dried whey 3.00...Special steamed bonemeal 1.50...Limestone, ground 0.80...Salt mixture 1.OO...D-activated animal sterol 0.12....100.00.....At the end of ten weeks the results on this diet (Diet l l ) , as compared with that containing sardine meal (Diet 23), were as follows: Diet No. 11 Percentage survival 71, Average live weight per bird, grams 144,....Growing mash consumed, per bird-day, grams 6.8 Feed consumed per gram of gain in weight (grams) 3.8......Diet 23....Percentage survival, 80,...Avg live weight per bird, grams....145,....Growing mash consumed , per bird-day, grams...7.4...Feed consumed per gram of gain in weight (grams)....3.9. Results were unsatisfactory when expeller-processed soybean oil meal was used in this diet to replace solvent

  10. Access to capital--a growing concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Donald A

    2004-01-01

    Access to capital over the next ten years will be one of the biggest challenges healthcare organizations will face as they strive to remain competitive and serve their communities. Meeting the growing needs for capital will require a disciplined and honest assessment of the capital sources that will be available and the best ways of positioning an organization to maximize their uses. It is incumbent on chief executive officers and other senior leaders to create a disciplined process for allocating capital and conveying how that process will be linked to the organization's strategic plan. All of the credit constituencies "buying" healthcare need to fully understand how the organization is positioning itself for future growth and success, and detailed bond marketing plans need to be implemented well before the actual sale of a new bond issue. Large and small healthcare providers will have sufficient access to capital in the future if investors believe that senior hospital executives have a credible plan and are disciplined enough to execute it.

  11. Cottonseed oil in diets for growing broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia de Sousa Lima Aguiar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three levels of crude cottonseed oil on performance, organ weights, and blood parameters of growing broilers. Carcass and cut yields after 33 and 42 days of age and the economic viability of the diets were also evaluated. Male broilers of the Ross line were distributed in a completely randomized design, in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement (0, 2, 4, and 6% inclusion of cottonseed oil, with and without ferrous sulfate with five replicates. In the period from 22 to 33 days, quadratic and increasing linear effects were observed on feed intake and weight gain, respectively. Feed conversion during the same period was better with the addition of ferrous sulfate. The addition of ferrous sulfate caused a reduction in heart weight. From 22 to 42 days, carcass and cuts yield, organ weight, and intestine length were not influenced by the levels of oil or by the addition of ferrous sulfate. Supplementation with iron salts provided a lower red blood cell count and increased mean cell volume. Balanced diets formulated with up to 6% of crude cottonseed oil for broilers from 22-33 and 22-42 days of age do not affect their performance or the weight of their organs. Supplementation with ferrous sulfate improved feed conversion up to 33 days. Diets formulated with 4% cottonseed oil supplemented with ferrous sulfate are economically viable in the period from 22 to 42 days.

  12. Growing pains: twelve lessons from corporate restructuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S L; Johnson, R L

    1988-05-01

    Corporate reorganization is a realignment of resources to enhance competitive strength and can follow one of two lines, vertical or horizontal. Whichever strategy is used, the reason for it remains unchanged: to provide a structural hierarchy through which strategic market niches are acquired and resources are economically deployed throughout the system. Healthcare corporate restructuring, however, is encountering growing pains, some of which were inevitable and others avoidable. When the healthcare organizational landscape is surveyed, 12 lessons can be learned about corporate reorganization: 1. Reorganization should be based on anticipated market and environmental conditions. 2. Form follows function. 3. Interdependence among multiple corporate units must be clearly acknowledged. 4. Reorganization is much more costly and politically charged than it appears at first. Reserved rights must be clearly defined. 6. The purpose and composition of the parent governing board must be distinguished from those of subsidiary boards. 7. Clarification of roles and relationships between the parent and subsidiaries is critical. 8. Unrealistic expectations of success should be confronted through up-front planning, negotiation, and creative problem solving. 9. False assumptions about corporate staffing needs create internal system warfare. 10. Physician support is crucial for success. 11. Hospital-based management skills and understanding may be inadequate for making personnel decisions in subsidiaries other than the hospital. 12. Competitive strategies must be strategically determined and must not be taken gamesmanship.

  13. Growing Your Career through Volunteering and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, C. A.; Meth, C.

    2007-12-01

    From giving your first paper at a scientific meeting to chairing committees that make multi-million dollar decisions, scientific organizations provide critical opportunities for growing your career. Many organizations support student activities by providing travel grants and fellowships - an important first step towards joining the larger scientific community. Beyond these standard opportunities, organizations also provide opportunities for students interested in gaining leadership experience, a skill not typically acquired in graduate science programs. For example, the Consortium for Leadership's Schlanger Ocean Drilling Fellowship provides research funds to graduate students, but also introduces the fellows to the communication skills needed to become successful members of their scientific community. Beyond student opportunities, volunteering provides mid-career and established scientists further experience in leadership. Opportunities exist in advising government science policy, guiding large-scale research programs, organizing large scientific meetings, and serving on non-profit boards. The variety of volunteer and leadership opportunities that are available give scientists at all stages of their career a chance to expand and diversify their experience, leading to new successes.

  14. Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. [Healthcare: a growing role in international politics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, M; Rey, J L

    2004-01-01

    Since the end of the cold war the tone of international relations has clearly changed. Whereas relations were once defined strictly in terms of more or less armed confrontation, economic and social issues now play a growing role. Healthcare policies in Africa have long been influenced by the policies of countries sponsoring bilateral and even multilateral foreign aid programs. However the last ten years have witnessed an increasing interaction between international policy and healthcare policy. The two main reasons for this trend involve 1) access to drug treatment and the WTO and 2) the extension and impact of the AIDS epidemic. The problem of access to drug treatment for poor populations (fundamental right) has led to the emergence of an increasingly strong and effective civil society. Because of its social and economic effects as well as its geopolitical and security implications, AIDS has become a major factor in international relations. With regard to both these issues the place and role of the USA is demonstrative of the interaction between healthcare and international relations.

  16. Autoethnography in Health Research: Growing Pains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heewon

    2016-03-01

    Autoethnography is gaining acceptance as a legitimate research method in health science research. The growing volume of published autoethnographies is indicative of this trend. After discussing the methodological tenents of this qualitative research method and its compatibility with health-related research, the author illustrates this trend with examples of published autoethnogrpahic books, theses, and journal articles. While celebrating the potential of autoethnography as a suitable health research method, the author critiques dominatly descriptive and evocative illness self-narratives that may evoke emontionally compelling responses from readers but offer insufficient sociocultural insights about the illness phenomenon. To identify a "desirable" autoethnography that provides not only a "thick description" of personal experiences but also a sociocultural interpration of such experiences, the author recommends both creators and consumers of autoethnography to ask five evaluative questions: (1) Does the autoethnography use authentic and trustworthy data?; (2) Does the autoethnography follow a reliable research process and show the process clearly?; (3) Does the autoethnography follow ethical steps to protect the rights of self and others presented and implicated in the autoethnography?; (4) Does the autoethnography analyze and interpret the sociocultural meaning of the author's personal experiences?; and (5) Does the autoethnography attempt to make a scholarly contribution with its conclusion and engagement of the existing literature?

  17. Chamber for Growing and Observing Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Molina, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    A chamber has been designed to enable growth and observation of microcolonies of fungi in isolation from the external environment. Unlike prior fungus-growing apparatuses, this chamber makes it possible to examine a fungus culture without disrupting it. Partly resembling a small picture frame, the chamber includes a metal plate having a rectangular through-thethickness opening with recesses for a top and a bottom cover glass, an inlet for air, and an inlet for water. The bottom cover glass is put in place and held there by clips, then a block of nutrient medium and a moisture pad are placed in the opening. The block is inoculated, then the top cover glass is put in place and held there by clips. Once growth is evident, the chamber can be sealed with tape. Little (if any) water evaporates past the edges of the cover glasses, and, hence there is little (if any) need to add water. A microscope can be used to observe the culture through either cover glass. Because the culture is sealed in the chamber, it is safe to examine the culture without risking contamination. The chamber can be sterilized and reused.

  18. Paediatric suicidal burns: A growing concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segu, Smitha; Tataria, Rachana

    2016-06-01

    An alarming rise in rates of paediatric population committing self-immolation acts is a growing social and medical problem. In recent times there seems to be a rising concern in paediatric population. A study was conducted at a government tertiary care burn centre over 5 years in paediatric age group of middle and upper lower class families. Most had deep partial thickness burns. Psychiatric and personality disorder were found in 24.03% and 31.46% patients respectively. Kerosene was the main agent chosen to inflict injury. The average length of hospital stay was 19.8 days. The crude mortality rate observed was 38.2%. With cultural and socio-economic changes children and adolescents are exposed to increased levels of stress and peer pressure leaving them vulnerable. A multidisciplinary care involving medical, psychological and social support is required. Identifying children at risk and proper counselling and support can form an important strategy at prevention rather than cure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution and revolution as organizations grow. 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, L E

    1998-01-01

    The influence of history on an organization is a powerful but often overlooked force. Managers, in their haste to build companies, frequently fail to ask such critical developmental questions as, Where has our organization been? Where is it now? and What do the answers to these questions mean for where it is going? Instead, when confronted with problems, managers fix their gaze outward on the environment and toward the future, as if more precise market projections will provide the organization with a new identity. In this HBR Classic, Larry Greiner identifies a series of developmental phases that companies tend to pass through as they grow. He distinguishes the phases by their dominant themes: creativity, direction, delegation, coordination, and collaboration. Each phase begins with a period of evolution, steady growth, and stability, and ends with a revolutionary period of organizational turmoil and change. The critical task for management in each revolutionary period is to find a new set of organizational practices that will become the basis for managing the next period of evolutionary growth. Those new practices eventually outlast their usefulness and lead to another period of revolution. Managers therefore experience the irony of seeing a major solution in one period become a major problem in a later period. Originally published in 1972, the article's argument and insights remain relevant to managers today. Accompanying the original article is a commentary by the author updating his earlier observations.

  20. An analysis of yearly trends in growing degree days and the relationship between growing degree day values and reference evapotranspiration in Turpan area, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lijun; Wang, Quanjiu; Bai, Yungang

    2013-08-01

    The growth and development of crops is commonly regarded as a function of time alone. However, this approach can be inadequate due to temperatures which vary from year to year caused by global climate change. This prompted the development of the growing degree day concept, which incorporates information on both the passage of time and the temperature experienced by the crop plant during that time. Crop water requirements, which are estimated by multiplying reference evapotranspiration values by a crop-specific coefficient, play a crucial role in the management of hydrologic cycles on arable land. Consequently, it would be useful to identify the relationships between cumulative growing degree days and reference evapotranspiration, in order to develop new methods for predicting crop growth and development periods and calculating reference evapotranspiration. This paper describes annual trends in cumulative growing degree days values and their impact on grape growth. Three different methods for calculating cumulative growing degree days values were evaluated as well. Several key findings were achieved. First, for the period between 1952 and 1995, the cumulative growing degree days values for specific days of the year were normally distributed. Second, the relationship between the relative cumulative growing degree days value and the passage of time can be accurately described by using a cubic polynomial function. Third, the day-to-day change in the average relative cumulative reference evapotranspiration can be described using an exponential function of time, which can be used to calculate the relative cumulative reference evapotranspiration value for any given day of the year. Fourth, there was a significant correlation between the relative cumulative growing degree days and cumulative reference evapotranspiration values during the period between grape budding and maturity, which can be described using a cubic polynomial function. Finally, a new method for

  1. Cultivation of fast-growing hardwoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, E.H.; Abrahamson, L.P. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1991-10-01

    The intensive culture of hybrid poplar has received in-depth study as part of the Fast-Growing Hardwood Program. Research has concentrated on short-rotation intensive culture systems. Specific studies and operations included establishing and maintaining a nursery/cutting orchard, installing clone-site trials in central and southern New York State and initiating studies of no-till site preparation, nutrient utilization efficiency, wood quality and soil solution chemistry. The nursery/cutting orchard was used to provide material for various research plantings and as a genotype repository. Clone- site trials results showed that hybrid poplar growth potential was affected by clone type and was related to inherent soil-site conditions. No-till techniques were shown to be successful in establishing hybrid poplar in terms of survival and growth when compared to conventional clean tillage and/or no competition control, and can be considered for use on sites that are particularly prone to erosion. Nutrient use efficiency was significantly affected by clone type, and should be a consideration when selecting clones for operational planting if fertilization is to be effectively and efficiently used. Wood quality differed among clones with site condition and tree age inferred as important factors. Soil solution chemistry was minimally affected by intensive cultural practices with no measured adverse effect on soil water quality. Generally, results of these studies showed that appropriate hybrid poplar clones grown in short-rotation intensively cultured systems can be used successfully in New York State if proper site conditions exist and appropriate establishment and maintenance techniques are used. 37 refs., 4 figs., 22 tabs.

  2. Honey oil burns: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Guy; Bertelotti, Robert; Greenhalgh, David; Palmieri, Tina; Maguina, Pirko

    2015-01-01

    There is an emerging mechanism of burn injury as a result of the ignition of butane, during the manufacture of a tetrahydrocannabinol concentrate known as butane honey oil. The authors report of a series of patients who presented with this mechanism of injury and a description of the process that causes these burns. Patient data were gathered from the medical records of eight patients treated at the University of California Davis Medical Center and Shriners Hospital of Northern California. Information on the manufacturing process of butane honey oil was gathered from Internet searches and published literature on the topic. The burns witnessed at the abovementioned institutions ranged from 16 to 95% TBSA, with an average of 49.9%. The average length of stay for the patients was 118.3 hospital days and 114.4 intensive care unit days, with an average of 43.8 days spent on mechanical ventilation. The average age of patients was 22 years, with only one patient above the age of 30 years. Accidents during honey oil production have resulted in a surge of burn injuries in our community during the past year. The manufacture of this product, which involves the use of volatile butane gas, is gaining in popularity. Although considered to be safer than previous methods, multiple casualties with extensive burn injuries have resulted from this process. Associated injuries from blast trauma or chemical burns are not likely to occur in these types of explosions and have not been observed in the series reported in this article. In light of the increasing popularity of honey oil, it is important for burn care providers to gain awareness and understanding of this problem and its growing presence in the community.

  3. Fast growing research on negative emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minx, Jan C.; Lamb, William F.; Callaghan, Max W.; Bornmann, Lutz; Fuss, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    Generating negative emissions by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is a key requirement for limiting global warming to well below 2 °C, or even 1.5 °C, and therefore for achieving the long-term climate goals of the recent Paris Agreement. Despite being a relatively young topic, negative emission technologies (NETs) have attracted growing attention in climate change research over the last decade. A sizeable body of evidence on NETs has accumulated across different fields that is by today too large and too diverse to be comprehensively tracked by individuals. Yet, understanding the size, composition and thematic structure of this literature corpus is a crucial pre-condition for effective scientific assessments of NETs as, for example, required for the new special report on the 1.5 °C by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In this paper we use scientometric methods and topic modelling to identify and characterize the available evidence on NETs as recorded in the Web of Science. We find that the development of the literature on NETs has started later than for climate change as a whole, but proceeds more quickly by now. A total number of about 2900 studies have accumulated between 1991 and 2016 with almost 500 new publications in 2016. The discourse on NETs takes place in distinct communities around energy systems, forests as well as biochar and other soil carbon options. Integrated analysis of NET portfolios—though crucial for understanding how much NETs are possible at what costs and risks—are still in their infancy and do not feature as a theme across the literature corpus. Overall, our analysis suggests that NETs research is relatively marginal in the wider climate change discourse despite its importance for global climate policy.

  4. Geometry and mechanics of growing bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhihong; Pearce, Daniel; Sengupta, Anupam; Giomi, Luca

    Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and non-living surfaces, and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine and industry. Although extensively researched - from single cells up to the population levels - a comprehensive biophysical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using numerical and analytical models, we study the mechanics of self-organization leading to the colony morphology of cells growing on a substrate with free boundary. We consider hard rods to mimic the growth of rod-shaped non-motile cells, and show that the colony, as a whole, does not form an ordered nematic phase, nor does it result in a purely disordered (isotropic) phase. Instead, different sizes of domains, in which cells are highly aligned at specific orientations, are found. The distribution of the domain sizes follows an exponential relation - indicating the existence of a characteristic length scale that determines the domain size relative to that of the colony. A continuum theory, based on the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals, is built to account for these phenomena, and is applied to describe the buckling transition from a planar to three-dimensional (3D) colony. The theory supports preliminary experiments conducted with different strains of rod shaped bacterial cells, and reveals that the buckling transition can be regulated by varying the cell stiffness and aspect ratio. This work proposes that, in addition to biochemical pathways, the spatio-temporal organization in microbial colonies is significantly tuned by the biomechanical and geometric properties of the microbes in consideration.

  5. WSGB: A Web Service-Based Growing Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, C. R.; Huang, L. H.; Chen, K. H.; Chiu, J. C.; Lin, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Growing Book refers to an electronic textbook that is co-developed, and has the ability to be constantly maintained, by groups of independent authors, thus creating a rich and ever-growing learning environment that can be conveniently accessible from anywhere. This work designs and implements a Web Service-based Growing Book that has the merits of…

  6. Inverse modeling and animation of growing single-stemmed trees at interactive rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Rudnick; L. Linsen; E.G. McPherson

    2007-01-01

    For city planning purposes, animations of growing trees of several species can be used to deduce which species may best fit a particular environment. The models used for the animation must conform to real measured data. We present an approach for inverse modeling to fit global growth parameters. The model comprises local production rules, which are iteratively and...

  7. Segregation of chromosome arms in growing and non-growing Escherichia coli cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad L. Woldringh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In slow-growing Escherichia coli cells the chromosome is organized with its left (L and right (R arms lying separated in opposite halves of the nucleoid and with the origin (O in-between, giving the pattern L-O-R. During replication one of the arms has to pass the other to obtain the same organization in the daughter cells: L-O-R L-O-R. To determine the movement of arms during segregation six strains were constructed carrying three coloured loci: the left and right arms were labeled with red and cyan fluorescent-proteins, respectively, on loci symmetrically positioned at different distances from the central origin, which was labeled with green-fluorescent protein. In non-replicating cells with the predominant spot pattern L-O-R, initiation of replication first resulted in a L-O-O-R pattern, soon changing to O-L-R-O. After replication of the arms the predominant spot patterns were, L-O-R L-O-R, O-R-L R-O-L or O-L-R L-O-R indicating that one or both arms passed an origin and the other arm. To study the driving force for these movements cell growth was inhibited with rifampicin allowing run-off DNA synthesis. Similar spot patterns were obtained in growing and non-growing cells, indicating that the movement of arms is not a growth-sustained process, but may result from DNA synthesis itself. The distances between loci on different arms (LR-distances and between duplicated loci (LL- or RR-distances as a function of their distance from the origin, indicate that in slow-growing cells DNA is organized according to the so-called sausage model and not accordingto the doughnut model.

  8. A growing danger: the risks posed by marihuana grow-ops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, F. [Canadian Electricity Association (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    The proliferation of sophisticated illegal indoor multi-plant marihuana cultivation operations is discussed, focusing primarily on public health and safety issues. Public health issues arise from the high level of molds and pollens caused by high humidity, which can cause asthma, respiratory conditions and allergies, particularly among children, and the likelihood of deadly levels of carbon monoxide build-up resulting from faulty rerouting of the residence's ventilation system. Safety issues discussed are: fires and electrocutions associated with the use of electrical diversions or bipasses to circumvent utility meters, the chemical and electrical hazards involved in investigating and dismantling growing operations, the significant dangers to utility crews who must repair illegal electrical bypasses, injuries by the booby-traps planted to protect the operation from other criminals or law enforcement agents, and the physical danger from the violence, including homicide and assaults, carried out by operators to exert control over production and distribution. Although in general, there is a relaxed attitude towards marihuana use in Canada. there is growing evidence of increasing public concern over large-scale growing operations. Nevertheless, to date operators of grow-ops have been dealt with lightly by the justice system. For example, in British Columbia 11,733 cases have come to the attention of police during the 1997 to 2000 period. Of these about half were dealt with informally (i.e. 'no case' seizures) and 2,255 cases led to at least one offender being convicted. The majority of convictions did not result in custodial dispositions. Only 18 per cent of the cases resulted in prison sentences, the average term being only 4.5 months.

  9. Chemical composition of metapleural gland secretions of fungus-growing and non-fungus-growing ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexsandro S; Morgan, E David; Drijfhout, Falko P; Camargo-Mathias, Maria I

    2012-10-01

    The metapleural gland is exclusive to ants, and unusual among exocrine glands in having no mechanism for closure and retention of secretion. As yet, no clear conclusion has been reached as to the function of metapleural gland secretion. Metapleural gland secretions were investigated for fungus-growing ants representing the derived attines Trachymyrmex fuscus, Atta laevigata, and Acromyrmex coronatus, the basal attines Apterostigma pilosum and Mycetarotes parallelus, and non-fungus-growing ants of the tribes Ectatommini (Ectatomma brunneum) and Myrmicini (Pogonomyrmex naegeli). Our results showed that the secretions of leaf-cutting ants (A. laevigata and A. coronatus) and the derived attine, T. fuscus, contain a greater variety and larger quantities of volatile compounds than those of myrmicine and ectatommine ants. The most abundant compounds found in the metapleural glands of A. laevigata and A. coronatus were hydroxyacids, and phenylacetic acid (only in A. laevigata). Indole was present in all groups examined, while skatole was found in large quantities only in attines. Ketones and aldehydes are present in the secretion of some attines. Esters are present in the metapleural gland secretion of all species examined, although mainly in A. laevigata, A. coronatus, and T. fuscus. Compared with basal attines and non-fungus-growing ants, the metapleural glands of leaf-cutting ants produce more acidic compounds that may have an antibiotic or antifungal function.

  10. Modeling nurses' attitude toward using automated unit-based medication storage and distribution systems: an extension of the technology acceptance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Rodríguez, Tomás; Romero-Alonso, María Mercedes

    2013-05-01

    This article analyzes the attitude of nurses toward the use of automated unit-based medication storage and distribution systems and identifies influencing factors. Understanding these factors provides an opportunity to explore actions that might be taken to boost adoption by potential users. The theoretical grounding for this research is the Technology Acceptance Model. The Technology Acceptance Model specifies the causal relationships between perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude toward using, and actual usage behavior. The research model has six constructs, and nine hypotheses were generated from connections between these six constructs. These constructs include perceived risks, experience level, and training. The findings indicate that these three external variables are related to the perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of automated unit-based medication storage and distribution systems, and therefore, they have a significant influence on attitude toward the use of these systems.

  11. Ten practice redesign approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Val

    2013-01-01

    As healthcare delivery continues to evolve at a rapid pace, practices need to consider redesign approaches to stay ahead of the pack. From national policy and private payer initiatives to societal macro trends and the growing use of mobile technologies, delivering value, understanding customer needs, and assessing satisfaction are important elements to achieve and maintain success. This article discusses 10 practice redesign approaches.

  12. The growing need for microservices in bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Williams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Within the information technology (IT industry, best practices and standards are constantly evolving and being refined. In contrast, computer technology utilized within the healthcare industry often evolves at a glacial pace, with reduced opportunities for justified innovation. Although the use of timely technology refreshes within an enterprise′s overall technology stack can be costly, thoughtful adoption of select technologies with a demonstrated return on investment can be very effective in increasing productivity and at the same time, reducing the burden of maintenance often associated with older and legacy systems. In this brief technical communication, we introduce the concept of microservices as applied to the ecosystem of data analysis pipelines. Microservice architecture is a framework for dividing complex systems into easily managed parts. Each individual service is limited in functional scope, thereby conferring a higher measure of functional isolation and reliability to the collective solution. Moreover, maintenance challenges are greatly simplified by virtue of the reduced architectural complexity of each constitutive module. This fact notwithstanding, rendered overall solutions utilizing a microservices-based approach provide equal or greater levels of functionality as compared to conventional programming approaches. Bioinformatics, with its ever-increasing demand for performance and new testing algorithms, is the perfect use-case for such a solution. Moreover, if promulgated within the greater development community as an open-source solution, such an approach holds potential to be transformative to current bioinformatics software development. Context: Bioinformatics relies on nimble IT framework which can adapt to changing requirements. Aims: To present a well-established software design and deployment strategy as a solution for current challenges within bioinformatics Conclusions: Use of the microservices framework

  13. The growing need for microservices in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher L; Sica, Jeffrey C; Killen, Robert T; Balis, Ulysses G J

    2016-01-01

    Within the information technology (IT) industry, best practices and standards are constantly evolving and being refined. In contrast, computer technology utilized within the healthcare industry often evolves at a glacial pace, with reduced opportunities for justified innovation. Although the use of timely technology refreshes within an enterprise's overall technology stack can be costly, thoughtful adoption of select technologies with a demonstrated return on investment can be very effective in increasing productivity and at the same time, reducing the burden of maintenance often associated with older and legacy systems. In this brief technical communication, we introduce the concept of microservices as applied to the ecosystem of data analysis pipelines. Microservice architecture is a framework for dividing complex systems into easily managed parts. Each individual service is limited in functional scope, thereby conferring a higher measure of functional isolation and reliability to the collective solution. Moreover, maintenance challenges are greatly simplified by virtue of the reduced architectural complexity of each constitutive module. This fact notwithstanding, rendered overall solutions utilizing a microservices-based approach provide equal or greater levels of functionality as compared to conventional programming approaches. Bioinformatics, with its ever-increasing demand for performance and new testing algorithms, is the perfect use-case for such a solution. Moreover, if promulgated within the greater development community as an open-source solution, such an approach holds potential to be transformative to current bioinformatics software development. Bioinformatics relies on nimble IT framework which can adapt to changing requirements. To present a well-established software design and deployment strategy as a solution for current challenges within bioinformatics. Use of the microservices framework is an effective methodology for the fabrication and

  14. Tree immunity: growing old without antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Peri A; Guest, David I

    2014-06-01

    Perennial plants need to cope with changing environments and pathogens over their lifespan. Infections are compartmentalised by localised physiological responses, and multiple apical meristems enable repair and regrowth, but genes are another crucial component in the perception and response to pathogens. In this opinion article we suggest that the mechanism for dynamic pathogen-specific recognition in long-lived plants could be explained by extending our current understanding of plant defence genes. We propose that, in addition to physiological responses, tree defence uses a three-pronged genomic approach involving: (i) gene numbers, (ii) genomic architecture, and (iii) mutation loads accumulated over long lifespans.

  15. Growing the Space Station's electrical power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    For over a decade NASA LeRC has been defining, demonstrating, and evaluating power electronic components and multi-kilowatt, multiply redundant, electrical power systems as part of OAST charter. Whether one considers aircraft (commercial transport/military), Space Station Freedom, growth station, launch vehicles, or the new Human Exploration Initiative, the conclusions remain the same: high frequency AC power distribution and control is superior to all other approaches for achieving a fast, smart, safe, versatile, and growable electrical power system that will meet a wide range of mission options. To meet the cost and operability goals of future aerospace missions that require significantly higher electrical power and longer durations, we must learn to integrate multiple technologies in ways that enhance overall system synergisms. The way NASA is doing business in space electric power is challenged and some approaches for evolving large space vehicles and platforms in well constructed steps to provide safe, ground testable, growable, smart systems that provide simple, replicative logic structures, which enable hardware and software verification, validation, and implementation are proposed. Viewgraphs are included.

  16. Forecasting Inundation from Debris Flows That Grow By Entraining Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. E.; Coe, J. A.; Brien, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Destructive debris flows often grow, and extend their runouts, by entraining sediment as they travel. However, incorporating varied entrainment processes into physics-based flow routing models is challenging. As an alternative, we developed a relatively simple, automated method for forecasting the inundation hazards posed by debris flows that entrain sediment and coalesce from multiple flows. Within a drainage network, we amalgamate the effects of many possible debris flows with each flow volume proportional to an entrainment rate scaled by the upslope contributing area, and then use these volumes in the USGS GIS-based inundation model LAHARZ. Our approach only requires estimates of two parameters: spatial entrainment rate & maximum entrainment area or maximum volume. Our procedure readily integrates various sediment sources and it can portray different inundation hazard levels on a GIS-based map by varying our two parameters. We applied this approach to part of the Coast Range, southern Oregon, USA. Using aerial photography, we mapped debris flows triggered by a large 1996 rain event on a LiDAR-derived topographic base, and identified initiation locations, travel paths, and areas of channel erosion and deposition. Many catchments experienced multiple debris flows that coalesced downstream and about 95% of the debris flows entrained sediment as they traveled. Flows typically stopped entraining sediment before the upslope contributing area reached ~500,000 m2. We used pre- and post-debris-flow stereo photos to estimate spatial entrainment rates in four clear-cut catchments having both channel erosion and coalescence of flows; these rates varied from 0.12 to 0.2 m3/m2. GIS-based inundation maps, using our automated methods, are quite similar to the mapped flow paths and deposits. Given appropriate parameters, our approach could be applied to a variety of steep, channelized environments where entrainment is important, such as alpine and post-wildfire slopes.

  17. Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW): a family-centered, community-based obesity prevention randomized controlled trial for preschool child-parent pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po'e, Eli K; Heerman, William J; Mistry, Rishi S; Barkin, Shari L

    2013-11-01

    Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW) is a randomized controlled trial that tests the efficacy of a family-centered, community-based, behavioral intervention to prevent childhood obesity among preschool-aged children. Focusing on parent-child pairs, GROW utilizes a multi-level framework, which accounts for macro (i.e., built-environment) and micro (i.e., genetics) level systems that contribute to the childhood obesity epidemic. Six hundred parent-child pairs will be randomized to a 3-year healthy lifestyle intervention or a 3-year school readiness program. Eligible children are enrolled between ages 3 and 5, are from minority communities, and are not obese. The principal site for the GROW intervention is local community recreation centers and libraries. The primary outcome is childhood body mass index (BMI) trajectory at the end of the three-year study period. In addition to other anthropometric measurements, mediators and moderators of growth are considered, including genetics, accelerometry, and diet recall. GROW is a staged intensity intervention, consisting of intensive, maintenance, and sustainability phases. Throughout the study, parents build skills in nutrition, physical activity, and parenting, concurrently forming new social networks. Participants are taught goal-setting, self-monitoring, and problem solving techniques to facilitate sustainable behavior change. The GROW curriculum uses low health literacy communication and social media to communicate key health messages. The control arm is administered to both control and intervention participants. By conducting this trial in public community centers, and by implementing a family-centered approach to sustainable healthy childhood growth, we aim to develop an exportable community-based intervention to address the expanding public health crisis of pediatric obesity.

  18. Segregation of chromosome arms in growing and non-growing Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldringh, Conrad L.; Hansen, Flemming G.; Vischer, Norbert O. E.;

    2015-01-01

    In slow-growing Escherichia coli cells the chromosome is organized with its left (L) and right (R) arms lying separated in opposite halves of the nucleoid and with the origin (0) in-between, giving the pattern L-O-R. During replication one of the arms has to pass the other to obtain the same...... organization in the daughter cells: L-O-R L-O-R. To determine the movement of arms during segregation six strains were constructed carrying three colored loci: the left and right arms were labeled with red and cyan fluorescent-proteins, respectively, on loci symmetrically positioned at different distances from...... that the movement of arms is not a growth-sustained process, but may result from DNA synthesis itself. The distances between loci on different arms (LR-distances) and between duplicated loci (LL- or RR-distances) as a function of their distance from the origin, indicate that in slow-growing cells DNA is organized...

  19. Growing Wikipedia Across Languages via Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulczyn, Ellery; West, Robert; Zia, Leila; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    The different Wikipedia language editions vary dramatically in how comprehensive they are. As a result, most language editions contain only a small fraction of the sum of information that exists across all Wikipedias. In this paper, we present an approach to filling gaps in article coverage across different Wikipedia editions. Our main contribution is an end-to-end system for recommending articles for creation that exist in one language but are missing in another. The system involves identifying missing articles, ranking the missing articles according to their importance, and recommending important missing articles to editors based on their interests. We empirically validate our models in a controlled experiment involving 12,000 French Wikipedia editors. We find that personalizing recommendations increases editor engagement by a factor of two. Moreover, recommending articles increases their chance of being created by a factor of 3.2. Finally, articles created as a result of our recommendations are of comparable quality to organically created articles. Overall, our system leads to more engaged editors and faster growth of Wikipedia with no effect on its quality.

  20. Many ways to grow: creative art therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R S

    1989-10-01

    So often, the prevailing thought surrounding treatment is that to be effective the treatment must be serious in tone. Yet, when you ask creative art therapists to describe their work, more often than not they will say that the ability to mix enjoyment with clinical technique is the "secret of our success." Again and again, recalcitrant, angry, underfocused, lethargic, and delayed children spring to life within an arts therapy session. Whether the modality used is music, dance, or the visual arts, children find in it the pleasure, stimulation, fun, and communication that may be missing from other aspects of their world. The creative art therapist helps a child by presenting the two-pronged approach of using the art form to foster mastery while allowing it to be a metaphor for ideas and concerns. Thus, both the process of "making something" and the symbols within the content are simultaneously providing therapeutic acid. Most exciting is the ability of the creative art therapist to unlock the child's inner world and bring new vitality to children and families alike. The creative art therapies are an important and unique tool among the constellation of health services.

  1. The one number you need to grow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichheld, Frederick F

    2003-12-01

    Companies spend lots of time and money on complex tools to assess customer satisfaction. But they're measuring the wrong thing. The best predictor of top-line growth can usually be captured in a single survey question: Would you recommend this company to a friend? This finding is based on two years of research in which a variety of survey questions were tested by linking the responses with actual customer behavior--purchasing patterns and referrals--and ultimately with company growth. Surprisingly, the most effective question wasn't about customer satisfaction or even loyalty per se. In most of the industries studied, the percentage of customers enthusiastic enough about a company to refer it to a friend or colleague directly correlated with growth rates among competitors. Willingness to talk up a company or product to friends, family, and colleagues is one of the best indicators of loyalty because of the customer's sacrifice in making the recommendation. When customers act as references, they do more than indicate they've received good economic value from a company; they put their own reputations on the line. And they will risk their reputations only if they feel intense loyalty. The findings point to a new, simpler approach to customer research, one directly linked to a company's results. By substituting a single question--blunt tool though it may appear to be--for the complex black box of the customer satisfaction survey, companies can actually put consumer survey results to use and focus employees on the task of stimulating growth.

  2. Metabolism of lactose by Clostridium thermolacticum growing in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Christophe; Girbal, Laurence; Péringer, Paul; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul; Soucaille, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the metabolism of Clostridium thermolacticum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, growing continuously on lactose (10 g l(-1)) and to determine the enzymes involved in the pathways leading to the formation of the fermentation products. Biomass and metabolites concentration were measured at steady-state for different dilution rates, from 0.013 to 0.19 h(-1). Acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were produced at all dilution rates, whereas lactate was detected only for dilution rates below 0.06 h(-1). The presence of several key enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, including beta-galactosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, ethanol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. Finally, the intracellular level of NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP was also measured for different dilution rates. The production of ethanol and lactate appeared to be linked with the re-oxidation of NADH produced during glycolysis, whereas hydrogen produced should come from reduced ferredoxin generated during pyruvate decarboxylation. To produce more hydrogen or more acetate from lactose, it thus appears that an efficient H2 removal system should be used, based on a physical (membrane) or a biological approach, respectively, by cultivating C. thermolacticum with efficient H2 scavenging and acetate producing microorganisms.

  3. Yeast diversity on grapes in two German wine growing regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brysch-Herzberg, Michael; Seidel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The yeast diversity on wine grapes in Germany, one of the most northern wine growing regions of the world, was investigated by means of a culture dependent approach. All yeast isolates were identified by sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA and the ITS region. Besides Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima, which are well known to be abundant on grapes, Metschnikowia viticola, Rhodosporidium babjevae, and Curvibasidium pallidicorallinum, as well as two potentially new species related to Sporidiobolus pararoseus and Filobasidium floriforme, turned out to be typical members of the grape yeast community. We found M. viticola in about half of the grape samples in high abundance. Our data strongly suggest that M. viticola is one of the most important fermenting yeast species on grapes in the temperate climate of Germany. The frequent occurrence of Cu. pallidicorallinum and strains related to F. floriforme is a new finding. The current investigation provides information on the distribution of recently described yeast species, some of which are known from a very few strains up to now. Interestingly yeasts known for their role in the wine making process, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus ssp. uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, were not found in the grape samples.

  4. Restoration of red mud deposits by naturally growing vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Tripti; Singh, N B; Singh, Nandita

    2017-05-04

    Disposal of red mud (RM) poses serious environmental problems such as wind erosion, air and water pollution. To overcome these problems, effective restoration of the disposal land through naturally growing vegetation is a sustainable and economical approach. The present study involved estimation of frequency (F), density (D), abundance (Ab), and important value index (IVI) of natural flora on abandoned RM sites in order to assess their metal toxicity tolerance capacity. Based on visual observations and highest IVI, S. Asper and S. punicea were identified as effective ecological tools for the restoration of barren RM sites. From the study, remarkable differences were observed between non-rhizospheric and rhizospheric RM of both species. These rhizospheric RM analyses confirm the ability of S. asper and S. punicea for enhancing the biological activities of abandoned RM. Translocation factor (TF) of iron was maximum (2.58) in S. asper, and bioconcentration factor (BCF) was found maximum (1.25) in S. punicea, but both TF (2.58) and BCF (1.35) were high in S. asper. Therefore, this plant could be reported as an iron hyperaccumulator plant. These results suggest that these plant species can be exploited for effective restoration of RM deposited land without any inputs or maintenance.

  5. Mesoscopic model for filament orientation in growing actin networks: the role of obstacle geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Weichsel, Julian; 10.1088/1367-2630/15/3/035006

    2013-01-01

    Propulsion by growing actin networks is a universal mechanism used in many different biological systems. Although the core molecular machinery for actin network growth is well preserved in most cases, the geometry of the propelled obstacle can vary considerably. In recent years, filament orientation distribution has emerged as an important observable characterizing the structure and dynamical state of the growing network. Here we derive several continuum equations for the orientation distribution of filaments growing behind stiff obstacles of various shapes and validate the predicted steady state orientation patterns by stochastic computer simulations based on discrete filaments. We use an ordinary differential equation approach to demonstrate that for flat obstacles of finite size, two fundamentally different orientation patterns peaked at either +35/-35 or +70/0/-70 degrees exhibit mutually exclusive stability, in agreement with earlier results for flat obstacles of very large lateral extension. We calculat...

  6. An Approach to Calculating Crystal Orientation through the Use of Preferentially Growing Direction of Dendritic Structure in Cast Alloys%根据枝晶优先生长方向计算铸造合金的晶体位向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任遥遥; 彭方; 梅青松; 燕平; 赵京晨; 王延庆; 孙家华

    2000-01-01

    根据枝晶优先生长方向与磨面之间的几何关系,导出了铸造合金试样任意三个相交磨面的晶面指数算式,并创建了两个含有不同算式的电子表格,分别可实现晶体位向及定向切割所需夹角的自动计算,使晶体位向的测算比常用的X射线Laue背射法简单、代价低、效率高。实例验算并通过与X射线Laue背射法测定结果及其它有关数据的比较分析表明,本文建立的方法计算结果可靠。%On the basis of the geometric relationships between the preferentially growing direction of dendritic structure and the grinding faces ,formulae are deduced to determine the crystal plane indexes of any three intersecting grinding faces of cast alloy samples. Two electronic spreadsheets containing the obtained formulae are produced. Automatic calculations on the crystal orientation and angles needed for directional cutting on the samples can be made through the application of the electronic spreadsheets. As compared with the Laue-back reflection method,the proposed one is characterized with the advantages of simplicity,low cost and high effectiveness. Checking computations with examples,comparisons with the Laue-back reflection method and with other related data show that the calculated results with the proposed method are reliable.

  7. Glucose turnover in fast-growing, lean and in slow-growing, obese swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, P J; Wangsness, P J; Varela-Alvarez, H; Griel, L C; Kavanaugh, J F

    1982-01-01

    Glucose turnover and associated measurements were compared in genetically obese, slow-growing feral pigs (Ossabaw) and domestic lean, fast-growing (Yorkshire) pigs. Five Ossabaw and five Yorkshire pigs 8 wk of age were prepared with indwelling arterial catheters to facilitate injection of tracer and serial sampling of blood. After a 14-h fast, pigs were administered 100 muCi of glucose-6-3H in a single injection; 12 blood samples were obtained over the subsequent 4-h period to obtain tracer dilution curves. Plasma glucose concentrations were the same in both strains (88 mg/100 ml) prior to tracer injection and remained constant for the duration of the 4-h sampling period. Ossabaw pigs exhibited a smaller minimal glucose mass (144 vs 179 mg/kg body weight, P less than .01) and space (16 vs 20%, P less than .01) when compared with Yorkshire pigs. Glucose replacement rate was greater for Ossabaw pigs than for Yorkshire pigs (3.96 vs 2.97 mg.min-1.kg-1 body weight, P less than .001). Minimal transit time was less in Ossabaw pigs than Yorkshire pigs (36 vs 60 min, P less than .001), which reflected the greater rate of irreversible disposal of tracer from the glucose pool of Ossabaw pigs. In conclusion, under these experimental conditions and at similar fasting glucose concentrations, glucose turnover and metabolic clearance rates were greater in Ossabaw than Yorkshire pigs. The results suggest a greater rate of fasting liver gluconeogenesis during short-term fasting in the young Ossabaw than the Yorkshire pig.

  8. Optimization of Fuel Consumption and Emissions for Auxiliary Power Unit Based on Multi-Objective Optimization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongpeng Shen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxiliary power units (APUs are widely used for electric power generation in various types of electric vehicles, improvements in fuel economy and emissions of these vehicles directly depend on the operating point of the APUs. In order to balance the conflicting goals of fuel consumption and emissions reduction in the process of operating point choice, the APU operating point optimization problem is formulated as a constrained multi-objective optimization problem (CMOP firstly. The four competing objectives of this CMOP are fuel-electricity conversion cost, hydrocarbon (HC emissions, carbon monoxide (CO emissions and nitric oxide (NO x emissions. Then, the multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO algorithm and weighted metric decision making method are employed to solve the APU operating point multi-objective optimization model. Finally, bench experiments under New European driving cycle (NEDC, Federal test procedure (FTP and high way fuel economy test (HWFET driving cycles show that, compared with the results of the traditional fuel consumption single-objective optimization approach, the proposed multi-objective optimization approach shows significant improvements in emissions performance, at the expense of a slight drop in fuel efficiency.

  9. Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Respiration to Nitrogen Fertilization: Varying Effects between Growing and Non-Growing Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Rui; Li, Rujian; Hu, Yaxian; Guo, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization has a considerable effect on food production and carbon cycling in agro-ecosystems. However, the impacts of N fertilization rates on the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) were controversial. Five N rates (N0, N45, N90, N135, and N180) were applied to a continuous winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crop on the semi-arid Loess Plateau, and the in situ soil respiration was monitored during five consecutive years from 2008 to 2013. During the growing season, the mean soil respiration rates increased with increasing N fertilization rates, peaking at 1.53 μmol m−2s−1 in the N135 treatment. A similar dynamic pattern was observed during the non-growing season, yet on average with 7.3% greater soil respiration rates than the growing season. In general for all the N fertilization treatments, the mean Q10 value during the non-growing season was significantly greater than that during the growing season. As N fertilization rates increased, the Q10 values did not change significantly in the growing season but significantly decreased in the non-growing season. Overall, N fertilization markedly influenced soil respirations and Q10 values, in particular posing distinct effects on the Q10 values between the growing and non-growing seasons. PMID:27992576

  10. Evolution of Communicative Competence in Adolescents Growing up in Orphanages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribakova, Laysan A.; Parfilova, Gulfia G.; Karimova, Lilya Sh.; Karimova, Raushan B.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes features of the communicative competence evolution in adolescents growing up in orphanages. The specificity is revealed and definition is given to key concept of the research, namely "communicative competence". Authors emphasize and demonstrate the evaluation peculiarities of the adolescents, growing up in…

  11. Temperature fields in a growing solar silicon crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondrik A. I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimal thermal terms for growing by Czochralski method Si single-crystals, suitable for making photoelectric energy converters, has been defined by the computer simulation method. Dependences of temperature fields character and crystallization front form on the diameter of the crystal, stage and speed of growing, and also on correlation between diameter and height of the crystal has been studied.

  12. Closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands: the finishing touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the latest developments in closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands, where growers are obliged to invest in environmently friendly cropping systems, in order to comply with new legislation. Subjects of discussion will be the reasons for regulation, the growe

  13. The effect of lumbosacral manipulation on growing pains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid de Beer

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The results from this study, specifically the feedback from parent(s/guardians(s and the pain diaries, indicated that spinal manipulation is beneficial in the treatment of growing pains. The results also showed that other methods of treating growing pains, such as simple leg rubs, may also bring relief.

  14. 7 CFR 319.37-8 - Growing media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... plants) established solely on tree fern slabs, coconut husks, coconut fiber, new clay pots, or new wooden...) Approved growing media are baked expanded clay pellets, coal cinder, coir, cork, glass wool, organic and...) in pots containing only APHIS approved growing media. (B) Inspection and treatment. When any cuttings...

  15. Functional influence on sutural bone apposition in the growing rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsaros, C.; Zissis, A.; Bresin, A.; Kiliaridis, S.

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to quantify the influence of reduced masticatory muscle function on sutural bone apposition in the growing rat. METHODS: Twenty-six growing male albino rats were randomly divided into 2 equal groups; 1 (hard-diet group) received the ordinary diet of hard pelle

  16. Initial approach to hypertension in the hemodynamics unit: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Teixeira Fulton Schimit

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Correct identification and early management of hypertensive disorders should be a part of the therapeutic repertoire of every professional working in hemodynamics units. Based on recent publications, this study aims to propose a practical approach to the identification and early management of these disorders in this type of service.

  17. Optimization of caffeine bioremoval by growing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Taguchi analysis methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Morahem Ashengroph; Masoud Haidarizadeh; Maryam Borchaluei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the recent years, application of microorganisms as green biocatalysts for removing caffeine pollution from industrial wastes and food caffeinated have been extensively considered. This investigation reports on optimization of bio-decaffeination process under growing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using the Taguchi statistical approach.  Materials and methods: Five variables, i.e. caffeine, Zn+2, glucose, peptone concentrations and time incubation, which h...

  18. Economic Evaluation of Intensive Growing of Selected Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Homolka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The submitted paper on the topic: “Economic Evaluation of Intensive Growing of Selected Crops” deals with an economic evaluation of growing of selected crops – winter oilseed rape, winter wheat, and sugar beet in Agro Žlunice a.s. where intensive growing technologies are used. Reached results are compared with results in the framework of the Czech Republic which represent average values for the mentioned crops. Agro Žlutice a.s. is situated in sugar beet production area in district Jičín and it farms on 1902 ha of agricultural land of which 1742 ha is arable land. A decisive subject of business here is plant production, animal production, and fruit growing. In the paper, an intensity and economics of growing of winter oilseed rape, winter wheat, and sugar beet in 2010, 2011 and 2012 is evaluated. Winter oilseed rape from a market view-point is an important crop for the chosen enterprise and Czech agriculture. In suitable growing it significantly contributes to a positive economic result. In winter wheat growing, from a view-point of competitiveness, it is important to reduce technological inputs which does not lead to decrease in yield and has provable economic benefit in evaluation of costs per a production unit. A favourable economics of growing of this crop is reached both in the intensive growing technology in the given enterprise, and within average growing conditions. A basic presumption whether to grow sugar beet is a possibility of the enterprise to supply this raw-material for processing either for sugar or bio-ethanol production. This crop in the mentioned enterprise and in the nationwide framework shows a favourable profitability. The reached growing and economic results of the enterprise Agro Žlunice a.s. in use of intensive growing technologies are more favourable in comparison with average results over the whole sector of agriculture.Pieces of knowledge introduced in this paper resulted from solution of an

  19. Segregation of chromosome arms in growing and non-growing Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldringh, Conrad L.; Hansen, Flemming G.; Vischer, Norbert O. E.

    2015-01-01

    In slow-growing Escherichia coli cells the chromosome is organized with its left (L) and right (R) arms lying separated in opposite halves of the nucleoid and with the origin (0) in-between, giving the pattern L-O-R. During replication one of the arms has to pass the other to obtain the same...... organization in the daughter cells: L-O-R L-O-R. To determine the movement of arms during segregation six strains were constructed carrying three colored loci: the left and right arms were labeled with red and cyan fluorescent-proteins, respectively, on loci symmetrically positioned at different distances from...... the central origin, which was labeled with green-fluorescent protein. In non-replicating cells with the predominant spot pattern L-O-R, initiation of replication first resulted in a L-O-O-R pattern, soon changing to O-L-R-O. After replication of the arms the predominant spot patterns were, L-O-R L-O-R, O...

  20. Effect of Teaching Protein Synthesis Unit Based On Multiple Intelligence Theory, To the Student Level of Retaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet HASENEKOĞLU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Protein Synthesis Unit was presented through Multiple Intelligence Theory based activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate Multiple Intelligence Theory’s impacts on student’s retention of knowledge acquired about Protein Synthesis. This research was conducted with Sophomores from Primary Science Education Department in Kafkas University Faculty of Education and lasted three weeks in the spring term of 2007–2008 academic year. In this study, within context of quasi-experimental method, which is based on impartially selected groups, nonequivalent control groups pretest-posttest method was used. Two classes from Primary Science Education Department were randomly selected. While the traditionalapproach was used in the control group, the teaching activities based on Multiple Intelligences Theory were used in the experimental group. The Protein Syntheses achievement test which had an reliability coefficient Cronbach Alpha of 0,8 prepared by the researcher were used to collect data.The data obtained, t test and A nova test was evaluated by using SPSS 12.0 package program. As a result of research was found that teaching based on Multiple Intelligence has been more effective in increasing student’s achievement and their levels of retention compared to teaching based on Traditional Approach.

  1. INTELLECT DEVELOPMENT IN THE GROWING-UP PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Revenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at studying the dynamics specificity of intelligence development in the growing-up process.The research methods involve the group intelligence tests for junior teens; R. Amthauer’s students test (IST adapted by L. A. Yasyukova; longitude and cross-section methods.The research findings demonstrate both the irregularity and conformity of intelligence development starting from the secondary school and up to the undergraduate university level. In the secondary school, there is a fast growth of quantitative characteristics of intellectual dynamics and verbal skills do minance. However in the high school, the qualitative competence-related changes prevail giving way to the non-verbal skills; and the given trend continues up to the undergraduate level.The author emphasizes the differences in intellect dynamics depending on the student’s basic mental faculties: the school students with higher faculties demonstrate a higher intelligence dynamics, while the university students reveal quite the opposite trend of lower intelligence dynamics in groups with higher faculties. As a result, the obvious differences in students’ intellect capacities in the secondary and high school become less evident at the university level.The author points out the novelty of differentiated analysis of intellectual indices dynamics, substantiating the assumption of individual typical patterns of intellect development.The research outcomes make a foundation for the theory of individual and typological options (trajectories of intellect development, and guarantee a differentiated approach to students’ education according to the rate and tempo specifics of intellectual maturity.

  2. Biochar as growing media additive and peat substitute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Steiner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental concerns raised the demand for alternative growing media substituting sphagnum peat. However growing media formulations still depend on peat and alternatives are limited. Biochar is carbonized plant material and could be an appropriate additive or even substitute for sphagnum peat. Freshly produced, it is free from pathogens, has a low nutrient content (if produced from nutrient poor feedstock, a very high structural stability and likely other favourable properties such as air capacity and water holding capacity. Preliminary tests were conducted to compare biochar with other growing media and growing media additives. The growth of a miniature sunflower, pH and electrical conductivity (EC was measured in different growing media such as biochar, perlite, clay granules, sphagnum peat and peat mixed with biochar in the ratios 1 : 4, 1 : 1 and 4 : 1 (25, 50 and 75%, by volume. Fresh biochar has a similar EC than peat which is even lower after rinsing with water. Due to the relatively high pH of biochar, it could be added to peat instead of lime in a concentration of up to 75%. The growth of the sunflower was similar in all growing media. Only the plant weight was slightly higher of plants that grew in perlite or peat. There is a large potential for optimization such as selection of particle size and feedstock for biochar production and growing media formulations for specific plant requirements.

  3. Hillslope characterization in terms of geophysical units based on the joint interpretation of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskova, Tatiana; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    perpendicular to this transect. The measurements along the hillslope transect deliver the two-dimensional hillslope section of resistivity and seismic velocity distribution with contrasting stratigraphic interfaces, whereas the measurements perpendicular to the hillslope transect obtained from vertical electrical soundings survey localize significant hillslope areas indicating existence of two-dimensional features in the subsurface. To demonstrate the suitability of the suggested approach, resistivity and refraction seismic measurements were carried out at the forested gently inclined hillslope in the Weierbach catchment, which belongs to the hydrological observatory Attert Basin locating in the mid-western part of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. This hillslope is characterized by Pleistocene periglacial slope deposits, which plays an important role in the ecosystem functioning. The obtained resistivity and seismic hillslope models of the Weierbech catchment complement well one another. The hillslope models identify three significant hillslope areas along the hillslope called as elementary functional units, and four electrical vertical stratigraphic units and two seismic vertical stratigraphic units that agree with lithological stratigraphy of this study site. In conclusions, the suggested geophysical approach is suitable to characterise a hillslope as the representative unit only at a single transect in the efficient manner in contrast to the expensive 3D-measurements.

  4. Morphoelastic rods. Part I: A single growing elastic rod

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, D.E.

    2013-02-01

    A theory for the dynamics and statics of growing elastic rods is presented. First, a single growing rod is considered and the formalism of three-dimensional multiplicative decomposition of morphoelasticity is used to describe the bulk growth of Kirchhoff elastic rods. Possible constitutive laws for growth are discussed and analysed. Second, a rod constrained or glued to a rigid substrate is considered, with the mismatch between the attachment site and the growing rod inducing stress. This stress can eventually lead to instability, bifurcation, and buckling. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF FAST GROWING TREES SPECIES FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. ANBU*, K. T. PARTHIBAN1, I. SEKAR U. SIVAKUMAR3,S.UMESHKANNA1 ,V. SARAVANA P. DURAIRASU1

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The fast growing trees were had the acceptable growth, chemical composition and morphological properties that make it suitable for ethanol recovery. The growth attained average level from 1.57m to 3.73m at the end of ninth month. The chemical composition such as higher proportion of holocellulose and lower content of lignin of the fast growing trees expected the more ethanol recovery with minimum recalcitrant. Due to long fiber length, wider fiber width, and wide lumen diameter with thin cell wall thickness of the fast growing trees were preferable for ethanol conversion.

  6. Social vulnerability assessment: a growing practice in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsell, S.; McC arthy, S.

    2012-04-01

    This paper builds upon work on social vulnerability from the CapHaz-Net consortium, an ongoing research project funded by the European Commission in its 7th Framework Programme. The project focuses on the social dimensions of natural hazards, as well as on regional practices of risk prevention and management, and aims at improving the resilience of European societies to natural hazards, paying particular attention to social capacity building. The topic of social vulnerability is one of seven themes being addressed in the project. There are various rationales for examining the relevance of social vulnerability to natural hazards. Vulnerability assessment has now been accepted as a requirement for the effective development of emergency management capability, and assessment of social vulnerability has been recognised as being integral to understanding the risk to natural hazards. The aim of our research was to examine social vulnerability, how it might be understood in the context of natural hazards in Europe, and how social vulnerability can be addressed to increase social capacity. The work comprised a review of research on social vulnerability to different natural hazards within Europe and included concepts and definitions of social vulnerability (and related concepts), the purpose of vulnerability assessment and who decides who is vulnerable, different approaches to assessing or measuring social vulnerability (such as the use of 'classical' quantitative vulnerability indicators and qualitative community-based approaches, along with the advantages and disadvantages of both), conceptual frameworks for assessing social vulnerability and three case studies of social vulnerability studies within Europe: flash floods in the Italian Alps, fluvial flooding in Germany and heat waves in Spain. The review reveals variable application of social vulnerability analysis across Europe and there are indications why this might be the case. Reasons could range from the scale of

  7. On-line identification of hybrid systems using an adaptive growing and pruning RBF neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alizadeh, Tohid

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces an adaptive growing and pruning radial basis function (GAP-RBF) neural network for on-line identification of hybrid systems. The main idea is to identify a global nonlinear model that can predict the continuous outputs of hybrid systems. In the proposed approach, GAP......-RBF neural network uses a modified unscented kalman filter (UKF) with forgetting factor scheme as the required on-line learning algorithm. The effectiveness of the resulting identification approach is tested and evaluated on a simulated benchmark hybrid system....

  8. Is It Worthwhile for Farmers to Grow Grain? ——A Study of Farmers’ Behavior of Growing Grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min SHA; Laping WU

    2016-01-01

    Based on the substitutability of economic activities,by comparing the profit margin of farmers’ planting of food crops and non-food crops,grain growing and breeding,as well as the daily return of grain growing and working outside during 2001-2013,this paper points out that the comparative income from farmers’ behavior of growing grain is not absolutely low,and the income from growing grain is higher than from breeding pigs. It also studies the effect of food subsidies on farmers’ behavior of growing grain. Farmers’ behavior of growing grain is a helpless choice under many constraints,including not only economic returns,but also moral sentiments,political and social factors. From yield,quality and price,government should rely on science and technology to give full play to the functions of government guidance and supervision,and enhance the enthusiasm of farmers for growing grain,to increase food production and ensure food security.

  9. As World's Population Ages, Blindness Rates Likely to Grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167592.html As World's Population Ages, Blindness Rates Likely to Grow Study of ... estimate that 0.75 percent of the world's population was blind in 1990, compared to 0.5 ...

  10. Climate Prediction Center Weekly Corn Growing Degree Days

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A corn growing degree day (GDD) is an index used to express crop maturity. The index is computed by subtracting a base temperature of 50?F from the average of the...

  11. Lilienfeld Prize Talk: How do massive black holes grow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei evolve in symbiosis with their hosts. This paper will review how they grow, with particular emphasis on mergers, and on the complex phenomena associated with the tidal capture and disruption of stars.

  12. Agricultural Commercialisation In Coffee Growing Areas Of Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of the study were (i) to assess the scale of commercialisation in coffee growing ... As the propensity to supply more coffee is significantly higher among ... the importance of addressing risks associated with food supply and price.

  13. Growing grass for a green biorefinery - an option for Ireland?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Keeffe, S.; Schulte, R.P.O.; O'Kiely, P.; O'Donoghue, C.; Lalor, S.T.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Growing grass for a green biorefinery – an option for Ireland? Mind the gap: deciphering the gap between good intentions and healthy eating behaviour Halting biodiversity loss by 2020 – implications for agriculture A milk processing sector model for Ireland

  14. Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts Rob Mitchell Abstract: Switchgrass, big bluestem, and warm-season grass mixtures provide numerous benefits. Existing field equipment, herbicides, and cultivar improvement promote rapid establishment in the planting year. These gra...

  15. Accumulated Growing Degree Days, Contiguous United States, 1981 - Current Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USA National Phenology Network has available a series of gridded products enabling researchers to analyze current year Accumulated Growing Degree Days (AGDD)...

  16. Growing actin networks regulated by obstacle size and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Lin, Ji; Qian, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Growing actin networks provide the driving force for the motility of cells and intracellular pathogens. Based on the molecular-level processes of actin polymerization, branching, capping, and depolymerization, we have developed a modeling framework to simulate the stochastic and cooperative behaviors of growing actin networks in propelling obstacles, with an emphasis on the size and shape effects on work capacity and filament orientation in the growing process. Our results show that the characteristic size of obstacles changes the protrusion power per unit length, without influencing the orientation distribution of actin filaments in growing networks. In contrast, the geometry of obstacles has a profound effect on filament patterning, which influences the orientation of filaments differently when the drag coefficient of environment is small, intermediate, or large. We also discuss the role of various parameters, such as the aspect ratio of obstacles, branching rate, and capping rate, in affecting the protrusion power of network growth.

  17. The growth performance of growing pigs during feed restriction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... ISSN 1684–5315 © 2009 Academic Journals. Full Length Research Paper. The growth performance of growing pigs during feed restriction and ... animal whose growth has been slowed by nutritional deprivation may exhibit ...

  18. Water quality assessment of razorback sucker grow-out ponds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water quality parameters had never been assessed in these grow-out ponds. Historically growth, condition, and survival of razorback suckers have been variable...

  19. Algebraically growing waves in ducts with sheared mean flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Telionis, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of the behavior of standing and traveling acoustic waves in a smooth duct with a fluid flow having a sheared mean velocity profile, when the waves grow algebraically as they travel along the duct axis. It is shown that standing waves growing algebraically with the axial distance cannot exist in a smooth duct when the duct wall have a finite resistance. The existence of traveling waves subject to the same law of growth is also dismissed under realistic flow conditions.

  20. Fabric Defect Detection Based on Regional Growing PCNN

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive image segmentation method based on a new Regional Growing Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) model for detecting fabric defects. In this method, the pixels of analyzed image are mapped on the neurons in a pulse coupled neural network. Improved PCNN model and regional growing theory are combined in the light of the requirements for fabric defect detection. And the mean and variance value of the defect-free images are introduced into this model. The validation t...

  1. The Growing Indian Middle Class: Attracting Indian Tourists to Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Srabani Roy Choudhury

    2015-01-01

    Two policy decisions motivated this paper. One, a Japanese Government policy to increase the number of visitors to Japan by 30 million; and the other, growing India- Japan relations where emphasizes on ‘People to People Exchange’ is increasingly gaining significance. While conducting preliminary investigation on this subject, it was realized that India’s growing middle class which is the main driver for consumption was being focused on by Japan as a single group and not being considered as se...

  2. Food-Growing, Air- And Water-Cleaning Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Scheld, H. W.; Mafnuson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus produces fresh vegetables and removes pollutants from air. Hydroponic apparatus performs dual function of growing fresh vegetables and purifying air and water. Leafy vegetables rooted in granular growth medium grow in light of fluorescent lamps. Air flowing over leaves supplies carbon dioxide and receives fresh oxygen from them. Adaptable to production of food and cleaning of air and water in closed environments as in underwater research stations and submarines.

  3. The growing dichotomy between real and financial sectors

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The paper contends that the economic growth process around the world has seen a growing dichotomy between real and financial sectors in the last four decades. There has been a marked stagnation in the real sector with falling growth and productivity levels, worsening physical investment and employment growth and dwindling saving rates. In contrast, the financial sector has seen a huge appreciation in financial assets and growing income from ownership of financial capital. The paper highlights...

  4. Application of neutron radiography and tomography for analysis of root morphology of growing ginseng

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Ho; Sung, Bong Jae; Park, Jong Yoon [Geumsan Agricultural Development and Technology Center, Geumsan (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Cheul Muu; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Seung Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The shape of main root of ginseng is very important for its commercial value. The morphology of main root is predominantly determined by the root-growing pattern in one year after transplantation of ginseng seedling(one years root). There are many factors affecting the root growing of young ginseng but no systematic approach has been applied to find the effects of various factors. The main reason for this was no method was sought to see the root shapes non-destructively. Neutron radiography is thought to be an appropriate NDT method for root morphology examination in ginseng and a study on using NR for the research on ginseng is being conducted. Considering that the live plants should be moved to the reactor site for their examination of four or five times per year at least, the pot growing method is indispensable. The pot should contain enough soils for growing-up of ginseng and its maximum size is limited to have good contrast in neutron radiography image of ginseng root. Thus, a preliminary radiographic study was performed to find the proper size of ginseng pot using the NR facility of HANARO. Several pots will be prepared for young ginsengs and they will be examined for about one year.

  5. Semantic Units Based Event Detection in Soccer Videos%基于语义单元的足球视频事件检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童晓峰; 刘青山; 卢汉清; 金洪亮

    2005-01-01

    A semantic unit based event detection scheme in soccer videos is proposed in this paper.The scheme can be characterized as a three-layer framework. At the lowest layer, low-level features including color, texture, edge, shape, and motion are extracted. High-level semantic events are defined at the highest layer. In order to connect low-level features and high-level semantics, we design and define some semantic units at the intermediate layer. A semantic unit is composed of a sequence of consecutives frames with the same cue that is deduced from low-level features. Based on semantic units, a Bayesian network is used to reason the probabilities of events. The experiments for shoot and card event detection in soccer videos show that the proposed method has an encouraging performance.

  6. Geographically Sourcing Cocaine’s Origin – Delineation of the Nineteen Major Coca Growing Regions in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallette, Jennifer R.; Casale, John F.; Jordan, James; Morello, David R.; Beyer, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, geo-sourcing to five major coca growing regions within South America was accomplished. However, the expansion of coca cultivation throughout South America made sub-regional origin determinations increasingly difficult. The former methodology was recently enhanced with additional stable isotope analyses (2H and 18O) to fully characterize cocaine due to the varying environmental conditions in which the coca was grown. An improved data analysis method was implemented with the combination of machine learning and multivariate statistical analysis methods to provide further partitioning between growing regions. Here, we show how the combination of trace cocaine alkaloids, stable isotopes, and multivariate statistical analyses can be used to classify illicit cocaine as originating from one of 19 growing regions within South America. The data obtained through this approach can be used to describe current coca cultivation and production trends, highlight trafficking routes, as well as identify new coca growing regions. PMID:27006288

  7. Guidelines regarding the interim use and phase out of neonicotinoid insecticides to grow agricultural crops for wildlife on NWRs in the Pacific Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum describing a phased approach in the Pacific Region to eliminate the use of neonicotinoidinsecticides (by any method) to grow agricultural crops for...

  8. A knowledge management framework to grow innovation capability maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denéle Esterhuizen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Innovation is a key prerequisite for being organisationally competitive. Therefore, it is imperative that enterprises grow and mature their innovation capability. Knowledge management plays a fundamental role in the ability of enterprises to innovate successfully.Objectives: There are no formal guidelines for using knowledge management to grow innovation capability maturity. The researchers intended to develop a knowledge management framework that enables innovation capability.Method: The scope of the research did not allow for the practical implementation of the framework. However, five industry and subject theory experts evaluated the applicability and usability of the framework.Results: All five experts reported that enterprises could use knowledge management tools and organisational facilitating conditions to allow innovation capability maturity to grow. The importance of the framework is that it gives guidelines for using knowledge management as a vehicle for growing innovation capability maturity.Conclusion: The framework determines whether enterprises’ organisational conditions and knowledge management tools are sufficient to sustain or grow their innovation capability maturity.

  9. Marijuana growing operations in British Columbia revisited, 1997-2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, D.; Malm, A.; Kinney, B. [University College of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC (Canada). Dept. of Criminology and Criminal Justice]|[University College of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC (Canada). International Centre for Urban Research Studies

    2005-03-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of marihuana cultivation in British Columbia were presented. This report describes the incidents of marihuana grow operations coming to the attention of the police; the characteristics of marihuana growing operations; the suspects involved; the actions taken by the police and courts; and penalty. The study confirms that these operations which are dispersed throughout the province are increasing in both size and sophistication. The average number of kilograms of harvested marihuana seized per grow operation tripled from 1997 to 2003. In addition, the number of high intensity lights seized per operation also grew, leading to an associated increase in the average amount of electricity theft per operation. About 1 in 5 grow operations involved hydro theft. The average cost associated with hydro theft per operation was about $2,880 in 1997 and $3,740 in 2003. In 2003, it is estimated that growers stole more than $3,200,000 from BC Hydro. In addition to electricity by-passes, 15 per cent of indoor grow operations contained hazards such as weapons, explosives, and other drugs. 25 tabs., 34 figs.

  10. Measuring efficiency of rice growing farmers using data envelopment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaibidi, Nerda Zura; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Ramli, Razamin; Baten, Md. Azizul; Khan, Sahubar Ali Nadhar

    2015-12-01

    Self-sufficiency in rice production has been the main issue in Malaysia agriculture. It is significantly low and does not comply with the current average rice yield of 3.7 tons per ha per season. One of the best options and the most effective way to improve rice productivity is through more efficient utilization of paddy farmers. Getting farmers to grow rice is indeed a challenge when they could very well be making better money doing something else. This paper attempts to study the efficiency of rice growing farmers in Kubang Pasu using Data Envelopment Analysis model. For comparative analysis, three scenarios are considered in this study in measuring efficiency of rice growing farmers. The first scenario considers only fertilizer factor as an input while for the second, the land size is added as another factor. The third scenario considers more details about the inputs such as the type of fertilizer, NPK and mixed and also land tenureship and size. In all scenarios, the outputs are rice yield (tons) and the profit (RM). As expected, the findings show that the third scenario establishes the highest number of efficient rice growing farmers. It reveals that the combination of outputs and inputs chosen has significant contribution in measuring efficiency of rice growing farmers.

  11. Surfing gravitational waves: can bigravity survive growing tensor modes?

    CERN Document Server

    Amendola, Luca; Martinelli, Matteo; Pettorino, Valeria; Zumalacarregui, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The theory of bigravity offers one of the simplest possibilities to describe a massive graviton while having self-accelerating cosmological solutions without a cosmological constant. However, it has been shown recently that bigravity is affected by early-time fast growing modes on the tensor sector. Here we argue that we can only trust the linear analysis up to when perturbations are in the linear regime and use a cut-off to stop the growing of the metric perturbations. This analysis, although more consistent, still leads to growing tensor modes that are unacceptably large for the theory to be compatible with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), both in temperature and polarization spectra. In order to suppress the growing modes and make the model compatible with CMB spectra, we find it necessary to either fine-tune the initial conditions, modify the theory or set the cut-off for the tensor perturbations of the second metric much lower than unity. Initial conditions such that the growing mod...

  12. Modeling mechanical interactions in growing populations of rod-shaped bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, James J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2017-10-01

    Advances in synthetic biology allow us to engineer bacterial collectives with pre-specified characteristics. However, the behavior of these collectives is difficult to understand, as cellular growth and division as well as extra-cellular fluid flow lead to complex, changing arrangements of cells within the population. To rationally engineer and control the behavior of cell collectives we need theoretical and computational tools to understand their emergent spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we present an agent-based model that allows growing cells to detect and respond to mechanical interactions. Crucially, our model couples the dynamics of cell growth to the cell’s environment: Mechanical constraints can affect cellular growth rate and a cell may alter its behavior in response to these constraints. This coupling links the mechanical forces that influence cell growth and emergent behaviors in cell assemblies. We illustrate our approach by showing how mechanical interactions can impact the dynamics of bacterial collectives growing in microfluidic traps.

  13. Action selection in growing state spaces: control of network structure growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Gómez, Vicenç; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical processes taking place on a network depend on its topology. Influencing the growth process of a network therefore has important implications on such dynamical processes. We formulate the problem of influencing the growth of a network as a stochastic optimal control problem in which a structural cost function penalizes undesired topologies. We approximate this control problem with a restricted class of control problems that can be solved using probabilistic inference methods. To deal with the increasing problem dimensionality, we introduce an adaptive importance sampling method for approximating the optimal control. We illustrate this methodology in the context of formation of information cascades, considering the task of influencing the structure of a growing conversation thread, as in Internet forums. Using a realistic model of growing trees, we show that our approach can yield conversation threads with better structural properties than the ones observed without control.

  14. The seasonal timing of warming that controls onset of the growing season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James S; Melillo, Jerry; Mohan, Jacqueline; Salk, Carl

    2014-04-01

    Forecasting how global warming will affect onset of the growing season is essential for predicting terrestrial productivity, but suffers from conflicting evidence. We show that accurate estimates require ways to connect discrete observations of changing tree status (e.g., pre- vs. post budbreak) with continuous responses to fluctuating temperatures. By coherently synthesizing discrete observations with continuous responses to temperature variation, we accurately quantify how increasing temperature variation accelerates onset of growth. Application to warming experiments at two latitudes demonstrates that maximum responses to warming are concentrated in late winter, weeks ahead of the main budbreak period. Given that warming will not occur uniformly over the year, knowledge of when temperature variation has the most impact can guide prediction. Responses are large and heterogeneous, yet predictable. The approach has immediate application to forecasting effects of warming on growing season length, requiring only information that is readily available from weather stations and generated in climate models. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A Growing Self-Organizing Network for Reconstructing Curves and Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Piastra, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Self-organizing networks such as Neural Gas, Growing Neural Gas and many others have been adopted in actual applications for both dimensionality reduction and manifold learning. Typically, in these applications, the structure of the adapted network yields a good estimate of the topology of the unknown subspace from where the input data points are sampled. The approach presented here takes a different perspective, namely by assuming that the input space is a manifold of known dimension. In return, the new type of growing self-organizing network presented gains the ability to adapt itself in way that may guarantee the effective and stable recovery of the exact topological structure of the input manifold.

  16. Potential for nitrogen fixation in fungus-growing termite symbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Sapountzis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Termites host a gut microbiota of diverse and essential symbionts that enable specialization on dead plant material; an abundant, but nutritionally imbalanced food source. To supplement the severe shortage of dietary nitrogen (N, some termite species make use of diazotrophic bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2. Fungus-growing termites (subfamily Macrotermitinae host a fungal exosymbiont (genus Termitomyces that provides digestive services and the main food source for the termites. This has been thought to obviate the need for N2-fixation by bacterial symbionts. Here we challenge this notion by performing acetylene reduction assays of live colony material to show that N2 fixation is present in two major genera (Macrotermes and Odontotermes of fungus-growing termites. We compare and discuss fixation rates in relation to those obtained from other termites, and suggest avenues of research that may lead to a better understanding of N2 fixation in fungus-growing and other termites.

  17. Growing Multiplex Networks with Arbitrary Number of Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Fotouhi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of growing multiplex networks. Currently, the results on the inter-layer degree distribution of growing multiplex networks present in the literature pertain to the case of two layers, and are confined to the special case of homogeneous growth. In the present paper, we obtain closed-form solutions for the inter-layer degree distribution of heterogeneously growing multilayer networks with arbitrary number of layers in the steady state. Heterogeneous growth means that each incoming node establishes different numbers of links in different layers. We first briefly consider the problem for two layers: we consider the cases of preferential attachment and uniform attachment separately, and we obtain closed-form expressions for the inter-layer degree distribution and expected degree distributions in each layer. Then for both attachment schemes, we generalize the problem to $M$ layers, and provide solutions for the joint degree distribution across all layers.

  18. Experimental and theoretical strain distributions for stationary and growing cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerberich, W. W.; Davidson, D. L.; Kaczorowski, M.

    E XPERIMENTAL strain distributions are determined very near the crack tip in Fe-3wt.%Si single crystals. Both in situ stereoimaging and electron channeling techniques give reasonably reproducible distributions. By growing fatigue cracks on a {100} cleavage plane, the singularity strengths have been determined for both growing and stationary cracks under relatively plane stress and plane strain conditions. This has allowed a comparison to existing theoretical models. It is shown that the HRR singularity (Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren, 1968) for stationary cracks is very good to within I μm of the crack tip and a hardening model for the growing crack (gao and hwang, Advances in Fracture Research, edited by D. Francois. 5th Int. Conf. on Fracture, Cannes, France, 2, 669, 1981) is surprisingly good. Other issues such as fracture criteria are discussed since strains greater than unity were measured at the crack tip in this relatively brittle material.

  19. Growing a Chemical Garden at the Air-Fluid Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Salome; Maselko, Jerzy; Pantaleone, James T

    2016-01-26

    Here we grow chemical gardens using a novel, quasi two-dimensional, experimental configuration. Buoyant calcium chloride solution is pumped onto the surface of sodium silicate solution. The solutions react to form a precipitation structure on the surface. Initially, an open channel forms that grows in a spiral. This transitions to radially spreading and branching fingers, which typically oscillate in transparency as they grow. The depth of the radial spreading, and the fractal dimension of the finger growth, are surprisingly robust, being insensitive to the pumping rate. The curvature of the channel membrane and the depth of the radially spreading solution can be explained in terms of the solution densities and the interfacial tension across the semipermeable membrane. These unusually beautiful structures provide new insights into the dynamics of precipitation structures and may lead to new technologies where structures are grown instead of assembled.

  20. Bioavailability of dietary cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, J J; Guay, F; Le Floc'h, N; Girard, C L

    2010-12-01

    The present project aimed to estimate bioavailability of dietary vitamin B(12), for which little information is available in growing pigs. Two approaches, each using 2 quantities of dietary cyanocobalamin, were compared; the first was based on whole body retention for 8 d and the second was based on nycthemeral portal net flux of vitamin B(12). In the first trial, 15 blocks of 3 pigs (31.7 ± 0.5 kg of BW) were formed according to their vitamin B(12) status. Within each block, 1 pig (CONT) was killed and tissues were sampled for vitamin B(12) determination. The remaining 2 piglets were fed 25 (B(12)-25) or 250 (B(12)-250) μg daily of cyanocobalamin for 8 d. Urine was sampled twice daily, and the pigs were killed and sampled as CONT pigs. The total content of vitamin B(12) in the carcass, urine, and intestinal tract was affected by the dietary treatments (P 0.019). The whole body retention of vitamin B(12) was greater (P = 0.02) in B(12)-250 than B(12)-25 pigs, but the corresponding bioavailability was estimated to be 5.3 and 38.2%, respectively. In trial 2, 11 pigs (35.1 ± 4.0 kg of BW and 75.4 ± 5.9 d of age) fed a diet unsupplemented with vitamin B(12) from weaning at 28 d of age were surgically equipped with catheters in the portal vein and carotid artery and an ultrasonic flow probe around the portal vein. Each pig received 3 boluses of 0 (B(12)-0), 25, and 250 μg of dietary vitamin B(12) according to a crossover design. Postprandial nycthemeral arterial plasma concentrations of vitamin B(12) reached minimum values (P < 0.01) between 15 and 18 h postmeal that were 29.6, 15.6, and 10.0% less than the premeal values for B(12)-0, B(12)-25, and B(12)-250 pigs, respectively (linear, P < 0.01). The cumulative net flux of vitamin B(12) for 24 h corresponded to 2.4 and 5.1 µg for B(12)-25 and B(12)-250 treatments, respectively, and the corresponding bioavailability was estimated to be 9.7 and 2.0%, respectively. Although bioavailability estimates varied according

  1. On the mechanics of thin films and growing surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Holland, M. A.

    2013-05-24

    Many living structures are coated by thin films, which have distinct mechanical properties from the bulk. In particular, these thin layers may grow faster or slower than the inner core. Differential growth creates a balanced interplay between tension and compression and plays a critical role in enhancing structural rigidity. Typical examples with a compressive outer surface and a tensile inner core are the petioles of celery, caladium, or rhubarb. While plant physiologists have studied the impact of tissue tension on plant rigidity for more than a century, the fundamental theory of growing surfaces remains poorly understood. Here, we establish a theoretical and computational framework for continua with growing surfaces and demonstrate its application to classical phenomena in plant growth. To allow the surface to grow independently of the bulk, we equip it with its own potential energy and its own surface stress. We derive the governing equations for growing surfaces of zero thickness and obtain their spatial discretization using the finite-element method. To illustrate the features of our new surface growth model we simulate the effects of growth-induced longitudinal tissue tension in a stalk of rhubarb. Our results demonstrate that different growth rates create a mechanical environment of axial tissue tension and residual stress, which can be released by peeling off the outer layer. Our novel framework for continua with growing surfaces has immediate biomedical applications beyond these classical model problems in botany: it can be easily extended to model and predict surface growth in asthma, gastritis, obstructive sleep apnoea, brain development, and tumor invasion. Beyond biology and medicine, surface growth models are valuable tools for material scientists when designing functionalized surfaces with distinct user-defined properties. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Muscle MRI of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD): A growing demand and a promising approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, F; Salort-Campana, E; Le Troter, A; Bendahan, D; Attarian, S

    2016-10-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), an inherited and progressive muscle disorder, is among the most common hereditary muscle disorders. From a clinical vantage point, FSHD is characterized by weakness of the facial, shoulder (often with scapular winging), arm (including biceps and triceps) and abdominal muscles. Forearm muscles are usually spared and weakness is usually asymmetrical. Over the past few decades, muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become established as a reliable and accurate noninvasive tool for the diagnosis and assessment of progression in neuromuscular diseases, showing specific patterns of muscle involvement for a number of myopathies. More recently, MRI has been used to noninvasively identify quantitative biomarkers, allowing evaluation of the natural progression of disease and assessment of therapeutic interventions. In the present review, the intention was to present the most significant MRI developments related to diagnosis and pattern recognition in FSHD and to discuss its capacity to provide outcome measures.

  3. How to Grow Project Scientists: A Systematic Approach to Developing Project Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Howard

    2011-01-01

    The Project Manager is one of the key individuals that can determine the success or failure of a project. NASA is fully committed to the training and development of Project Managers across the agency to ensure that highly capable individuals are equipped with the competencies and experience to successfully lead a project. An equally critical position is that of the Project Scientist. The Project Scientist provides the scientific leadership necessary for the scientific success of a project by insuring that the mission meets or exceeds the scientific requirements. Traditionally, NASA Goddard project scientists were appointed and approved by the Center Science Director based on their knowledge, experience, and other qualifications. However the process to obtain the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities was not documented or done in a systematic way. NASA Goddard's current Science Director, Nicholas White saw the need to create a pipeline for developing new projects scientists, and appointed a team to develop a process for training potential project scientists. The team members were Dr. Harley Thronson, Chair, Dr. Howard Kea, Mr. Mark Goldman, DACUM facilitator and the late Dr. Michael VanSteenberg. The DACUM process, an occupational analysis and evaluation system, was used to produce a picture of the project scientist's duties, tasks, knowledge, and skills. The output resulted in a 3-Day introductory course detailing all the required knowledge, skills and abilities a scientist must develop over time to be qualified for selections as a Project Scientist.

  4. Growing Our Own: A Sustainable Approach to Teacher Education at Turtle Mountain Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Carmelita

    2014-01-01

    Through its teacher education program, Turtle Mountain Community College (TMCC) is meeting the Anishinaabe of North Dakota's educational needs, strengthening tribal sovereignty and self-determination, and positively affecting people's lives. Pivotal to the success of the teacher education program are strongly committed faculty, supportive staff,…

  5. Growing food, feeding change: towards a holistic and dynamic approach of eco-city planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernay, A.B.H.; Salcedo Rahola, T.B.; Ravesteijn, W.

    2010-01-01

    In response to increasing environmental problems and consciousness in relation to urbanization, more and more cities are trying to become eco-cities. We can question, however, whether these cities can be considered as sustainable cities. The eco-city concept usually includes criteria regarding

  6. Dietary influences on nutrient partitioning and anatomical body composition of growing pigs; modelling and experimental approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halas, V.

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of pig performance from data on nutrient intake and animal properties makes it easier to obtain a better productivity. It provides tools to arrive at desired outputs, or to calculate required inputs. Thus it enables production to be flexible, safe and less erratic. It is to be expected th

  7. A new approach to grow C-doped GaN thick epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogova, D.; Siche, D.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.; Rost, H.J.; Fornari, R. [Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth, Max-Born-Strasse 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Rudko, G.Yu. [V. Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductors Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2011-07-15

    In this study we employ a new method for growth of carbon-doped wurtzite crystalline GaN (GaN:C) based on vapour phase transport of Ga by the pseudohalide hydrogen cyanide HCN. GaN:C layers with a thicknesses from 10 to 100 {mu}m and up to 19 mm in size were grown from gallium melt and ammonia as feeding materials in a carbon-containing equipment. The properties of the GaN:C layers were characterized by low-temperature photoluminescence (LTPL), High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and room-temperature Hall effect and Raman spectroscopy measurements. HRXRD studies demonstrated good crystalline quality of the thick GaN layers (the Rocking curve FWHMs are 570 arcsec for the (0004) reflection and 561 arcsec for the (10-14) reflection for 10 {mu}m thick samples). The LTPL and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the good optical and structural quality of the material. The carbon concentration measured by SIMS was 6x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, however, the room-temperature Hall effect experiments showed n-type conductivity. Carbon acceptor incorporation into GaN (from the transport agent) as well as the reason of its electrical overcompensation by unintentional impurities like oxygen and silicon is discussed. Ways of technological process improvement are proposed. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Cluster growing process and a sequence of magic numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2003-01-01

    demonstrate that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence for the clusters of noble gas atoms......We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the cluster growing process. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system, and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster sizes of more than 100 atoms. We...... and compare it with experimental observations....

  9. Growing bubbles in a slightly supersaturated liquid solution

    CERN Document Server

    Enríquez, Oscar R; Bruggert, Gert-Wim; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and constructed an experimental system to study gas bubble growth in slightly supersatu- rated liquids. This is achieved by working with carbon dioxide dissolved in water, pressurized at a maximum of 1 MPa and applying a small pressure drop from saturation conditions. Bubbles grow from hydrophobic cavities etched on silicon wafers, which allows us to control their number and position. Hence, the experiment can be used to investigate the interaction among bubbles growing in close proximity when the main mass transfer mechanism is diffusion and there is a limited availability of the dissolved species.

  10. Concentration distribution around a growing gas bubble in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadein, S A; Mohamed, K G

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the concentration distribution around a growing nitrogen gas bubble in the blood and other tissues of divers who surface too quickly, when the ambient pressure through the decompression process is variable and constant. This effort is a modification of Sirinivasan et al. model (1999) [9]. The mathematical model is solved analytically to find the growth rate of a gas bubble in a tissue after decompression in the ambient pressure. Moreover, the concentration distribution around the growing bubble is introduced. The growth process is affected by ascent rate alpha (t), tissue diffusivity D(T), initial concentration difference DeltaC(0), surface tension sigma and void fraction varphi(0).

  11. Cyber-physical attacks a growing invisible threat

    CERN Document Server

    Loukas, George

    2015-01-01

    Cyber-Physical Attacks: A Growing Invisible Threat presents the growing list of harmful uses of computers and their ability to disable cameras, turn off a building's lights, make a car veer off the road,  or a drone land in enemy hands. In essence, it details the ways cyber-physical attacks are replacing physical attacks in crime, warfare, and terrorism. The book explores how attacks using computers affect the physical world in ways that were previously only possible through physical means. Perpetrators can now cause damage without the same risk, and without the political, social, or moral

  12. Recommendations for Sustainable Development of Ankang Tobacco Growing Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hatao; YANG; Ke; SUN; Feng; ZHU

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable development of high quality characteristic tobacco is the only path for future development of China’s tobacco industry.In combination with realities of tobacco development in Ankang tobacco growing area,this paper made analysis on factors restricting sustainable development of Ankang tobacco growing area.On the basis of actual situations,it came up with recommendations including establishing scientific basic tobacco field protection system,gradually cultivating professional tobacco farmers and strengthening tobacco technician team construction,improving scientific and technological innovation,implementing standardized technologies,improving tobacco production organization mode,and improving tobacco production security mechanism.

  13. On Li Zhi's Theory of Growing up in Spirit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Junjiang

    2006-01-01

    The theory of growing up in spirit is the core of Li Zhi's thought.The theory attempts to get rid of the limit of the rigid ethical doctrine of Confucianismand to encourage growth in a helpful person for the benefit of the country,which demands both a free environment of society and enough courage and insight of the individual.At the same time,the criterion of growing up in spirit indicates the limitation of Li Zhi's thought.His free exploration,however,provides various revelations for us.

  14. Growing oral biofilms in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratten, Jonathan

    2007-08-01

    In order to grow organisms in such a manner as to mimic their physiological growth state in vivo, it is often desirable to grow them as biofilms in the laboratory. There are numerous systems available to accomplish this; however, some are more suited to the growth of oral biofilms (dental plaque) than others. The operating parameters of one such model, the constant depth film fermentor (CDFF), are given in this unit. This model is particularly suited to studying the varied biofilms which exist in the oral cavity because environmental factors such as the substratum, nutrient source, and gas flow can be altered.

  15. NEW APPROACHES TO EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Alina Petronela NEGREA

    2015-01-01

    The economic literature and the political discourse typically look at international competitiveness mainly by the means of export market shares. However, globalisation, production fragmentation and the growing importance of global value chains (GVCs) increasingly challenge traditional approaches of export competitiveness and call for a more accurate and disaggregated level of analysis. Due to the growing fragmentation of production, a country exports now include a significant amount of import...

  16. Embryonic stem cells growing in 3-dimensions shift from reliance on the substrate to each other for mechanical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Ailing; Lim, Mayasari; Weihs, Daphne

    2015-07-16

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) grow into three-dimensional (3D) spheroid structures en-route to tissue growth. In vitro spheroids can be controllably induced on a two-dimensional (2D) substrate with high viability. Here we use a method for inducing pluripotent embryoid body (EB) formation on flat polyacrylamide gels while simultaneously evaluating the dynamic changes in the mechano-biology of the growing 3D spheroids. During colony growth in 3D, pluripotency is conserved while the spheroid-substrate interactions change significantly. We correlate colony-size, cell-applied traction-forces, and expressions of cell-surface molecules indicating cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, while verifying pluripotency. We show that as the colony size increases with time, the stresses applied by the spheroid to the gel decrease in the 3D growing EBs; control cells growing in 2D-monolayers maintain unvarying forces. Concurrently, focal-adhesion mediated cell-substrate interactions give way to E-cadherin cell-cell connections, while pluripotency. The mechano-biological changes occurring in the growing embryoid body are required for stabilization of the growing pluripotent 3D-structure, and can affect its potential uses including differentiation. This could enable development of more effective expansion, differentiation, and separation approaches for clinical purposes.

  17. Environmental and Social Programmes and Rapidly Growing Retailers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter JONES

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks to provide an exploratory review of the extent to which the world’s fastest growing retailers are publicly reporting on their environmental and social commitments and programmes. The paper begins with an outline discussion of corporate environmental and social programmes and on public reporting processes. The paper draws its empirical material from the most recent information on environmental and social commitments and programmes posted on the world’s top twenty fastest growing retailers’ corporate web sites. While the majority of the world’s top twenty fastest growing retailers provide some public information on their commitment to environmental and social programmes there is marked variation in the extent, the nature and the detail of that information. The findings suggest that the integration of environmental and social programmes is not one of the hallmarks of rapidly growing retailers and in part this reflects the fact that many of the selected retailers are trading within emergent markets where price and availability are the principal factors driving consumer buying behaviour.

  18. Growing reforestation conifer stock: Utilizing peat/sawdust medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice K. Schaefer

    2009-01-01

    Western Forest Systems, Incorporated (WFS) (Lewiston, ID) has been utilizing a peat/sawdust blended mix as our growing medium for the past 10 years. Our decision to change from a peat/vermiculite blend to a peat/Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) sawdust blend involved worker health and safety issues, seedling culture, seedling production, and...

  19. Fungus-Growing Termites Originated in African Rain Forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanen, Duur Kornelis; Eggleton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    extant savanna species are found in most genera, this moreover suggests that the savanna has repeatedly been colonized by fungus-growing termites. Furthermore, at least four independent "out-of-Africa" migrations into Asia, and at least one independent migration to Madagascar, have occurred. Although...

  20. Homeschooling: A Growing Option in American Education. Backgrounder. No. 2122

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Dan; Feinberg, Evan

    2008-01-01

    A growing number of American families are choosing to homeschool their children. While research evidence is limited, evaluations of student outcomes suggest that homeschooling is successful for participating students: They do well in their learning environment, perform as well on national college assessment tests as traditional high school…

  1. Growing evidence for human health benefits of boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growing evidence from numerous laboratories using a variety of experimental models shows that boron is a bioactive beneficial, perhaps essential, element for humans. Reported beneficial actions of boron include arthritis alleviation or risk reduction; bone growth and maintenance; central nervous sys...

  2. Contact zoonosis related to aquaculture: a growing concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquaculture develops fast worldwide, with new cultured species and increased global transport of live aquaculture products. There is a growing recognition of zoonotic disease agents causing epidemics and carrier states in cultured fish and shellfish, especially from warm water systems, transmitted t...

  3. Phylogeny of rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitulle, C; Dorsch, M; Kazda, J; Wolters, J; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-07-01

    The 16S rRNAs from nine rapidly growing Mycobacterium species were partially sequenced by using the dideoxynucleotide-terminated, primer extension method with cDNA generated by reverse transcriptase. The sequences were aligned with 47 16S rRNA or DNA sequences that represented 30 previously described and 5 undescribed species of the genus Mycobacterium, and a dendrogram was constructed by using equally weighted distance values. Our results confirmed the phylogenetic separation of the rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria and showed that the majority of the slowly growing members of the genus represent the most recently evolved organisms. The 24 strains which represented 21 rapidly growing species constituted several sublines, which were defined by the following taxa: (i) Mycobacterium neoaurum and M. diernhoferi, (ii) M. gadium, (iii) the M. chubuense cluster, (iv) the M. fortuitum cluster, (v) M. kommossense, (vi) M. sphagni, (vii) M. fallax and M. chitae, (viii) M. aurum and M. vaccae, (ix) the M. flavescens cluster, and (x) M. chelonae subsp. abscessus. Our phylogenetic analysis confirmed the validity of the phenotypically defined species mentioned above, but our conclusions disagree with most of the conclusions about intrageneric relationships derived from numerical phenetic analyses.

  4. NASA's Bioreactor: Growing Cells in a Microgravity Environment. Educational Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This brief discusses growing cells in a microgravity environment for grades 9-12. Students are provided with plans for building a classroom bioreactor that can then be used with the included activity on seed growth in a microgravity environment. Additional experimental ideas are also suggested along with a history and background on microgravity…

  5. Education, Poetry, and the Process of Growing Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadlandsvik, Ragna

    2007-01-01

    Should all generations be included in our society's educational project? In PEP (Prosjekt eldrepedagogikk), in Bergen, we argue that the concept of care for old people should be redefined to include an aspect of learning. This learning can have a creative and existential purpose, not necessarily an instrumental one. "To grow old" also…

  6. Relationships of a growing magnetic flux region to flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadee, A.; Martin, S.F.; Bentley, R.D.; Antalova, A.; Kucera, A.; Dezs, L.; Gesztelyi, L.; Harvey, K.L.; Jones, H.; Livi, S.H.B.; Wang, J.

    1984-01-01

    Some sites for solar flares are known to develop where new magnetic flux emerges and becomes abutted against opposite polarity pre-existing magnetic flux (review by Galzauskas/1/). We have identified and analyzed the evolution of such flare sites at the boundaries of a major new and growing magnetic

  7. A Technical College Grow-Your-Own Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ken; Sanders-McBryde, Tennie

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of baby boomers (born 1946-1964) looming, considerable discussion and research has been conducted into succession planning and the educational impact from the loss of these leadership skills and experiences in community colleges. To prepare for this eventuality, many community colleges have begun Grow-Your-Own (GYO) leadership…

  8. The suitability evaluation of lignocellulosic substrate as growing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative ... generally residual materials such as wood waste, coconut coir, rice .... of all lignocellulosic substrate (sample : distilled water ratio of 1:5) ..... Reuse of waste materials as growing media for ornamental plants.

  9. Feeling Good: Helping Children Grow Emotionally and Socially.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mimi, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to be presented in a workshop format, by trainers, to an audience of caregivers of young children, these materials provide six modules for workshops in the areas of helping children grow emotionally and socially. Contents of the workshop modules focus on adult behavior and children's self-esteem, feelings and sexuality, activities for…

  10. Cooperation and its evolution in growing systems with cultural reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Portillo, Ignacio

    2012-12-01

    We explore the evolution of cooperation in the framework of the evolutionary game theory using the prisoner's dilemma as metaphor of the problem. We present a minimal model taking into account the growing process of the systems and individuals with imitation capacity. We consider the topological structure and the evolution of strategies decoupled instead of a coevolutionary dynamic. We show conditions to build up a cooperative system with real topological structures for any natural selection intensity. When the system starts to grow, cooperation is unstable but becomes stable as soon as the system reaches a small core of cooperators whose size increases when the intensity of natural selection decreases. Thus, we reduce the evolution of cooperative systems with cultural reproduction to justify a small initial cooperative structure that we call cooperative seed. Otherwise, given that the system grows principally as cooperator whose cooperators inhabit the most linked parts of the system, the benefit-cost ratio required for cooperation evolve is drastically reduced compared to the found in static networks. In this way, we show that in systems whose individuals have imitation capacity the growing process is essential for the evolution of cooperation.

  11. Growing up and being young in an Indonesian provincial town

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minza, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of youth in the provincial town of Pontianak, West Kalimantan, done in Pontianak, the provincial capital of West Kalimantan during the years 2008-2009. It tries to understand the various patterns of relations between growing up and being young, how social

  12. America's Growing Dilemma: Pesticides in Food and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Valerie; Sullivan, Monica, Ed.

    Public concern about the safety of continued reliance on pesticides in agricultural production is widespread and growing. The lack of understanding of how food is grown, the role of pesticides in food production, the risk assessment and regulatory processes and alternatives to pesticide use limits citizen participation in food safety debates and…

  13. Growing Disparities in Life Expectancy. Economic and Budget Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Joyce; Topoleski, Julie

    2008-01-01

    In a continuation of long-term trends, life expectancy has been steadily increasing in the United States for the past several decades. Accompanying the recent increases, however, is a growing disparity in life expectancy between individuals with high and low income and between those with more and less education. The difference in life expectancy…

  14. Fatty acid supply of growing pigs in Central Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Linh Quang

    2002-01-01

    This thesis concerns the influence of essential dietary fatty acids on the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue and growth performance of growing pigs kept on samll holdings in Central Vietnam. Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the body and have to be ingested with the feed. There a

  15. A characterization of rice-growing environments in West Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriesse, W.; Fresco, L.O.

    1991-01-01

    Building on past classifications, this article proposes a comprehensive characterization of rice-growing environments in West Africa on the basis of ecological and agronomic parameters. Using climate, soils, toposequence, land types and rice cropping system as classificatory principles, 18 different

  16. Growing up with short stature : Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-van Balen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Growing up with short stature. Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment To enhance height in children with short stature, growth hormone (GH) can be used. In short children without a detectable pathology underlying their short stature, there is no medical rationale for growth hormone treatment

  17. Gaborone is Growing like a Baby: Life Expectancies and Death ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    This article examines the paradox of Botswana's twin reputations: first, success- ful national .... statements. The image of Gaborone growing like a baby is suggestive of the .... through developments, through school education of Rre Khama'. ..... ways anticipated by a life cycle change that not unexpectedly includes nostalgia.

  18. Interpretation of Contrasts Employed in The Virtues of Growing Older

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-hui; QU Ying-jie

    2013-01-01

    People make comparison and contrasts everyday, though they may not be aware of it. Comparison and contrast are ma-jor methods to develop a piece of exposition. This paper mainly interprets the effective use of contrasts in The Virtues of Growing Older and explores the language art of an exposition.

  19. Meta-analysis of phosphorus balance data from growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulin-Zeuthen, M.; Kebreab, E.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Lopez, S.; Fan, M.Z.; Dias, R.S.; France, J.

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have highlighted concerns over current methods of determining endogenous P losses and P requirements in growing pigs. Therefore, a database containing observations on 350 pigs was assembled from various studies. Four functions for analyzing P balance data were considered: 1) a straight

  20. Moderate cholecalciferol supplementation depresses intestinal calcium absorption in growing dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tryfonidou, M.A.; Stevenhagen, J.J.; Bemd, G.J.C.M. van den; Oosterlaken-Dijksterhuis, M.A.; Deluca, H.F.; Mol, J.A.; Brom, W.E. van den; Leeuwen, J.P.T.M. van; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    2002-01-01

    Hormonal regulation of calcium (Ca) absorption was investigated in a cholecalciferol (vitamin D3)supplemented group (hVitD) vs. a control group (cVitD) of growing Great Danes (100 vs. 12.5 μg vitamin D3/kg diet). Although Ca intakes did not differ, fractional Ca absorption was significantly lower in

  1. Growing with EASE: Eating, Activity, and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettig, Carol; Rich, Shannon; Engelbrecht, Jo Ann; Sanborn, Charlotte; Essery, Eve; DiMarco, Nancy; Velez, Luisa; Levy, Luba

    2006-01-01

    A diverse group of professionals associated with Texas Woman's University's Institute for Women's Health, working collaboratively with school administrators, teachers, family support teams, and family members, developed Growing with EASE: Eating, Activity, and Self-Esteem, a nutrition program for young children and their families. In tracking the…

  2. Dietary Supplementation of Seaweed (Ulva lactuca) to alleviate the Impact of Heat Stress in Growing Lambs

    OpenAIRE

    Kkalid A. Abdoun, Aly B. Okab, Ahmed M. El-Waziry, Emad M. Samara and Ahmed A. Al-Haidary

    2014-01-01

    Several environmental and nutritional management approaches have been used to mitigate heat stress and improve performance of farm animals in semi-arid and arid regions. The present study was designed with the intention to alleviate the negative effects of heat stress and to promote the performance of growing lambs reared under hot environmental conditions. The study was conducted on 18 male Naimey lambs with average body weight of 22.78±0.49 kg, and 4-5 months old. The animals were randomly...

  3. Automated Segmentation of Coronary Arteries Based on Statistical Region Growing and Heuristic Decision Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation of coronary arteries is a vital process that helps cardiovascular radiologists detect and quantify stenosis. In this paper, we propose a fully automated coronary artery segmentation from cardiac data volume. The method is built on a statistics region growing together with a heuristic decision. First, the heart region is extracted using a multi-atlas-based approach. Second, the vessel structures are enhanced via a 3D multiscale line filter. Next, seed points are detected automatically through a threshold preprocessing and a subsequent morphological operation. Based on the set of detected seed points, a statistics-based region growing is applied. Finally, results are obtained by setting conservative parameters. A heuristic decision method is then used to obtain the desired result automatically because parameters in region growing vary in different patients, and the segmentation requires full automation. The experiments are carried out on a dataset that includes eight-patient multivendor cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA volume data. The DICE similarity index, mean distance, and Hausdorff distance metrics are employed to compare the proposed algorithm with two state-of-the-art methods. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is capable of performing complete, robust, and accurate extraction of coronary arteries.

  4. Landscape planning for agridevelopment at regional scale: an example from cotton growing Yavatmal district, Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskara Phaneendra Bhaskar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The basaltic landscape planning on the hot semiarid ecosystem in cotton growing Yavatmal district, Maharashtra tends to concentrate on 52 per cent of total cultivated area with 43 per cent of rural families living below poverty line posing major problem for environmental protection and resource management. Concepts of sustainable development at regional-level planning suggested that there is a growing concern for the landscape community to develop a strategic regional agricultural planning perspective in order to assist landscape planning goals. These challenges were explored with particular reference to the cotton growing Yavatmal district in Maharashtra through baseline land resource / agronomic surveys and assessing the production potential of regional rural landscapes for crop planning. Landscape analysis, premised on the geopedological and elevation constructs, culminated in a spatial coverage of hills and ridges (12.6 per cent of total area in northern and central parts whereas plateaus (29.3 per cent in association with isolated hills, mesas and butte and escarpments (17.7 per cent, pediplains (28.8 per cent and plains (8.1 per cent in south western parts of the district. Regional level analysis revealed spatially variable soil typologies dominated by vertisols and vertic intergrades. An exploration and brief account of integration landscape planning was discussed with some reflections on the experience and highlighting some of the problems and potentials of this approach within the regional context.

  5. Less is more: reduced catechol production permits Pseudomonas putida F1 to grow on styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kevin W; Hay, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida F1 is unable to grow on styrene due to the accumulation of 3-vinylcatechol, a toxic metabolite that is produced through the toluene degradation (tod) pathway and causes catechol-2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) inactivation. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous F1 mutant, designated SF1, which acquired the ability to grow on styrene and did not accumulate 3-vinylcatechol. Whereas adaptation to new aromatic substrates has typically been shown to involve increased C23O activity or the acquisition of resistance to C23O inactivation, SF1 retained wild-type C23O activity. Surprisingly, SF1 grew more slowly on toluene, its native substrate, and exhibited reduced toluene dioxygenase (TDO) activity (approximately 50 % of that of F1), the enzyme responsible for ring hydroxylation and subsequent production of 3-vinylcatechol. DNA sequence analysis of the tod operon of SF1 revealed a single base pair mutation in todA (C479T), a gene encoding the reductase component of TDO. Replacement of the wild-type todA allele in F1 with todA(C479T) reduced TDO activity to SF1 levels, obviated vinylcatechol accumulation, and conferred the ability to grow on styrene. This novel 'less is more' strategy - reduced catechol production as a means to expand growth substrate range - sheds light on an alternative approach for managing catechol toxicity during the metabolism of aromatic compounds.

  6. Multi-Scale Mapping of Forest Growing Stock Volume Using Envisat ASAR, ALOS PALSAR Landsat, and ICESat GLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartus, Oliver; Santoro, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    Multi-scale approaches for mapping aboveground biomass globally are evaluated that exploit the multi- temporal archive of low-resolution (1 km) ENVISAT ASAR C-band observations and ca. 30 m resolution ALOS PALSAR L-band and Landsat mosaics. The BIOMASAR algorithm, which was initially developed for ENVISAT ASAR C-band data and boreal forest [1], is deployed to map growing stock volume, a proxy for aboveground biomass, globally at 1 km resolution. We explore different options for improving ASAR based maps using high resolution data. Two approaches are pursued: 1) the BIOMASAR algorithm adopted for L- band, 2) a simple re-scaling of ASAR derived estimates of growing stock volume from 1 km pixel posting to 30 m using PALSAR and Landsat data [2]. The initial results for different forest ecosystems suggest that both approaches allow for improved estimates, albeit with the expected limitations in high biomass forests.

  7. Morphophysiological Differences between the Metapleural Glands of Fungus-Growing and Non–Fungus-Growing Ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexsandro Santana; Bueno, Odair Correa; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2012-01-01

    The metapleural gland is an organ exclusive to ants. Its main role is to produce secretions that inhibit the proliferation of different types of pathogens. The aim of the present study was to examine the morphophysiological differences between the metapleural gland of 3 non–fungus-growing ants of the tribes Ectatommini, Myrmicini, and Blepharidattini and that of 5 fungus-growing ants from 2 basal and 3 derived attine genera. The metapleural gland of the non–fungus-growing ants and the basal attine ants has fewer secretory cells than that of the derived attine ants (leaf-cutting ants). In addition, the metapleural gland of the latter had more clusters of secretory cells and sieve plates, indicating a greater storage capacity and demand for secretion in these more advanced farming ants. The glands of the derived attine ants also produced higher levels of polysaccharides and acidic lipids than those of Myrmicini, Blepharidattini, and basal attines. Our results confirm morphophysiological differences between the metapleural glands of the derived attines and those of the basal attines and non–fungus-growing ants, suggesting that the metapleural glands of the derived attines (leaf-cutting ants) are more developed in morphology and physiology, with enhanced secretion production (acidic lipids and protein) to protect against the proliferation of unwanted fungi and bacteria in the fungal garden, it is possible that leaf-cutting ants may have evolved more developed metapleural glands in response to stronger pressure from parasites. PMID:22927993

  8. Morphophysiological differences between the metapleural glands of fungus-growing and non-fungus-growing ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexsandro Santana; Bueno, Odair Correa; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2012-01-01

    The metapleural gland is an organ exclusive to ants. Its main role is to produce secretions that inhibit the proliferation of different types of pathogens. The aim of the present study was to examine the morphophysiological differences between the metapleural gland of 3 non-fungus-growing ants of the tribes Ectatommini, Myrmicini, and Blepharidattini and that of 5 fungus-growing ants from 2 basal and 3 derived attine genera. The metapleural gland of the non-fungus-growing ants and the basal attine ants has fewer secretory cells than that of the derived attine ants (leaf-cutting ants). In addition, the metapleural gland of the latter had more clusters of secretory cells and sieve plates, indicating a greater storage capacity and demand for secretion in these more advanced farming ants. The glands of the derived attine ants also produced higher levels of polysaccharides and acidic lipids than those of Myrmicini, Blepharidattini, and basal attines. Our results confirm morphophysiological differences between the metapleural glands of the derived attines and those of the basal attines and non-fungus-growing ants, suggesting that the metapleural glands of the derived attines (leaf-cutting ants) are more developed in morphology and physiology, with enhanced secretion production (acidic lipids and protein) to protect against the proliferation of unwanted fungi and bacteria in the fungal garden, it is possible that leaf-cutting ants may have evolved more developed metapleural glands in response to stronger pressure from parasites.

  9. Comparison of hydrogen-production capability of four different Enterobacteriaceae strains under growing and non-growing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Eunhee; Kim, Seohyoung; Raj, S. Mohan; Park, Sunghoon [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    Non-growing cells can function as whole-cell biocatalysts for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production, a process that has recently drawn much attention. In order to evaluate their potential as whole-cell biocatalysts, we compared the H{sub 2}-production capability of four Enterobacteriaceae strains (Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19, Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655, Escherichia coli DJT135, and Enterobacter aerogenes) under growing and non-growing conditions. We evaluated their H{sub 2}-production activity at varying temperatures (25-45 C) and pH conditions (6.0-8.0) using glucose or formate as the carbon source. Under growing conditions with 10 mM glucose as a substrate, E. aerogenes exhibited the highest H{sub 2}-production activity (17.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg cell{sup -1} h{sup -1}) among the four strains, but the final H{sub 2} yield was similar (1.7-1.8 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose) in all four strains. H{sub 2} production in the four strains proceeded through a formate-dependent pathway that involved the formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) complex. Under non-growing conditions with 20 mM formate as a substrate, we obtained high H{sub 2}-production activities, in the range of 95.5-195.2 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg cell{sup -1} h{sup -1}, with E. coli DJT135 exhibiting the highest activity (195.2 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg{sup -1} h{sup -1}) at pH 6.0 and 45 C. In contrast, using glucose as the carbon substrate in non-growing cell experiments greatly reduced the H{sub 2}-production activity to 6.1-7.7 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg cell{sup -1} h{sup -1}. This study indicated that formate is a better substrate than glucose for H{sub 2} production by non-growing cells, and that the H{sub 2}-production performance among the strains did not vary significantly, with the exception of E. coli K-12 MG1655. (author)

  10. Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Affinita, Antonio; Catalani, Loredana; Cecchetto, Giovanna; De Lorenzo, Gianfranco; Dilillo, Dario; Donegani, Giorgio; Fransos, Lucia; Lucidi, Fabio; Mameli, Chiara; Manna, Elisa; Marconi, Paolo; Mele, Giuseppe; Minestroni, Laura; Montanari, Massimo; Morcellini, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this...

  11. Growing older in the context of needing geriatric assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Bente Appel; Hvitved, Ida; Andersen, Hanne Elkjær

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The number of older adults will increase worldwide in the next 30 years, with many expected to develop chronic diseases and consequently require additional medical assessments and adequate care. The aim of this study was to describe how a group of older adults who need geriatric assessment...... experience growing older. METHODOLOGY: A qualitative study was performed. The empirical data consisted of qualitative in-depth interviews with eight older persons referred to geriatric assessment (median age 76, range 65-86). The interviews were analysed based on Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological...... of their advancing age. CONCLUSION: Growing older while in need of comprehensive geriatric assessment led to participants feeling they were no longer able to do the same things, they used to do. Consequently, compensation became an essential part of adaption to the altered situation. Aides that helped to overcome...

  12. MELNIK VINE-GROWING REGION – HISTORY AND TRADITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslava Ganeva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The region of Melnik (Southwest Bulgaria has exclusively appropriate climate for wine growing. Its borders are defined by the dissemination of the wide Melnik grape vine, revealed by experts as an old local variety. Few are the wine-growing centers that carry such an effective ampelographic tradition. A few are the viticulture centers, bearing such effective tradition. The vine is grown here from the Thracian antiquity and is the basis for a livelihood, preserved and retransmitted for many generations. It is characterized by a specialization in the production and marketing of high quality red dry wines. The article deals with the development of the Melnik vineyard as a result of different political and economic conditions in the course of historical development. Various archival materials, specialized studies and personal fieldwork research have been used.

  13. Natural ingredients for darker skin types: growing options for hyperpigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexis, Andrew F; Blackcloud, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Dyschromia is one of the most common dermatological concerns in patients with darker skin.1 Disorders of hyperpigmentation, including postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, melasma, solar lentigines, and miscellaneous causes of facial hyperpigmentation, are the most frequently treated dyschromias and can have a considerable psychosocial impact. Given the high prevalence of hyperpigmentation and the considerable demand for an even complexion, newer treatment options for hyperpigmentation are of growing interest among consumers, manufacturers, and dermatologists. Blinded, controlled studies demonstrating skin lightening effects in soy, niacinamide, n-acetylglucosamine, licorice extract, arbutin, vitamin c, kojic acid, emblica extract, lignin peroxidase, and glutathione have led to the development of a growing list of non-prescription skin care products that can be incorporated (mostly as adjuncts) in the management of hyperpigmentation.

  14. Potential for nitrogen fixation in fungus-growing termite symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapountzis, Panagiotis; de Verges, Jane; Rousk, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Termites host a gut microbiota of diverse and essential symbionts that enable specialization on dead plant material; an abundant, but nutritionally imbalanced food source. To supplement the severe shortage of dietary nitrogen (N), some termite species make use of diazotrophic bacteria to fix...... atmospheric nitrogen (N2). Fungus-growing termites (subfamily Macrotermitinae) host a fungal exosymbiont (genus Termitomyces) that provides digestive services and the main food source for the termites. This has been thought to obviate the need for N2-fixation by bacterial symbionts. Here, we challenge...... this notion by performing acetylene reduction assays of live colony material to show that N2 fixation is present in two major genera (Macrotermes and Odontotermes) of fungus-growing termites. We compare and discuss fixation rates in relation to those obtained from other termites, and suggest avenues...

  15. Fabric Defect Detection Based on Regional Growing PCNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshu Si

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive image segmentation method based on a new Regional Growing Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN model for detecting fabric defects. In this method, the pixels of analyzed image are mapped on the neurons in a pulse coupled neural network. Improved PCNN model and regional growing theory are combined in the light of the requirements for fabric defect detection. And the mean and variance value of the defect-free images are introduced into this model. The validation tests on the developed algorithm were performed with fabric images from TILDA database and results showed that the proposed method is feasible and efficient for fabric defect detection. 

  16. Near tip strain evolution of a growing fatigue crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-L. Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Near tip full-field strains in a growing fatigue crack have been studied in situ using the Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique in a compact tension specimen of stainless steel 316L under tension-tension cyclic loading. An error analysis of displacements and strains has been carried out, and the results show that the precision of displacements and strains in the wake of the crack is worse than that in front of the crack. A method for the determination of crack tip location is proposed for the DIC analysis. Strain ratchetting is observed ahead of the growing fatigue crack tip and found to be dependent on the distance to the crack tip; whilst normal strains appear to stabilise behind the crack tip.

  17. Temporal Dynamics of Connectivity and Epidemic Properties of Growing Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fotouhi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown---mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady-state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary net...

  18. Structure analysis of growing network based on partial differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo JIA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The topological structure is one of the most important contents in the complex network research. Therein the node degree and the degree distribution are the most basic characteristic quantities to describe topological structure. In order to calculate the degree distribution, first of all, the node degree is considered as a continuous variable. Then, according to the Markov Property of growing network, the cumulative distribution function's evolution equation with time can be obtained. Finally, the partial differential equation (PDE model can be established through distortion processing. Taking the growing network with preferential and random attachment mechanism as an example, the PDE model is obtained. The analytic expression of degree distribution is obtained when this model is solved. Besides, the degree function over time is the same as the characteristic line of PDE. At last, the model is simulated. This PDE method of changing the degree distribution calculation into problem of solving PDE makes the structure analysis more accurate.

  19. OPPORTUNITIES AND TRENDS IN WALNUTS GROWING IN BULGARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Buhalski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a great interest among manufacturers to conventional and organic production of walnuts. Currently Bulgarian market has over 500 walnut producers and about 30,000 acres of industrial walnut orchards. Suitable areas for growing walnuts in Bulgaria are Plovdiv, Pazardzhik, Stara Zagora, Haskovo, Shumen and Razgrad, as most industrial plants are in Stara Zagora, Plovdiv, Pleven and Haskovo. The market for walnuts in Europe is virtually limitless, since about 100 thousand tonnes per year are imported, mostly from the US. Walnuts growing is a profitable business and an excellent long term investment. The return of the investment depends mainly on the choice of locally relevant varieties.

  20. Circumferential buckling instability of a growing cylindrical tube

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, D.E.

    2011-03-01

    A cylindrical elastic tube under uniform radial external pressure will buckle circumferentially to a non-circular cross-section at a critical pressure. The buckling represents an instability of the inner or outer edge of the tube. This is a common phenomenon in biological tissues, where it is referred to as mucosal folding. Here, we investigate this buckling instability in a growing elastic tube. A change in thickness due to growth can have a dramatic impact on circumferential buckling, both in the critical pressure and the buckling pattern. We consider both single- and bi-layer tubes and multiple boundary conditions. We highlight the competition between geometric effects, i.e. the change in tube dimensions, and mechanical effects, i.e. the effect of residual stress, due to differential growth. This competition can lead to non-intuitive results, such as a tube growing to be thinner and yet buckle at a higher pressure. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future.

  2. [Disinfection of wood in mushroom growing cellars with Mycetox].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, J; Wazny, J

    1995-01-01

    Since the use od phenolic disinfectants for impregnating and disinfecting of wood in mushroom--growing cellars was banned in Poland for ecologic and hygienic reasons, the new product, namely Mycetox, containing quaternary ammonium compound and boric acid has been registered for this purpose. Mycetox belongs to new generation products and is non toxic for man and the environment. It is first Polish product developed for the general disinfection as well as for impregnating purposes in mushroom farms. The efficacy of Mycetox in mushroom-growing cellars has been evaluated basing on its fungicidal properties in the different substrates used for the cultivation of mushrooms. Also its influence on mushroom spawn growth, crop yield, and the penetration of spawn into wooden cages impregnated with Mycetox as well as its influence on blanching of mushrooms has been investigated.

  3. Adapting to Non-stationarity with Growing Expert Ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Clauset, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    When dealing with time series with complex and uncertain non-stationarities, low retrospective regret on individual realizations is in general a more appropriate goal than low prospective risk in expectation. Online learning algorithms provide powerful guarantees of this form and have often been proposed for use with non-stationary processes because of their ability to switch between different forecasters or "experts." However, existing methods assume that this set of experts whose forecasts are to be combined is given at the start and fixed over time, and such assumptions are not generally plausible when dealing with genuinely historical or evolutionary systems. We show how to modify the "fixed shares" algorithm for tracking the best expert to handle a steadily growing set of experts, in which new experts are fitted to new data as they become available, and we obtain regret bounds for the growing ensemble.

  4. Rotary forcespun styrofoam fibers as a soilless growing medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Ahmad; Edikresnha, Dhewa; Munir, Muhammad Miftahul; Khairurrijal

    2016-04-01

    To make styrofoam fibers from used styrofoam, rotary forcespinning technique was used because it offers high production rate and affordable production cost. The used styrofoam was dissolved in acetone to obtain styrofoam solution as a precursor of syrofoam fibers. Since the technique utilizes centrifugal force, the precursor was thrown out and its phase changed to be solid following acetone solvent evaporation. Long, clean and light styrofoam fibers were then produced. To determine if the styrofoam fibers is a good soilless growing medium, physico-chemical properties including pH and electrical conductivity, bulk density, water retention and wettability were measured. Rockwool, which is the most popular soilless growing medium and easily obtained from local farm suppliers, was selected as a benchmark to evaluate the styrofoam fibers.

  5. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF WEED VEGETATION IN DIFFERENT APPLE GROWING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venera TASSEVA

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out in the period 2001-2003 in an orchard of the Institute of Agriculture, Kyustendil, Bulgaria, created in the spring of 1996 on leached cinnamonic forest soil. The weed populations under four different farming technologies of growing of apple cultivar Florina were investigated. It was established, that the apple growing technologies influence the weed association composition. The highest weed diversity was found in the organic technology - 16 weed species were found. In the application of resource economical and integrated technologies, the development of 13-14 weed species was established. The smallest weed diversity was observed in the conventional technology - eight species, which was due to the twofold herbicide application.

  6. China’s growing role in the South Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Erthal Abdenur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the flow of goods, people and ideas across the South Atlantic has increased considerably, due not only to growing trade and cooperation ties between South America and Africa, but also to the new interests of extra-regional emerging powers such as the People’s Republic of China. This article examines China’s growing role in the region in three different spheres (economic, political andsecurity interests in light of its changing strategy in developing countries; the role of non-state actors such as corporations and diaspora communities is also included. The authors conclude that, even though the Chinese state does not yet have a “South Atlantic policy”, the region has gained strategic importance for China. Finally, the article highlights China’s renewed interest in Antarctica.

  7. ESTIMATION OF EXPENSES, INCOME AND PROFIT IN MULBERRY TREE GROWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha POPESCU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to comparatively analyze the economic efficiency for two experimental variants in Mulberry tree growing as follows: V1 – Mulberry planatation 0.5 ha + Layer maker 0.5 ha; V2 – Mulberry plantation 0.5 ha + Seed Field 0.2 ha + Layer maker 0.1 ha + Sowing Field 0.2 ha. The V2 variant assured Euro 51,915.49 profit, while V1 just Euro 3,675.41 profit. Therefore, the most profitable variant is V2. This means that production diversification in mulberry tree growing could have positive effects leading to an increased profitability. The hierarchy of the variants was made based on profit that the sericiculturist could get in the first 8 years of activity when mulberry plantation will reach the maximum production.

  8. Slowly-growing gap-opening planets trigger weaker vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Michael; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Lin, Min-Kai

    2017-04-01

    The presence of a giant planet in a low-viscosity disc can create a gap edge in the disc's radial density profile sharp enough to excite the Rossby wave instability. This instability may evolve into dust-trapping vortices that might explain the 'banana-shaped' features in recently observed asymmetric transition discs with inner cavities. Previous hydrodynamical simulations of planet-induced vortices have neglected the time-scale of hundreds to thousands of orbits to grow a massive planet to Jupiter size. In this work, we study the effect of a giant planet's runaway growth time-scale on the lifetime and characteristics of the resulting vortex. For two different planet masses (1 and 5 Jupiter masses) and two different disc viscosities (α = 3 × 10-4 and 3 × 10-5), we compare the vortices induced by planets with several different growth time-scales between 10 and 4000 planet orbits. In general, we find that slowly-growing planets create significantly weaker vortices with lifetimes and surface densities reduced by more than 50 per cent. For the higher disc viscosity, the longest growth time-scales in our study inhibit vortex formation altogether. Additionally, slowly-growing planets produce vortices that are up to twice as elongated, with azimuthal extents well above 180° in some cases. These unique, elongated vortices likely create a distinct signature in the dust observations that differentiates them from the more concentrated vortices that correspond to planets with faster growth time-scales. Lastly, we find that the low viscosities necessary for vortex formation likely prevent planets from growing quickly enough to trigger the instability in self-consistent models.

  9. From Kennedy, to Beyond: Growing Plants in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Cedric, II; Seck, Sokhana A.; Massa, Gioia D.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts cannot have their cake and eat it too, but what about growing a salad and eating it? As NASA continues to push the envelope on Space exploration and inhabitance the need for a fresh food source becomes more vital. The Life Support team at NASA is using a system developed by ORBITEC the VEGGIE, in which astronauts aboard the ISS, and potentially the Moon and Mars, will be capable of growing food. The introduction of plants not only gives astronauts a means of independently supplying food, but also recreation, oxygen replenishment and psychological benefits. The plants were grown in "pillows", the system used for growing plants within the VEGGIE. This test included 4 types of media mixtures that are composed of a clay based media called Arcilite and Fafard #2, which is a peat moss-based media ( Tests were being conducted to see which form of media has the ratio of best growth and least amount of microbes that are harmful. That is essential because a person's body becomes more susceptible to illness when they leave Earth. As a result, test must be conducted on the "pillow" system to assess the levels of microbial activity. The cultivars were tested at different stages during their growing process for microbes. Datum show that the mix of Fafard and Arcilite had the best growth, but also the most microbes. This was due to the fact that Fafard is an organic substance so it contains material necessary for microbes to live. Data suggest that the <1 mm Arcilite has an acceptable amount of growth and a lower level of microbes, because it is non-organic.

  10. Increase of heterozygosity in a growing population of lesser kestrels

    OpenAIRE

    Ortego, Joaquín; Aparicio, José Miguel; Calabuig, Gustau; Cordero, Pedro J.

    2007-01-01

    The lesser kestrel (Falco naumanni) suffered a sharp population decline over much of its European distribution range in the middle of the twentieth century. Still declining in some areas, the species has recently experienced a notable population recovery in certain regions. We examined the genetic diversity variation in a growing population of lesser kestrels from Central Spain over a 6-year period (2000–2005). The population studied showed a rapid demographic expansion, increasing in the num...

  11. Growing Global Migration and Its Implications for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Dallas Jacksonville Mexicali El Paso Ciudad Juarez Houston New Orleans Miami Monterrey Matamoros Mazatlan Merida Leon Guadalajara Veracruz Puebla...United States—as new waves of legal and illegal migrants , asylum-seekers, and refugees flee poverty, conflict, and persecution in their native lands. The...interests. Growing Migration Today, more than 140 million people live outside their countries of birth and migrants comprise more than 15 percent of the

  12. Structure analysis of growing network based on partial differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Junbo JIA; Jin, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The topological structure is one of the most important contents in the complex network research. Therein the node degree and the degree distribution are the most basic characteristic quantities to describe topological structure. In order to calculate the degree distribution, first of all, the node degree is considered as a continuous variable. Then, according to the Markov Property of growing network, the cumulative distribution function's evolution equation with time can be obtained. Finally...

  13. When I grow up: Culturally sensitive graphic design explorations

    OpenAIRE

    Schutte, Grace

    2013-01-01

    With a global village that is growing and a world that is getting smaller it becomes evermore important for graphic designers to successfully cross cultural borders, yet this is easier said than done. My theoretical work aims at making these cross-cultural design experiences easier for graphic designers, as well as creating higher awareness of the differences that exist within cultural constructions. An amalgamation of design practices, cultural and anthropological research, the theory e...

  14. Motor learning with fading and growing haptic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Herbert; Lüttgen, Jenna

    2014-07-01

    Haptic guidance has been shown to have both facilitatory and interfering effects on motor learning. Interfering effects have been hypothesized to result from the particular dynamic environment, which supports a passive role of the learner, and they should be attenuated by fading guidance. Facilitatory effects, in particular for dynamic movement characteristics, have been hypothesized to result from the high-quality information provided by haptic demonstration. If haptic demonstration provides particularly precise information about target movements, the motor system's need for such information should more likely increase in the course of motor learning, in which case growing guidance should be more beneficial for learning. We contrasted fading and growing guidance in the course of learning a spatio-temporal motor pattern. To stimulate an active role of the learner, practice trials consisted of three phases, a visual demonstration of the target movement, a guided reproduction, and a reproduction without haptic guidance. Performance was assessed in terms of variable duration errors, relative-timing errors, variable path-length errors, and shape errors. Motor learning with growing and fading guidance turned out to be largely equivalent, so that the notion of an increasing optimal precision of haptic demonstrations, which matches a demand of increasingly precise information on the target movement, found no support. Duration errors declined only with fading, but not with growing guidance. Relative timing revealed a benefit of immediately preceding haptic demonstration, but learning was not different between the two practice protocols. This contrast between absolute and relative timing adds to other evidence according to which acquisition of these two aspects of motor timing involves different learning mechanisms. Whereas relative timing gained from immediately preceding haptic demonstration, but revealed no practice-related improvement in the presence of haptic guidance

  15. City Children Now Know How a Tomato Grows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANE SHAW

    1994-01-01

    "WHERE does a tomato come from?" The top class in a Chinese kindergarten was silenced by this question. Some children looked to the right and left. Others twiddled their fingers and lowered their heads. The teacher in charge of the class called a student’s name, "Come, you answer it." "A tomato grows on a plate." Before the little boy finished his words, the children began to discuss this point heatedly.

  16. China's Foreign Trade to Grow 15% in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ China's foreign trade is projected to grow 15 percent next year,according to a report released by the China Institute for WTO Studies on Dec.21,2009.The report forecasts imports to increase by 15 percent and exports up 13 percent.With the external demand improving and the global economic recovery gaining momentum,"the declining trend of China's exports would come to an end next year," the report says.

  17. Economical process for growing seaweed as biomass fuel source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagovskiy, V.

    1985-10-10

    Calculations made by researchers of Moscow State University have shown that the Aral Sea is capable of providing energy for almost the entire country. An experimental unit called Biosolar, for growing such energy already exists. Up to 40 liters of fuel gas a day can be gathered from a single square meter of plant beds. Seaweed yields biomass, which is placed in special vats. There it is eaten by bacteria, which release methane.

  18. VEGETABLE GROWING - HOBBY AND BENEFIT FOR AGED PERSON HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scurtu Ion

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable growing in small areas (open field, plastic tunnels, unheated or heated green house or even in balcony may be a very pleasant activity for many old persons who want to preserve their physical and mental health. Beside many common vegetable species like tomatoes, pepper, eggplant, onion, garlic, cabbage, cucumber, lettuce and so on - can be cultivated in small areas many others vegetables like broccoli, Brussels cabbage, Scorzonera hispanica, asparagus, Witloof Chicory (French endive and vegetable with medicinal properties.

  19. Economic aspects of triticale growing: Australian farmer experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katharine V; Elleway, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Australian farmers grow triticale for economic benefit. A range of farmers in different localities, with different farm size, soil type, rainfall and proximity to markets, were asked why they grew triticale and how it contributed to their farm economics. The main encouragements to grow triticale relate to its agronomic prowess: its reliability and magnitude of production on all soil types and particularly in conditions in which other crops are relatively poor producers. Also in favour of triticale is its ability to produce economic return following a high yielding wheat crop, whilst providing soil benefits as a rotation crop reducing root and stubble diseases. Triticale's versatility and utility as high grade animal feed, by supplying grazing, fodder for conservation, and grain for on-farm animal production, further encourages farmers to include triticale in their cropping programs. The main inhibitor to growing triticale relates to the cost and ease of marketing the product, relative to other crops, and even triticale enthusiasts do not persist with triticale, if the economics are not in its favour. A downturn in the dairy industry, and the cessation of triticale grain receivals at bulk handling sites has resulted in a contraction of triticale production in some regions. Less triticale is likely to be grown where farmers have to provide their own storage, find their own markets, freight the product further, or have limited market options. New specific markets, such as high grade hay from reduced-awn triticale varieties, for the horse industry, may increase the profitability of triticale producing enterprises.

  20. DEMANDING NEED OF GROWING TECHNOLOGIES IN DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amtul HAFEEZ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In distance education system use of different media enable the learners to start the course of study independently. The appearance of the internet and the expansion of web have now changed distance learning from a broadcasting way to an interactive way, and allowed connecting the learners and instructors who are geographically divided. Technological advances have created a paradigm shift in education and the definition of distance learning, as described by James Morrison (1996, who states that telecommunications, software, and the Internet eliminate walls and boundaries. In addition, he states that an increasing number of students want and need non-traditional, flexible schedules. Main findings of the study revealed that majority of the distance learners need growing technologies to interact with the tutors and peers for academic guidance and use of latest technologies make distance learners more up to date and helpful for better academic achievements. Majority of the students agreed that without any training distance learner cannot use growing technologies. It was recommended that AIOU may take steps to organize a specific website for the MS/M.phil and Ph.D scholars so that they can easily interact with peers and tutors. A comprehensive training programme may be launched to enable the tutors for using growing technologies so that they can facilitate the learners by using latest methods of teaching. Virtual classrooms can be started along with the workshops. Students and academicians of education department may use latest technologies and internet softwares which can be helpful for academic purpose.

  1. Mechanical Stress Induces Remodeling of Vascular Networks in Growing Leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohai Bar-Sinai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation into well-defined patterns and tissue growth are recognized as key processes in organismal development. However, it is unclear whether patterns are passively, homogeneously dilated by growth or whether they remodel during tissue expansion. Leaf vascular networks are well-fitted to investigate this issue, since leaves are approximately two-dimensional and grow manyfold in size. Here we study experimentally and computationally how vein patterns affect growth. We first model the growing vasculature as a network of viscoelastic rods and consider its response to external mechanical stress. We use the so-called texture tensor to quantify the local network geometry and reveal that growth is heterogeneous, resembling non-affine deformations in composite materials. We then apply mechanical forces to growing leaves after veins have differentiated, which respond by anisotropic growth and reorientation of the network in the direction of external stress. External mechanical stress appears to make growth more homogeneous, in contrast with the model with viscoelastic rods. However, we reconcile the model with experimental data by incorporating randomness in rod thickness and a threshold in the rod growth law, making the rods viscoelastoplastic. Altogether, we show that the higher stiffness of veins leads to their reorientation along external forces, along with a reduction in growth heterogeneity. This process may lead to the reinforcement of leaves against mechanical stress. More generally, our work contributes to a framework whereby growth and patterns are coordinated through the differences in mechanical properties between cell types.

  2. Multifork chromosome replication in slow-growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowski, Damian; Hołówka, Joanna; Ginda, Katarzyna; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    The growth rates of bacteria must be coordinated with major cell cycle events, including chromosome replication. When the doubling time (Td) is shorter than the duration of chromosome replication (C period), a new round of replication begins before the previous round terminates. Thus, newborn cells inherit partially duplicated chromosomes. This phenomenon, which is termed multifork replication, occurs among fast-growing bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. In contrast, it was historically believed that slow-growing bacteria (including mycobacteria) do not reinitiate chromosome replication until the previous round has been completed. Here, we use single-cell time-lapse analyses to reveal that mycobacterial cell populations exhibit heterogeneity in their DNA replication dynamics. In addition to cells with non-overlapping replication rounds, we observed cells in which the next replication round was initiated before completion of the previous replication round. We speculate that this heterogeneity may reflect a relaxation of cell cycle checkpoints, possibly increasing the ability of slow-growing mycobacteria to adapt to environmental conditions. PMID:28262767

  3. Effects of Root-Growing Space on Its Absorbing Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hai-xing; LI Sheng-xiu

    2003-01-01

    Influences of root-growing space of maize upon root physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake and crop yields were studied under conditions with and without supply of water and N. Results showed that limitation of the root-growing space greatly affected root growth, decreased total root-absorbing area and TTC-reductive amounts. However, it obviously increased the root active-absorbing area, specific absorbing area (absorbing area per gram root weight) and specific active-absorbing area (actively absorbing area per gram root weight) in addition to promoting the TTC-reductive intensity. This clearly showed that plants were not passively tolerant to stress, but actively regulated their physiological metabolic processes, and strengthened their absorbing ability to increase water and nutrient uptake so that root injury by the environmental stress could be reduced. Supply of water and N stimulated root growth, increased root-absorbing area and activity, promoted nutrient uptake, and therefore increased crop yield and decreased the detrimental effects resulting from the limitation of roots-growing space.

  4. Effect of Cobalt Supplementation on Performance of growing Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Nagabhushana

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to study the effect of critical supplementation of wheat straw with cobalt on fibre utilization and nutrient utilization in growing cross-bred male calves. Twenty-one crossbred (HF X Local male growing calves of 3-4 months age were fed with wheat straw based diet consisting without (Co0 and with 1 (Co1 and 6 (Co6 ppm cobalt as cobaltous chloride. There was no significant difference in intake of wheat straw, concentrate and DMI between the three groups and the ratio between concentrate and wheat straw was maintained at 40:60 irrespective of dietary level of cobalt. Similarly, average cumulative body weight, net gain in body weight or feed efficiency did not differ significantly between treatments. No significant effect was observed on the digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract and fibre constituents like NDF, ADF, hemicellulose or cellulose by supplementation of 1 and 6 ppm Co to the diet of growing calves. Balance of nutrients such as Nitrogen, Calcium and Phosphorus was similar and positive in all the treatment groups. TDN and DCP values of the experimental diets remained almost similar irrespective of dietary level of cobalt. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(10.000: 299-302

  5. Metabolic Flexibility of Yarrowia lipolytica Growing on Glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egermeier, Michael; Russmayer, Hannes; Sauer, Michael; Marx, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a fascinating microorganism with an amazing metabolic flexibility. This yeast grows very well on a wide variety of carbon sources from alkanes over lipids, to sugars and glycerol. Y. lipolytica accumulates a wide array of industrially relevant metabolites. It is very tolerant to many environmental factors, above all the pH value. It grows perfectly well over a wide pH range, but it has been described, that the pH has a decisive influence on the metabolite pattern accumulated by this yeast. Here, we set out to characterize the metabolism of different Y. lipolytica strains, isolated from various environments, growing on glycerol at different pH values. The conditions applied for strain characterization are of utmost importance. Shake flask cultures lead to very different results, when compared to controlled conditions in bioreactors regarding pH and aeration. Only one of the tested strains was able to accumulate high amounts of citric acid in shake flask experiments, whereas a group of six strains turned out to accumulate citric acid efficiently under controlled conditions. The present study shows that strains isolated from dairy products predominantly accumulate sugar alcohols at any given pH, when grown on glycerol under nitrogen-limitation. PMID:28174563

  6. The research of lamp for the growing of green plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunyuan; Feng, Hongnian; Jin, Shangzhong; Gao, Jun

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthesis of plants is to absorb the special wavelength of sunlight by the chlorophylls. According to the absorption spectrum of chlorophylls, we managed to make a LED lamp for the growing of green plants, and the relative energy spectrum distribution of the lamp match with the absorbing spectrum of green plants. Because the absorption wavelength range of chlorophylls are respectively 390~420nm, 430~460nm and 650~680nm, we choose different peak wavelength LEDs which are respectively at 400nm, 450nm, 655nm. By calculation, the general energy ratio of the three types of LEDs is 22:46:33, which corresponds to the absorption spectrum of chlorophylls. The illuminance of lamp for the growing of green plants on plants away 0.5 meter is 80lx by measuring. The LEDs lamp can be used to complement light and increase the efficiency of photosynthesis in cloudy, in door or at night. In another word, the photosynthesis is more powerful, and the more carbohydrates are synthesized, supplying enough material and energy for the growing of green plants.

  7. Shrinking, growing, and bursting: microfluidic equilibrium control of water-in-water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2016-07-05

    We demonstrate the dynamic control of aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets in shrinking, growing, and dissolving conditions. The ATPS droplets are formed passively in a flow focusing microfluidic channel, where the dextran-rich (DEX) and polyethylene glycol-rich (PEG) solutions are introduced as disperse and continuous phases, respectively. To vary the ATPS equilibrium condition, we infuse into a secondary inlet the PEG phase from a different polymer concentration ATPS. We find that the resulting alteration of the continuous PEG phase can cause droplets to shrink or grow by approximately 45 and 30%, respectively. This volume change is due to water exchange between the disperse DEX and continuous PEG phases, as the system tends towards new equilibria. We also develop a simple model, based on the ATPS binodal curve and tie lines, that predicts the amount of droplet shrinkage or growth, based on the change in the continuous phase PEG concentration. We observe a good agreement between our experimental results and the model. Additionally, we find that when the continuous phase PEG concentration is reduced such that PEG and DEX phases no longer phase separate, the ATPS droplets are dissolved into the continuous phase. We apply this method to controllably release encapsulated microparticles and cells, and we find that their release occurs within 10 seconds. Our approach uses the dynamic equilibrium of ATPS to control droplet size along the microfluidic channel. By modulating the ATPS equilibrium, we are able to shrink, grow, and dissolve ATPS droplets in situ. We anticipate that this approach may find utility in many biomedical settings, for example, in drug and cell delivery and release applications.

  8. Flow Optimization of an atmospheric distillation unit based on aspen plus%基于AsPen Plus的常压蒸馏装置流程优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张哲; 卢涛

    2009-01-01

    为增加年综合收益,应用流程模拟软件Aspen Plus对某厂一套常压蒸馏装置进行流程优化.在流程模拟的基础上,给定约束条件,优化决策变量,建立了以年综合收益最大为目标函数的优化模型,并在Aspen Plus平台上进行二次开发,对优化模型进行了求解,获得了良好的优化结果,详细分析了产品收益与泵动力消耗、加热和冷却负荷以及蒸汽消耗等成本对年综合收益的贡献率及影响.最终得到了年综合收益最大化下的各工艺参数.%Flow optimization of an atmospheric distillation unit based on a flow simulation software, Aspen Plus, was completed to increase the annual profit. Based on the flow simulation, the article given constraint condi-tions, optimization decision variables, then optimization model is established. The optimization model is solved on Aspen Plus platform. Good optimization result is achieved. The profit's contribution of products and cost of pump work, heat or cool duty, and steam consumption to annual profit of the atmospheric distillation unit and the influence of these factors on the annual profit were analyzed in detail. At last we get the processing parame-ters under the maximum annual profit.

  9. Developmental word grounding through a growing neural network with a humanoid robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyuan; Kojima, Ryo; Hasegawa, Osamu

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents an unsupervised approach of integrating speech and visual information without using any prepared data. The approach enables a humanoid robot, Incremental Knowledge Robot 1 (IKR1), to learn word meanings. The approach is different from most existing approaches in that the robot learns online from audio-visual input, rather than from stationary data provided in advance. In addition, the robot is capable of learning incrementally, which is considered to be indispensable to lifelong learning. A noise-robust self-organized growing neural network is developed to represent the topological structure of unsupervised online data. We are also developing an active-learning mechanism, called "desire for knowledge," to let the robot select the object for which it possesses the least information for subsequent learning. Experimental results show that the approach raises the efficiency of the learning process. Based on audio and visual data, they construct a mental model for the robot, which forms a basis for constructing IKRI's inner world and builds a bridge connecting the learned concepts with current and past scenes.

  10. Hard competitive growing neural network for the diagnosis of small bearing faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, M.; El Badaoui, M.; Guillet, F.

    2013-05-01

    A hard competitive growing neural network (HC-GNN) with shrinkage learning is put forward to detect and diagnose small bearing faults. Structure determination based on supervised learning is an important issue in pattern classification. For that reason, the proposed approach introduces new hidden units whenever necessary and adjusts their shapes to minimize the risk of misclassification. This leads to smaller networks compared to classical radial basis functions or probabilistic neural networks and therefore enables the use of large data sets with satisfactory classification accuracy. This technique is based on the following concepts: (1) growing architecture, (2) dynamic adaptive learning, (3), convergence by means of several criteria, (4) embedded weighted feature selection, and (5) optimized network structure. HC-GNN consists of two main stages and runs in an iterative way. The first stage learns weighted selected parameters to well-known classes while the second stage associates the testing parameters of unknown samples to the learned classes. This approach is applied on a machinery system with different small bearing faults at various speeds and loads. The challenge is to detect and diagnose these faults regardless of the motor's shaft speed. Obtained results are analyzed, explained and compared with various techniques that have been widely investigated in diagnosis area.

  11. A Model of Appropriate Self-Adjustment of Farmers who Grow Para Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis in Northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montri Srirajlao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Para Rubber was an economic wood growing in Northeast Thailand playing economic and social role. The objectives of this research were to study: (1 the economic, social and cultural lifestyle and (2 the appropriate adjustment model of agriculturists or farmers growing Para Rubber in Northeast Thailand. Approach: The research area covered 6 provinces: Mahasarakam, Roi-ed, Khon Kaen, Nongkai, Udontani and Loei. The samples were selected by Purposive Sampling including: 90 experts, 60 practitioners and 60 general people. The instruments using for collecting data were: (1 The Interview Form, (2 The Observation Form, (3 Focus Group Discussion and (4 Workshop, investigated by Triangulation. Data were analyzed according to the specified objectives and presented in descriptive analysis. Results: The farmers' lifestyle in traditional period of Northeast Thailand was to earn their living from producing by themselves and sharing resources with each other including: rice farming, farm rice growing, vegetable garden growing, searching for natural food without cost wasting one's capital. When it was period of changing, the price of traditional industrial crop was lowered, the agriculturists began to grow Para Rubber instead since the promotion of governmental industrial section. For the economic, social and cultural changes, found that the agriculturists growing Para Rubber Plantation, had more revenue. But, the mechanism of market price and selling had stability was attached with political situation. For the pattern of adjustment of the agriculturists growing Para Rubber Plantation in Northeast Thailand, found that there was an adjustment in individual level for developing their self study by applying body of knowledge learned by experience of successful people by being employed in cutting Para Rubber in The Southern of Thailand as well as the academic support and selling to serve the need of farmers. Conclusion/Recommendations: Para Rubber

  12. Insulin induced growth hormone response in fast-growing, lean and in slow-growing, obese pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsness, P J; Martin, R J; Gatchel, B B

    1980-12-01

    The effect of intravenous (IV) infusion of insulin on subsequent serum growth hormone (GH) response was studied in fasted lean, fast-growing and in genetically obese, slow-growing pigs at 6 months of age. A smaller GH response in obese compared to lean pigs was observed from 30 to 60 min after insulin infusion. Concurrently, marked hypoglycemia and a decrease in serum free fatty acids (FFA) were evident. Changes in serum glucose and FFA were similar in both pig strains. After IV administration of exogenous GH, the decrease in serum GH (half-life) and the simultaneous increase in serum FFA were not different for lean and obese pigs. The reduced GH secretory potential in obese pigs is consistent with reduced muscle development and growth rate.

  13. Growing Up in Poverty, Growing Old in Infirmity: The Long Arm of Childhood Conditions in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampubolon, Gindo

    2015-01-01

    Background The ageing population poses a tremendous challenge in understanding the sources of inequalities in health. Though they appear to be far removed, childhood conditions are known to be inextricably linked with adult health, and in turn on health in later life. The long arm of childhood conditions hypothesis is often tested using recollection of childhood circumstances, but such subjective recall can yield potentially inaccurate or possibly biased inferences. We tested the long arm hypothesis on three outcomes in later life, arrayed from objective to subjective health, namely: gait speed, episodic memory and mental health. Methods and Findings We used the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing 2006 enriched with retrospective life history (N = 5,913). To deal with recall problems two solutions, covariate measurement and endogenous treatment models, were applied. Retrospective childhood material lack includes growing up without running hot or cold water, fixed bath, indoor lavatory and central heating. Adjustment is made for an extensive set of confounders including sex, age, adult health, wealth, education, occupation, social support, social connections, chronic conditions, smoking, drinking, and physical exercise. It is found that material poverty when growing up shows no association with health when growing old, assuming accurate recall. Once recall problems are controlled, we found that childhood material poverty changes inversely with later life health. Conclusion A poorer childhood goes with slower gait, poorer memory and more depression in later life. This result provides a further impetus to eliminate child poverty. PMID:26675009

  14. Growing Up in Poverty, Growing Old in Infirmity: The Long Arm of Childhood Conditions in Great Britain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gindo Tampubolon

    Full Text Available The ageing population poses a tremendous challenge in understanding the sources of inequalities in health. Though they appear to be far removed, childhood conditions are known to be inextricably linked with adult health, and in turn on health in later life. The long arm of childhood conditions hypothesis is often tested using recollection of childhood circumstances, but such subjective recall can yield potentially inaccurate or possibly biased inferences. We tested the long arm hypothesis on three outcomes in later life, arrayed from objective to subjective health, namely: gait speed, episodic memory and mental health.We used the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing 2006 enriched with retrospective life history (N = 5,913. To deal with recall problems two solutions, covariate measurement and endogenous treatment models, were applied. Retrospective childhood material lack includes growing up without running hot or cold water, fixed bath, indoor lavatory and central heating. Adjustment is made for an extensive set of confounders including sex, age, adult health, wealth, education, occupation, social support, social connections, chronic conditions, smoking, drinking, and physical exercise. It is found that material poverty when growing up shows no association with health when growing old, assuming accurate recall. Once recall problems are controlled, we found that childhood material poverty changes inversely with later life health.A poorer childhood goes with slower gait, poorer memory and more depression in later life. This result provides a further impetus to eliminate child poverty.

  15. Metabolic flux profiling of recombinant protein secreting Pichia pastoris growing on glucose:methanol mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordà Joel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. Mixed feeds of methanol and a multicarbon source instead of methanol as sole carbon source have been shown to improve product productivities and alleviate metabolic burden derived from protein production. Nevertheless, systematic quantitative studies on the relationships between the central metabolism and recombinant protein production in P. pastoris are still rather limited, particularly when growing this yeast on mixed carbon sources, thus hampering future metabolic network engineering strategies for improved protein production. Results The metabolic flux distribution in the central metabolism of P. pastoris growing on a mixed feed of glucose and methanol was analyzed by Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA using 13C-NMR-derived constraints. For this purpose, we defined new flux ratios for methanol assimilation pathways in P. pastoris cells growing on glucose:methanol mixtures. By using this experimental approach, the metabolic burden caused by the overexpression and secretion of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol in P. pastoris was further analyzed. This protein has been previously shown to trigger the unfolded protein response in P. pastoris. A series of 13C-tracer experiments were performed on aerobic chemostat cultivations with a control and two different Rol producing strains growing at a dilution rate of 0.09 h−1 using a glucose:methanol 80:20 (w/w mix as carbon source. The MFA performed in this study reveals a significant redistristribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism when comparing the two recombinant strains vs the control strain, reflected in increased glycolytic, TCA cycle and NADH regeneration fluxes, as well as higher methanol dissimilation rates. Conclusions Overall, a further 13C-based MFA development to characterise the central metabolism of methylotrophic

  16. Metabolic flux profiling of recombinant protein secreting Pichia pastoris growing on glucose:methanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordà, Joel; Jouhten, Paula; Cámara, Elena; Maaheimo, Hannu; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau

    2012-05-08

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. Mixed feeds of methanol and a multicarbon source instead of methanol as sole carbon source have been shown to improve product productivities and alleviate metabolic burden derived from protein production. Nevertheless, systematic quantitative studies on the relationships between the central metabolism and recombinant protein production in P. pastoris are still rather limited, particularly when growing this yeast on mixed carbon sources, thus hampering future metabolic network engineering strategies for improved protein production. The metabolic flux distribution in the central metabolism of P. pastoris growing on a mixed feed of glucose and methanol was analyzed by Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) using 13C-NMR-derived constraints. For this purpose, we defined new flux ratios for methanol assimilation pathways in P. pastoris cells growing on glucose:methanol mixtures. By using this experimental approach, the metabolic burden caused by the overexpression and secretion of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol) in P. pastoris was further analyzed. This protein has been previously shown to trigger the unfolded protein response in P. pastoris. A series of 13C-tracer experiments were performed on aerobic chemostat cultivations with a control and two different Rol producing strains growing at a dilution rate of 0.09 h(-1) using a glucose:methanol 80:20 (w/w) mix as carbon source.The MFA performed in this study reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism when comparing the two recombinant strains vs the control strain, reflected in increased glycolytic, TCA cycle and NADH regeneration fluxes, as well as higher methanol dissimilation rates. Overall, a further 13C-based MFA development to characterise the central metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts when growing on mixed methanol:multicarbon sources has been

  17. Fiber level for laying hens during the growing phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednardo Rodrigues Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feeding management of laying hens has been focused on the direct influence of nutrient intake on weight gain, especially at growing phase. This study evaluates nutrient digestibility, performance, development of the digestive tract, body composition, and bone quality of two strains of laying hens fed with different levels of neutral detergent fiber (NDF during the growing phase from the 7th to the 12th week of age. A total of 1,296 birds were distributed in a completely randomized design in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement (two strains x three levels of NDF with four replicates of 54 birds per treatment. Semi-heavy (Hy Line Brown and light-strain (Lohman LSL pullets were allotted to dietary treatments consisting of 14.50, 16.50, and 18.50% NDF. An interaction between strains and NDF levels was observed only for feed/gain ratio and light-strain pullets had lower performance with 18.50% NDF. The increasing levels of NDF in the diet reduced the coefficients of digestibility of dry matter, nitrogen and gross energy, and the values of metabolizable energy. Higher levels of NDF in the diet increased the relative weight of liver and intestines and reduced gizzard weight. It was also observed differences between bone quality and composition of the femur and tibia of light and semi-heavy hens. The increase in NDF level in ration for growing phase laying hens above 14.50% decreases the nutrient digestibility and the metabolizable energy of the diet; however, it does not affect the carcass composition, bone quality, feed intake, and weight gain, although it may impair feed conversion of light-strain pullets.

  18. Growing Mediums in Different Environments for Sunflower and Cilantro Microgreens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, B.; Gonzalez, O.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to investigate the growth and subsequent harvest of young seedlings known as microgreens, which have expanded into a very profitable market. The goal of the experiment is to discover whether the nutrients, soil quality and climate influences the quality, flavor, and yield of the microgreens. To conduct this experiment, locations and soil types were chosen; the locations consisted of a greenhouse (an enclosed space which held consistent sunlight, warmth, and humidity) and a lath house (a somewhat shaded location that was open to the elements as well as temperature changes), while compost, Quick Root (a growing medium that is relatively devoid of nutrients), and a combination of the two is used in this experiment. This meant that a total of six different combinations could be tested. Along with that, two different seeds were selected, sunflower seeds and cilantro seeds. Each of the results are mainly influenced by the soil type, and a partial influence by the climate. Compost has an extreme lack in growth and did not produce enough plants to record in general. The Quick Root results show only a burst of growth would occur; also, the plants did not have a strong taste, but did grow slightly quicker within the greenhouse. Another advantage to the Quick Root results is that the root size nearly tripled compared to the 50/50 root size. 50/50 holds the strongest results i.e., growth consistency and holds a stronger taste. Originally, there was an attempt to grow sunflowers uncovered, but was not attempted again due to poor results. Overall the 50/50 held a stronger growth and taste, but also would easily excel in the long run compared to the Quick Root and the compost.

  19. Impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea on performance of growing pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alvarez

    Full Text Available The impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv infection on the US pork industry has mainly been attributed to the mortality that it causes in suckling piglets, and, consequently, much effort has been invested in the quantification of its effect in sow farms. However, no information on the performance of surviving pigs that were exposed to the PEDv as piglets is available. Here, a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv infection on growing pigs' performance, as indicated by mortality, average daily gain (ADG, average daily feed intake (ADFI, and feed conversion ratio (FCR was performed using production records from weaned pigs in nursery and wean-to-finish sites from sow farms that became PEDv-infected between May 2013 and June 2014. Production records from the first batch of growing pigs weaned in infected flows after the PEDv outbreak ("infected batches" were compared with those from pigs weaned within the previous 14 to 120 days ("control batches". Performance records from infected and control batches, paired by flow, were compared using non-parametric paired tests. Mortality, ADG and FCR were significantly different in PEDv-positive (infected compared with PEDv-negative (control batches, with a mean increase of mortality and FCR of 11% and 0.5, respectively, and a decrease of ADG of 0.16 lb/day. Our results demonstrate a poorer performance of growing pigs weaned after a PEDv outbreak compared with those weaned within the previous 14-120 days, suggesting that in addition to the mortality induced by PEDv in suckling pigs, the disease also impairs the performance of surviving pig. These findings help to quantify the impact of PEDv infection in the US and, ultimately, contribute to efforts to quantify the cost-effectiveness of disease prevention and control measures.

  20. Stem taper equations for poplars growing on farmland in Sweden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Birger Hjelm

    2013-01-01

    We developed a simple polynomial taper equation for poplars growing on former farmland in Sweden and also evaluated the performance of some well-known taper equations.In Sweden there is an increasing interest in the use of poplar.Effective management of poplar plantations for high yield production would be facilitated by taper equations providing better predictions of stem volume than currently available equations.In the study a polynomial stem taper equation with five parameters was established for individual poplar trees growing on former farmland.The outputs of the polynomial taper equation were compared with five published equations.Data for fitting the equations were collected from 69 poplar trees growing at 37 stands in central and southern Sweden (lat.55-60° N).The mean age of the stands was 21 years (range 14-43),the mean density 984 stemsha-1 (198-3,493),and the mean diameter at breast height (outside bark) 25 cm (range 12-40).To verify the tested equations,performance of accuracy and precision diameter predictions at seven points along the stem was closely analyzed.Statistics used for evaluation of the equations indicated that the variable exponent taper equation presented by Kozak (1988) performed best and can be recommended.The stem taper equation by Kozak (1988) recommended in the study is likely to be beneficial for optimising the efficiency and profitability of poplar plantation management.The constructed polynomial equation and the segmented equation presented by Max & Burkhart (1976) were second and third ranked.Due to the statistical complexity of Kozak's equation,the constructed polynomial equation is alternatively recommended when a simple model is requested and larger bias is accepted.

  1. [A very slow growing ankle swelling in a healthy male].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Christoph; Merlo, Pierina; Holzinger, Fernando; Pranghofer, Sigrid; Pfeiffer, David; Nüesch, Reto

    2014-08-20

    We describe the case report of a 66-year-old man with a very slow growing ankle tumour caused by a subcutaneous fungal abscess. Phaeoacremonium inflatipes, a member of the Dematiaceae family, was identified by needle puncture and culture of the non-odorous creamy yellow brown fluid. The fungal pseudocyst was surgically removed in toto and no further fungicidal drug therapy was required. Human infections by dematiaceous fungi causes subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis, a rare, deep fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues usually acquired through traumatic skin lesions. In addition, systemic infections are reported, predominantly in immunosuppressed individuals.

  2. Pseudoxylaria as stowaway of the fungus-growing termite nest:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Anna A.; Kooij, Pepijn Wilhelmus; Debets, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Though inconspicuous in healthy nests, Pseudoxylaria species are almost always present and overgrow deteriorating fungus-growing termite gardens. Whether these fungi are detrimental to the fungus-garden, benign, or even beneficial is unclear. We hypothesize that Pseudoxylaria is a stowaway...... that practices a sit-and-wait strategy to survive in the termite nest. Using isolates from three different termite genera to test our hypothesis, we compared Pseudoxylaria’s growth on 40 carbon sources with that of Termitomyces and tested its interaction with Termitomyces. The C-source use of both fungi largely...

  3. Adaptive calibration method with on-line growing complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šika Z.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a modified variant of a kinematical calibration algorithm. In the beginning, a brief review of the calibration algorithm and its simple modification are described. As the described calibration modification uses some ideas used by the Lolimot algorithm, the algorithm is described and explained. Main topic of this paper is a description of a synthesis of the Lolimot-based calibration that leads to an adaptive algorithm with an on-line growing complexity. The paper contains a comparison of simple examples results and a discussion. A note about future research topics is also included.

  4. Designing a Growing Functional Modules “Artificial Brain”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Leboeuf-Pasquier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    The present paper illustrates the design process for the Growing Functional Modules (GFM learning based controller. GFM controllers are elaborated interconnecting four kinds of components: Global Goals, Acting Modules, Sensations and Sensing Modules. Global Goals trigger intrinsic motivations, Acting and Sensing Modules develop specific functionalities and Sensations provide the controlled system's feedback. GFM controllers learn to satisfy some predefined goals while interacting with the environment and thus should be considered as artificial brains. An example of the design process of a simple controller is provided herein to explain the inherent methodology, to exhibit the components' interconnections and to demonstrate the control process.

  5. Calif. ISO gears up for growing renewables portfolio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    Operating the grid is going to become more of a challenge as wind and solar generation -- the biggest two contributors with the most hourly and daily variations -- grow over time. Forecasting exactly how much capacity will be available a mere one hour ahead still remains difficult. More renewable generation is not good business for conventional peaking and load-following thermal generation, mostly burning natural gas. Their revenues, depending on the specific scenario considered, may drop by 20 to 40 percent. Something has to be done to sustain these critical players even as their output is not required as much as in the past.

  6. Maximum Leaf Spanning Trees of Growing Sierpinski Networks Models

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Bing; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical phenomena of complex networks are very difficult to predict from local information due to the rich microstructures and corresponding complex dynamics. On the other hands, it is a horrible job to compute some stochastic parameters of a large network having thousand and thousand nodes. We design several recursive algorithms for finding spanning trees having maximal leaves (MLS-trees) in investigation of topological structures of Sierpinski growing network models, and use MLS-trees to determine the kernels, dominating and balanced sets of the models. We propose a new stochastic method for the models, called the edge-cumulative distribution, and show that it obeys a power law distribution.

  7. Antioxidant properties of some plants growing wild in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serteser, A.; Kargioglu, M.; Gok, V.; Bagci, Y.; Musa Ozcan, M.; Arslan, D.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the antioxidant activity of 50% aqueous methanol extracts of 38 plants growing in the Afyonkarahisar province of Turkey were evaluated by various antioxidant assay, including free radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) scavenging and metal (Fe{sup 2}+) chelating activities. The methanolic fruit extracts of the Cornus and Morus species (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and DPPH scavenging activities, Fe{sup 2}+ chelating activity) and the methanolic leaf extracts of the Mentha species (DPPH scavenging activities) examined in the assay showed the strongest activities. These antioxidant properties depended on the concentration of samples. (Author) 30 refs.

  8. Tsallis Mapping in Growing Complex Networks with Fitness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Gui-Feng; ZHANG Xiao-Bing; ZHANG Yi

    2012-01-01

    We introduce Tsallis mapping in Bianconi-Barabgsi (B-B) fitness model of growing networks. This mapping addresses the dynamical behavior of the fitness model within the framework of nonextensive statistics mechanics, which is characterized by a dimensionless nonextensivity parameter q. It is found that this new phenomenological parameter plays an important role in the evolution of networks: the underlying evolving networks may undergo a different phases depending on the q exponents, comparing to the original B-B fitness model, and the corresponding critical transition temperature Tc is also identified.

  9. Exploitation Strategies in Social Parasites of Fungus Growing Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Janni Dolby

    . Inquilines are usually close relatives of their host and so share ancestral characteristics (Emery’s rule). They are dependent on being fully integrated into their host’s colony throughout their lives in order to reproduce. Most inquiline ants have completely lost their sterile worker caste. Exceptions...... to this are Acromyrmex insinuator and Acromyrmex ameliae, parasites of fungus-growing ants. By still producing a worker caste both species offers a rare opportunity to study adaptive features in parasite worker behaviour. Furthermore can closely related inquiline-host combinations give us an insight in the trade...

  10. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune

    intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  11. Two New Flavone Glycosides from Chenopodiumambrosioides Growing Wildly in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala M. Hammoda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chenopodiumambrosioides (Chenopodiaceae growing wildly in Egypt was subjected to antioxidant –guided phytochemical investigation and the EtOAc fraction afforded the two new flavone glycosides; scutellarein-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranoside (1 and scutella-rein-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranoside (2. In addition, the invitro antioxidant activities of the plant alcohol extract, CHCl 3 fraction, EtOAc fraction and isolates were studied.

  12. How Copper Nanowires Grow and How To Control Their Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shengrong; Stewart, Ian E; Chen, Zuofeng; Li, Bo; Rathmell, Aaron R; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2016-03-15

    Scalable, solution-phase nanostructure synthesis has the promise to produce a wide variety of nanomaterials with novel properties at a cost that is low enough for these materials to be used to solve problems. For example, solution-synthesized metal nanowires are now being used to make low cost, flexible transparent electrodes in touch screens, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and solar cells. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of solution-phase syntheses that enable control over the assembly of atoms into nanowires in the last 15 years, but proposed mechanisms for nanowire formation are usually qualitative, and for many syntheses there is little consensus as to how nanowires form. It is often not clear what species is adding to a nanowire growing in solution or what mechanistic step limits its rate of growth. A deeper understanding of nanowire growth is important for efficiently directing the development of nanowire synthesis toward producing a wide variety of nanostructure morphologies for structure-property studies or producing precisely defined nanostructures for a specific application. This Account reviews our progress over the last five years toward understanding how copper nanowires form in solution, how to direct their growth into nanowires with dimensions ideally suited for use in transparent conducting films, and how to use copper nanowires as a template to grow core-shell nanowires. The key advance enabling a better understanding of copper nanowire growth is the first real-time visualization of nanowire growth in solution, enabling the acquisition of nanowire growth kinetics. By measuring the growth rate of individual nanowires as a function of concentration of the reactants and temperature, we show that a growing copper nanowire can be thought of as a microelectrode that is charged with electrons by hydrazine and grows through the diffusion-limited addition of Cu(OH)2(-). This deeper mechanistic understanding, coupled to an

  13. Video Segmentation Using Fast Marching and Region Growing Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftychis Sifakis

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The algorithm presented in this paper is comprised of three main stages: (1 classification of the image sequence and, in the case of a moving camera, parametric motion estimation, (2 change detection having as reference a fixed frame, an appropriately selected frame or a displaced frame, and (3 object localization using local colour features. The image sequence classification is based on statistical tests on the frame difference. The change detection module uses a two-label fast marching algorithm. Finally, the object localization uses a region growing algorithm based on the colour similarity. Video object segmentation results are shown using the COST 211 data set.

  14. Pharmaceutical Industry in Vietnam: Sluggish Sector in a Growing Market

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Angelino; Do Ta Khanh; Nguyen An Ha; Tuan Pham

    2017-01-01

    Vietnam is a fast growing economy in the Asian region with a significantly high population (over 92 million in 2015). Although still expanding (about 1.1% on average during 2000–2015), the Vietnamese population is considered to be entering the ageing stage at a very high rate. The rapid expansion of the middle-income urban class and the ageing people ratio have dramatically pushed up the demand for healthcare goods, particularly in terms of pharmaceutical products. Since the early 1990s the g...

  15. WTO: Global Trade Volume to Grow 13% in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    WTO recently released the latest global trade environment report and analyzed the varous data from Dec. 2009 to Oct. 2010, including trade situation, employment market, GDP, regional trade protocols and trade barriers. World Trade Organization forecasted that global trade volume (including goods trade and service trade) would grow 13% in 2010. The statistics show that the global export growth has exceeded the output growth. From 2000 to 2007, the world export trade rose at the pace of 6%, but dropped to 2% in 2008, even negative growth in 2009. The falling pace was 12%. Not untill July 2010, did the world trade recover the precrisis level of June 2008.

  16. Design of Smart Merging Unit Based on FPGA and ARM%基于FPGA与ARM的智能合并单元设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱超; 黄灿; 梅军; 郑建勇

    2011-01-01

    To meet the requirements of smart substations for digital information. integrated functions and compact structure, the definitions of merging unit in IEC 6OO44 -8 and IEC 61850-9-1/2 are analyzed, and on this basis a smart merging unit based on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and advanced RISC machines (ARM) is designed The auxiliary processor FPGA is responsible for synchronously receiving multi-channel data from different electronic transformers and implementing the parallel operation and switching-over of busbar by integrated Iogical control mechanism software; the main ARM prcessor is responsible for the real-time control of FPGA and sending the sampled data in the form specified in IEC 61850-9-2 by Ethemet, and the pre-configured sampled valne control block is utilized to implement the flexible definition of transmission model for sampled values to avoid the difficulty in implementing the mapping of manufacturing message specification (MMS) Testing results show that the proposed design is feasible and correct.%针对智能变电站信息数字化、功能集成化、结构紧凑化的要求,分析了IEC 60044-8、IEC 61850-9-1/2标准对合并单元的定义,在此基础上设计了一种基于现场可编程门阵列(field-programmable gate array,FPGA)与高级RISC微处理器(advanced RlSC machines,ARM)的智能合并单元.辅处理器FPGA负责多路数据的同步接收,并集成逻辑判别机制软件实现母线的并列运行和切换;主处理器ARM负责FPGA的实时控制并将采样值按IEC 61850-9-2标准通过以太网发送,采用预配置采样值控制块实现采样值传输模型的灵活定义,避免了制造报文规范(manufacturing message specification,MMS)映射的实现困难.试验结果表明了设计方法的可行性和正确性.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in biofilm-growing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macià, M D; Rojo-Molinero, E; Oliver, A

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are organized bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix attached to living or abiotic surfaces. The development of biofilms is currently recognized as one of the most relevant drivers of persistent infections. Among them, chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is probably the most intensively studied. The lack of correlation between conventional susceptibility test results and therapeutic success in chronic infections is probably a consequence of the use of planktonically growing instead of biofilm-growing bacteria. Therefore, several in vitro models to evaluate antimicrobial activity on biofilms have been implemented over the last decade. Microtitre plate-based assays, the Calgary device, substratum suspending reactors and the flow cell system are some of the most used in vitro biofilm models for susceptibility studies. Likewise, new pharmacodynamic parameters, including minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration, minimal biofilm-eradication concentration, biofilm bactericidal concentration, and biofilm-prevention concentration, have been defined in recent years to quantify antibiotic activity in biofilms. Using these parameters, several studies have shown very significant quantitative and qualitative differences for the effects of most antibiotics when acting on planktonic or biofilm bacteria. Nevertheless, standardization of the procedures, parameters and breakpoints, by official agencies, is needed before they are implemented in clinical microbiology laboratories for routine susceptibility testing. Research efforts should also be directed to obtaining a deeper understanding of biofilm resistance mechanisms, the evaluation of optimal pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models for biofilm growth, and correlation with clinical outcome.

  18. Slowly-growing gap-opening planets trigger weaker vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Michael; Lin, Min-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a giant planet in a low-viscosity disc can create a gap edge in the disc's radial density profile sharp enough to excite the Rossby Wave Instability. This instability may evolve into dust-trapping vortices that might explain the "banana-shaped" features in recently observed asymmetric transition discs with inner cavities. Previous hydrodynamical simulations of planet-induced vortices have neglected the timescale of hundreds to thousands of orbits to grow a massive planet to Jupiter-size. In this work, we study the effect of a giant planet's runaway growth timescale on the lifetime and characteristics of the resulting vortex. For two different planet masses (1 and 5 Jupiter masses) and two different disc viscosities ($\\alpha$=3$\\times 10^{-4}$ and 3$\\times10^{-5}$), we compare the vortices induced by planets with several different growth timescales between 10 and 4000 planet orbits. In general, we find that slowly-growing planets create significantly weaker vortices with lifetimes and surface d...

  19. A dynamic cellular vertex model of growing epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao-Zhen; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2017-04-01

    Intercellular interactions play a significant role in a wide range of biological functions and processes at both the cellular and tissue scales, for example, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cancer invasion. In this paper, a dynamic cellular vertex model is presented to study the morphomechanics of a growing epithelial monolayer. The regulating role of stresses in soft tissue growth is revealed. It is found that the cells originating from the same parent cell in the monolayer can orchestrate into clustering patterns as the tissue grows. Collective cell migration exhibits a feature of spatial correlation across multiple cells. Dynamic intercellular interactions can engender a variety of distinct tissue behaviors in a social context. Uniform cell proliferation may render high and heterogeneous residual compressive stresses, while stress-regulated proliferation can effectively release the stresses, reducing the stress heterogeneity in the tissue. The results highlight the critical role of mechanical factors in the growth and morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and help understand the development and invasion of epithelial tumors.

  20. Force-velocity measurements of a few growing actin filaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraline Brangbour

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point.

  1. Force-Velocity Measurements of a Few Growing Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangbour, Coraline; du Roure, Olivia; Helfer, Emmanuèle; Démoulin, Damien; Mazurier, Alexis; Fermigier, Marc; Carlier, Marie-France; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point. PMID:21541364

  2. A MICRO-IMAGE FUSION ALGORITHM BASED ON REGION GROWING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Cuixia; Jiang Gangyi; Yu Mei; Wang Yigang; Shao Feng; Peng Zongju

    2013-01-01

    Due to the limitation of Depth Of Field (DOF) of microscope,the regions which are not within the DOF will be blurring after imaging.Thus for micro-image fusion,the most important step is to identify the blurring regions within each micro-image,so as to remove their undesirable impacts on the fused image.In this paper,a fusion algorithm based on a novel region growing method is proposed for micro-image fusion.The local sharpness of micro-image is judged block by block,then blocks whose sharpness is lower than an adaptive threshold are used as seeds,and the sharpness of neighbors of each seed are evaluated again during the region growing until the blurring regions are identified completely.With the decreasing in block size,the obtained region segmentation becomes more and more accurate.Finally,the micro-images are fused with pixel-wise fusion rules.The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm benefits from the novel region segmentation and it is able to obtain fused micro-image with higher sharpness compared with some popular image fusion method.

  3. The Growing Use of GMES across Europe’s Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione GEOmedia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Una guida per i decisori politici sulle potenzialità e ibenefici derivanti dall’uso delle tecnologie di monitoraggiodella Terra nelle regioni EuropeeAbstractThe Growing Use of GMES across Europe’s Regions” LaunchEvent at the European Parliament.NEREUS – Network of European Regions Using Space Technologiesand ESA – European Space Agency, are pleased to announce the launch of a joint publication with the title “TheGrowing Use of GMES across Europe’s Regions”, a collection of 67 illustrative articles on regional GMES applications. Addressed to a non-specialist audience, the collection illustrates the strategic value of the Programme for regional administrations and authorities in the context of territorial management and forward planning. The variety of existing andpotential regional uses across Europe shows how GMES not only contributes to better informed decision making but also how the data can be exploited to support sustainable environmental protection with a long term perspective. Quoting end user experiences, the publication gives a first-hand impression on the impact of GMES on regional development and policy implementation.

  4. Excess growing-season water limits lowland black spruce productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, S.; Kolka, R. K.; Bolstad, P. V.; Gill, K.; Curzon, M.; D'Amato, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The annual growth of many tree species is limited by water availability, with growth increasing as water becomes less scarce. In lowland bogs of northern Minnesota, however, black spruce (Picea mariana) is often exposed to excess water via high water table elevations. These trees grow in thick deposits of organic mucky peat and often have shallow rooting systems to avoid the complete submersion of roots in water. While it is generally believed that black spruce decrease growth rates with rising water table elevations, this hypothesis has not been tested in situ. We used a unique, 50-year record of daily bog water table elevations at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) in northern Minnesota to investigate the relationship between climate and black spruce productivity. Nine 1/20th ha circular plots were established in five different bogs and tree height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), and crown class were recorded. Additionally, two perpendicular cores were collected on all trees greater than 10 cm diameter-at-breast-height. Tree cores were sanded, mounted, cross-dated, and de-trended according to standard dendrochronological procedures. Ring width measurements were correlated with precipitation, temperature, and water table elevation using package BootRes in R to determine the climatic variables most associated with stand level productivity. Across the different plots, we found that early growing season water table elevation (May and June) was negatively correlated with both individual and stand-level black spruce growth (p productivity of black spruce.

  5. Cycles and eigenvalues of sequentially growing random regular graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Consider the sum of d many iid random permutation matrices on n labels along with their transposes. The resulting matrix is the adjacency matrix of a random regular (multi)-graph of degree 2d on n vertices. It is known that the distribution of smooth linear eigenvalue statistics of this matrix is given asymptotically by sums of Poisson random variables. This is in contrast with Gaussian fluctuation of similar quantities in the case of Wigner matrices. It is also known that for Wigner matrices the joint fluctuation of linear eigenvalue statistics across minors of growing sizes can be expressed in terms of the Gaussian Free Field (GFF). In this article we explore joint asymptotic (in n) fluctuation for a coupling of all random regular graphs of various degrees obtained by growing each component permutation according to the Chinese Restaurant Process. Our primary result is that the corresponding eigenvalue statistics can be expressed in terms of a family of independent Yule processes with immigration. These proc...

  6. BLOOD METABOLIC HORMONES AND LEPTIN IN GROWING LAMBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Antunović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the concentration of blood metabolic hormones and leptin levels in growing lambs. The research was carried out on Tsigai lambs in two periods (suckling and fattening during the winter feeding season. Lambs were suckling and ate a food mixture and alfalfa hay ad libitum, while during the fattening period they were fed only with the above mentioned mixture and alfalfa hay ad libitum. Their blood was analyzed on 35th and 75th day of age. Concentrations of minsulin, leptin and thyroid hormones were determined in the blood serum of lambs during both periods. In the blood of fattening lambs significantly higher (P0.05 insulin concentrations (1.05 and 0.54 μU/mL, were determined, compared to suckling lambs. A significant strong positive correlation between serum leptin and insulin (r = 0.85, P0.05. The concentration of thyroid hormones did not significantly differ depending on the period of measurement. These changes indicate that the measurement concentrations of metabolic hormones and leptin in blood are very important in order to understand the changes of metabolism and nutrient supply in growing lambs.

  7. Mycobacterium nebraskense sp. nov., a novel slowly growing scotochromogenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amr M; Iwen, Peter C; Tarantolo, Stefano; Hinrichs, Steven H

    2004-11-01

    The characterization of a novel slowly growing, scotochromogenic Mycobacterium species is reported. This previously undescribed mycobacterial species was isolated from five different patients with symptomatic pulmonary infections. All isolates were acid-fast-positive and the mycolic acid profiles were unique and supported placement into the genus Mycobacterium. Phenotypic characteristics of each strain included optimal growth after 3 weeks at a temperature range of 30-35 degrees C, yellow pigmentation after incubation in the dark and production of a heat-stable catalase. The 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 sequences were identical for all five strains, but distinct from all known mycobacterial species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed the novel species within the slowly growing mycobacteria group in close proximity to Mycobacterium malmoense, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. These data support the conclusion that the related five described organisms represent a novel Mycobacterium species, for which the name Mycobacterium nebraskense sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain UNMC-MY1349(T) (=ATCC BAA-837(T)=DSM 44803(T)).

  8. Soil Respiration During a Soybean-Growing Season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Soil respiration induced by soybean cultivation over its entire growing season and the factors influencing soil respiration were investigated to examine the seasonal pattern of soil respiration induced by soybean cultivation, explore soybean growth and photosynthesis on soil respiration, and determine the temperature dependence on soil respiration. Soil respiration in a pot experiment with and without soybean plants was sampled using the static chamber method and measured using gas chromatograph. Air temperature was a dominant factor controlling soil respiration rate in unplanted soil. Additionally,rhizosphere respiration comprised 62% to 98% of the soil respiration rate in the soybean-planted soil varying with the soybean growth stages. Harvesting aerial parts of soybean plant caused an immediate drop in the soil respiration rate at that stage. After harvesting the aerial parts of the soybean plant, a highly significant correlation between soil respiration rate and air temperature was found at the flowering stage (P < 0.01), the pod stage (P < 0.01), and the seed-filling stage(P < 0.05). Thus, rhizosphere respiration during the soybean-growing period not only made a great contribution to soil respiration, but also determined the seasonal variation pattern of the soil respiration rate.

  9. Topology of growing networks accelerated by intermediary process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Nobutoshi

    2017-10-01

    We examined the effect of accelerated growth (increase in the mean vertex degree) caused by internal links between pre-existing nodes on the topology of growing networks and showed that a kind of local rule, edge additions stimulated by randomly chosen intermediaries (intermediary process), not only guarantees a highly clustered structure but also induces the scale-free property on growing networks without an explicit preferential rule with the aid of accelerating growth. We relate the power-law exponent γ describing the degree distribution to the rate of acceleration and an internal factor which expresses the contribution of internal links to the rate of increase in degrees. The behavior of the internal factor generates different forms of time dependence of degrees according to whether γ > 2 or γ < 2. Accelerating growth plays a dominant role in the structural formation of networks based on local rules, in contrast to cases when non-local rules are applied, because similar studies showed that a simple preferential linking rule (a non-local rule) easily induces power laws without accelerating growth.

  10. Silymarin content in Silybum marianum populations growing in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouZid, Sameh F; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2016-05-01

    Chemical variation of Silybum marianum growing in the north, middle, and south of Egypt was investigated. Variation was assessed according to the content of the individual silymarin components in the fruits of the plant. The fruits were distinguished according to location, plant variety, and fruit color (maturity). Accelerated solvent extraction was used to standardize the silymarin extraction. Quantitative analysis of the content of silymarin components was carried out using HPLC with qNMR-controlled reference standards of taxifolin and seven major flavonolignans including silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, isosilybin B, silychristin, isosilychristin, and silydianin. The quantification method was validated in accordance with ICH guidelines. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering were carried out to create homogeneous clusters of samples based on the content of the silymarin components. Taxifolin had the lowest correlation relative to other silymarin components, whereas silybin A was positively correlated with silybin B. The samples clustered into three classes: silydianin-rich samples, samples with an average silymarin content of class enriched in silymarin (>18.8 mg/g). S. marianum growing in the Nile delta showed the highest silymarin content. No correlation was found between fruit color and silymarin content, indicating that the fruit maturity stage has no significance.

  11. Growing patterns to produce 'nitrate-free' lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Fülöp, Ibolya; Modroiu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables can contain significant amounts of nitrate and, therefore, may pose health hazards to consumers by exceeding the accepted daily intake for nitrate. Different hydroponic growing patterns were examined in this work in order to obtain 'nitrate-free lettuces'. Growing lettuces on low nitrate content nutrient solution resulted in a significant decrease in lettuces' nitrate concentrations (1741 versus 39 mg kg(-1)), however the beneficial effect was cancelled out by an increase in the ambient temperature. Nitrate replacement with ammonium was associated with an important decrease of the lettuces' nitrate concentration (from 1896 to 14 mg kg(-1)) and survival rate. An economically feasible method to reduce nitrate concentrations was the removal of all inorganic nitrogen from the nutrient solution before the exponential growth phase. This method led to lettuces almost devoid of nitrate (10 mg kg(-1)). The dried mass and calcinated mass of lettuces, used as markers of lettuces' quality, were not influenced by this treatment, but a small reduction (18%, p lettuces and their modifications are also discussed in the paper. It is possible to obtain 'nitrate-free' lettuces in an economically feasible way.

  12. Self-driven jamming in growing microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Morgan; Hartung, Jörn; Schreck, Carl; Gniewek, Pawel; Hu, Lucy; Herminghaus, Stephan; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    In natural settings, microbes tend to grow in dense populations where they need to push against their surroundings to accommodate space for new cells. The associated contact forces play a critical role in a variety of population-level processes, including biofilm formation, the colonization of porous media, and the invasion of biological tissues. Although mechanical forces have been characterized at the single-cell level, it remains elusive how collective pushing forces result from the combination of single-cell forces. Here, we reveal a collective mechanism of confinement, which we call self-driven jamming, that promotes the build-up of large mechanical pressures in microbial populations. Microfluidic experiments on budding yeast populations in space-limited environments show that self-driven jamming arises from the gradual formation and sudden collapse of force chains driven by microbial proliferation, extending the framework of driven granular matter. The resulting contact pressures can become large enough to slow down cell growth, to delay the cell cycle in the G1 phase, and to strain or even destroy the micro-environment through crack propagation. Our results suggest that self-driven jamming and build-up of large mechanical pressures is a natural tendency of microbes growing in confined spaces, contributing to microbial pathogenesis and biofouling.

  13. Mutant number distribution in an exponentially growing population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter; Antal, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    We present an explicit solution to a classic model of cell-population growth introduced by Luria and Delbrück (1943 Genetics 28 491-511) 70 years ago to study the emergence of mutations in bacterial populations. In this model a wild-type population is assumed to grow exponentially in a deterministic fashion. Proportional to the wild-type population size, mutants arrive randomly and initiate new sub-populations of mutants that grow stochastically according to a supercritical birth and death process. We give an exact expression for the generating function of the total number of mutants at a given wild-type population size. We present a simple expression for the probability of finding no mutants, and a recursion formula for the probability of finding a given number of mutants. In the ‘large population-small mutation’ limit we recover recent results of Kessler and Levine (2014 J. Stat. Phys. doi:10.1007/s10955-014-1143-3) for a fully stochastic version of the process.

  14. The State of the Kenyan Cotton Growing Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josphat Igadwa Mwasiagi; HUANG Xiu-bao; WANG Xin-hou; J O Wagala

    2007-01-01

    From the early 1960s to late 1980s, the Kenyan cotton growing industry played a vital role in the Kenyan economy in terms of provision of employment and creation of wealth in the rural areas. It also played a central role in the textile industry which was thriving during the above mentioned period. Over the years, cotton production in Kenya has fallen steadily, such that by the year 2000, the country experienced a severe cotton fiber deficit. This study was undertaken to investigate the trend of the cotton growing industry in Kenya. Selected aspects of the industry like cost of production, cotton seed distribution, the operation of cotton gins and the quality of cotton lint were considered.Kohonen Self Organizing Maps (SOM) and K-means clustering techniques were used in data analysis. The results of this study show that Kenyan cotton farmers produced seed cotton at a break-even price of US$ 0.31 per kilogram, while the price offered was US $ 0.29 per kilogram.c

  15. Dynamics of neutrino lumps in growing neutrino quintessence

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, Santiago; Wetterich, Christof

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the formation and dissipation of large scale neutrino structures in cosmologies where the time evolution of dynamical dark energy is stopped by a growing neutrino mass. In models where the coupling between neutrinos and dark energy grows with the value of the scalar cosmon field, the evolution of neutrino lumps depends on the neutrino mass. For small masses the lumps form and dissolve periodically, leaving only a small backreaction of the neutrino structures on the cosmic evolution. This process heats the neutrinos to temperatures much above the photon temperature such that neutrinos acquire again an almost relativistic equation of state. The present equation of state of the combined cosmon-neutrino fluid is very close to -1. In contrast, for larger neutrino masses the lumps become stable. The highly concentrated neutrino structures entail a large backreaction similar to the case of a constant neutrino-cosmon coupling. A present average neutrino mass of around 0.5 eV seems so far compatible wit...

  16. Osseointegrated dental implants in growing children: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankani, Nivedita; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Patil, Brijesh A; Nagaraj, E; Madalli, Poornima

    2014-10-01

    Edentulism is usually associated with the aging patient. However, total or partial tooth loss also affects young individuals, mainly as a result of trauma, decay, anodontia, or congenital and acquired jaw defects involving the alveolar processes. For elderly patients, the use of oral implants has become an accepted treatment modality for edentulism, and most of today's knowledge regarding implants is based on such practice. There has been hesitation to perform implant therapy for growing children; hence, few children to date have been provided with implant-supported construction. Consequently, little is known about the outcome of the osseointegration procedure in young patients, and until now, only a limited number of case presentations have been reported. This article reviews the current literature to discuss the use of dental implants in growing patients and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. The literature review was performed through Science Direct, Wileys Blackwell Synergy, PubMed, Google, Embase, Medknow publications, and Springer for references published from 1963 to 2011. It is recommended to wait for the completion of dental and skeletal growth, except for severe cases of ectodermal dysplasia.

  17. A dynamic cellular vertex model of growing epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao-Zhen; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2017-03-01

    Intercellular interactions play a significant role in a wide range of biological functions and processes at both the cellular and tissue scales, for example, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cancer invasion. In this paper, a dynamic cellular vertex model is presented to study the morphomechanics of a growing epithelial monolayer. The regulating role of stresses in soft tissue growth is revealed. It is found that the cells originating from the same parent cell in the monolayer can orchestrate into clustering patterns as the tissue grows. Collective cell migration exhibits a feature of spatial correlation across multiple cells. Dynamic intercellular interactions can engender a variety of distinct tissue behaviors in a social context. Uniform cell proliferation may render high and heterogeneous residual compressive stresses, while stress-regulated proliferation can effectively release the stresses, reducing the stress heterogeneity in the tissue. The results highlight the critical role of mechanical factors in the growth and morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and help understand the development and invasion of epithelial tumors.

  18. Treating opioid dependence. Growing implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2004-02-01

    Almost 3 million Americans have abused heroin. The most effective treatment for this concerning epidemic is opioid replacement therapy. Although, from a historical perspective, acceptance of this therapy has been slow, growing evidence supports its efficacy. There are 3 approved medications for opioid maintenance therapy: methadone hydrochloride, levomethadyl acetate, and buprenorphine hydrochloride. Each has unique characteristics that determine its suitability for an individual patient. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported with methadone and levomethadyl, but not with buprenorphine. Due to concerns about cardiac risk, levomethadyl use has declined and the product may ultimately be discontinued. These recent safety concerns, specifics about opioid detoxification and maintenance, and new federal initiatives were studied. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Although only a minority of eligible patients are engaged in treatment, opioid maintenance therapy appears to offer the greatest public health benefits. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. This model has gained wide acceptance in Europe and is now being implemented in the United States. The recent Drug Addiction Treatment Act enables qualified physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting. Mainstreaming opioid addiction treatment has many advantages; its success will depend on resolution of ethical and delivery system issues as well as improved and expanded training of physicians in addiction medicine.

  19. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  20. Monitoring Growing Season Length of Deciduous Broad Leaf Forest Derived From Satellite Data in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan B. Kafaki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Leaf phenology describes the seasonal cycle of leaf functioning and is essential for understanding the interactions between the biosphere, the climate and biogeochemical cycles. This study aimed to quantify changes in plant phenology of deciduous broadleaf forests between the years 1982-1999 and investigate the relationships between the onset dates of phenology and climatic factors. Approach: We studied the climate changes effected on the growing season duration in vegetation of Iran, using the AVHRR/NDVI biweekly time-series data collected from 1982-1999 and concurrent mean temperature and precipitation data. The first estimated fastest changes of NDVI corresponded to the vegetation green-up and dormancy from the seasonal cycle of NDVI during 1982-1999. The onset dates of vegetation green-up and dormancy were determined based on the estimated rates and the NDVI seasonal cycles. Results: The results showed that over the study period, the growing season duration has lengthened by 0.94 days year-1 in study region. The green-up of vegetation has advanced in the spring by 0.63 days year-1 and the dormancy delayed in autumn by 0.32 days year-1. The onset date of green-up for all vegetation types negatively correlated with mean preseason temperature for almost all the preseason periods significant, suggesting that the warmer winters probably benefit an earlier green-up the following spring. Conclusion: Based on NOAA/AVHRR NDVI biweekly time-series data and concurrent climate information, it was estimated that the growing season duration of Iran’s vegetation was significantly lengthened, primarily through an earlier green-up and a later dormancy during the period of 1982-1999.

  1. Assessment of functional development of the otolithic system in growing children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Yi-Ho

    2015-04-01

    Although the caloric test, rotational test, and posturography have been used to investigate balance function conventionally, and they are older than tests of otolithic organs, yet it seems that most clinicians are less familiar with the development of otolithic (saccular and utricular) function in children. This study reviewed the electrophysiological testing used to assess the functional development of the otolithic system in growing children. Based on the literature, studies of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) tests in children ranging from newborns, small children to adolescents were reviewed. Papers concerning foam posturography in children were also included. The cVEMPs can be elicited in newborns at day 5, whereas the oVEMPs are absent in neonatal period. When children grow to 2 years old, the oVEMPs can be induced with eyes closed condition, while the oVEMPs with eyes up condition can be elicited in children aged >3 years old, with the characteristic parameters similar to adult levels. In contrast with cVEMPs, it is until the neck length >15.3cm (aldolesence), one need not account for neck length in evaluating cVEMP latency. Additionally, foam posturography indicated by the Romberg quotient of the sway velocity/area on foam pad is considered to reflect the otolithic function, which reached adult levels when the children at 12 years old. For the functional development of the otolithic system in growing children to approach adult levels, the earliest occurrence is the oVEMP test, followed by the foam posturography, and cVEMP test. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary Supplementation of Seaweed (Ulva lactuca to alleviate the Impact of Heat Stress in Growing Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kkalid A. Abdoun, Aly B. Okab, Ahmed M. El-Waziry, Emad M. Samara and Ahmed A. Al-Haidary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental and nutritional management approaches have been used to mitigate heat stress and improve performance of farm animals in semi-arid and arid regions. The present study was designed with the intention to alleviate the negative effects of heat stress and to promote the performance of growing lambs reared under hot environmental conditions. The study was conducted on 18 male Naimey lambs with average body weight of 22.78±0.49 kg, and 4-5 months old. The animals were randomly divided into 3 equal groups (A, B and C, and fed diets containing different concentrations of seaweed (Ulva lactuca for 90 days. Group A served as control and was offered diet containing 0.0% seaweed. Groups B and C served as treated groups and were offered diets containing 3.0 and 5.0% seaweed, respectively. Dietary inclusion of seaweed to the diet of growing lambs exposed to heat stress (max Ta 43.9oC, max RH 81.1%, max THI 84.6 neither influenced (P>0.05 the thermo-physiological parameters (rectal and skin temperatures, nor affected (P>0.05 the performance parameters (feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion efficiency. Furthermore, dietary seaweed supplementation did not alter (P>0.05 blood constituents or blood antioxidant capacity. However, dietary seaweed supplementation significantly (P<0.05 reduced respiratory rate, and increased serum potassium concentration. Based on the data of the present study, seaweed (Ulva lactuca supplementation to the diets of growing lambs reared under heat stress conditions did not show any indication of promoting their production performance or heat tolerance.

  3. Valine needs in starting and growing Cobb (500) broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernari, F C; Lelis, G R; Vieira, R A; Rostagno, H S; Albino, L F T; Oliveira Neto, A R

    2013-01-01

    Two independent experiments were conducted with male Cobb × Cobb 500 broilers to determine the optimal valine-to-digestible-lysine ratio for broiler development. We conducted a randomized block experiment with 7 treatments, each with 8 replicates of 25 starter birds (8 to 21 d of age) and 20 finisher (30 to 43 d of age) birds. To prevent any excess of digestible lysine, 93% of the recommended level of digestible lysine was used to evaluate the valine-to-lysine ratio. The utilized levels of dietary digestible lysine were 10.7 and 9.40 g/kg for the starting and growing phases, respectively. A control diet with 100% of the recommended level of lysine and an adequate valine-to-lysine ratio was also used. The feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, and carcass parameters were evaluated. The treatments had no significant effect on the feed intakes or carcass parameters in the starter and finisher phases. However, during both of the studied phases, we observed a quadratic effect on weight gain and the feed conversion ratio. The broilers of both phases that were fed test diets with the lower valine-to-lysine (Val/Lys) ratio had poorer performance compared with those broilers fed control diets. However, when higher Val/Lys ratios were used for the starting and growing broilers that were fed test diets, the 2 groups had similar performance. During the starting phase, in broilers that were fed a higher Val/Lys ratio, weight gain, and the feed conversion ratio improved by 5.5% compared with broilers fed the basal diets. The broilers in the growing phase also had improved performance (by 7 to 8%) when the test diets had higher Val/Lys ratios. Based on the analysis of the starter phase data, we concluded that the optimal digestible Val/Lys ratio for Cobb × Cobb 500 broilers is 77%, whereas for birds in the finisher phase (30 to 43 d of age), a digestible Val/Lys ratio of 76% is suggested.

  4. Fruit-Growing in Latvia – Industry and Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufmane Edīte

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In all times, fruit trees for family use have been grown at Latvian farms. Yet these fruits obtained market value only after the land ownership reform in 19th century. This facilitated rapid area increase of different fruit crops, allowing supply with fruits not only the local market, but also for export to the largest cities of Russia. Especially fast development of fruit-growing was observed during the first independent republic (1919–1940. The demand for planting material increased, and plants were imported from Western Europe. Choice of unsuitable cultivars and rootstocks was the main reason of the massive orchard area loss during the following severe winters. After the Second World War, the Soviet powers supported only the establishment of large orchards for processing needs, 200-300 ha, which were unsuitable for the Latvian climate and terrain. At the same time, numbers of allotment gardens rapidly increased and part of their produce was sold also on the market. After regaining of independence and private property, interest in fresh fruit and berry production for market, as well as processing, renewed. It was hindered by lack of continuity in experience and knowledge. Diversity of terrain, soils and climate all demand considerate choice of suitable orchard location and cultivars. Direct use of foreign experience often led to failure. At present, development of the fruit industry is most of all hindered by lack of qualified specialists of different levels, which does not allow to establish an appropriate consulting system. Cooperation of growers for easier marketing also is developing too slowly. Insufficient economic and market research does not allow to balance the demand with increase of plantation area, especially for large-scale processing and export, so strategic guidance of the fruit industry is not possible. Development of fruit-growing is hindered also by a lack of continuous long-term support to horticultural science. As a

  5. Workplace ESL: Effective Adaptations To Fill a Growing Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Carla; Wilberschied, Lee

    2003-01-01

    Using a cooperative and situated learning approach, two vocational English-as-a-Second-Language instructors created a linguistic community of practice among nonnative speaking immigrant restaurant employees and their native speaking coworkers. (Author/VWL)

  6. Bioavailability of dietary cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) in growing pigs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matte, J J; Guay, F; Le Floc'h, N; Girard, C L

    2010-01-01

    .... Two approaches, each using 2 quantities of dietary cyanocobalamin, were compared; the first was based on whole body retention for 8 d and the second was based on nycthemeral portal net flux of vitamin B(12...

  7. The Enterobacterium Trabulsiella odontotermitis Presents Novel Adaptations Related to Its Association with Fungus-Growing Termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntjes, Thijs; Otani, Saria; Estevez, James; da Costa, Rafael R.; Plunkett, Guy; Perna, Nicole T.; Poulsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Fungus-growing termites rely on symbiotic microorganisms to help break down plant material and to obtain nutrients. Their fungal cultivar, Termitomyces, is the main plant degrader and food source for the termites, while gut bacteria complement Termitomyces in the degradation of foodstuffs, fixation of nitrogen, and metabolism of amino acids and sugars. Due to the community complexity and because these typically anaerobic bacteria can rarely be cultured, little is known about the physiological capabilities of individual bacterial members of the gut communities and their associations with the termite host. The bacterium Trabulsiella odontotermitis is associated with fungus-growing termites, but this genus is generally understudied, with only two described species. Taking diverse approaches, we obtained a solid phylogenetic placement of T. odontotermitis among the Enterobacteriaceae, investigated the physiology and enzymatic profiles of T. odontotermitis isolates, determined the localization of the bacterium in the termite gut, compared draft genomes of two T. odontotermitis isolates to those of their close relatives, and examined the expression of genes relevant to host colonization and putative symbiont functions. Our findings support the hypothesis that T. odontotermitis is a facultative symbiont mainly located in the paunch compartment of the gut, with possible roles in carbohydrate metabolism and aflatoxin degradation, while displaying adaptations to association with the termite host, such as expressing genes for a type VI secretion system which has been demonstrated to assist bacterial competition, colonization, and survival within hosts. PMID:26162887

  8. Formation of Information Support in Management of Production of Beet Growing Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korol Viktoriia V.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article considers main methodical approaches to formation of information support in management of production of sugar beet. It conducts analysis, systematisation and generalisation of theoretical developments of scientists with respect to definition of the “information support” notion, which allows formulation of the author’s vision. The article considers definitions of the expenditures notion as one of the central categories in management of production and types of cost value as objects of management. The article proves that business accounting is in close connection with the managerial system, which, consequently, determines a specific role of expenditures in enterprise management. It identifies topical directions of formation of information support in management of production of sugar beet. On the basis of the study of practice of sugar growing enterprises the article forms main data carriers within stages of the accounting process with the aim to carry out efficient management of sugar beet production. The prospect of further studies is improvement of information support in the beet growing industry through: development of accounting policy; system of primary documents by means of formation of product quality indicators; automation of formation of their indicators with the purpose of operative control; development of budgets for planning production indicators with the purpose of management and control.

  9. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with reverse pull headgear in a growing individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambreen Afzal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal Class III malocclusion is considered to be one of the most difficult orthodontic problems to treat. This malocclusion is associated with the retrognathic maxilla or prognathic mandible or sometimes a combination of both. The treatment of such cases requires an integrated approach and a comprehensive treatment plan including growth modification, dental camouflage, or orthognathic surgery. In a growing patient, orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with the help of a reverse pull headgear is crucial as it can reduce the chances of further surgical treatment to correct the skeletal discrepancy. This case report describes the management of skeletal Class III malocclusion in a 12-year-old female child with a retrognathic maxilla. The patient did not have any other genetic abnormality or significant known comorbidity. The treatment plan involved fixed orthodontic appliance therapy in combination with a reverse pull headgear for an orthopedic effect. This treatment was continued for 3 years, and well-aligned dental arches with a positive over jet were achieved at the conclusion of treatment. Using facemask therapy in conjunction with fixed orthodontic appliances has been a successful treatment option in growing children. Treatment should be carried out as early as possible to correct the skeletal discrepancy nonsurgically and achieve better results.

  10. Actin filaments growing against a barrier with fluctuating shape

    CERN Document Server

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We study force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against a non-rigid obstacle, in presence of an external load. The filaments polymerize by either moving the whole obstacle, with a large energy cost, or by causing local distortion in its shape which costs much less energy. The non-rigid obstacle also has local thermal fluctuations due to which its shape can change with time and we describe this using fluctuations in the height profile of a one dimensional interface with Kardar-Parisi-Zhang dynamics. We find the shape fluctuations of the barrier strongly affects the force generation mechanism. The qualitative nature of the force-velocity curve is crucially determined by the relative time-scale of filament and barrier dynamics. The height profile of the barrier also shows interesting variation with the external load. Our analytical calculation within mean-field theory shows reasonable agreement with our simulation results.

  11. Three-dimensional stability of growing boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    A theory is developed for the linear stability of three-dimensional growing boundary layers. The method of multiple scales is used to derive partial-differential equations describing the temporal and spatial evolution of the complex amplitudes and wavenumbers of the disturbances. In general, these equations are elliptic unless certain conditions are satisfied. For a monochromatic disturbance, these conditions demand that the ratio of the components of the complex group velocity be real and thereby relate the direction of growth of the disturbance to the disturbance wave angle. For a nongrowing boundary layer, this condition reduces to d-alpha/d-beta being real, in agreement with the result obtained by using the saddle-point method. For a wavepacket, these conditions demand that the components of the group velocity be real.

  12. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Tully Champion`

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-08-28

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Tully Champion`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 25% more woody biomass than two current production clones (Salix dasyclados `SV1` and Salix miyabeana `SX64`), more than 2.5-fold greater biomass than one of its parents (Salix miyabeana `SX67`), and nearly 3-fold more biomass than another production clone (Salix sacchalinensis, `SX61`) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Tully Champion` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Tully Champion` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  13. Chemical constituents isolated from Zygophyllum melongena Bunge growing in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbaatar, Chunsriimyatav; Gruner, Margit; Tunsag, Jigjidsuren; Batsuren, Dulamjav; Ganpurev, Batsuren; Chuluunnyam, Lkhamjav; Sodbayar, Batsuren; Schmidt, Arndt W; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2016-07-01

    We report the first investigation of the chemical constituents of Zygophyllum melongena Bunge, a species growing in Mongolia. The quinovic acid glycosides 3-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)quinovic acid and 3-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)quinovic acid (28→1)-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) ester were identified in the chloroform fraction along with the flavonoid glycoside astragalin. The n-butanol fraction contained (+)-D-pinitol as the major component, a cyclitol with anti-diabetic properties. The structures of the isolated natural products were confirmed using ESI-MS and NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (13)C, COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and ROESY). This is the first report of the isolation of (+)-D-pinitol from the genus Zygophyllum.

  14. Acacia mangium: Growing and utilization. MPTS monograph series No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awang, K.; Taylor, D.

    1993-01-01

    With deforestation in the Asia-Pacific region progressing at the rate of 4.4 million ha per year, many countries have adopted plantation forestry using fast-growing species as a way to sustain the commercial supply of tree products and reduce pressure on natural forests. Acacia mangium (A. mangium) is playing a large role in this development, especially in Indonesia and Malaysia, due to its versatility and its ability to recapture grasslands dominated by the noxious weed, Imperata cylindrica. This monograph consolidates information on A. mangium from published literature, unpublished reports and studies, and observations from those familiar with the species. Priorities for future research are included in each chapter and in the final summary.

  15. Evaluation of chronic immune system stimulation models in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandeh, A; de Lange, C F M

    2012-02-01

    Two experiments (EXPs) were conducted to evaluate models of immune system stimulation (ISS) that can be used in nutrient metabolism studies in growing pigs. In EXP I, the pig's immune response to three non-pathogenic immunogens was evaluated, whereas in EXP II the pig's more general response to one of the immunogens was contrasted with observations on non-ISS pigs. In EXP I, nine growing barrows were fitted with a jugular catheter, and after recovery assigned to one of three treatments. Three immunogens were tested during a 10-day ISS period: (i) repeated injection of increasing amounts of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS); (ii) repeated subcutaneous injection of turpentine (TURP); and (iii) feeding grains naturally contaminated with mycotoxins (MYCO). In EXP II, 36 growing barrows were injected repeatedly with either saline (n = 12) or increasing amounts of LPS (n = 24) for 7 days (initial dose 60 μg/kg body weight). Treating pigs with TURP and LPS reduced feed intake (P < 0.02), whereas feed intake was not reduced in pigs on MYCO. Average daily gain (ADG; kg/day) of pigs on LPS (0.50) was higher than that of pigs on TURP (0.19), but lower than that of pigs on MYCO (0.61; P < 0.01). Body temperature was elevated in pigs on LPS and TURP, by 0.8°C and 0.7°C, respectively, relative to pre-ISS challenge values (39.3°C; P < 0.02), but remained unchanged in pigs on MYCO. Plasma concentrations of interleukin-1β were increased in pigs treated with LPS and TURP (56% and 55%, respectively, relative to 22.3 pg/ml for pre-ISS; P < 0.01), but not in MYCO-treated pigs. Plasma cortisol concentrations remained unchanged for pigs on MYCO and TURP, but were reduced in LPS-treated pigs (30% relative to 29.8 ng/ml for pre-ISS; P < 0.05). Red blood cell glutathione concentrations were lower in TURP-treated pigs (13% relative to 1.38 μM for pre-ISS; P < 0.05), but were unaffected in pigs on LPS and MYCO. In EXP I, TURP caused severe responses including skin ulceration and

  16. Infrared allows a peek inside to detect grow-ops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastrow, B. [Infrared Solutions, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Apartment buildings have become a preferred location for marijuana growers in the Greater Toronto Area. The grow operations pose a fire and health risk to neighbours who may breathe in potentially harmful mould spores and pores from fertilizers. One advantage for growers is that many apartment buildings have only a single hydro meter for the entire building. As such, Toronto Hydro cannot detect extraordinary electricity consumption. This article described a method for detecting high electricity use by infrared thermography. An average size hallway electrical distribution panel is equipped with an 80 Amp or 100 Amp double-pole circuit breaker. Growers unplug the 220 Volt stove outlet and run their 1000 Watt lighting systems for long periods of time. Since the lights create excessive lamp loading, a thermal anomaly can be detected on the individual circuit breaker. High-end thermal imagers will detect this thermal pattern and transpose it into a thermograph. 1 fig.

  17. Influence of growing and exploatation of bovins on regional agroecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Podar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientists all over the are concerned regarding the influence of growing ruminants on regional agro-ecosystems due to green house gases resulted (CO 2, CH4, N2O5. Cattle have contributed to environmental pollution in old industrial farming systems, when the cattle number in Romania, reached 8 million, manure evacuation was not solved and manure was accumulating around the farm polluting the soil, water and air. Low density of ruminants existing in the agricultural sector of the country is not significant in terms of pollution. Currently cattle have positive effects on the environment by the use of legumes, grasses and manure production contributing to the increase of agricultural production: crop production (sugar beet, potato and cereals, animal production (milk, meat, leather production and industrial production also (biogas, befouls, alcohol, oil production.

  18. A growing social network model in geographical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioni, Alberto; Tomassini, Marco

    2017-09-01

    In this work we propose a new model for the generation of social networks that includes their often ignored spatial aspects. The model is a growing one and links are created either taking space into account, or disregarding space and only considering the degree of target nodes. These two effects can be mixed linearly in arbitrary proportions through a parameter. We numerically show that for a given range of the combination parameter, and for given mean degree, the generated network class shares many important statistical features with those observed in actual social networks, including the spatial dependence of connections. Moreover, we show that the model provides a good qualitative fit to some measured social networks.

  19. Absorption and metabolism of benzoic acid in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, N B; Nørgaard, J V; Wamberg, S

    2009-01-01

    Dietary benzoic acid (BA) supplementation causes a pronounced reduction in urinary pH but only small changes in blood pH. The present study aimed to investigate the portal absorption profile, hepatic metabolism of BA, and renal excretion of hippuric acid (HA) underlying the relatively small impact...... of BA on systemic acid-base status. Eight growing pigs (BW = 63 ± 1 kg at sampling) fitted with permanent indwelling catheters in the abdominal aorta, hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, and mesenteric vein were allocated to 4 sampling blocks and randomly assigned to control (CON; nonsupplemented diet...... portal flux and hepatic uptake of BA was 87 ± 5% and 89 ± 15%, respectively. The recovery of dietary BA as urinary excretion of BA and HA was 0.08 ± 0.02% and 85 ± 7%, respectively. It is concluded that the small impact of BA supplementation on systemic acid-base status was caused by a protracted BA...

  20. Two-Population Dynamics in a Growing Network Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Kristinka

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a growing network evolution model with nodal attributes. The model describes the interactions between potentially violent V and non-violent N agents who have different affinities in establishing connections within their own population versus between the populations. The model is able to generate all stable triads observed in real social systems. In the framework of rate equations theory, we employ the mean-field approximation to derive analytical expressions of the degree distribution and the local clustering coefficient for each type of nodes. Analytical derivations agree well with numerical simulation results. The assortativity of the potentially violent network qualitatively resembles the connectivity pattern in terrorist networks that was recently reported. The assortativity of the network driven by aggression shows clearly different behavior than the assortativity of the networks with connections of non-aggressive nature in agreement with recent empirical results of an online social system.

  1. Antiurease activity of plants growing in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hřibová, Petra; Khazneh, Elian; Žemlička, Milan; Švajdlenka, Emil; Ghoneim, Mohammed M; Elokely, Khaled M; Ross, Samir A

    2014-01-01

    The antiurease activity of the aqueous extracts of 42 plants growing in the Czech Republic was investigated. A phenol-hypochlorite reaction was used for the determination of ammonia produced by urease. The inhibitory activity of the extracts at a concentration of 0.2 mg/mL varied from 17.8% to 80.0%. Extracts from six Potentilla species expressed inhibitory activity against jack bean urease. They were further investigated for their phenolic constituents and the major compounds were subjected to molecular docking. The results revealed that both jack bean urease and Helicobacter pylori urease were inhibited by quercetin-3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside-6″-gallate (1), myricetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronide (2), tiliroside (3) and B-type procyanidin (4). The antiurease activity of the investigated Potentilla species is probably due to the presence of complex phenolic constituents such as flavonoid glycosides and catechin dimers.

  2. Mushroom growing project at the Los Humeros, Mexico geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, M.E.R. [Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    1998-12-01

    There are several projects of direct (non-electrical) use of geothermal energy in Mexico. Personnel of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) have experience in various of these projects, like drying of timber and fruits, space heating, food processing, etc. Taking this in consideration, CFE built the Los Humeros mushroom plant using for heat source the geothermal steam from Well H-1. The main purpose of the project was to take advantage of residual geothermal energy in a food production operation and to develop the appropriate technology. In 1992, existing installations were renovated, preparing appropriate areas for pasteurization, inoculation and production. The mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus var. florida and columbinus was used. A year later, CFE proposed the construction of improved facilities for growing edible mushrooms. New materials and equipment, as well as different operation conditions, were proposed on the basis of the experience gained in the initial project. The construction and renovation activities were completed in 1994.

  3. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Hungarian wild-growing mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ványolós, Attila; Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Hohmann, Judit

    2014-08-01

    Mushrooms represent a remarkable and yet largely unexplored source of new, biologically active natural products. In this work, we report on the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of 47 wild-growing mushrooms native to Hungary. Aqueous and organic (n-hexane, chloroform, and 50% methanol) extracts of selected mushrooms from different families were screened for their XO inhibitory activities. Among the 188 extracts investigated, the chloroform and 50% methanol fractions proved to be the most effective. Some species exhibited high inhibitory activity, e.g., Hypholoma fasciculare (IC50  =67.76 ± 11.05 µg/mL), Suillus grevillei (IC50  =13.28 ± 1.58 µg/mL), and Tricholoma populinum (IC50  =85.08 ± 15.02 µg/mL); others demonstrated moderate or weak activity. Additional studies are warranted to characterize the compounds responsible for the XO inhibitory activity of mushroom extracts.

  4. Cleaner Production: A Growing Movement in Brazilian Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduvaldo Vendrametto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cleaner Production (CP is gaining emphasis in both world and Brazilian production sectors. Nature’s warnings indicating the exhaustion of any capacity to absorb and regenerate waste, stricter legislation regarding pollution emitters, market competitiveness associated with environmental and social responsibility cause concerns and lead to actions to reduce aggressions against the environment. This paper shows evidence of this concern and presents cases in which a large automotive industry, acting as a partner to suppliers, promotes changes in how it delivers its products, eliminating large cardboard, plastic and wood packaging. A small company had a similar initiative, reducing the use of cardboard and plastic packaging. More important is the revelation of a widely dispersed, yet growing and incremental movement of responsibilities among companies.The benefits of cleaner production implementation were evaluated by confronting environmental and financial assessment. For the ambient evaluation, it will be used methodology of Material Intensity (Wuppertal Institute, a.

  5. Fractal Evolving Theory and Growing Model of Olefin Polymerization Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍超; 任晓红; 等

    2003-01-01

    The surface morphology of Ti-Mg supported catalyst and the polyethylene particles are studied using scanning electron microscope(SEM) technology.The results show that either the catalyst's surface or polymer particle's surface is irregular and has fractal characteristics,which can be described by fractal parameter.The more interesting discovery is that the surface fractal dimension values of the polymer particles vary periodically with the polymerization time.We call this phenomenon fractal evolution,which can be divided into the "revolution" stage and the "evolution" stage,And then we present polymerization fractal growing model(PFGM),and successfully describe and /or predict the whole evolving process of the polyethylene particle morphology under the different slurry polymerization(including pre-polymerization) conditions without H2.

  6. Law of genome evolution direction: Coding information quantity grows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao-fu LUO

    2009-01-01

    The problem of the directionality of genome evolution is studied. Based on the analysis of C-value paradox and the evolution of genome size, we propose that the function-coding information quantity of a genome always grows in the course of evolution through sequence duplication, expansion of code,and gene transfer from outside. The function-coding information quantity of a genome consists of two parts, p-coding information quantity that encodes functional protein and n-coding information quantity that encodes other functional elements. The evidences on the law of the evolutionary directionality are indicated. The needs of function are the motive force for the expansion of coding information quantity,and the information quantity expansion is the way to make functional innovation and extension for a species. Therefore, the increase of coding information quantity of a genome is a measure of the acquired new function, and it determines the directionality of genome evolution.

  7. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced ...

  8. Xylanase supplementation to rye diets for growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Pedersen, Trine Friis; Blaabjerg, Karoline;

    2016-01-01

    Supplementation of xylanase to pig diets can hydrolyze arabinoxylan (AX) into lower molecular weight compounds and thereby decrease the viscosity and improve nutrient utilization. Xylanase supplementation has, however, shown variable effects in diets containing wheat, rye, and combinations thereof....... Differences in animal age, enzyme source and dose, target substrate, and diet processing may explain this. The objective was to study the effect of increasing doses of endo-1,4-β-xylanase from Trichoderma reesei on apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of OM, starch, nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP), AX......, fat, N, and P of rye fed to growing pigs. Twenty-four 47-kg pigs were assigned to 4 diets containing 97.85% rye and 0, 4,000, 8,000, or 16,000 units xylanase/kg (as-fed basis). Pigs were placed in metabolic cages for 10 d: 5 d for adaption and 5 d for total but separate collection of feces and urine...

  9. Educating nurses in political process: a growing need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, K

    1991-01-01

    If we are to advance the profession of nursing, we must educate nurses to become key participants in the formulation of health policy. If we fail to do this, others will make decisions that affect our practice without our input. A growing number of nurses are recognizing the need to increase our power, and we understand that political participation provides a pathway to power. We must continue to increase the number of nurses who are politically astute and active in order to achieve our goal. The most effective way to accomplish this is to educate large numbers of staff nurses for this vital role. This article suggests educational strategies and methods that can be utilized in continuing education programs to begin the political education process.

  10. Garden sharing and garden stealing in fungus-growing ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rachelle M. M.; Mueller, U. G.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Green, Abigail M.; Narozniak, Joanie

    Fungi cultivated by fungus-growing ants (Attini: Formicidae) are passed on between generations by transfer from maternal to offspring nest (vertical transmission within ant species). However, recent phylogenetic analyses revealed that cultivars are occasionally also transferred between attine species. The reasons for such lateral cultivar transfers are unknown. To investigate whether garden loss may induce ants to obtain a replacement cultivar from a neighboring colony (lateral cultivar transfer), pairs of queenright colonies of two Cyphomyrmex species were set up in two conjoined chambers; the garden of one colony was then removed to simulate the total crop loss that occurs naturally when pathogens devastate gardens. Garden-deprived colonies regained cultivars through one of three mechanisms: joining of a neighboring colony and cooperation in a common garden; stealing of a neighbor's garden; or aggressive usurpation of a neighbor's garden. Because pathogens frequently devastate attine gardens under natural conditions, garden joining, stealing and usurpation emerge as critical behavioral adaptations to survive garden catastrophes.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECT OF GROWING MISCANTHUS GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marián KOTRLA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deliberate cultivation of plants for energy biomass is becoming increasingly important. Biomass should significantly contribute to increase the share of renewable energy in the European Union. On the research locality of Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra localized in the village Kolíňany (Slovak Republic is implemented basic research focused on the growth and production of the two genotypes energy grass Miscanthus. Research is carried out since 2010. In the third year after planting (the year 2012 were confirmed biomass production depending on the genotype of 35.45 and 36.67 t ha-1. Based on the analysis of growth and production performance of Miscanthus genotypes can be evaluated the high environmental and socio-economic aspects of growing energy crops, depending on the specific agro-ecological conditions.

  12. Dynamics of epidemic diseases on a growing adaptive network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Güven; Barter, Edmund; Gross, Thilo

    2017-02-01

    The study of epidemics on static networks has revealed important effects on disease prevalence of network topological features such as the variance of the degree distribution, i.e. the distribution of the number of neighbors of nodes, and the maximum degree. Here, we analyze an adaptive network where the degree distribution is not independent of epidemics but is shaped through disease-induced dynamics and mortality in a complex interplay. We study the dynamics of a network that grows according to a preferential attachment rule, while nodes are simultaneously removed from the network due to disease-induced mortality. We investigate the prevalence of the disease using individual-based simulations and a heterogeneous node approximation. Our results suggest that in this system in the thermodynamic limit no epidemic thresholds exist, while the interplay between network growth and epidemic spreading leads to exponential networks for any finite rate of infectiousness when the disease persists.

  13. Flotation bubble image segmentation based on seed region boundary growing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guoying; Zhu Hong; Xu Ning

    2011-01-01

    Segmenting blurred and conglutinated bubbles in a flotation image is done using a new segmentation method based on Seed Region and Boundary Growing (SRBG). Bright pixels located on bubble tops were extracted as the seed regions. Seed boundaries are divided into four curves: left-top, right-top, rightbottom, and left-bottom. Bubbles are segmented from the seed boundary by moving these curves to the bubble boundaries along the corresponding directions. The SRBG method can remove noisy areas and it avoids over- and under-segmentation problems. Each bubble is segmented separately rather than segmenting the entire flotation image. The segmentation results from the SRBG method are more accurate than those from the Watershed algorithm.

  14. Soliton gyroscopes in media with spatially growing repulsive nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Driben, Rodislav; Malomed, Boris A; Meier, Torsten; Torner, Lluis

    2013-01-01

    We find that the recently introduced model of self-trapping supported by a spatially growing strength of a repulsive nonlinearity gives rise to robust vortex-soliton tori, i.e., three-dimensional vortex solitons, with topological charges S. The family with S=1 is completely stable, while the one with S=2 has alternating regions of stability and instability. The families are nearly exactly reproduced in an analytical form by the Thomas-Fermi approximation (TFA). Unstable states with S=2 and 3 split into persistently rotating pairs or triangles of unitary vortices. Application of a moderate torque to the vortex torus initiates a persistent precession mode, with the torus' axle moving along a conical surface. A strong torque heavily deforms the vortex solitons, but, nonetheless, they restore themselves with the axle oriented according to the vectorial addition of angular momenta.

  15. Design of components for growing higher plants in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to design unique systems and components for growing higher plants in microgravity during long-term space missions (Mars and beyond). Specific design tasks were chosen to contribute to and supplement NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project. Selected tasks were automated seeding of plants, plant health sensing, and food processing. Prototype systems for planting both germinated and nongerminated seeds were fabricated and tested. Water and air pressure differences and electrostatic fields were used to trap seeds for separation and transport for planting. An absorption spectrometer was developed to measure chlorophyll levels in plants as an early warning of plant health problems. In the area of food processing, a milling system was created using high-speed rotating blades which were aerodynamically configured to produce circulation and retractable to prevent leakage. The project produced significant results having substantial benefit to NASA. It also provided an outstanding learning experience for the students involved.

  16. "Something good can grow here": chicago urban agriculture food projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, Lena; Brown, Loretta; Hopkins, Joan; Larsen, Kelly; Fournier, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Food security is a challenge facing many African-American low-income communities nationally. Community and university partners have established urban agriculture programs to improve access to high quality affordable fruits and vegetables by growing, distributing, and selling food in urban neighborhoods. While the challenge of food security is within communities of color, few studies have described these urban agriculture programs and documented their impact on the crew members who work in the programs and live in the low-income communities. More information is needed on the program impact for crew and community health promotion. Using a survey and focus group discussion from the crew and staff we describe the program and activities of four Chicago Urban Agriculture programs. We summarized the impact these programs have on crew members' perception of urban agriculture, health habits, community engagement, and community health promotion in low-income African-American neighborhoods.

  17. Carbonization of some fast-growing species in Sudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khristova, P.; Khalifa, A.W. (Khartoum Univ. (Sudan). Forestry Dept.)

    1993-01-01

    Four wood species, indigenous Acacia seyal (talh) and exotic fast-growing Conocarpus lancifolius (damas), Eucalyptus microtheca (kafur) and Prosopis chilensis (mesquite) grown in Sudan, were assessed and compared as raw materials for charcoal making. The effects of production method (traditional earth mound and improved metal kiln) and the physical and chemical properties of the wood and bark on the yield and quality of charcoal produced were assessed. Regression analyses of wood properties and heat value data indicated high negative correlations of the wood heat value with halocellulose and ash, and high positive correlations with wood density, lignin, and alcohol-benzene and hot-water solubles. Carbonization with the Tropical Products Institute metal kiln produced higher yields (33%) than the traditional earth mound (27%), although the difference in energy transformation yields was found to be insignificant both between appliances and species. (author)

  18. Responses of Scots pine to waterlogging during growing season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Tapani; Launiainen, Samuli; Lehto, Tarja; Sutinen, Sirkka; Ruhanen, Hanna; Heiskanen, Juha; Laurén, Ari; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Vapaavuori, Elina; Finér, Leena

    2016-04-01

    For the future management and sustainable use of boreal forests it is crucial to consider the rate and strength of tree responses to an elevated water table and the concurrent oxygen limitations, especially in peatlands. We examined the response dynamics of 7-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings to a five-week waterlogging (WL) during a growing season in a root lab experiment. WL took place after shoot elongation had ended whereas growth of the trunk diameter was still in progress. We monitored shoots and roots before, during and after WL treatment. Relations between the shoot and root responses, the latter being the primary target of the WL stress, will be discussed. We hypothesize that root responses, in terms of growth by minirhizotron imaging, will appear with delay as compared with the first symptoms in physiology of above-ground organs.

  19. Intraoral tumor with rapid growing. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martín-Moro, Javier; Cebrián-Carretero, Jose Luis; Gómez-García, Elena; del Castillo-Pardo de Vera, Jose Luis; del Val, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The appearance of an intraoral mass is common in our specialty. Most are benign lesions, but some are primary malignancies. Metastases account for less than 1% of all oral malignancies. An 86 year old woman was referred to our department with a large, asymptomatic, intraoral, fast-growing mass. She had no previous cancer history or other relevant physical findings. The radiology studies showed underlying bone erosion. The histological study showed a metastatic adenocarcinoma with a suspected origin in the abdomen. We were unable to identify it by non invasive diagnostic procedures. Given the patient's general status and despite the ominous prognosis of such lesions, we decided not to perform any aggressive therapy beyond removing the oral mass, in order to maintain her quality of life. There have been no local recurrences until this time.

  20. Capital income taxation in a growing open economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    1991-01-01

    The paper studies the dynamic macroeconomic effects of various forms of capital income taxation in a model of a small open economy with perfect mobility of financial capital and intertemporal optimization on the part of households and firms. One of the noteworthy results is that the introduction...... of a (low) corporate income tax will not affect consumption in the long run, but will simply lead to a replacement of shares by foreign financial assets in household portfolios. It is also found that an anticipated investment tax credit can have and that an anticipated dividend tax will have contractionary...... effects on investment before they are introduced. Moreover, it is shown that while an unanticipated dividend tax is neutral with respect to investment, it will have real effects on consumption and net foreign assets in a growing economy...

  1. Analysis Regarding the Growing Presence of Italian Firms in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Valdemarin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of 2014, the number of firms with an Italian presence in Romania was 39,556, representing 19.33% out of total registered firms and this number is still growing. This article focuses on answering the following question: what kind of Italian firms are investing in Romania and why? Starting from the empirical observation that the number of Italian firms in Romania grew by 6.82% last year, we have used a PESTEL analysis to find the key points characterizing the country, paying attention also to the concept of country brand. From the point of view of Italian firms, we have also analyzed the shifting paradigm of internationalization from a Vertical Foreign Direct Investment model to a Horizontal Foreign Direct Investment model. This paper can be useful for managers and entrepreneurs who are oriented towards investing in Romania following the path of Italian firms.

  2. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikiran N

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  3. Robustness of synthetic oscillators in growing and dividing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijmans, Joris; Lubensky, David K.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2017-05-01

    Synthetic biology sets out to implement new functions in cells, and to develop a deeper understanding of biological design principles. Elowitz and Leibler [Nature (London) 403, 335 (2000), 10.1038/35002125] showed that by rational design of the reaction network, and using existing biological components, they could create a network that exhibits periodic gene expression, dubbed the repressilator. More recently, Stricker et al. [Nature (London) 456, 516 (2008), 10.1038/nature07389] presented another synthetic oscillator, called the dual-feedback oscillator, which is more stable. Detailed studies have been carried out to determine how the stability of these oscillators is affected by the intrinsic noise of the interactions between the components and the stochastic expression of their genes. However, as all biological oscillators reside in growing and dividing cells, an important question is how these oscillators are perturbed by the cell cycle. In previous work we showed that the periodic doubling of the gene copy numbers due to DNA replication can couple not only natural, circadian oscillators to the cell cycle [Paijmans et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 113, 4063 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1507291113], but also these synthetic oscillators. Here we expand this study. We find that the strength of the locking between oscillators depends not only on the positions of the genes on the chromosome, but also on the noise in the timing of gene replication: noise tends to weaken the coupling. Yet, even in the limit of high levels of noise in the replication times of the genes, both synthetic oscillators show clear signatures of locking to the cell cycle. This work enhances our understanding of the design of robust biological oscillators inside growing and diving cells.

  4. Unpredictable feeding impairs glucose tolerance in growing lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L Jaquiery

    Full Text Available Irregular eating is associated with insulin resistance and metabolic disease in adults but may affect young, growing children differently. We investigated the metabolic effects of unpredictable feeding in female juvenile lambs randomly assigned to receive, for six weeks, maintenance feed given twice daily in equal portions (Control Group, C; n = 24 or the same weekly feed amount in aliquots of variable size at unpredictable times (Unpredictable Group, U; n = 21. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT, insulin tolerance tests (ITT, and measurement of diurnal plasma cortisol concentrations were performed pre and post the dietary intervention. Groups were compared using t test and RM ANOVA. Weight gain was similar in both groups (C 18 ± 2%; U 16 ± 2% of initial body weight. Glucose area under the curve (AUC was unchanged in C (AUC pre 818 ± 34, post 801 ± 33 mmol.min.l(-1, but increased by 20% in U (pre 830 ± 25, post 1010 ± 19 mmol.min.l(-1; p<0.0001, with an inadequate insulin response to glucose load (log(AUC insulin first 40 minutes post intervention C 1.49 ± 0.04 vs U 1.36 ± 0.04 ng.min.ml(-1; p = 0.03. Insulin tolerance and diurnal variation of plasma cortisol concentrations were not different between groups. Unpredictable feeding impairs insulin response to glucose in growing lambs despite high quality food and normal weight gain. Irregular eating warrants investigation as a potentially remediable risk factor for disordered glucose metabolism.

  5. Bone disorders in experimentally induced liver disease in growing rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viktória Ferencz; Ferenc Szalay; Csaba Horváth; Béla Kári; János Gaál; Szilvia Mészáros; Zsuzsanna Wolf; Dalma Hegedüs; Andrea Horváth; Anikó Folhoffer

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the change of bone parameters in a new model of experimentally induced liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in growing rats.METHODS: Fischer-344 rats (n = 55) were used. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), phenobarbital (PB), and a single diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injection were used. Animals were killed at wk 8 and 16. Bone mineral content, femoral length, cortical index (quotient of cortical thickness and whole diameter) and ultimate bending load (Fmax)of the femora were determined. The results in animals treated with DEN+PB+CCl4 (DPC, n = 21) were compared to those in untreated animals (UNT,n = 14) and in control group treated only with DEN+PB (DP, n = 20).RESULTS: Fatty liver and cirrhosis developed in each DPC-treated rat at wk 8 and HCC was presented at wk 16. No skeletal changes were found in this group at wk 8,but each parameter was lower (P<0.05 for each) at wk 16 in comparison to the control group. Neither fatty liver nor cirrhosis was observed in DP-treated animals at any time point. Femoral length and Fmax values were higher (P<0.05 for both) in DP-treated animals at wk 8 compared to the UNT controls. However, no difference was found at wk 16.CONCLUSION: Experimental liver cirrhosis and HCC are accompanied with inhibited skeletal growth, reduced bone mass, and decreased mechanical resistance in growing rats. Our results are in concordance with the data of other studies using different animal models. A novel finding is the transiently accelerated skeletal growth and bone strength after a 8-wk long phenobarbital treatment following diethylnitrosamine injection.

  6. Antigovernment Groups. A Growing Threat to US Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, Alicia L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-04-25

    Domestic terrorism is a growing threat in the United States, particularly from the 998 right-wing antigovernment (AG) groups in existence in 2015. In the years since the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City, right-wing anti-government acts have oc- curred more often and killed more people in the United States than Muslim extremists. Such AG group members are often in uenced by racist, anti-Semitic, or anti-Islamic views, believe conspiracy theories about the government, and often refuse to pay taxes or participate in frivolous lawsuits in order to intentionally waste the government's time. There is, however, a violent element to these groups which participates in events ranging from the armed take-over of federal land in Oregon, to an armed stand-o with federal agents in Nevada, to the bombing of the Oklahoma City building which killed 168 people. Such acts may be conducted by a few individuals, as is the case of the Oklahoma City bombing, or an entire group. Such groups have a wide range of capabilities, with typical weapons including legal and illegal rearms, with a focus on purchasing fully automatic weapons; hand grenades, with some homemade; deadly tox- ins, like ricin (in multiple cases) and sodium cyanide (in one case); transportation, such as all-terrain vehicles (ATVs); arson, with the intent of destroying federal property; and explosives, often in large numbers and including pipe bombs, truck bombs, IEDs, and other homemade explosives. The growing acceptance of these violent methods by Republican congressmen and governors, however, only increases visibility of such groups and encourages their behavior. Coupled with the removal of the Department of Homeland Security's division responsible for monitoring such groups, the result could prove disastrous for the safety of United States citizens.

  7. Comparison between margin-growing algorithms in radiotherapy software environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D W; Morgan, A M; Pooler, A M; Thwaites, D I

    2008-05-01

    Margin-growing algorithms are commonly used tools that are available within virtual simulation and treatment planning software. We report on the accuracy of the margin-growing algorithms available in six commercially available radiotherapy software environments. A phantom containing two differently sized spheres and two rods (one level and one inclined) was constructed and scanned by CT with 1.25 mm, 2.5 mm, 3.75 mm and 5 mm slice thicknesses. The objects were outlined on a GE Advantage Simulator, and the outlined volumes recorded. Images and structures were transferred to MasterPlan, Xio, Pinnacle, Eclipse and Prosoma, where imported volumes were recorded. The contours on each system were grown isotropically by 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, and volumes for each grown contour were recorded. Transfer of structure sets created in GE Advantage Simulator to the other software environments showed that the reported volumes of the four structures differ on each system. Results showed no correlation between volume accuracy and slice thickness. In general, margin growth of up to 30 mm for the rods and spheres is shown to be consistent between systems to within 1.33 mm for all slice thicknesses. Slice thickness did not appear to influence the accuracy of margin growth. Although this work highlights apparent differences in the reported volumes grown from the same original structure sets, the significance of this aspect of the planning process needs to weighed against reported intra- and inter-clinician variability in contour definition. It is not unreasonable, however, to expect that software packages should at least be consistent in volume information provided to the user.

  8. Temporal dynamics of connectivity and epidemic properties of growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Shirkoohi, Mehrdad Khani

    2016-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: Online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown, mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary network that is subject to growth. We use the theoretical findings to predict the epidemic properties of the network as a function of time. We observe that the introduction of new individuals into the network can enhance or diminish its resilience against endemic outbreaks and investigate how this regime shift depends upon the connectivity of newcomers and on how they establish connections to existing nodes. Throughout, theoretical findings are corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations over synthetic and real networks. The results shed light on the effects of network growth on the future epidemic properties of networks and offers insights for devising a priori immunization strategies.

  9. Intra-population chemical polymorphism in Thymus pannonicus All. growing in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Filippo; Caprioli, Giovanni; Papa, Fabrizio; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro; Kolarčik, Vladislav; Mártonfi, Pavol

    2014-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction technique coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the inter- and intra-population chemical polymorphism in volatile constituents of three populations of Thymus pannonicus growing in Slovakia. To have an idea on what really the plant emits under different environmental and physiological conditions, a total of 86 individuals were separately analysed using low extraction temperatures (30°C). Data were analysed using a chemometric approach such as the principal component analysis which revealed a significant intra-population variability with the existence of up to four chemotypes: the most abundant is the p-cymene/γ-terpinene chemotype, followed by the geraniol and linalool chemotypes, and, only in one population, by the γ-muurolene/(E)-caryophyllene chemotype. This differentiation of individual plants inside the populations allows better adaptation to ecological conditions of localities and is probably connected with intrinsic genetic diversity of the species.

  10. Bayesian simultaneous equation models for the analysis of energy intake and partitioning in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Jørgensen, Henry; Kebreab, E

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT SUMMARY The objective of the current study was to develop Bayesian simultaneous equation models for modelling energy intake and partitioning in growing pigs. A key feature of the Bayesian approach is that parameters are assigned prior distributions, which may reflect the current state...... of nature. In the models, rates of metabolizable energy (ME) intake, protein deposition (PD) and lipid deposition (LD) were treated as dependent variables accounting for residuals being correlated. Two complementary equation systems were used to model ME intake (MEI), PD and LD. Informative priors were...... genders (barrows, boars and gilts) selected on the basis of similar birth weight. The pigs were fed four diets based on barley, wheat and soybean meal supplemented with crystalline amino acids to meet or exceed Danish nutrient requirement standards. Nutrient balances and gas exchanges were measured at c...

  11. Growing Food for Space and Earth: NASA's Contributions to Vertical Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Beginning in the 1980s with NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program and later the 1990s and early 2000s with the Advanced Life Support Project, NASA conducted extensive testing with crops in controlled environment conditions. One series of tests conducted at Kennedy Space Center used a large chamber with vertically stacked shelves to support hydroponic growing trays, with a bank of electric lamps above each shelf. This is essentially the same approach that has become popular for use in so-called vertical agriculture systems, which attempts to optimize plant production in a fixed volume. Some of the findings and commonalities of NASA's work during this period and how it overlaps with current interests in vertical agriculture will be presented in the talk.

  12. A multivariate nonlinear mixed effects method for analyzing energy partitioning in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Danfær, Allan Christian; Chwalibog, André

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous equations have become increasingly popular for describing the effects of nutrition on the utilization of ME for protein (PD) and lipid deposition (LD) in animals. The study developed a multivariate nonlinear mixed effects (MNLME) framework and compared it with an alternative method...... for estimating parameters in simultaneous equations that described energy metabolism in growing pigs, and then proposed new PD and LD equations. The general statistical framework was implemented in the NLMIXED procedure in SAS. Alternative PD and LD equations were also developed, which assumed...... that the instantaneous response curve of an animal to varying energy supply followed the law of diminishing returns behavior. The Michaelis-Menten function was adopted to represent a biological relationship in which the affinity constant (k) represented the sensitivity of PD to ME above maintenance. The approach...

  13. Mathematical modelling study for water uptake of steadily growing plant root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jiaqing; Jiao, Weiping; Xu, Jianjun

    2008-02-01

    The root system of plant is a vitally important organ for living plant. One of the major functions of the root system is uptaking water and nutrients from the soil. The present paper analyzes the whole process of water uptake from soil by a steadily growing plant with a single slender root. We start from the basic principles of physics and fluid-dynamics, consider the structure characteristics of the water transport channel formed by the tiny xylems tubes inside plant, and establish a simplified coherent mathematical model to describe the water transport in the complete system consisting of soil, individual plant, including root, stem and leaves-atmosphere, on the basis of the plant physiology. Moreover, we resolve the proposed mathematical model for a simple artificial plant model under a variety of conditions, in terms of the numerical approach as well as analytical approach. It is shown that the results obtained by both approaches are in very good agreement; the theoretical predictions are qualitatively consistent with the practical experiences very well. The simplified mathematical model established in the present paper may provide a basis for the further investigations on the more sophisticated mathematical model.

  14. Mathematical modelling study for water uptake of steadily growing plant root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The root system of plant is a vitally important organ for living plant. One of the major functions of the root system is uptaking water and nutrients from the soil. The present paper analyzes the whole process of water uptake from soil by a steadily growing plant with a single slender root. We start from the basic principles of physics and fluid-dynamics, consider the structure characteristics of the water transport channel formed by the tiny xylems tubes inside plant, and establish a simplified coherent mathematical model to describe the water transport in the complete system consisting of soil, individual plant, including root, stem and leaves-atmosphere, on the basis of the plant physiology. Moreover, we resolve the proposed mathematical model for a simple artificial plant model under a variety of conditions, in terms of the numerical approach as well as analytical approach. It is shown that the results obtained by both approaches are in very good agreement; the theoretical predictions are qualitatively consistent with the practical experi-ences very well. The simplified mathematical model established in the present pa-per may provide a basis for the further investigations on the more sophisticated mathematical model.

  15. Interconnected growing self-organizing maps for auditory and semantic acquisition modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxue eCao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the incremental nature of knowledge acquisition, in this study we propose a growing self-organizing neural network approach for modeling the acquisition of auditory and semantic categories. We introduce an Interconnected Growing Self-Organizing Maps (I-GSOM algorithm, which takes associations between auditory information and semantic information into consideration, in this paper. Direct phonetic--semantic association is simulated in order to model the language acquisition in early phases, such as the babbling and imitation stages, in which no phonological representations exist. Based on the I-GSOM algorithm, we conducted experiments using paired acoustic and semantic training data. We use a cyclical reinforcing and reviewing training procedure to model the teaching and learning process between children and their communication partners; a reinforcing-by-link training procedure and a link-forgetting procedure are introduced to model the acquisition of associative relations between auditory and semantic information. Experimental results indicate that (1 I-GSOM has good ability to learn auditory and semantic categories presented within the training data; (2 clear auditory and semantic boundaries can be found in the network representation; (3 cyclical reinforcing and reviewing training leads to a detailed categorization as well as to a detailed clustering, while keeping the clusters that have already been learned and the network structure that has already been developed stable; and (4 reinforcing-by-link training leads to well-perceived auditory--semantic associations. Our I-GSOM model suggests that it is important to associate auditory information with semantic information during language acquisition. Despite its high level of abstraction, our I-GSOM approach can be interpreted as a biologically-inspired neurocomputational model.

  16. Financing strategic healthcare facilities: the growing attraction of alternative capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zismer, Daniel K; Fox, James; Torgerson, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Community health system leaders often dismiss use of alternative capital to finance strategic facilities as being too expensive and less strategically useful, preferring to follow historical precedent and use tax-exempt bonding to finance such facilities. Proposed changes in accounting rules should cause third-party-financed facility lease arrangements to be treated similarly to tax-exempt debt financings with respect to the income statement and balance sheet, increasing their appeal to community health systems. An in-depth comparison of the total costs associated with each financing approach can help inform the choice of financing approaches by illuminating their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  17. Growing Open: The transition from QDA to Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Gynnild, Ph.D

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Doing a PhD can principally be carried out in three ways; firstly by applying existing theories on new data, secondly by theoretically comparing existing theories and thirdly by generating a new theory. Choice of approach of course depends on awareness and accessibility of alternatives. In essence, most PhD studies are exploratory journeys in a jungle of descriptive methodologies based on very uniform data. In this paper, the author elaborates the exploratory research process that subconsciously, and later consciously, required a shift from the initial QDA approach to grounded theory. The cutting point was discovering the multifaceted implications of the all-is-data dictum in GT.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    Dusty plasmas refer to a broad category of plasmas. Plasmas such as argon-silane plasmas in which particles nucleate and grow are widely used in semiconductor processing and nanoparticle manufacturing. In such dusty plasmas, the plasma and the dust particles are strongly coupled to each other. This means that the presence of dust particles significantly affects the plasma properties and vice versa. Therefore such plasmas are highly complex and they involve several interesting phenomena like nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport. Dusty plasma afterglow is equally complex and important. Especially, residual charge on dust particles carries special significance in several industrial and laboratory situations and it has not been well understood. A 1D numerical model was developed of a low-pressure capacitively-coupled plasma in which nanoparticles nucleate and grow. Polydispersity of particle size distributions can be important in such plasmas. Sectional method, which is well known in aerosol literature, was used to model the evolving particle size and charge distribution. The numerical model is transient and one-dimensional and self consistently accounts for nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport of dust particles and their effect on plasma properties. Nucleation and surface growth rates were treated as input parameters. Results were presented in terms of particle size and charge distribution with an emphasis on importance of polydispersity in particle growth and dynamics. Results of numerical model were compared with experimental measurements of light scattering and light emission from plasma. Reasonable qualitative agreement was found with some discrepancies. Pulsed dusty plasma can be important for controlling particle production and/or unwanted particle deposition. In this case, it is important to understand the behavior of the particle cloud during the afterglow following plasma turn-off. Numerical model was modified to self

  19. Feedback control of water supply in an NFT growing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, Th.H.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Vries, de H.C.; Loef, P.

    2001-01-01

    The paper explores a concept of irrigation control, where the supply of nutrient solution is controlled without the use of predictive uptake models but rather by the use of a direct feedback of a drain flow measurement. This concept proves to be a viable approach. Results are presented, showing the

  20. Learning and Growing: Trust, Leadership, and Response to Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Ian E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of trust in a school community related to the leadership response to crisis. Design/Methodology/Approach: This study was a multiple-source qualitative study of a single case of a PreK-12 international school called The Learning School. Findings: The findings revealed the nature of how…