WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit training managers

  1. Determinants of Effective Unit Performance: Research on Measuring and Managing Unit Training Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    increases, he has more incentive to "persevere as a person" and to sustain his image. This is reflected in what the philosopher Spinoza had referred... virtue of its purpose and training, a soldier’s courage is vital to its success. A soldier’s fortitude is not assured in combat un- less the

  2. An Evaluation of Leadership and Management Training in the United States Coast Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-06

    produc- tivity. The next major influence in management thinking was the Adminisxtrative Management theory proposed by FayOl and otliers in the 1920’s... Managers were responsible for planning, organizing and controlling. He proposed a avmber of basic principles , "such as the unity of command (a person...Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1968. Goodacre, D. M. III, The experimental evaluation of management training; principles and practice. Personnel, May

  3. Effectiveness of classroom based crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: study design of a controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Bruijne, M. de; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Crew resource management (CRM) has the potential to enhance patient safety in intensive care units (ICU) by improving the use of non-technical skills. However, CRM evaluation studies in health care are inconclusive with regard to the effect of this training on behaviour and

  4. Short simulation training improves objective skills in established advanced practitioners managing emergencies on the ward and surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Jose L; Holena, Daniel N; Vella, Michael A; Palmieri, Joseph; Sicoutris, Corinna; Selvan, Ben; Fox, Adam D; Sarani, Babak; Sims, Carrie; Williams, Noel N; Schwab, Charles William

    2011-08-01

    Several studies evaluating simulation training in intensive care unit (ICU) physicians have demonstrated improvement in leadership and management skills. No study to date has evaluated whether such training is useful in established ICU advanced practitioners (APs). We hypothesized that human patient simulator-based training would improve surgical ICU APs' skills at managing medical crises. After institutional review board approval, 12 APs completed ½ day of simulation training on the SimMan, Laerdal system. Each subject participated in five scenarios, first as team leader (pretraining scenario), then as observer for three scenarios, and finally, again as team leader (posttraining). Faculty teaching accompanied each scenario and preceded a debriefing session with video replay. Three experts scored emergency care skills (Airway-Breathing-Circulation [ABCs] sequence, recognition of shock, pneumothorax, etc.) and teamwork leadership/interpersonal skills. A multiple choice question examination and training effectiveness questionnaire were completed before and after training. Fellows underwent the same curriculum and served to validate the study. Pre- and postscores were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test with two-tailed significance of 0.05. Improvement was seen in participants' scores combining all parameters (73% ± 13% vs. 80% ± 11%, p = 0.018). AP leadership/interpersonal skills (+12%), multiple choice question examination (+4%), and training effectiveness questionnaire (+6%) scores improved significantly (p managing medical emergencies. Such a validated curriculum may be useful as an AP continuing education resource.

  5. A Study of United States Army Product Support Manager (PSM) Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    in order to be an effective PSM • Product support management; Design interface; Sustaining engineering ; Supply support; Maintenance planning and...the men and women of the Armed Forces whose mission and objectives require the proper equipment and weapon systems. The concept of product support is...conduct an analysis of the effectiveness of that PSM training in relation to weapon system acquisition support. PRODUCT SUPPORT MANAGER (PSM

  6. Portable Virtual Training Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Reagan; Johnston, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Mission Operations Lab initiated a project to design, develop, deliver, test, and validate a unique training system for astronaut and ground support personnel. In an effort to keep training costs low, virtual training units (VTUs) have been designed based on images of actual hardware and manipulated by a touch screen style interface for ground support personnel training. This project helped modernized the training system and materials by integrating them with mobile devices for training when operators or crew are unavailable to physically train in the facility. This project also tested the concept of a handheld remote device to control integrated trainers using International Space Station (ISS) training simulators as a platform. The portable VTU can interface with the full-sized VTU, allowing a trainer co-located with a trainee to remotely manipulate a VTU and evaluate a trainee's response. This project helped determine if it is useful, cost effective, and beneficial for the instructor to have a portable handheld device to control the behavior of the models during training. This project has advanced NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) VTU capabilities with modern and relevant technology to support space flight training needs of today and tomorrow.

  7. An Intelligent Training Management System (ITMS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stottler, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Air Force training units are in extreme need of advanced, intelligent training management systems to aid the training managers and schedulers in the performance of their duties and to help students...

  8. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM): A tool for improved flight safety (United Airlines CRM training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J. E.; Taggart, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The approach and methodology used in developing cockpit management skills is effective because of the following features: (1) A comparative method of learning is used enabling crewmembers to study different forms of teamwork. (2) The learning comes about as a result of crewmembers learning from one another instead of from an expert instructor. (3) Key elements of cockpit teamwork and effective management are studied so that crewmembers can determine how these elements can improve safety and problem solving. (4) Critique among the crewmembers themselves rather than from outsiders is used as a common focusing point for crews to provide feedback to one another on how each can be a more effective crewmember. (5) The training is continuous in the sense that it becomes part of recurrent, upgrade, and other forms of crewmember training and development. And (6) the training results in sound and genuine insights that come about through solid education as opposed to tutoring, coaching, or telling crewmembers how to behave more effectively.

  9. Effectiveness of classroom based crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: study design of a controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemper Peter F

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crew resource management (CRM has the potential to enhance patient safety in intensive care units (ICU by improving the use of non-technical skills. However, CRM evaluation studies in health care are inconclusive with regard to the effect of this training on behaviour and organizational outcomes, due to weak study designs and the scarce use of direct observations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CRM training on attitude, behaviour and organization after one year, using a multi-method approach and matched control units. The purpose of the present article is to describe the study protocol and the underlying choices of this evaluation study of CRM in the ICU in detail. Methods/Design Six ICUs participated in a paired controlled trial, with one pre-test and two post test measurements (respectively three months and one year after the training. Three ICUs were trained and compared to matched control ICUs. The 2-day classroom-based training was delivered to multidisciplinary groups. Typical CRM topics on the individual, team and organizational level were discussed, such as situational awareness, leadership and communication. All levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework (reaction, learning, behaviour and organisation were assessed using questionnaires, direct observations, interviews and routine ICU administration data. Discussion It is expected that the CRM training acts as a generic intervention that stimulates specific interventions. Besides effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, the assessment of the barriers and facilitators will provide insight in the implementation process of CRM. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR1976

  10. Effectiveness of classroom based crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: study design of a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Peter F; de Bruijne, Martine; van Dyck, Cathy; Wagner, Cordula

    2011-11-10

    Crew resource management (CRM) has the potential to enhance patient safety in intensive care units (ICU) by improving the use of non-technical skills. However, CRM evaluation studies in health care are inconclusive with regard to the effect of this training on behaviour and organizational outcomes, due to weak study designs and the scarce use of direct observations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CRM training on attitude, behaviour and organization after one year, using a multi-method approach and matched control units. The purpose of the present article is to describe the study protocol and the underlying choices of this evaluation study of CRM in the ICU in detail. Six ICUs participated in a paired controlled trial, with one pre-test and two post test measurements (respectively three months and one year after the training). Three ICUs were trained and compared to matched control ICUs. The 2-day classroom-based training was delivered to multidisciplinary groups. Typical CRM topics on the individual, team and organizational level were discussed, such as situational awareness, leadership and communication. All levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework (reaction, learning, behaviour and organisation) were assessed using questionnaires, direct observations, interviews and routine ICU administration data. It is expected that the CRM training acts as a generic intervention that stimulates specific interventions. Besides effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, the assessment of the barriers and facilitators will provide insight in the implementation process of CRM. Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR1976.

  11. A gap analysis of the United States death care sector to determine training and education needs pertaining to highly infectious disease mitigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Aurora B; Witter, Lesley; Herstein, Jocelyn J; Jelden, Katelyn C; Beam, Elizabeth L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Lowe, John J

    2017-09-01

    A United States industry-specific gap analysis survey of the death care sector-which comprises organizations and businesses affiliated with the funeral industry and the handling of human remains- was developed, the results analyzed, and training and education needs in relation to highly infectious disease mitigation and management were explored in an effort to identify where occupational health and safety can be enhanced in this worker population. Collaborating national death care organizations distributed the 47-question electronic survey. N = 424 surveys were initiated and results recorded. The survey collected death care sector-specific information pertaining to the comfortability and willingness to handle highly infectious remains; perceptions of readiness, current policies and procedures in place to address highly infectious diseases; current highly infectious disease training levels, available resources, and personal protective equipment. One-third of respondents have been trained on how to manage highly infectious remains. There was a discrepancy between Supervisor/Management and Employee/Worker perceptions on employees' willingness and comfortability to manage potentially highly infectious remains. More than 40% of respondents did not know the correct routes of transmission for viral hemorrhagic fevers. Results suggest death care workers could benefit from increasing up-to-date industry-specific training and education on highly infectious disease risk mitigation and management. Professional death care sector organizations are positioned to disseminate information, training, and best practices.

  12. Training of Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi Ogulin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The article underlines the importance of training of managers and the role of students from different cultural environments. As a result of economic growth on an international level, the role of training managers on such a level has become increasingly important. This training method also offers an excellent opportunity for networking, which is very important in business today, especially for smaller countries. Main source of competitiveness today consists of a combination of know-how, technology and motivational environment with the ability to react fast to any changes on the market (access and flow of information. Thus it can be concluded that post-graduate studies abroad must have a much higher importance for countries in transition in comparison to studies offered in recently established organizations in the country of origin. Latter, nevertheless are trying to cooperate with similar institutions abroad, but this can never be compared to the possibility of gaining experience and making contacts abroad.

  13. Verification of electricity savings through energy-efficient train management - Energy data base for traction units - Annex 5; Verifizierung der Stromeinsparung durch energieeffizientes Zugsmanagement - Anhang 5: Energiedatenbank Traktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.; Lerjen, M.; Menth, S. [emkamatik GmbH, Wettingen (Switzerland); Luethi, M. [Swiss Federal Insitute of Technology (ETHZ), Institute for Transport Planning and Systems (IVT), Zuerich (Switzerland); Tuchschmid, M. [SBB AG, BahnUmwelt-Center, 3000 Bern (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    This appendix to a final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at how various data sources on the energy consumption of the SBB's traction units can be combined into an energy-data basis. In this way, the considerable amount of work previously involved in combining and correlating data can be avoided. The aims being followed in the realisation of the traction data base are examined and discussed. The data base will provide the basis for the manual detail analysis of energy consumption within the framework of the overall efforts to save electricity using efficient train management.

  14. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  15. Junior Leader Training Development in Operational Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Research Program Manager Director Training and Leader Development Division Research accomplished under contract for the Department of the Army...Digital Training Management System (DTM ). While work has been done to mitigate the training development cha enges experienced by junior leaders , there...operations. The manual provides junior leaders with guidance on how to conduct training and training management . Of particular importance is the definition

  16. Plan de formación continuada en una unidad de gestión clínica Continuing training plan in a clinical management unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Miguel Gamboa Antiñolo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La Unidad de Continuidad Asistencial está orientada a la atención de pacientes frágiles, pluripatológicos y de cuidados paliativos. Atiende a pacientes en domicilio, consulta, unidad de día, consultoría telefónica y en dos hospitales de la misma área sanitaria. Desde su inicio en 2002 como unidad de gestión, la formación ha sido un elemento prioritario de desarrollo. Los elementos clave son acercar la formación al lugar de trabajo, incluir aspectos fundamentales de los problemas asistenciales más prevalentes en el trabajo diario, orientar la formación a todo el personal incluyendo aspectos organizativos, de seguridad del paciente y su entorno, mejora del clima laboral, desarrollo de nuevas habilidades y conocimientos apoyados en la asistencia basada en la evidencia para el desarrollo de las diferentes competencias profesionales. La unidad puede ser el escenario idóneo para acometer las necesarias reformas conceptuales de la formación de los profesionales que permitan mejorar la calidad asistencial.Continuing Care Unit (UCA focused the attention of frail patients, polypathological patients and palliative care. UCA attend patients at home, consulting, day unit, telephone consulting and in two hospitals of the health area. From 2002 UCA began as a management unit, training has been a priority for development. Key elements include: providing education to the workplace, including key aspects of the most prevalent health care problems in daily work, directing training to all staff including organizational aspects of patient safety and the environment, improved working environment, development of new skills and knowledge supported by the evidence-based care for the development of different skills. The unit can be the ideal setting to undertake the reforms necessary conceptual training of professionals to improve the quality of care.

  17. An Analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training Using Supply Chain and Operations Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    is to level load trainees to the training pipeline throughout the year; second, develop a pull inventory system by eliminating PEF code assignments...eliminating PEF code assignments and postponing trainee classification; third, decrease capacity at the recruit depots and increase capacity at Marine Combat...Patients, Prisoners, Trainees, and Transients PEF Program Enlisted For POI Program of Instruction PRASP Permissive Recruiter Assistance Support Program

  18. Using CCTV in Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Robert

    1977-01-01

    Means of achieving acceptable television pictures in using closed circuit television for management training are presented. Various production techniques for both video and audio and their operation are described. (MF)

  19. Investigation of The regularities of the process and development of method of management of technological line operation within the process of mass raw mate-rials supply in terms of dynamics of inbound traffic of unit trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Катерина Ігорівна Сізова

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sinter plants at metallurgical enterprises incorporate highly productive transport-and-handling complexes (THC that receive and process mass iron-bearing raw materials. Such THCs as a rule include unloading facilities and freight railway station. The central part of the THC is a technological line that carries out operations of reception and unloading of unit trains with raw materials. The technological line consists of transport and freight modules. The latter plays a leading role and, in its turn, consists of rotary car dumpers and conveyor belts. This module represents a determinate system that carries out preparation and unloading operations. Its processing capacity is set in accordance with manufacturing capacity of the sinter plant. The research has shown that in existing operating conditions, which is characterized by “arrhythmia” of interaction between external transport operation and production, technological line of THC functions inefficiently. Thus, it secures just 18-20 % of instances of processing of inbound unit trains within set standard time. It was determined that duration of the cycle of processing of inbound unit train can play a role of regulator, under stochastic characteristics of intervals between inbound unit trains with raw materials on the one hand, and determined unloading system on the other hand. That is why evaluation of interdependence between these factors allows determination of duration of cycle of processing of inbound unit trains. Basing on the results of the study, the method of logistical management of the processing of inbound unit trains was offered. At the same time, real duration of processing of inbound unit train is taken as the regulated value. The regulation process implies regular evaluation and comparison of these values, and, taking into account different disturbances, decision-making concerning adaptation of functioning of technological line. According to the offered principles

  20. Enrollment Management in Academic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBiaso, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management functions of recruiting, admissions, marketing, orientation, financial aid/scholarships, academic advising, student…

  1. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Schedule of courses for March to June 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Title Date 1st semester 2006 Language CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 7, 8 mars F CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 16, 17 March E CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 21, 22 March E Risk Management 20, 21 April E Managing by project 25, 26 April E CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 11, 12 mai F Personal Awareness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May E-F Introduction to Leadership 17, 18, 19 May E CDP for Group Leaders - part 2 19, 20, 21 June E-F Leadership Competencies 22, 23 June E-F Project Management 19, 20, 21 June E...

  2. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for March to June 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Title Date 1st semester 2006 Language CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 7, 8 mars F CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 16, 17 March E CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 21, 22 March E Risk Management 20, 21 April E Managing by project 25, 26 April E CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 11, 12 mai F Personal Awarness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May E-F Introduction to Leadership 17, 18, 19 May E CDP for Group Leaders - part 2 19, 20, 21 June E-F Leadership Competencies 22, 23 June E-F Project Management 19, 20, 21 June E...

  3. Human Factors in Training - Space Flight Resource Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryne, Vicky; Connell, Erin; Barshi, Immanuel; Arsintescu, L.

    2009-01-01

    . Work on SFRM training has been conducted in collaboration with the Expedition Vehicle Division at the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) and with United Space Alliance (USA) which provides training to Flight Controllers. The space flight resource management training work is part of the Human Factors in Training Directed Research Project (DRP) of the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project under the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Human factors researchers at the Ames Research Center have been investigating team work and distributed decision making processes to develop a generic SFRM training framework for flight controllers. The work proposed for FY10 continues to build on this strong collaboration with MOD and the USA Training Group as well as previous research in relevant domains such as aviation. In FY10, the work focuses on documenting and analyzing problem solving strategies and decision making processes used in MCC by experienced FCers.

  4. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Maye; Gerein, Nancy; Tarin, Ehsanullah; Butcher, Christopher; Pearson, Stephen; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2009-03-05

    The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least useful areas were those that dealt with training and

  5. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. Methods The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Results Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least

  6. Simulation training for hyperacute stroke unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roots, Angela; Thomas, Libby; Jaye, Peter; Birns, Jonathan

    National clinical guidelines have emphasized the need to identify acute stroke as a clinical priority for early assessment and treatment of patients on hyperacute stroke units. Nurses working on hyperacute stroke units require stroke specialist training and development of competencies in dealing with neurological emergencies and working in multidisciplinary teams. Educational theory suggests that experiential learning with colleagues in real-life settings may provide transferable results to the workplace with improved performance. Simulation training has been shown to deliver situational training without compromising patient safety and has been shown to improve both technical and non-technical skills (McGaghie et al, 2010). This article describes the role that simulation training may play for nurses working on hyperacute stroke units explaining the modalities available and the educational potential. The article also outlines the development of a pilot course involving directly relevant clinical scenarios for hyperacute stroke unit patient care and assesses the benefits of simulation training for hyperacute stroke unit nurses, in terms of clinical performance and non-clinical abilities including leadership and communication.

  7. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Calendar of courses for May to June 2006 Management Curriculum 1st semester 2006 Titles Dates language CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May English Personal Awareness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May Bilingual CDP pour superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 11, 12 mai français Introduction to Leadership 17, 18, 19 May English Communicating Effectively - Residential 14, 15, 16 June Bilingual CDP for Group Leaders - part 2 19, 20, 21 June Bilingual Project Management 19, 20, 21 June Bilingual Personal Awareness & Impact - Follow-up 19, 20 June bilingual Leadership Competencies 27, 28 June Bilingual Communication curriculum 1st semester 2006 Titles Dates language Personal Awareness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May Bilingual Personal Awareness & Impact - Follow-up 19, 20 June Bilingual Communicating Effectively 15, 16 May &...

  8. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Date of courses for March to June 2008Please check our Web site (http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300 )to find out the number of places available, which may vary. curriculum Management Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (part 2) 31 March, 1 April (Full) Introduction to Leadership 9, 10, 11 April (2 places available) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (partie 2) 24, 25 avril (complet) Quality Management 6, 7 May (10 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 13, 14, 15 May (full) Managing Teams 21, 22, 23 May (8 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (part 2) 28, 29 May (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact 2, 3, 4 June (3 places available) Dealing with Conflict 6 and 13 June (8 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up 9, 10 June (5 places available) Communicating to Convince 16, 17 June (4 places available) curriculum communication Mak...

  9. Managing Highway Maintenance: Instructor's Manual for Management by Objectives Review, Unit 11, All Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit is designed for the training group leader and contains selected highlights and suggested discussion questions from six units of training: maintenance activities, work units, and classifying work; maintenance feature inventories; how to conduct a maintenance feature inventory;…

  10. Current status of preventive cardiology training among United States cardiology fellowships and comparison to training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Quinn R; Keteyian, Steven J; McBride, Patrick E; Weaver, W Douglas; Kim, Henry E

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated preventive cardiology education in United States cardiology fellowship programs and their adherence to Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium training guidelines, which recommend 1 month of training, faculty with expertise, and clinical experience in cardiac rehabilitation, lipid disorder management, and diabetes management as a part of the prevention curricula. We sent an anonymous survey to United States cardiology program directors and their chief fellow. The survey assessed the program curricula, rotation structure, faculty expertise, obstacles, and recommended improvements. The results revealed that 24% of surveyed programs met the Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium guidelines with a dedicated 1-month rotation in preventive cardiology, 24% had no formalized training in preventive cardiology, and 30% had no faculty with expertise in preventive cardiology, which correlated with fewer rotations in prevention than those with specialized faculty (p = 0.009). Fellows rotated though the following experiences (% of programs): cardiac rehabilitation, 71%; lipid management, 37%; hypertension, 15%; diabetes, 7%; weight management/obesity, 6%; cardiac nutrition, 6%; and smoking cessation, 5%. The program directors cited "lack of time" as the greatest obstacle to providing preventive cardiology training and the chief fellows reported "lack of a developed curriculum" (p = 0.01). The most recommended improvement was for the American College of Cardiology to develop a web-based curriculum/module. In conclusion, most surveyed United States cardiology training programs currently do not adhere to basic preventive cardiovascular medicine Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium recommendations. Additional attention to developing curricular content and structure, including the creation of an American College of Cardiology on-line knowledge module might improve fellowship training in preventive cardiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Managing the training process in bodybuilding

    OpenAIRE

    Netík, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Anotation Title: Managing the training process in bodybuilding This thesis describes the sport of bodybuilding and its training process. It also describes aspects of managing the training process and based on own research determines what impact the training process is applied to changes in the state of training and performance. There is also considering the impact of specific training methods and intensification. In the research of this thesis, we used different testing methods. We performed ...

  12. Procrastination at work and time management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eerde, Wendelien

    2003-09-01

    The author examined the impact of time management training on self-reported procrastination. In an intervention study, 37 employees attended a 1 1/2-day time management training seminar. A control group of employees (n = 14) who were awaiting training also participated in the study to control for expectancy effects. One month after undergoing time management training, trainees reported a significant decrease in avoidance behavior and worry and an increase in their ability to manage time. The results suggest that time management training is helpful in lessening worry and procrastination at work.

  13. Management training effects on nurse manager leadership behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K R; D'Argenio, C

    1991-01-01

    Costly organization-based leadership/management development training gives little evidence that such training affects long-term changes in nurse manager leader style adaptability in meeting situations and staff needs.

  14. Waste management units - Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    This report is a compilation of worksheets from the waste management units of Savannah River Plant. Information is presented on the following: Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with a known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with no known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received no hazardous waste or hazardous constituents; Waste Management Units having received source; and special nuclear, or byproduct material only.

  15. 76 FR 41525 - Hewlett Packard Global Parts Supply Chain, Global Product Life Cycles Management Unit Including...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard Global Parts Supply Chain, Global Product Life Cycles... Chain, Global Product Life Cycles Management Unit, including teleworkers reporting to Houston, Texas... Parts Supply Chain, Global Product Life Cycles Management Unit, including teleworkers reporting to...

  16. Residency training in the United States: What foreign medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FMGs) planning to pursue post-graduate residency training in the United States of America (USA). While the number of residency training positions is shrinking, and the number of United States graduates has steadily declined over the past ...

  17. A case for safety leadership team training of hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Vogt, Jay W; Sales, Michael; Aristidou, Angela; Gray, Garry C; Kiang, Mathew V; Meyer, Gregg S

    2011-01-01

    Delivering safe patient care remains an elusive goal. Resolving problems in complex organizations like hospitals requires managers to work together. Safety leadership training that encourages managers to exercise learning-oriented, team-based leadership behaviors could promote systemic problem solving and enhance patient safety. Despite the need for such training, few programs teach multidisciplinary groups of managers about specific behaviors that can enhance their role as leadership teams in the realm of patient safety. The aims of this study were to describe a learning-oriented, team-based, safety leadership training program composed of reinforcing exercises and to provide evidence confirming the need for such training and demonstrating behavior change among management groups after training. Twelve groups of managers from an academic medical center based in the Northeast United States were randomly selected to participate in the program and exposed to its customized, experience-based, integrated, multimodal curriculum. We extracted data from transcripts of four training sessions over 15 months with groups of managers about the need for the training in these groups and change in participants' awareness, professional behaviors, and group activity. Training transcripts confirmed the need for safety leadership team training and provided evidence of the potential for training to increase targeted behaviors. The training increased awareness and use of leadership behaviors among many managers and led to new routines and coordinated effort among most management groups. Enhanced learning-oriented leadership often helped promote a learning orientation in managers' work areas. Team-based training that promotes specific learning-oriented leader behaviors can promote behavioral change among multidisciplinary groups of hospital managers.

  18. Visual Training for Sustainable Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aik, Chong-Tek; Tway, Duane C.

    2004-01-01

    It is increasingly important for timber companies to train managers in the principles and practices of sustainable forest management. One of the most effective ways to conduct such training is through use of visual training methods. This is partly because visual representations encode large amounts of information and help learners to grasp…

  19. Employee Perceptions of Quality Management: Effects of Employee Orientation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdere, Mesut; Schmidt, Steven W.

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study examines employee perceptions of quality management at three different time periods. New employees at a large United States manufacturing organization were surveyed regarding their perceptions of their organization's quality management practices before they attended a new employee orientation training, immediately after the…

  20. Real Time Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    i AFRL-RH-AZ-TR-2011-0005 Real Time Cockpit Resource Management ( CRM ) Training David Kaiser Jeffery Eberhart Chris Butler Gregg...Resource Management ( CRM ) Training 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-08-C-6848 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kaiser, David...283 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Real Time Cockpit Resource Management ( CRM ) Training 4 Table of

  1. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  2. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  3. Maintenance routing for train units: the scenario model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Maróti (Gábor); L.G. Kroon

    2004-01-01

    textabstractTrain units need regular preventive maintenance. Given the train units that require maintenance in the forthcoming 1--3 days, the rolling stock schedule must be adjusted so that these urgent units reach the maintenance facility in time. We present an integer programming model for this

  4. Preservice Teachers' Classroom Management Training: A Survey of Self-Reported Training Experiences, Content Coverage, and Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Michael; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Many teachers report that their preservice training in classroom management was inadequate or ineffective, but little is known about the types of training they receive. In this exploratory study, 157 preservice teachers from throughout the United States were surveyed about the training sources through which they obtained knowledge and skills in…

  5. Waste management units - Savannah River Site. Volume 1, Waste management unit worksheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    This report is a compilation of worksheets from the waste management units of Savannah River Plant. Information is presented on the following: Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with a known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with no known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received no hazardous waste or hazardous constituents; Waste Management Units having received source; and special nuclear, or byproduct material only.

  6. Optimization methods for the Train Unit Shunting Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Jørgen Thorlund; Lusby, Richard Martin; Wagenaar, Joris Camiel

    2017-01-01

    We consider the Train Unit Shunting Problem, an important planning problem for passenger railway operators. This problem entails assigning train units from shunting yards to scheduled train services in such a way that the resulting operations are without conflicts. The problem arises at every...... shunting yard in the railway network and involves matching train units to arriving and departing train services as well as assigning the selected matchings to appropriate shunting yard tracks. We present an extensive comparison benchmark of multiple solution approaches for this problem, some of which...

  7. Training and Education of Environmental Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Sinding, Knud; Madsen, Henning

    An analysis of the training backgrounds of environmental managers in a range of environmentally advanced European companies reveals the very broad qualifications ideally required of these managers. At the same time, however, it is found that the provision of training opportunities relevant for th...... for this important category of managers is both limited in scope and foundation, and highly dependent on the randomly distributed efforts of educators with an environmental interest....

  8. Improving Port Performance: History of a Management Training Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian J.; Reach, D. Keith

    1984-01-01

    Describes the background to and the aims, development, production, and testing of the Improving Port Performance project initiated by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development to provide training for port managers in developing countries. The content and approach of the first set of materials produced are outlined. (MBR)

  9. CERN hosts training event on international management

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    CERN held its first training event on international management at the Globe on 2 October, sharing its expertise with high-level Swiss managers as part of their year-long part-time executive training programme on advanced management. CERN is often talked about in terms of impressive statistics: the coldest place in the universe, the largest accelerator, the greatest volume of data. Whilst the science is undeniably remarkable, it is backed by a management infrastructure that has to be as cutting-edge as the research it supports. On 2 October, the Learning and Development section of HR organised an event for 60 delegates to come to CERN to learn about international management from those who have taken on the management challenges at the heart of this unique institution. It was the first time that CERN had prepared such an event. SKU, a non-profit organisation, approached our management training team to arrange the event as part of a wee...

  10. A Better Model for Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobele, H. Kenneth; Buchanan, Peter J.

    1976-01-01

    Greater precision in appraising training needs, greater clarity in defining training objectives, and an emphasis on a practical, skills-oriented approach to management development can result from using Henry Mintzberg's model which describes managerial work in terms of 6 job characteristics and 10 interpersonal, informational, or decisional roles.…

  11. Training for Environmental Management - Industry and Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning; Kjær, M.

    Sustainable development requires innovative approaches at organisation level as well as a range of new skills and competencies throughout the workforce. The development of appropriate training materials and courses is an essential part of this equation. This report presents an overview of the Fou...... of the Foundation's research and findings on environmental management training requirements in industry in the EU from 1993-1998....

  12. Training to Support Standardization and Improvement of Configuration Management Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauber, V.; Scheffer, N.; Schoenfelder, C.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years AREVA has conducted several measures to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of configuration management-related activities within a nuclear power plant (NPP) new build as well as modernization projects, thereby further strengthening its commitment to achieving the highest level of safety in nuclear facilities. This paper describes a new training course that shall support the standardization and improvement of configuration management activities. Recommendations will be given that should be considered when designing and developing comparable training programs to support change processes within engineering units. (Author)

  13. Rheumatology training in Poland vs. United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarewicz, Karina; Chinoy, Hector

    2017-01-01

    When evaluating the quality of Rheumatology specialty training, it can be useful to explore similarities and differences between countries. In this article we compare the training in the UK and Poland. The two training programmes are similar in length and in the competencies that must be achieved, although they do have significant differences in the way the training is structured. The UK-based system is more out-patient based, which can be advantageous, as after completion of training the doctor is more confident in treating common rheumatological problems. On the other hand, having exposure to paediatric rheumatology and orthopaedics like one has in Polish-based training, despite a short placement time, is definitely beneficial for the trainee in gaining all-round knowledge. In conclusion, each system has its merits and can be further enhanced by observing how junior doctors are sub-speciality trained in different countries.

  14. Project management training : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2005 the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) went through a complete reorganization of its operations going from centralized to decentralized (District) management. This reorganization gave Districts autonomy to manage construction projec...

  15. Project management training : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) went through a complete reorganization of its operations going from centralized to decentralized (District) management. This reorganization gave Districts autonomy to manage construction proje...

  16. Advanced project management : training manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-14

    This course identifies the principles and methodologies adopted by the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) to support successful project management and delivery. Project management requires the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and te...

  17. Outdoor management training z pohledu psychologie

    OpenAIRE

    Šulc, Marek

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is focused on a description of educational methods for outdoor management training managers. This method bears in its basis on the pedagogy of experience, feelings and learning, so that it is possible to find a detailed description of these psychological constructs in this work. The author took heed of a global process of training and education of adults, also to a problem of basis criteria needed for a succesfull realisation of this educational method. There are real, reali...

  18. Training product unit neural networks with genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, D. J.; Frenzel, J. F.; Thelen, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    The training of product neural networks using genetic algorithms is discussed. Two unusual neural network techniques are combined; product units are employed instead of the traditional summing units and genetic algorithms train the network rather than backpropagation. As an example, a neural netork is trained to calculate the optimum width of transistors in a CMOS switch. It is shown how local minima affect the performance of a genetic algorithm, and one method of overcoming this is presented.

  19. Health care units and human resources management trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Adriana Maria; Ciampone, Maria Helena Trench; Santelle, Odete

    2013-02-01

    To identify factors producing new trends in basic health care unit management and changes in management models. This was a prospective study with ten health care unit managers and ten specialists in the field of Health in São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The Delphi methodology was adopted. There were four stages of data collection, three quantitative and the fourth qualitative. The first three rounds dealt with changing trends in management models, manager profiles and required competencies, and the Mann-Whitney test was used in the analysis. The fourth round took the form of a panel of those involved, using thematic analysis. The main factors which are driving change in basic health care units were identified, as were changes in management models. There was consensus that this process is influenced by the difficulties in managing teams and by politics. The managers were found to be up-to-date with trends in the wider context, with the arrival of social health organizations, but they are not yet anticipating these within the institutions. Not only the content, but the professional development aspect of training courses in this area should be reviewed. Selection and recruitment, training and assessment of these professionals should be guided by these competencies aligned to the health service mission, vision, values and management models.

  20. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007
Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 10, 11, 12 September, (full) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (2 places disponibles) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October, (full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October, (full) Quality Management (Bilingual) 18, 19 October (10 places available) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (full) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English) 25, 26 September (6 places...

  1. Medical Waste Management Training for Healthcare Managers - a Necessity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aclan Ozder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:This is an interventional study, since a training has been given, performed in order to investigate whether training has significant impact on knowledge levels of healthcare managers (head-nurses, assistant head nurses, hospital managers and deputy managers regarding bio-medical waste management.Methods:The study was conducted on 240 volunteers during June – August 2010 in 12 hospitals serving in Istanbul (private, public, university, training-research hospitals and other healthcare institutions. A survey form prepared by the project guidance team was applied to the participants through the internet before and after the training courses. The training program was composed of 40 hours of theory and 16 hours of practice sessions taught by persons known to have expertise in their fields. Methods used in the analysis of the data chi-square and t-tests in dependent groups.Results:67.5% (162 of participants were female. 42.5% (102 are working in private, and 21.7% in state-owned hospitals. 50.4% are head-nurses, and 18.3% are hospital managers.A statistically significant difference was found among those who had received medical waste management training (preliminary test and final test and others who had not (p<0.01. It was observed that information levels of all healthcare managers who had received training on waste management had risen at the completion of that training session.Conclusion:On the subject of waste management, to have trained healthcare employees who are responsible for the safe disposal of wastes in hospitals is both a necessity for the safety of patients and important for its contribution to the economy of the country.

  2. Stress Management Training in Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An effort to teach medical students practical stress management skills is discussed. A group of students volunteered to participate in a six-session program that taught them personal stress management techniques including self-relaxation training, schedule-planning, priority-setting, leisure time-planning, and cognitive modification techniques.…

  3. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier.   Management Curriculum / curriculum Management NEW COURSE - Dealing with Conflict, 5 & 12 October (6 places available) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October\t(Full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October\t(Full) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (1 place available) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) - 
Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 &...

  4. Equality of Opportunity and Vocational Training. Creation and Management of Enterprises by Women. The Situation in the United Kingdom. Rapport National Royaume-Uni. Synthesis Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Annie

    This document contains three reports: (1) a report on women entrepreneurs in the United Kingdom (UK) in English; (2) the same report in French; and (3) a synthesis report of 12 national reports and 4 related reports. The report on women entrepreneurs in the UK includes an introduction, a description of the methodology, five sections of findings,…

  5. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Managing by Project (English)\t9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English)\t15, 16, 17 October, (Full) Introduction to Leadership (English)\t17, 18, 19 October, (Full) Managing Teams (English)\t13, 14, 15 November\t(1 place available)) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual)\t20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English)\t13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English)\t25, 26 September (4 p...

  6. Assessing the Performance of Business Unit Managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, J.F.M.G.; van Lent, L.A.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Using a sample of 140 managers, we investigate the use of various performance metrics in determining the periodic assessment, bonus decisions, and career paths of business unit managers.We show that the weight on accounting return measures is associated with the authority of these managers, and we

  7. Muscular endurance training and motor unit firing patterns during fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    With muscular training, the central nervous system may regulate motor unit firing rates to sustain force output and delay fatigue. The aims of this study were to investigate motor unit firing rates and patterns of the adductor pollicis (AdP) muscle in young, able-bodied adults throughout a sustained submaximal isometric fatiguing contraction and postactivation potentiation pre-post 4 weeks of muscular endurance training. Fifteen participants (training group: N = 10; control group: N = 5) performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and a sustained isometric 20 % MVC fatigue task pre-post training. Single-motor-unit potentials were recorded from the AdP during the fatigue task with intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. Twitch force potentiation was measured during single-pulse electrical stimulation of the ulnar nerve before and after MVCs. The training group endurance trained their AdP muscle at 20 % MVC for 4 weeks. Mean motor unit firing rates were calculated every 5 % of endurance time (ET). ET increased by 45.2 ± 8.7 % (p endurance training. Although ET increased, mean motor unit firing rates during the fatigue task did not change significantly with training. The general motor unit firing pattern consisted of an initial slowing followed by an increase in firing rate late in fatigue and remained consistent pre-post training. Potentiation did not change following training. These data suggest that the ability of the neuromuscular system to sustain motor unit firing rate may serve as a mechanism to augment the duration of submaximal muscle performance and delay muscular fatigue.

  8. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from October to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Leadership - 2 October, 29 October + 1 December - (full) CDP-SL for new supervisors, part 1 - 5, 6, 7 October - (2 places available) Introduction to Leadership - 7, 8, 9 October - (4 places available) Voice your Leadership - 13, 14 October - (full) Managing Teams - 10, 11, 12 November - (7 places available) Risk Management - 17, 18 November - (6 places available) Dealing with Conflict - 20, 27 November - (5 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1 - 30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre - (4 places disponibles) Communication Curriculum Making presentations - 14, 15 October + 9 November - (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe - 19, 20 octobre - (7 places disponibles) Gestion du stress - 20, 21 octobre - (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement - 21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novemb...

  9. TRAINING ON PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT AND LABOR ECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Polevaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the training of spe-cialists in the eld of labor and the house-keeper personnel management within the federal state educational standards of higher education. The analysis of the possibility of training in these specialties in the various educational standards. The necessity of focusing on the prepara-tion of these destinations within certain standards.

  10. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2)\t(full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management\t25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mars (6 places d...

  11. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Calendar of courses for February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management 25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership 1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mar...

  12. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (5 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (2 places available) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (8 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (2 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (1 place disponible) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1...

  13. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Serv...

  14. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Service Orientation/Orienta...

  15. Defense Management Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    5010.16-C SECURITY CLEARANCE: A SECRET security clearance is required. 0 Course Title: LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT COURSE SA-Fi6 Location: AIJEC ...A-83 DOD 5010.16-C Course Title: RELIABILITY CENTERED MAINTENANCE (RCX) COURSE ALC-RE Location: AIJEC , Fort Lee, VA 23801-6048 Length: 1 Week

  16. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from November to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (4 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1\t30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre (2 places disponibles) Managing by Project\t1, 2 December (full) Communication Curriculum Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (complet) Managing Stress\t10, 11 November (6 places available) Communicating Effectively\t11, 12 November + 8, 9 December (4 places available) Orientation service\t12, 13 novembre (5 places disponibles) Gestion du stress\t17, 18 novembre (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail\t9, 10, 11 décembre (3 places disponibles) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessions, please talk to your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH from the course description p...

  17. The benefits of management training

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    After six years an unusual management course remains very popular. Participants in the most recent session of 3CM course, with the external course leader Ton Bastiaans (left back), Lyn Evans, LHC project leader (3rd from the right) and Sudeshna Datta Cockerill (far right) who organises the management and communication courses. In 1996 a sceptical Lyn Evans agreed to act as the 'sponsor' from CERN's senior management for a new course on 'Introduction to management', aimed at young professionals at CERN who may in the near future have supervisory roles. CERN's LHC Project Leader quickly discovered that it is a 'remarkable course' and six years later he remains enthusiastic about its value. His role is to attend at the end of the last day and to listen to the reactions of the participants - how they have benefited and how they see the benefits to CERN. The session also gives the participants the opportunity to discuss with one of the Directorate their views on problems at CERN. Code-named 3CM, and run by an ex...

  18. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Quality Management\t25, 26 March\t(6 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars (4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (9 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (4 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Nég...

  19. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Calendar of courses for October to December 2008 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Introduction to Leadership\t15, 16, 17 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 October (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2)\t11, 12, 13 November (full) Risk Management\t13, 14 November (5 places available) Managing Teams\t18, 19, 20 November (2 places available) Communicating to Convince\t19, 20 November (5 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 25, 26, 27 November (part 1) + 3, 4 March 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (3 + 2 jours) 9, 10, 11 décembre (partie 1) + 21, 22 avril 2009 (partie 2) (full) Communication Curriculum Communicating Effectively\t21, 22 October + 27, 28 November (4 places available)\tCommuniquer efficacement\t23, 24 octobre + 2...

  20. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (2 places available) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Quality Management\t12, 13 May (6 places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t30 June + 1 July (6 places available) Communicating to Convince\t22, 23 June (7 places available) Communication Curriculum Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (3 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 mai + 23 juin + 7 juillet (3 places disponibles) Making presentations\t13, 14 May + 11 June (Full) Writing of Successful FP7 Proposals\t26 May (20 places available) Communicating Effectively\t8, 29 May + 22, 23 June (2 places available) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessio...

  1. SPECIALITY TRAINING IN ABROAD – UNITED KINGDOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Pakiž

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud. According to the Rules on types and curriculum of specialization of doctors in Slovenia part of the specialization can be conducted in abroad after conformation of Medical Chambers. Specialization abroad enables us to learn about different therapeutic approaches, organization of work, educational systems, new methods of treatment, etc. Content In the article organization of work at the Liverpool Women’s Hospital, the greatest European hospital for women’s diseases is presented. Furthermore, specialty training for obstetrics and gynecology according to the rules of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in the UK is described. The specialty training and education programme last seven years in the UK. The specialty trainees attend specific modules besides working at gynaecological and obstetrics departments. The exam is divided in two parts and performed after the second and fifth year of training. During the last two years of the specialty training the doctor is able to roughly determine the subspeciality. The education programme is adjusted for those who are interested in research and academic fields. Conclusions. My experiences as foreign visiting doctor, as well as differences towards our system, are shared.

  2. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à un...

  3. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou par...

  4. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail/Chairing ...

  5. Parent Training Management of Preschool ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    Parent training (PT) and parent counseling and support (PC&S) techniques were compared in the management of a community sample of preschool 3-year-old children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) followed in the Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, UK.

  6. Farm Management and Leadership. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in farm management and leadership: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with farm management. SMAT materials can…

  7. TRAINING OF THE STATE PRESIDENT'S UNIT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the Portuguese forces in Angola in 1972 and that of President Stroessner of Paraguay in 1974. Other appearances include those at state fune- rals and when foreign ambassadors present their credentials to the State President. All the occasions at which the Unit performs, especially the annual official Opening of Parlia-.

  8. Unit Cost Handbook : a Financial Management Tool for Today & Tomorrow

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This handbook is intended to acquaint Department of Defense (DoD) executives and managers with the subject of unit cost. It provides an overall familiarization with unit cost and the management challenges, opportunities and benefits unit cost management offers.

  9. Scientific Management Training | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI intramural program is one of the largest centers for cancer research in the world, with approximately 200 principal investigators and 500 postdoctoral fellows. While outstanding scientific research is conducted at NCI, many of the scientists who go on to lead their own laboratories have few management skills. The Scientific Management Training course focuses on personnel and project management. In the “Art of Supervision” section, the emphasis is on the uniqueness of each person and how each staff member should be treated to achieve desired outcomes.

  10. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, Jeffrey P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-02-13

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3427 sites and 564 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  11. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, Jeffrey P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2012 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3389 sites and 540 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  12. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, Jeffrey P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-19

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3438 sites and 569 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  13. Strategies to address management challenges in larger intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, M C; Bezuidenhout, M C; Botha, A D H

    2015-10-01

    To illustrate the need for and suggest strategies that will enhance sustainable management of a large intensive care unit (ICU). The challenges faced by intensive care nursing in South Africa are well documented. However, there appear to be no strategies available to assist nurses to manage large ICUs or for ICU managers to deal with problems as they arise. Data sources to illustrate the need for strategies were challenges described by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A purposive sample of managers was included in individual interviews during compilation of evidence regarding the challenges experienced in the management of large ICUs. The challenges were presented at the Critical Care Society of Southern Africa Congress held on 28 August to 2 September 2012 in Sun City North-West province, South Africa. Five strategies are suggested for the challenges identified: divide the units into sections; develop a highly skilled and effective nursing workforce to ensure delivery of quality nursing care; create a culture to retain an effective ICU nursing team; manage assets; and determine the needs of ICU nurses. ICUs need measures to drive the desired strategies into actions to continuously improve the management of the unit. Future research should be aimed at investigating the effectiveness of the strategies identified. This research highlights issues relating to large ICUs and the strategies will assist ICU managers to deal with problems related to large unit sizes, shortage of trained ICU nurses, use of agency nurses, shortage of equipment and supplies and stressors in the ICU. The article will make a contribution to the body of nursing literature on management of ICUs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Strength training, but not endurance training, reduces motor unit discharge rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Chã, Carolina; Falla, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effects of strength and endurance training on motor unit discharge rate variability and force steadiness of knee extensor muscles. Thirty sedentary healthy men (age, 26.0±3.8yrs) were randomly assigned to strength training, endurance training or a control group. Conventional endurance and strength training was performed 3days per week, over a period of 6weeks. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), time to task failure (at 30% MVC), coefficient of variation (CoV) of force and of the discharges rates of motor units from the vastus medialis obliquus and vastus lateralis were determined as subjects performed 20% and 30% MVC knee extension contractions before and after training. CoV of motor unit discharges rates was significantly reduced for both muscles following strength training (Pendurance (P=0.875) or control group (P=0.995). CoV of force was reduced after the strength training intervention only (Ptraining, but not endurance training, reduces motor unit discharge rate variability and enhances force steadiness of the knee extensors. These results provide new insights into the neuromuscular adaptations that occur with different training methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The medical education of United States citizens who train abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, John; Anderson, M Brownell; McKinley, Danette W

    2006-09-01

    Graduates of international medical schools (IMGs) make up approximately one quarter of the physician workforce in the United States. Among IMGs are a number of US citizens (USIMGs) who take graduate training positions and ultimately practice in the United States. Compared with graduates of US medical schools (USMGs), relatively little is known about the undergraduate educational experiences of these US citizens. The objective of this study was to identify the schools that produce the most USIMGs and to describe the educational experiences and examination performance of graduates of these schools. The 10 largest schools were identified based on the number of USIMGs who were certified by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates between 2001 and 2004. Information about the institutions was collected from the International Medical Education Directory; educational experience information was gathered from 100 randomly selected transcripts and from a survey that was completed by 418 graduates of the schools. These data were compared with information about USMGs from the curriculum management and information tool and the graduation questionnaire of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Performance on steps 1 and 2CK of the United States Medical Licensing Examination were also analyzed. Some differences existed between USIMGs and USMGs in the required clinical clerkships, the sites where educational experiences occurred, and the special topics that were covered. USMGs and non-US citizen IMGs had better examination scores than USIMGs. There are many similarities; however, there are some noteworthy differences between the educational experiences of USIMGs and USMGs. Further work is needed to better understand the educational experiences of USIMGs, particularly in the clinical clerkships.

  16. Psychiatry training in the United Kingdom--part 2: the training process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, N; Kasiakogia, K

    2015-01-01

    In the second part of this diptych, we shall deal with psychiatric training in the United Kingdom in detail, and we will compare it--wherever this is meaningful--with the equivalent system in Greece. As explained in the first part of the paper, due to the recently increased emigration of Greek psychiatrists and psychiatric trainees, and the fact that the United Kingdom is a popular destination, it has become necessary to inform those aspiring to train in the United Kingdom of the system and the circumstances they should expect to encounter. This paper principally describes the structure of the United Kingdom's psychiatric training system, including the different stages trainees progress through and their respective requirements and processes. Specifically, specialty and subspecialty options are described and explained, special paths in training are analysed, and the notions of "special interest day" and the optional "Out of programme experience" schemes are explained. Furthermore, detailed information is offered on the pivotal points of each of the stages of the training process, with special care to explain the important differences and similarities between the systems in Greece and the United Kingdom. Special attention is given to The Royal College of Psychiatrists' Membership Exams (MRCPsych) because they are the only exams towards completing specialisation in Psychiatry in the United Kingdom. Also, the educational culture of progressing according to a set curriculum, of utilising diverse means of professional development, of empowering the trainees' autonomy by allowing initiative-based development and of applying peer supervision as a tool for professional development is stressed. We conclude that psychiatric training in the United Kingdom differs substantially to that of Greece in both structure and process. Τhere are various differences such as pure psychiatric training in the United Kingdom versus neurological and medical modules in Greece, in-training

  17. Scheduling Additional Train Unit Services on Rail Transit Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhibin Jiang; Yuyan Tan; Özgür Yalçınkaya

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of scheduling additional train unit (TU) services in a double parallel rail transit line, and a mixed integer programming (MIP) model is formulated for integration strategies of new trains connected by TUs with the objective of obtaining higher frequencies in some special sections and special time periods due to mass passenger volumes. We took timetable scheduling and TUs scheduling as an integrated optimization model with two objectives: minimizing travel ti...

  18. Analytic institutes: A guide to training in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanken, Terry G.

    This investigation was inspired by the researcher's desire to pursue psychoanalytic training subsequent to completion of her PhD in clinical psychology and the discovery that no comprehensive resource existed to assist prospective psychoanalytic candidates with identifying or evaluating psychoanalytic training opportunities. This dissertation therefore aspires to provide a comprehensive guide to analytic training in the United States today. The researcher presents the expanding horizons of depth-oriented training leading to certification as an analyst, including training based on those schools of thought that resulted from early splits with Freud (Adlerian and Jungian) as well as training based on thought that has remained within the Freudian theoretical umbrella (e.g., classical, object relations, self psychology, etc.). Employing a heuristic approach and using hermeneutics and systems theory methodologies, the study situates analytic training in its historical context, explores contemporary issues, and considers its future. The study reviews the various analytic schools of thought and traces the history of psychoanalytic theory from its origins with Freud through its many permutations. It then discusses the history of psychoanalytic training and describes political, social, and economic factors influencing the development of training in this country. The centerpiece of the dissertation is a guidebook offering detailed information on each of 107 training institutes in the United States. Tables provide contact data and information which differentiate the institutes in terms of such parameters as size; length of program, theoretical orientation, and accreditation. A narrative of each institute summarizes the unique aspects of the program, including its admissions policy, the requirements for the training analysis and supervised clinical work, and the didactic curriculum, along with lists of courses offered. Child and adolescent psychoanalytic training is also

  19. Managing the Training Load in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    While historically adolescents were removed from their parents to prepare to become warriors, this process repeats itself in modern times but with the outcome being athletic performance. This review considers the process of developing athletes and managing load against the backdrop of differing approaches of conserving and maximizing the talent available. It acknowledges the typical training "dose" that adolescent athletes receive across a number of sports and the typical "response" when it is excessive or not managed appropriately. It also examines the best approaches to quantifying load and injury risk, acknowledging the relative strengths and weaknesses of subjective and objective approaches. Making evidence-based decisions is emphasized, while the appropriate monitoring techniques are determined by both the sporting context and individual situation. Ultimately a systematic approach to training-load monitoring is recommended for adolescent athletes to both maximize their athletic development and allow an opportunity for learning, reflection, and enhancement of performance knowledge of coaches and practitioners.

  20. Management training for cockpit crews at Piedmont flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifford, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A brief history of Piedmont Airlines' flight operations is presented. A captain-management seminar conducted regularly by Piedmont is discussed. Piedmont's approach to cockpit resource management (CRM) is reviewed, and the relationship of CRM training to other aspects of flight training is addressed. Future leadership research plans and CRM training is considered along with critical training issues.

  1. Personnel Management Training Center: Course Schedule, Fiscal Year 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Training.

    The Personnel Management Training Center's Course Schedule for Fiscal Year 1973 lists all courses available to government employees. Interagency training programs include courses in employee relations, counseling, personnel management, and instructor training. Courses are also offered by the Equal Employment Opportunity Training Institute, and…

  2. Assessment of learning components of management training course ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of learning components of any training course provides a benchmark through which training institutions or organizers could assess the effectiveness of the training. The study assessed learning components of agricultural research management training course organized for senior research managers in Nigeria.

  3. IMPROVING THE METHODS OF ESTIMATION OF THE UNIT TRAIN EFFECTIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro KOZACHENKO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies of freight transportation by unit trains. The article is aimed at developing the methods of the efficiency evaluation of unit train dispatch on the basis of full-scale experiments. Duration of the car turnover is a random variable when dispatching the single cars and group cars, as well as when dispatching them as a part of a unit train. The existing methodologies for evaluating the efficiency of unit trains’ make-up are based on the use of calculation methodologies and their results can give significant errors. The work presents a methodology that makes it possible to evaluate the efficiency of unit train shipments based on the processing of results of experimental travels using the methods of mathematical statistics. This approach provides probabilistic estimates of the rolling stock use efficiency for different approaches to the organization of car traffic volumes, as well as establishes the effect for each of the participants in the transportation process.

  4. Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods : Uniting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Couverture du livre Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods : Uniting Science and Participation ... Il donne des idées afin que la recherche soit participative tout en restant rigoureuse et dans le domaine de la science biologique de haute qualité, en conservant différentes formes de participation et des ...

  5. Integrating rolling stock scheduling with train unit shunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Jørgen Thorlund; Lusby, Richard Martin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider integrating two important railway optimization problems, in particular the Rolling Stock Scheduling Problem and the Train Unit Shunting Problem. We present two similar branch-and-cut based approaches to solve this integrated problem and, in addition, provide a comparison...... of different approaches to solve the so-called Track Assignment Problem, a subcomponent of the Train Unit Shunting problem. In this analysis we demonstrate, by way of a counter example, the heuristic nature of a previously argued optimal approach. For the integrated problem we analyze the performance...... of the proposed approaches on several real-life case studies provided by DSB S-tog, a suburban train operator in the greater Copenhagen area. Computational results confirm the necessity of the integrated approach; high quality solutions to the integrated problem are obtained on instances where a conventional...

  6. Comparing and contrasting knowledge of pressure ulcer assessment, prevention and management in people with spinal cord injury among nursing staff working in two metropolitan spinal units and rehabilitation medicine training specialists in a three-way comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N; Loong, B; Leong, G

    2012-02-01

    To assess for differences in knowledge of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and management among nurses working in two metropolitan spinal cord injury (SCI) units, and between nurses and rehabilitation registrars (doctors). There is anecdotal evidence of wide variation in PU management. An understanding of current knowledge is fundamental to evidence-based practice implementation. This was a prospective survey, using a multiple choice question format developed with nurse wound specialists. A total of 10 questions assessed PU prevention and 10 assessed management. It was distributed to nurses working at the spinal units and rehabilitation registrars. The results from the groups were analysed for similarities and differences using one- and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests and tests for significance of specific linear combinations of group means. The response rate was 79% (19/24) and 71% (20/ 28) from the two SCI units, and 46% (13/28) from doctors. Doctors performed better than nurses on prevention questions (Pmanagement (Pmanagement knowledge (Pknowledge (Pmanagement questions). Rehabilitation registrars score better in prevention questions, but poorer in management questions, which reflects academic rather than experiential knowledge. There are also differences in management knowledge among nurses, based on work area rather than years of experience. Although knowledge does not necessarily reflect practice, this calls for better standardisation and implementation of wound management pathways.

  7. Identity work and identity regulation in managers' personal development training

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the role of personal development training in managers’ identity processes. Personal development training constitutes a local management discourse, which can influence both identity work and identity regulation processes. The study emphasizes the importance of personal life stories in understanding how managers are influenced by personal development training. The training provokes different processes of identity work and identity regulation, and managers actively work wi...

  8. Farm Management and Leadership. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three communication skills units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in farm management and leadership: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner with the reading, writing, and spoken communication skills needed to deal with…

  9. Building capacity for Health Impact Assessment: Training outcomes from the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchter, Joseph [Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutt, Candace, E-mail: awr8@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, 4770 Buford Highway MS/F-77, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Satariano, William A. [University of California Berkeley, School of Public Health, Division of Community Health and Human Development, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Despite the continued growth of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in the US, there is little research on HIA capacity-building. A comprehensive study of longer-term training outcomes may reveal opportunities for improving capacity building activities and HIA practice. Methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with HIA trainees in the United States to assess their outcomes and needs. Using a training evaluation framework, we measured outcomes across a spectrum of reaction, learning, behavior and results. Results: From 2006 to 2012, four organizations trained over 2200 people in at least 75 in-person HIA trainings in 29 states. We interviewed 48 trainees, selected both randomly and purposefully. The mean duration between training and interview was 3.4 years. Trainees reported that their training objectives were met, especially when relevant case-studies were used. They established new collaborations at the trainings and maintained them. Training appeared to catalyze more holistic thinking and practice, including a range of HIA-related activities. Many trainees disseminated what they learned and engaged in components of HIA, even without dedicated funding. Going forward, trainees need assistance with quantitative methods, project management, community engagement, framing recommendations, and evaluation. Conclusions: The research revealed opportunities for a range of HIA stakeholders to refine and coordinate training resources, apply a competency framework and leverage complimentary workforce development efforts, and sensitize and build the capacity of communities. - Highlights: • We interviewed HIA trainees in the United States to assess longer-term outcomes. • Training appeared to catalyze a range of beneficial partnerships and activities. • Trainees reported outstanding needs for specific skills and competencies. • There are various opportunities to improve training and capacity-building.

  10. 29 CFR 1960.54 - Training of top management officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of top management officials. 1960.54 Section 1960.54 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.54 Training of top management officials. Each agency shall...

  11. Identifying an Education Gap in Wound Care Training in United States Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Emily Stamell; Ingram, Amber; Landriscina, Angelo; Tian, Jiaying; Kirsner, Robert S; Friedman, Adam

    2015-07-01

    As restoration of the integument is paramount to wound healing, dermatologists should be central to managing wounds; yet this is often not the case. If a training gap exists during residency training, this may account for the observed discrepancy. To identify United States (US) dermatology residents' impressions regarding their preparedness to care for wounds, and to assess the amount and type of training devoted to wound care during residency. An online survey among current US dermatology residents enrolled in a residency training program. The primary goal was to determine whether dermatology residents believe more wound care education is needed, evaluate preparedness to care for wounds, and identify future plans to manage wounds. Responses were received from 175 of 517 (33.8%) US Dermatology residents contacted. The majority of residents did not feel prepared to manage acute (78.3%) and chronic (84.6%) wounds. Over three quarters (77.1%) felt that more education is needed. Fewer than half (49.1% and 35.4%) of residents planned to care for acute and chronic wounds, respectively, when in practice. There is a gap in wound care education in US dermatology residency training. This translates to a low percentage of dermatology residents planning to care for wounds in future practice. Dermatology residents need to receive focused wound care training in order to translate the underpinnings of wound healing biology and ultimately better serve patients.

  12. Technical Training Requirements of Middle Management in the Greek Textile and Clothing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotinopoulou, K.; Manolopoulos, N.

    A case study of 16 companies in the Greek textile and clothing industry elicited the training needs of the industry's middle managers. The study concentrated on large and medium-sized work units, using a lengthy questionnaire. The study found that middle managers increasingly need to solve problems and ensure the reliability of new equipment and…

  13. Middle Managers and the Environment: Attitudes and Training Interests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    ) middle managers, and (iii) workers. The project has been based partly on interviews in a small number of European companies at the forefront of environmental management and ditto educational and training institutions, and partly on more large-scale questionnaire surveys. This paper will briefly describe...... the background of the overall project, and, in more detail, the questionnaire survey on environmental attitudes and training interests among Danish middle managers.......It has long been recognised that education and training are essential to the development of environmental management in business organisations. So far, however, there has been little information about environmental management practice and related educational and training requirements in even...

  14. Smart Training: The Manager's Guide to Training for Improved Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Clay

    This book describes and advocates "smart training," an approach to on-the-job training that helps employees gain competence and empowers them to act to satisfy customers. The book is organized in 16 chapters grouped into 4 parts. Part 1 outlines the basics of smart training, including its performance base, the need for initial analysis,…

  15. Integrating rolling stock scheduling with train unit shunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Jørgen Thorlund; Lusby, Richard Martin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider integrating two important railway optimization problems, in particular the Rolling Stock Scheduling Problem and the Train Unit Shunting Problem. We present two similar branch-and-cut based approaches to solve this integrated problem and, in addition, provide a comparison......, sequential approach ends in infeasibility. Furthermore, for the considered instances, solutions are typically found within a few minutes, indicating the applicability of the methodology to short-term planning....

  16. Intensive care unit nurse managers' views regarding nurse staffing in their units in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, Mokgadi C; Botha, Annali D H

    2016-02-01

    To explore the views of the intensive care unit (ICU) nurse managers regarding nurse staffing in the large ICUs. A qualitative design was used to explore the views of the ICU managers. Four individual interviews were conducted with ICU managers. The interviews were audio recorded; transcribed verbatim and content data analysis was undertaken. The settings were ICUs of four private hospitals in the Tshwane metropolitan area in Gauteng Province, South Africa. Two themes that emerged from the data were shortage of competent and trained nurses and problems with agency nurses. Shortage of competent and trained nurses was associated with the global shortage of nurses; and led to increased patient-to-nurse ratios and the use of other categories of nurses, other than professional nurses. The problems with agency nurses were lack of ICU experience and lack of commitment to their professional work. These brought about risks in the provision of quality nursing care. Adequate numbers of competent and committed nurses is essential for efficient patient care and favourable outcomes in the ICUs. The findings demonstrate the importance of provision of ICU trained nurses for patient care, rather than nurse staffing simply to balance the numbers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A management framework for training providers to improve skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Training providers need an internal management framework to enable them to improve workplace skills development. ... The management role of workplace training providers in the midst of the skills revolution is under ...... Benefit Analysis to determine a Return on Investment; TQM or Total. Quality Management; and PMF or ...

  18. Human resource training and development. The outdoor management method.

    OpenAIRE

    THANOS KRIEMADIS; ANNA KOURTESOPOULOU

    2008-01-01

    In the age of international competition in today’s economy, companies must train their employees and prepare them for jobs in the future. There are many different types and educational approaches in human resource training, but the present study will focus on the Outdoor Management Development (OMD). For better understanding, the particular training method and the core stages of the training process will be examined and the definitions of OMD as an educational tool for management development ...

  19. The Organization and Management of Company Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Barry T.

    This document outlines the need for manpower training and discusses the components of adequate training as provided by the Industrial Training Act of March, 1964, in order to set guidelines and standards for industries involved in the training revolution in England. Besides training and what it entails, the document presents the philosophy of…

  20. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Office of Grants & Debarment (OGD) worked with the national Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (NPETE) to develop training materials. Training materials, including the training manuals & webinar recordings, are available for download.

  1. Analysis of brokerage feasibility for unit coal train shipments to the Midwest. [Unit train shipment and local distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, R.; Vezeris, S.; Wilkie, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of aggregating industry and utility demand for coal and serving the demand through a local brokerage operation to reduce transportation cost. This cost saving is associated with the economy of scale of unit train shipments. The delivered price of western coal is calculated for local users in a given midwest subregion based on present utility and industrial coal demand. The broker operation would consist of unit train hauls from western mines, a receiving and storage terminal, local truck or rail transportation from the terminal to each user, and possible transshipment to distant waterfront users. The research focuses on the Green Bay, Wisconsin area. Applicability of this brokerage concept to other areas receiving western coal shipments is also discussed.

  2. Leadership and Management: Techniques and Principles for Athletic Training

    OpenAIRE

    Nellis, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    Leadership and management have become topics of recent interest in athletic training. These skills are distinct from each other and are vital to a successful and efficient athletic training room. Leadership is an influence relationship, while management is an authority relationship. Leadership is concerned with knowing yourself, your staff, your profession, and how to apply people skills. Management is concerned with organization, communication, and the development of your athletic training f...

  3. Leadership and management: techniques and principles for athletic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, S M

    1994-12-01

    Leadership and management have become topics of recent interest in athletic training. These skills are distinct from each other and are vital to a successful and efficient athletic training room. Leadership is an influence relationship, while management is an authority relationship. Leadership is concerned with knowing yourself, your staff, your profession, and how to apply people skills. Management is concerned with organization, communication, and the development of your athletic training facility's mission. By applying good management and leadership skills, you can implement your mission statement, evaluate your results, and improve the performance of your athletic training facility.

  4. Leadership and Management: Techniques and Principles for Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    Leadership and management have become topics of recent interest in athletic training. These skills are distinct from each other and are vital to a successful and efficient athletic training room. Leadership is an influence relationship, while management is an authority relationship. Leadership is concerned with knowing yourself, your staff, your profession, and how to apply people skills. Management is concerned with organization, communication, and the development of your athletic training facility's mission. By applying good management and leadership skills, you can implement your mission statement, evaluate your results, and improve the performance of your athletic training facility. PMID:16558296

  5. The effect of stress fracture interventions in a single elite infantry training unit (1983-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Charles; Finestone, Aharon S

    2017-10-01

    stopping specific running exercises and adding lower body strengthening exercises were associated with a decrease in stress fracture. 67% of recruits who sustained stress fractures and 69% who did not sustain stress fracture finished their military service as combat soldiers in the unit (p=0.87). There are no magic bullets to prevent stress fractures. Stress cannot be lowered beyond the level which compromises the training goals. It is a problem that can be managed by awareness that identifies and treats stress fractures while they are still in the micro stage and not in the more dangerous macro stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Maxillofacial prosthetics training and practice profiles in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, James L; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Davis, Betsy K; Wee, Alvin G

    2017-10-01

    The motivation of maxillofacial prosthodontists to go into fellowship training and specific procedures in maxillofacial prosthetics practice once they have completed training has not been previously evaluated. The purpose of this study was to survey maxillofacial prosthodontists in the United States to investigate their reasons for pursuing maxillofacial prosthetic training and their practice profiles. In June 2015, a survey was sent to all US maxillofacial prosthodontists asking for descriptive demographics, their reasoning as to what prompted entrance into a maxillofacial prosthetic program, and their practice pattern. Frequencies, percentages, means, and standard deviations were calculated and reported. The survey response rate was 60.4%. The main reason for pursuing maxillofacial training was primarily personal satisfaction, prosthodontic residency exposure, and mentorship rather than media exposure and compensation. The time spent in prosthodontic practice varied among practitioners, with the majority of practice time spent accomplishing standard prosthodontic procedures (65.59%) versus maxillofacial (25.53%) or surgical procedures (9.67%). Of 12 clinical maxillofacial procedures inquired about, the most prevalent were obturators, dental oncology, and mandibular resections. This study reveals that personal satisfaction, mentorship, and prosthodontic residency exposure were the reasons most prosthodontists pursued an additional year of maxillofacial prosthetic fellowship. Most were very satisfied with their training and chosen career path and would recommend an additional year of training. The majority of maxillofacial prosthodontists provided maxillofacial prosthetic treatment for approximately one fourth of their practice time. The most common procedures performed were obturators, dental oncology, and mandibular resections. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Managed lanes handbook training : year 2 report of activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This report summarizes the Year 2 activities under Implementation Project 5-4160-01, Managed Lanes : Handbook Training. The overall objective of the project is to develop a 12-hour workshop covering The : Managed Lanes Handbook, and teach the materia...

  8. Assessment methods in surgical training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenios Evgeniou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A career in surgery in the United Kingdom demands a commitment to a long journey of assessment. The assessment methods used must ensure that the appropriate candidates are selected into a programme of study or a job and must guarantee public safety by regulating the progression of surgical trainees and the certification of trained surgeons. This review attempts to analyse the psychometric properties of various assessment methods used in the selection of candidates to medical school, job selection, progression in training, and certification. Validity is an indicator of how well an assessment measures what it is designed to measure. Reliability informs us whether a test is consistent in its outcome by measuring the reproducibility and discriminating ability of the test. In the long journey of assessment in surgical training, the same assessment formats are frequently being used for selection into a programme of study, job selection, progression, and certification. Although similar assessment methods are being used for different purposes in surgical training, the psychometric properties of these assessment methods have not been examined separately for each purpose. Because of the significance of these assessments for trainees and patients, their reliability and validity should be examined thoroughly in every context where the assessment method is being used.

  9. Human resource training and development. The outdoor management method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THANOS KRIEMADIS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the age of international competition in today’s economy, companies must train their employees and prepare them for jobs in the future. There are many different types and educational approaches in human resource training, but the present study will focus on the Outdoor Management Development (OMD. For better understanding, the particular training method and the core stages of the training process will be examined and the definitions of OMD as an educational tool for management development will be presented. Basic theories and models will be analysed as well as the benefits earned and evaluation concerns about the effectiveness of such training programs.

  10. How and why medically-trained managers undertake postgraduate management training - a qualitative study from Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the research question using qualitative research methods: how and why medically trained managers choose to undertake postgraduate management training? This research used two qualitative methods to gather data. Both methods used purposeful sampling to select interviewees with appropriate management expertise, qualifications and experience. The first stage utilised convergent interviews and was exploratory. The five interviewees were managers and academics. The second stage used case research methodology and was confirmatory. The fifteen interviewees were medically qualified chief executives and chief medical officers. In total, 20 in-depth interviews were carried. Rigorous content analysis of data collected showed emergent themes. The first theme that emerged was that doctors move into management positions without first undertaking training. The second theme was that doctors undertake such training in the form of a masters-level degree and/or a specialist fellowship. The third theme was that effective postgraduate management training for doctors requires a combination of theory and practice. The fourth theme was that clinical experience alone does not lead to required management competencies. The fifth theme was that doctors choose to undertake training to gain credibility. This research was exploratory and descriptive in nature and limited to analytical rather than statistical generalisation. This research has provided insights into the importance of understanding how and why doctors undertake postgraduate management training, and may assist policy makers and training providers in the development of such training for doctors.

  11. The Future of Management Training in Canadian Healthcare Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A case study of a Canadian health care organization and a Delphi study with a sample of subject-matter experts identified five themes for management training and development: continued tight financial constraints; greater accountability; need for better staff development and evaluation; cooperative resource sharing for management training; and…

  12. Airway management: A survey of training and practices of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Airway management is an integral part of anesthetist's training and clinical practice. Studies have suggested that opportunities for anesthesia trainees to learn and practice endotracheal intubation have decreased over time. We sought to examine the current training and practices of airway management by ...

  13. Designing Mixed Reality Mobile Games for Crisis Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, Ines; Mora, Simone; Divitini, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Games for crisis management offer an interesting complement to traditional training. Experiments on their usage show that games can be promising tools able to address some of the limitations of traditional training. Also our first assessment with a board game for panic management shows that this particular kind of game could be useful for soft…

  14. The Experience of Initial Management Training in ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Management training in ELT organizations is often inadequate. New managers are in severe need of training, especially for tasks which are non-pedagogical, yet they operate in a milieu where there are few opportunities for support compared with colleagues in mainstream education. The purpose of this case study, a rare evidence-based contribution to…

  15. Decreasing Students' Stress through Time Management Training: An Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Oberst, Verena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a time management training program on perceived control of time and perceived stress in the context of higher education. Twenty-three undergraduate students attended a time management training intervention and reported demands, perceived stress and perceived control of time directly before 2 and…

  16. Geriatric Medical Education and Training in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michéle J. Saunders

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical education in geriatrics is an important requirement to ready the profession to provide comprehensive health care to the world's and also Taiwan's aging population. The predoctoral curricula and postdoctoral training programs in the United States were developed and supported by government agencies and professional education societies. Geriatric medical education in American medical schools has improved in the past 20 years, yet is still facing many challenges. The purposes of this paper are to review the current progress of, and propose some main principles and policies for the development of geriatric medical education and current progress in the United States. Geriatric medical education should be mandatory to adequately prepare medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians to treat the elderly. The current progress and practice of geriatric medical education at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio are presented as an example.

  17. Opportunities for vocational training and training in investment project management in Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Vanya Antonova

    2015-01-01

    Possessing the necessary knowledge, skills and competences in the area of project management is a compulsory condition and major prerequisite for achieving professional management. In the article there are studied the possibilities for vocational education and training in the area of project management, specifically the management of investment projects. The analysis is built on types of institution, encompassing both the system of vocational education and training (including professional sec...

  18. A Hierarchy of Management Training Requirements: The Competency Domain Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwith, Paul

    1993-01-01

    The Competency Domain Model has five domains of management competencies: conceptual/creative, leadership, interpersonal, administrative, and technical. Specific competencies and training plans can be identified in each domain for different levels--first line supervisor, field office manager, assistant manager, area manager, director of operations.…

  19. Exploring how Conflict Management Training Changes Workplace Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima

    2012-01-01

    While many organisations offer conflict management training to both staff and management, there has been little research investigating the changes resulting from such training. Using an interpretive framework of analysis, a qualitative case study was conducted to understand how 'sensemakings' about...... conflicts change when enacted from the perspective of staff and management in a non-profit organisation that participated in conflict management training. The case study was constructed as a longitudinal investigation with ethnographic fieldwork as the primary method of inquiry. The training worked....... Some conflicts did not change through training, where the perpetual structural bases of the conflicts remained intact. Insights from the study call attention to the embedding of conflict in the organisation's social fabric. As a practical implication of the study, trainers in conflict management...

  20. Getting the Most of Management Training - the Role of Identical Elements for Training Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Dan Chiaburu; prof. dr. Karen van Dam; drs. Martijn van der Locht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - Focusing on management training, this study aimed to establish whether identical elements in a training program (i.e. aspects resembling participants' work situation) can improve training transfer and whether they do so beyond the contribution of two well-established predictors --

  1. Nursing unit managers, staff retention and the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine M; Roche, Michael A; Blay, Nicole; Stasa, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of leadership characteristics of nursing unit managers, as perceived by staff nurses, on staff satisfaction and retention. A positive work environment will increase levels of job satisfaction and staff retention. Nurse leaders play a critical role in creating a positive work environment. Important leadership characteristics of the front-line nurse manager include visibility, accessibility, consultation, recognition and support. Secondary analysis of data collected on 94 randomly selected wards in 21 public hospitals across two Australian states between 2004-2006. All nurses (n = 2488, 80·3% response rate) on the selected wards were asked to complete a survey that included the 49-item Nursing Work Index-Revised [NWI-R] together with measures of job satisfaction, satisfaction with nursing and intention to leave. Subscales of the NWI-R were calculated. Leadership, the domain of interest, consisted of 12 items. Wards were divided into those reporting either positive or negative leadership. Data were analysed at the nurse level using spss version 16. A nursing manager who was perceived to be a good leader, was visible, consulted with staff, provided praise and recognition and where flexible work schedules were available was found to distinguish the positive and negative wards. However, for a ward to be rated as positive overall, nurse leaders need to perform well on all the leadership items. An effective nursing unit manager who consults with staff and provides positive feedback and who is rated highly on a broad range of leadership items is instrumental in increasing job satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing. Good nurse managers play an important role in staff retention and satisfaction. Improved retention will lead to savings for the organisation, which may be allocated to activities such as training and mentorship to assist nurse leaders in developing these critical leadership skills. Strategies also need to be put in place to

  2. Nursing Management of Delirium in the Postanesthesia Care Unit and Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Neziha; Yaman Aktaş, Yeşim

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine nurses' approaches to care of patients with postoperative delirium in the postanesthesia care unit and intensive care unit. A descriptive survey design was used. Eighty-seven nurses who have been working at a Training and Research Hospital in Erzurum, east of Turkey, were enrolled in this study between October 1 and November 20, 2012. 83.9% of the nurses reported that they had given pharmacologic therapy for pain management in delirium patients, 39.1% massage, 31.0% rhythmic breathing exercise, and 26.4% music therapy. 90.8% of nurses also stated that they reduced noise and lighting at night to ensure normal sleep pattern. Nurses need to be supported to take part in courses, conferences, and training seminars. A standard data tool or scale needs to be used to assess delirium routinely in all patients admitted. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. H1N1 in dialysis units: Prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkar Ayman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis patients are at increased risk of contracting influenza A H1N1 and deve-loping serious illness. Increasing the awareness of dialysis patients and continuous education and training of medical staff on early recognition and management of influenza A H1N1 can help in saving the life of patients. Antiviral drugs and influenza vaccines are effective in providing ade-quate immunity in dialysis patients with strict implementation of infection control policies and procedures can help in preventing and controlling the dissemination of influenza A H1N1 in dia-lysis units. We report a case of a patient who presented with HINI influenza and developed acute kidney injury during his hospitalization and his course with disease.

  4. 40 CFR 264.552 - Corrective Action Management Units (CAMU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CAMU). 264.552 Section 264.552 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Special Provisions for Cleanup § 264.552 Corrective Action Management Units (CAMU). (a... management unit means an area within a facility that is used only for managing CAMU-eligible wastes for...

  5. EMG signal decomposition using motor unit potential train validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaei, Hossein; Stashuk, Daniel W

    2013-03-01

    A system to resolve an intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) signal into its component motor unit potential trains (MUPTs) is presented. The system is intended mainly for clinical applications where several physiological parameters of motor units (MUs), such as their motor unit potential (MUP) templates and mean firing rates, are of interest. The system filters an EMG signal, detects MUPs, and clusters and classifies the detected MUPs into MUPTs. Clustering is partially based on the K-means algorithm, and the supervised classification is implemented using a certainty-based algorithm. Both clustering and supervised classification algorithms use MUP shape and MU firing pattern information along with signal dependent assignment criteria to obtain robust performance across a variety of EMG signals. During classification, the validity of extracted MUPTs are determined using several supervised classifiers; invalid trains are corrected and the assignment threshold for each train is adjusted based on the estimated validity (i.e., adaptive classification). Performance of the developed system in terms of accuracy (A(c)), assignment rate (A(r)), correct classification rate (CC(r)) , and the error in estimating the number of MUPTs represented in the set of detected MUPs (E(NMUPTs)) was evaluated using 32 simulated and 30 real EMG signals comprised of 3-11 and 3-15 MUPTs, respectively. The developed system, with average CC(r) of 86.4% for simulated and 96.4% for real data, outperformed a previously developed EMG decomposition system, with average CC(r) of 71.6% and 89.7% for simulated and real data, by 14.7% and 6.7%, respectively. In terms of E(NMUPTs), the new system, with average E(NMUPTs) of 0.3 and 0.2 for simulated and real data respectively, was better able to estimate the number of MUPTs represented in a set of detected MUPs than the previous system, with average E(NMUPTs) of 2.2 and 0.8 for simulated and real data respectively. For both the simulated and real data used

  6. A Treatment Train Approach To Catchment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nick; Quinn, Paul; Org, EdenDTC

    2017-04-01

    The treatment train approach has been attempted in a 1.6km2 catchment in the River Eden as part of the UK Demonstration Test Catchment Project. The catchment is one of three detailed study catchments of 10km2 that are investigating diffuse pollution losses from an intense grassland farming system. The catchment is very susceptible to saturation and high losses of fine sediment and phosphorus in storm events. The poster will show how a sequence of mitigation features that target nutrient sources and flow pathways can reduce nutrient losses. 5 features have been installed from farmyard runoff control, along polluting tracks and sediment traps in the farm ditch network. Together the features can slow, store and trap sediment and pollutants. The potential to have further impacts on flood generation and drought mitigation are also being studied. Although the features are currently small in size the ability to directly reduce pollution can be demonstrated. Hence, the potential to scale up these features to a broader catchment scale can be explored and the likely costs and benefits can be simulated. This work builds upon similar work addressing flood control features, sediment trapping on farms and methods for the direct mitigation of fast polluting pathways often referred to as Nature Based Solutions. The designs and construction of the completed features will be shown in the poster. Early results show that the combined effect of the 5 features can significantly impact on sediment and pollution during storm events. The specific yield of the impact was 42 kg of suspended sediment/ha 0.06 kg P/ha of P trapped and 0.16 kg of N/ha. This mitigation impact is derived from an area of only 0.02% of the catchment. The potential to increase the mitigated area is thus large. Payment schemes for farmers could encourage the take up the of these methods and future maintenance regimes for managing the features would also have to be created. However, the potential to mitigate fast

  7. Vision training methods for sports concussion mitigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph F; Colosimo, Angelo; Ellis, James K; Mangine, Robert; Bixenmann, Benjamin; Hasselfeld, Kimberly; Graman, Patricia; Elgendy, Hagar; Myer, Gregory; Divine, Jon

    2015-05-05

    There is emerging evidence supporting the use vision training, including light board training tools, as a concussion baseline and neuro-diagnostic tool and potentially as a supportive component to concussion prevention strategies. This paper is focused on providing detailed methods for select vision training tools and reporting normative data for comparison when vision training is a part of a sports management program. The overall program includes standard vision training methods including tachistoscope, Brock's string, and strobe glasses, as well as specialized light board training algorithms. Stereopsis is measured as a means to monitor vision training affects. In addition, quantitative results for vision training methods as well as baseline and post-testing *A and Reaction Test measures with progressive scores are reported. Collegiate athletes consistently improve after six weeks of training in their stereopsis, *A and Reaction Test scores. When vision training is initiated as a team wide exercise, the incidence of concussion decreases in players who participate in training compared to players who do not receive the vision training. Vision training produces functional and performance changes that, when monitored, can be used to assess the success of the vision training and can be initiated as part of a sports medical intervention for concussion prevention.

  8. Large-scale computer-mediated training for management teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Salmon

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995/6 the Open University Business School (OUBS trained 187 tutors in the UK and Continental Western Europe in Computer Mediated Conferencing (CMC for management education. The medium chosen for the training was FirstClassTM. In 1996/7 the OUBS trained a further 106 tutors in FirstClassTM using an improved version of the previous years training. The on line training was based on a previously developed model of learning on line. The model was tested both by means of the structure of the training programme and the improvements made. The training programme was evaluated and revised for the second cohort. Comparison was made between the two training programmes.

  9. Community-Based Solid Waste Management: A Training Facilitator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Urban environmental management and environmental health issues are of increasing concern worldwide. The need for urban environmental management work at the local level where the Peace Corps works most effectively is significant, but training materials dedicated specifically to community-based solid waste management work in urban areas are lacking.…

  10. Quality Management Builds Solid eTraining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echard, Rachel D.; Berge, Zane L.

    2008-01-01

    History has shown effective training techniques can produce significant business results especially in customer service, product development, and capability in obtaining new skill sets. This linkage of training to business strategy has given many businesses the needed competitive edge in today's global market. In today's technology age,…

  11. Better training, better management, better school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Gómez Delgado

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The school head is presented in the literature as a key factor in improving schools and school performance of students, so that training for managerial tasks is critical for achieving greater competence in the exercise of office. This research shows that in the Andalusian Community is organized a complex Initial Training Program, in which the mentoring and the Working Groups are the most valuable training modalities. Both modes, with expert presentations, case studies, online training, and regional development events, create a situation that allows new school head feel a level of competence higher than average in all managerial competences identified by Teixido (2007, except the leadership for learning. Therefore is needed better training on issues related to the curriculum and improving schools.

  12. 76 FR 34271 - Hewlett Packard, Global Parts Supply Chain, Global Product Life Cycles Management Unit, Including...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard, Global Parts Supply Chain, Global Product Life Cycles... workers of Hewlett Packard, Global Parts Supply Chain, Global Product Life Cycles Management Unit...

  13. The Role of an Academic Development Unit in Supporting Institutional VET Learning and Teaching Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotinatos, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role and impact of a central academic development unit (ADU) within an institutional strategic and operational change management project. The primary goal of this project was to improve vocational education and training (VET) learning and teaching practice in an Australian dual-sector regional university.…

  14. Management training programmes: the influence of managerial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings of the study revealed that managerial status had significantly influenced learning effectiveness. Also, old managers learn more than the young manager on psychological issues, such as stress management, workers motivation and career development. Male managers were found to be more responsive to ...

  15. Medical leadership and management in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyratsis, Yiannis; Armit, Kirsten; Zyada, Azra; Lees, Peter

    2016-06-01

    This article aims to outline the historical development of medical leadership in the United Kingdom (UK), present recent advances, and discuss professional development and future prospects. With increasing involvement of medical professionals in top managerial roles in the UK over the last 30 years, leadership development initiatives have been growing steadily and there is increasing recognition of the need for leadership and management skills for doctors. Such skills can help to greatly improve patient care as well as enhance organisational effectiveness and productivity. The central involvement of professional bodies such as the UK Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management, and the establishment of medical fellowship schemes, have provided a solid foundation for a new generation of aspiring medical leaders but there is still a long way to go to achieve a higher degree of professionalism for clinical leadership in the UK. The evidence base is weak such that integrated efforts by clinicians and management academics have much to offer in achieving the vision of socially responsible, clinically relevant and research informed medical leadership training. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  16. The Development Strategies for the Management Models of the Electronic Documents and Records in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Yen Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The trend toward electronic government has espoused a large quantity of electronic records, which challenge the existing records management models in the modern countries. This paper describes and compares the development and transition toward electronic records management in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia to show how the three advanced countries evolved the government records management practices. The analysis emphasized on the holistic policy initiative perspective and compared the directives and regulations, research and development programs and plans, the emerging structures of governance, staffing and professional training, and risk management provisions. The comparison may shed lights on the government electronic management in the other countries. [Article content in Chinese

  17. Improved trauma management with advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M J; Lockey, A S; Culshaw, M C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training for medical staff in a major incident situation, based upon performance in a simulated exercise. METHODS: A major incident exercise was used to assess the management of trauma victims arriving in hospital suffering from multiple or life threatening injuries. The effect of ATLS training, or exposure to an abbreviated form of ATLS training, on the management of patients with simulated life threatening traumatic injuries was examined. The treatment offered by medical staff of different grades and varying exposure to ATLS training was compared. RESULTS: Medical staff who had undertaken ATLS training attained a higher number of ATLS key treatment objectives when treating the simulated trauma victims. CONCLUSION: Medical staff who have either undertaken the full ATLS course or an abbreviated form of the course were more effective in their management of the simulated trauma cases. PMID:9132197

  18. Improved trauma management with advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M J; Lockey, A S; Culshaw, M C

    1997-03-01

    To determine the value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) training for medical staff in a major incident situation, based upon performance in a simulated exercise. A major incident exercise was used to assess the management of trauma victims arriving in hospital suffering from multiple or life threatening injuries. The effect of ATLS training, or exposure to an abbreviated form of ATLS training, on the management of patients with simulated life threatening traumatic injuries was examined. The treatment offered by medical staff of different grades and varying exposure to ATLS training was compared. Medical staff who had undertaken ATLS training attained a higher number of ATLS key treatment objectives when treating the simulated trauma victims. Medical staff who have either undertaken the full ATLS course or an abbreviated form of the course were more effective in their management of the simulated trauma cases.

  19. TRAINING OF E-LEARNING MANAGERS: COMPETENCY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the competencies necessary for the successful professional activity of e-learning managers. The content of the professional qualification "e-learning manager" is revealed. The model of competency system of the e-learning manager is offered. The model, which defines the content, forms, methods and means of training, tools and indicators for assessing the results of training e-learning managers by levels, is substantiated. Examples of competency tasks for forming of professional competencies in innovative teaching methods and technologies, Web 2.0 services, e-learning expertise, e-environment design, IT infrastructure management, and the development of Soft skills are presented. It is proposed to solve the problem of training specialists who will be able not only to use ICT in educational activities, but also to master the competencies of e-learning management.

  20. Biofeedback Training in Crisis Managers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Brunner, B; Oppenrieder, S; Duschek, S

    2017-06-01

    Working in crisis environments represents a major challenge, especially for executive personnel engaged in directing disaster operations, i.e. crisis managers. Crisis management involves operating under conditions of extreme stress resulting, for instance, from high-level decision-making, principal responsibility for personnel, multitasking or working under conditions of risk and time pressure. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a newly developed biofeedback training procedure based on electrodermal activity, especially designed for the target group of crisis managers. The training comprised exercises promoting acquisition of control over sympathetic arousal under resting conditions and during exposure to visual, acoustic and cognitive stressors resembling situations related to crisis management. In a randomized controlled design, 36 crisis managers were assigned to either a biofeedback training group or waiting list control group. Subjective stress was assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. In the training group, stress level markedly decreased; the decrease remained stable at follow-up 2 months after the training. The results indicate that biofeedback training in crisis management is an effective method for stress management that may help to reduce vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and stress-related disease.

  1. A conceptual framework for cost management training in the Limpopo Province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Karien; Mothiba, Tebogo Maria

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the perceptions of nurse managers about their dual role in nursing units as cost centres. The tertiary hospital in the Limpopo province is the first institution to appoint nurse managers with a dual role in cost centres. The development of a conceptual framework for a context-specific programme for Cost Centre Managers is the first of its nature in South Africa. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive design was followed. The target population included nurse managers (n = 35) formally appointed as cost centre managers with a dual role of delivering quality care and cost management. A focus group and individual interviews were conducted until data saturation occurred. Personal and professional distress, an empowering potential of being a cost centre manager, and the need for decentralized cost centre management were indicated as barriers for nurse managers that led to a framework for a context-specific training programme. There is a need for a context-specific training programme for cost centre managers in a hospital with cost centres. The training of cost centre managers for their dual role in cost centres could enhance cost effectiveness, quality care and staff satisfaction. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The making of a manager: Evidence from military officer training

    OpenAIRE

    Grönqvist, Erik; Lindqvist, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We show that officer training during the Swedish military service has a strong positive effect on the probability to attain a managerial position later in life. The most intense type of officer training increases the probability of becoming a civilian manager by about 5 percentage points, or 75 percent. Officer training also increases educational attainment post-military service. We argue that the effect on civilian leadership could be due to acquisition of leadership specific skills during t...

  3. An ethical leadership program for nursing unit managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Hee; Park, Mihyun; Choi, Kyungok; Kim, Mi Kyoung

    2017-12-19

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of an ethical leadership program (ELP) on ethical leadership, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and job outcomes of nursing unit managers (UMs) and to examine changes in staff nurses' perception about UMs' EL, OCB, job outcomes, and ethical work environments (EWEs) post-ELP. A quasi-experimental (pre- and post-test design) study conducted six-month intervention (ELP) using self-reported UM survey (n=44), and staff nurses (n=158) were randomly extracted by two steps. The Korean version of Ethical Leadership at Work for UMs' self-ethical leadership, the Ethical Leadership Scale for staff nurses' perceived ethical leadership, a 19-item OCB scale, and six dimensions of the medium-sized Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II for job outcomes and EWEs were administered at baseline and post-intervention. UMs' ethical leadership scores differed significantly over time in people orientation (p=0.041) and concern for ethical leadership sustainability (p=0.002) adjusting for UM experience duration and nursing unit type. Total mean and level of power-sharing of ethical leadership among UMs with <5years of UM experience improved significantly over time. Of staff nurses' perception changes about UMs' ethical leadership, OCB, job outcomes, and EWEs, significant improvement over time appeared only in EWEs' work influence level (p=0.007). This study provides useful information for clinical ELP development and examining the program's effect on leadership skills and followers' outcomes. Program facilitation relies on practical training methods, participant motivation, and assessment outcome designs by controlling clinical confounding factors. Findings have implications as an attempt for intervention to promote competencies related to ethical leadership of nursing unit managers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 2014 National Asset Management Conference and training on implementation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report documents the major research activities conducted as part of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) : Transportation Pooled Fund (TPF) Program project, TPF-5(275) 2014 National Asset Management Conference and Training on : Implementati...

  5. Airway management: A survey of training and practices of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-21

    Feb 21, 2014 ... Background: Airway management is an integral part of anesthetist's training and clinical practice. Studies have suggested that opportunities for anesthesia trainees to learn and practice endotracheal intubation have decreased over time. We sought to examine the current training and practices of airway ...

  6. Predictors of Management Training Effectiveness for Nursing Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Nicholas; Kuehl, Charles

    1976-01-01

    The study examined the moderating effects that nursing supervisors' leadership styles and interpersonal needs have on changes between their pre and post-training measures of leadership attitudes and opinions. The 119 subjects were participants in a two day management development training program. Tabulated findings and implications for hospitals…

  7. Development of Managers' Emotional Competencies: Mind-Body Training Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruicic, Dusan; Benton, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to research about the effect of mind-body training on the development of emotional competencies of managers. Design/methodology/approach: Quasi-experimental design, i.e. before and after (test-retest). Findings: Results showed that the experimental group, after training, achieved around 15 per cent higher scores compared…

  8. UK Managers' Conceptions of Employee Training and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowall, Almuth; Saunders, Mark N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The first purpose of this paper is to review the practical and theoretical distinctions between training and development in the organisational psychology and human resource development (HRD) literatures. Then the paper seeks to investigate how managers responsible for the training and development function conceptualise these activities in…

  9. Crew resource management training within the automotive industry: does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Nicki; Robelski, Swantje; Hoeger, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    This article presents the development, implementation, and evaluation of a crew resource management (CRM) training program specifically designed for employees within the automotive industry. The central objective of this training program was to improve communication, teamwork, and stress management skills as well to increase the workers' situational awareness of potential errors that can occur during the production process. Participants in the training program of this study were 80 employees, all of whom were working in a production unit for gearbox manufacturing. Effectiveness of the CRM training course was evaluated two times (1 month and 6 months after the training program). The results showed a significant improvement in a wide range of CRM-relevant categories, especially in teamwork-related attitudes, in addition to an increase in the workers' situational awareness after the training program. On the basis of the results, it can be stated that CRM training, which was originally developed for the aviation industry, can be transferred to the automotive industry. However, because of the lack of behavioral observations, these effects are limited to CRM attitudes and knowledge changes. Several recommendations for future research and training development in the field of human factors training are made.

  10. Determining water management training needs through stakeholder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is a water-stressed country and the efficient management of the demand for and frugal use of water is a topic that can no longer be avoided. Community-based natural resource management is an alternative approach to government stewardship of natural resources, and in the instance of water management it is ...

  11. Training Packages: The Scientific Management of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, John

    The theory of scientific management was established as a way to increase workers' productivity. The following are among the key principles underpinning scientific management: task simplification and division of labor boost productivity; management must control the planning of work down to its minutiae; and remuneration should be based on output.…

  12. Understanding how train dispatchers manage and control trains : results of a cognitive task analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    This report documents the results of a Cognitive Task Analysis that examined how experienced railroad dispatchers manage and : schedule trains in todays environment. The objective was to understand the cognitive demands placed on railroad dispatch...

  13. RESEARCH ON ROMANIAN MANAGER TRAINING IN PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuşa Ana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the implementation of educational reform, school leadership has become very important. School principals have become managers and it was necessary a qualification process for them. The purpose of this study was to establish training needs and training school managers. The research instrument was a questionnaire applied to a number of 38 school managers of the eight regions of Romania. Analyzing data from the questionnaires respondents received, we found the following: • there is a clear idea of managerial tasks • school management issues are not fully known by the respondents. School education directors reported several problems such as: • Requiring high problems that have not been trained • The need for skills in areas such as accounting, administration, legal, information technology • Making teaching standard together with managerial activity A percentage of 62.70% of executives felt they were not sufficiently prepared for effective business management.

  14. Train-to-Train Impact Test of Crash-Energy Management Passenger Rail Equipment: Occupant Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-06

    As part of an ongoing passenger rail crashworthiness effort, : a full-scale impact test of a train with crash energy management : (CEM) passenger cars was conducted on March 23, 2006. In : this test, a train made up of a CEM cab car, four CEM coach :...

  15. The Impact of PMIS Training: Patterns of Benefit Realization in Project Management Information Systems Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew McCarty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of project, program, and portfolio management software toolsets can be enhanced through training. Little is known about the realization of positive, beneficial outcomes and Project Management Information System (PMIS training. This research seeks to improve understanding of project management software toolset training practices and outcomes. This study examines the prevalence, effectiveness, and impact-per-hour efficiency of training in real-world organizations. We further explore relationships between individual and organizational characteristics and training outcomes. Formulae for estimating training costs are derived using regression modeling. Surveys were collected from 1,021 active professionals and analyzed using quantitative methods. Research participants were practitioners recruited by eight different companies, industry groups, and professional organizations within the PMIS community. The findings of this research indicate significant differences in utilization, efficacy, and efficiency of PMIS training in practice. The outcomes and methodologies of this study are being incorporated into ongoing research that focuses on improving PMIS training delivery, evaluation, and planning. The outcomes of this research may result in more effective, efficient, and economical PMIS training that is better tailored to the unique needs of each organization.

  16. Operative training in otolaryngology in the United Kingdom: a specialist registrar survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgalas, Christos; Hadjihannas, Edward; Ghufoor, Khalid; Pracy, Paul; Papesch, Michael

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the current status of operative training for otolaryngology specialist registrars in the United Kingdom. DESIGN: Web-based questionnaire survey. PARTICIPANTS: All otolaryngology specialist registrars in the United Kingdom. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The overall satisfaction with

  17. TRAININGS AND MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT AT TESCO IN SZEGED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László GULYÁS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important function of human resource management is doing the human resource planning (HRP. It means that effective HRP should result the right people doing the right things in the right place at precisely the right time. If HR-experts do not able to handle precisely this function a gap arises. The exact name of it is training gap. The essence of training gap that there is a difference between employee’s actual performance and employee’s desire performance. The main aim of training is to eliminate this kind of gap. In this paper I examine one of the multinational firms – this is TESCO in Szeged – how to eliminate the training gaps and how to do human resource development. I survey what kind of trainings and manager development does TESCO have.

  18. Progress toward improved leadership and management training in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ronald L; Hassell, Lewis A; Parks, Eric R

    2014-04-01

    Competency gaps in leadership and laboratory management skills continue to exist between what training programs deliver and what recent graduates and future employers expect. A number of recent surveys substantiate this. Interest in delivering content in these areas is challenged by time constraints, the presence of knowledgeable faculty role models, and the necessary importance placed on diagnostic skills development, which overshadows any priority trainees have toward developing these skills. To describe the problem, the near-future horizon, the current solutions, and the recommendations for improving resident training in laboratory management. The demands of new health care delivery models and the value being placed on these skills by the Pathology Milestones and Next Accreditation System initiative of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for training programs emphasizes their importance. This initiative includes 6 milestone competencies in laboratory management. Organizations like the American Society for Clinical Pathology, the American Pathology Foundation, the College of American Pathologists, and the Association of Pathology Chairs Program Directors Section recognize these competencies and are working to create new tools for training programs to deploy. It is our recommendation that (1) every training program develop a formal educational strategy for management training, (2) greater opportunity and visibility be afforded for peer-reviewed publications on management topics in mainstream pathology literature, and (3) pathology milestones-oriented tools be developed to assist program directors and their trainees in developing this necessary knowledge and skills.

  19. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  20. Training staff to manage challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  1. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  2. Education and Training in Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošková-Mayerová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Quality education is an indispensable prerequisite for all kinds of human activities. No area of human activity if it has to function properly can exist without sophisticated education that determines the quality of workers in the given area. Training of public administration officials is a very important step to ensure conditions for adequate…

  3. Impression Management Training: Conceptualization and Application to Personal Selling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Dale G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of impression management, an individual's conscious attempt to exercise control over selected communicative behaviors and cues for purposes of making a desired impression. Provides a comprehensive conceptualization of the impression-management process, and demonstrates how this process can facilitate effective training of…

  4. Persistent Classroom Management Training Needs of Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Laura M.; Montague, Marcia L.; Landmark, Leena Jo; Williams-Diehm, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Experienced special education teachers (n = 62) were surveyed on their professional preparation to become effective classroom managers. Despite having received extensive preservice training, over 83% of the sample reported being underprepared in classroom management and behavioral interventions. No statistically significant difference was found…

  5. Managing Customer Credit and Collections. PACE Revised. Level 3. Unit 17. Research & Development Series No. 240CB17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This individualized, competency-based unit on managing customer credit and collection, the 17th of 18 modules, is on the third level of the revised Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). Intended for the advanced secondary and postsecondary levels and for adults wanting training or retraining, this unit, together with the…

  6. Relationship Between Labor and Delivery Unit Management Practices and Maternal Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plough, Avery C; Galvin, Grace; Li, Zhonghe; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Alidina, Shehnaz; Henrich, Natalie J; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Berry, William R; Gawande, Atul A; Peter, Doris; McDonald, Rory; Caldwell, Donna L; Muri, Janet H; Bingham, Debra; Caughey, Aaron B; Declercq, Eugene R; Shah, Neel T

    2017-08-01

    To define, measure, and characterize key competencies of managing labor and delivery units in the United States and assess the associations between unit management and maternal outcomes. We developed and administered a management measurement instrument using structured telephone interviews with both the primary nurse and physician managers at 53 diverse hospitals across the United States. A trained interviewer scored the managers' interview responses based on management practices that ranged from most reactive (lowest scores) to most proactive (highest scores). We established instrument validity by conducting site visits among a subsample of 11 hospitals and established reliability using interrater comparison. Using a factor analysis, we identified three themes of management competencies: management of unit culture, patient flow, and nursing. We constructed patient-level regressions to assess the independent association between these management themes and maternal outcomes. Proactive management of unit culture and nursing was associated with a significantly higher risk of primary cesarean delivery in low-risk patients (relative risk [RR] 1.30, 95% CI 1.02-1.66 and RR 1.47, 95% CI 1.13-1.92, respectively). Proactive management of unit culture was also associated with a significantly higher risk of prolonged length of stay (RR 4.13, 95% CI 1.98-8.64), postpartum hemorrhage (RR 2.57, 95% CI 1.58-4.18), and blood transfusion (RR 1.87, 95% CI 1.12-3.13). Proactive management of patient flow and nursing was associated with a significantly lower risk of prolonged length of stay (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.12-0.46 and RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.11-0.62, respectively). Labor and delivery unit management varies dramatically across and within hospitals in the United States. Some proactive management practices may be associated with increased risk of primary cesarean delivery and maternal morbidity. Other proactive management practices may be associated with decreased risk of prolonged length

  7. Lessons Learned From Joint Training Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    address the environmental, social and economic aspects of conducting business. This process also includes procurement being considered as an integral part...elevation from approximately 240m to 450m above Ordnance Datum (aOD). The high ground acts as a watershed between the River Coquet and the River Rede , which...the River Coquet or southwards towards the River Rede . Alongside military training, the land is utilised primarily for sheep farming (cows are also

  8. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  9. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410...-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management training... Part B covers outpatient diabetes self-management training for a beneficiary who has been diagnosed...

  10. Virtual Reality Applications for Stress Management Training in the Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, Federica; Argenton, Luca; Toniazzi, Nicola; Aceti, Luciana; Mantovani, Fabrizia

    2016-12-01

    Stress Management Training programs are increasingly being adopted in the military field for resilience empowerment and primary stress prevention. In the last several years, advanced technologies (virtual reality in particular) have been integrated in order to develop more innovative and effective stress training programs for military personnel, including soldiers, pilots, and other aircrew professionals. This systematic review describes experimental studies that have been conducted in recent years to test the effectiveness of virtual reality-based Stress Management Training programs developed for military personnel. This promising state-of-the-art technology has the potential to be a successful new approach in empowering soldiers and increasing their resilience to stress. To provide an overview from 2001 to 2016 of the application of virtual reality for Stress Management Training programs developed for the military, a computer-based search for relevant publications was performed in several databases. Databases used in the search were PsycINFO, Web of Science (Web of Knowledge), PubMed, and Medline. The search string was: ("Virtual Reality") AND ("Military") AND ["Stress Training" OR ("Stress Management")]. There were 14 studies that met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The main observation to be drawn from this review is that virtual reality can provide interactive Stress Management Training to decrease levels of perceived stress and negative affect in military personnel. This technology appears to be a promising tool for assessing individuals' resilience to stress and for identifying the impact that stress can have on physiological reactivity and performance.Pallavicini F, Argenton L, Toniazzi N, Aceti L, Mantovani F. Virtual realtiy applications for stress management training in the military. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(12):1021-1030.

  11. Strategies business of the unit providing services of virtual training – unipanamericana compensar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Marcela Cardona Bedoya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of processes thesis of "Master in Management and Marketing Management and Global New Markets" for the University Camilo José Cela. The data collection is done through an exploratory research and the study of business unit Unit Providing Services of Virtual Training Unipanamericana - Compensate. Considering secondary sources we identified: 1 The most important in the world and in Colombia at the level of new technologies, 2 The development trends of the array Mic Mac establishes the relationship between trends and portfolio of the business unit. And 3 Identify the growth of applications and the impact of E-learning. The collection and analysis of information on the qualitative method developed through interviews, aiming to identify trends that impact the marketing plan. In the analysis were found four trends that impact the line of business: The joint educational levels, The new educational experiences, Changes in learning models and Strengthening education systems. These trends were explored in an evaluative context, to identify new technologies that are necessary for professional development.   

  12. Global Diversity and Academic Success of Foreign-Trained Academic Neurosurgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Kumar, Nishant Ganesh; Reynolds, Rebecca A; Hale, Andrew T; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the proportion of academic neurosurgeons practicing in the United States who acquired residency training outside of the United States and compare their training backgrounds and academic success with those who received their residency training in the United States. We identified 1338 clinically active academic neurosurgeons from 104 programs that participated in the neurosurgery residency match in the United States in January-February 2015. Their training backgrounds, current academic positions, and history of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from publicly accessible sources. Eighty-four U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) received their residency training in 20 different countries outside of the United States/Puerto Rico, representing all major regions of the world. The majority trained in Canada (n = 48). We found no major differences between the foreign-trained and U.S.-trained neurosurgeons in male:female ratio, year of starting residency, proportion with positions in medical schools ranked in the top 15 by the U.S. News and World Report, general distribution of academic positions, and proportion with an NIH grant. Compared with U.S.-trained academic neurosurgeons, foreign-trained academic neurosurgeons had a significantly higher proportion of Ph.D. degrees (32.1% vs. 12.3%; P academic practices of the foreign-trained neurosurgeons were widely distributed throughout the United States. A small group of U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) have acquired residency training outside of the United States, representing all major regions of the world. Their general demographic data and academic accomplishments are comparable to those of U.S.-trained neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods: Uniting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2003-07-31

    Jul 31, 2003 ... Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods analyses and extends this premise to show unequivocally that the process of research for improving natural resource management must incorporate participatory and user-focused approaches, leading to development based on the needs and ...

  14. Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods: Uniting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    31 juil. 2003 ... Management of local resources has a greater chance of a sustainable outcome when there is partnership between local people and external agencies, and agendas relevant to their aspirations and circumstances. Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods analyses and extends this premise ...

  15. The United Kingdom's School Asset Management Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Examines the U.K.'s Asset Management Plans (AMPs) designed to help Local Education Authorities (LEAs) identify and address the most important priorities in their school capital programs, and to help in their longer term planning and management of the school estate. Discusses AMP objectives, the stages of developing an AMP, and how the Department…

  16. Training hospital managers for strategic planning and management: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic-Supic, Zorica; Bjegovic-Mikanovic, Vesna; Vukovic, Dejana; Santric-Milicevic, Milena; Marinkovic, Jelena; Vasic, Vladimir; Laaser, Ulrich

    2015-02-26

    Training is the systematic acquisition of skills, rules, concepts, or attitudes and is one of the most important components in any organization's strategy. There is increasing demand for formal and informal training programs especially for physicians in leadership positions. This study determined the learning outcomes after a specific training program for hospital management teams. The study was conducted during 2006 and 2007 at the Centre School of Public Health and Management, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade and included 107 participants involved in the management in 20 Serbian general hospitals. The management teams were multidisciplinary, consisting of five members on average: the director of the general hospital, the deputy directors, the head nurse, and the chiefs of support services. The managers attended a training program, which comprised four modules addressing specific topics. Three reviewers independently evaluated the level of management skills at the beginning and 12 months after the training program. Principal component analysis and subsequent stepwise multiple linear regression analysis were performed to determine predictors of learning outcomes. The quality of the SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analyses performed by the trainees improved with differences between 0.35 and 0.49 on a Likert scale (p strategic planning. Following the training program, the external environment, strategic positioning, and quality of care were predictors of learning outcomes. The four regression models used showed that the training program had positive effects (p Strategic Plan comprising the hospital mission, vision, strategic objectives, and action plan. This study provided evidence that training for strategic planning and management enhanced the strategic decision-making of hospital management teams, which is a requirement for hospitals in an increasingly competitive, complex and challenging context. For the first time, half of

  17. Management and Supervisory Training: A Review and Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    analysis of the state of the art of small-group methods of instruc- tion. It describes some of the more commonly used small-group techniques and the...state-of-the- art survey of simu- lation were conducted, and 351 games and simulations were surveyed to determine relevance for junior officers. After... psychoanalysis , and conventional management training courses. It shows members of the training session how to eliminate fears of failure, how to be more

  18. Training Our Future Teachers: Classroom Management. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Julie; Putman, Hannah; Walsh, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This report examines traditional teacher preparation in classroom management, which is a struggle for many teachers, especially new ones. 122 teacher preparation programs--both elementary and secondary, graduate and undergraduate--were examined to review the full breadth of the professional sequence. The following conclusions are made as a result…

  19. Training system for load managers. Trainingssystem fuer Lastverteiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, W.; Scheele, K.

    1992-09-01

    The training and education system will be an integral part of the future control system in load distribution of the Hamburg Electricity Works (HEW). The heart of this is a process simulator in which the network with its protective devices, the powerstations and the transmission grid are simulated. The simulator makes the training of operating engineers in load distribution possible with regard to network operational control and energy management. The quick rebuilding of the despatch network after network failures or collapse can also be included in training. (orig.).

  20. Small Unit Management Project : 1990 : Cooperator Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this project is to determine the recruitment potential of mallards and other dabbling ducks for use in assessing the effectiveness of management...

  1. Systems-Based Aspects in the Training of IMG or Previously Trained Residents: Comparison of Psychiatry Residency Training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, India, and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Mazhar, Mir Nadeem; Uga, Aghaegbulam; Punwani, Manisha; Broquet, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: International medical graduates (IMGs) account for a significant proportion of residents in psychiatric training in the United States. Many IMGs may have previously completed psychiatry residency training in other countries. Their experiences may improve our system. Authors compared and contrasted psychiatry residency training in the…

  2. Handbook for Training Management during System Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    for AFSC. (AFSCR 23-10) Regardless of the division executing SPO responsibility, AFR 800-8 requires the SPO program manager to integrate logis- tics ...HQ USAF/ LEYE , 7 February 1980. 24. US Department of the Air Force: Headquarters US Air Force. AFR 800-12: Acquisition of Support Equipment. Washington...AFR 800-21: Interim Contractor Support for Systems and Equipment. Washington, DC: HQ USAF/ LEYE , 26 September 1978. 27. US Department of the Air Force

  3. Configuration and Management Tool for Laboratory Training

    OpenAIRE

    Arnous, Saher; Lelevé, Arnaud; Kouiss, Khalid; Prévot, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Electronic Laboratories have been growing during the last decade, but till now, configuring acomplex automated system shared between several institutes and used for several disciplines, is a process restricted to qualified staff. Moreover, tuthoring and managing lab resources (programs, learningscenarios, documentation for both instructors and trainees) is a complex task as soon as the number of instructors, disciplines, different levels... grows up.This paper introduc...

  4. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE DISCRIMINATION, EDUCATION, AND DIVERSITY TRAINING: A COMPARATIVE STUDY IN THE UNITED STATES AND THAILAND

    OpenAIRE

    Bahaudin G. M ujtaba; Frank J. Cavico; Albert A. Williams; Jatuporn Sungkhawan

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript explores age discrimination in employment and the challenges that managers confront in seeking to establish and maintain a legal, ethical, and productive workplace. The data regarding age and older workers comes from 218 respondents in the United States and 379 respondents in Thailand. A factor analysis was done ; and the results demonstrate that race, gender, education, country where you live the most, country where you presently live, and diversity training were statisticall...

  5. 78 FR 8544 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers... its training program to give regulatory project managers the opportunity to tour pharmaceutical... period, small groups (five or less) of regulatory project managers, including a senior level regulatory...

  6. Initial Survey Instructions for management unit water monitoring : level

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial survey instructions for 1.08 management unit water monitoring (level) survey on Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This survey is conducted weekly and is...

  7. Summary of the East Africa Training Consortium Biorisk Management Practices and Training Needs Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Julie; Mancini, Giulio M.; Wakabi, Timothy; Boggs, Susan E.

    2017-03-01

    A survey was designed to query former Biorisk management (BRM) trainees in the East Africa region about their practices post-training and their perceived future training needs. A subset of those surveyed had been trained as BRM trainers. The survey was conducted to obtain a baseline of BRM practices that can serve as a benchmark for performance monitoring, to identify priorities for future BRM training and to gauge local BRM trainers' abilities to deliver effective training. The survey revealed that less than 50% of the respondents could identify evidence of a BRM system in their institute. Coaching and mentoring by BRM experts was identified as being of highest benefit to enable success as BRM practitioners. Local trainers reached 1538 trainees in the previous year and reported that trainings positively correlated with desired BRM behavior. Acknowledgements The authors wish to sincerely thank all of the former biorisk management trainees in East Africa who agreed to participate in this survey. Their candid and honest input was extremely insightful. We also thank Lora Grainger (06826) and Ben Brodsky (Manager, 06824) for careful and critical review of the report. We are grateful for the financial support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Cooperative Biological Engagement Program.

  8. Technological sequence of creating components of the training system of the future officers to the management of physical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkhovy O.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to determine constructive ways of sequence of constructing components of the training system of the future officers to carry out official questions of managing the physical training in the process of the further military career. The structural logic circuit of the interconnections stages of optimum cycle management and technological sequence of constructing the components of the training system of the future officers to the management of physical training, which provides: definition of requirements to the typical problems of professional activities on the issues of the leadership, organization and conducting of physical training, the creation of the phased system model cadets training, training of the curriculum discipline ″Physical education, special physical training and sport″; model creation and definition of criteria of the integral evaluation of the readiness of the future officers to the management of physical training was determined through the analysis more than thirty documentary and scientific literature.

  9. The Unit of Analysis in Supply Chain Management Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jingjing

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation will introduce the different unit of analysis in supply chain management research. The dissertation structure more base literature review dissertation. It selects several of academic journal bases on a periodicals journal list focus on supply chain management research. In this dissertation, it choice three issues which are supply chain relationship, sustainable supply chain and supply chain procurement. There were some units of analysis from these issues in order to find whi...

  10. Effect of stress management interventions on job stress among nurses working in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light Irin, C; Bincy, R

    2012-01-01

    Stress in nurses affects their health and increases absenteeism, attrition rate, injury claims, infection rates and errors in treating patients. This in turn significantly increases the cost of employment in healthcare units. Proper management of stress ensures greater efficiency at work place and improved wellbeing of the employee. Therefore, a pre-experimental study was conducted among 30 Critical Care Unit nurses working inMedical College Hospital, Thiruvananthapuram, (Kerala) to assess the effect of stress management interventions such as Job Stress Awareness, Assertiveness Training, Time Management, andProgressive Muscle Relaxation on job stress. The results showed that caring for patients, general job requirements and workload were the major sources of stress for the nurses. The level of severe stress was reduced from 60 percent to 20 percent during post-test. The Stress Management Interventions were statistically effective in reducing the stress of nurses at p<0.001 level.

  11. Assessment and Management of Professionalism Issues in Pathology Residency Training

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald E. Domen MD; Michael L. Talbert MD; Kristen Johnson PhD; Miriam D. Post MD; Mark D. Brissette MD; Richard Michael Conran MD, PhD, JD; Robert D. Hoffman MD, PhD; Cindy B. McCloskey MD; Patricia M. Raciti MD; Cory Anthony Roberts MD; Amyn M. Rojiani MD, PhD; J. Allan Tucker MD; Suzanne Zein-Eldin Powell MD

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism issues are common in residency training and can be very difficult to recognize and manage. Almost one-third of the milestones for pathology recently instituted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education encompass aspects of professionalism. Program directors are often unsure of how and when to remediate residents for unprofessional behavior. We used a case-based educational approach in a workshop setting to assist program directors in the management of unprofe...

  12. Identification of an Effective Total Quality Management Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-31

    quality= Responding to the consumer’s demand for the best value healthm r care, J. Nursing Quality Assurance. 2(3):70-78. - " mx"D0 Implementing Total...Quality takes 10 steps forward, Healthcare Forum Journal . 29-34. Process Management Institute, Inc. (1987). Achieving Integration of m the Philosophy of...missing link, Journal of Quality Assurance, 8-36. Effective Training Program 48 Tennessee Associates International (1990). Managing for Continuous

  13. The Effect of Knowledge Management Systems on Organizational Performance. Do Soldier and Unit Counterinsurgency Knowledge and Performance Improve Following ’Push’ or ’Adaptive-Push’ Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    at Cisco and Enron provided a sense of overconfidence in predictive business models at Cisco and in the online market exchange at Enron that led to...Video reenactments were developed by the battle command training center (BCTC), using videogame software and adding realistic audio. The audio...Secure Mosque 193 Secure market 193 Secure/check on school 193 Establish high ground 194 Secure site through dominant terrain 194 Secure site 195 Secure

  14. The Holistic Leadership Model and the Nurse Unit Manager ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to create healthy work environments (Potter & Frisch, 2016). Conclusion. The transition of the staff nurse into the nurse unit manager role can be overwhelming for even the most expert of clinicians. As they strive to meet administrative expectations and collaborate with colleagues to realize institutional goals, the nurse unit ...

  15. Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable Livelihoods : Uniting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    La gestion des ressources locales a plus de chance d'obtenir des résultats durables quand il existe un partenariat entre la population locale et les organismes externes, ainsi que des programmes répondant à leurs aspirations et aux circonstances dans lesquelles ils évoluent. Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable ...

  16. 7 CFR 275.6 - Management units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Management Evaluation (ME... project areas designated by FNS for participation in the program. For example, State-established welfare...

  17. Using new Web technologies in training process management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Vesko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Training management is a very complex process involving number of activities related to the formation and training movement techniques of athletes, as well as their physical and psychological characteristics, in order to achieve results in the competitions, especially the strongest ones. There are a lot of resources in recent theory and practice of professional sport related to this issue. In order to efficiently use its content, it is essential to create the system that will provide better insight into the state of preparedness of athletes, as well as adequate influence on the factors for the achievement of planned results. The application of modern information technologies is inevitable in this case, since relevant content could properly use. The subject of this paper is the overview of software for the training management called Content/Knowledge Provision (CKP service, that is developed within the scientific project called IntelLEO under the FP7 EU Program. The software aims to facilitate collaboration among the various participants involved in the training process. During the training process there can occur several problems in the realization of work plan and program and that can't be solved using the trainer knowledge by itself. Depending of the type of problem, the trainer needs to communicate with different field experts, by using the CKP service. This forms an overall picture of the athletes' physical and psychological characteristics improving the performance of the training process on that way.

  18. 76 FR 3831 - Crew Resource Management Training for Crewmembers in Part 135 Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 135 RIN 2120-AJ32 Crew Resource Management Training for Crewmembers in Part 135... include in their training programs crew resource management training for crewmembers, including pilots and... training in the use of crew resource management principles, as appropriate for their operation. This final...

  19. Pathways for foreign-trained dentists to pursue careers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Elangovan, Satheesh; Nalliah, Romesh P; Chickmagalur, Nithya; Allareddy, Veeratrishul

    2014-11-01

    With the U.S. population growing ever more diverse and the need for dentists in many areas of the United States, there is increasing opportunity for foreign-trained dentists to pursue dental careers in this country. This article provides a broad overview of dental education and career pathways available for foreign-trained dentists in the United States. Educational opportunities include pursuing advanced standing dental degree programs and advanced graduate education (residency programs). Career pathways include working in academic and private practice settings. This article also describes the licensure and visa requirements foreign-trained dentists must satisfy to work legally in the United States.

  20. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  1. Using Emotional Intelligence in Training Crisis Managers: The Pandora Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Lachian; Bacon, Liz; Cortellessa, Gabriella; Cesta, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Multi-agency crisis management represents one of the most complex of real-world situations, requiring rapid negotiation and decision-making under extreme pressure. However, the training offered to strategic planners, called Gold Commanders, does not place them under any such pressure. It takes the form of paper-based, table-top exercises, or…

  2. QUALITY OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING THROUGH PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT INSTRUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen\tCHAŞOVSCHI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It appears that, during the process of continuous training, there is a growing need from VET providers of a reliable and easy to use tool ensuring the quality of the services provided. Product life cycle active management, including the use of suitable PLM software, is or may be a tool for monitoring and controlling product portfolio of an educational institution. It can be recommended not only for reasons of quality assurance, but also to facilitate the development of products for greater transparency in strategic business areas, and not least, to maintain competitiveness of VET providers. The Q-PLM project analysed the core of the product life cycle management in other sectors, identified the relevant variables that have an impact on the life cycle of VET provision and, on this basis, developed the beta version of a IT tool (software for product life cycle management addressed to VET providers, and a user manual for product life cycle management. The Q-PLM software makes possible the identification of the training products lifecycle, the life cycle stages, the key success factors and indicators for the training products lifecycle, separately for each training program and for each college.

  3. Blood Pressure Variability and Stress Management Training for Essential Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vera, Maria Paz; Sanz, Jesus; Labrador, Francisco J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether stress management training reduces blood pressure (BP) variability in hypertensive patients. Previous literature suggests that cardiovascular risk is not only a function of BP levels, but also of BP variability, and this partially depends on changes induced by the stress of everyday life. The…

  4. Human Resource Management in Australian Registered Training Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Hawke Geof

    2008-01-01

    This report forms part of a comprehensive research program that has examined issues related to building the organisational capability of vocational education and training providers. In particular, this report focuses on the current state of human resource management practice in both technical and further education and private registered training…

  5. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A.; Carnahan, Robert H.; Brown, Abigail M.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical…

  6. Employment Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Goff, Solenn; Ristol, Santi; Estévez, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Le Goff, S., Ristol, S., & Estévez, J.A. (2006). Employing Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st,

  7. Education and training in recreation management at tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tertiary institutions should realise the gaps and opportunities that could be filled in recreation management training. The current article reviews literature focussing on the importance of recreation participation, the benefits of participation and the impact it has on society in order to lead a quality life. International and national ...

  8. Identification of management units using population genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palsboll, Per J.; Berube, Martine; Allendorf, Fred W.

    The identification of management units (MUs) is central to the management of natural populations and is crucial for monitoring the effects of human activity upon species abundance. Here, we propose that the identification of MUs from population genetic data should be based upon the amount of genetic

  9. Delineating site-specific management units with proximal sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional farming uniformly manages fields with no consideration for spatial variability. This causes reduced productivity, misuse of finite resources (e.g., water and fertilizer), and detriment impacts on the environment. Site-specific management units (SSMUs) have been proposed as a means of ...

  10. Defence force activities in marine protected areas: environmental management of Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Wang, Xiaohua; Paull, David; Kesby, Julie

    2010-05-01

    Environmental management of military activities is of growing global concern by defence forces. As one of the largest landholders in Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) is increasingly concerned with sustainable environmental management. This paper focuses on how the ADF is maintaining effective environmental management, especially in environmentally sensitive marine protected areas. It uses Shoalwater Bay Training Area (SWBTA) as a research example to examine environmental management strategies conducted by the ADF. SWBTA is one of the most significant Defence training areas in Australia, with a large number of single, joint and combined military exercises conducted in the area. With its maritime component contained in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP), the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA), and abutting Queensland’s State Marine Parks, it has high protection values. It is therefore vital for the ADF to adopt environmentally responsible management while they are conducting military activities. As to various tools employed to manage environmental performance, the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) is widely used by the ADF. This paper examines military activities and marine environmental management within SWBTA, using the Talisman Saber (TS) exercise series as an example. These are extensive joint exercises conducted by the ADF and the United States defence forces. The paper outlines relevant legislative framework and environmental policies, analyses how the EMS operates in environmental management of military activities, and how military activities comply with these regulations. It discusses the implementation of the ADF EMS, including risk reduction measures, environmental awareness training, consultation and communication with stakeholders. A number of environmental management actions used in the TS exercises are presented to demonstrate the EMS application. Our investigations to this point indicate that the ADF is

  11. Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutto, Craig; French, Mindy

    2017-06-01

    Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. The symptoms of sodium derangement and their effect on brain physiology make early recognition and correction paramount in the neurologic ICU. Hyponatremia in brain injured patients can lead to life-threatening conditions such as seizures and may worsen cerebral edema and contribute to alterations in intracranial pressure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Training Requirements of Battle Staff NCOs in Digital Units

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Felton, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    The United States Army is transforming to a versatile force with the capabilities, particularly the digital technology, necessary to optimize the flow of information and enhance situational awareness...

  13. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  14. Care management in nursing within emergency care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane; Vieira Hermida, Patrícia Madalena; da Silva Copelli, Fernanda Hannah; Guedes Dos Santos, José Luís; Lorenzini Erdmann, Alacoque; Regina de Andrade, Selma

    2015-12-01

    Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  15. Management training of physician executives, their leadership style, and care management performance: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Samuels, Michael E; Curtin, Thomas F

    2006-02-01

    To examine associations between management training of physician executives and their leadership styles, as well as effectiveness in achieving disease management goals. Cross-sectional national survey. Executive directors of community health centers (269 respondents; response rate = 40.9%) were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the medical director's leadership, and for quantitative information on the center's achievement of clinical (mostly disease management) goals. The dependent variables were the medical director's scores (as perceived by the executive director) on transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership, effectiveness, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate extra effort, using an adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (43 items; 5-point Likert scale). The independent variable was the medical director's management training status. Compared with medical directors with or =30 days of in-service training, had 0.32, 0.35, 0.30, 0.36, and 0.37 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, satisfaction, and subordinate extra effort, respectively, and 0.31 lower score on laissez-faire leadership (all P management degrees but with > or =30 days of in-service training had 0.34, 0.36, 0.50, and 0.47 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, and satisfaction with the leader (all P leadership significantly influences achievement of disease management goals. Training may enable physician executives to develop leadership styles that are effective in influencing clinical providers' adoption of disease management guidelines under managed care.

  16. Occupant Protection Experiments in Support of a Full-scale Train-to-Train Crash Energy Management Equipment Collision Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-31

    The Federal Railroad Administration sponsored a full-scale train-to-train crash energy management (CEM) technology test that was conducted on March 23, 2006, at the Transportation Technology Center in Pueblo, Colorado. The Volpe National Transportati...

  17. [Spanish short-stay-units: results according to department designated to manage the unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis Roca, Ferrán; Ferré Losa, Carles; Juan Pastor, Antoni; Martín Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Sempere Montes, Gonzalo; Jacob Rodríguez, Javier; Llorens Soriano, Pere; Navarro Bustos, Carmen; Martínez Ortiz de Zárate, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficiency of short-stay units (SSUs) managed by different departments within hospitals. Cross-sectional study in 40 hospitals with SSUs. From June 1 to December 31, 2012,we gathered data on clinical caseloads and management. Variables directly related to efficiency were mean length of stay, bed rotation index, and weekend discharge rate. Forty SSUs were studied; 25 (62.5%) were managed by the hospital's emergency department (ED), 9 (22.5%) were managed by the internal medicine department (IMD), 5 (12.5%) were independent, and 1 was jointly managed by the hospital's ED and the IMD. A total of 45 140 patients were discharged from the SSUs. The most common diagnoses were exacerbation of chronic heart or respiratory disease, urinary tract infection, and respiratory infection. Age was the only variable that was related to the hospital department designated to manage these SSUs. The mean ages by management type were as follows: independent SSUs (75.6 years) vs ED-managed SSUs (67.2 years) vs IMD-managed SSUs (57.8 years) (P=.02). Group-by-group comparisons showed that the mean length of stay was shorter in ED-managed SSUs than in IMD-managed units (2.65 vs 3.73 respectively; P=.047), and overall mortality was lower in IMD-managed SSUs than in ED-managed SSUs (0.64% vs 3%; P=.033). However, unforeseen mortality (after excluding patients under palliative care or judged to be in the final hours of life) did not differ significantly between groups. We did not detect important differences between SSUs managed by different departments in the hospitals in this series. However, mean length of stay was found to be shorter in ED-managed SSUs than in IMD-managed units.

  18. Training doctors to manage patients with multimorbidity: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliona Lewis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with multimorbidity (two or more chronic conditions are now the norm in clinical practice, and place an increasing burden on the healthcare system. Management of these patients is challenging, and requires doctors who are skilled in the complexity of multiple chronic diseases. Objective: To perform a systematic review of the literature to ascertain whether there are education and training formats which have been used to train postgraduate medical doctors in the management of patients with multimorbidity in primary and/or secondary care, and which have been shown to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes, and/or patient outcomes. Methods: Overall, 75,110 citations were screened, of which 65 full-text articles were then independently assessed for eligibility by two reviewers, and two studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Results: The two included studies implemented and evaluated multimorbidity workshops, and highlight the need for further research addressing the learning needs of doctors tasked with managing patients with multimorbidity in their daily practice. Conclusion: While much has been published about the challenges presented to medical staff by patients with multimorbidity, published research regarding education of doctors to manage these problems is lacking. Further research is required to determine whether there is a need for, or benefit from, specific training for doctors to manage patients with multimorbidity. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013004010. Journal of Comorbidity 2016;6(2:85–94

  19. Enrollment of SME Managers to Growth-oriented Training Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Torben; Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm; Schou Nielsen, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth-intention......Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth......-intention levels vary significantly. Potential participants may suffer from limited ability to transform new knowledge into practice, absence of growth intention and too high or too low a prior competence level to be able to benefit substantially. Selection and self-selection processes therefore have a bearing...... on the extent to which such programs result in additionality, i.e. improved growth performance compared to non-intervention. Design/methodology Selection and self-selection processes are explored through a study of a large-scale training program for growth oriented managers of small Danish firms. This program...

  20. Simulation Based Training Improves Airway Management for Helicopter EMS Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Harinder S.; Reid, Renee; Murray, David; Lovelady, James; Powell, Katie; Sayles, Jeff; Stevenson, Christopher; Baker, Kathy; Solada, Brian; Carroll, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The use of paralytic medications in the performance of RSI intubation is a high risk intervention used by many HEMS crews. There is no margin for error in RSI intubation as the results can be fatal. Operating room access for airway management training has become more difficult, and is not representative of the environment in which HEMS crews typically function. LifeEvac of Virginia designed and implemented an SST airway management program to provide a realistic, consistent training platform. The dynamic program incorporates standardized scenarios, and real life challenging cases that this and other programs have encountered. SST is done in a variety of settings including the helicopter, back of ambulances, staged car crashes and simulation centers. The result has been the indoctrination of a well defined, consistent approach to every airway management intervention. The SST program facillitates enhancement of technical skills. as well as team dynamics and communication.

  1. 14 CFR 121.404 - Compliance dates: Crew and dispatcher resource management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... resource management training. 121.404 Section 121.404 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 121.404 Compliance dates: Crew and dispatcher resource management training. After March 19, 1998, no... approved crew resource management (CRM) or dispatcher resource management (DRM) initial training, as...

  2. Measuring Teacher Classroom Management Skills: A Comparative Analysis of Distance Trained and Conventional Trained Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henaku, Christina Bampo; Pobbi, Michael Asamani

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers and educationist remain skeptical about the effectiveness of distance learning program and have termed it as second to the conventional training method. This perception is largely due to several challenges which exist within the management of distance learning program across the country. The general aim of the study is compare the…

  3. Pathways for foreign-trained dentists to pursue careers in the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Elangovan, Satheesh; Nalliah, Romesh P; Chickmagalur, Nithya; Allareddy, Veeratrishul

    2014-01-01

    With the U.S. population growing ever more diverse and the need for dentists in many areas of the United States, there is increasing opportunity for foreign-trained dentists to pursue dental careers in this country...

  4. An interactive two-step training and management model of point-of-care glucose testing in northern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Liisa; Liikanen, Eeva; Melkko, Tarja; Ebeling, Tapani; Kouri, Timo

    2011-06-01

    To assess an interactive 2-step training and management model for nurses in glucose point-of-care testing (POCT). The training of the nursing staff by the point-of-care coordinator of the laboratory started with interactive sessions with contact persons who subsequently trained their nursing colleagues at the Oulu University Hospital in northern Finland. The 2-step training model was applied in blood glucose testing as a pilot study. Functional quality was assessed through interviews with clinical contact persons and a questionnaire was given to the trained nurses. Technical quality was assessed through control measurements by laboratory and nursing staff. Training succeeded because of basic resources (trainers' knowledge and skills, organized contents of training and place), interpersonal communication and high-quality interactions. Nurses were especially satisfied with the prerequisite training of the contact persons (mean score 1.58, Likert scale from -2 to +2, strongly disagree - strongly agree). Day-to-day repeatabilities of less than 3% were achieved in control measurements by both nursing and laboratory staff. The interactive 2-step training and management model could be implemented in the clinical units using a reasonable amount of laboratory resources. The goal of good functional and technical quality in point-of-care testing in the clinical units was achieved. Despite successful implementation, POCT needs continuous support from the laboratory.

  5. Improving Stroke Management through Specialized Stroke Units in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    and Nurses trained in providing supportive care. The challenges of the start –up cost, and public education in seeking help early ... The average age of stroke onset in Nigeria is 61 years (12% below age 40 with unknown etiology), resulting in loss of a greater number of productive years of life. Overview of the management ...

  6. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita [European Nuclear Society ENS, Brussels (Belgium). ENS High Scientific Council

    2010-04-15

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the

  7. Changes in surgical training in the United Kingdom and the possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in surgical training in the United Kingdom and the possible consequences for African trainees. J L Craven FRCS. Retired surgeon,. York, UK. Over the past 50 years, Britain has increasingly failed to meet the training needs of Africa's surgeons. It has always been difficult to overcome the bureaucratic hurdles of ...

  8. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT XXI, MICHIGAN/CLARK TRANSMISSION--COMPLETE POWER TRAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS MOSULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF A SPECIFIC POWER TRAIN SYSTEM USED ON DIESEL POWERED EQUIPMENT. TOPICS ARE EXAMINING THE POWER FLOW, UNIT OIL FLOW, AND OIL PRESSURE IN THE CONVERTER AND TRANSMISSION SYSTEM. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM TRAINING FILM "UNDERSTANDING THE…

  9. Guide Dog Teams in the United States: Annual Number Trained and Active, 1993-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Ed; Eames, Toni; Diament, Sara

    2001-01-01

    A study investigated the number of guide dog teams that have been trained and are active in the United States from 1993-1999. Results found 1,556 guide dog teams were trained in 1999, an increase of 7%, and that there were 9,000 active teams, an increase of 10% since 1993. (Contains eight references.) (CR)

  10. Training of the state president's unit | Meyers | Scientia Militaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 16, No 5 (1986) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Training of the state president's ...

  11. Plastic Surgery Training Worldwide: Part 1. The United States and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Parisa; van Paridon, Maaike W.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Paul, Marek A.; Winters, Henri A.; Martinot-Duquennoy, Veronique; Noah, Ernst Magnus; Pallua, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Major differences exist in residency training, and the structure and quality of residency programs differ between different countries and teaching centers. It is of vital importance that a better understanding of the similarities and differences in plastic surgery training be ascertained as a means of initiating constructive discussion and commentary among training programs worldwide. In this study, the authors provide an overview of plastic surgery training in the United States and Europe. Methods: A survey was sent to select surgeons in 10 European countries that were deemed to be regular contributors to the plastic surgery literature. The questions focused on pathway to plastic surgery residency, length of training, required pretraining experience, training scheme, research opportunities, and examinations during and after plastic surgery residency. Results: Plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States differ from the various (selected) countries in Europe and are described in detail. Conclusions: Plastic surgery education is vastly different between the United States and Europe, and even within Europe, training programs remain heterogeneous. Standardization of curricula across the different countries would improve the interaction of different centers and facilitate the exchange of vital information for quality control and future improvements. The unique characteristics of the various training programs potentially provide a basis from which to learn and to gain from one another. PMID:27257571

  12. TRADE instructional materials for SARA/OSHA training. Volume 2, Managers and supervisors training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This document provides instructional materials for an eight-hour training course for managers and supervisors of hazardous waste sites. It is one of three volumes of course materials TRADE is preparing to help DOE contractor training staff comply with 29 CFR 1910.120, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) rule that implements Title I of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. OSHA`s final rule for hazardous waste operators was published in the Federal Register of March 6, 1989 (54 FR 9294). Combined with the materials in Volumes I and III and with appropriate site-specific information, these materials will help DOE contractors to meet the requirements of 1910.120 (e) that ``on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations`` receive the same initial training as that of the employees they supervise and at least eight additional hours of specialized training in managing hazardous waste operations.

  13. Training Middle Managers of South African Public Schools in Leadership and Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampane, Sharon Thabo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual explanatory research is to highlight the importance of training of Middle Managers or Heads of Department (HoDs) in leadership and management in South African public schools. Leadership responsibilities in schools are becoming more complex to the extent that principals can no longer be sole leaders in schools. The…

  14. Human Resource Strategic Management in NPOs: An Explorative Study on Managers' Psychosocial Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevene, Paula; Cortini, Michela

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This explorative research aims at examining the social representation of psychosocial training in NPOs managers. Design/methodology/approach: An adopted multiple research approach was adopted to analyse a corpus of qualitative data. A detailed semi-structured interview was administered to 122 senior managers of as many Italian NPOs.…

  15. [Operational units for health risk management (patient safety)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Hernández, A; Claveria Fontán, A; García Urbaneja, M; López Barba, J

    2008-12-01

    In 1995 INSALUD began to develop performance measures in the field of risk management, and following transfer of powers to the regions, these led to the development of operational units in individual healthcare centres. These units, which consist of a group of health professionals, including managers, aim to identify, evaluate, analyse and deal with health risks, to enhance patient safety. Their organisational structure can vary in accordance with the needs, resources and philosophy of each individual organisation. This paper presents the experience of the risk management units developed in four Spanish regions: Madrid, the Basque Country, Galicia and INGESA (Ceuta and Melilla). It also includes reflections on assessment of their impact and on their future role in improving safety in healthcare services.

  16. Differences in Pediatric Pain Management by Unit Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Kelsea; Olds, Danielle

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in pediatric pain management by unit type in hospitals across the United States. The aims were to (a) compare unit-type rates of assessment, intervention, and reassessment (AIR), and (b) describe differences in assessment tools and intervention use by unit type. The study used a cross-sectional design. A secondary analysis of 2013 data from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI®) pain AIR cycle indicator was conducted. The sample included 984 pediatric units in 390 hospitals. Data were gathered via retrospective chart review on the pain assessment tool used, presence of pain, interventions, and reassessment. Descriptive statistics and the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test were conducted. Post-hoc analyses included the Wilcoxon-rank sum test with Bonferroni correction. Across all units the mean unit-level percentage of patients assessed for pain was 99.6%. Of those patients assessed, surgical units had the highest average unit-level percentage of patients with pain, while Level 4 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) had the lowest. The most commonly used assessment tool among all units was the Faces, Legs, Activity, Crying, and Consolability (FLACC) Scale. The Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) and Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) specifically developed for infants were more commonly used across NICU unit types. The mean unit-level percentage of patients with pain receiving an intervention was 89.4%, and reassessment was 83.6%. Overall, pharmacologic methods were the most common pain intervention, while music was the least common. Assessments were performed routinely, yet interventions and reassessments were not. Pain AIR cycle completion varied by unit type. Pain was also widely present across many unit types, and pharmacologic methods were most frequently used. Frontline nurses are instrumental to pain management and have the ability to improve patient

  17. Practitioner Perceptions of Adaptive Management Implementation in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Harm. Benson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive management is a growing trend within environment and natural resource management efforts in the United States. While many proponents of adaptive management emphasize the need for collaborative, iterative governance processes to facilitate adaptive management, legal scholars note that current legal requirements and processes in the United States often make it difficult to provide the necessary institutional support and flexibility for successful adaptive management implementation. Our research explores this potential disconnect between adaptive management theory and practice by interviewing practitioners in the field. We conducted a survey of individuals associated with the Collaborative Adaptive Management Network (CAMNet, a nongovernmental organization that promotes adaptive management and facilitates in its implementation. The survey was sent via email to the 144 participants who attended CAMNet Rendezvous during 2007-2011 and yielded 48 responses. We found that practitioners do feel hampered by legal and institutional constraints: > 70% of respondents not only believed that constraints exist, they could specifically name one or more examples of a legal constraint on their work implementing adaptive management. At the same time, we found that practitioners are generally optimistic about the potential for institutional reform.

  18. Pain Management Perceptions of the Neonatal Nurses in NICUs and Neonatal Units in Ardebil, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Mehrnoush

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to determine neonatal nurses’ perceptions of knowledge and practice in pain management in NICUs & neonatal units. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used. A total of 120 neonatal nurses who working in NICUs & neonatal units in Ardebil province, Iran were selected using the convenience sampling technique. A questionnaire of Nurses’ Perceptions of Neonatal Pain (Cong, 2013, including 36 questions with Likert scale and 2 open ended questions, was used. Data collected were analyzed with descriptive statistics of frequencies and percentages.Results: Nurses had Appropriate knowledge of neonatal pain management , but less than 50% felt that they received adequate training and continuing education on pain. Participants reported that they don’t use of pain assessment tools (65%. Less than half felt that the pain tool used in their unit was an accurate measure (44.2%. Fewer than half reported that pain was well managed (28.3% , that their pain protocols were research evidence based (34.2% and more than half reported that parents should be involve with the care and comfort of their infant during painful procedures (71.6%. Barriers to effective pain management emerged as high workload, shortage of personnel, lack of knowledge, absence of pain protocols, lack of time, and lack of trust in the pain assessment tools.Conclusions: proper pain management was significantly correlated with adequate training, use of proper and accurate pain tools, and clear and research-based protocols and parental involvement. It can be improved by developing guidelines and support of nurses, develop of clinically feasible pain tools, adequate training and proper supervision.

  19. [Crew resource management and simulator training in acute stroke therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtali, D; Bohmann, F; Rostek, P; Misselwitz, B; Reihs, A; Heringer, F; Jahnke, K; Steinmetz, H; Pfeilschifter, W

    2016-12-01

    Time is of critical importance in acute stroke management. The establishment of thrombectomy now adds to the complexity and interdisciplinarity of the initial phase. In non-medical high-fidelity situations, such as aviation, crew resource management (CRM) has proven to be highly efficient. It has therefore also been implemented in professional cardiovascular life support training. In a setting where every minute counts, CRM and regular training of the high-fidelity stroke team could offer ways to improve treatment of acute stroke patients. We evaluated the effects of a CRM-based stroke team with regular simulation training on the quality of care (e.g. door to needle time and thrombolysis rate) as well as on staff satisfaction and perceived patient safety in the emergency department of a tertiary care neurocenter. We implemented a dedicated stroke team consisting of 7 persons who are notified by a collective call via speed dial and conceived a simulator-based team training for all new stroke team members which we conduct at monthly intervals. We recorded door to needle times of all consecutive patients, staff satisfaction in the emergency room and the acceptance of this new learning format. This approach led to a relevant and sustained reduction of the mean door to needle time to less than 30 min. It improved perceived patient safety in residents with professional experience of less than 2 years. There was a very high acceptance within the stroke team training and staff and its usefulness was judged to be very high. Even though our data do not allow positive effects on patient outcomes to be inferred, the implementation of a CRM-based stroke team and simulator training has had multiple positive effects on the workflow and work satisfaction in the treatment of acute stroke patients.

  20. Self-control of dysmenorrheic symptoms through pain management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillen, M A; Denney, D R

    1982-06-01

    An adaptation of Anxiety Management Training was evaluated as a means of teaching women to use relaxation in order to control menstrual pain and discomfort. After reporting their menstrual symptoms for two successive baseline periods, spasmodic and congestive dysmenorrheic subjects received four individual sessions of pain management training. Following treatment, these subjects reported significant reductions in pain, discomfort, interference, and time loss due to dysmenorrheic symptoms relative to their own baselines and to an untreated control group. These effects were still in evidence 18 months after treatment and appeared to have generalized to behavioral, attentional and autonomic symptoms that might be considered secondary sequelae of dysmenorrhea. With one minor exception, there was no differential response to treatment by spasmodic as opposed to congestive subjects.

  1. Psychiatry training in the United Kingdom--Part 1: a general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiakogia, K; Christodoulou, N

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been a strong trend of emigration of Greek medical doctors. The reason for this phenomenon is certainly multifactorial, but it has been greatly exacerbated due to the latest financial crisis. The United Kingdom is one of the most popular destinations amongst emigrating Greek psychiatric doctors, as reflected by official data and by the sheer volume of requests for information received by the United Kingdom Division of the Hellenic Psychiatric Association. There are many systemic and practical differences between the Greek and the United Kingdom health systems, which complicate training and further career decisions. These complex differences make it hard for psychiatric doctors to decide which steps to take, and often result in them making the "wrong" decision. These "wrong" decisions are very often the result of poor information or misinformation. For instance many doctors are confused about the equivalence of training and service grades between Greece and the United Kingdom, what a good portfolio means, or the significance of the MRCPsych exam. This information exists, sometimes in comprehensive ways on the internet, but for doctors who are not familiar with the system, finding this information can be a time-consuming and laborious task. Therefore, providing a starting point with realistic and useful information about psychiatric training and generally career progression in the United Kingdom to Greek psychiatric doctors has become very important. The United Kingdom Division of the Hellenic Psychiatric Association has decided to pick up the role of providing exactly that information. The first part of this two-piece paper provides a starting point for Greek doctors considering the move to the United Kingdom for training and/or work in psychiatry. Firstly, it gives a general overview of psychiatric training in the United Kingdom, and explains that the pragmatic equivalence between training stages between Greece and the United Kingdom often

  2. Nursery performance analysis within a model of management units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Hexsel Segui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identify the nursery’s working spaces after implementation of a Unit Management model at a large and complex teaching hospital in south of Brazil. Method: exploratory descriptive study with a qualitative approach – Case Study. The data were collected with semi-structured interviews. Subjects: 15 nurses that represent the job positions at the institution. Results: All subjects are female, aged from 25 to 59 years, with high-level education, work experience at the hospital between 5 and 30 years, most of them have a post-graduate degree. The activities are divided on consulting services, public health surveillance, management, nursing care, on-the-job education, health education, research, and university-related management work. Conclusion: nurses working as assistants give support to public health surveillance; at Nursing Services, the activities are related to unit and care management; and at external administrative positions, they support general institutional demands.

  3. Managing Highway Maintenance: Maintenance Management--by Objectives, Unit 10, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Offices of Research and Development.

    Part of the series "Managing Highway Maintenance," the unit deals with management by objectives--its definition, how it works, and necessary steps for application. It is designed for maintenance supervisors who are familiar with maintenance management systems. The format is a programed, self-instructional approach in which questions are…

  4. The Efficacy of Crisis Intervention Training for Educators: A Preliminary Study from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forthun, Larry F.; McCombie, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Professional development in crisis intervention skills can help address the growing needs of schools to train faculty to respond to students in acute crisis. Unlike traditional methods of classroom management, crisis intervention training teaches specific strategies to de-escalate conflict while at the same time addressing the underlying…

  5. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self-management

  6. Field Test of the Unit Equal Opportunity Training Diagnosis and Assessment System (TDAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    not, however, designed to be used by the unit commander, but by a trained specialist in organizational diagnosis and intervention , the Organizational...of information, performing as much analysis and priority-setting as possible without human intervention so as to simplify the commander’s task in...about "women in this unit" where no women are assigned to the unit; - key item data on sexism where no such data are available; d. data for all warrant

  7. Using CrisisKit and MOPED to improve emergency management team training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, R. van; Berlo, M. van

    2004-01-01

    In order to reduce the effects of a disaster, people in the emergency management organization have to be trained. In recent years training emergency management teams has become a bigger issue. A realistic and effective training of emergency management teams however is a difficult matter. We search

  8. Comparison of Anxiety Management Training and Desensitization in Reducing Test and Other Anxieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Shelton, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Effects of systematic desensitization and anxiety management training in reducing test anxiety and generalizing to other anxieties were compared. Both desensitization and anxiety management training produced significant reduction of text anxiety, but by follow-up, anxiety management training produced significantly more test-anxiety reduction on…

  9. Differences in Hospital Managers', Unit Managers', and Health Care Workers' Perceptions of the Safety Climate for Respiratory Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kristina; Rogers, Bonnie M E; Brosseau, Lisa M; Payne, Julianne; Cooney, Jennifer; Joe, Lauren; Novak, Debra

    2016-07-01

    This article compares hospital managers' (HM), unit managers' (UM), and health care workers' (HCW) perceptions of respiratory protection safety climate in acute care hospitals. The article is based on survey responses from 215 HMs, 245 UMs, and 1,105 HCWs employed by 98 acute care hospitals in six states. Ten survey questions assessed five of the key dimensions of safety climate commonly identified in the literature: managerial commitment to safety, management feedback on safety procedures, coworkers' safety norms, worker involvement, and worker safety training. Clinically and statistically significant differences were found across the three respondent types. HCWs had less positive perceptions of management commitment, worker involvement, and safety training aspects of safety climate than HMs and UMs. UMs had more positive perceptions of management's supervision of HCWs' respiratory protection practices. Implications for practice improvements indicate the need for frontline HCWs' inclusion in efforts to reduce safety climate barriers and better support effective respiratory protection programs and daily health protection practices. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Overcoming KC-10 Formal Training Unit Pilot Production Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    each location and comparing it to published Air Force regulations and initial syllabi, the goal is to gain valuable comprehension of the delay...AFIT/ GMO /LAS/97Y-8. School of Logistics and Acquisition Management, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, May 1997

  11. United nations Supported principles for Responsible Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godemann, Jasmin; Moon, Jeremy; Haertle, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    and various ecological system crises. The United Nations supported Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) initiative is an important catalyst for the transformation of management education and a global initiative to change and reform management education in order to meet the increasing...... societal demands for responsible business. This paper introduces the initiative and illustrates progress made by PRME signatories drawing upon analysis of their self-presentations in their Sharing Information on Progress (SIP) reports. The paper synthesizes the studies' findings and concludes with some...... thoughts on current and future directions and prospects of the initiative....

  12. Animal health management practices in zero grazing dairy units in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at investigating the animal health management practices in zero grazing dairy units. A questionnaire was used to assess the veterinary practices including the administration of antibiotics and other veterinary inputs to promote growth, prevent and treat diseases. Sixty-five (65) respondents were involved in ...

  13. The Holistic Leadership Model and the Nurse Unit Manager ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leadership Competencies in Nursing. A Global Perspective. In compiling the requisites of leadership for the nurse unit manager, the literature was searched to identify key competencies and characteristics of effective leaders across disciplines and specialties. Patterson and Krouse. (2015) identifyfour primary skills for the ...

  14. The holistic leadership model and the nurse unit manager ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective leadership is arguably one of the most relevant indicators of a profession's advancement or lack thereof. The purpose of this article is to share the authors' personal views on the leadership competencies necessary for the nurse unit manager transitioning into the role for the first time. To identify these leadership ...

  15. An Update on Asset Management Plans in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mukund

    1999-01-01

    Describes a current project in the United Kingdom designed to improve school buildings. The use of Asset Management Plans (AMPs) in providing the means through which likely future needs are assessed, criteria for prioritization are set, and informed decisions on local spending are made are examined. (GR)

  16. Observing handoffs and telephone management in GI fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Renee; Miler, Roy; Shah, Brijen; Chokhavatia, Sita; Poles, Michael; Zabar, Sondra; Gillespie, Colleen; Weinshel, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Gastroenterology (GI) training programs are mandated to teach fellows interpersonal communication and professionalism as basic competencies. We sought to assess important skill sets used by our fellows but not formally observed or measured: handoffs, telephone management, and note writing. We designed an Observed Standardized Clinical Examination (OSCE) form and provided the faculty with checklists to rate fellows' performance on specific criteria. We created two new scenarios: a handoff between a tired overnight senior fellow on call and a more junior fellow, and a telephone management case of an ulcerative colitis flare. Fellows wrote a progress notes documenting the encounters. To add educational value, we gave the participants references about handoff communication. Four OSCE stations-handoff communication, telephone management, informed consent, and delivering bad news-were completed by fellows and observed by faculty. Eight faculty members and eight fellows from four GI training programs participated. All the fellows agreed that handoffs can be important learning opportunities and can be improved if they are structured, and that handoff skills can improve with practice. OSCEs can serve as practicums for assessing complex skill sets such as handoff communication and telephone management.

  17. Training requirements for DXA technologists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Laura D; Barrow, Karen D; Vannerson, Julie; Boatright, David; Womack, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine, by state, the requirements for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry(DXA) operators' training, knowledge of these state requirements, and factors that predicted state and International Society of Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) certification of DXA technologists. Seventeen states required registered technologist (RT) certification or authorized/licensed limited certification for DXA operators, 16 had no certification requirements, 12 required RT certification, and 5 had state-specific requirements. There were 9745 surveys mailed toDXA users including 50% Hologic Inc., 50% GE Lunar, and 100% Norland; 3148 surveys are included in this analysis. Among responders who indicated that their state did not have any certification requirements (n=1673), 1095(65.5%) were incorrect; there were requirements. Possession of state and ISCD certification was significantly correlated with the number of patients scanned per week (pquality are urgently needed.

  18. Genomic Relatedness Strengthens Genetic Connectedness Across Management Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haipeng; Spangler, Matthew L; Lewis, Ronald M; Morota, Gota

    2017-10-05

    Genetic connectedness refers to a measure of genetic relatedness across management units (e.g., herds and flocks). With the presence of high genetic connectedness in management units, best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) is known to provide reliable comparisons between estimated genetic values. Genetic connectedness has been studied for pedigree-based BLUP; however, relatively little attention has been paid to using genomic information to measure connectedness. In this study, we assessed genome-based connectedness across management units by applying prediction error variance of difference (PEVD), coefficient of determination (CD), and prediction error correlation r to a combination of computer simulation and real data (mice and cattle). We found that genomic information ([Formula: see text]) increased the estimate of connectedness among individuals from different management units compared to that based on pedigree ([Formula: see text]). A disconnected design benefited the most. In both datasets, PEVD and CD statistics inferred increased connectedness across units when using [Formula: see text]- rather than [Formula: see text]-based relatedness, suggesting stronger connectedness. With r once using allele frequencies equal to one-half or scaling [Formula: see text] to values between 0 and 2, which is intrinsic to [Formula: see text] connectedness also increased with genomic information. However, PEVD occasionally increased, and r decreased when obtained using the alternative form of [Formula: see text] instead suggesting less connectedness. Such inconsistencies were not found with CD. We contend that genomic relatedness strengthens measures of genetic connectedness across units and has the potential to aid genomic evaluation of livestock species. Copyright © 2017 Yu et al.

  19. Assessment and Management of Professionalism Issues in Pathology Residency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Domen MD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism issues are common in residency training and can be very difficult to recognize and manage. Almost one-third of the milestones for pathology recently instituted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education encompass aspects of professionalism. Program directors are often unsure of how and when to remediate residents for unprofessional behavior. We used a case-based educational approach in a workshop setting to assist program directors in the management of unprofessional behavior in residents. Eight case scenarios highlighting various aspects of unprofessional behavior by pathology residents were developed and presented in an open workshop forum at the annual pathology program director’s meeting. Prior to the workshop, 2 surveys were conducted: (1 to collect data on program directors’ experience with identifying, assessing, and managing unprofessional behavior in their residents and (2 to get feedback from workshop registrants on how they would manage each of the 8 case scenarios. A wide range of unprofessional behaviors have been observed by pathology program directors. Although there is occasionally general agreement on how to manage specific behaviors, there remains wide variation in how to manage many of the presented unprofessional behaviors. Remediation for unprofessional behavior in pathology residents remains a difficult and challenging process. Additional education and research in this area are warranted.

  20. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  1. 76 FR 9028 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers... operations. To this end, CDER is continuing its training program to give regulatory project managers the... managers, including a senior level regulatory project manager, can observe operations of pharmaceutical...

  2. PMBOK® Application in project management in information units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Spudeit

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The units of information are increasingly being seen as providing services organizations whose main input is the information that adds value to the company and the intellectual capital. Indicating a need for planning to meet the informational needs of its customers. Objective: The aim of this study is to recognize the project management as an alternative to improve from planning and implementation through solutions that meet these needs. Methodology: Was conduced a bibliographic research that pursuit to enhance the use of best practices in project management for helping, and supporting the management of information units. Results: As results, it is pointed out that all ten areas of PMBOK® are applicable to units of information and it is up to the librarian, promote the implementation, monitoring and completion of these processes. Conclusions: Information units is to promote access to information sources and so it is important that best practices are adopted the PMBOK ® as accelerate the launch of products and services, reduce costs, improve quality controls and optimize resources and efforts.

  3. Modeling Organisational Management Structure of the United University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana E. Maykova

    2017-09-01

    . Based on profilisation criteria, the provisional structure of the scientific and educational institutions of the merged university is proposed. The analysis of domestic and international approaches to the development of university management structures allowed to put forward alternative scenarios for the formation of the organisational management structure model of a united university for the implementation of priority directions of its development. Discussion and Conclusions: the proposals and recommendations following the results of the research seek to create conditions for effective interaction between the subdivisions of the united university, optimisation of the managerial and organisational functions of the leadership of educational and research institutions. For universities originated after the merging of separate universities, scientific organisations, institutes, colleges, variants of the contour model of the organisational management structure are proposed. Those proposals are universal during organisational merging of universities.

  4. United States-Japan Industry and Technology Management Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cole, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... The report presents accomplishments relative to stated program goals, results of cooperative efforts with the other grantees, and the Program's activities in research, the Business Technical Japanese...

  5. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  6. [IMPLEMENTATION OF A QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN A NUTRITION UNIT ACCORDING TO ISO 9001:2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Gimeno, Cristina; Cuerda Compés, Cristina; Alonso Puerta, Alba; Frías Soriano, Laura; Camblor Álvarez, Miguel; Bretón Lesmes, Irene; Plá Mestre, Rosa; Izquierdo Membrilla, Isabel; García-Peris, Pilar

    2015-09-01

    the implementation of quality management systems (QMS) in the health sector has made great progress in recent years, remains a key tool for the management and improvement of services provides to patients. to describe the process of implementing a quality management system (QMS) according to the standard ISO 9001:2008 in a Nutrition Unit. the implementation began in October 2012. Nutrition Unit was supported by Hospital Preventive Medicine and Quality Management Service (PMQM). Initially training sessions on QMS and ISO standards for staff were held. Quality Committee (QC) was established with representation of the medical and nursing staff. Every week, meeting took place among members of the QC and PMQM to define processes, procedures and quality indicators. We carry on a 2 months follow-up of these documents after their validation. a total of 4 processes were identified and documented (Nutritional status assessment, Nutritional treatment, Monitoring of nutritional treatment and Planning and control of oral feeding) and 13 operating procedures in which all the activity of the Unit were described. The interactions among them were defined in the processes map. Each process has associated specific quality indicators for measuring the state of the QMS, and identifying opportunities for improvement. All the documents associated with requirements of ISO 9001:2008 were developed: quality policy, quality objectives, quality manual, documents and records control, internal audit, nonconformities and corrective and preventive actions. The unit was certified by AENOR in April 2013. the implementation of a QMS causes a reorganization of the activities of the Unit in order to meet customer's expectations. Documenting these activities ensures a better understanding of the organization, defines the responsibilities of all staff and brings a better management of time and resources. QMS also improves the internal communication and is a motivational element. Explore the satisfaction

  7. Differences between rural and urban primary care units in Turkey: Implications on residents′ training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Yikilkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Family practice training takes place at primary care based training centers linked to Education and Research State Hospitals in Turkey. There is a discussion if these units are adequate to train primary care staff and if the patients of these units reflect the applicants of primary care. Aims: The aim of our study is to investigate the demographic characteristics, the effect of distance on primary care utilization, and most common diagnosis of the patients who applied to two different outpatient clinics: One urban and one rural. Settings and Design: Study was conducted from the electronic health records of the patients applied to outpatient clinics of Ankara Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Training and Research Hospital Department of Family Medicine between 1 January and 31 December 2009. Results: Total number of patients applied to both of the outpatient clinics was 34,632 [urban clinic: 16.506 (47.7%, rural clinic: 18.126 (52.3%]. Leading three diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (URTI, general medical examination (GME, and hypertension (HT in the most common 10 diagnosis. Conclusion: In our study, the rural outpatient clinic is regarded as a primary care unit in the neighborhood of living area and the urban clinic as close to working environment. We found statistically meaningful differences in most common diagnosis, gender, age, and consultation time between the rural and urban clinics. According to our results, family practitioners′ field training should take place at different primary care units according to sociodemographic characteristics of each country.

  8. Formal verification of a set of memory management units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, E. Thomas; Levitt, K.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the verification of a set of memory management units (MMU). The verification effort demonstrates the use of hierarchical decomposition and abstract theories. The MMUs can be organized into a complexity hierarchy. Each new level in the hierarchy adds a few significant features or modifications to the lower level MMU. The units described include: (1) a page check translation look-aside module (TLM); (2) a page check TLM with supervisor line; (3) a base bounds MMU; (4) a virtual address translation MMU; and (5) a virtual address translation MMU with memory resident segment table.

  9. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  10. Development and evaluation of targeted psychological skills training for oncology nurses in managing stressful patient and family encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Lara; Park, Elyse R; Sporn, Nora; Repper-DeLisi, Jennifer; Convery, Mary Susan; Jacobo, Michelle; Pirl, William F

    2013-07-01

    To reduce workplace stress by developing a brief psychological skills training for nurses and to evaluate program feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy in decreasing burnout and stress. Intervention development and evaluation. Outpatient chemotherapy unit at a comprehensive cancer center. 26 infusion nurses and oncology social workers. Focus groups were conducted with nurses. Results informed the development and evaluation of training for nurses. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Perceived Stress Scale post-training. Burnout and stress. Focus groups indicated strong commitment among nurses to psychosocial care and supported the idea that relationships with patients and families were sources of reward and stress. Stressors included factors that interfered with psychosocial care such as difficult family dynamics, patient behaviors and end-of-life care issues. Psychological skills training was developed to address these stressors. Evaluations suggested that the program was feasible and acceptable to nurses. At two months, participants showed reductions in emotional exhaustion (p = 0.02) and stress (p = 0.04). Psychological skills training for managing difficult encounters showed feasibility, acceptability, and potential benefit in reducing emotional exhaustion and stress. Brief training that targets sources of clinical stress may be useful for nurses in outpatient chemotherapy units. Specific stressors in relationships with patients and families present challenges to nurses' therapeutic use of self. Targeted psychological skills training may help nurses problem-solve difficult encounters while taking care of themselves. System-level strategies are needed to support and promote training participation.

  11. Comparative effects of emotion management training and social skills training in Korean children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Sil; Lee, Woo Kyeong

    2015-02-01

    ADHD is associated with social and emotional impairment that goes beyond the core symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention deficits. This study evaluates the comparative efficacy of emotional management training (EMT) with social skills training (SST) and no treatment in children with ADHD. A randomized, controlled treatment outcome study was conducted with 32 boys and 40 girls (aged 10-12 years). The Child Behavior Checklist, Emotion Expression Scale for Children, Child Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for children were completed before and after the intervention. The EMT group exhibited a significant improvement in emotion recognition and expressive reluctance. Therefore, focusing on emotion identification and expression in social cognitive processes (i.e., EMT), instead of merely focusing on social skills (SST), enhances treatment efficacy. These results support the hypothesis that focusing on the identification and expression of emotional information processes, instead of merely focusing on social skills (SST) enhances treatment efficacy. © 2013 SAGE Publications.

  12. [Barriers and challenges of the functional healthcare risk management units in hospitals of Madrid health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Hernández, A; Navarro-Royo, C; Arguedas-Sanz, R; Albeniz-Lizarraga, C; Morón-Merchante, J

    2014-01-01

    To identify the barriers and challenges for the effective development of risk management units in hospitals of the Madrid Health Service. Descriptive cross-sectional study aimed at the management teams and members of the functional units of 31 hospitals in the Madrid Health Service. A self-administered questionnaire requesting answers in free text was used, identifying up to five barriers and challenges, and their prioritization by awarding from 1-5 points according to their importance. A discourse analysis was then conducted, grouping common themes and sorting them according to their score. The overall response rate was 94%. The most frequently identified barriers were lack of time (21%), inadequate safety culture (13%), lack of publication of their activities (10%), and lack of training (10%). The most important challenge was developing the training (18%), followed by improving the culture (17%), communication of safety activities (11%), and achieve leadership from the managers of the services (11%). According to the study conditions, the main identified barrier identified was the lack of available time, and the principal challenge found was promoting a proactive learning culture. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. 40 CFR 264.101 - Corrective action for solid waste management units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.101 Corrective action for solid waste management units. (a) The owner or operator of a facility seeking a permit for the treatment... management unit at the facility, regardless of the time at which waste was placed in such unit. (b...

  14. Self-Regulation in Error Management Training: Emotion Control and Metacognition as Mediators of Performance Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Nina; Frese, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In error management training, participants are explicitly encouraged to make errors and learn from them. Error management training has frequently been shown to lead to better performance than conventional trainings that adopt an error avoidant approach. The present study investigated self-regulatory processes mediating this effect. Fifty-five…

  15. Impact of online toxicology training on health professionals: the Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Vohra, Rais; Dawson, Andrew H; Stolbach, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP), supported by the American College of Medical Toxicology, links countries with and without toxicology services via distance education with the aim to improve education. Due to the lack of toxicology services in some countries there is a knowledge gap in the management of poisonings. We describe our experience with the worldwide delivery of an online introductory toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and other health professionals treating poisoned patients. We delivered a 15-module introductory Internet-based toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and health professionals, conducted from August to December 2016. This Internet-based curriculum was adapted from one used to teach emergency residents toxicology in the United States. Modules covered themes such as pharmaceutical (n = 8), toxidromes (n = 2) and agrochemicals (n = 5) poisoning. Participants completed pre-test and post-test multiple choice questions (MCQs) before and after completing the online module, respectively, throughout the course. We collected information on participant demographics, education and training, and perception of relevance of the curriculum. Participants gave feedback on the course and how it affected their practice. One hundred and thirty-six health professionals from 33 countries participated in the course: 98 emergency doctors/medical officers, 25 physicians, eight pharmacists/poisons information specialists, two toxicologists, two medical students and one nurse. Median age of participants was 34 years. Median number of years postgraduate was seven. Ninety (65%) had access to either a poisons information centre over the phone or toxicologist and 48 (35%) did not. All participants expected the course to help improve their knowledge. Overall median pre-module MCQ scores were 56% (95%CI: 38, 75%) compared to post-module MCQ scores median 89% (95% CI: 67, 100%) (p education to health professionals treating

  16. Managing the Near Term Functions of Change in Medical Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-06

    v List of Tables and Figures .......................................... vii Chapter One The Importance of Change Manangement ...AD-A1?2 83e MRNAGING THE NEAR TERM FUNCTIONS OF CHANGE IN MEDICAL 1/2 UNITS(U) ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS R G BRUELAND...im 11111. 111111.25 1.4 16 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS- 193-A 0 (MANAGING THE NEAR TERM FUNCTIONS OF CHANGE IN

  17. Tele-Dysphagia management: an opportunity for prevention, cost-savings and advanced training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, James

    2012-01-01

    Many patients survive severe stroke because of aggressive management in intensive care units. However, acquiring pneumonia during the post-onset phase significantly reduces both the quality and likelihood of survival. Aspiration pneumonia (AP), a relatively recent addition to the list of the pneumonias, is associated with dysphagia, a swallowing disorder that may cause aspiration of swallowed food or liquids mixed with bacterial pathogens common to saliva, or by aspiration of gastric contents due to emesis or gastroesophageal reflux. While it is within the purview of speech-language pathologists to provide evaluation, treatment, and management of dysphagia, the number of patients with dysphagia is growing faster than the number of qualified dysphagia clinicians. Because dysphagia consultations via telepractice are feasible and relatively accessible from a technological standpoint, they offer a promising strategy to bring the expertise of distant dysphagia experts to patients in underserved areas. Tele-dysphagia management has the potential to increase patients' survival, enhance the expertise of primary, local clinicians, and reduce healthcare costs. Even a modest reduction in either hospital admissions for aspiration pneumonia, or in the length of stay for AP, could save the US health care system hundreds of millions of dollars each year. Wide spread tele-dysphagia management offers significant opportunities for prevention, cost-savings and advanced training, and is therefore worthy of consideration by stakeholders in the health care system and university training programs.

  18. Tele-Dysphagia Management: An Opportunity for Prevention, Cost-Savings and Advanced Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Coyle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many patients survive severe stroke because of aggressive management in intensive care units.  However, acquiring pneumonia during the post-onset phase significantly reduces both the quality and likelihood of survival. Aspiration pneumonia (AP, a relatively recent addition to the list of the pneumonias, is associated with dysphagia, a swallowing disorder that may cause aspiration of swallowed food or liquids mixed with bacterial pathogens common to saliva, or by aspiration of gastric contents due to emesis or gastroesophageal reflux. While it is within the purview of speech-language pathologists to provide evaluation, treatment, and management of dysphagia, the number of patients with dysphagia is growing faster than the number of qualified dysphagia clinicians.  Because dysphagia consultations via telepractice are feasible and relatively accessible from a technological standpoint, they offer a promising strategy to bring the expertise of distant dysphagia experts to patients in underserved areas.  Tele-dysphagia management has the potential to increase patients’ survival, enhance the expertise of primary, local clinicians, and reduce healthcare costs. Even a modest reduction in either hospital admissions for aspiration pneumonia, or in the length of stay for AP, could save the US health care system hundreds of millions of dollars each year.  Wide spread tele-dysphagia management offers significant opportunities for prevention, cost-savings and advanced training, and is therefore worthy of consideration by stakeholders in the health care system and university training programs.

  19. Reflection on the Implementation of a Nurse Practitioner Training Programme in a Large Cardiothoracic Surgical Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Laidler, Sandra; MacFarlane, Rowena; Clarke, Lisa; Naden, Scott; Newberry, Gillian; Thompson, Fiona; Stamenkovic, Sasha; Clark, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Driven by EWTD, junior doctors training and cost cutting, the nurse practitioner role was expanded with acquisition of new skills.\\ud \\ud Methods: 10 experienced cardiothoracic nurses with degree level education were appointed to work with the CT1’s on the wards. Although initially supernumerary this has become a fully independent practice with a 24hour shift pattern. Foundation training was given in e.g. history taking, physical examination and management of post operative compli...

  20. Challenges in Hospital-Associated Infection Management: A Unit Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining a successful unit-based continuous quality improvement program for managing hospital-associated infections is a huge challenge and an overwhelming task. It requires strong organizational support and unit leadership, human and fiscal resources, time, and a dedicated and motivated nursing staff. A great deal of effort goes into implementing, monitoring, reporting, and evaluating quality improvement initiatives and can lead to significant frustration on the part of the leadership team and nursing staff when quality improvement efforts fail to produce the desired results. Each initiative presents its own unique set of challenges; however, common issues influence all initiatives. These common issues include organization and unit culture, current clinical practice guidelines being used to drive the initiatives, performance discrepancies on the part of nursing staff, availability of resources including equipment and supplies, monitoring of the data, and conflicting quality improvement priorities.

  1. Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness: Implications for Case Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Nina R; Stanton, Marietta P

    The purpose of this case study is to provide a specific example of the disease trajectory for one patient's experience with intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). This case study provides those in case management with an overview of some of the common signs and symptoms of ICUAW, as well as the possible prognosis and recovery from ICUAW. The events in this case study take place in the acute care setting including the intensive care unit of a mid-sized health center, a general medical-surgical (med-surg) unit, and a long-term acute care facility. ICUAW affects the clinical, functional, and financial outcomes of patients. If the patient survives, their quality of life and the quality of life of their family members could be severely impacted. Case management practice has a significant role in coordinating care for those diagnosed with ICUAW. Case managers can use knowledge about ICUAW to improve the patient's transition throughout the hospital stay, improve discharge recommendations, and improve the patient's short-term and long-term outcomes. This may reduce unnecessary utilization of health care resources.

  2. Training managers to facilitate their meetings: An intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2014-01-01

    Meetings in organisations are a common object of popular frustration. They are often run by managers who picked up their meeting skills from their superiors a generation previously, thus perpetuating obsolescent practices unsuited to today’s world of work. This paper reports on a research-based i...... showed that in the employees’ judgement, there were significant improvements in their managers’ competencies in both new meeting facilitation and classical meeting management, whereas other meeting outcomes resisted change........ To test this reconceptualisation in a live experiment intended to improve real meetings, we conducted brief training of 103 managers in meeting facilitation in two organisations in Denmark. A pre- and post-intervention survey of a thousand employees who regularly participated in these managers’ meetings......Meetings in organisations are a common object of popular frustration. They are often run by managers who picked up their meeting skills from their superiors a generation previously, thus perpetuating obsolescent practices unsuited to today’s world of work. This paper reports on a research...

  3. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu R; Cattamanchi, Srihari; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman; Aljohani, Majed; Keim, Mark; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-08-01

    The increase in natural and man-made disasters occurring worldwide places Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians at the forefront of responding to these crises. Despite the growing interest in Disaster Medicine, it is unclear if resident training has been able to include these educational goals. Hypothesis This study surveys EM residencies in the United States to assess the level of education in Disaster Medicine, to identify competencies least and most addressed, and to highlight effective educational models already in place. The authors distributed an online survey of multiple-choice and free-response questions to EM residency Program Directors in the United States between February 7 and September 24, 2014. Questions assessed residency background and details on specific Disaster Medicine competencies addressed during training. Out of 183 programs, 75 (41%) responded to the survey and completed all required questions. Almost all programs reported having some level of Disaster Medicine training in their residency. The most common Disaster Medicine educational competencies taught were patient triage and decontamination. The least commonly taught competencies were volunteer management, working with response teams, and special needs populations. The most commonly identified methods to teach Disaster Medicine were drills and lectures/seminars. There are a variety of educational tools used to teach Disaster Medicine in EM residencies today, with a larger focus on the use of lectures and hospital drills. There is no indication of a uniform educational approach across all residencies. The results of this survey demonstrate an opportunity for the creation of a standardized model for resident education in Disaster Medicine. Sarin RR , Cattamanchi S , Alqahtani A , Aljohani M , Keim M , Ciottone GR . Disaster education: a survey study to analyze disaster medicine training in emergency medicine residency programs in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.

  4. Education and training of future wetland scientists and managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Wetland science emerged as a distinct discipline in the 1980s. In response, courses addressing various aspects of wetland science and management were developed by universities, government agencies, and private firms. Professional certification of wetland scientists began in the mid-1990s to provide confirmation of the quality of education and experience of persons involved in regulatory, management, restoration/construction, and research involving wetland resources. The education requirements for certification and the need for persons with specific wetland training to fill an increasing number of wetland-related positions identified a critical need to develop curriculum guidelines for an undergraduate wetland science and management major for potential accreditation by the Society of Wetland Scientists. That proposed major contains options directed toward either wetland science or management. Both options include required basic courses to meet the general education requirements of many universities, required upper-level specialized courses that address critical aspects of physical and biological sciences applicable to wetlands, and a minimum of four additional upper-level specialized courses that can be used to tailor a degree to students' interests. The program would be administered by an independent review board that would develop guidelines and evaluate university applications for accreditation. Students that complete the required coursework will fulfill the education requirements for professional wetland scientist certification and possess qualifications that make them attractive candidates for graduate school or entry-level positions in wetland science or management. Universities that offer this degree program could gain an advantage in recruiting highly qualified students with an interest in natural resources. Alternative means of educating established wetland scientists are likewise important, especially to provide specialized knowledge and experience or

  5. [Training to management of violence in hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, B; Mora, M; Blasquez, S; Moussot, P-E; Silva, S; Cocquet, P

    2013-03-01

    Evaluate the typology of violence in hospital setting, study the psychophysiological state of care givers dealing with the aggression and provide appropriate training. Single centre, observational. A first anonymous questionnaire was given to a sample of emergency and intensive care providers in Narbonne Hospital. The parameters studied included: demographics data, the Trait Anxiety Inventory test, the typology of aggressions, and the psycho-physiological state of subjects dealing with the aggression. Robert Paturel, an instructor of French Special Forces (Recherche-Assistance-Intervention-Dissuasion [RAID]), has provided training for the management of violence. A second questionnaire assessed satisfaction for proposed formation. Forty-one questionnaires were returned. The rates of verbal and physical violence touching care givers were respectively 97 % and 41 % (median of 7years [1-36] experience on the job). Eighty-five percent of care givers wanted training in psychology of conflict and 93 % wanted a formation with a self-defense aspect. The first reason of violence was drugs and alcohol abuse. The "tunnel effect" during stress was identified in 34 % of care givers, and 20 % were unaware of its nature. Twenty-one percent of care givers spontaneously adopting a safe distance of more than 1m during a conflict had been physically assaulted versus 63 % for those staying less than 1m (P=0.03). The proposed formation, including psychology of conflict and self-defense, was satisfactory to all care givers who participated (median score 9/10 [7-10]). The verbal and physical violence affecting emergency departments is a common phenomenon warranting appropriate training. The proposed formation included the comprehension of the conflict causality, self-defense and self-control. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Robotic surgery training in gynecologic fellowship programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehchehr, Soorena; Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Gardner, Michael O; Ramunno, Elisa; Doyle, Nora M

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use and acceptance of robotic platforms calls for the need to train not only established surgeons but also residents and fellow trainees within the context of the traditional residency and fellowship program. Our study aimed to clarify the current status of robotic training in gynecologic fellowship programs in the United States. This was a Web-based survey of four gynecology fellowship programs in the United States from November 2010 to March 2011. Programs were selected based on their geographic areas. A questionnaire with 43 questions inquiring about robotic surgery performance and training was sent to the programs and either a fellow or the fellowship director was asked to complete. Participation was voluntary. We had 102 responders (18% respond rate) with an almost equal response rate from all four gynecologic fellowships, with a median response rate of 25% (range 21-29%). Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) and Gynecologic Oncology (Gyn Onc) fellowships had the highest rate of robotic training in their fellowship curriculum-95% and 83%, respectively. Simulator training was used as a training tool in 74% of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS); however, just 22% of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility fellowships had simulator training. Eighty-seven percent of Gyn Onc fellows graduate with >50 robotic cases, but this was 0% for Reproductive Endocrinology Infertility fellows. Our study showed that the use of a robotic system was built into fellowship curriculum of >80% of MIS and Gyn Onc fellowship programs that were entered in our study. Simulator training has been used widely in Ob&Gyn fellowship programs as part of their robotic training curriculum.

  7. The changing training needs of clinical nurse managers: exploring issues for continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D; Kelly, D; Goldstone, L; Maidwell, A

    2001-04-01

    To identify areas where clinical nurse managers perceived that they would benefit from further training and to make recommendations for planning future programmes to meet their needs. The effectiveness of the clinical nurse manager has traditionally been associated with maintaining standards of care. Continuing professional development (CPD) is essential to ensure this important group feel adequately prepared to perform their role and has been recognized as an important factor in maintaining job satisfaction and reducing wasteful staff turnover. A review of the literature indicated that since the 1980s the CPD needs of clinical nurse managers have tended to be overlooked despite increasing complexity of the tasks expected of them. Thus it appeared that a fresh study to address these needs would be justified and should take into account sources of work-related stress and variables relating to job satisfaction. The study involved clinical nurse managers employed in all four acute hospital National Health Service (NHS) trusts where training needs were served by a major inner city educational consortium. Data collection proceeded in two stages. Initially interviews were undertaken with a random sample of 15 clinical nurse managers to provide in-depth, qualitative data. This information was used to develop a survey questionnaire distributed to the remaining 182 clinical nurse managers in each of the trusts. Data from the interviews indicated that clinical nurse managers appeared to feel clinically competent but generally experienced lack of confidence when dealing with a range of issues, in particular; human resources, managing budgets, deputizing for senior colleagues across the trust ('acting up') and using information technology in everyday practice. Response rate to the survey was good (65%). The results corroborated the interview findings, indicating a need for updating in the same wide range of topics. There were few differences in training needs across all four

  8. Phenology research for natural resource management in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquist, Carolyn A F; Kellermann, Jherime L; Gerst, Katharine L; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J

    2014-05-01

    Natural resource professionals in the United States recognize that climate-induced changes in phenology can substantially affect resource management. This is reflected in national climate change response plans recently released by major resource agencies. However, managers on-the-ground are often unclear about how to use phenological information to inform their management practices. Until recently, this was at least partially due to the lack of broad-based, standardized phenology data collection across taxa and geographic regions. Such efforts are now underway, albeit in very early stages. Nonetheless, a major hurdle still exists: phenology-linked climate change research has focused more on describing broad ecological changes rather than making direct connections to local to regional management concerns. To help researchers better design relevant research for use in conservation and management decision-making processes, we describe phenology-related research topics that facilitate "actionable" science. Examples include research on evolution and phenotypic plasticity related to vulnerability, the demographic consequences of trophic mismatch, the role of invasive species, and building robust ecological forecast models. Such efforts will increase phenology literacy among on-the-ground resource managers and provide information relevant for short- and long-term decision-making, particularly as related to climate response planning and implementing climate-informed monitoring in the context of adaptive management. In sum, we argue that phenological information is a crucial component of the resource management toolbox that facilitates identification and evaluation of strategies that will reduce the vulnerability of natural systems to climate change. Management-savvy researchers can play an important role in reaching this goal.

  9. [Training and action research in a short-stay geriatric oncology unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charniot, Christine; Berchouchi, Florence; Marchand, Claire; Gagnayre, Rémi; Sebbane, Georges; Pamoukdjian, Frédéric

    A participative action research project was undertaken in a geriatric oncology hospital unit. It resulted in the training of paramedical staff regarding the specific care to be provided to elderly people with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Habitat Demonstration Unit Project Leadership and Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) led multi-center Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project leadership and management strategies. The HDU project team constructed and tested an analog prototype lunar surface habitat/laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) during 2010. The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a tiger team approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies and innovations from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the leadership and management strategies as well as lessons learned pertaining to leading and managing a multi-center diverse team in a rapid prototype environment. The PEM configuration went from a paper design to an operational surface habitat demonstration unit in less than 12 months. The HDU project is part of the strategic plan from the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Directorate Integration Office (DIO) and the Exploration Mission Systems Office (EMSO) to test destination elements in analog environments. The 2011 HDU-Deep Space Habitat (DSH) configuration will build upon the PEM work, and emphasize validity of crew operations (remote working and living), EVA operations, mission operations, logistics operations, and science operations that might be required in a deep space context for Near Earth Object (NEO) exploration mission architectures. The 2011 HDU-DSH will be field-tested during the 2011 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (DRaTS) field tests. The HDU project is a "technology-pull" project that integrates technologies and innovations from multiple NASA centers. This project will repurpose the HDU 2010 demo unit that was field tested in the 2010 DRaTS, adding habitation functionality to the prototype unit. This paper will describe the strategy of establishing a multi-center project management team that put in place the key multi-center leadership skills and

  11. Environmental Management and Education and Training Provision in Selected EU Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning

    of im-proved environmental management, and thus also as crucial to progress towards sustainable development. The idea for an international programme on environ-mental education dates back to the 1972 United Nation´s Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. Twenty years later, at the United Nation......´s Conference on Environ-ment and Development in Rio, a whole chapter of Agenda 21 was devoted to a plan of action for sustainable development, which called for national strategies for environ-mental education. At the EU level, the starting point for joint action in this area was the Council Resolution......Particular attention has been given at the UN level and in the EU environmental policy to the importance of the educational requirements which follow from the implementation of cleaner and less harmful practices. Therefore, training and education have long been recognised as essential ingredients...

  12. Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Beliefs About Delirium Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhouse, Kimberly J; Vincent, Catherine; Foreman, Marquis D; Gruss, Valerie A; Corte, Colleen; Berger, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Delirium, the most frequent complication of hospitalized older adults, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), can result in increased mortality rates and length of stay. Nurses are neither consistently identifying nor managing delirium in these patients. The purpose of this study was to explore ICU nurses' identification of delirium, actions they would take for patients with signs or symptoms of delirium, and beliefs about delirium assessment and management. In this cross-sectional study using qualitative descriptive methods guided by the theory of planned behavior, 30 ICU nurses' responses to patient vignettes depicting different delirium subtypes were explored. Descriptive and content analyses revealed that nurses did not consistently identify delirium; their actions varied in different vignettes. Nurses believed that they needed adequate staffing, balanced workload, interprofessional collaboration, and established policy and protocols to identify and manage delirium successfully. Research is needed to determine if implementing these changes increases recognition and decreases consequences of delirium. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Integrating medical management with diabetes self-management training: a randomized control trial of the Diabetes Outpatient Intensive Treatment program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polonsky, William H; Earles, Jay; Smith, Susan; Pease, Donna J; Macmillan, Mary; Christensen, Reed; Taylor, Thomas; Dickert, Judy; Jackson, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the Diabetes Outpatient Intensive Treatment (DOIT) program, a multiday group education and skills training experience combined with daily medical management, followed by case management over 6 months...

  14. The road weather bulletin #2 : road weather management publications and training materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This flyer summarizes recent documents and training materials : concerning road weather management and surface transportation published since June 2011. It includes reports, flyers, pamphlets, and training courses to show the progress made in the : m...

  15. Essential trauma management training: addressing service delivery needs in active conflict zones in eastern Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Matthew G

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Access to governmental and international nongovernmental sources of health care within eastern Myanmar's conflict regions is virtually nonexistent. Historically, under these circumstances effective care for the victims of trauma, particularly landmine injuries, has been severely deficient. Recognizing this, community-based organizations (CBOs providing health care in these regions sought to scale up the capacity of indigenous health workers to provide trauma care. Case description The Trauma Management Program (TMP was developed by CBOs in cooperation with a United States-based health care NGO. The goal of the TMP is to improve the capacity of local health workers to deliver effective trauma care. From 2000 to the present, international and local health care educators have conducted regular workshops to train indigenous health workers in the management of landmine injuries, penetrating and blunt trauma, shock, wound and infection care, and orthopedics. Health workers have been regularly resupplied with the surgical instruments, supplies and medications needed to provide the care learnt through TMP training workshops. Discussion and Evaluation Since 2000, approximately 300 health workers have received training through the TMP, as part of a CBO-run health system providing care for approximately 250 000 internally displaced persons (IDPs and war-affected residents. Based on interviews with health workers, trauma registry inputs and photo/video documentation, protocols and procedures taught during training workshops have been implemented effectively in the field. Between June 2005 and June 2007, more than 200 patients were recorded in the trauma patient registry. The majority were victims of weapons-related trauma. Conclusion This report illustrates a method to increase the capacity of indigenous health workers to manage traumatic injuries. These health workers are able to provide trauma care for otherwise inaccessible

  16. Disaster management among pediatric surgeons: preparedness, training and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Nikunj K; Behar, Solomon; Nager, Alan L; Dorey, Fred; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary events in the United States (eg, September 2001, school shootings), Europe (eg, Madrid train bombings), and the Middle East have raised awareness of mass casualty events and the need for a capable disaster response. Recent natural disasters have highlighted the poor preparation and infrastructure in place to respond to mass casualty events. In response, public health policy makers and emergency planners developed plans and prepared emergency response systems. Emergency response providers include first responders, a subset of emergency professionals, including firemen, law enforcement, paramedics, who respond to the incident scene and first receivers, a set of healthcare workers who receive the disaster victims at hospital facilities. The role of pediatric surgeons in mass casualty emergency response plans remains undefined. The authors hypothesize that pediatric surgeons' training and experience will predict their willingness and ability to be activated first receivers. The objective of our study was to determine the baseline experience, preparedness, willingness, and availability of pediatric surgeons to participate as activated first receivers. After institutional review board approval, the authors conducted an anonymous online survey of members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association in 2007. The authors explored four domains in this survey: (1) demographics, (2) disaster experience and perceived preparedness, (3) attitudes regarding responsibility and willingness to participate in a disaster response, and (4) availability to participate in a disaster response. The authors performed univariate and bivariate analyses to determine significance. Finally, the authors conducted a logistic regression to determine whether experience or preparedness factors affected the respondent's availability or willingness to respond to a disaster as a first receiver The authors sent 725 invitations and received 265 (36.6 percent) completed surveys. Overall, the

  17. 77 FR 10538 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers... is continuing its training program to give regulatory project managers the opportunity to tour..., over a 2- to 3-day period, small groups (five or less) of regulatory project managers, including a...

  18. Preparations for a train-to-train impact test of crash-energy management passenger rail equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-16

    Preparations are ongoing for a full-scale train-to-train : impact test of crash-energy management (CEM) equipment, : during which a cab car-led passenger consist, initially moving : at 30 mph, will impact a standing locomotive-led consist. The : coll...

  19. Manage Computer Support Costs through Effective User Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Compagnon, Betty; Leydon, John F.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents the University of New Hampshire's approach to ongoing training of computer users and argues that training is an investment with a large payoff. The article considers factors affecting training success; computer support; academic computing training; and administrative computing training, including developing a user services…

  20. Education and training initiatives for crisis management in the European Union: a web-based analysis of available programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Foletti, Marco; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Scarone, Piercarlo; Ragazzoni, Luca; Corte, Francesco Della; Kaptan, Kubilay; Lupescu, Olivera; Arculeo, Chris; von Arnim, Gotz; Friedl, Tom; Ashkenazi, Michael; Heselmann, Deike; Hreckovski, Boris; Khorram-Manesh, Amir; Khorrram-Manesh, Amir; Komadina, Radko; Lechner, Kostanze; Patru, Cristina; Burkle, Frederick M; Fisher, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Education and training are key elements of disaster management. Despite national and international educational programs in disaster management, there is no standardized curriculum available to guide the European Union (EU) member states. European- based Disaster Training Curriculum (DITAC), a multiple university-based project financially supported by the EU, is charged with developing a holistic and highly-structured curriculum and courses for responders and crisis managers at a strategic and tactical level. The purpose of this study is to qualitatively assess the prevailing preferences and characteristics of disaster management educational and training initiatives (ETIs) at a postgraduate level that currently exist in the EU countries. An Internet-based qualitative search was conducted in 2012 to identify and analyze the current training programs in disaster management. The course characteristics were evaluated for curriculum, teaching methods, modality of delivery, target groups, and funding. The literature search identified 140 ETIs, the majority (78%) located in United Kingdom, France, and Germany. Master level degrees were the primary certificates granted to graduates. Face-to-face education was the most common teaching method (84%). Approximately 80% of the training initiatives offered multi- and cross-disciplinary disaster management content. A competency-based approach to curriculum content was present in 61% of the programs. Emergency responders at the tactical level were the main target group. Almost all programs were self-funded. Although ETIs currently exist, they are not broadly available in all 27 EU countries. Also, the curricula do not cover all key elements of disaster management in a standardized and competency-based structure. This study has identified the need to develop a standardized competency-based educational and training program for all European countries that will ensure the practice and policies that meet both the standards of care and

  1. Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of French physiotherapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Bonnevie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Questions: How common is inspiratory muscle training by physiotherapists in the intensive care unit (ICU? Which patients receive the training? What methods are used to administer the training? Is maximal inspiratory pressure used to evaluate the need for the training and the patient's outcome after training? Design: Cross-sectional survey of all ICUs in France. Participants: Two hundred and sixty-five senior physiotherapists. Results: The response rate was 99% among eligible units. Therapist experience in ICU was significantly associated with the use of inspiratory muscle training (p = 0.02. Therapists mainly used inspiratory muscle training either systematically or specifically in patients who failed to wean from mechanical ventilation. The training was used significantly more in non-sedated patients (p < 0.0001. The most commonly nominated technique that respondents claimed to use to apply the training was controlled diaphragmatic breathing (83% of respondents, whereas 13% used evidence-based methods. Among those who applied some form of inspiratory muscle training, 16% assessed maximal inspiratory pressure. Six respondents (2%, 95% CI 1 to 5 used both an evidence-based method to administer inspiratory muscle training and the recommended technique for assessment of inspiratory muscle strength. Conclusion: Most physiotherapists in French ICUs who apply inspiratory muscle training use methods of uncertain efficacy without assessment of maximal inspiratory pressure. Further efforts need to be made in France to disseminate information regarding evidence-based assessment and techniques for inspiratory muscle training in the ICU. The alignment of inspiratory muscle training practice with evidence could be investigated in other regions. [Bonnevie T, Villiot-Danger J-C, Gravier F-E, Dupuis J, Prieur G, Médrinal C (2015 Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of

  2. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  3. Operations research in intensive care unit management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jie; Fügener, Andreas; Schoenfelder, Jan; Brunner, Jens O

    2016-08-12

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is a crucial and expensive resource largely affected by uncertainty and variability. Insufficient ICU capacity causes many negative effects not only in the ICU itself, but also in other connected departments along the patient care path. Operations research/management science (OR/MS) plays an important role in identifying ways to manage ICU capacities efficiently and in ensuring desired levels of service quality. As a consequence, numerous papers on the topic exist. The goal of this paper is to provide the first structured literature review on how OR/MS may support ICU management. We start our review by illustrating the important role the ICU plays in the hospital patient flow. Then we focus on the ICU management problem (single department management problem) and classify the literature from multiple angles, including decision horizons, problem settings, and modeling and solution techniques. Based on the classification logic, research gaps and opportunities are highlighted, e.g., combining bed capacity planning and personnel scheduling, modeling uncertainty with non-homogenous distribution functions, and exploring more efficient solution approaches.

  4. Effects of Computer-based Stress Management Training on Psychological Well-being and Work Performance in Japanese Employees: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    UMANODAN, Rino; SHIMAZU, Akihito; MINAMI, Masahide; KAWAKAMI, Norito

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based stress management training (SMT) program in improving employees’ psychological well-being and work performance. A total of 12 work units (N=263) were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (8 work units, n=142) or to a wait-list control group (4 work units, n=121). All participants were requested to answer online questionnaires assessing psychological well-being as a primary outcome, and coping style, social support, and kn...

  5. A community needs responsive management training model: Re-envisioning management training for pastors of the International Assemblies of God Church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malesela J. Masenya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organisations (NGO�s play an important role in helping satisfy society�s many needs. Churches, for example, are called upon to address critical challenges facing the South African society such as discrepancies in life chances, unemployment and corruption. It largely depends on the management skills of leaders of such organisations to succeed in their endeavour to meet community needs. In order to improve these skills, this study sought to redefine the initial training of student pastors, including their management training, at the colleges of the International Assemblies of God Church (IAG. A qualitative research approach was followed. Two focus group interviews and seven individual interviews were conducted. Interviews included members of the national and provincial executive committees of the IAG, serving pastors, directors of training colleges, pastor trainees in their final year of study, and a newly graduated student. The findings of the study support the importance of formal management training for pastors before being employed in the service of the IAG. This Church has moved away from accepting ministers for service based on their faith and profession of a call to ministry only. The investigation revealed shortcomings in the initial training programmes of pastors; for example, the emphasis on theological courses at the expense of courses that are responsive to community needs and management training issues. Leaders with the competency to respond to community needs are required. The implementation of a transformational management framework, which includes community responsive courses, is recommended as a way to effectively train church leaders.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Although this article is written within the framework of Educational Management, it touches on other fields like Practical Theology and Curriculum Development. It reflects on the perceived need to include management training in

  6. Effects of Selection and Training on Unit-Level Performance over Time: A Latent Growth Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H.; Ferris, Gerald R.; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Perryman, Alexa A.; Blass, Fred R.; Heetderks, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly few data exist concerning whether and how utilization of job-related selection and training procedures affects different aspects of unit or organizational performance over time. The authors used longitudinal data from a large fast-food organization (N = 861 units) to examine how change in use of selection and training relates to…

  7. A management strategy for internal quality assurance in the training of student teachers in teacher training institutions in the Gauteng Province / Jacoba Elizabeth Fourie

    OpenAIRE

    Fourie, Jacoba Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the management of internal quality assurance in the professional training of student teachers in teacher training institutions by focusing on: • the nature of teacher training in South Africa; • the nature of the management of quality assurance in education; • models for the management of internal quality assurance in education; • existing practices regarding the management of internal quality assurance in teacher training inst...

  8. Use of training dentures in management of gagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gagging is a frequent impediment to the performance of dental procedures. This stimulation of the gagging reflex, or more accurately, the vomiting reflex, is a special problem in prosthodontic service. A hypersensitive gagging reflex often prevents the dentist from carrying out critical procedures or causes them to performat a less than satisfactory level. In addition, once having suffered an unpleasant gagging experience in a dentist′s office, the patients develop a fear of further visits to dentists. The purpose of this paper is to describe methods of managing the gagging patient that has a sound rationale based on modified treatment approaches starting from impression making to design of the prosthesis aided by training dentures to help the patient to tolerate prosthesis in mouth before fabrication of definite prosthesis.

  9. OER Usage by Instructional Designers and Training Managers in Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Cohen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the development of Open Educational Resources (OERs, different models regarding the usage of these resources in education have appeared in the literature. Wiley’s 4-Rs model is considered to be one of the leading models. Research based on Wiley’s model shows that using materials without making changes is the most common use. Compared to the extensive literature regarding OER usage in education, the literature barely deals with OER usage by instructional designers or training managers in corporations. The purpose of this research is to examine the OER usage of these two stakeholders, distinguishing between Little and Big OER repositories, in which Little OER repositories such as YouTube and Wikipedia aren’t necessarily designed to fulfill educational purposes. Findings show that these stakeholders almost use only Little repositories and that their usage level is higher than what is documented in the literature: they mostly Revise–modify the form of the resource, and Remix–combine different resources to create new ones. These differences can be explained by the fact that materials from Little OER repositories are raw materials, requiring further editing and adjustment. Significant differences between instructional designers’ and training managers’ usage of OERs were found regarding the Reuse level of resources from internal repositories and the Google Images repository, and the frequency of this Reuse.

  10. Change management methodologies trained for automotive infotainment projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostean, G.; Volker, S.; Hutanu, A.

    2017-01-01

    An Automotive Electronic Control Units (ECU) development project embedded within a car Environment is constantly under attack of a continuous flow of modifications of specifications throughout the life cycle. Root causes for those modifications are for instance simply software or hardware implementation errors or requirement changes to satisfy the forthcoming demands of the market to ensure the later commercial success. It is unavoidable that from the very beginning until the end of the project “requirement changes” will “expose” the agreed objectives defined by contract specifications, which are product features, budget, schedule and quality. The key discussions will focus upon an automotive radio-navigation (infotainment) unit, which challenges aftermarket devises such as smart phones. This competition stresses especially current used automotive development processes, which are fit into a 4 Year car development (introduction) cycle against a one-year update cycle of a smart phone. The research will focus the investigation of possible impacts of changes during all phases of the project: the Concept-Validation, Development and Debugging-Phase. Building a thorough understanding of prospective threats is of paramount importance in order to establish the adequate project management process to handle requirement changes. Personal automotive development experiences and Literature review of change- and configuration management software development methodologies led the authors to new conceptual models, which integrates into the structure of traditional development models used in automotive projects, more concretely of radio-navigation projects.

  11. Delivery Strategies to Enhance the Sustainability of Training: Lessons from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, Cecilia; Nadeau, Andrew; Hernandez, Emilio; Kafeero, Fred; Zahiga, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) utilizes training as a major component of the support it provides to its member countries in Africa. In the past, stand-alone training events targeting individual actors were the norm. However, an external evaluation indicated that this type of training scores low in terms of…

  12. A successful physician training program in cholesterol screening and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, B W; Gans, K M; McQuade, W; Culpepper, L; Lasswell, A; Hume, A L; Dowling, P T; Carleton, R A

    1991-05-01

    Thirty-six resident physicians received a blood cholesterol training program which included training in blood cholesterol screening using a fingerstick method and a desktop analyzer, diet assessment and counseling, and a management protocol for follow-up diet and drug treatment. The program also included feedback to residents about their blood cholesterol screening activity, incentives, and biweekly articles in the department newsletter. Between 1986-1987 (baseline) and 1987-1988 (intervention), the percentage of the target patient population (ages 20-65 years, nonpregnant, not screened in the previous year) that was screened for hypercholesterolemia in this primary care practice increased from 16.2 to 23.2% [rate difference (RD) = 7.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.75-9.25]. The mean value of the screening tests decreased from 5.36 mmol/liter (207.2 mg/dl) to 5.08 mmol/liter (196.6 mg/dl; t = 2.98, P = 0.003) and the percentage of the population screened needing further evaluation decreased from 36.8 to 27.6% (RD 9.2; CI = 2.00-14.00). In the intervention year, compared with the baseline year, patients with a borderline blood cholesterol and cardiovascular risk factors were more likely to have a follow-up test (28.8% vs 11.9%, RD = 16.9; 95% CI = 0.80-33.00) and the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol test was used less for screening (8.2% vs 19.4%, P less than 0.0001). Conclusion. We conclude that this program was effectively integrated into a busy primary care practice, leading to improvement in blood cholesterol screening and management practices.

  13. TRAINING OF MANAGERS – SUPPORT FOR EXERTING A STRATEGIC EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia BAESU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Managers are an important component of human resources in a company, bringing a decisive contribution to the establishment and achievement of company’s objectives. In managerial training a special role is played by the change of ideas and experiences with managers from economic environments with different degrees of development, facing with the same type of problems, by holding round tables and seminars. These events may be important opportunities for the Romanian managers to get in direct contact with all the novelties at international level of improving their own knowledge and skills. In the context of global development of economy the roles and tasks assigned to managers of corporations have changed as well. Consequently, at present the success of an enterprise depends decisively on the managers’ quality.

  14. PLANNING THE WORK OF AVIATION UNITS USING PROJECT MANAGEMENT TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Valerievich Bogomolov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problematic issues of planning the work of aviation units and offers one of the possible variants of their solutions by means of project management tools implementation in aviation units.As a key concept in the theory of planning, the author proposes introducing the concept of a project as a complex, non-repeating one-time action, limited in time, budget, resources and in clear guidance throughout the process, followingthe customer requirements. In aviation engineering service work, this also includes such works as operational preparationstypes, routine maintenance, aviation technology improvements, military repair etc.The use of network models can also easily specify the sequence of some of the actions (events, to make process flow charts and organizational charts.The main advantage of linear graphs is their clarity and simplicity. Linear graphs make it possible to optimize the work on a variety of criteria, including the equability of labor force, machinery, building materials, etc. At the same time,the main drawback of linear graphs is that they are difficult to correct in case of non-compliance with the deadlines or a change in their arrangement. These drawbacks are eliminated by a different form of scheduling - network charts.The scheme of planning the work of units using project management tools is given. To carry out the scheme theauthor proposes to use modern tools of project management, which allow to structure the process of maintenance activities through its decomposition into phases, tasks and subtasks, then to identify critical path tasks, construct the chart of imple- mentation. The process model as a project allows to make the prognostic analysis and to improve the process according to it, for what a number of modern software packages that automate the functions of planning and planned types of work schedule control.

  15. Effect of Mandatory Unit and Individual Physical Training on Fitness in Military Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Morgan K; Grier, Tyson; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Bushman, Timothy T; Nindl, Bradley C; Jones, Bruce H

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to look at the effect of additional individual physical training (PT) in addition to mandatory unit PT as well as other risk factors on physical fitness. A cross-sectional design. This study was conducted on a US military installation. Participants were 6290 male and 558 female active duty US Army soldiers in 3 light infantry brigades. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires asking about individual characteristics, PT, and physical fitness. Cut points were established for soldiers scoring within the top 33% for each of the 3 Army Physical Fitness Test events (2-mile run, sit-ups, and push-ups) and top 50% in each of the tests combined for overall performance. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals from multivariate analyses were calculated. Variables impacting physical fitness performance of men and women included increased body mass index, leading unit PT sessions, and individual distance running mileage. Other variables impacting physical performance for men included increased age, smoking, and individual resistance training. Soldiers performing additional individual PT demonstrated a positive influence on fitness compared to unit PT participation alone. Increased age and being overweight/obese negatively influenced physical fitness. To enhance fitness performance through unit PT, running by ability groups and resistance training should be encouraged by leadership.

  16. Redundancy management of the Space Shuttle inertial measurement units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, J. R.; Bauer, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the inertial measurement unit (IMU) redundancy management (RM) techniques for automatic in-flight monitoring of inertial instrument performance by the Space Shuttles primary onboard guidance, navigation, and control computers. The techniques and rationale for detecting and identifying faulty instruments are discussed. Special attention is given to the design philosophy, thresholds, and error propagation characteristics of the IMU RM system. The derivation of thresholds is described from the viewpoint of reliability and the safety of the vehicle and crew.

  17. DRUG MANAGEMENT REVIEWS IN DISTRICT DRUG MANAGEMENT UNIT AND GENERAL HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug is one of the essential elements in healthcare that should be effectively and efficiently managed. Following thedecentralization in 2001 in Indonesia, drug management has changed in district drug management units and also in District General Hospitals. Certainly this condition influences the sustainability of drug access in primary health care such as in Community Health Center and District General Hospital, especially in drug financing policy. A cross sectional descriptive study to obtain information on drug management in public healthcare in district had been carried out between July and December 2006 in 10 District Public Drug Management Units from 10 district health offices and 9 district general hospitals as samples. Data were collected by interviewing heads of Drug Section in District Health Offices and heads of Hospital Pharmacies using structured questionnaires and observing drug storage in District Drug Management Units, Community Health Centers, and Hospital Pharmacies. Results of the study show that drug planning in District Health Offices and General Hospitals did not meet the basic real need in some districts nor District Hospitals. The minimum health service standards had no been achieved yet. Furthermore, drug procurement, storage and recording as well as reporting was not good enough either, such as shown by the existence of expired drugs. Lead time for drug delivery to community health centers in some districts was longer than the average of lead time in the past 3 years.

  18. The prevalence of and attitudes toward neonatal functional echocardiography use and training in the United States: a survey of neonatal intensive care unit medical directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachinger, S; Stansfield, R B; Ensing, G; Schumacher, R

    2014-01-01

    Internationally, neonatologists are increasingly performing functional echocardiography to evaluate the hemodynamic status and cardiac function in neonates. The purpose of this study was to describe the current prevalence of and attitudes toward the use and training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography in the United States. An anonymous survey was sent to United States neonatal intensive care unit medical directors. Neonatologists scored availability of echocardiography and attitudes toward the use and training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography. Response rate was 43.7% (247 of 565 surveys sent) and captured 95% of the neonatal-perinatal training programs. Nine percent of units had a functional echocardiography trained neonatologist; eight percent of the neonatal-perinatal training programs offered functional echocardiography training. There was no difference in the timely ability to obtain hemodynamic status with echocardiography in units compared by the presence of functional echocardiography trained neonatologists (mean = 3.13 vs. 2.67, p = 0.08) and fellowships (mean = 2.69 vs. 2.72, p = 0.85). Overall positive attitudes (mean = 14.6 ± 3.46) towards the training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography did not correlate with the perceived timely availability of echocardiography support (mean = 2.72 ± 1.43, r = -0.11, p = 0.1). Functional echocardiography use and training is not prevalent in the United States. There are positive attitudes toward the training of neonatologists in functional echocardiography that are independent of the presence of fellowships, neonatologists with echocardiography training, and the perceived availability of echocardiography support.

  19. Evaluation of a documentation system for airway management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Stephen W; Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Resuscitation science is a dynamic part of healthcare training, with an expanding role for simulation. Historically, performance measurement and documentation relied upon the presence of an instructor, an expensive and potentially inaccurate assessment tradition that tied performance testing to a fixed facility. We hypothesize that an automated system might be developed and validated to document performance in airway management for self assessment in the absence of a human trainer. The system would also store and transmit data to a central registry to document skill acquisition and maintenance. Multiple video and pressure inputs captured and documented resuscitation task performance on a readily available standard practice manikin. Bag-valve-mask ventilation (BVM), endotracheal intubation, and ventilation via endotracheal tube (ETT) were studied for accuracy, adequacy, and time. The 12 participants performed each task for 5 repetitions, resulting in 60 total attempts for each skill. Twelve untrained participants performed 3 critical tasks in airway management. Review with the system informed the participant of his/her performance and desired outcome. The system also documented skill performance objectively relative to a standard, recording both successes and failures. Compressed and abstracted performance records populated an average 14-megabyte file size (excluding full motion video). This system was successfully used to document student performance of BVM, orotracheal intubation, and ventilation via ETT. The system easily integrates documentation, including text reports, airway pressure readings, still images and videos of task performance. Such digital documentation could guide skill acquisition and quantitatively certify performance with minimal reliance upon an instructor and evaluator.

  20. Effects of watershed management practices on sediment concentrations in the southwestern United States: Management implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente L. Lopes; Peter F. Ffolliott; Malchus B. Baker

    2000-01-01

    Effects of watershed management practices on suspended sediment concentrations from ponderosa pine forests and pinyon-juniper woodlands in the Southwestern United States are examined. Completely cleared and strip-cut ponderosa pine watersheds produced higher sediment concentrations than the control. Likewise, cabled and herbicide-treated pinyon-juniper watersheds...

  1. Alternative Approaches to Organizing, Training, and Assessing Army and Marine Corps Units. Part 2. The Reserve Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    to a short warning wartime scenario. Reserve readiness can be Improved even further by improving simulator training of reserve units, espacially In...techniques; * Reduce administrative impediments to effective mobilization;3 * Train in the combat theater where possible. Preliminary analysis of one of these...H provides an analysis of the concept of training readiness and the training strategy that the Army and Marine Corps employ today. It also addresses

  2. Implementation of Crew Resource Management: A Qualitative Study in 3 Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Peter F; van Dyck, Cathy; Wagner, Cordula; de Bruijne, Martine

    2017-12-01

    Classroom-based crew resource management (CRM) training has been increasingly applied in health care to improve safe patient care. Crew resource management aims to increase participants' understanding of how certain threats can develop as well as provides tools and skills to respond to such threats. Existing literature shows promising but inconclusive results that might be explained by the quality of the implementation. The present research systematically describes the implementation from the perspective of 3 trained intensive care units (ICUs). The design of the study was built around 3 stages of implementation: (1) the preparation, (2) the actions after the CRM training, and (3) the plans for the future. To assess all stages in 3 Dutch ICUs, 12 semistructured interviews with implementation leaders were conducted, the End-of-Course Critique questionnaire was administered, and objective measurements consisting of the number and types of plans of action were reported. The results categorize initiatives that all 3 ICUs successfully launched, including the development of checklists, each using a different implementation strategy. All ICUs have taken several steps to sustain their approach for the foreseeable future. Three similarities between the units were seen at the start of the implementation: (1) acknowledgment of a performance gap in communication, (2) structural time allocated for CRM, and (3) a clear vision on how to implement CRM. This study shows that CRM requires preparation and implementation, both of which require time and dedication. It is promising to note that all 3 ICUs have developed multiple quality improvement initiatives and aim to continue doing so.

  3. The relationship between hospital managers' leadership style and effectiveness with passing managerial training courses

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh Ardestani, Abbas; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Abtahi, Seyyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective leadership that rises from managerial training courses is highly constructive in managing hospitals more effectively. This study aims at investigating the relationship between leadership effectiveness with providing management training courses for hospital managers. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on top and middle managers of 16 hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences. As a sample, 96 participants were selected through census method. Data ...

  4. Training in commercial logistics practices to improve inventory management in the Army

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Leonard T.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Department of Defense (DoD) and private firms share a common set of logistical challenges. Rising costs, external pressures, new technology, and other factors have focused attention on improving logistics management. GAO believes top management support and training are fundamental to improving economy and efficiency for DoD's inventory management system. This thesis examines current inventory management training and policies for se...

  5. Building capacity for water, sanitation, and hygiene programming: Training evaluation theory applied to CLTS management training in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jonny; Shields, Katherine F; Venkataramanan, Vidya; Saywell, Darren; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Training and capacity building are long established critical components of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) policies, strategies, and programs. Expanding capacity building support for WaSH in developing countries is one of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, training evaluations in WaSH have been infrequent, have often not utilized these methods and tools, and have lacked rigor. We developed a conceptual framework for evaluating training in WaSH by reviewing and adapting concepts from literature. Our framework includes three target outcomes: learning, individual performance, and improved programming; and two sets of influences: trainee and context factors. We applied the framework to evaluate a seven-month community-led total sanitation (CLTS) management training program delivered to 42 government officials in Kenya from September 2013 to May 2014. Trainees were given a pre-training questionnaire and were interviewed at two weeks and seven months after initial training. We qualitatively analyzed the data using our conceptual framework. The training program resulted in trainees learning the CLTS process and new skills, and improving their individual performance through application of advocacy, partnership, and supervision soft skills. The link from trainees' performance to improved programming was constrained by resource limitations and pre-existing rigidity of trainees' organizations. Training-over-time enhanced outcomes and enabled trainees to overcome constraints in their work. Training in soft skills is relevant to managing public health programs beyond WaSH. We make recommendations on how training programs can be targeted and adapted to improve outcomes. Our conceptual framework can be used as a tool both for planning and evaluating training programs in WaSH. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic population structure of marine fish : mismatch between biological and fisheries management units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiss, Henning; Hoarau, Galice; Dickey-Collas, Mark; Wolff, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    An essential prerequisite of a sustainable fisheries management is the matching of biologically relevant processes and management action. In fisheries management and assessment, fish stocks are the fundamental biological unit, but the reasoning for the operational management unit is often indistinct

  7. Genetic population structure of marine fish: mismatch between biological and fisheries management units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiss, H.; Hoarau, G.; Dickey-Collas, M.; Wolff, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    An essential prerequisite of a sustainable fisheries management is the matching of biologically relevant processes and management action. In fisheries management and assessment, fish stocks are the fundamental biological unit, but the reasoning for the operational management unit is often indistinct

  8. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices for training of technical staff and managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide contains information that can be used to develop or validate training programs for technical staff and managers at DOE nuclear facilities. Training programs based on the content of this guide should provide assurance that these personnel perform their jobs safely and competently.

  9. Public health ethics related training for public health workforce: an emerging need in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, A; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    Ethics is a discipline, which primarily deals with what is moral and immoral behavior. Public Health Ethics is translation of ethical theories and concepts into practice to address complex multidimensional public health problems. The primary purpose of this paper was to conduct a narrative literature review-addressing role of ethics in developing curriculum in programs and schools of public health, ethics-related instruction in schools and programs of public health and the role of ethics in developing a competent public health workforce. An open search of various health databases including Google scholar and Ebscohost yielded 15 articles related to use of ethics in public health practice or public health training and the salient features were reported. Results indicated a variable amount of ethics' related training in schools and programs of public health along with public health practitioner training across the nation. Bioethics, medical ethics and public health ethics were found to be subspecialties' needing separate ethical frameworks to guide decision making. Ethics based curricular and non-curricular training for emerging public health professionals from schools and programs of public health in the United States is extremely essential. In the current age of public health challenges faced in the United States and globally, to have an ethically untrained public health force is arguably, immoral and unethical and jeopardizes population health. There is an urgent need to develop innovative ethic based curriculums in academia as well as finding effective means to translate these curricular competencies into public health practice.

  10. Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to compare two teaching methods for postpartum hemorrhage management: interactive hands-on training and non-interactive video training. In a controlled intervention study at a secondary health care center in Kenya, the two training methods, based on the Advanced Life Support......, pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way...

  11. Rapid Development and Use of a Nationwide Training Program for Cholera Management, Haiti, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Lambert, Yves; Sobel, Jeremy; Domerçant, Jean W.; Khan, Azharul

    2011-01-01

    When epidemic cholera appeared in Haiti in October 2010, the medical community there had virtually no experience with the disease and needed rapid training as the epidemic spread throughout the country. We developed a set of training materials specific to Haiti and launched a cascading training effort. Through a training-of-trainers course in November 14–15, 2010, and department-level training conducted in French and Creole over the following 3 weeks, 521 persons were trained and equipped to further train staff at the institutions where they worked. After the training, the hospitalized cholera patients’ case-fatality rate dropped from 4% to <2% by mid-December and was <1% by January 2011. Continuing in-service training, monitoring and evaluation, and integration of cholera management into regular clinical training will help sustain this success. PMID:22099112

  12. Counseling for Indecisiveness: Problem-Solving and Anxiety-Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, James D.; Siess, Thomas F.

    1976-01-01

    University students (N=32) with anxious vocational indecision were randomly assigned to five training conditions: (1) anxiety management; (2) problem-solving; (3) both of the above; (4) a placebo procedure; and (5) a no-treatment condition. A combination of anxiety-management and problem-solving training was proven more effective than either…

  13. The Impact of Stress Management Training on the Academic Performance of Low-Achieving College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the impact of stress management training as part of an academic skills training program upon students' (N=22) self-reported symptoms of stress and academic performance. Results indicated that success-stress management treatment was more effective in reducing stress and increasing academic performance than success treatment alone. (LLL)

  14. Medical residents' perceptions of their competencies and training needs in health care management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berkenbosch, Lizanne; Schoenmaker, Suzanne Gerdien; Ahern, Susannah

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that Dutch medical residents feel inadequate in certain management areas: 85% had a need for management training and reported preferences on the format of such training. Our objective was to explore if the perceived deficiencies and needs among Dutch residents were...

  15. Postoperative pain management in the postanesthesia care unit: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo J

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Jie Luo, Su Min Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Acute postoperative pain remains a major problem, resulting in multiple undesirable outcomes if inadequately controlled. Most surgical patients spend their immediate postoperative period in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, where pain management, being unsatisfactory and requiring improvements, affects further recovery. Recent studies on postoperative pain management in the PACU were reviewed for the advances in assessments and treatments. More objective assessments of pain being independent of patients’ participation may be potentially appropriate in the PACU, including photoplethysmography-derived parameters, analgesia nociception index, skin conductance, and pupillometry, although further studies are needed to confirm their utilities. Multimodal analgesia with different analgesics and techniques has been widely used. With theoretical basis of preventing central sensitization, preventive analgesia is increasingly common. New opioids are being developed with minimization of adverse effects of traditional opioids. More intravenous nonopioid analgesics and adjuncts (such as dexmedetomidine and dexamethasone are introduced for their opioid-sparing effects. Current evidence suggests that regional analgesic techniques are effective in the reduction of pain and stay in the PACU. Being available alternatives to epidural analgesia, perineural techniques and infiltrative techniques including wound infiltration, transversus abdominis plane block, local infiltration analgesia, and intraperitoneal administration have played a more important role for their effectiveness and safety. Keywords: postoperative complications, anesthesia recovery period, pain assessment, pain management, acute pain 

  16. Trends in ureteropelvic junction obstruction management among urologists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Beng Jit; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Marcovich, Robert; Smith, Arthur D; Lee, Benjamin R

    2005-02-01

    To determine current practice patterns in the surgical treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) among urologists in the United States. Using the American Urological Association directory, an electronic mail survey regarding the surgical management of UPJO was sent to 1040 urologists in the United States with an electronic mail address listed in the roster. The response rate was 37.6%. Of the respondents, 67.4% were in community practice and 32.6% in academic practice. Nearly 53% of the respondents would perform a workup for a crossing vessel before definitive therapy; if no crossing vessel was found, 43.5% would consider Acucise endopyelotomy as the first-line procedure. However, if a crossing vessel was found, 57.4% would perform open pyeloplasty and 34.3% would choose laparoscopic pyeloplasty as their first-line procedure. If pyeloplasty was chosen, community urologists preferred open pyeloplasty (77.6%), and academic urologists preferred laparoscopic pyeloplasty (66.9%). The surgeon's training and experience was the most influential factor in choosing between laparoscopic and open pyeloplasty. If the patient had a failed endopyelotomy in the past, most respondents (90.8%) would perform pyeloplasty for definitive treatment of the UPJO. Demonstration of a crossing vessel remains an important factor in determining the course of management of a UPJO. During the past 5 years, a growing number of urologists in both academic and nonacademic practices have been performing laparoscopic pyeloplasty for the management of UPJO in adults. Several factors, especially the surgeon's training, have an impact on the choice of procedure. Open pyeloplasty is still performed by a significant number of urologists. These data may be useful in designing physician education programs and/or future investigations to help define standard treatment practices for UPJO.

  17. 75 FR 10806 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers... regulatory project managers, including a senior level regulatory project manager, can observe operations of... to provide an avenue for open dialogue. During the Site Tours Program, regulatory project managers...

  18. Changes in the contractile properties of motor units in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle after one month of treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrzebna, M; Celichowski, J

    2008-08-01

    The influence of 4 weeks treadmill training on the contractile properties of motor units (MUs) in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle was investigated. A population of 18 Wistar rats was divided into two groups: trained on a treadmill (n = 7, locomotion speed 27 cm s(-1), 1 km daily, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks) and control (n = 11). The contractile properties of isolated MUs were studied. Functional isolation of units was achieved by electrical stimulation of filaments of the ventral roots. A total of 299 MUs were investigated (142 in the control group and 157 in the trained group). They were divided into fast fatigable (FF), fast resistant to fatigue (FR) and slow (S). Their proportions and parameters of contractions were analysed. Following training, the number of FF units decreased and the number of FR units increased. The distribution of the fatigue index changed within these two types of fast units. The twitch and tetanus forces increased considerably in fast MUs, mainly in those of the FF type. The contraction and relaxation times shortened in the FR and S MUs. The steep part of the force-frequency curves shifted towards higher stimulation frequencies in FR and S units, while in FF units the shift was in the opposite direction. The significant change in the proportions of fast MUs following training indicates FF to FR transformation. The various effects of training seen in the different MU types help explain the rationale behind mixed training.

  19. Simulation team training for improved teamwork in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Christer; Gustafsson, Helena; Wallin, Carl-Johan; Meurling, Lisbet; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats; Hansson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to describe implementation of simulator-based medical team training and the effect of this programme on inter-professional working in an intensive care unit (ICU). Over a period of two years, 90 percent (n = 152) of the staff of the general ICU at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden, received inter-professional team training in a fully equipped patient room in their own workplace. A case study method was used to describe and explain the planning, formation, and results of the training programme. In interviews, the participants reported that the training had increased their awareness of the importance of effective communication for patient safety. The intervention had even had an indirect impact by creating a need to talk, not only about how to communicate efficaciously, but also concerning difficult care situations in general. This, in turn, had led to regular reflection meetings for nurses held three times a week. Examples of better communication in acute situations were also reported. However, the findings indicate that the observed improvements will not last, unless organisational features such as staffing rotas and scheduling of rounds and meetings can be changed to enable use of the learned behaviours in everyday work. Other threats to sustainability include shortage of staff, overtime for staff, demands for hospital beds, budget cuts, and poor staff communication due to separate meetings for nurses and physicians. The present results broaden our understanding of how to create and sustain an organizational system that supports medical team training.

  20. Classroom Management Training, Teaching Experience and Gender: Do These Variables Impact Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs toward Classroom Management Style?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nancy K.; Yin, Zenong; Mayall, Hayley

    2006-01-01

    This study represents a continuation of research efforts to further refine the Attitudes and Beliefs on Classroom Control (ABCC) Inventory. The purposes of this study were to investigate the: (1) impact of classroom management training on classroom management style; (2) differences in attitudes toward classroom management between novice and…

  1. Implementation of exercise training programs in a hemodialysis unit: effects on physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulckaen, Massimo; Capitanini, Alessandro; Lange, Sara; Caciula, Andrea; Giuntoli, Franco; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2011-01-01

    Exercise training is beneficial for hemodialysis patients, but it should be tailored to individual abilities and willingness to participate. This study evaluated the effects of different 6-month programs of physical activity in 18 patients of a single hemodialysis unit. Before and after a 12-month control period (T0), and following 3 (T3) and 6 (T6) months of training, the patients underwent the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and constant treadmill test at 3 km/hour speed and 10% grade; spontaneous physical activity was assessed by pedometers. All patients trained for coordination, flexibility and muscular strengthening for 30 minutes within the first 2 hours of hemodialysis sessions: 9 patients underwent home exercise walking training (advised walking group [AWG]); the other 9 patients underwent the advised home training program plus an additional supervised gym training session, twice weekly (supervised walking group [SWG]). In both AWG and SWG, no changes occurred during the control period (232 ± 204 m and 248 ± 187 m at T0). In contrast, endurance performance at treadmill increased at T3 and T6 in the AWG (377 ± 272 m and 615 ± 413 m; p<0.01) and in the SWG (424 ± 272 m and 890 ± 364 m; p<0.001). No unwanted side effects occurred. This study shows that physical exercise programs can safely increase physical performance in hemodialysis patients. The training program should be continued for at least 6 months to increase muscle strength and endurance. Intradialytic exercise and home-based, pedometer-based regimens may be a useful and easy approach, whereas supervised programs can give additional benefits in motivated, selected patients.

  2. Advanced aerospace management of integrated education and training towards comprehensive security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter TEREM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aviatic integrated education and training based on the progressive technologies towards comprehensive security will be necessary for the future specialized preparation and training of the personnel in civil and military aerospace management and aviation, especially for expeditionary missions. The integrated pilot flight preparation and training based on the modern methodology of situational control would be used for improving our general system of present preparation and training, within the framework of the Armed Forces of the Slovak Republic.

  3. STAFF TRAINING MANAGEMENT IN AN COMMERCIAL BANK: EFFECTS AND SYNERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Artemyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the dependence of a commercial bank on a staff number and a profit on staff training expenses. Necessity of an address approach in the process of the staff training is proved. The key features of this approach are revealed. The authors describe its realization in the automated system of training control.

  4. Training and Organizational Effectiveness: Moderating Role of Knowledge Management Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Azmawani Abd; Ng, Siew Imm; Sambasivan, Murali; Wong, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Training alone is not sufficient to enhance organizational effectiveness to a greater level because not all knowledge obtained from the training is properly transferred and applied to the organization. This study aims to investigate whether efforts invested by Malaysian manufacturers in employee training and knowledge transfer affect…

  5. The Evolution of Public Health Education and Training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Cole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The United Kingdom has a long and evolving history of public health education. From the initiation of formal standardised training for Medical Officers for Health in the early 1900s, to the current national public health training programme, public health education has adapted to the changing contexts of public health practice. Whilst the profession was originally only a medical specialty, subsequent re­­cognition of the skills and contribution of the wider public health workforce has led to changes in professional specialist training for public health, which is now open to non-medical applicants. This well-established professional training scheme allows the formal accreditation of competence in a broad range of public health skills. The academic component of public health training is provided by a rapidly growing number of postgraduate courses. Once confined to the UK’s first school of public health, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a handful of British Universities, the current 60 or so courses across the country are found in diverse university settings. Quality and standards in higher education are monitored by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education but there are no other professional accreditation schemes for postgraduate courses in public health nationally. Public health education and training continues to face challenges in the UK, notably the current government plans for major restructuring of the National Health Service (NHS which threatens the loss of traditional NHS training placements and has created uncertainty around how professional training might be structured in the future. Whilst the long established tradition of public health education and more recent adoption of competency-based approaches to training gives some flexibility to meet these challenges, insight and innovative responses are required to ensure that public health education and training are not destabilised by these challenges

  6. Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C. E.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2009-09-01

    Produced water volume generation and management in the United States are not well characterized at a national level. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Argonne National Laboratory to compile data on produced water associated with oil and gas production to better understand the production volumes and management of this water. The purpose of this report is to improve understanding of produced water by providing detailed information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the ways in which produced water is disposed or reused. As the demand for fresh water resources increases, with no concomitant increase in surface or ground water supplies, alternate water sources, like produced water, may play an important role. Produced water is water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil or gas production. Because the water has been in contact with hydrocarbon-bearing formations, it contains some of the chemical characteristics of the formations and the hydrocarbons. It may include water from the reservoir, water previously injected into the formation, and any chemicals added during the production processes. The physical and chemical properties of produced water vary considerably depending on the geographic location of the field, the geologic formation, and the type of hydrocarbon product being produced. Produced water properties and volume also vary throughout the lifetime of a reservoir. Produced water is the largest volume by-product or waste stream associated with oil and gas exploration and production. Previous national produced water volume estimates are in the range of 15 to 20 billion barrels (bbl; 1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons) generated each year in the United States (API 1988, 2000; Veil et al. 2004). However, the details on generation and management of produced water are not well understood on a national scale. Argonne National Laboratory developed detailed national-level information on the volume of produced

  7. Evaluating Interactive Fatigue Management Workshops for Occupational Health Professionals in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Ali

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Fatigue can lead to severe functional impairment with adverse workplace outcomes. One-day workshops can be effective in training OH professionals in how to diagnose and manage fatigue and CFS. Training may increase general knowledge of fatigue and confidence in fatigue management in an OH setting.

  8. Improving the training of managers in the sphere of physical culture and sports in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadnik S.O.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed contemporary research on the training of managers in the sphere of physical culture and sports in Ukraine and abroad. Analyzed 50 references, which dealt with various aspects of the preparation of sports managers. It was found that in higher education of Great Britain, Germany, France, Switzerland, Russia is working to prepare managers for the sphere of physical culture and sports. It was found that training of managers in Ukraine is carried out only on the basis of two universities. Found that the content of the training of sports managers in our country needs to be improved, taking into account international experience and current market conditions of the functioning of sports organizations. Identified the main ways of improving the training of managers in the sphere of physical culture and sports in Ukraine.

  9. Leadership development: an essential ingredient in supporting nursing unit managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson V

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Valerie Wilson,1,2 Sheree Paterson,3 Kelly Kornman1 1Nursing Research and Practice Development Unit, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Nursing Midwifery Health, The University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway, NSW, Australia; 3Formerly of the Nursing Research and Practice Development Unit, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW, Australia Purpose: The aim of the leadership development program was to enhance participants’ understanding of person-centered leadership in the context of their nursing unit manager (NUM roles. Materials and methods: This article details the results of the NUM leadership development program (LDP. Twenty-one NUMs from an Australian pediatric hospital participated in the 8-month program. The evaluation encompassed a group claims/concerns/issues session, one-on-one interviews, and written feedback. Data were themed using a four-step sequential process. Results: The NUM LDP had a positive impact on the leadership practices of the participants. Six key themes were identified from the evaluation: “forming the group”; “being in the group”; “translating into practice”; “how we see ourselves; how do we want to be seen?”; “positive outcomes for me”; and “positive outcomes for others”. Conclusion: This study showed improvements in the leadership understanding and practice of NUMs who participated in the program. Further research, particularly into the transferability of skills and active participatory aspects of these types of evaluation studies, is required. Keywords: nurse, evaluation, person-centered care, experiential learning

  10. Reducing Adolescent Rage Bullies: Study on Behavior Management Training Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Beirami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Adverse effects inner anger and interpersonal relationships will follow on from the other parent behavior management training and promoting and improving relations between parent-child.در این راستا هدف پژوهش حاضر بررسی اثربخشی آموزش مدیریت رفتار براساس مدل بارکلی در کاهش خشم دانش آموزان دختر و پسر قلدر دوره اول متوسطه بود. Methods: The present Experimental research used a pretest– posttest and a control group. جامعه آماری شامل دانش آموزان دختر و پسر دوره اول متوسطه شهر تبریز که در سال تحصیلی 93-1392 مشغول به تحصیل بودند. The population consisted of male and female junior high school students in Tabriz who were enrolled in the 2012-2013 school year. به منظور اجرای پژوهش پس از انجام سرند توسط معلمان و اجرای پرسشنامه قلدر/قربانی الویوس، 30نفر از کودکانی که براساس نمرات کسب شده در پرسشنامه الویوس، به عنوان قلدر طبقه بندی شده بودند به صورت تصادفی در دو گروه 15 نفری آزمایش و کنترل جایگزین شدند؛ و پس از تکمیل پرسشنامه خشم نیلسون(2000 توسط دانش آموزان قلدر؛ والدین گروه آزمایش به مدت 9جلسه (45 دقیقه ای در برنامه آموزش مدیریت رفتار قرارگرفتند، ولی گروه کنترل هیچگونه آموزشی دریافت نکرد.Therefore, after screening by the teachers and the Nelson anger questionnaire, 30 children who, according to scores on the questionnaire were bullies, were classified randomly into two groups of 15 cases and controls were replaced and after completing the questionnaire anger Nilsson (2000 bullying by students, parents groups

  11. EMS-physicians' self reported airway management training and expertise; a descriptive study from the Central Region of Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rognås Leif K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prehospital advanced airway management, including prehospital endotracheal intubation is challenging and recent papers have addressed the need for proper training, skill maintenance and quality control for emergency medical service personnel. The aim of this study was to provide data regarding airway management-training and expertise from the regional physician-staffed emergency medical service (EMS. Methods The EMS in this part of The Central Region of Denmark is a two tiered system. The second tier comprises physician staffed Mobile Emergency Care Units. The medical directors of the programs supplied system data. A questionnaire addressing airway management experience, training and knowledge was sent to the EMS-physicians. Results There are no specific guidelines, standard operating procedures or standardised program for obtaining and maintaining skills regarding prehospital advanced airway management in the schemes covered by this study. 53/67 physicians responded; 98,1% were specialists in anesthesiology, with an average of 17,6 years of experience in anesthesiology, and 7,2 years experience as EMS-physicians. 84,9% reported having attended life support course(s, 64,2% an advanced airway management course. 24,5% fulfilled the curriculum suggested for Danish EMS physicians. 47,2% had encountered a difficult or impossible PHETI, most commonly in a patient in cardiac arrest or a trauma patient. Only 20,8% of the physicians were completely familiar with what back-up devices were available for airway management. Conclusions In this, the first Danish study of prehospital advanced airway management, we found a high degree of experience, education and training among the EMS-physicians, but their equipment awareness was limited. Check-outs, guidelines, standard operating procedures and other quality control measures may be needed.

  12. Postoperative pain management in the postanesthesia care unit: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Min, Su

    2017-01-01

    Acute postoperative pain remains a major problem, resulting in multiple undesirable outcomes if inadequately controlled. Most surgical patients spend their immediate postoperative period in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), where pain management, being unsatisfactory and requiring improvements, affects further recovery. Recent studies on postoperative pain management in the PACU were reviewed for the advances in assessments and treatments. More objective assessments of pain being independent of patients’ participation may be potentially appropriate in the PACU, including photoplethysmography-derived parameters, analgesia nociception index, skin conductance, and pupillometry, although further studies are needed to confirm their utilities. Multimodal analgesia with different analgesics and techniques has been widely used. With theoretical basis of preventing central sensitization, preventive analgesia is increasingly common. New opioids are being developed with minimization of adverse effects of traditional opioids. More intravenous nonopioid analgesics and adjuncts (such as dexmedetomidine and dexamethasone) are introduced for their opioid-sparing effects. Current evidence suggests that regional analgesic techniques are effective in the reduction of pain and stay in the PACU. Being available alternatives to epidural analgesia, perineural techniques and infiltrative techniques including wound infiltration, transversus abdominis plane block, local infiltration analgesia, and intraperitoneal administration have played a more important role for their effectiveness and safety. PMID:29180895

  13. [Measurement of tube cuff pressure levels in intensive care unit: considerations on the benefits of training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Silvia Renata Rezek; Juliano, Maria Cecília Rezek; Cividanes, Jose Paulo; Houly, João Geraldo Simões; Gebara, Otavio Celso Eluf; Cividanes, Gil Vicente L; Catão, Elaine C

    2007-09-01

    The tube cuff pressure directly transmitted on the tracheal wall in an irregular form can cause injuries and lead to bronchoaspiration. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the implementation of routine tube cuff pressure measurements result in a reliable control to maintain the measurements within the parameters considered safe, thus preventing the described complications. A total of 3,195 tube cuff measurements were obtained from 1,194 male and female patients admitted at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Coronary Unit (CU), who were undergoing mechanical ventilation with endotracheal prosthesis and tracheotomy cannula, during the morning and afternoon periods. From March to August 2005 the follow-up of the measurements obtained by the physical therapy professionals was carried out and it was observed that the measurements were irregular, on average, in 80% of the cases. Thus, a training program was established, which was focused on the Nursing Teams of the ICU and CU, consisting in providing directions for the adequate procedures performed at the bedside (in loco training). The training procedures were carried out at two different periods (morning and afternoon) in order to include the whole team. It is suggested that it is necessary to monitor tube cuff pressure through the implementation of routine measurements in the morning, afternoon and evening periods as a prophylactic measure, in order to prevent the possible complications of tracheal prosthesis balloon pressure.

  14. Corporate e-Learning: Justification for Implementation and Evaluation of Benefits. A Study Examining the Views of Training Managers and Training Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert; Doonga, Nitin

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the experience and perceptions of training managers and training suppliers with respect to provision of e-training to corporate clients--a rapidly growing area of commercial activity. In particular the study explores the justification for implementing e-training and the consequent benefits which are anticipated by training…

  15. Automated external defibrillator availability and CPR training among state police agencies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Lior M; Wallace, Sarah K; Leary, Marion; Tucker, Kathryn D; Becker, Lance B; Abella, Benjamin S

    2012-07-01

    Access to automated external defibrillators and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training are key determinants of cardiac arrest survival. State police officers represent an important class of cardiac arrest first responders responsible for the large network of highways in the United States. We seek to determine accessibility of automated external defibrillators and CPR training among state police agencies. Contact was attempted with all 50 state police agencies by telephone and electronic mail. Officers at each agency were guided to complete a 15-question Internet-based survey. Descriptive statistics of the responses were performed. Attempts were made to contact all 50 states, and 46 surveys were completed (92% response rate). Most surveys were filled out by police leadership or individuals responsible for medical programs. The median agency size was 725 (interquartile range 482 to 1,485) state police officers, with 695 (interquartile range 450 to 1,100) patrol vehicles ("squad cars"). Thirty-three percent of responding agencies (15/46) reported equipping police vehicles with automated external defibrillators. Of these, 53% (8/15) equipped less than half of their fleet with the devices. Regarding emergency medical training, 78% (35/45) of state police agencies reported training their officers in automated external defibrillator usage, and 98% (44/45) reported training them in CPR. One third of state police agencies surveyed equipped their vehicles with automated external defibrillators, and among those that did, most equipped only a minority of their fleet. Most state police agencies reported training their officers in automated external defibrillator usage and CPR. Increasing automated external defibrillator deployment among state police represents an important opportunity to improve first responder preparedness for cardiac arrest care. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  16. A Framework for Developing Management Goals for Species at Risk and Application to Military Installations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Westervelt, James D. [ERDC-CERL

    2009-01-01

    A decision framework for setting management goals for species at risk is presented. Species at risk are those whose potential future rarity is of concern. Listing these species as threatened or endangered could potentially result in significant restrictions to activities in resource management areas in order to maintain those species. The management areas in the example application are United States (US) military installations, which are concerned about potential restrictions to military training capacity if species at risk become regulated under the US Endangered Species Act. The decision framework, designed to foster proactive management, has nine steps: identify species at risk on and near the management area, describe available information and potential information gaps for each species, determine the potential distribution of species and their habitat, select metrics for describing species status, assess the status of local population or metapopulation, conduct threat assessment, set and prioritize management goals, develop species management plans, and develop criteria for ending special species management where possible. This framework will aid resource managers in setting management goals that minimally impact human activities while reducing the likelihood that species at risk will become rare in the near future. The benefits of the proactive management set forth in this formal decision framework are that it is impartial, provides a clear procedure, calls for identification of causal relationships that may not be obvious, provides a way to target the most urgent needs, reduces costs, enhances public confidence, and, most importantly, decreases the chance of species becoming more rare.

  17. Framework for Developing Management goals for Species at Risk and Application to Military Installations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Westervelt, James D. [ERDC-CERL

    2009-01-01

    A decision framework for setting management goals for species at risk is presented. Species at risk are those whose potential future rarity is of concern. Listing these species as threatened or endangered could potentially result in significant restrictions to activities in resource management areas in order to maintain those species. The decision framework, designed to foster proactive management, has nine steps: identify species at risk on and near the management area, describe available information and potential information gaps for each species, determine the potential distribution of species and their habitat, select metrics for describing species status, assess the status of local population or metapopulation, conduct threat assessment, set and prioritize management goals, develop species management plans, and develop criteria for ending special species management where possible. This framework will aid resource managers in setting management goals that minimally impact human activities while reducing the likelihood that species at risk will become rare in the near future. The management areas in many of the examples are United States (US) military installations, which are concerned about potential restrictions to military training capacity if species at risk become regulated under the US Endangered Species Act. The benefits of the proactive management set forth in this formal decision framework are that it is impartial, provides a clear procedure, calls for identification of causal relationships that may not be obvious, provides a way to target the most urgent needs, reduces costs, enhances public confidence, and, most importantly, decreases the chance of species becoming more rare.

  18. Educational and school managers training in the context of educational reforms: consensus and dissensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Oliveira Rescia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows some of the results from a doctoral research on the educational and school managers training to the beginning of XXI century, in the context of decentralization and trends of educational reforms in Latin America at the end of 1980s and 1990s. Guided by a qualitative, bibliographic and documentary research, the methodological procedures had reference in studies conducted by international organizations, such as: UNESCO, ECLAC and ILPE as well as scholars from different management paradigms, considering the Latin-American education systems’ needs. In Brazil, we sought to understand the requirements of transformation of local competences in planning and educational management after implications and managers training initiatives within this new reality. Therefore, it was analyzed for comparative purposes, three educational and school managers training programs in public schools: Management Circuit Program; Distance Learning Program for School Managers and the Managers’ School Program of Public Basic Education. It was intended to identify the trends of each program for educational and school managers training, with a view to the changes occurred in our society and education and the requirements to acquire new skills and abilities. As conclusion, the research indicated that although the training programs have originated from different instances and explain various guidelines, everything converges to the same set of skills in educational and school managers training.

  19. Training and use of lasers in postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansie, Chase O; Park, Jae Hyun; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2013-06-01

    This study was designed to determine if orthodontic residents are being trained to use lasers in the postgraduate orthodontic residency programs of the United States and Canada. An anonymous electronic survey was sent to the program director/chair of each of the seventy orthodontic residency programs, and thirty-seven (53 percent) of the programs responded. Of these thirty-seven programs, twenty-eight (76 percent) reported providing patient treatment with lasers in the orthodontic graduate program, eight (22 percent) said they do not provide treatment in the orthodontic graduate program, and one program (3 percent) reported providing laser training but not using lasers on patients. Gingivectomy and canine exposure were reported as the most common procedures that residents perform with a laser, while debonding of orthodontic brackets was the least common procedure performed with a laser. A diode laser was the most common type of laser used. Of the eight programs (22 percent) not offering laser training, four indicated having no plans to begin using lasers or training on their use. The other four indicated that they have plans to incorporate laser use in the future.

  20. Motor unit synchronization in FDI and biceps brachii muscles of strength-trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fling, Brett W; Christie, Anita; Kamen, Gary

    2009-10-01

    Motor unit (MU) synchronization is the simultaneous or near-simultaneous firing of two MUs which occurs more often than would be expected by chance. The present study sought to investigate the effects of exercise training, muscle group, and force level, by comparing the magnitude of synchronization in the biceps brachii (BB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of untrained and strength-trained college-aged males at two force levels, 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 80% MVC. MU action potentials were recorded directly via an intramuscular needle electrode. The magnitude of synchronization was assessed using previously-reported synchronization indices: k', E, and CIS. Synchronization was significantly higher in the FDI than in the BB. Greater synchronization was observed in the strength-trained group with CIS, but not with E or k'. Also, synchronization was significantly greater at 80% MVC than at 30% MVC with E, but only moderately greater with CIS and there was no force difference with k'. Synchronization prevalence was found to be greater in the BB (80.1%) than in the FDI (71.5%). Thus, although the evidence is a bit equivocal, it appears that MU synchronization is greater at higher forces, and greater in strength-trained individuals than in untrained subjects.

  1. Parental stress management using relaxation techniques in a neonatal intensive care unit: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiou, Catherine; Vlastarakos, Petros V; Bakoula, Chrysa; Papagaroufalis, Konstantinos; Bakoyannis, George; Darviri, Christine; Chrousos, George

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxation techniques on the stress/anxiety of parents with hospitalised premature infants, three months following discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. A randomised controlled trial was conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary maternity hospital including 59 parents, who were randomised into two groups: 31 in the intervention group and 28 in the control group. Parents in the intervention group practiced three different relaxation techniques, in addition to undergoing the same information-based training courses as did the parents of the control group. Data were collected 10-15 days post delivery and three months post discharge. The assessment measures included the Perceived Stress Scale, the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory 1 and 2 and salivary cortisol levels. The psychometric assessment at baseline was comparable between the two groups. The intervention group showed a significant reduction in trait anxiety (p=0.02) compared with the control group three months post discharge. The perceived stress decreased in both groups (p=0.699). No difference in salivary cortisol levels was detected. The multivariate analysis revealed that higher initial stress levels (pintensive care unit experience could assess more delayed effects of stress management by relaxation techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exposure to electromagnetic fields aboard high-speed electric multiple unit trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, D; Zhu, F; Qiu, R; Niu, Q

    2016-01-01

    High-speed electric multiple unit (EMU) trains generate high-frequency electric fields, low-frequency magnetic fields, and high-frequency wideband electromagnetic emissions when running. Potential human health concerns arise because the electromagnetic disturbances are transmitted mainly into the car body from windows, and from there to passengers and train staff. The transmission amount and amplitude distribution characteristics that dominate electromagnetic field emission need to be studied, and the exposure level of electromagnetic field emission to humans should be measured. We conducted a series of tests of the on board electromagnetic field distribution on several high-speed railway lines. While results showed that exposure was within permitted levels, the possibility of long-term health effects should be investigated.

  3. Training the next generation of disaster risk managers through sustainability research and teaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Addas, Amr; Kibsey, Stefanie D; Ng, Gary; Walker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    .... The David O'Brien Centre for Sustainable Enterprise at Concordia University researches and teaches disaster risk management through involvement in a collaborative project with the United Nations...

  4. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Carnahan, Robert H; Brown, Abigail M; Gould, Kathleen L

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical team-based projects aimed at solving real business problems encountered by institutional shared--resource core facilities. The program also included a retreat featuring presentations by and networking with local life science entrepreneurs and final team presentations to expert judges. Quantitative and qualitative metrics were used to evaluate the program's impact on trainees. A pretest-posttest approach was used to assess trainees' baseline knowledge and mastery of module concepts, and each individual's pretest and posttest responses were compared. The mean score improved by more than 17 percentage points. Trainees also took an online survey to provide feedback about the module. Nearly all participants agreed or strongly agreed that the module was a valuable use of their time and will help guide their career decisions and that project work helped drive home module concepts. More than 75% of trainees reported discussing the module with their research advisors, and all of these participants reported supportive or neutral responses. Collectively, the trainee feedback about the module, improvement in test scores, and trainee perception of advisor support suggest that this short module is an effective method of providing scientists with efficient and meaningful exposure to business concepts. © 2017 K. A. Petrie et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  5. A reflection on the relationship between performance management and training in the South African public service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Harry Munzhedzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Performance management plays a pivotal role in the realisation of many facets of public administration, including service delivery, good governance and organisational productivity through setting of performance targets and regular assessments of performance. In search of improved quality and productivity in the public service, the South African government introduced several legislative and policy interventions, including but not limited to the Public Service Act, 1994 (Proclamation 103 of 1994, Public Service Regulations of 2001 and the White Paper on Transforming Public Service Delivery of 1997.Research purpose: The main thrust of this conceptual paper was to explore the relationship between performance management and training in the South African public service.Motivation for the study: The lack of sufficient literature on the relationship between performance management and training. To also prove that the two are inseparably linked, meaning that one cannot exist without the other.Research design, approach and method: This article, which is conceptual in nature, reviewed existing literature on performance management and training in the public service extensively so as to arrive at a definitive conclusion.Main findings: The article contends that as much as training underpins the process of performance management, training is also fortified by performance management. Precisely, there cannot be performance management without training and vice versa.Practical/managerial implications: As much as training is imperative in the management of performance in the public service, such training must be need-based and it must be underpinned by performance management through identification of skills gap in the assessment of performance.Contribution: It is proposed that to enhance the knowledge, capacity, effectiveness and efficiency of the public service performance, needs-based training that seeks to close the skills gap, is developed and

  6. Emotional intelligence: A unique group training in a hematology-oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, Tamar; Dolev, Niva; Attias, Dina; Lelong, Ayalla Reuven; Rofe, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is increasingly viewed as one of the important skills required for a successful career and personal life. Consequently, efforts have been made to improve personal and group performance in EI, mostly in commercial organizations. However, these programs have not been widely applied in the health field. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of a unique special EI interventional process within the framework of an active hematology-oncology unit in a general hospital. This investigation employed a pre- and post-training design using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) measure of EI, both before and after completion of training 10 months later. The training included personal and group EI assessments and 10 EI workshops, each 2 weeks apart and each lasting approximately 2 h. Results were compared to a control group of medical staff who did not undergo any EI training program during the same time period. Average total Bar-On EQ-i level at baseline for the group was 97.9, which increased significantly after the interventional process to a score of 105.6 (P = 0.001). There were also significant increases in all five main EQ-i scales, as well as for 12 of the 15 subscales. In contrast, the control group showed no significant differences in general EI level, in any of the five main scales or 15 EI subscale areas. This pilot study demonstrated the capability of a group intervention to improve EI of medical staff working in a hematology-oncological unit. The results are encouraging and suggest that the model program could be successfully applied in a large-scale interventional program.

  7. Does training managers enhance the effects of implementing teamworking? A longitudinal, mixed methods field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Randall, R; Christensen, KB

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of team-working often has positive effects on team members but places significant new demands on managers. Unfortunately, little research has examined whether the impact of the intervention may be enhanced by providing managers with training during the change process. To test...... this possibility we carried out a longitudinal intervention study (with a ‘no training’ comparison group) in a part of the Danish elderly care sector that was implementing teamwork. Kirkpatrick’s (1998) training evaluation model was used to examine the effects of training team managers in issues such as teamwork......, transformational leadership and change management on the outcomes of team implementation. We used a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods to isolate the impact of manager training on the success of the teamwork intervention. The results identified some significant, but modest, incremental...

  8. The Importance of Ethical Training for the Improvement of Ethical Decision-Making: Evidence from Germany and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottig, Daniel; Heischmidt, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Based on three independent samples from Germany and the United States, this exploratory, cross-cultural study examines empirically the importance of ethical training for the improvement of ethical decision-making. The results of the study reveal a significant difference in the use of corporate codes of conduct and ethical training, as well as…

  9. Impact of a risk management plan on Legionella contamination of dental unit water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Erica; Dallolio, Laura; Stagni, Francesca; Sanna, Tiziana; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Piana, Gabriela

    2015-02-23

    The study aimed to assess the prevalence of Legionella spp. in dental unit waterlines of a dental clinic and to verify whether the microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality were correlated with Legionella contamination. A risk management plan was subsequently implemented in the dental health care setting, in order to verify whether the adopted disinfection protocols were effective in preventing Legionella colonization. The water delivered from syringes and turbines of 63 dental units operating in a dental clinic, was monitored for counts of the heterotrophic bacteria P. aeruginosa and Legionella spp. (22 °C and 37 °C). At baseline, output water from dental units continuously treated with disinfection products was more compliant with the recommended standards than untreated and periodically treated water. However, continuous disinfection was still not able to prevent contamination by Legionella and P. aeruginosa. Legionella was isolated from 36.4%, 24.3% and 53.3% of samples from untreated, periodically and continuously treated waterlines, respectively. The standard microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality proved to be unreliable as predictors of the presence of Legionella, whose source was identified as the tap water used to supply the dental units. The adoption of control measures, including the use of deionized water in supplying the dental unit waterlines and the application of a combined protocol of continuous and periodic disinfection, with different active products for the different devices, resulted in good control of Legionella contamination. The efficacy of the measures adopted was mainly linked to the strict adherence to the planned protocols, which placed particular stress on staff training and ongoing environmental monitoring.

  10. Training future surgeons for management roles: the resident-surgeon-manager conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Waël C; Mulder, David S; Fried, Gerald M; Elhilali, Mostafa; Khwaja, Kosar A

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate that senior surgical residents would benefit from focused training by professionals with management expertise. Although managerial skills are recognized as necessary for the successful establishment of a surgical practice, they are not often emphasized in traditional surgical residency curricula. DESIGN Senior residents from all surgical subspecialties at McGill University were invited to participate in a 1-day management seminar. Precourse questionnaires aimed at evaluating the residents' perceptions of their own managerial knowledge and preparedness were circulated. The seminar was then given in the form of interactive lectures and case-based discussions. The questionnaires were readministered at the end of the course, along with an evaluation form. Precourse and postcourse data were compared using the Freeman-Halton extension of the Fisher exact test to determine statistical significance (P < .05). SETTING McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 43 senior residents. RESULTS Before the course, the majority of residents (27 of 43 [63%]) thought that management instruction only happened "from time to time" in their respective programs. After the course, 15 residents (35%) felt that management topics were "well addressed," and 19 (44%) felt that management topics have been "very well addressed" (P < .01). Residents noted a significant improvement in their ability to perform the following skills after the course: giving feedback, delegating duties, coping with stress, effective learning, and effective teaching. On the ensemble of all managerial skills combined, 26 residents (60%) rated their performance as "good" or "excellent" after the course vs only 21 (49%) before the course (P = .02). Residents also noted a statistically significant improvement in their ability to perform the managerial duties necessary for the establishment of a surgical practice. CONCLUSIONS Surgical residency programs

  11. Business impact of nurse-designed training for claims case managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    Teaching is a fundamental role of occupational health nurses. The primary purpose of any training is to change behavior. Time, resources, money, and personnel required for effective training are in short supply. Occupational health nurses must be able to quantify the effect of their training for business leaders to increase occupational health nurse funding. This article details how to calculate the business impact of training conducted by occupational health nurses. Two separate groups of claims case managers were evaluated for best practice scores. One group was trained by an occupational health nurse to determine occupational injury or illness causality. Best practice scores were analyzed 4 months later. A 14% difference was observed between the trained group and the control group. Occupational health nurses can quantify the effect their training has and use those results to improve their training and secure more resources from business leaders.

  12. What Are the Essential Capabilities for Those Who Manage Training Organisations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Victor J.

    A project developed and tested a management and leadership capability framework for the vocational educational and training (VET) sector. The framework emerged from a review of research into the characteristics and behaviors of managers and leaders and from interviews and focus group meetings with VET managers. The framework that emerged consisted…

  13. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule in...

  14. To what extent are students as middle managers at a training hotel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research has shown that middle managers can exert major upward or downward influence on their organisation's strategy. Inthe practice department of our hotel school, senior students act as managers to train managerial competences. To analyse if thisreflects reality, I have researched whether student managers do have ...

  15. Training within integrated environmental and energy management; Efteruddannelse i integreret miljoe- og energiledelse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pommer, K. [Teknologisk Institut (Denmark)

    2006-05-19

    This report describes the results from the project Training of consultants and instructors within integrated environmental and energy management. The purpose was to develop a training programme to provide more knowledge for consultants and to promote the efforts regarding integrated systems. The training programme was planned, material developed and the courses tested in the period March 2003 to December 2004. At first one structure for the programme was developed, but because of lack of interest from potential participants the structure was changed. The second programme was interesting for potential participants, and material for the training was developed, the training was tested and the material revised according to the test. (au)

  16. Development of a Bilingual Training Tool to Train Dairy Workers on the Prevention and Management of Non-Ambulatory Cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Muniz, Ivette N.; Van Metre, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Dairy cows at risk of becoming non-ambulatory or downers represent economic losses and animal well-being issues for the dairy industry. Colorado State University researchers and Extension faculty collaborated with Colorado's dairy industry to create a training tool for the early identification and management of cows at risk of becoming downers on…

  17. Situating Midlevel Managers' Training: Learning and Doing in Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, John M.

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that effective leadership training for chairs needs to be situated in realistic contexts. Encourages development of chair-training programs that incorporate the actual experiences of practitioners. Analyzes the results of a survey that examines chair duties and responsibilities. (VWC)

  18. Pain Management Practice and Guidelines in Jordanian Pediatric Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmad; Forgeron, Paula; Polomeno, Viola; Gharaibeh, Huda; Harrison, Denise

    2017-11-15

    Limited knowledge exists of current pain management practices and supporting guidelines in Jordanian pediatric intensive care units. To determine the current pain management practices and the availability and content of practice guidelines in Jordanian pediatric intensive care units, we conducted a cross-sectional and multisite survey of four pediatric intensive care units in Jordan. A questionnaire was developed and orally administered over the phone or in person to head nurses or their nominees to capture pain management practices and the existence and content of guidelines. All units had written pain management guidelines that included pain assessment, documentation, and management. All four units used one or more pain assessment tools. In three units, pain management was considered multidisciplinary and routinely discussed on unit rounds. In two units, continuous infusion of intravenous opioids was used as well as sedatives and neuromuscular blockers for most ventilated patients. In the two other units, continuous intravenous infusion of opioids was not used and only sedatives were administered for patients on mechanical ventilation. In two units, there were no specific guidelines on the use of nonopioid analgesics, patient-controlled anesthesia, or the management of postoperative pain. No unit used an opioid or sedative withdrawal assessment tool or had pain management guidelines on the use of topical anesthetic agents or sucrose. Pain management practices and guidelines varied across the four units, suggesting that there is an opportunity for improvement in pain management in pediatric intensive care units in Jordan. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Training Corporate Managers to Adopt a More Autonomy-Supportive Motivating Style toward Employees: An Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2009-01-01

    Management style is treated in a variety of ways across the training and development literature. Yet few studies have tested the training-based malleability of management style in a for-profit, authentic work context. The present research tested whether or not training intervention would help managers adopt a more autonomy-supportive motivating…

  20. Do United States’ Teachers Know and Adhere to the National Guidelines on Asthma Management in the Classroom? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudilyn Jaramillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper asthma management in schools is important in achieving optimum asthma control in children with asthma. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI has developed guidelines on classroom asthma management. We conducted a systematic review to examine teacher knowledge of the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management in the classroom. We searched PubMed and EMBASE using search terms “asthma management,” “teacher(s,” “school teacher,” and “public school.” The inclusion criteria were articles published in English from 1994 to May 2014 that focus on schools in the United States (US. From 535 titles and abstracts, 9 studies met inclusion criteria. All studies reported that school teachers did not know the policies and procedures of asthma management. Teachers relied on school nurses to handle medical emergencies. Some studies identified that lack of full-time school nurses was a barrier to asthma management. Only one study showed directly that classroom teachers were not following the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management. Our literature review revealed that US teachers do not know the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management in the classroom. Future research should focus on interventions targeted toward training classroom teachers on asthma management as per NHLBI guidelines to ultimately improve asthma management in schools.

  1. Do United States' teachers know and adhere to the national guidelines on asthma management in the classroom? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Yudilyn; Reznik, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Proper asthma management in schools is important in achieving optimum asthma control in children with asthma. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has developed guidelines on classroom asthma management. We conducted a systematic review to examine teacher knowledge of the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management in the classroom. We searched PubMed and EMBASE using search terms "asthma management," "teacher(s)," "school teacher," and "public school." The inclusion criteria were articles published in English from 1994 to May 2014 that focus on schools in the United States (US). From 535 titles and abstracts, 9 studies met inclusion criteria. All studies reported that school teachers did not know the policies and procedures of asthma management. Teachers relied on school nurses to handle medical emergencies. Some studies identified that lack of full-time school nurses was a barrier to asthma management. Only one study showed directly that classroom teachers were not following the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management. Our literature review revealed that US teachers do not know the NHLBI guidelines on asthma management in the classroom. Future research should focus on interventions targeted toward training classroom teachers on asthma management as per NHLBI guidelines to ultimately improve asthma management in schools.

  2. The effects of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training in airline maintenance: Results following three year's experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. C.; Robertson, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    An airline maintenance department undertook a CRM training program to change its safety and operating culture. In 2 1/2 years this airline trained 2200 management staff and salaried professionals. Participants completed attitude surveys immediately before and after the training, as well as two months, six months, and one year afterward. On-site interviews were conducted to test and confirm the survey results. Comparing managers' attitudes immediately after their training with their pretraining attitudes showed significant improvement for three attitudes. A fourth attitude, assertiveness, improved significantly above the pretraining levels two months after training. The expected effect of the training on all four attitude scales did not change significantly thereafter. Participants' self-reported behaviors and interview comments confirmed their shift from passive to more active behaviors over time. Safety, efficiency, and dependability performance were measured before the onset of the training and for some 30 months afterward. Associations with subsequent performance were strongest with positive attitudes about sharing command (participation), assertiveness, and stress management when those attitudes were measured 2 and 12 months after the training. The two month follow-up survey results were especially strong and indicate that active behaviors learned from the CRM training consolidate and strengthen in the months immediately following training.

  3. Simulation training program for midwives to manage postpartum hemorrhage: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Chiho; Kataoka, Yaeko

    2017-04-01

    To explore the effectiveness of a simulation training program for midwives in performance and knowledge for the management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Midwives working at one obstetrics ward in an urban area were randomly assigned to simulation training program or no training. This "simulation program" included pre study e-learning and simulation. Inclusion criteria were midwives who: 1) had two or three years of clinical experience, 2) worked in an obstetrics ward, and 3) had experience with birth assistance. There was one exclusion criterion namely prior experience of simulation training for PPH. Change in performance was evaluated using a PPH scenario performance test at one month after the simulation training. Change in knowledge was evaluated by a 25-item multiple-choice questionnaire completed shortly before the training and one month after the training. The ethical review committee of St Luke's International University granted approval (No. 14-096). Eighty-one midwives were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n=40) or the control group (n=41). Performance in the simulation training group was significantly better in comparison to the no training group; mean performance score was 23.85(SD 2.71) in the training group versus 18.00(SD 3.01) in the no training group (MD 5.85 95% CI 4.85-7.12, t=9.17, psimulation training group; amount of knowledge score was 3.65(SD 3.40) in the training group versus -0.02(SD 3.02) in the no training group (MD 3.67 95% CI 2.25-5.10, t=5.14, psimulation training. However, assessments of long-term effects on performance, and knowledge and the clinical outcomes in managing of obstetric complications are necessary to adequately evaluate the effectiveness of simulation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation-based crisis resource management training for pediatric critical care medicine: a review for instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Donoghue, Aaron; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Eppich, Walter

    2012-03-01

    To review the essential elements of crisis resource management and provide a resource for instructors by describing how to use simulation-based training to teach crisis resource management principles in pediatric acute care contexts. A MEDLINE-based literature source. OUTLINE OF REVIEW: This review is divided into three main sections: Background, Principles of Crisis Resource Management, and Tools and Resources. The background section provides the brief history and definition of crisis resource management. The next section describes all the essential elements of crisis resource management, including leadership and followership, communication, teamwork, resource use, and situational awareness. This is followed by a review of evidence supporting the use of simulation-based crisis resource management training in health care. The last section provides the resources necessary to develop crisis resource management training using a simulation-based approach. This includes a description of how to design pediatric simulation scenarios, how to effectively debrief, and a list of potential assessment tools that instructors can use to evaluate crisis resource management performance during simulation-based training. Crisis resource management principles form the foundation for efficient team functioning and subsequent error reduction in high-stakes environments such as acute care pediatrics. Effective instructor training is required for those programs wishing to teach these principles using simulation-based learning. Dissemination and integration of these principles into pediatric critical care practice has the potential for a tremendous impact on patient safety and outcomes.

  5. Water Management Program: Unit Three, 1986 Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water management facilities in Unit Three at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge were completed in 1984, providing management capability of over 2500 acres of marsh....

  6. Water Management Program: Unit Three, 1987 Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water management facilities in Unit Three at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge were completed in 1984, providing management capability of over 2500 acres of marsh....

  7. A study on the effectiveness of task manager board game as a training tool in managing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd; Radzi, Shanizan Herman Md; Din, Sharifah Nadera Syed; Khalid, Nurhafizah

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, games have become one of the useful tools in training. Many instructors choose to use games to enhance the way of delivering the subject. Failure to apply the suitable tool in training will lead to discouragement in learning and causing waste to the resources. An effective game will help the student understand the concept quickly. It can also help students to get involve in experiential learning where the student can manage and solve the problem as in the actual situation. This study will focus on the effectiveness of board game as a training tool for managing projects. This game has 4 tasks to be completed by students. They will be divided into a group of 4 or 5. Two methods are used in this study, pilot test, and post-test. These methods are chosen to analyze the effectiveness of using Task Manager Board Game as a teaching tool and the improvement of student's knowledge in project management. Three sub-components assessed were motivation, user experience and learning using case studies on Kirkpatrick's level one base on the perception of the students. The result indicated that the use of Task Manager board game as a training tool for managing project has a positive impact on students. It helps students to experience the situation of managing projects. It is one of the easiest ways for improving time management, human resources and communication skill.

  8. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  9. 78 FR 18325 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Formal Training Unit (FTU) and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Unit (FTU) and Main Operating Base 1 (MOB 1) for the Beddown of KC-46A Tanker Aircraft AGENCY... Training Unit (FTU) and Main Operating Base 1 (MOB 1) for the Beddown of KC-46A Tanker Aircraft. The EIS... infrastructure and manpower of the FTU and MOB 1 at existing active duty Air Force installations within the...

  10. Mission Command: Reconciling the ARFORGEN Model with Training Doctrine and the Current Operating Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    Training Units and Developing Leaders . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mission Command, Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN), Training Management , Current Operating...of their training. Lastly, exercise mentorship and empower tactical leaders instead of management through metrics and data points in order to...training management , and the ARFORGEN process. Next, this paper will briefly review examples of force generation models and training studies to provide a

  11. LOCAL AREA NETWORK MANAGEMENT (Case Study at Assessment and Development Information Technology Units Brawijaya University Malang)

    OpenAIRE

    Hadiwijaya, Mohammad Firman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the management local area network at Assessment and Development Information Technology units, furthermore this study focusing on network management functions that applied by Assessment and Development Information Technology Units. This study will explain about the implementation of network management functions in the local area network management. The research method employ in this research is by using descriptive qualitative method by study case approach...

  12. Training of medical teams on-site for individual and coordinated response in emergency management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    A system for training of coordination and cooperation of decision makers in emergency management has been under construction for some time. A first prototype of the system was developed in the MUSTER system. The system is being developed modularly with one module for each of the suborganisations ...... system for specific training set-ups for specific groups of trainees. The first module completed as a commercial system, "Training of medical teams on site", will be presented....

  13. Space Flight Resource Management Training for International Space Station Flight Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Training includes both SFRM-dedicated lessons and SFRM training embedded into technical lessons. Goal is to reduce certification times by 50% and integrated simulations by 75-90%. SFRM is practiced, evaluated and debriefed in part task trainers and full-task simulation lessons. SFRM model and training are constantly being evaluated against student/management feedback, best practices from industry/ military, and latest research.

  14. Feasibility and acceptability of a resilience training program for intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealer, Meredith; Conrad, David; Evans, John; Jooste, Karen; Solyntjes, Janet; Rothbaum, Barbara; Moss, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The critical nursing shortage is particularly apparent in specialty areas such as intensive care units (ICUs). Some nurses develop resilient coping strategies and adapt to stressful work experiences, mitigating the development of common maladaptive psychological symptoms. To determine if a multimodal resilience training program for ICU nurses was feasible to perform and acceptable to the study participants. In a randomized and controlled 12-week intervention study, treatment and control groups completed demographic questions and measures of resilience, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and burnout syndrome before and after the intervention. The intervention included a 2-day educational workshop, written exposure sessions, event-triggered counseling sessions, mindfulness-based stress reduction exercises, and a protocolized aerobic exercise regimen. Nurses in the intervention arm also completed satisfaction surveys for each component of the intervention. This mulitmodal resilience training program was feasible to conduct and acceptable to ICU nurses. Both nurses randomized to the treatment group and nurses randomized to the control group showed a significant decrease in PTSD symptom score after the intervention. A multifaceted resilience training program for ICU nurses was both feasible and acceptable. A sufficiently powered, randomized clinical trial is needed to assess the effect of the intervention on improving individuals' level of resilience and improving psychological outcomes such as symptoms of anxiety, depression, burnout syndrome, and PTSD. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. Multicultural training in the United States: a survey of occupational therapy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elena Verdine Donoso; Muñoz, Jaime Phillip; Powell, Janet M

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to describe multicultural training practices in occupational therapy programs. A survey was sent to occupational therapy programs in the United States to gather information on multicultural content, skills, and teaching methods as well as diversity context and challenges. The response rate was 54%. The most frequently covered multicultural content was related to cultural background and sociopolitical factors. Multicultural skills covered most often were practice oriented and interpersonal skills. Teaching methods reported as used most often differed from the methods thought by the respondents to be most effective. Programs reported multiple challenges to multicultural training including lack of time and lack of diversity in the student body, faculty, and environment. Results suggest that educators may need to expand multicultural content and skills to prepare occupational therapy students for providing care in increasingly diverse practice settings. In addition, increased use of teaching methods that focus on exposure to diverse populations and reflection may be needed to improve the effectiveness of multicultural training in occupational therapy programs.

  16. Anger Management - Evaluation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Training Program for Table Tennis Players

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Georges Steffgen

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, the main goal of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief training program for table tennis players in cognitive-behavioral anger management that aimed at changing...

  17. Management by Agreement: Its Impact on Training. Opening Address of the BACIE Annual Conference 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadbury, G. A. H.

    1974-01-01

    One of the keys to decision making in business and industry today is through a proper balance of participation. Without participation, innovation and change cannot take place. Proper management education and training are the vital components of promoting participation. (DS)

  18. Partnership with Montgomery Schools trains teachers in water quality management exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Ana

    2007-01-01

    High and middle school teachers from four Montgomery County (Va.) public schools will receive training in water quality management for their classroom instruction using the latest field measurement tools and techniques.

  19. Evaluation of management information systems: a study at a further education and training college

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Management information systems (MIS) are pivotal in the efficient and effective running of Further Education and Training (FET) colleges. Therefore, the evaluation of MIS success is an essential spoke in the wheel of FET college success. Based...

  20. Watershed research and management in the lake states and northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton S. Verry; James W. Hornbeck; H. Albert

    2000-01-01

    We present a brief synopsis of the beginnings of watershed management research and practice in the Lake States and Northeastern United States, followed by a summary of significant research findings on many aspects of watershed management, and finally, a review of four examples of how watershed management research has been incorporated into national forest management...

  1. Advanced placement, qualifying, and degree completion programs for internationally trained dentists in Canada and the United States: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorberg, Noriko B; Schönwetter, Dieter J; Swain, Vanessa L

    2009-03-01

    Canadian and U.S. universities are faced with the challenge that they are not graduating enough dentists to meet the future needs of the Canadian and U.S. populations. Foreign-trained dentists represent a valuable resource to society and the economy. Dental programs have been established to train foreign-trained dentists for some or all of the following reasons: public need for health care services, income generation for universities, and demand by foreign-trained dentists who desire to practice dentistry in Canada or the United States rather than in their own nation. Changes implemented by the National Dental Examining Board (NDEB) of Canada in 2000 and by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) in the United States in 1986 have resulted in foreign-trained dentists no longer being able to gain dental licensure in these countries strictly through a certification examination. Foreign-trained dentists are now required to apply for and complete a two- to three-year advanced placement, qualifying, or degree program at a Canadian or U.S. dental school prior to receiving licensure to practice. The study reported in this article investigated the various types of advanced placement, qualifying, or degree programs available to foreign-trained dentists wishing to practice in either Canada or the United States and the differences among these programs. This research provides a better understanding of the various commonalities and differences among Canadian and U.S. programs for internationally trained dentists.

  2. Course Management System's Compatibility with Teaching Style Influences Willingness to Complete Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Audrey Smith; Wahi, Monika Maya

    2017-01-01

    Although course management systems (CMSs) provide technology platforms that help faculty members adopt better techniques for teaching and learning, and training contributes to faculty information technology (IT) use, many higher education faculty members do not complete CMS training programs, resulting in underuse of CMSs. Therefore, the overall…

  3. Protected Area managers' Perceptions of Community Conservation Training in West and Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, P.; Groot, de W.T.; Mayna, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Training needs assessments have revealed the need for people-oriented training to increase the job performance of African protected area (PA) managers. The Garoua regional wildlife college for francophone Africa (Cameroon) developed the first long (diploma and certificate) and refresher courses in

  4. A Conceptual Model for Employer Training to Manage Employee Counter-Productive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Naomi Spickard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for employer training to manage employees who possess counter-productive behaviors. With the increasing encouragement for employers to hire without discriminating, the number of individuals with disabilities in the workforce will rise. There is limited training in universities and businesses to…

  5. Financial Management and Job Social Skills Training Components in a Summer Business Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; Conway, Debbie; Beisecker, Monica; Murphy, Heather; Farley, Alisha; Waite, Melissa; Gugino, Kristin; Knatz, Danielle; Lopez-Frank, Carolina; Burns, Jack; Madison, Suzanne; Shorty, Carrie

    2005-01-01

    Ninety-two adolescents, predominantly ethnic minority high school students, participated in a structured Summer Business Institute (SBI). Participating youth were randomly assigned to receive either job social skills or financial management skills training components. Students who additionally received the job social skills training component were…

  6. ‘Essentials 4 Data Support’: five years’ experience with data management training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Ellen; Grootveld, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a research data management course for support staff such as librarians and IT staff. The authors, who coach the participants, introduce the three course formats and describe the training in more detail. In the last years over 170 persons have participated in this training. It

  7. Training Needs of Purchasing and Supply Management Personnel in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Antonio K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The importance of purchasing and supply management (PSM) for business performance has received considerable attention in recent years. However, research on PSM training and education is inadequate. This paper aims to present initial findings from PSM practitioners about current PSM training and education needs in Hong Kong.…

  8. ‘Essentials 4 Data Support’ : Five years’ experience with data management training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Ellen; Grootveld, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a research data management course for support staff such as librarians and IT staff. The authors, who coach the participants, introduce the three course formats and describe the training in more detail. In the last years over 170 persons have participated in this training. It

  9. [Training of managers and politicians in ethics of science and ethics of public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    First of all, I will identify the various possible objectives of training in ethics of science and health. I will then examine the institutional context in which managers and politicians act in the light of what is done in Quebec. This analysis will lead me to defend the thesis that in Quebec at least such training is necessary.

  10. Traits and Training: Attributes and Skills of Pennsylvania Academic Library Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell A. Hall

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available What makes a good library manager? Is a good library manager born or bred?  To find out, Pennsylvania academic library managers were surveyed to determine their education and training backgrounds. The survey also illuminates the skills and personal traits these managers find most important in managing an academic library. Interpersonal skills and integrity were found to be the most important traits for an academic library manager to possess. Human resources and personnel issues were found to be the most difficult issues faced by academic library managers. In addition to presenting a snapshot of what today’s academic library leadership qualifications look like, the study will also provide future managers with an idea of what sort of training they should be seeking.

  11. Identifying the Learning Curve for Uterine Artery Embolisation in an Interventional Radiological Training Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Raj, E-mail: rajdas@nhs.net, E-mail: raj.das@stgeorges.nhs.uk; Lucatelli, Pierleone, E-mail: pierleone.lucatelli@gmail.com; Wang, Haofan, E-mail: wwhhff123@gmail.com; Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    AimA clear understanding of operator experience is important in improving technical success whilst minimising patient risk undergoing endovascular procedures, and there is the need to ensure that trainees have the appropriate skills as primary operators. The aim of the study is to retrospectively analyse uterine artery embolisation (UAE) procedures performed by interventional radiology (IR) trainees at an IR training unit analysing fluoroscopy times and radiation dose as surrogate markers of technical skill.MethodsTen IR fellows were primary operator in 200 UAE procedures over a 5-year period. We compared fluoroscopy times, radiation dose and complications, after having them categorised according to three groups: Group 1, initial five, Group 2, >5 procedures and Group 3, penultimate five UAE procedures. We documented factors that may affect screening time (number of vials employed and use of microcatheters).ResultsMean fluoroscopy time was 18.4 (±8.1), 17.3 (±9.0), 16.3 (±8.4) min in Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these groups (p > 0.05) with respect to fluoroscopy time or radiation dose. Analysis after correction for confounding factors showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). All procedures were technically successful, and total complication rate was 4 %.ConclusionUAE was chosen as a highly standardised procedure followed by IR practitioners. Although there is a non-significant trend for shorter screening times with experience, technical success and safety were not compromised with appropriate Consultant supervision, which illustrates a safe construct for IR training. This is important and reassuring information for patients undergoing a procedure in a training unit.

  12. Management System for Integrating Basic Skills 2 Training and Unit Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Education Program, provided for a three-phase BSEP (BSEP I, II, and III) to develop job -related educational competencies and skills and to assist in...is designed to develop educational competencies required for a soldier’s job performance, enhance skill qualifications, and provide for career growth...2.385 2.733 3.370 deposit/withdrawal. " 3.308 4.103 3.889 9. Use good study skills , including 2.385 2.667 2.960 finding a good place to study. 007 1

  13. Investigation and management of gastro-oesophageal reflux in United Kingdom neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Andradi, Gwendolyn; Bhat, Ravindra; Greenough, Anne

    2018-01-01

    In 2004, wide variation in the investigation and management of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) of infants on UK major neonatal units was demonstrated. Our aim was to resurvey neonatal practitioners to determine current practice and whether it was now evidence based. A questionnaire was sent to all 207 UK neonatal units. Responses were obtained from 84% of units. The most frequent 'investigation' was a trial of therapy (83% of units); pH studies were used in 38%, upper GI contrast studies in 19% and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)/pH studies in 5%. Only six units suggested a threshold for an abnormal pH study and two units for an abnormal MII study. Infants were commenced on antireflux medication without investigation always in 32% of units, often in 29%, occasionally in 19% and only never in 1%. Gaviscon was used as first line treatment in 60% of units, and other medications included ranitidine in 53%, thickening agents in 27%, proton pump inhibitors in 23%, domperidone in 22% and erythromycin in 6%. There remains a wide variation in diagnostic and treatment strategies for infants with suspected GOR on neonatal intensive care units, emphasising the need for randomised trials to determine appropriate GOR management. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. How Dutch medical specialists perceive the competencies and training needs of medical residents in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenbosch, L; Bax, M; Scherpbier, A; Heyligers, I; Muijtjens, A M M; Busari, J O

    2013-04-01

    The Dutch postgraduate medical training has been revised to focus on seven competencies. The role as manager is one of these competencies. Recent studies show that this competency receives little attention during the residency training. In an earlier study, we discovered that residents perceived their competency as managers to be moderate. In this study, we investigated how medical specialists perceived the managerial competencies of medical residents and their need for management education. In September 2010, a 46-item questionnaire was designed which examined medical specialists' perceptions of the competency and needs of residents in the field of medical management. Two hundred ninety-eight specialists were invited via email to participate. Hundred twenty-nine specialists (43.3%) responded to our survey. They rated the residents' competencies in contract negotiating skills, knowledge of the healthcare system, and specialist department poorly. They felt that residents were competent in updating their medical knowledge. Ninety-four percent reported a need for training in management among residents. Preferred topics were time management and healthcare organization. The preferred training method was a workshop given during residency by an extramural expert. Dutch medical specialists perceive the management competencies of residents in some areas to be inadequate. They feel that training in medical management during residency is necessary.

  15. Effects of a "Brief Stress Management Training Program" from Medical Students’ Viewpoints: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sepideh Herizchi; Jaafar Sadegh Tabrizi; Fatemeh Ranjbar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students undergo many stressors during various stages of medical education and must learn to cope with their new situation. Some studies have reported that stress management training methods have significant effects on decreasing stress in medical students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a "Stress Management Training Session" from medical students’ viewpoints. Methods: This study design employed a qualitative phenomenological research method. U...

  16. Integrating Space Flight Resource Management Skills into Technical Lessons for International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center s (JSC) International Space Station (ISS) Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM) training program is designed to teach the team skills required to be an effective flight controller. It was adapted from the SFRM training given to Shuttle flight controllers to fit the needs of a "24 hours a day/365 days a year" flight controller. More recently, the length reduction of technical training flows for ISS flight controllers impacted the number of opportunities for fully integrated team scenario based training, where most SFRM training occurred. Thus, the ISS SFRM training program is evolving yet again, using a new approach of teaching and evaluating SFRM alongside of technical materials. Because there are very few models in other industries that have successfully tied team and technical skills together, challenges are arising. Despite this, the Mission Operations Directorate of NASA s JSC is committed to implementing this integrated training approach because of the anticipated benefits.

  17. Local organizations` expectations towards remote management of heating units: a building management system users group; Attentes des collectivites locales dans le domaine de la telegestion des chaufferies: le groupement des utilisateurs de systemes de telegestion (GUST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irigoin, M. [Mairie de Montpellier, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1995-12-01

    A users group has been created in France for collective local organizations (cities, etc.) using remote management systems for heating plants and units, public buildings, etc., with several objectives: comparison of the various control equipment and software codes and evaluation of their system compatibility, promotion of control systems for small size units and integration of non-energy related functions, monitoring and maintenance of heating systems, training, development of data transmission protocols

  18. [Management of parenteral nutrition in intensive care units in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquerizo Alonso, Clara; Mesejo, Alfonso; Acosta Escribano, José; Ruiz Santana, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    -volume and low-glucose TPN; 42% prescribe TPN with SMOF (soybean, MCT, olive and fish oil); and 33% with OOBE (olive oil based emulsion) as lipid emulsion. 92% added glutamine. 60% considered that the new formulation may be indicated for sepsis, trauma, burn patients and MOF (multiple organ failure) and the 30% would use it as a routine therapy at the time of admission. 40% considered that insulin requirements were reduced; 50% claimed better volume management and 60% highlighted the protein/volume ratio. Attending to patient outcome, patients receiving the specific formulation have less affected hepatic function, higher protein intake and lower volume infusion but no significant differences were observed and they required less insulin dosage (p = 0.07). In the twelve ICUs included in the survey, the clinical practice patterns related to parenteral nutrition management are adapted to the guidelines of scientific societies such as the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC), the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). The new formulations designed for critically ill patients may be indicated for these conditions. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Operator Training and TEMS Support: A Survey of Unit Leaders in Northern and Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason B; Galante, Joseph M; Sena, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Members of Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams routinely work in high-risk tactical situations. Awareness of the benefit of Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) is increasing but not uniformly emphasized. To characterize the current regional state of tactical medicine and identify potential barriers to more widespread implementation. A multiple-choice survey was administered to SWAT team leaders of 22 regional agencies in northern and central California. Questions focused on individual officer self-aid and buddy care training, the use and content of individual first aid kits (IFAKs), and the operational inclusion of a dedicated TEMS provider. Respondents included city police (54%), local county sheriff (36%), state law enforcement (5%), and federal law enforcement (5%). RESULTS showed that 100% of respondents thought it was ?Very Important? for SWAT officers to understand the basics of self-aid and buddy care and to carry an IFAK, while only 71% of respondents indicated that team members actually carried an IFAK. In addition, 67% indicated that tourniquets were part of the IFAK, and 91% of surveyed team leaders thought it was ?Very Important? for teams to have a trained medic available onsite at callouts or high-risk warrant searches. Also, 59% of teams used an organic TEMS element. The majority of SWAT team leaders recognize the benefit of basic Operator medical training and the importance of a TEMS program. Despite near 100% endorsement by unit-level leadership, a significant proportion of teams are lacking one of the key components including Operator IFAKs and/or tourniquets. Tactical team leaders, administrators, and providers should continue to promote adequate Operator training and equipment as well as formal TEMS support. 2013.

  20. Differential Motor Unit Changes after Endurance or High-Intensity Interval Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Valdes, Eduardo; Falla, Deborah; Negro, Francesco; Mayer, Frank; Farina, Dario

    2017-06-01

    Using a novel technique of high-density surface EMG decomposition and motor unit (MU) tracking, we compared changes in the properties of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis MU after endurance (END) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sixteen men were assigned to the END or the HIIT group (n = 8 each) and performed six training sessions for 14 d. Each session consisted of 8-12 × 60-s intervals at 100% peak power output separated by 75 s of recovery (HIIT) or 90-120 min continuous cycling at ~65% V˙O2peak (END). Pre- and postintervention, participants performed 1) incremental cycling to determine V˙O2peak and peak power output and 2) maximal, submaximal (10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% maximum voluntary contraction [MVC]), and sustained (until task failure at 30% MVC) isometric knee extensions while high-density surface EMG signals were recorded from the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis. EMG signals were decomposed (submaximal contractions) into individual MU by convolutive blind source separation. Finally, MU were tracked across sessions by semiblind source separation. After training, END and HIIT improved V˙O2peak similarly (by 5.0% and 6.7%, respectively). The HIIT group showed enhanced maximal knee extension torque by ~7% (P = 0.02) and was accompanied by an increase in discharge rate for high-threshold MU (≥50% knee extension MVC) (P 0.05). HIIT and END induce different adjustments in MU discharge rate despite similar improvements in cardiopulmonary fitness. Moreover, the changes induced by HIIT are specific for high-threshold MU. For the first time, we show that HIIT and END induce specific neuromuscular adaptations, possibly related to differences in exercise load intensity and training volume.

  1. Averaging methods for extracting representative waveforms from motor unit action potential trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanda, Armando; Navallas, Javier; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Rodriguez-Carreño, Ignacio; Gila, Luis

    2015-08-01

    In the context of quantitative electromyography (EMG), it is of major interest to obtain a waveform that faithfully represents the set of potentials that constitute a motor unit action potential (MUAP) train. From this waveform, various parameters can be determined in order to characterize the MUAP for diagnostic analysis. The aim of this work was to conduct a thorough, in-depth review, evaluation and comparison of state-of-the-art methods for composing waveforms representative of MUAP trains. We evaluated nine averaging methods: Ensemble (EA), Median (MA), Weighted (WA), Five-closest (FCA), MultiMUP (MMA), Split-sweep median (SSMA), Sorted (SA), Trimmed (TA) and Robust (RA) in terms of three general-purpose signal processing figures of merit (SPMF) and seven clinically-used MUAP waveform parameters (MWP). The convergence rate of the methods was assessed as the number of potentials per MUAP train (NPM) required to reach a level of performance that was not significantly improved by increasing this number. Test material comprised 78 MUAP trains obtained from the tibialis anterioris of seven healthy subjects. Error measurements related to all SPMF and MWP parameters except MUAP amplitude descended asymptotically with increasing NPM for all methods. MUAP amplitude showed a consistent bias (around 4% for EA and SA and 1-2% for the rest). MA, TA and SSMA had the lowest SPMF and MWP error figures. Therefore, these methods most accurately preserve and represent MUAP physiological information of utility in clinical medical practice. The other methods, particularly WA, performed noticeably worse. Convergence rate was similar for all methods, with NPM values averaged among the nine methods, which ranged from 10 to 40, depending on the waveform parameter evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Gordian knot: managing herring (Clupea harengus) bridging across populations, fishery units, management areas, and politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe Clausen, Lotte; Mosegaard, Henrik; Berg, Casper Willestofte

    2012-01-01

    The management of western Baltic spring spawning (WBSS) herring is challenged by the highly complex stock structure with a temporal and geographical distribution leading to conflicting interests among different stakeholder groups. The stock is exploited in the Baltic Sea (Subdivisions 22–24) and ......The management of western Baltic spring spawning (WBSS) herring is challenged by the highly complex stock structure with a temporal and geographical distribution leading to conflicting interests among different stakeholder groups. The stock is exploited in the Baltic Sea (Subdivisions 22......–24) and the North Sea (Division IIIa) by various EU—and in the latter case also non‐EU—fishing fleets. For the two separate management areas, TACs are set at different times in the yearly TACsetting process by the EU and negotiating counties, which often result in conflicts over quota allocations among different...... management units. The WBSS herring stock spawns in the western Baltic Sea and migrates into the Kattegat and Skagerrak areas, where it mixes with North Sea autumn spawning (NSAS) herring. Recent development of otolith shape analysis has enabled a high‐resolution separation of herring stocks in these waters...

  3. Nutrition Training Improves Health Workers’ Nutrition Knowledge and Competence to Manage Child Undernutrition: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F.; Poudel, Krishna C.; Mlunde, Linda B.; Urassa, David P.; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on health workers’ nutrition knowledge, counseling skills, and child undernutrition management practices. Methods: We conducted a literature search on nutrition interventions from PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and World Health Organization regional databases. The outcome variables were nutrition knowledge, nutrition-counseling skills, and undernutrition management practices of health workers. Due to heterogeneity, we conducted only descriptive analyses. Results: Out of 3910 retrieved articles, 25 were selected as eligible for the final analysis. A total of 18 studies evaluated health workers’ nutrition knowledge and showed improvement after training. A total of 12 studies with nutrition counseling as the outcome variable also showed improvement among the trained health workers. Sixteen studies evaluated health workers’ child undernutrition management practices. In all such studies, child undernutrition management practices and competence of health workers improved after the nutrition training intervention. Conclusion: In-service nutrition training improves quality of health workers by rendering them more knowledge and competence to manage nutrition-related conditions, especially child undernutrition. In-service nutrition training interventions can help to fill the gap created by the lack of adequate nutrition training in the existing medical and nursing education system. In this way, steps can be taken toward improving the overall nutritional status

  4. Nutrition training improves health workers' nutrition knowledge and competence to manage child undernutrition: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F; Poudel, Krishna C; Mlunde, Linda B; Urassa, David P; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-09-24

    Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on health workers' nutrition knowledge, counseling skills, and child undernutrition management practices. We conducted a literature search on nutrition interventions from PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and World Health Organization regional databases. The outcome variables were nutrition knowledge, nutrition-counseling skills, and undernutrition management practices of health workers. Due to heterogeneity, we conducted only descriptive analyses. Out of 3910 retrieved articles, 25 were selected as eligible for the final analysis. A total of 18 studies evaluated health workers' nutrition knowledge and showed improvement after training. A total of 12 studies with nutrition counseling as the outcome variable also showed improvement among the trained health workers. Sixteen studies evaluated health workers' child undernutrition management practices. In all such studies, child undernutrition management practices and competence of health workers improved after the nutrition training intervention. In-service nutrition training improves quality of health workers by rendering them more knowledge and competence to manage nutrition-related conditions, especially child undernutrition. In-service nutrition training interventions can help to fill the gap created by the lack of adequate nutrition training in the existing medical and nursing education system. In this way, steps can be taken toward improving the overall nutritional status of the child population.

  5. Military Training: Management Actions Needed to Enhance DOD's Investment in the Joint National Training Capability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    St. Laurent, Janet; Durland, Laura; Harrison, Fred; Faley, Joe; Anderson, Bonita; Watson, Angela; Song, Yong; Keith, Kevin; Ditto, Susan; Shea, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    .... While DOD's initial training transformation assessment set a basic framework for measuring future program performance, DOD has not developed a strategy to evaluate the overall impact of the JNTC...

  6. Pain management in urology training: A national survey of senior residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Jonathan; Jaeger, Melanie; Nickel, J Curtis; Siemens, D Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the attitudes and experience of urology residents toward acute and chronic pain management during their training. A convenience sample of Canadian Urology chief residents were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire involving both open and closed-ended questions using a 5-point Likert scale. Descriptive and quantitative statistics were used to analyze the attitudes toward pain management, including their experience and training issues. The response rate was 97%. Most residents agreed or strongly agreed that more formal training in acute pain (77% agreement, mean 4.03 ± 0.98 SD) and chronic pain (68%, 3.97 ± 0.95) management would be valuable in urology residency with only 1 respondent disagreeing that training should be mandatory. There was a significant difference of training experience in chronic versus acute pain management, with only 13% agreement (2.99 ± 0.67) that their training in chronic pain was adequate. Most residents agreed (74%, 3.84 ± 1.00) that most of their training in pain management came from their senior residents or fellows. Many of the residents (65%, 3.61 ± 0.84) felt that they could manage their patients' acute pain issues independently, even in the absence of an acute pain service, although apparent knowledge of opioids was poor. The results of this survey suggest that urology residents attain their knowledge of pain management experientially with what may be insufficient formal training, particularly in chronic pain. These observations are limited by the relatively small number of respondents and by the nature of a cross-sectional, self-reported survey; however, they would appear to underscore a need to redouble efforts in residency education.

  7. 40 CFR 264.550 - Applicability of Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Unit (CAMU) regulations. 264.550 Section 264.550 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) regulations. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section... before November 20, 2000, are subject to the requirements in § 264.551 for grandfathered CAMUs; CAMU...

  8. Big Game Management Units, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — GMUs are based on New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Big Game Management Units and Game Management Sub-units as described in Title 19 Chapter 30 Part 4 ofThe New...

  9. Special features in managing European Training Networks (ETN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton; Drossou-Berendes, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    The Marie Skłodowska-Curie European Training Networks (ETN) within Horizon 2020, the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, aim to train a new generation of creative and innovative early-stage researchers with focus on both scientific excellence and researchers' career development extending the traditional academic research training, and providing researchers with tools to develop scientific expertise and transferable skills needed to establish career perspectives in academia as well as non-academia. This profile is different from what we know from "typical" collaborative projects, and project consortia face specific challenges with regard to international recruitment, joint organization of network activities, financial regulations, etc. The poster will give an overview of the main ETN features emphasizing special requirements and needs, and identifying main challenges, which may rise.

  10. The training of specialists in Family and Community Health Nursing according to the supervisors of the teaching units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Martínez-Riera, José Ramón; Mármol-López, María Isabel; Pastor-Gallardo, Francisco Javier; Gras-Nieto, Elvira; Holgado-Fernández, Ana

    To analyze the current situation of the training of specialists in family and community nursing from the perspective of nurses responsible for teaching units. Exploratory analysis using nominal group technique of the contributions made by representatives of 19 multidisciplinary teaching units in family and community care from 11 Spanish autonomous communities. They categorized and weighted those contributions. The emerging categories on the strengths and difficulties encountered related to the tutors, the environment where the training took place, the structure of the teaching unit, the organization of the teaching and the official programme of the speciality, the external supports and the theoretical training. Training in Family and Community Nursing is an opportunity to improve primary health care to train in news and necessary but complex skills. Support is required for training to be effective and the specialty and training should be made known. Tutors are a key part of this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Unit cost analysis of training and deploying paid community health workers in three rural districts of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kassimu; Exavery, Amon; Baynes, Colin D; Pemba, Senga; Hingora, Ahmed; Manzi, Fatuma; Phillips, James F; Kanté, Almamy Malick

    2016-07-08

    Tanzania, like other African countries, faces significant health workforce shortages. With advisory and partnership from Columbia University, the Ifakara Health Institute and the Tanzanian Training Centre for International Health (TTCIH) developed and implemented the Connect Project as a randomized cluster experimental trial of the childhood survival impact of recruiting, training, and deploying of a new cadre of paid community health workers (CHW), named "Wawazesha wa afya ya Jamii" (WAJA). This paper presents an estimation of the cost of training and deploying WAJA in three rural districts of Tanzania. Costing data were collected by tracking project activity expenditure records and conducting in-depth interviews of TTCIH staff who have led the training and deployment of WAJA, as well as their counterparts at Public Clinical Training Centres who have responsibility for scaling up the WAJA training program. The trial is registered with the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Register number ( ISRCTN96819844 ). The Connect training cost was US$ 2,489.3 per WAJA, of which 40.1 % was for meals, 20.2 % for accommodation 10.2 % for tuition fees and the remaining 29.5 % for other costs including instruction and training facilities and field allowance. A comparable training program estimated unit cost for scaling-up this training via regional/district clinical training centres would be US$ 833.5 per WAJA. Of this unit cost, 50.3 % would involve the cost of meals, 27.4 % training fees, 13.7 % for field allowances, 9 % for accommodation and medical insurance. The annual running cost of WAJA in a village will cost US$ 1.16 per capita. Costs estimated by this study are likely to be sustainable on a large scale, particularly if existing regional/district institutions are utilized for this program.

  12. [Pediatric management by mobile intensive care units in the northern French Alps emergency network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesnière, M; Matonnier, A; Courtiol, G; Désormais, G; Wroblewski, I; Michard-Lenoir, A-P; Venchiarutti, D; Pruvost-Dussart, I; Hallain, M; Mampe-Armstrong, H; Belle, L; Griffet, J

    2015-06-01

    The northern French Alps emergency network (RENAU) manages emergent care and patient treatment pathways in a three-county area in the French Alps. The aim of the study was to describe the pediatric activity in mobile intensive care units (MICUs). This retrospective observational study was conducted from 1 January to 31 December 2012. Data were obtained from patients' medical records in seven representative MICUs of the RENAU. Consecutive patients between 1 month and 18 years of age were enrolled. During the study period, MICUs carried out 11,951 primary transports and 3087 secondary transfers. A total of 1325 patients were enrolled: 1087 primary transports and 238 secondary transfers. In primary interventions, 531 (48.9%) patients were managed for a trauma, 118 (11%) children were discharged and stayed home, 427 (39.9%) underwent an intravenous cannulation and 27 (2.5%) on-scene intubation. A pediatrician was in charge of 64 (26.9%) secondary transfers. Among 1649 (18%) mountain rescues, 296 (18.7%) involved a child. Emergency physicians in MICUs are involved with children's prehospital care and need dedicated materiel and special training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. [Strategy for implementing and assessing a health care risk management unit in a primary care area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena Mateo, José María; de la Fuente, Angel Sanz-Vírseda; Cañada Dorado, Asunción; Villamor Borrego, Manuela

    2009-06-01

    To describe the setting up of a clinical risk management unit (CRMU) within primary care management, as well as the aims of the project, its implementation phases and the assessment of the results after one year of experience. A safety plan was prepared, based on the European Excellence Model (EFQM), to establish a strategic working framework. The plan included 38 proposed actions, associated with criteria elements and 26 indicators to evaluate the selected criteria. A total of 82% of the anticipated actions were implemented in 2007, which included, actions related to teaching and training (15 activities with 237 trainees), spreading of information associated with patient safety, incident analysis (14) and the introduction of specific safe practices (12). Four of those were considered as "generalisable" safe practices and were spread to the rest of the CRMUs in the Autonomous Region of Madrid. The CRMUs have introduced and monitored three processes related to patient safety, participated in a formal programme on the polymedicated elderly, with good results in cover and quality of the indicators. A primary care team (PCT) from the area took part in the first study carried out in Spain on adverse effects in primary care (APEAS Study). The CRMU can give impetus to strategic lines of safety. The preparation of a strategy defining specific aims has helped in the introduction of patient safety activities and along with the proposed indicators enables the impact of the intervention to be assessed.

  14. END-USER TRAINING ON DIGITAL TEACHING TOOLS: REACTION, LEARNING, BEHAVIOR, RESULTS, AND MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave E. Marcial

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed digital teaching tools, namely mobile class record application and portable learning management system were launched and distributed. This paper measures the evaluation rating of the region-wide end-user training on the classroom use and integration of the two digital teaching tools. A total of 74 trainees in Central Visayas, Philippines were trained. Using the New World Kirkpatrick Model, the trainees evaluated the training regarding reaction, learning, behavior, results, and management. The data show that the trainees rated the training with an overall mean of 3.70 described as “strongly agree.” The result implies that the end-user training on digital teaching tools is very successful and excellent.

  15. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations: Introduction to Tribal Administrative and Financial Guidance for Assistance Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA training can help grant recipients manage assistance agreement awards. Learn about grant requirements and EPA expectations. Learn how to manage an entire program, manage a specific piece of the project, or refresh understanding of specific tasks.

  16. Experiences of training and implementation of integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI in South Africa: a qualitative evaluation of the IMCI case management training course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollins Nigel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI is a strategy to reduce mortality and morbidity in children under-5 years by improving management of common illnesses at primary level. IMCI has been shown to improve health worker performance, but constraints have been identified in achieving sufficient coverage to improve child survival, and implementation remains sub-optimal. At the core of the IMCI strategy is a clinical guideline whereby health workers use a series of algorithms to assess and manage a sick child, and give counselling to carers. IMCI is taught using a structured 11-day training course that combines classroom work with clinical practise; a variety of training techniques are used, supported by comprehensive training materials and detailed instructions for facilitators. Methods We conducted focus group discussions with IMCI trained health workers to explore their experiences of the methodology and content of the IMCI training course, whether they thought they gained the skills required for implementation, and their experiences of follow-up visits. Results Health workers found the training interesting, informative and empowering, and there was consensus that it improved their skills in managing sick children. They appreciated the variety of learning methods employed, and felt that repetition was important to reinforce knowledge and skills. Facilitators were rated highly for their knowledge and commitment, as well as their ability to identify problems and help participants as required. However, health workers felt strongly that the training time was too short to acquire skills in all areas of IMCI. Their increased confidence in managing sick children was identified by health workers as an enabling factor for IMCI implementation in the workplace, but additional time required for IMCI consultations was expressed as a major barrier. Although follow-up visits were described as very helpful, these were often delayed

  17. [New professional field in France: Analysis of the training needs of case managers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somme, Dominique; Corvol, Aline; Couturier, Yves; Pimouguet, Clément; Moreau, Olivier; Perivier, Samuel; Balard, Frédéric; de Stampa, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Case management is a relatively new career field in France. It was first introduced on an experimental basis in 2007-2008, and was then developedfollowing the National Alzheimer Plan and finally enshrined in legislation in 2012. This careerfield is based on a set of tasks widely described internationally: identifying the right level of intervention, standardized multidimensional assessment, planning all aid (care and social services), implementation of the plan, monitoring and reassessment and periodic reassessment of all needs in a continuous and long-term process. The specific, systematic and dedicated nature of these tasks to these tasks makes training essential. Regulations also stipulate that the professional must acquire additional training by a dedicated inter-university degree. This requirement is a French specificity The authors present the history of case management and training in France and analyze the various international training frameworks identified by an Internet search. Moreover, based on the opinions expressed by case managers at different times of the scientific assessment and a review ofseveral studies conducted by inter-university case management program students, this article highlights the specific training needs of case managers and how the proposed training can meet these needs.

  18. Training Vietnamese diabetes specialists in facilitation methods as part of a train-the-trainer programme in diabetes management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Persson, Frederik; Noctor, Eoin

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an important issue in Vietnam, with a doubling in prevalence to 5.4% of the population from 2002 to 2012. Upskilling general practitioners and internal medicine physicians to provide comprehensive, evidence-based diabetes treatment is a key step in addressing this emerging...... challenge. The Vietnamese Association of Diabetes and Endocrinology and Steno Diabetes Center, with Ministry of Health support, deliver a train-the-trainer programme to build diabetes treatment capacity. In this model, an annual 2-day course is delivered to a group of endocrinologists (the ’trainers......’). These doctors then form the faculty for a national training programme on evidence-based diabetes management for general practitioners and internal medicine physicians. In addition to diabetes management topics, various pedagogical methods, with an emphasis on participant interaction, sharing a constructivist...

  19. Developing standardized strategic response categories for fire management units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Thompson; Crystal S. Stonesifer; Robert C. Seli; Marlena Hovorka

    2013-01-01

    Federal wildland fire policy requires that publicly owned lands with burnable vegetation have a fire management plan (FMP); this applies to the five primary Federal fire agencies (Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Forest Service). FMPs are based on land and resource management plans and are...

  20. Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to compare two teaching methods for postpartum hemorrhage management: interactive hands-on training and non-interactive video training. In a controlled intervention study at a secondary health care center in Kenya, the two training methods, based on the Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics curriculum, were evaluated utilizing structured observation of a standardized scenario before and after training. Both intervention groups significantly increased in performance scores after receiving hands-on training: 40% (95% CI 29.5-47.0) and video training: 34.5% (95% CI 25.0-42.0); likewise, pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Education and training in recreation management at tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recreation facilities, parks and programmes are essential to bring balance in our hectic lives. As professionals and citizens we need to take these services to the public. The importance of recreation participation and programmes should be realised and professionals should be trained to understand the important role ...

  2. Functional training in the management of chronic facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, V; Hariohm, K; Vijayakumar, P; Bindiya, D Thangjam

    2012-04-01

    Disability in patients with facial paralysis is the result of impairment or loss of complex and multidimensional functions of the face, including expression of emotions, facial identity, and communication. However, the majority of interventions for facial paralysis are unidimensional and impairment oriented. Thus, a functional training program intended to address various dimensions of disability caused by facial paralysis was devised. This patient-centered, multidimensional approach to the rehabilitation of people with facial paralysis consists of patient education, functional training, and complementary exercises. This approach is focused on various dimensions of disability, including the physical, emotional, and social dimensions, by encouraging context-specific facial functions, positive coping strategies, and social interaction skills. The patient was a 25-year-old woman with chronic complete right facial paralysis caused by a postoperative complication of ear surgery. The patient's problems were evaluated with the Facial Disability Index (physical function subscale score=45/100, social/well-being function subscale score=28/100) and an informal interview exploring her experiences and priorities. After 8 weeks of functional training, the patient showed considerable improvement in facial functions (physical function subscale score=95/100, social/well-being function subscale score=100/100) and reported positive changes in social interactions and interpersonal relationships. The use of a functional training program was associated with positive changes in emotional expression, psychosocial function, and social integration, thus contributing to reduced disability of a person with chronic facial paralysis.

  3. A management framework for training providers to improve skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is in a skills revolution, launched by the Department of Labour via the Skills Development Act in 1998 and the Skills Development Levies Act in 1999. The skills revolution challenges workplace training providers through employers who pay a percentage of payroll towards skills levies and want to recover these ...

  4. Effect of Training on Sharp Handling and Management among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data collection tools included an individual questionnaire, health facility questionnaire and an observatory checklist. Intervention was the training of health workers. Results: Mean ages of the health workers in the experimental and control groups were 42 ± 9.3 years and 40 ± 10.2 years respectively. Average year of practice ...

  5. TRAINING MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR HUMAN RESOURCE CAPACITY BUILDING (ANALYSIS OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING AGENCY, WEST JAVA PROVINCE, INDONESIA)

    OpenAIRE

    -, Mustakim

    2017-01-01

    Stakeholderis a driving force in an organization. However, over time, an organizationcannot be avoided with the crisis of leadership. This condition is due to thelack of human resources that has credibility and capacity as a leader. Throughthe Training Management Model, it aims to improve the capacity of humanresources, which is expected to become a model of the emergence of futureleaders. The civil service is a state apparatus that works to serve the Stateof the Republic of Indonesia. Then, ...

  6. Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO™) in Mexico City: Integrating Cultural Adaptation Activities in an Implementation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Ana A; Domenech Rodríguez, Melanie M; Amador, Nancy G; Forgatch, Marion S; Parra-Cardona, J Rubén

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the process of cultural adaptation at the start of the implementation of the Parent Management Training intervention-Oregon model (PMTO) in Mexico City. The implementation process was guided by the model, and the cultural adaptation of PMTO was theoretically guided by the cultural adaptation process (CAP) model. During the process of the adaptation, we uncovered the potential for the CAP to be embedded in the implementation process, taking into account broader training and economic challenges and opportunities. We discuss how cultural adaptation and implementation processes are inextricably linked and iterative and how maintaining a collaborative relationship with the treatment developer has guided our work and has helped expand our research efforts, and how building human capital to implement PMTO in Mexico supported the implementation efforts of PMTO in other places in the United States.

  7. Lessons learned: Managing the development of a corporate Ada training project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Linda F.

    1986-01-01

    The management lessons learned during the implementation of a corporate mandate to develop and deliver an effective Ada training program to all divisions are discussed. The management process involved in obtaining cooperation from all levels in the development of a corporate-wide project is described. The problem areas are identified along with some possible solutions.

  8. More explicit communication after classroom-based crew resource management training: results of a pragmatic trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Aviation-based crew resource management trainings to optimize non-technical skills among professionals are often suggested for health care as a way to increase patient safety. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 2-day classroom-based crew resource management (CRM)

  9. Classroom Management Intervention: The Effects of Training and Mentoring on the Inductee Teacher's Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallion, Brenda K.; Zimpher, Nancy L.

    1991-01-01

    Study assessed a classroom management program embedded in a mentor and beginning teacher induction program. Researchers assigned mentor/beginning teacher pairs to treatment conditions. Some pairs completed a midyear classroom management intervention workshop. Trained teachers received higher ratings than untrained ones. The presence of mentors did…

  10. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  11. Classroom Profiling Training: Increasing Preservice Teachers' Confidence and Knowledge of Classroom Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Cliff; Simoncini, Kym; Davidson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Classroom management is a serious concern for beginning teachers including preservice teachers. The Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has developed the Essential Skills for Classroom Management (ESCM), a system of positive and pro-active strategies for maintaining supportive learning environments. In addition, the…

  12. New Roles and training programs for managers in the communicating and printing industry in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, W.J.; Streumer, Jan

    1998-01-01

    The communications industry has been subject to radical changes in this decade. Managers working in this branch of industry need to adapt their management style to changing conditions. This study was carried out for the branch training and education institute in The Netherlands (STIVAKO) to provide

  13. Educational training and attitudes towards recycling among campground managers in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marci Cobb; Robert A. Robertson

    1995-01-01

    In surveying managers of Iowa's campgrounds to determine their attitudes and behavior regarding recycling, it was found that attitudes were related to the type of educational backgrounds. For example, managers with park and recreation degrees had less strong conservation orientation than those with educational training in natural sciences which tended to develop...

  14. MANAGEMENT AIDE IN LOW-RENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS, A SUGGESTED TRAINING PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    RESOURCE MATERIAL IS PROVIDED FOR USE IN DEVELOPING A TRAINING PROGRAM FOR MANAGEMENT AIDES, PERSONS WHO ASSIST HOUSING MANAGERS OF LOCAL HOUSING AUTHORITIES IN ORIENTING RESIDENTS TO LIVING IN A NEW ENVIRONMENT. THE PROGRAM OBJECTIVE IS TO PREPARE TRAINEES TO ESTABLISH WORKING RELATIONSHIPS WITH PEOPLE OF VARYING BACKGROUNDS, INTERPRET…

  15. Mess Management Specialist 3 and 2. Naval Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The training manual is designed as a self-study package that will enable Mess Management Specialists Third and Second Class to fulfill the requirements of their rating and qualify for future advancement. Among these requirements are the abilities to perform the following food preparation, food service, and hotel management duties, which are in the…

  16. More explicit communication after classroom-based crew resource management training: results of a pragmatic trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noord, I.; de Bruijne, M.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; van Dyck, C.; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Aviation-based crew resource management trainings to optimize non-technical skills among professionals are often suggested for health care as a way to increase patient safety. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 2-day classroom-based crew resource management (CRM)

  17. A Survey of Civilian Food Service Management Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Cooking Principlea Touriam Liberal Arte Human Relations Culinary Arts ... Cooking Principles Tourism Liberal Arts Human Relations Culinary Arts Motivation Time Management Deciaion Making Coal Setting Management by... Culinary arts 27.5 25.0 Ecology 2A.1 5.0a Note: a denotes a difference between the groups significant at P< 0.05 b denotes a difference significant

  18. Evaluation of pre-service training on integrated management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was col-lected using pre-tested questionnaires, focused group interviews with teachers and students, observation of stu-dents while managing sick children using Integrated Management of Newborn and Childhood Illness guidelines, and reviews of pediatric course outlines and other teaching/learning materials.

  19. Integrating climate change considerations into forest management tools and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda M. Nagel; Christopher W. Swanston; Maria K. Janowiak

    2010-01-01

    Silviculturists are currently facing the challenge of developing management strategies that meet broad ecological and social considerations in spite of a high degree of uncertainty in future climatic conditions. Forest managers need state-of-the-art knowledge about climate change and potential impacts to facilitate development of silvicultural objectives and...

  20. Microbiology Managers: Managerial Training in the RItrain Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, R Russell M; Lima, Nelson; Brooksbank, Cath; Guarini, Enrico; Pasterk, Markus; Lavitrano, Marialuisa

    2017-06-01

    Leaders of research infrastructures (RIs) in Europe who are scientists require competencies in management. RItrain has addressed this issue by identifying skills required, locating relevant courses and finding gaps, whilst establishing a Master of Management programme. We describe how one contributing microbiology RI determined the most relevant skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 42 CFR 21.51 - Appointment of officers having specialized training or experience in administration and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appointment of officers having specialized training... Appointment of officers having specialized training or experience in administration and management. The... specialized training or experience in administration and management relating to the functions of the Service...

  2. Crisis Management Simulation: Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciporen, Jeremy; Gillham, Haley; Noles, Michele; Dillman, Dawn; Baskerville, Mark; Haley, Caleb; Spight, Donn; Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P

    2018-01-01

    Simulation training has been shown to be an effective teaching tool. Learner management of an intraoperative crisis such as a major cerebrovascular bleed requires effective teamwork, communication, and implementation of key skill sets at appropriate time points. This study establishes a first of a kind simulation experience in a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident (learners) team working together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Using a cadaveric cavernous carotid injury perfusion model, 7 neurosurgery and 6 anesthesia learners, were trained on appropriate vascular injury management using an endonasal endoscopic technique. Learners were evaluated on communication skills, crisis management algorithms, and implementation of appropriate skill sets at the right time. A preanatomic and postanatomic examination and postsimulation survey was administered to neurosurgery learners. Anesthesia learners provided posttraining evaluation through a tailored realism and teaching survey. Neurosurgery learners' anatomic examination score improved from presimulation (33.89%) to postsimulation (86.11%). No significant difference between learner specialties was observed for situation awareness, decision making, communications and teamwork, or leadership evaluations. Learners reported the simulation realistic, beneficial, and highly instructive. Realistic, first of kind, clinical simulation scenarios were presented to a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident team who worked together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Learners were effectively trained on crisis management, the importance of communication, and how to develop algorithms for future implementation in difficult scenarios. Learners were highly satisfied with the simulation training experience and requested that it be integrated more consistently into their residency training programs.

  3. Can we manage for resilience? The integration of resilience thinking into natural resource management in the united states

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of resilience is now frequently invoked by natural resource agencies in the United States. This reflects growing trends within ecology, conservation biology, and other disciplines acknowledging that social-ecological systems require management approaches recognizing ...

  4. Workplace safety and health improvements through a labor/management training and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Bruce; Morawetz, John; Ruttenberg, Ruth; Workman, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Seven hundred thirty-nine workers at Merck's Stonewall plant in Elkton, Virginia, have a safer and healthier workplace because four of them were enthusiastic about health and safety training they received from the union's training center in Cincinnati, Ohio. What emerged was not only that all 739 plant employees received OSHA 10-hour General Industry training, but that it was delivered by "OSHA-authorized" members of the International Chemical Workers Union Council who worked at the plant. Merck created a new full-time position in its Learning and Development Department and filled it with one of the four workers who had received the initial training. Strong plant leadership promoted discussions both during the training, in evaluation, and in newly energized joint labor-management meetings following the training. These discussions identified safety and health issues needing attention. Then, in a new spirit of trust and collaboration, major improvements occurred.

  5. Forest management and water in the United States [Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary

    2017-01-01

    This chapter outlines a brief history of the United States native forests and forest plantations. It describes the past and current natural and plantation forest distribution (map, area, main species), as well as main products produced (timber, pulp, furniture, etc.). Integrated into this discussion is a characterization of the water resources of the United States and...

  6. Stormwater Management Plan for the Arden Hills Army Training Site, Arden Hills, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Adrianne E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wuthrich, Kelsey K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ziech, Angela M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bowen, Esther E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quinn, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This stormwater management plan focuses on the cantonment and training areas of the Arden Hills Army Training Site (AHATS). The plan relates the site stormwater to the regulatory framework, and it summarizes best management practices to aide site managers in promoting clean site runoff. It includes documentation for a newly developed, detailed model of stormwater flow retention for the entire AHATS property and adjacent upgradient areas. The model relies on established modeling codes integrated in a U.S. Department of Defense-sponsored software tool, the Watershed Modeling System (WMS), and it can be updated with data on changes in land use or with monitoring data.

  7. International genetic counseling students' perspective on their training experience in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadini, Marta; Naldi, Mariana; Packman, Wendy; Youngblom, Janey; Weil, Jon

    2013-12-01

    International students face social, psychological and academic challenges upon moving to a foreign country to pursue higher education. Clinical disciplines such as genetic counseling present additional challenges adapting to an unfamiliar health care system and different interactions and expectations with patients and colleagues. This study used semi-structured interviews to identify challenges that international genetic counseling students face during training in the United States. Eight international genetic counseling alumni who graduated from U.S.-accredited programs were interviewed. Participants stated that the U.S. academic system was unfamiliar-class participation and paper-writing required the greatest adjustment. There was a need for help in understanding social norms in academic settings. Clinically, they were unfamiliar with the dynamics and communication style of U.S. families. Non-native English speakers experienced greater difficulty in all areas. Most participants reported that they were uncomfortable asking for help in transitioning to life, study and work. Participants identified mentorship programs for international students as potentially useful in clarifying expectations in academic and clinical settings. These results may assist international students preparing to study genetic counseling in the U.S. and may help genetic counseling training programs identify the academic and clinical challenges faced by international students.

  8. [Pilot training experience in lip-reading skills for nurses in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degan, M; Pollastri, G; Genova, V; Marin, B

    2002-01-01

    In the intensive care unit (ICU) of Mestre hospital (Italy) a research was carried out to analyse the possibility to improve nurses' lip-reading skills. A specialized speech therapist organized a 20 hour training course for 34 health workers in ICU. The participants had a lip-reading test at the beginning and at the end of the course and six months later. The final test revealed that participants could recognize a greater number of typical words in ICU in comparison to the initial test. Yet, after 6 months the skill decreased to the level shown at the beginning of the course. On the other hand, the trend shows that some participants' skill did not decrease. Neither the starting level nor intermediate stage are conditioned by sex, age, profession, and experience. In order to measure clinic efficacy, the participants had another test to understand if improved lip-reading skill could influence the following variables: word comprehension, nurse attitude to communication toward non-speaking people, patient emotional status and nurse emotional status. The training course seems to have had good effects on nurses' attitudes towards their patients and on their communication. Yet, study results do not show if increased lip-reading skills have real positive effects on ICU communication and whether this method is better than usual communication methods (e.g. mimic or alphabetic board).

  9. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-02-25

    This Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a). This work plan describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to NMED’s guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The scope of work for the RFI Work Plan or SAP is being developed by the Permittees. The final content of the RFI Work Plan or SAP will be coordinated with the NMED for submittal on May 24, 2000. Specific project-related planning information will be included in the RFI Work Plan or SAP. The SWMU program at WIPP began in 1994 under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulatory authority. NMED subsequently received regulatory authority from EPA

  10. Training cows to approach the milking unit in response to acoustic signals in an automatic milking system during the grazing season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wredle, E.; Munksgaard, Lene; Sporndly, E.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether cows in a commercially-managed barn with automatic milking can learn to visit the milking unit in response to an acoustic signal during the grazing season. The study included 10 Swedish Red and White dairy cows, randomly selected from a herd of 45...... cows housed in a barn with an automatic milking system. A small box emitting an acoustic signal was attached to the collar of the 10 cows. During the training period, the signal was induced manually from a distance and during the evaluation period, signals were activated automatically from a computer...

  11. Training peer educators to promote self-management skills in people with serious mental illness (SMI) and diabetes (DM) in a primary health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blixen, Carol; Perzynski, Adam; Kanuch, Stephanie; Dawson, Neal; Kaiser, Denise; Lawless, Mary E; Seeholzer, Eileen; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-04-01

    To describe the training and participant experience of patients with both severe mental illness (SMI) and diabetes (DM) who were enrolled in a Peer Educator Training Program adapted to a primary health care setting. The mortality of patients with both SMI and DM is high. Illness self-management includes medications, psychosocial treatments, and healthy behaviors, yet treatment engagement is often sub-optimal with adherence rates of 52% for diabetic medications and 62% for antipsychotic medications among the SMI. To address this problem, a new behavioral intervention study targeting SMI and DM self-management used trained peer educators (PEs) with the same chronic conditions to enhance program effectiveness. A manual facilitated training on intervention topics such as SMI and DM therapies, stress management, and stigma reduction as well as training in group intervention techniques, telephone skills, and crisis management. We assessed PE attitudes and input using in-depth face-to-face interviews. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using the classic method of content analysis emphasizing dominant themes. A member check-in was conducted where participants commented on analysis results. Six relevant descriptive themes emerged: (1) positive group experience; (2) success with learning manual content; (3) increased knowledge about SMI and DM; (4) improved self-management skills; (5) increased self-confidence and self-efficacy in becoming a PE; and being (6) united in purpose to help others self-manage their SMI and DM. Qualitative evidence supports structured training for SMI-DM PEs. Key components include written educational materials and the power of the group process to increase knowledge, self-management skills, confidence, and self-efficacy. Recommendations are offered to support further endeavors to mobilize peers with SMI to help other patients with complex comorbidities better manage their own health.

  12. USAWC (United States Army War College) Military Studies Program. Training, Motivation and Intrinsic Task Value. Essential Elements of Excellence (Readiness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-04

    Foresman and Co., 1982. Hersey , Paul and Kenneth H. Blanchard. Management of S Organizational Behavior Utilizing Human Resourcesa. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice...of Management (Glenview: Scott, Forsman and Co., 1982), p. 155. 5. Steers, p. 88. 6. Hersey . Paul and Kenneth H. Blanchard. Manaqement of 0ranxzatxonal...learning/motivation behavior theory, (2) the latest books on " manage - ment for excellence" in Industry, and (3) army training regulations and leader

  13. Ecosystem management decision support for federal forests in the United States: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Michael Rauscher

    1999-01-01

    Ecosystem management has been adopted as the philosophical paradigm guiding management on many Federal forests in the United States. The strategic goal of ecosystem management is to find a sensible middle ground between ensuring long-term protection of the environment while allowing an increasing population to use its natural resources for maintaining and improving...

  14. 75 FR 5849 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Claim Against the United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Claim Against the United States for the Proceeds of a Government Check AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of...

  15. Integrating concerns about wood production and sustainable forest management in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.W. Haynes

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) in the United States is strongly influenced by U.S. forest products markets and the numerous management decisions made by individual landowners and managers. These decisions are influenced by a mix of market incentives and regulatory actions reducing predictability in assessing progress towards SFM and causing...

  16. 76 FR 69225 - Migratory Bird Permits; Double-Crested Cormorant Management in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... other and with DCCO population dynamics. Legal, Regulatory, and Management Context The USFWS has... data management collection and activities on the eliminate using public resources best available being... Management in the United States AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Request for comments...

  17. Training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in intensive care unit patients: limits and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Conceição Merces

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Nursing has an important role in urinary tract infection prevention and control. Urinary catheters insertion represents the local topography with the highest rate of hospital infection. Foley catheter placement is performed solely by the nurse and requires aseptic techniques during its performance, thus preventing risks to the patients. The study aimed to evaluate the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion and point out limits and possibilities of this practice in patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of Hospital Geral do Interior da Bahia (HGIB. Methods: This was a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews. After data analysis, two categories were evaluated, namely: the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients and the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses in ICU patients. Bardin analysis was used for data analysis. Results: The study shows that the nurse’s practice on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients is based on the use of aseptic techniques for urinary tract infection prevention, theoretical and practical knowledge on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients, knowledge on urinary tract infections and associations with catheter insertion, whereas the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses are understood through measures to minimize the risk of hospital infection caused by long-term catheter use in the ICU. Nurses point out that the risks of hospital infection are inherent to long-term catheter use. This is an important fact, as the knowledge or its absence may constitute a limit or possibility for Foley catheter insertion practice by the nurse in ICU patients. Conclusion: Nurses must seek the systematization of knowledge, which warrants support for the team, as well as information, safety and prompt care, allowing the reduction of urinary

  18. Youth sport specialization: how to manage competition and training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capranica, Laura; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L

    2011-12-01

    A prevailing theory (and practical application) is that elite performance requires early childhood skill development and training across various domains, including sport. Debate continues whether children specializing early (ie, training/competition in a single sport) have true advantage compared with those who sample various sports early and specialize in a single sport later (adolescence). Retrospective data and case studies suggest either model yields elite status depending upon the sport category (ie, situational: ball games, martial arts, fencing; quantitative: track and field, swimming, skiing; or qualitative: gymnastics, diving, figure skating). However, potential risks of early specialization include greater attrition and adverse physical/emotional health outcomes. With the advent of the IOC Youth Olympic Games, increased emphasis on global youth competition has unknown implications but also represents a potential platform for investigation. Modification of youth competition formats should be based upon multidisciplinary research on psychophysiological responses, and technical-tactical behaviors during competition. The assumption that a simple scaled-down approach of adult competitions facilitates the development of technical/tactical skills of youth athletes is not necessarily substantiated with field-based research. Relatively little evidence exists regarding the long-term effects of rigorous training and competitive schedules on children in specific sports. It is clear that more prospective studies are needed to understand the training dose that optimally develops adaptations in youth without inducing dropout, overtraining syndrome, and/or injury. Such an approach should be sport specific as well as gender based. Until such evidence exists, coaches and sport administrators will continue to rely upon their sport-specific dogma to influence programmatic development of our most vulnerable population.

  19. Train-to-train impact test of crash energy management passenger rail equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    On March 23, 2006, a full-scale test was conducted on a passenger rail train retrofitted with newly developed cab and coach car crush zone designs. This test was conducted as part of a larger testing program to establish the degree of enhanced perfor...

  20. Train-to-Train Impact Test of Crash-Energy Management Passenger Rail Equipment: Structural Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    On March 23, 2006, a full-scale test was conducted on a : passenger rail train retrofitted with newly developed cab end : and non-cab end crush zone designs. This test was conducted : as part of a larger testing program to establish the degree of : e...