WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit step function

  1. Step-grandparenthood in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahirun, Jenjira J; Park, Sung S; Seltzer, Judith A

    2018-01-18

    This study provides new information about the demography of step-grandparenthood in the United States. Specifically, we examine the prevalence of step-grandparenthood across birth cohorts and for socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups. We also examine lifetime exposure to the step-grandparent role. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the Health and Retirement Study, we use percentages to provide first estimates of step-grandparenthood and to describe demographic and socioeconomic variation in who is a step-grandparent. We use life tables to estimate the exposure to step-grandparenthood. The share of step-grandparents is increasing across birth cohorts. However, individuals without a college education and non-Whites are more likely to become step-grandparents. Exposure to the step-grandparent role accounts for approximately 15% of total grandparent years at age 65 for women and men. A growing body of research finds that grandparents are increasingly instrumental in the lives of younger generations. However, the majority of this work assumes that these ties are biological, with little attention paid to the role of family complexity across three generations. Understanding the demographics of step-grandparenthood sheds light on the family experiences of an overlooked, but growing segment of the older adult population in the United States. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  3. United States steps up waste isolation programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedes, H W [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (USA). Office of Waste Isolation; Carbiener, W A [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (USA)

    1982-11-01

    A description is given of the United States' waste isolation programme which now involves tests of specific sites. The US Department of Energy plans to build a system of mined geological repositories for the disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste. It is hoped that the first repository will be available by 1998. Studies of the geology and hydrology of the proposed sites, the waste packaging and the repository design are reported.

  4. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  5. Functional unit for a processor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohani, A.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a functional unit for a processor, such as a Very Large Instruction Word Processor. The invention further relates to a processor comprising at least one such functional unit. The invention further relates to a functional unit and processor capable of mitigating the effect of

  6. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  7. Accessory stimulus modulates executive function during stepping task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Nojima, Ippei

    2015-07-01

    When multiple sensory modalities are simultaneously presented, reaction time can be reduced while interference enlarges. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of task-irrelevant acoustic accessory stimuli simultaneously presented with visual imperative stimuli on executive function during stepping. Executive functions were assessed by analyzing temporal events and errors in the initial weight transfer of the postural responses prior to a step (anticipatory postural adjustment errors). Eleven healthy young adults stepped forward in response to a visual stimulus. We applied a choice reaction time task and the Simon task, which consisted of congruent and incongruent conditions. Accessory stimuli were randomly presented with the visual stimuli. Compared with trials without accessory stimuli, the anticipatory postural adjustment error rates were higher in trials with accessory stimuli in the incongruent condition and the reaction times were shorter in trials with accessory stimuli in all the task conditions. Analyses after division of trials according to whether anticipatory postural adjustment error occurred or not revealed that the reaction times of trials with anticipatory postural adjustment errors were reduced more than those of trials without anticipatory postural adjustment errors in the incongruent condition. These results suggest that accessory stimuli modulate the initial motor programming of stepping by lowering decision threshold and exclusively under spatial incompatibility facilitate automatic response activation. The present findings advance the knowledge of intersensory judgment processes during stepping and may aid in the development of intervention and evaluation tools for individuals at risk of falls. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. A step towards positive safety culture in DAE units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramprasad, K.

    2016-01-01

    Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) has considered safety as its priority, since inception in late 1950s, in all its activities. A belief in safety principles like defense-in depth, diversity, multi-tier review, etc. has laid a long path of success in safety management for decades. Multitude of DAE activities in the past few decades, especially in application of nuclear energy in scientific research, industrial, medical, agriculture and food technologies, often, poses new challenges in safety management. A good safety management system is in place in DAE units to cope up with the challenges of the evolving technologies. An opportunity is taken through this workshop to highlight extra efforts to be taken to inch forward in developing a strong safety culture

  9. Functional Analysis of Kori Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Soo; Han, Jeong Hyun; Heo, Tae Young

    2009-07-01

    Function Analysis of Kori Unit 1 has been performed as a part of independent human factors review tasks for control room renovation of the plant. The top level goal defined for the scope of function analysis is 'Generate Electricity'. Through this function analysis of Kori Unit 1, the detailed sub-functions extracted from the existing design documents and procedures, functional relationships among the high level functions, functional classification of each hierarchical level, and tree diagrams of the hierarchical function structures of the plant were developed and identified as the result of the project. In addition, we investigated and compiled the specifications of MMIS devices used in Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 5,6 in accordance with the request from KAERI. The results of those researches will be used as basis data for independent review of the control room MMIS design of the Kori Unit 1

  10. Measure Guideline. Five Steps to Implement the Public Housing Authority Energy-Efficient Unit Turnover Checklist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaukus, Christine [Building American Research Alliance, Kent, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Five Steps to Implementing the PHA Energy Efficient Unit Turnover Package (ARIES, 2014) is a guide to prepare for the installation of energy efficient measures during a typical public housing authority unit turnover. While a PHA is cleaning, painting and readying a unit for a new resident, there is an opportunity to incorporate energy efficiency measures to further improve the unit's performance. The measures on the list are simple enough to be implemented by in-house maintenance personnel, inexpensive enough to be folded into operating expenses without needing capital budget, and fast enough to implement without substantially changing the number of days between occupancies, a critical factor for organizations where the demand for dwelling units far outweighs the supply. The following guide lays out a five step plan to implement the EE Unit Turnover Package in your PHA, from an initial Self-Assessment through to Package Implementation.

  11. A functional intranet for the United States Coast Guard Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, Robert Todd.

    1998-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. This thesis describes the complete development process of a friendly functional Intranet for an operational United States Coast Guard (USCG) electronic Support Unit (ESU) in Alameda, California. The final product is suitable for immediate use. It may also be used as a prototype for future Intranet development efforts. The methodology used to develop a finished, working product provides the core subject matter for this thesis. The disc...

  12. Predicting United States Medical Licensure Examination Step 2 clinical knowledge scores from previous academic indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro KA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kristina A Monteiro, Paul George, Richard Dollase, Luba Dumenco Office of Medical Education, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA Abstract: The use of multiple academic indicators to identify students at risk of experiencing difficulty completing licensure requirements provides an opportunity to increase support services prior to high-stakes licensure examinations, including the United States Medical Licensure Examination (USMLE Step 2 clinical knowledge (CK. Step 2 CK is becoming increasingly important in decision-making by residency directors because of increasing undergraduate medical enrollment and limited available residency vacancies. We created and validated a regression equation to predict students’ Step 2 CK scores from previous academic indicators to identify students at risk, with sufficient time to intervene with additional support services as necessary. Data from three cohorts of students (N=218 with preclinical mean course exam score, National Board of Medical Examination subject examinations, and USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK between 2011 and 2013 were used in analyses. The authors created models capable of predicting Step 2 CK scores from academic indicators to identify at-risk students. In model 1, preclinical mean course exam score and Step 1 score accounted for 56% of the variance in Step 2 CK score. The second series of models included mean preclinical course exam score, Step 1 score, and scores on three NBME subject exams, and accounted for 67%–69% of the variance in Step 2 CK score. The authors validated the findings on the most recent cohort of graduating students (N=89 and predicted Step 2 CK score within a mean of four points (SD=8. The authors suggest using the first model as a needs assessment to gauge the level of future support required after completion of preclinical course requirements, and rescreening after three of six clerkships to identify students who might benefit from

  13. Improving Urogenital Function with Step Training after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    closed with suture, the skin closed with Michel clips, and topical antibiotic applied. Animals were single housed on a 12 : 12 light : dark cycle. 2.2...dysfunction are among the highest priorities after injury, yet few studies are being done. Our study uses a clinically relevant chronic SCI animal ...participants that step training can have beneficial outcomes on bladder maintenance, including polyuria (over- production of urine resulting in the need to

  14. Carbide induced reconstruction of monatomic steps on Ni(111) - A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    We present density functional calculations for carbon adsorption at the two types of monatomic steps on a Ni(111) surface. We show that it is thermodynamically favourable to make a carbon induced clock-type reconstruction at the close-packed step with a [111] step geometry, which creates fourfold...

  15. Collision Avoidance Functional Requirements for Step 1. Revision 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This Functional Requirements Document (FRD) describes the flow of requirements from the high level operational objectives down to the functional requirements specific to cooperative collision avoidance for high altitude, long endurance unmanned aircraft systems. These are further decomposed into performance and safety guidelines that are backed up by analysis or references to various documents or research findings. The FRD should be considered when establishing future policies, procedures, and standards pertaining to cooperative collision avoidance.

  16. Control Of Motor Unit Firing During Step-Like Increases In Voluntary Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang eHu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In most skeletal muscles, force is generated by a combination of motor unit (MU recruitment and increases in the firing rate of previously active MUs. Two contrasting patterns of firing rate organization have been reported. In the first pattern, the earliest recruited MUs reach the highest firing rates as force is increased, and later recruited MUs fire at lower rates. When firing rate of multiple MUs are superimposed, these rate trajectories form a concentric layered profile termed ‘onion skin’. In the second pattern, called ‘reverse onion skin’, later recruited MUs reach higher firing rates, and crossing of firing rate trajectories for recorded MUs is common (although such trajectories are assembled routinely from different trials. Our present study examined the firing rate organization of concurrently active MUs of the first dorsal interosseous muscle during serial, step-like increases in isometric abduction forces. We used a surface sensor array coupled with MU discrimination algorithms to characterize MU firing patterns. Our objective was to determine whether ‘onion skin’ profiles are contingent upon the force trajectory of the motor task, examined here using step-like increases of force output, and also whether they are manifested at different force levels.Our results revealed that the overall ‘onion skin’ firing rate profile was retained as the force level increased with each force step up to 15% MVC. However, the distribution of firing rates across MUs was compressed with increasing force, and overlapping firing rate of units were observed. This rate compression was largely due to rate saturation of the relatively high frequency discharging MUs.Our results reflect flexible firing patterns across MUs at different levels of excitation drive. It is also evident that many units did not follow all the step increases consistently. This failure to track firing rate increases at higher forces could be due to an intrinsically

  17. Which functional unit to identify sustainable foods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masset, Gabriel; Vieux, Florent; Darmon, Nicole

    2015-09-01

    In life-cycle assessment, the functional unit defines the unit for calculation of environmental indicators. The objective of the present study was to assess the influence of two functional units, 100 g and 100 kcal (420 kJ), on the associations between three dimensions for identifying sustainable foods, namely environmental impact (via greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE)), nutritional quality (using two distinct nutrient profiling systems) and price. GHGE and price data were collected for individual foods, and were each expressed per 100 g and per 100 kcal. Two nutrient profiling models, SAIN,LIM and UK Ofcom, were used to assess foods' nutritional quality. Spearman correlations were used to assess associations between variables. Sustainable foods were identified as those having more favourable values for all three dimensions. The French Individual and National Dietary Survey (INCA2), 2006-2007. Three hundred and seventy-three foods highly consumed in INCA2, covering 65 % of total energy intake of adult participants. When GHGE and price were expressed per 100 g, low-GHGE foods had a lower price and higher SAIN,LIM and Ofcom scores (r=0·59, -0·34 and -0·43, respectively), suggesting a compatibility between the three dimensions; 101 and 100 sustainable foods were identified with SAIN,LIM and Ofcom, respectively. When GHGE and price were expressed per 100 kcal, low-GHGE foods had a lower price but also lower SAIN,LIM and Ofcom scores (r=0·67, 0·51 and 0·47, respectively), suggesting that more environment-friendly foods were less expensive but also less healthy; thirty-four sustainable foods were identified with both SAIN,LIM and Ofcom. The choice of functional unit strongly influenced the compatibility between the sustainability dimensions and the identification of sustainable foods.

  18. Approximating Smooth Step Functions Using Partial Fourier Series Sums

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    interp1(xt(ii), smoothstepbez( t(ii), min(t(ii)), max(t(ii)), ’y’), t(ii), ’linear’, ’ extrap ’); ii = find( abs(t - tau/2) <= epi ); iii = t(ii...interp1( xt(ii), smoothstepbez( rt, min(rt), max(rt), ’y’), t(ii), ’linear’, ’ extrap ’ ); % stepm(ii) = 1 - interp1(xt(ii), smoothstepbez( t(ii...min(t(ii)), max(t(ii)), ’y’), t(ii), ’linear’, ’ extrap ’); In this case, because x is also defined as a function of the independent parameter

  19. Empirical Green's function analysis: Taking the next step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    An extension of the empirical Green's function (EGF) method is presented that involves determination of source parameters using standard EGF deconvolution, followed by inversion for a common attenuation parameter for a set of colocated events. Recordings of three or more colocated events can thus be used to constrain a single path attenuation estimate. I apply this method to recordings from the 1995-1996 Ridgecrest, California, earthquake sequence; I analyze four clusters consisting of 13 total events with magnitudes between 2.6 and 4.9. I first obtain corner frequencies, which are used to infer Brune stress drop estimates. I obtain stress drop values of 0.3-53 MPa (with all but one between 0.3 and 11 MPa), with no resolved increase of stress drop with moment. With the corner frequencies constrained, the inferred attenuation parameters are very consistent; they imply an average shear wave quality factor of approximately 20-25 for alluvial sediments within the Indian Wells Valley. Although the resultant spectral fitting (using corner frequency and ??) is good, the residuals are consistent among the clusters analyzed. Their spectral shape is similar to the the theoretical one-dimensional response of a layered low-velocity structure in the valley (an absolute site response cannot be determined by this method, because of an ambiguity between absolute response and source spectral amplitudes). I show that even this subtle site response can significantly bias estimates of corner frequency and ??, if it is ignored in an inversion for only source and path effects. The multiple-EGF method presented in this paper is analogous to a joint inversion for source, path, and site effects; the use of colocated sets of earthquakes appears to offer significant advantages in improving resolution of all three estimates, especially if data are from a single site or sites with similar site response.

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation of stepping source in afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy for GZP6 unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toossi, M.T.B.; Abdollahi, M.; Ghorbani, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Stepping source in brachytherapy systems is used to treat a target lesion longer than the effective treatment length of the source. Dose calculation accuracy plays a vital role in the outcome of brachytherapy treatment. In this study, the stepping source (channel 6) of GZP6 brachytherapy unit was simulated by Monte Carlo simulation and matrix shift method. The stepping source of GZP6 was simulated by Monte Carlo MCNPX code. The Mesh tally (type I) was employed for absorbed dose calculation in a cylindrical water phantom. 5 x 108 photon histories were scored and a 0.2% statistical uncertainty was obtained by Monte Carlo calculations. Dose distributions were obtained by our matrix shift method for esophageal cancer tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm. Isodose curves produced by simulation and TPS were superimposed to estimate the differences. Results Comparison of Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions show that in longitudinal direction (source movement direction) Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions are comparable. [n transverse direction, the dose differences of 7 and 5% were observed for esophageal tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm respectively. Conclusions Although, the results show that the maximum difference between Monte Carlo and TPS calculations is about 7%, but considering that the certified activity is given with ± I 0%, uncertainty, then an error of the order of 20% for Monte Carlo calculation would be reasonable. It can be suggested that accuracy of the dose distribution produced by TPS is acceptable for clinical applications. (author)

  1. CIT photoheliograph functional verification unit test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Tests of the 2/3-meter photoheliograph functional verification unit FVU were performed with the FVU installed in its Big Bear Solar Observatory vacuum chamber. Interferometric tests were run both in Newtonian (f/3.85) and Gregorian (f/50) configurations. Tests were run in both configurations with optical axis horizontal, vertical, and at 45 deg to attempt to determine any gravity effects on the system. Gravity effects, if present, were masked by scatter in the data associated with the system wavefront error of 0.16 lambda rms ( = 6328A) apparently due to problems in the primary mirror. Tests showed that the redesigned secondary mirror assembly works well.

  2. Coherent states for the time dependent harmonic oscillator: the step function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moya-Cessa, Hector; Fernandez Guasti, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    We study the time evolution for the quantum harmonic oscillator subjected to a sudden change of frequency. It is based on an approximate analytic solution to the time dependent Ermakov equation for a step function. This approach allows for a continuous treatment that differs from former studies that involve the matching of two time independent solutions at the time when the step occurs

  3. A deterministic algorithm for fitting a step function to a weighted point-set

    KAUST Repository

    Fournier, Hervé ; Vigneron, Antoine E.

    2013-01-01

    Given a set of n points in the plane, each point having a positive weight, and an integer k>0, we present an optimal O(nlogn)-time deterministic algorithm to compute a step function with k steps that minimizes the maximum weighted vertical distance

  4. "Detecting Differential Item Functioning and Differential Step Functioning due to Differences that ""Should"" Matter"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Miller

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study illustrates the use of differential item functioning (DIF and differential step functioning (DSF analyses to detect differences in item difficulty that are related to experiences of examinees, such as their teachers' instructional practices, that are relevant to the knowledge, skill, or ability the test is intended to measure. This analysis is in contrast to the typical use of DIF or DSF to detect differences related to characteristics of examinees, such as gender, language, or cultural knowledge, that should be irrelevant. Using data from two forms of Ontario's Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics, analyses were performed comparing groups of students defined by their teachers' instructional practices. All constructed-response items were tested for DIF using the Mantel Chi-Square, standardized Liu Agresti cumulative common log-odds ratio, and standardized Cox's noncentrality parameter. Items exhibiting moderate to large DIF were subsequently tested for DSF. In contrast to typical DIF or DSF analyses, which inform item development, these analyses have the potential to inform instructional practice.

  5. Achievable steps toward building a National Health Information infrastructure in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, William W; Kelly, Brian J; Kolodner, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Consensus is growing that a health care information and communication infrastructure is one key to fixing the crisis in the United States in health care quality, cost, and access. The National Health Information Infrastructure (NHII) is an initiative of the Department of Health and Human Services receiving bipartisan support. There are many possible courses toward its objective. Decision makers need to reflect carefully on which approaches are likely to work on a large enough scale to have the intended beneficial national impacts and which are better left to smaller projects within the boundaries of health care organizations. This report provides a primer for use by informatics professionals as they explain aspects of that dividing line to policy makers and to health care leaders and front-line providers. It then identifies short-term, intermediate, and long-term steps that might be taken by the NHII initiative.

  6. Classified one-step high-radix signed-digit arithmetic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherri, Abdallah K.

    1998-08-01

    High-radix number systems enable higher information storage density, less complexity, fewer system components, and fewer cascaded gates and operations. A simple one-step fully parallel high-radix signed-digit arithmetic is proposed for parallel optical computing based on new joint spatial encodings. This reduces hardware requirements and improves throughput by reducing the space-bandwidth produce needed. The high-radix signed-digit arithmetic operations are based on classifying the neighboring input digit pairs into various groups to reduce the computation rules. A new joint spatial encoding technique is developed to present both the operands and the computation rules. This technique increases the spatial bandwidth product of the spatial light modulators of the system. An optical implementation of the proposed high-radix signed-digit arithmetic operations is also presented. It is shown that our one-step trinary signed-digit and quaternary signed-digit arithmetic units are much simpler and better than all previously reported high-radix signed-digit techniques.

  7. Why Not Wait? Eight Institutions Share Their Experiences Moving United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 After Core Clinical Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle; Fleming, Amy; Grochowski, Colleen O'Conner; Harnik, Vicky; Klimstra, Sibel; Morrison, Gail; Pock, Arnyce; Schwartz, Michael L; Santen, Sally

    2017-11-01

    The majority of medical students complete the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 after their foundational sciences; however, there are compelling reasons to examine this practice. This article provides the perspectives of eight MD-granting medical schools that have moved Step 1 after the core clerkships, describing their rationale, logistics of the change, outcomes, and lessons learned. The primary reasons these institutions cite for moving Step 1 after clerkships are to foster more enduring and integrated basic science learning connected to clinical care and to better prepare students for the increasingly clinical focus of Step 1. Each school provides key features of the preclerkship and clinical curricula and details concerning taking Steps 1 and 2, to allow other schools contemplating change to understand the landscape. Most schools report an increase in aggregate Step 1 scores after the change. Despite early positive outcomes, there may be unintended consequences to later scheduling of Step 1, including relatively late student reevaluations of their career choice if Step 1 scores are not competitive in the specialty area of their choice. The score increases should be interpreted with caution: These schools may not be representative with regard to mean Step 1 scores and failure rates. Other aspects of curricular transformation and rising national Step 1 scores confound the data. Although the optimal timing of Step 1 has yet to be determined, this article summarizes the perspectives of eight schools that changed Step 1 timing, filling a gap in the literature on this important topic.

  8. Method of synchronizing independent functional unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhoan

    2018-03-13

    A system for synchronizing parallel processing of a plurality of functional processing units (FPU), a first FPU and a first program counter to control timing of a first stream of program instructions issued to the first FPU by advancement of the first program counter; a second FPU and a second program counter to control timing of a second stream of program instructions issued to the second FPU by advancement of the second program counter, the first FPU is in communication with a second FPU to synchronize the issuance of a first stream of program instructions to the second stream of program instructions and the second FPU is in communication with the first FPU to synchronize the issuance of the second stream program instructions to the first stream of program instructions.

  9. Using step and path selection functions for estimating resistance to movement: Pumas as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. Zeller; Kevin McGarigal; Samuel A. Cushman; Paul Beier; T. Winston Vickers; Walter M. Boyce

    2015-01-01

    GPS telemetry collars and their ability to acquire accurate and consistently frequent locations have increased the use of step selection functions (SSFs) and path selection functions (PathSFs) for studying animal movement and estimating resistance. However, previously published SSFs and PathSFs often do not accommodate multiple scales or multiscale modeling....

  10. MORSEC-SP, Step Function Angular Distribution for Cross-Sections Calculation by Program MORSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: MORSEC-SP allows one to utilize a step distribution to describe the angular dependence of the multi- group function in the MORSEC cross section module of the MORSE Monte Carlo code. The step distribution is always non-negative and may be used in the random walk and for making point detector estimators. 2 - Method of solution: MORSEC-SP utilizes a table look up procedure to provide the probability of scattering when making point detector estimates for a given incident energy group and scattering angle. In the random walk, the step distributions are converted to cumulative distributions and an angle of scatter is selected from the cumulative distributions. Step distributions are obtained from calculation using the converted moments from the given Legendre coefficients of the scattering distributions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Additional coding to the MORSEC module is variable dimensional and fully incorporated into blank common

  11. Process of motion by unit steps over a surface provided with elements regularly arranged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.E.; Hendee, L.C. III; Hill, W.G. Jr.; Leshem, Adam; Marugg, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    This invention concerns a process for moving by unit steps an apparatus travelling over a surface provided with an array of orifices aligned and evenly spaced in several lines and several parallel rows regularly spaced, the lines and rows being parallel to axes x and y of Cartesian co-ordinates, each orifice having a separate address in the Cartesian co-ordinate system. The surface travelling apparatus has two previously connected arms aranged in directions transversal to each other thus forming an angle corresponding to the intersection of axes x and y. In the inspection and/or repair of nuclear or similar steam generator tubes, it is desirable that such an apparatus should be able to move in front of a surface comprising an array of orifices by the selective alternate introduction and retraction of two sets of anchoring claws of the two respective arms, in relation to the orifices of the array, it being possible to shift the arms in a movement of translation, transversally to each other, as a set of claws is withdrawn from the orifices. The invention concerns a process and aparatus as indicated above that reduces to a minimum the path length of the apparatus between the orifices it is effectively opposite and a given orifice [fr

  12. Relationship of functional fitness with daily steps in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Lucelia Luna; Menec, Verena H; Ready, A Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Walking is the main type of physical activity among community-dwelling older adults and it is associated with various health benefits. However, there is limited evidence about the relationship between functional fitness and walking performed under independent living conditions among older adults. This study examined the relationship between functional fitness and steps walked per day among older adults, both assessed objectively, with performance-based measures accounting for the effect of age, gender, and chronic conditions. In this cross-sectional study, 60 participants aged 65 years or older (mean = 76.9 ± 7.3 years, range 65-92 years) wore pedometers for 3 consecutive days. Functional fitness was measured using the Functional Fitness Test (lower and upper body strength, endurance, lower and upper body flexibility, agility/balance). The outcome measure was the mean number of steps walked for 3 days with participants classified into tertiles: low walkers (age, gender, and the number of chronic conditions, none of the functional fitness parameters was significantly associated with steps taken per day when comparing medium walkers with low walkers. In contrast, all functional fitness parameters, except upper body flexibility, were significantly associated with steps taken per day when comparing high walkers with low walkers. In this sample of older adults, greater functional fitness was associated only with relatively high levels of walking involving 6500 steps per day or more. It was not related to medium walking levels. The findings point to the importance of interventions to maintain or enhance functional fitness among older adults.

  13. A scaling study of the step scaling function of quenched QCD with improved gauge actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, S.; Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.

    2005-01-01

    We study the scaling behavior of the step scaling function for SU(3) gauge theory, employing the Iwasaki gauge action and the Luescher-Weisz gauge action. In particular, we test the choice of boundary counter terms and apply a perturbative procedure for removal of lattice artifacts for the simulation results in the extrapolation procedure. We confirm the universality of the step scaling functions at both weak and strong coupling regions. We also measure the low energy scale ratio with the Iwasaki action, and confirm its universality

  14. A Mononuclear Iron-Dependent Methyltransferase Catalyzes Initial Steps in Assembly of the Apratoxin A Polyketide Starter Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, Meredith A; Sikkema, Andrew P; Moss, Nathan A; Tran, Collin L; Sturgis, Rebecca M; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L

    2017-12-15

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways contain a plethora of enzymatic tools to carry out difficult biosynthetic transformations. Here, we discover an unusual mononuclear iron-dependent methyltransferase that acts in the initiation steps of apratoxin A biosynthesis (AprA MT1). Fe 3+ -replete AprA MT1 catalyzes one or two methyl transfer reactions on the substrate malonyl-ACP (acyl carrier protein), whereas Co 2+ , Fe 2+ , Mn 2+ , and Ni 2+ support only a single methyl transfer. MT1 homologues exist within the "GNAT" (GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase) loading modules of several modular biosynthetic pathways with propionyl, isobutyryl, or pivaloyl starter units. GNAT domains are thought to catalyze decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA and acetyl transfer to a carrier protein. In AprA, the GNAT domain lacks both decarboxylation and acyl transfer activity. A crystal structure of the AprA MT1-GNAT di-domain with bound Mn 2+ , malonate, and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) reveals that the malonyl substrate is a bidentate metal ligand, indicating that the metal acts as a Lewis acid to promote methylation of the malonyl α-carbon. The GNAT domain is truncated relative to functional homologues. These results afford an expanded understanding of MT1-GNAT structure and activity and permit the functional annotation of homologous GNAT loading modules both with and without methyltransferases, additionally revealing their rapid evolutionary adaptation in different biosynthetic contexts.

  15. The propagator for the step potential and delta function potential using the path decomposition expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yearsley, James M [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-18

    We present a derivation of the propagator for a particle in the presence of the step and delta function potentials. These propagators are known, but we present a direct path integral derivation, based on the path decomposition expansion and the Brownian motion definition of the path integral. The derivation exploits properties of the Catalan numbers, which enumerate certain classes of lattice paths.

  16. Photon strength function in the Hf-181 nucleus by method of two-step cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hong Khiem

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of sum-coincidence measurements of two-step cascade gamma ray spectra determining Photon Strength Function (PSF) of Hf-181 induced from Hf-180 (n,2γ) Hf-181 reaction is presented. Up to 80% intensity of the primary gamma ray transitions in a wide energy range have been deduced and compared to model calculation. (author)

  17. A deterministic algorithm for fitting a step function to a weighted point-set

    KAUST Repository

    Fournier, Hervé

    2013-02-01

    Given a set of n points in the plane, each point having a positive weight, and an integer k>0, we present an optimal O(nlogn)-time deterministic algorithm to compute a step function with k steps that minimizes the maximum weighted vertical distance to the input points. It matches the expected time bound of the best known randomized algorithm for this problem. Our approach relies on Coles improved parametric searching technique. As a direct application, our result yields the first O(nlogn)-time algorithm for computing a k-center of a set of n weighted points on the real line. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  18. The usage of English phraseological units and their functions

    OpenAIRE

    RAKHIMOVA GUZAL YULDASHOVNA; ATAMURATOV DILSHOD ALIMBAYEVICH

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the units of phraseology and their major functions with examples which are complicated to understand. Besides, plenty of explanations of functions are stated here according to experienced scientists’ theories.

  19. Uniting Control Lyapunov and Control Barrier Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romdlony, Zakiyullah; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonlinear control design for solving the problem of stabilization with guaranteed safety. The design is based on the merging of a Control Lyapunov Function and a Control Barrier Function. The proposed control method allows us to combine the design of a stabilizer based on

  20. Modification of Harvard step-test for assessment of students’ with health problems functional potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Kopeikina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to substantiate, work out and experimentally prove modified test for assessment of students’ with health problems functional potentials. Material: in the research students and girl students of 18-20 years’ age (n=522 participated. According to the worked out modification of test during 30 seconds student ascended on bench (h=43 cm and descended from it. Then pulse was measured three times. In total the test took 4 minutes. Results: For working out the scale for interpretation of the received results we assessed new 30 seconds’ modification of Harvard step-test for validity. First, for this purpose all students fulfilled modified step-test. Then after full restoration (after 20 minutes they fulfilled its three minutes’ variant. Correlation analysis of the received results showed the presence of average correlation between two samples (r=0.64. Conclusions: application of this modified variant permits for pedagogues to completely assess functional potentials of students with heath problems.

  1. Functional Requirements Document for HALE UAS Operations in the NAS: Step 1. Version 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this Functional Requirements Document (FRD) is to compile the functional requirements needed to achieve the Access 5 Vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the national airspace system (NAS)" for Step 1. These functional requirements could support the development of a minimum set of policies, procedures and standards by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and various standards organizations. It is envisioned that this comprehensive body of work will enable the FAA to establish and approve regulations to govern safe operation of UAS in the NAS on a routine or daily "file and fly" basis. The approach used to derive the functional requirements found within this FRD was to decompose the operational requirements and objectives identified within the Access 5 Concept of Operations (CONOPS) into the functions needed to routinely and safely operate a HALE UAS in the NAS. As a result, four major functional areas evolved to enable routine and safe UAS operations for an on-demand basis in the NAS. These four major functions are: Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, and Avoid Hazards. All of the functional requirements within this document can be directly traceable to one of these four major functions. Some functions, however, are traceable to several, or even all, of these four major functions. These cross-cutting functional requirements support the "Command / Control: function as well as the "Manage Contingencies" function. The requirements associated to these high-level functions and all of their supporting low-level functions are addressed in subsequent sections of this document.

  2. Corporal Punishment in Public Schools: Is the United States Out of Step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha M.

    2005-01-01

    Few topics evoke more emotion than how to discipline children in public schools. And not many people are neutral in their views toward corporal punishment. Surprisingly, the United States stands almost alone on its position regarding the legality of corporal punishment. Among thirty-five industrialized countries, only the United States and the…

  3. Single step synthesis, characterization and applications of curcumin functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J. Zach, E-mail: zach.hilt@uky.edu

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers, using a simple coprecipitation technique. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecule. - Graphical abstract: Novel single step curcumin coated magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers for medical, environmental, and other applications. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is reported. • The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. • The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB).

  4. Computing single step operators of logic programming in radial basis function neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadneh, Nawaf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Choon, Ong Hong [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    Logic programming is the process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable programs. A normal logic program consists of a finite set of clauses. A valuation I of logic programming is a mapping from ground atoms to false or true. The single step operator of any logic programming is defined as a function (T{sub p}:I→I). Logic programming is well-suited to building the artificial intelligence systems. In this study, we established a new technique to compute the single step operators of logic programming in the radial basis function neural networks. To do that, we proposed a new technique to generate the training data sets of single step operators. The training data sets are used to build the neural networks. We used the recurrent radial basis function neural networks to get to the steady state (the fixed point of the operators). To improve the performance of the neural networks, we used the particle swarm optimization algorithm to train the networks.

  5. Computing single step operators of logic programming in radial basis function neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadneh, Nawaf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Choon, Ong Hong

    2014-07-01

    Logic programming is the process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable programs. A normal logic program consists of a finite set of clauses. A valuation I of logic programming is a mapping from ground atoms to false or true. The single step operator of any logic programming is defined as a function (Tp:I→I). Logic programming is well-suited to building the artificial intelligence systems. In this study, we established a new technique to compute the single step operators of logic programming in the radial basis function neural networks. To do that, we proposed a new technique to generate the training data sets of single step operators. The training data sets are used to build the neural networks. We used the recurrent radial basis function neural networks to get to the steady state (the fixed point of the operators). To improve the performance of the neural networks, we used the particle swarm optimization algorithm to train the networks.

  6. Computing single step operators of logic programming in radial basis function neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamadneh, Nawaf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Choon, Ong Hong

    2014-01-01

    Logic programming is the process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable programs. A normal logic program consists of a finite set of clauses. A valuation I of logic programming is a mapping from ground atoms to false or true. The single step operator of any logic programming is defined as a function (T p :I→I). Logic programming is well-suited to building the artificial intelligence systems. In this study, we established a new technique to compute the single step operators of logic programming in the radial basis function neural networks. To do that, we proposed a new technique to generate the training data sets of single step operators. The training data sets are used to build the neural networks. We used the recurrent radial basis function neural networks to get to the steady state (the fixed point of the operators). To improve the performance of the neural networks, we used the particle swarm optimization algorithm to train the networks

  7. Students' Game Performance Improvements during a Hybrid Sport Education-Step-Game-Approach Volleyball Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Hastie, Peter; Pereira, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a hybrid combination of sport education and the step-game-approach (SGA) on students' gameplay performance in volleyball, taking into account their sex and skill-level. Seventeen seventh-grade students (seven girls, 10 boys, average age 11.8) participated in a 25-lesson volleyball season, in which the…

  8. Connectivity among subpopulations of Louisiana black bears as estimated by a step selection function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph D.; Jared S. Laufenberg,; Maria Davidson,; Jennifer L. Murrow,

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a fundamental cause of population decline and increased risk of extinction for many wildlife species; animals with large home ranges and small population sizes are particularly sensitive. The Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) exists only in small, isolated subpopulations as a result of land clearing for agriculture, but the relative potential for inter-subpopulation movement by Louisiana black bears has not been quantified, nor have characteristics of effective travel routes between habitat fragments been identified. We placed and monitored global positioning system (GPS) radio collars on 8 female and 23 male bears located in 4 subpopulations in Louisiana, which included a reintroduced subpopulation located between 2 of the remnant subpopulations. We compared characteristics of sequential radiolocations of bears (i.e., steps) with steps that were possible but not chosen by the bears to develop step selection function models based on conditional logistic regression. The probability of a step being selected by a bear increased as the distance to natural land cover and agriculture at the end of the step decreased and as distance from roads at the end of a step increased. To characterize connectivity among subpopulations, we used the step selection models to create 4,000 hypothetical correlated random walks for each subpopulation representing potential dispersal events to estimate the proportion that intersected adjacent subpopulations (hereafter referred to as successful dispersals). Based on the models, movement paths for males intersected all adjacent subpopulations but paths for females intersected only the most proximate subpopulations. Cross-validation and genetic and independent observation data supported our findings. Our models also revealed that successful dispersals were facilitated by a reintroduced population located between 2 distant subpopulations. Successful dispersals for males were dependent on natural land

  9. Determination of the structures of small gold clusters on stepped magnesia by density functional calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damianos, Konstantina; Ferrando, Riccardo

    2012-02-21

    The structural modifications of small supported gold clusters caused by realistic surface defects (steps) in the MgO(001) support are investigated by computational methods. The most stable gold cluster structures on a stepped MgO(001) surface are searched for in the size range up to 24 Au atoms, and locally optimized by density-functional calculations. Several structural motifs are found within energy differences of 1 eV: inclined leaflets, arched leaflets, pyramidal hollow cages and compact structures. We show that the interaction with the step clearly modifies the structures with respect to adsorption on the flat defect-free surface. We find that leaflet structures clearly dominate for smaller sizes. These leaflets are either inclined and quasi-horizontal, or arched, at variance with the case of the flat surface in which vertical leaflets prevail. With increasing cluster size pyramidal hollow cages begin to compete against leaflet structures. Cage structures become more and more favourable as size increases. The only exception is size 20, at which the tetrahedron is found as the most stable isomer. This tetrahedron is however quite distorted. The comparison of two different exchange-correlation functionals (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and local density approximation) show the same qualitative trends. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  10. Effect of step function-like perturbation on intermittent contact mode sensors: a response analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokavecz, Janos; Heszler, Peter; Toth, Zsolt; Mechler, Adam

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the intermittent contact mode (ICM) probe was investigated. In the experimental study we applied a step function signal to the Z piezo drive and recorded the amplitude signal of the probe while the probe was engaged with the surface. Transient overshoots appear at the edges of the steps. These transients are absent from the control contact force measurements, that is, they are proper to the ICM operation. The phenomenon was investigated by numerical calculations, focused on the effect of change of the drive frequency and the quality factor. We concluded, that the low value of the quality factor results in small transients and short settling time, which are necessary for fast atomic force microscopic operation. Simultaneously, the interaction force increases. Our calculations indicate that the tip-sample force can be lowered by setting the drive frequency slightly below the resonance

  11. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of acquired immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS which we call Adaptive Immune Response Simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system which responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner which is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate acquired immune system, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices. PMID:26391084

  12. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex 'information-processing cores' composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  13. Mao's steps in Monroe's backyard: towards a United States-China hegemonic struggle in Latin America?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose León-Manríquez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to what could be expected given the United States' historical hegemony of Latin America, growing Chinese influence in this region has not led to a dispute between China and the US. Despite activism of hard-line groups in the United States, both parties have faced the issue with noticeable pragmatism. This attitude could be explained by three variables: the US political negligence towards Latin America in the Post-Cold War, the focus of Sino-Latin American relations on economic rather than geopolitical or ideological affairs, and the scanty relevance of the region in the top priorities of overall Washington-Beijing relations.

  14. Achievable Steps Toward Building a National Health Information Infrastructure in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Stead, William W.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kolodner, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    Consensus is growing that a health care information and communication infrastructure is one key to fixing the crisis in the United States in health care quality, cost, and access. The National Health Information Infrastructure (NHII) is an initiative of the Department of Health and Human Services receiving bipartisan support. There are many possible courses toward its objective. Decision makers need to reflect carefully on which approaches are likely to work on a large enough scale to have th...

  15. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  16. Quality Function Deployment: Application to Chemotherapy Unit Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Hashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s healthcare organizations are challenged by pressures to meet growing population demands and enhance community health through improving service quality. Quality function deployment is one of the widely-used customerdriven approaches for health services development. In the current study, quality function deployment is used to improve the quality of chemotherapy unit services. Methods: First, we identified chemotherapy outpatient unit patients as chemotherapy unit customers. Then, the Delphi technique and component factor analysis with orthogonal rotation was employed to determine their expectations. Thereafter, data envelopment analysis was performed to specify user priorities. We determined the relationships between patients’ expectations and service elements through expert group consensus using the Delphi method and the relationships between service elements by Pearson correlation. Finally, simple and compound priorities of the service elements were derived by matrix calculation. Results: Chemotherapy unit patients had four main expectations: access, suitable hotel services, satisfactory and effective relationships, and clinical services. The chemotherapy unit has six key service elements of equipment, materials, human resources, physical space, basic facilities, and communication and training. There were four-level relationships between the patients’ expectations and service elements, with mostly significant correlations between service elements. According to the findings, the functional group of basic facilities was the most critical factor, followed by materials. Conclusion: The findings of the current study can be a general guideline as well as a scientific, structured framework for chemotherapy unit decision makers in order to improve chemotherapy unit services.

  17. A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of 6-Step vs 3-Step Hand Hygiene Technique in Acute Hospital Care in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jacqui S; Price, Lesley; Lang, Sue; Robertson, Chris; Cheater, Francine; Skinner, Kirsty; Chow, Angela

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the microbiologic effectiveness of the World Health Organization's 6-step and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 3-step hand hygiene techniques using alcohol-based handrub. DESIGN A parallel group randomized controlled trial. SETTING An acute care inner-city teaching hospital (Glasgow). PARTICIPANTS Doctors (n=42) and nurses (n=78) undertaking direct patient care. INTERVENTION Random 1:1 allocation of the 6-step (n=60) or the 3-step (n=60) technique. RESULTS The 6-step technique was microbiologically more effective at reducing the median log10 bacterial count. The 6-step technique reduced the count from 3.28 CFU/mL (95% CI, 3.11-3.38 CFU/mL) to 2.58 CFU/mL (2.08-2.93 CFU/mL), whereas the 3-step reduced it from 3.08 CFU/mL (2.977-3.27 CFU/mL) to 2.88 CFU/mL (-2.58 to 3.15 CFU/mL) (P=.02). However, the 6-step technique did not increase the total hand coverage area (98.8% vs 99.0%, P=.15) and required 15% (95% CI, 6%-24%) more time (42.50 seconds vs 35.0 seconds, P=.002). Total hand coverage was not related to the reduction in bacterial count. CONCLUSIONS Two techniques for hand hygiene using alcohol-based handrub are promoted in international guidance, the 6-step by the World Health Organization and 3-step by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study provides the first evidence in a randomized controlled trial that the 6-step technique is superior, thus these international guidance documents should consider this evidence, as should healthcare organizations using the 3-step technique in practice. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:661-666.

  18. How to Develop and Implement a Career Education Support Unit Curriculum: A Practical Guide in 7 Easy Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Martha D.

    This booklet is intended to instruct local high school educators on how to write a career education support unit curriculum which provides students with activities that will enable them to acquire the basic understanding and skills essential to function effectively within their economic system. Written in a question/answer format, this guide…

  19. A New Nonlinear Unit Root Test with Fourier Function

    OpenAIRE

    Güriş, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Traditional unit root tests display a tendency to be nonstationary in the case of structural breaks and nonlinearity. To eliminate this problem this paper proposes a new flexible Fourier form nonlinear unit root test. This test eliminates this problem to add structural breaks and nonlinearity together to the test procedure. In this test procedure, structural breaks are modeled by means of a Fourier function and nonlinear adjustment is modeled by means of an Exponential Smooth Threshold Autore...

  20. Functions and requirements for a cesium demonstration unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howden, G.F.

    1994-04-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company is investigating alternative means to pretreat the wastes in the Hanford radioactive waste storage tanks. Alternatives include (but are not limited to) in-tank pretreatment, use of above ground transportable compact processing units (CPU) located adjacent to a tank farm, and fixed processing facilities. This document provides the functions and requirements for a CPU to remove cesium from tank waste as a demonstration of the CPU concept. It is therefore identified as the Cesium Demonstration Unit CDU

  1. Mapping landscape units in Galicia (Spain: A first step for assessment and management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbelle-Rico Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the beginning of 2015, the Regional Administration of Galicia (NW Spain set the requirements for a map of landscape units: it had to be produced in less than 3 months, it should cover the whole territory of the region (29,574 km², and it should be useful for management at a scale of 1:25,000. With these objectives in mind, we pro- posed a semiautomatic mapping methodology entirely based on the use of free software (GRASS GIS and already available cartographic information. Semi-automatic classification of different land-use patterns was at the heart of the proposed process. Consultation with experts of different academic background took place along the project. This consultation process allowed to identify both problems and opportunities. As it could be expected, the diverse epistemic community represented by the expert panel implied that one of the main challenges was to reach consensus on the understanding of the concept of landscape and the decisions leading to the mapping methodology proposed in this paper. This initiated a very interesting debate that, in our view, was centred around three main issues: the approach to the landscape, the purpose of the mapping exercise, and the ability to include subjectivity into the analysis.

  2. One-step hydrothermal synthesis of carboxyl-functionalized upconversion phosphors for bioapplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianping; Shen, Dengke; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Wei; Fang, Yin; Wei, Yong; Yao, Chi; Tu, Bo; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2012-10-22

    In this paper, we report a facile one-step hydrothermal method to synthesize phase-, size-, and shape-controlled carboxyl-functionalized rare-earth fluorescence upconversion phosphors by using a small-molecule binary acid, such as malonic acid, oxalic acid, succinic acid, or tartaric acid as capping agent. The crystals, from nano- to microstructures with diverse shapes that include nanospheres, microrods, hexagonal prisms, microtubes, microdisks, polygonal columns, and hexagonal tablets, can be obtained with different reaction times, reaction temperatures, molar ratios of capping agent to sodium hydroxide, and by varying the binary acids. Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis, and upconversion luminescence spectra measurements indicate that the synthesized NaYF(4):Yb/Er products with hydrophilic carboxyl-functionalized surface offer efficient upconversion luminescent performance. Furthermore, the antibody/secondary antibody conjugation can be realized by the carboxyl-functionalized surfaces of the upconversion phosphors, thus indicating the potential bioapplications of these kinds of materials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Automatic quality improvement reports in the intensive care unit: One step closer toward meaningful use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadzko, Mikhail A; Thongprayoon, Charat; Ahmed, Adil; Tiong, Ing C; Li, Man; Brown, Daniel R; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-05-04

    To examine the feasibility and validity of electronic generation of quality metrics in the intensive care unit (ICU). This minimal risk observational study was performed at an academic tertiary hospital. The Critical Care Independent Multidisciplinary Program at Mayo Clinic identified and defined 11 key quality metrics. These metrics were automatically calculated using ICU DataMart, a near-real time copy of all ICU electronic medical record (EMR) data. The automatic report was compared with data from a comprehensive EMR review by a trained investigator. Data was collected for 93 randomly selected patients admitted to the ICU during April 2012 (10% of admitted adult population). This study was approved by the Mayo Clinic Institution Review Board. All types of variables needed for metric calculations were found to be available for manual and electronic abstraction, except information for availability of free beds for patient-specific time-frames. There was 100% agreement between electronic and manual data abstraction for ICU admission source, admission service, and discharge disposition. The agreement between electronic and manual data abstraction of the time of ICU admission and discharge were 99% and 89%. The time of hospital admission and discharge were similar for both the electronically and manually abstracted datasets. The specificity of the electronically-generated report was 93% and 94% for invasive and non-invasive ventilation use in the ICU. One false-positive result for each type of ventilation was present. The specificity for ICU and in-hospital mortality was 100%. Sensitivity was 100% for all metrics. Our study demonstrates excellent accuracy of electronically-generated key ICU quality metrics. This validates the feasibility of automatic metric generation.

  4. Lacritin and Other New Proteins of the Lacrimal Functional Unit

    OpenAIRE

    McKown, Robert L.; Wang, Ningning; Raab, Ronald W.; Karnati, Roy; Zhang, Yinghui; Williams, Patricia B.; Laurie, Gordon W.

    2008-01-01

    The lacrimal functional unit (LFU) is defined by the 2007 International Dry Eye WorkShop as ‘an integrated system comprising the lacrimal glands, ocular surface (cornea, conjunctiva and meibomian glands) and lids, and the sensory and motor nerves that connect them’. The LFU maintains a healthy ocular surface primarily through a properly functioning tear film that provides protection, lubrication, and an environment for corneal epithelial cell renewal. LFU cells express thousands of proteins. ...

  5. Coherent memory functions for finite systems: hexagonal photosynthetic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barvik, I.; Herman, P.

    1990-10-01

    Coherent memory functions entering the Generalized Master Equation are presented for an hexagonal model of a photosynthetic unit. Influence of an energy heterogeneity on an exciton transfer is an antenna system as well as to a reaction center is investigated. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  6. Numerical distribution functions of fractional unit root and cointegration tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKinnon, James G.; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We calculate numerically the asymptotic distribution functions of likelihood ratio tests for fractional unit roots and cointegration rank. Because these distributions depend on a real-valued parameter, b, which must be estimated, simple tabulation is not feasible. Partly due to the presence...

  7. Research at the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Peggy Tomasula is Research Leader of the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit (DFFRU), ARS, USDA, Wyndmoor, PA, a group that includes 11 Research Scientists, 4 of whom are Lead Scientists (LS), 13 support scientists, and 3 Retired Collaborators. The mission of the DFFRU is to solve critical ...

  8. [Structuro-functional units of the salivary and lacrimal glands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostilenko, Iu P; Mysliuk, I V; Deviatkin, E A

    1986-09-01

    By means of the multilayer graphic and plastic reconstruction methods using series of semithin sections, spatial tridimensional organization of the epithelial complexes and blood microcirculatory bed in the rat palatal salivary glands and the lacrimal gland of the human newborn have been studied. Since their ducts serve not only for discharging their secrete into the external medium, but also for accumulation (as collectors), the sublobular unit--adenomere should be referred to as a part of elementary level of organization of the epithelial complexes. The adenomere has in its composition a collecting centrally situating duct. However, while studying structure of the blood microcirculatory bed, it is found out that there is not any strict territorial correspondence between its functional units and structural units of the glandular epithelium. Nevertheless, giving a great importance to a tight syntopic connection of the collecting ducts of the adenomeres with the postcapillary venules (that belong to filtrating microvessels), these are sublobular units--adenomeres that are distinguished as structural-functional units in the glands.

  9. Applying Quality Function Deployment Model in Burn Unit Service Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkaran, Ali; Hashemi, Neda; Kharazmi, Erfan; Abbasi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Quality function deployment (QFD) is one of the most effective quality design tools. This study applies QFD technique to improve the quality of the burn unit services in Ghotbedin Hospital in Shiraz, Iran. First, the patients' expectations of burn unit services and their priorities were determined through Delphi method. Thereafter, burn unit service specifications were determined through Delphi method. Further, the relationships between the patients' expectations and service specifications and also the relationships between service specifications were determined through an expert group's opinion. Last, the final importance scores of service specifications were calculated through simple additive weighting method. The findings show that burn unit patients have 40 expectations in six different areas. These expectations are in 16 priority levels. Burn units also have 45 service specifications in six different areas. There are four-level relationships between the patients' expectations and service specifications and four-level relationships between service specifications. The most important burn unit service specifications have been identified in this study. The QFD model developed in the study can be a general guideline for QFD planners and executives.

  10. Antimicrobial bionanocomposite–from precursors to the functional material in one simple step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konvičková, Z., E-mail: konvickova.zuzana@gmail.com [VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, Nanotechnology Centre (Czech Republic); Schröfel, A., E-mail: adam.schrofel@gmail.com [Institute of Molecular Genetics of the ASCR, v. v. i, Division BIOCEV (Czech Republic); Kolenčík, M., E-mail: marekkolencik@gmail.com [Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Department of Soil Science and Geology (Slovakia); Dědková, K., E-mail: katerina.dedkova@vsb.cz; Peikertová, P., E-mail: pavlina.peikertova@vsb.cz [VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, Nanotechnology Centre (Czech Republic); Žídek, M., E-mail: martin.zidek@vsb.cz [VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, ENET Center, Laboratory of Bulk Materials (Czech Republic); Seidlerová, J., E-mail: jana.seidlerova@vsb.cz; Kratošová, G., E-mail: gabriela.kratosova@vsb.cz [VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, Nanotechnology Centre (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    The mesoporous biosilica with unique 3D hierarchy in/organic functional groups is attractive material in terms of interfacial phenomena, and its high biocompatibility accelerates development in biomedical devices. In addition, their benefits also play a fundamental role in antimicrobial assessment. We hypothesize that the Diadesmis gallica biosilica surface acts as a biotemplate for AgCl and Au nanoparticle (NP) biosynthesis. Moreover, it exhibits antibacterial action human pathogenic bacteria. Nanoparticle biosynthesis was performed via a pure environmental-friendly, static, bottom-up in vitro regime. Minimal inhibitory concentrations evaluated systems with bionanocomposites for antibacterial efficiency in temporal time-dose-dependency. TEM and XRD depicts a biosilica “local sphere” which affects formation, stabilization and encapsulation of crystalline Au (9–27 nm) and AgCl (3–51 nm) NPs in one simple step. FTIR analysis reveals various functional in/organic groups, including Si–OH and polyamides. While both metal-bionanoparticles have analogical spherical shape with determined aggregation, ICP-AES analysis determined more effective 5.29 wt% Au NP formation than 1 wt% AgCl NPs. MIC analysis confirms that bionanocomposite with AgCl by concentration 0.014 mg/mL has the most effective antibacterial system for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria strains. Although dual effect of Au/AgCl NP bionanocomposite has almost analogical influence on gram-positive bacteria, the synergic-antagonistic effect is irrelevant in this instance.

  11. A two-step crushed lava rock filter unit for grey water treatment at household level in an urban slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katukiza, A Y; Ronteltap, M; Niwagaba, C B; Kansiime, F; Lens, P N L

    2014-01-15

    Decentralised grey water treatment in urban slums using low-cost and robust technologies offers opportunities to minimise public health risks and to reduce environmental pollution caused by the highly polluted grey water i.e. with a COD and N concentration of 3000-6000 mg L(-1) and 30-40 mg L(-1), respectively. However, there has been very limited action research to reduce the pollution load from uncontrolled grey water discharge by households in urban slums. This study was therefore carried out to investigate the potential of a two-step filtration process to reduce the grey water pollution load in an urban slum using a crushed lava rock filter, to determine the main filter design and operation parameters and the effect of intermittent flow on the grey water effluent quality. A two-step crushed lava rock filter unit was designed and implemented for use by a household in the Bwaise III slum in Kampala city (Uganda). It was monitored at a varying hydraulic loading rate (HLR) of 0.5-1.1 m d(-1) as well as at a constant HLR of 0.39 m d(-1). The removal efficiencies of COD, TP and TKN were, respectively, 85.9%, 58% and 65.5% under a varying HLR and 90.5%, 59.5% and 69%, when operating at a constant HLR regime. In addition, the log removal of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and total coliforms was, respectively, 3.8, 3.2 and 3.9 under the varying HLR and 3.9, 3.5 and 3.9 at a constant HLR. The results show that the use of a two-step filtration process as well as a lower constant HLR increased the pollutant removal efficiencies. Further research is needed to investigate the feasibility of adding a tertiary treatment step to increase the nutrients and microorganisms removal from grey water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Palladium-Catalyzed Direct C-H Arylations of Dioxythiophenes Bearing Reactive Functional Groups: A Step-Economical Approach for Functional π-Conjugated Oligoarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Ching-Yuan

    2015-06-25

    A Pd-catalyzed and single-step C-H arylation of dioxythiophene derivates bearing unprotected reactive functional groups (-OH, -COOH, -N3) in a phosphine-free manner has been developed. Various dioxythiopene-based oligoarenes with extended π-conjugation are obtained with good yields (up to 90%). These oligoarenes display suitable optical properties (absorption and emission maxima, quantum yields) and contain reactive functional groups suitable for further conjugations with bioactive molecules. This new methodology is step economical (fewer synthetic steps), environmental friendly (no toxic metal-containing side-poducts) and the oligoarenes synthesized are potentially applicable for bio-labeling, bioimaging, and biosensing.

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Direct C-H Arylations of Dioxythiophenes Bearing Reactive Functional Groups: A Step-Economical Approach for Functional π-Conjugated Oligoarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Ching-Yuan; Chong, Hui; Lin, Hsing-An; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Zheng, Bin; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Hashizume, Daisuke; Yu, Hsiao-hua

    2015-01-01

    A Pd-catalyzed and single-step C-H arylation of dioxythiophene derivates bearing unprotected reactive functional groups (-OH, -COOH, -N3) in a phosphine-free manner has been developed. Various dioxythiopene-based oligoarenes with extended π-conjugation are obtained with good yields (up to 90%). These oligoarenes display suitable optical properties (absorption and emission maxima, quantum yields) and contain reactive functional groups suitable for further conjugations with bioactive molecules. This new methodology is step economical (fewer synthetic steps), environmental friendly (no toxic metal-containing side-poducts) and the oligoarenes synthesized are potentially applicable for bio-labeling, bioimaging, and biosensing.

  14. One step synthesis of polyacrylamide functionalized graphene and its application in Pb(II) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yaoyao; Qian, Xiaoming; Shi, Jie; Chen, Lei; Li, Baodong; Niu, Jiarong; Liu, Liangsen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PAM-g-graphene is synthesized by the co-irradiation between GO and AM monomers. • PAM graft on GO has led to the exfoliation of GO into individual sheets. • The γ-ray induced reduction of GO. • PAM-g-graphene exhibits high adsorption capacities toward Pb(II) ions. • PAM-g-graphene provides a new idea for heavy metal pollutants’ removal in water. - Abstract: Polyacrylamide grafted graphene (PAM-g-graphene) from graphite oxide (GO) was successfully prepared by γ-ray irradiation with acrylamide monomers in aqueous at room temperature in this paper. Our strategy involves the PAM chains graft on the surface and between the layers of GO by in situ radical polymerization which led to the exfoliation of GO into individual sheets. Results show that the degree of grafting of PAM-g-graphene samples is 24.2%, and the thickness is measured to be 2.59 nm. Moreover, the as-prepared PAM-g-graphene with some amino from PAM and little oxygen functional groups exhibit superior adsorption of Pb(II) ions. The adsorption processes reach equilibrium in just 30 min and the adsorption isotherms are described well by Langmuir and Freundlich classical isotherms models. The determined adsorption capacity of PAM-g-graphene is 819.67 mg g −1 (pH 6) for Pb(II), which is 20 times and 8 times capacities of that for graphene nanosheets and carbon nanotubes according to reports, respectively. This chemically modified graphene synthesized by this fast one-step approach, featuring a good versatility and adaptability, excellent adsorption capacity and rapid extraction, may provide a new idea for the global problem of heavy metal pollutants’ removal in water

  15. Effect of age on changes in motor units functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-08-01

    With age, there is a change in functional connectivity of motor units in muscle. This leads to reduced muscle strength. This study has investigated the effect of age on the changes in the motor unit recruitment by measuring the mutual information between multiple channels of surface electromyogram (sEMG) of biceps brachii muscle. It is hypothesised that with ageing, there is a reduction in number of motor units, which can lead to an increase in the dependency of remaining motor units. This increase can be observed in the mutual information between the multiple channels of the muscle activity. Two channels of sEMG were recorded during the maximum level of isometric contraction. 28 healthy subjects (Young: age range 20-35years and Old: age range - 60-70years) participated in the experiments. The normalized mutual information (NMI), a measure of dependency factor, was computed for the sEMG recordings. Statistical analysis was performed to test the effect of age on NMI. The results show that the NMI among the older cohort was significantly higher when compared with the young adults.

  16. Multi-Functional Distributed Generation Unit for Power Quality Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Zheng; Yang, Huan; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-functional distributed generation unit (MFDGU) and its control strategy are proposed in this paper for the purpose of enhancing power quality in low-voltage networks. By using the 3H-bridge converter structure, an MFDGU can be applied in 3-phase 4-wire low-voltage distribution networks...... reference of the MFDGU, which can be easily implemented in three-phase networks. A 15kVA prototype consisting of three full bridge converters has been built and tested. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed topology and control strategy....

  17. Stepping from Belgium to the United States and back: the conceptualization and impact of the Harvard Step Test, 1942-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangrunderbeek, Hans; Delheye, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    This article examines the contribution of the Belgian-American exercise physiologist Lucien Brouha in developing the Harvard Step Test (HST) at the'pioneering Harvard Fatigue Laboratory (HFL) during the Second World War and provides a better understanding of the importance of transnational relations concerning scientific progress. Analysis of sources in the University Archives of the State University in Liege (Belgium), the Archives and Documentation Centre of the Sportimonium at Hofstade (Belgium), the Harvard Business School Archives at Baker Library (Cambridge, MA), the Harvard Medical School Archives at Countway Library (Cambridge, MA), and the Brouha and Shaler private family archives (Sutton, VT). The outbreak of the Second World War shifted research at the interdisciplinary HFL toward the field of military physiology and resulted in the transfer of Brouha from Belgium to the HFL. Brouha's personal and academic experiences made him the right man in the right place to develop the HST in 1942. The HST--which has celebrated its 70th anniversary--was of immediate academic and practical significance during and after the war. Brouha' s case demonstrates the importance of personal experiences, transnational relations, and interdisciplinary research settings for the establishment of scientific (sub)disciplines. Studying internal scientific evolutions in relation to personal and work experiences of "mobile" and therefore often "forgotten" researchers like Brouha is necessary to better understand and interpret evolutions in science and corresponding processes of academic and social mobility.

  18. Type 1 Does The Two-Step: Type 1 Secretion Substrates With A Functional Periplasmic Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy J; Sondermann, Holger; O'Toole, George A

    2018-06-04

    Bacteria have evolved several secretion strategies for polling and responding to environmental flux and insult. Of these, the type 1 secretion system (T1SS) is known to secrete an array of biologically diverse proteins - from small < 10 kDa bacteriocins to gigantic adhesins with a mass over 1 MDa. For the last several decades T1SS have been characterized as a one-step translocation strategy whereby the secreted substrate is transported directly into the extracellular environment from the cytoplasm with no periplasmic intermediate. Recent phylogenetic, biochemical, and genetic evidence point to a distinct sub-group of T1SS machinery linked with a bacterial transglutaminase-like cysteine proteinase (BTLCP), which uses a two-step secretion mechanism. BTLCP-linked T1SS transport a class of repeats-in-toxin (RTX) adhesins that are critical for biofilm formation. The prototype of this RTX adhesin group, LapA of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, uses a novel N-terminal retention module to anchor the adhesin at the cell surface as a secretion intermediate threaded through the outer membrane-localized, TolC-like protein LapE. This secretion intermediate is post-translationally cleaved by the BTLCP family LapG protein to release LapA from its cognate T1SS pore. Thus, secretion of LapA and related RTX adhesins into the extracellular environment appears to be a T1SS-mediated, two-step process that involves a periplasmic intermediate. In this review, we contrast the T1SS machinery and substrates of the BLTCP-linked two-step secretion process with those of the classical one-step T1SS to better understand the newly recognized and expanded role of this secretion machinery. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Practical Steps toward Computational Unification: Helpful Perspectives for New Systems, Adding Functionality to Existing Ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    With ever increasing amounts of Earth-Science funding being diverted to the war in Iraq, the Earth-Science community must now more than ever wring every bit of utility out of every dollar. We're not likely to get funded any projects perceived by others as "pie in the sky", so we have to look at already funded programs within our community and directing new programs in a unifying direction. We have not yet begun the transition to a computationally unifying, general-purpose Earth Science computing paradigm, though it was proposed at the Fall 2002 AGU meeting in San Francisco, and perhaps earlier. Encouragingly, we do see a recognition that more commonality is needed as various projects have as funded goals the addition of the processing and dissemination of new datatypes, or data-sets, if you prefer, to their existing repertoires. Unfortunately, the timelines projected for adding a datatype to an existing system are typically estimated at around two years each. Further, many organizations have the perception that they can only use their dollars to support exclusively their own needs as they don't have the money to support the goals of others, thus overlooking opportunities to satisfy their own needs while at the same time aiding the creation of a global GeoScience cyber-infrastructure. While Computational Unification appears to be an unfunded, impossible dream, at least for now, individual projects can take steps that are compatible with a unified community and can help build one over time. This session explores these opportunities. The author will discuss the issues surrounding this topic, outlining alternative perspectives on the points of difficulty, and proposing straight-forward solutions which every Earth Science data processing system should consider. Sub-topics include distributed meta-data, distributed processing, distributed data objects, interdisciplinary concerns, and scientific defensibility with an overall emphasis on how previously written processes

  20. Step 1: Human System Interface (HSI) Functional Requirements Document (FRD). Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This Functional Requirements Document (FRD) establishes a minimum set of Human System Interface (HSI) functional requirements to achieve the Access 5 Vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the National Airspace System (NAS)". Basically, it provides what functions are necessary to fly UAS in the NAS. The framework used to identify the appropriate functions was the "Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, and Avoid Hazards" structure identified in the Access 5 FRD. As a result, fifteen high-level functional requirements were developed. In addition, several of them have been decomposed into low-level functional requirements to provide more detail.

  1. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, R.K.; Monteillet, H.J.M.; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery
    of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments,

  2. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, Rupali K.; Monteillet, Hélène; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Kleijn, J. Mieke; Leermakers, Frans A.M.; Wijffels, Rene H.; Eppink, Michel H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments, discarding

  3. Does increasing steps per day predict improvement in physical function and pain interference in adults with fibromyalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleth, Anthony S; Slaven, James E; Ang, Dennis C

    2014-12-01

    To examine the concurrent and predictive associations between the number of steps taken per day and clinical outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). A total of 199 adults with FM (mean age 46.1 years, 95% women) who were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial wore a hip-mounted accelerometer for 1 week and completed self-report measures of physical function (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Physical Impairment [FIQ-PI], Short Form 36 [SF-36] health survey physical component score [PCS], pain intensity and interference (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8 [PHQ-8]) as part of their baseline and followup assessments. Associations of steps per day with self-report clinical measures were evaluated from baseline to week 12 using multivariate regression models adjusted for demographic and baseline covariates. Study participants were primarily sedentary, averaging 4,019 ± 1,530 steps per day. Our findings demonstrate a linear relationship between the change in steps per day and improvement in health outcomes for FM. Incremental increases on the order of 1,000 steps per day were significantly associated with (and predictive of) improvements in FIQ-PI, SF-36 PCS, BPI pain interference, and PHQ-8 (all P physical activity. An exercise prescription that includes recommendations to gradually accumulate at least 5,000 additional steps per day may result in clinically significant improvements in outcomes relevant to patients with FM. Future studies are needed to elucidate the dose-response relationship between steps per day and patient outcomes in FM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Acceptance and introduction of disruptive technologies - simple steps to build a fully functional pulmonary valved stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christoph H; Marty, Bettina; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2007-08-01

    Valved stents are new land for cardiac surgeons even though they are being used more frequently by interventional disciplines. This paper presents simple steps to build a patient-specific pulmonary valved stent and its delivery device. The design concept was tested by random participants at a med-tech meeting. The valved stent is constructed by linking an endoprosthetic graft with a valved-jugular-vein. The delivery device is made from a modified 5-ml syringe. Of 72 participants, 66 (92%) built and 60 participants implanted the device successfully into the targeted pulmonary position via a trans-infundibular access.

  5. Evaluation of delivered monitor unit accuracy of gated step-and-shoot IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Lee, MeYeon; Kim, Su SSan; Park, SoAh; Hwang, Tae-Jin; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, 431070 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 431070 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To overcome the problem of organ motion in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), gated IMRT is often used for the treatment of lung cancer. In this study, the authors investigated the accuracy of the delivered monitor units (MUs) from each segment during gated IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array for user-specific verification purpose. Methods: The authors planned a 6 MV photon, seven-port step-and-shoot lung IMRT delivery. The respiration signals for gated IMRT delivery were obtained from the one-dimensional moving phantom using the real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The beams were delivered using a Clinac iX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with the Millennium 120 MLC. The MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Germany) was validated through consistency and reproducibility tests as well as comparison with measurements from a Farmer-type ion chamber. The authors delivered beams with varying dose rates and duty cycles and analyzed the MatriXX data to evaluate MU delivery accuracy. Results: There was quite good agreement between the planned segment MUs and the MUs computed from the MatriXX within {+-}2% error. The beam-on times computed from the MatriXX data were almost identical for all cases, and they matched well with the RPM beam-on and beam-off signals. A slight difference was observed between them, but it was less than 40 ms. The gated IMRT delivery demonstrated an MU delivery accuracy that was equivalent to ungated IMRT, and the delivered MUs with a gating signal agreed with the planned MUs within {+-}0.5 MU regardless of dose rate and duty cycle. Conclusions: The authors can conclude that gated IMRT is able to deliver an accurate dose to a patient during a procedure. The authors believe that the methodology and results can be transferred to other vendors' devices, particularly those that do not provide MLC log data for a verification purpose.

  6. Availability and cost functions for periodically inspected preventively maintained units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    Unavailability and cost rate functions are developed for components whose failures can occur randomly but they are detected only by periodic testing or inspections. If a failure occurs between consecutive inspections, the unit remains failed until the next inspection. Components are renewed by preventive maintenance periodically, or by repair or replacement after a failure, whichever occurs first (age-replacement). The model takes into account finite repair and maintenance durations as well as costs due to testing, repair, maintenance and lost production or accidents. For normally operating units the time-related penalty is loss of production. For standby safety equipment it is the expected cost of an accident that can happen when the component is down due to a dormant failure, repair or maintenance. The objective of maintenance optimization is to minimize the total cost rate by proper selection of two intervals, one for inspections and one for replacements. General conditions and techniques are developed for solving optimal test and maintenance intervals, with and without constraints on the production loss or accident rate. Insights are gained into how the optimal intervals depend on various cost parameters and reliability characteristics

  7. Aesthetic rehabilitation of a patient with an anterior maxillectomy defect, using an innovative single-step, single unit, plastic-based hollow obturator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwas Bhatia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available What could be better than improving the comfort and quality of life of a patient with a life-threatening disease? Maxillectomy, the partial or total removal of the maxilla in patients suffering from benign or malignant neoplasms, creates a challenging defect for the maxillofacial prosthodontist when attempting to provide an effective obturator. Although previous methods have been described for rehabilitation of such patients, our goal should be to devise one stage techniques that will allow the patient an improved quality of life as soon as possible. The present report describes the aesthetic rehabilitation of a maxillectomy patient by use of a hollow obturator. The obturator is fabricated through a processing technique which is a variation of other well-known techniques, consisting of the use of a single-step flasking procedure to fabricate a single-unit hollow obturator using the lost salt technique. As our aim is to aesthetically and functionally rehabilitate the patient as soon as possible, the present method of restoring the maxillectomy defect is cost-effective, time-saving and beneficial for the patient.

  8. One-step ligand exchange reaction as an efficient way for functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrówczyński, Radosław; Rednic, Lidia; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Novel magnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs) covered by one layer of functionalized fatty acids, bearing entities (Hayashi catalyst, biotin, quinine, proline, and galactose) of high interest for practical application in nanomedicine or organocatalysis, were synthesized. The functionalized fatty acids were obtained by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of azido fatty acids with alkynes. All the magnetic NPs show superparamagnetic behavior with high values of magnetization and high colloidal stability in DCM solution.

  9. Initiation of movement from quiet stance: comparison of gait and stepping in elderly subjects of different levels of functional ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Denis; Santos, Valeria; Kim, Hyeong Dong; Light, Kathye; Levy, Charles

    2005-04-01

    This study describes how elderly subjects initiate gait, and step from a position of quiet stance. Based on scores from selected standardized tests subjects were placed in either a high (HFL) or low functional level (LFL) group and were asked to initiate gait, step onto a 10 cm high, 1.22 m wide curb and step over a 10 cm high, 9 cm wide obstacle at a self paced speed. Stepping conditions affected the velocity of movement. It was clear that all subjects decreased initiation velocity for both curb and obstacle compared to gait initiation. Swing and stance limb acceleration ground reaction forces and EMG amplitude were modulated according to initiation velocity. Toe clearance was greater for obstacle than curb and gait initiation. Swing toe-off was significantly earlier and there was a trend for obstacle clearance to be greater for the HFL group. Those in the LFL group appear to be at a greater risk for falling due to the possible effect of slower rate of toe-off that could influence toe clearance over the obstacle.

  10. Lacritin and other new proteins of the lacrimal functional unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKown, Robert L; Wang, Ningning; Raab, Ronald W; Karnati, Roy; Zhang, Yinghui; Williams, Patricia B; Laurie, Gordon W

    2009-05-01

    The lacrimal functional unit (LFU) is defined by the 2007 International Dry Eye WorkShop as 'an integrated system comprising the lacrimal glands, ocular surface (cornea, conjunctiva and meibomian glands) and lids, and the sensory and motor nerves that connect them'. The LFU maintains a healthy ocular surface primarily through a properly functioning tear film that provides protection, lubrication, and an environment for corneal epithelial cell renewal. LFU cells express thousands of proteins. Over 200 new LFU proteins have been discovered in the last decade. Lacritin is a new LFU-specific growth factor in human tears that flows through ducts to target corneal epithelial cells on the ocular surface. When applied topically in rabbits, lacritin appears to increase the volume of basal tear secretion. Lacritin is one of only a handful of tear proteins preliminarily reported to be downregulated in blepharitis and in two dry eye syndromes. Computational analysis predicts an ordered C-terminal domain that binds the corneal epithelial cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-1 (SDC1) and is required for lacritin's low nanomolar mitogenic activity. The lacritin-binding site on the N-terminus of SDC1 is exposed by heparanase. Heparanase is constitutively expressed by the corneal epithelium and appears to be a normal constituent of tears. Binding triggers rapid signaling to downstream NFAT and mTOR. A wealth of other new proteins, originally designated as hypothetical when first identified by genomic sequencing, are expressed by the human LFU including: ALS2CL, ARHGEF19, KIAA1109, PLXNA1, POLG, WIPI1 and ZMIZ2. Their demonstrated or implied roles in human genetic disease or basic cellular functions are fuel for new investigation. Addressing topical areas in ocular surface physiology with new LFU proteins may reveal interesting new biological mechanisms and help get to the heart of ocular surface dysfunction.

  11. One-step ligand exchange reaction as an efficient way for functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrowczynski, Radoslaw [Humboldt-University Berlin, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Rednic, Lidia; Turcu, Rodica [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies (Romania); Liebscher, Juergen, E-mail: liebscher@chemie.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt-University Berlin, Department of Chemistry (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Novel magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) covered by one layer of functionalized fatty acids, bearing entities (Hayashi catalyst, biotin, quinine, proline, and galactose) of high interest for practical application in nanomedicine or organocatalysis, were synthesized. The functionalized fatty acids were obtained by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of azido fatty acids with alkynes. All the magnetic NPs show superparamagnetic behavior with high values of magnetization and high colloidal stability in DCM solution.

  12. Drug Dosing and Estimated Renal Function-Any Step Forward from Effersoe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Drug dosing in accordance with the renal function is a long-standing challenge to clinicians. For many years it has been evident that in many clinical situations there is no easy way to correctly dose any drug that is mainly cleared by the kidneys. Despite the development of many formulas...

  13. Which plant traits respond to aridity? A critical step to assess functional diversity in Mediterranean drylands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunes, A.; Köbel, M.; Pihno, P.; Matos, P.; de Bello, Francesco; Correia, O.; Branquinho, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 239, MAY 28 2017 (2017), s. 176-184 ISSN 0168-1923 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Annual plants * Climatic gradient * Functional dispersion Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 3.887, year: 2016

  14. A step towards functional integration : Reflection program case ‘Rotterdam roof park’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Kothuis, Baukje; Kok, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    Many functions are combined in the Rotterdam Roof Park project: It is a shopping mall, a parking garage, a park on the roof, and last but not least, a flood defense. The research in our program was done after the buildings and structures had been built. So the

  15. Energy hyperspace for stacking interaction in AU/AU dinucleotide step: Dispersion-corrected density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-01-01

    Double helical structures of DNA and RNA are mostly determined by base pair stacking interactions, which give them the base sequence-directed features, such as small roll values for the purine-pyrimidine steps. Earlier attempts to characterize stacking interactions were mostly restricted to calculations on fiber diffraction geometries or optimized structure using ab initio calculations lacking variation in geometry to comment on rather unusual large roll values observed in AU/AU base pair step in crystal structures of RNA double helices. We have generated stacking energy hyperspace by modeling geometries with variations along the important degrees of freedom, roll, and slide, which were chosen via statistical analysis as maximally sequence dependent. Corresponding energy contours were constructed by several quantum chemical methods including dispersion corrections. This analysis established the most suitable methods for stacked base pair systems despite the limitation imparted by number of atom in a base pair step to employ very high level of theory. All the methods predict negative roll value and near-zero slide to be most favorable for the purine-pyrimidine steps, in agreement with Calladine's steric clash based rule. Successive base pairs in RNA are always linked by sugar-phosphate backbone with C3'-endo sugars and this demands C1'-C1' distance of about 5.4 Å along the chains. Consideration of an energy penalty term for deviation of C1'-C1' distance from the mean value, to the recent DFT-D functionals, specifically ωB97X-D appears to predict reliable energy contour for AU/AU step. Such distance-based penalty improves energy contours for the other purine-pyrimidine sequences also. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 101: 107-120, 2014. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. HALE UAS Command and Control Communications: Step 1 - Functional Requirements Document. Version 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned aircraft system (UAS) communicates with an off-board pilot-in-command in all flight phases via the C2 data link, making it a critical component for the UA to fly in the NAS safely and routinely. This is a new requirement in current FAA communications planning and monitoring processes. This document provides a set of comprehensive C2 communications functional requirements and performance guidelines to help facilitate the future FAA certification process for civil UAS to operate in the NAS. The objective of the guidelines is to provide the ability to validate the functional requirements and in future be used to develop performance-level requirements.

  17. Three-dimensional habitat structure and landscape genetics: a step forward in estimating functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, P; Holderegger, R; Bollmann, K; Gugerli, F; Zellweger, F

    2017-02-01

    Estimating connectivity among fragmented habitat patches is crucial for evaluating the functionality of ecological networks. However, current estimates of landscape resistance to animal movement and dispersal lack landscape-level data on local habitat structure. Here, we used a landscape genetics approach to show that high-fidelity habitat structure maps derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data critically improve functional connectivity estimates compared to conventional land cover data. We related pairwise genetic distances of 128 Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) genotypes to least-cost path distances at multiple scales derived from land cover data. Resulting β values of linear mixed effects models ranged from 0.372 to 0.495, while those derived from LiDAR ranged from 0.558 to 0.758. The identification and conservation of functional ecological networks suffering from habitat fragmentation and homogenization will thus benefit from the growing availability of detailed and contiguous data on three-dimensional habitat structure and associated habitat quality. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. Physical Unclonable Function with Multiplexing Units and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masaya; Asai, Toshiya; Shiozaki, Mitsuru; Fujino, Takeshi

    Recently, semiconductor counterfeiting has become an increasingly serious problem. Therefore, techniques to prevent the counterfeit by using random characteristic patterns that are difficult to control artificially have attracted attention. The physical unclonable function (PUF) is one of the techniques. It is a method to derive ID information peculiar to a device by detecting random physical features that cannot be controlled during the device's manufacture. Because information such as the ID information is difficult to replicate, PUF is used as a technique to prevent counterfeiting. Several studies have been reported on PUF. Arbiter PUF, which utilizes the difference in signal propagation delay between selectors, is the typical method of composing PUF using delay characteristics. This paper proposed a new PUF which is based on the arbiter PUF. The proposed PUF introduces new multiplexing selector units. It attempts to generate an effective response using the orders of three signal arrivals. Experiments using FPGAs verify the validity of the proposed PUF. Although Uniqueness is deteriorated, Correctness, Steadiness, Randomness and Resistance against the machine learning attacks are improved in comparison with conventional one.

  19. Needle puncture in rabbit functional spinal units alters rotational biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Robert A; Bell, Kevin M; Quan, Bichun; Nuzhao, Yao; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D

    2015-04-01

    An in vitro biomechanical study for rabbit lumbar functional spinal units (FSUs) using a robot-based spine testing system. To elucidate the effect of annular puncture with a 16 G needle on mechanical properties in flexion/extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Needle puncture of the intervertebral disk has been shown to alter mechanical properties of the disk in compression, torsion, and bending. The effect of needle puncture in FSUs, where intact spinal ligaments and facet joints may mitigate or amplify these changes in the disk, on spinal motion segment stability subject to physiological rotations remains unknown. Rabbit FSUs were tested using a robot testing system whose force/moment and position precision were assessed to demonstrate system capability. Flexibility testing methods were developed by load-to-failure testing in flexion/extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Subsequent testing methods were used to examine a 16 G needle disk puncture and No. 11 blade disk stab (positive control for mechanical disruption). Flexibility testing was used to assess segmental range-of-motion (degrees), neutral zone stiffness (N m/degrees) and width (degrees and N m), and elastic zone stiffness before and after annular injury. The robot-based system was capable of performing flexibility testing on FSUs-mean precision of force/moment measurements and robot system movements were elastic zone stiffness in flexion and lateral bending. These findings suggest that disk puncture and stab can destabilize FSUs in primary rotations.

  20. First results on photon strength functions of 78Se from the two-step γ Cascades measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Stanislav; Bečvář, František; Krtička, Milan; Tomandl, Ivo

    2017-09-01

    Two-step gamma cascades (TSCs) following the radiative capture of thermal neutrons in 77Se were measured at the research reactor at Řež near Prague. Results on photon strength functions (PSFs) of 78Se, obtained from comparison of experimental TSC spectra with outcomes of simulations under different assumptions about level density and PSFs using the DICEBOX algorithm, are presented. The main attention is paid to possible manifestation of the pygmy resonance observed recently in this nucleus in the nuclear resonance fluorescence measurement and low-energy PSF enhancement observed in Oslo-type experiments for all A ≲ 100 nuclei.

  1. Cardiac biopotentials influence on central nervous system functioning: first steps in hypothesis verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondal'skaya Yu.O.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to verify the hypothesis on influence of cardiac biopotentials on central nervous system. Materials: 20 healthy individuals aged 18-26 years old have been participated in the investigations. Two groups composed of 10 patients each have been formed. Double increase in heart biopotentials by means of artificial impulse insertion between natural cardiac contractions has been modeled. Artificial impulses have been similar to unaffected ones, produced in a normal heart work. Additional impulses have been generated using external pacemaker and have been linked up with electrodes on the chest. They have been synchronized with the heart rhythm and located in-between R waves. The duration of those impulses has been fully matched to ventricular complex. Their amplitude has been adjusted individually depending on the height of R wave. Nervous system mobility has been used as the indicator reflecting the central nervous system functioning. Degree of mobility has been defined on the basis of tapping test results. The test has been repeated at specific intervals. Groups have been exposed to two adverse testing modes. Additional impulses have been conducted to the patients of group I within an hour over a period of the first and the third 15-minute intervals and to the patients of group II over a period of the second and the fourth 15-minute intervals. In the middle and in the end of each time interval tapping test has been carried out. After preliminary analysis two other modes of stimulation have been tested. The stimulation has been performed within the 40-minute course: over a period of the first 20-minute interval and vice versa. Results: Detailed evaluation has revealed that short-time increase of nervous processes has been checked in combination with decrease in their stability. Conclusion: The data obtained have shown that there is possible influence on central nervous system functioning. The article ends with prospects of further

  2. Effect of a dual-task net-step exercise on cognitive and gait function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Kazutoshi; Showa, Satoko; Hiraoka, Akira; Fushiki, Yasuhiro; Sakauchi, Humio; Mori, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Participation in generally recommended aerobics or strength exercises may be challenging for older adults. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the types and levels of physical activities suited for them to improve their cognitive and gait function and adherence to exercise programs. This has prompted efforts to identify exercises that require less physical strength and frequency of performance, while still offering cognitive and health benefits. Here, we aimed to assess the effect of a novel dual-task net-step exercise (NSE) performed once a week for 8 consecutive weeks on improvements in cognitive performance and gait function in an older population. In this pretest/posttest experimental case control study, 60 healthy older adults (mean age 76.4 years) were recruited from community-dwelling people and separated randomly into 2 groups: a dual-task NSE group and a control group. The NSE group was asked to walk across a net without stepping on the ropes or being caught in the net. Two computer panel-type cognitive functional assessments, the Touch-M and Touch Panel-Type Dementia Assessment Scale, were administered at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention to determine the effects of NSE. Improvements in gait function were also evaluated using Timed Up and Go test scores. Mixed-effect models with repeated measures (group × time) (analysis of variance, F test) were used to test the effects of NSE. Adjustments were made for covariates including age and sex (analysis of covariance). The NSE group showed significant improvement in cognitive performance (6.8% change; total Touch-M score 5.4 points; P = .04) and gait performance (11.5% change; Timed Up and Go time -0.98 second; P cognitive and gait performance in healthy older adults. Our results indicate that NSE offers an option for a large segment of the older population who need an easier way to maintain their cognitive health and gait function.

  3. Facile and easily popularized synthesis of L-cysteine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles based on one-step functionalization for highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoyan; Deng, Chunhui; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2018-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications. Also, efficient enrichment and separation of glycopeptides from complex samples are crucial for the thorough analysis of glycosylation. Developing novel hydrophilic materials with facile and easily popularized synthesis is an urgent need in large-scale glycoproteomics research. Herein, for the first time, a one-step functionalization strategy based on metal-organic coordination was proposed and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were directly functionalized with zwitterionic hydrophilic L-cysteine (L-Cys), greatly simplifying the synthetic procedure. The easily synthesized Fe 3 O 4 /L-Cys possessed excellent hydrophilicity and brief composition, contributing to affinity for glycopeptides and reduction in nonspecific interaction. Thus, Fe 3 O 4 /L-Cys nanoparticles showed outstanding sensitivity (25 amol/μL), high selectivity (mixture of bovine serum albumin and horseradish peroxidase tryptic digests at a mass ratio of 100:1), good reusability (five repeated times), and stability (room temperature storage of 1 month). Encouragingly, in the glycosylation analysis of human serum, a total of 376 glycopeptides with 393 N-glycosylation sites corresponding to 118 glycoproteins were identified after enrichment with Fe 3 O 4 /L-Cys, which was superior to ever reported L-Cys modified magnetic materials. Furthermore, applying the one-step functionalization strategy, cysteamine and glutathione respectively direct-functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and also achieved efficient glycopeptide enrichment in human serum. The results indicated that we have presented an efficient and easily popularized strategy in glycoproteomics as well as in the synthesis of novel materials. Graphical abstract Fe 3 O 4 /L-Cys nanoparticles based on one-step functionalization for highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides.

  4. A Conjugate Gradient Algorithm with Function Value Information and N-Step Quadratic Convergence for Unconstrained Optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrong Li

    Full Text Available It is generally acknowledged that the conjugate gradient (CG method achieves global convergence--with at most a linear convergence rate--because CG formulas are generated by linear approximations of the objective functions. The quadratically convergent results are very limited. We introduce a new PRP method in which the restart strategy is also used. Moreover, the method we developed includes not only n-step quadratic convergence but also both the function value information and gradient value information. In this paper, we will show that the new PRP method (with either the Armijo line search or the Wolfe line search is both linearly and quadratically convergent. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the new PRP algorithm is competitive with the normal CG method.

  5. A Conjugate Gradient Algorithm with Function Value Information and N-Step Quadratic Convergence for Unconstrained Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangrong; Zhao, Xupei; Duan, Xiabin; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the conjugate gradient (CG) method achieves global convergence--with at most a linear convergence rate--because CG formulas are generated by linear approximations of the objective functions. The quadratically convergent results are very limited. We introduce a new PRP method in which the restart strategy is also used. Moreover, the method we developed includes not only n-step quadratic convergence but also both the function value information and gradient value information. In this paper, we will show that the new PRP method (with either the Armijo line search or the Wolfe line search) is both linearly and quadratically convergent. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the new PRP algorithm is competitive with the normal CG method.

  6. Promoting Safe, Secure, and Peaceful Growth of Nuclear Energy: Next Steps for Russia and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, Matthew G.; Vyacheslav P. Kuznetzov

    2010-01-01

    Russia, the United States and other countries must cooperate to enable large-scale growth of nuclear energy around the world while achieving even higher standards of safety, security, and nonproliferation than are in place today. This will require building a new global framework for nuclear energy, including new or strengthened global institutions. The Belfer Center's Managing the Atom (MTA) Project and the Russian Research Center's Kurchatov Institute developed these and additional recommend...

  7. Modelling of Sub-daily Hydrological Processes Using Daily Time-Step Models: A Distribution Function Approach to Temporal Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, D. D.; Western, A. W.; Grayson, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    Mismatches in scale between the fundamental processes, the model and supporting data are a major limitation in hydrologic modelling. Surface runoff generation via infiltration excess and the process of soil erosion are fundamentally short time-scale phenomena and their average behaviour is mostly determined by the short time-scale peak intensities of rainfall. Ideally, these processes should be simulated using time-steps of the order of minutes to appropriately resolve the effect of rainfall intensity variations. However, sub-daily data support is often inadequate and the processes are usually simulated by calibrating daily (or even coarser) time-step models. Generally process descriptions are not modified but rather effective parameter values are used to account for the effect of temporal lumping, assuming that the effect of the scale mismatch can be counterbalanced by tuning the parameter values at the model time-step of interest. Often this results in parameter values that are difficult to interpret physically. A similar approach is often taken spatially. This is problematic as these processes generally operate or interact non-linearly. This indicates a need for better techniques to simulate sub-daily processes using daily time-step models while still using widely available daily information. A new method applicable to many rainfall-runoff-erosion models is presented. The method is based on temporal scaling using statistical distributions of rainfall intensity to represent sub-daily intensity variations in a daily time-step model. This allows the effect of short time-scale nonlinear processes to be captured while modelling at a daily time-step, which is often attractive due to the wide availability of daily forcing data. The approach relies on characterising the rainfall intensity variation within a day using a cumulative distribution function (cdf). This cdf is then modified by various linear and nonlinear processes typically represented in hydrological and

  8. Can ECG-gated MDCT be considered an obligatory step to plan and manage a new chest-pain unit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runza, G.; Alaimo, V.; La Grutta, L.; Galia, M.; Basile, A.; Cademartiri, F.; Krestin, G.P.; Midiri, M.

    2007-01-01

    The recent improvements in multi-detector computed tomography technology and its application in cardiac field allow to consider this non-invasive imaging technique as a promising comprehensive method for detecting significant coronary stenoses in a chest-pain unit. The possibility to use the ECG-synchronisation acquisition protocol, normally limited to the cardiac volume, for the entire thoracic vascular system should have the remarkable potential to reduce invasive and non-invasive procedures actually used to investigate acute chest pain and the number of unnecessary hospital admissions without reducing appropriate admissions in patients with chest pain

  9. Exploring overlapping functional units with various structure in protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Zhang

    Full Text Available Revealing functional units in protein-protein interaction (PPI networks are important for understanding cellular functional organization. Current algorithms for identifying functional units mainly focus on cohesive protein complexes which have more internal interactions than external interactions. Most of these approaches do not handle overlaps among complexes since they usually allow a protein to belong to only one complex. Moreover, recent studies have shown that other non-cohesive structural functional units beyond complexes also exist in PPI networks. Thus previous algorithms that just focus on non-overlapping cohesive complexes are not able to present the biological reality fully. Here, we develop a new regularized sparse random graph model (RSRGM to explore overlapping and various structural functional units in PPI networks. RSRGM is principally dominated by two model parameters. One is used to define the functional units as groups of proteins that have similar patterns of connections to others, which allows RSRGM to detect non-cohesive structural functional units. The other one is used to represent the degree of proteins belonging to the units, which supports a protein belonging to more than one revealed unit. We also propose a regularizer to control the smoothness between the estimators of these two parameters. Experimental results on four S. cerevisiae PPI networks show that the performance of RSRGM on detecting cohesive complexes and overlapping complexes is superior to that of previous competing algorithms. Moreover, RSRGM has the ability to discover biological significant functional units besides complexes.

  10. Function-oriented synthesis: biological evaluation of laulimalide analogues derived from a last step cross metathesis diversification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooberry, Susan L; Hilinski, Michael K; Clark, Erin A; Wender, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Laulimalide is a potent microtubule stabilizing agent and a promising anticancer therapeutic lead. The identification of stable, efficacious and accessible analogues is critical to clinically exploiting this novel lead. To determine which structural features of laulimalide are required for beneficial function and thus for accessing superior clinical candidates, a series of side chain analogues were prepared through a last step cross metathesis diversification strategy and their biological activities were evaluated. Five analogues, differing in potency from 233 nM to 7.9 muM, effectively inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Like laulimalide, they retain activity against multidrug resistant cells, stabilize microtubules and cause the formation of aberrant mitotic spindles, mitotic accumulation, Bcl-2 phosphorylation and initiation of apoptosis. Structural modifications in the C 23-C 27 dihydropyran side chain can be made without changing the overall mechanism of action, but it is clear that this subunit has more than a bystander role.

  11. A step function model to evaluate the real monetary value of man-sievert with real GDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Seong H.; Kim, Sun G.

    2009-01-01

    For use in a cost-benefit analysis to establish optimum levels of radiation protection in Korea under the ALARA principle, we introduce a discrete step function model to evaluate man-sievert monetary value in the real economic value. The model formula, which is unique and country-specific, is composed of real GDP, the nominal risk coefficient for cancer and hereditary effects, the aversion factor against radiation exposure, and average life expectancy. Unlike previous researches on alpha-value assessment, we show different alpha values in the real term, differentiated with respect to the range of individual doses, which would be more realistic and informative for application to the radiation protection practices. GDP deflators of economy can reflect the society's situations. Finally, we suggest that the Korean model can be generalized simply to other countries without normalizing any country-specific factors.

  12. A step function model to evaluate the real monetary value of man-sievert with real GDP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Seong H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: shna@kins.re.kr; Kim, Sun G. [School of Business, Daejeon University, Yong Woon-dong, Dong-gu, Daejeon 300-716 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sunkim@dju.ac.kr

    2009-07-15

    For use in a cost-benefit analysis to establish optimum levels of radiation protection in Korea under the ALARA principle, we introduce a discrete step function model to evaluate man-sievert monetary value in the real economic value. The model formula, which is unique and country-specific, is composed of real GDP, the nominal risk coefficient for cancer and hereditary effects, the aversion factor against radiation exposure, and average life expectancy. Unlike previous researches on alpha-value assessment, we show different alpha values in the real term, differentiated with respect to the range of individual doses, which would be more realistic and informative for application to the radiation protection practices. GDP deflators of economy can reflect the society's situations. Finally, we suggest that the Korean model can be generalized simply to other countries without normalizing any country-specific factors.

  13. A step function model to evaluate the real monetary value of man-sievert with real GDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Seong H; Kim, Sun G

    2009-01-01

    For use in a cost-benefit analysis to establish optimum levels of radiation protection in Korea under the ALARA principle, we introduce a discrete step function model to evaluate man-sievert monetary value in the real economic value. The model formula, which is unique and country-specific, is composed of real GDP, the nominal risk coefficient for cancer and hereditary effects, the aversion factor against radiation exposure, and average life expectancy. Unlike previous researches on alpha-value assessment, we show different alpha values in the real term, differentiated with respect to the range of individual doses, which would be more realistic and informative for application to the radiation protection practices. GDP deflators of economy can reflect the society's situations. Finally, we suggest that the Korean model can be generalized simply to other countries without normalizing any country-specific factors.

  14. 28 CFR 0.135 - Functions common to heads of organizational units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... organizational unit authority and responsibility for the reallotment of such funds and control of obligations and... organizational units. 0.135 Section 0.135 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE... Disqualification to Act § 0.135 Functions common to heads of organizational units. Subject to the general...

  15. Vision-Related Functional Burden of Diabetic Retinopathy Across Severity Levels in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jeffrey R; Doan, Quan V; Gleeson, Michelle; Haskova, Zdenka; Ramulu, Pradeep; Morse, Lawrence; Cantrell, Ronald A

    2017-09-01

    Among adults with diabetes in the United States, severe forms of diabetic retinopathy (DR) are significantly associated with a greater vision-related functional burden. To assess the functional burden of DR across severity levels in the United States. This cross-sectional study was based on 1004 participants 40 years or older with diabetes and valid ocular and sociodemographic outcomes in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) (2005-2006 and 2007-2008). Diabetic retinopathy was based on fundus photograph grading, using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study severity scale. The analysis was performed from October 15, 2016, to June 15, 2017. Functional difficulties secondary to vision were assessed during a household questionnaire in which participants self-reported difficulty with reading, visuospatial tasks (ie, close-up work or finding things on a crowded shelf), mobility (ie, walking down steps, stairs, or curbs), and driving. The main outcome measure was vision-related functional burden, which was defined as present for individuals reporting moderate or greater difficulty in any of the aforementioned tasks. Of the 1004 persons with diabetes analyzed for this study (mean age, 65.7 years [95% CI, 64.0-67.3 years]; 51.1% male [95% CI, 47.1-55.2] and 48.9% female [95% CI, 44.8-52.9]), the prevalence was 72.3% for no retinopathy, 25.4% for mild and moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), and 2.3% for severe NPDR or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The prevalence of vision-related functional burden was 20.2% (95% CI, 16.3%-24.1%) for those with no retinopathy, 20.4% (95% CI, 15.3%-27.8%) for those with mild and moderate NPDR, and 48.5% (95% CI, 25.6%-71.5%) for those with severe NPDR or PDR (P = .02). In multivariable analysis, the odds of vision-related functional burden were significantly greater among those with severe NPDR or PDR relative to those with no retinopathy (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.59; 95

  16. Effect of bilateral step-up and -down training on motor function in a person with hemiparesis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Mansoo; Hilgenberg, Sean; Hasson, Scott M; Braden, Heather J

    2014-11-01

    Gait training to facilitate the use of the paretic limb for persons with hemiparesis continues to be of interest to those in the clinical research domain. The purpose of this case report was to assess the outcomes of a repeated step-up and -down treatment, initiating with the paretic limb, on functional mobility, endurance and gait kinematic parameters in a person with hemiparesis. The participant was an 85-year-old female 3 years status post left hemiparesis, who reported overall good health. The participant was asked to step up on a 1-inch height wood box with her paretic limb. Once both feet were on top of the box, the participant initiated descent also with her paretic limb. The height of the box gradually progressed to 5 inches based on the participant's performance and tolerance. A metronome was used to facilitate rhythmic lower extremity movement patterns. The training duration for each treatment session was 7-15 min/day. The participant completed nine sessions spanning over 3 weeks. The outcome measure used to identify motor recovery was the Fugl-Myer (lower extremity). In addition, the timed up and go (TUG), the 6-min walk test (6 MWT) and gait kinematics were assessed to examine mobility and gait. The Fugl-Myer score and 6 MWT did not reflect a meaningful change (0% and +2.6%, respectively). However, TUG scores did show a meaningful change (+31.9%). With respect to gait kinematics, hip flexion on the paretic limb was improved from 11° to 18°, which indicates the normal range of hip motion during the initial swing phase in post-test.

  17. Error analysis and new dual-cosine window for estimating the sensor frequency response function from the step response data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Liang, Li-Ping; Liu, Hou-De; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Aiming at reducing the estimation error of the sensor frequency response function (FRF) estimated by the commonly used window-based spectral estimation method, the error models of interpolation and transient errors are derived in the form of non-parameter models. Accordingly, window effects on the errors are analyzed and reveal that the commonly used hanning window leads to smaller interpolation error which can also be significantly eliminated by the cubic spline interpolation method when estimating the FRF from the step response data, and window with smaller front-end value can restrain more transient error. Thus, a new dual-cosine window with its non-zero discrete Fourier transform bins at -3, -1, 0, 1, and 3 is constructed for FRF estimation. Compared with the hanning window, the new dual-cosine window has the equivalent interpolation error suppression capability and better transient error suppression capability when estimating the FRF from the step response; specifically, it reduces the asymptotic property of the transient error from O(N-2) of the hanning window method to O(N-4) while only increases the uncertainty slightly (about 0.4 dB). Then, one direction of a wind tunnel strain gauge balance which is a high order, small damping, and non-minimum phase system is employed as the example for verifying the new dual-cosine window-based spectral estimation method. The model simulation result shows that the new dual-cosine window method is better than the hanning window method for FRF estimation, and compared with the Gans method and LPM method, it has the advantages of simple computation, less time consumption, and short data requirement; the actual data calculation result of the balance FRF is consistent to the simulation result. Thus, the new dual-cosine window is effective and practical for FRF estimation.

  18. Electronic equipment. New functional units in NIM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheminaud, J.; Grasso, G.; Lacroix, C.; Le Baud, P.; Pichot, G.; Poirot, L.

    During the year 1974 some new modules have been developed: i) a tele-control for delay-time which utilizes a multiplexer-demultiplexer; ii) a fast pulse generator for light-emitting diodes which allows the test of devices using photomultipliers; iii) a plug-in-unit of variable shaper for fast pulses, with reset and zero dead time; iv) an amplifier with a 50MHz band-pass and an adjusting amplification from 0 to 10; v) a pocket generator delivering NIM pulses [fr

  19. Normative data for Farsi-speaking Iranians in the United States on measures of executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Justina F; Verney, Steven P; Kauzor, Kaitlyn; Flowers, Amina; Mehradfar, Maryam; Razani, Jill

    2018-01-09

    As the Farsi-speaking Iranian population continues to grow in the United States, examination of their cognitive performance is an imperative first step to providing this group with culturally competent services. Thirty-six healthy primarily Farsi-speaking Iranian adults completed Farsi-translated and adapted versions of three frequently used measures of executive/subcortical functioning: Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Trail Making Test (TMT), and Color Trails Test (CTT). Participants' performance on each measure was compared to published normative data resulting in 0-85% of cognitively and medically healthy individuals being classified as impaired depending on the executive/subcortical test score examined, with the highest impairment rates for specific WCST outcome scores. These findings raise questions for the use of published norms with Farsi-speaking Iranians residing in the US. The present study provided normative data from this group of Farsi-speaking Iranians on the Farsi-translated and adapted versions of the WCST, TMT, and CTT.

  20. United abominations: Density functional studies of heavy metal chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoendorff, George [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Carbonyl and nitrile addition to uranyl (UO22+) are studied. The competition between nitrile and water ligands in the formation of uranyl complexes is investigated. The possibility of hypercoordinated uranyl with acetone ligands is examined. Uranyl is studied with diactone alcohol ligands as a means to explain the apparent hypercoordinated uranyl. A discussion of the formation of mesityl oxide ligands is also included. A joint theory/experimental study of reactions of zwitterionic boratoiridium(I) complexes with oxazoline-based scorpionate ligands is reported. A computational study was done of the catalytic hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes with zirconium-based catalysts. Techniques are surveyed for programming for graphical processing units (GPUs) using Fortran.

  1. Effect of a functional monomer (MDP) on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsubota, Keishi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Berry, Thomas P; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of the functional monomer, 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives through integrating fatigue testing and long-term water storage. An MDP-containing self-etch adhesive, Clearfil Bond SE ONE (SE), and an experimental adhesive, MDP-free (MF), which comprised the same ingredients as SE apart from MDP, were used. Shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) were measured with or without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 6 months, or 1 yr. Although similar SBS and SFS values were obtained for SE with pre-etching and for MF after 24 h of storage in distilled water, SE with pre-etching showed higher SBS and SFS values than MF after storage in water for 6 months or 1 yr. Regardless of the pre-etching procedure, SE showed higher SBS and SFS values after 6 months of storage in distilled water than after 24 h or 1 yr. To conclude, MDP might play an important role in enhancing not only bond strength but also bond durability with respect to repeated subcritical loading after long-term water storage. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Acidity function p(a(H) gamma(Cl)) as a step to pH assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camões, Maria Filomena; Guiomar Lito, Maria

    2002-11-01

    The conventional assignment of pH reference buffer standards, pH(S), is achieved by means of a series of procedures that follow from measurement of Harned cell potentials for an electrolyte solution which is the buffer solution of interest. An intermediate step is assessment of the acidity function p( a(H) gamma(Cl))(0), the extrapolated value of a linear representation of the dependence of p( a(H) gamma(Cl)) on m(Cl) for at least three different molalities, m(Cl), of added alkali chloride (0.005; 0.010; 0.015 mol kg(-1) KCl). This experimental value can be compared with a theoretically expected value calculated from the dissociation constants of the buffer species. Whereas these calculations always give negative slopes for diprotic and triprotic acids and zero slope for monoprotic acids, experimental values with negative or positive slopes can be obtained for well fitting straight lines obtained for buffer solutions with ionic strengths from 0.0025 to 0.144 mol kg(-1). Such disagreement between theoretically and experimentally obtained values introduce an extra source of uncertainty in the establishment of pH(S) and on its traceability chain. In this work examples are presented and discussed for which the discrepancy between expected and experimental values leads to different intercept p( a(H) gamma(Cl))(0).

  3. Minimum Performance on Clinical Tests of Physical Function to Predict Walking 6,000 Steps/Day in Knee Osteoarthritis: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Hiral; Thoma, Louise M; Christiansen, Meredith B; Polakowski, Emily; Schmitt, Laura A; White, Daniel K

    2018-07-01

    Evidence of physical function difficulties, such as difficulty rising from a chair, may limit daily walking for people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to identify minimum performance thresholds on clinical tests of physical function predictive to walking ≥6,000 steps/day. This benchmark is known to discriminate people with knee OA who develop functional limitation over time from those who do not. Using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, we quantified daily walking as average steps/day from an accelerometer (Actigraph GT1M) worn for ≥10 hours/day over 1 week. Physical function was quantified using 3 performance-based clinical tests: 5 times sit-to-stand test, walking speed (tested over 20 meters), and 400-meter walk test. To identify minimum performance thresholds for daily walking, we calculated physical function values corresponding to high specificity (80-95%) to predict walking ≥6,000 steps/day. Among 1,925 participants (mean ± SD age 65.1 ± 9.1 years, mean ± SD body mass index 28.4 ± 4.8 kg/m 2 , and 55% female) with valid accelerometer data, 54.9% walked ≥6,000 steps/day. High specificity thresholds of physical function for walking ≥6,000 steps/day ranged 11.4-14.0 seconds on the 5 times sit-to-stand test, 1.13-1.26 meters/second for walking speed, or 315-349 seconds on the 400-meter walk test. Not meeting these minimum performance thresholds on clinical tests of physical function may indicate inadequate physical ability to walk ≥6,000 steps/day for people with knee OA. Rehabilitation may be indicated to address underlying impairments limiting physical function. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Functional unit and product functionality—addressing increase in consumption and demand for functionality in sustainability assessment with LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Seung Jin; Kara, Sami; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2016-01-01

    behaviour and demonstrates the vicious circle of improving product efficiency that leads to further consumption and environmental impact. To address this problem, a new framework of dynamic functional unit definition is put forward for performing comparative LCA to manage the development of product life...... consumption of products in provided services as well as in growing volumes. This article aims to present a new framework in defining a dynamic functional unit of product technologies that caters for changes in consumer behaviour and growing market. Methods: A new approach to defining the functional unit...... is demonstrated on a case study in which the analysis of historical data for two TV product technologies—CRT and LCD—is used to show how the total environmental impact is increasing due to the increased functionality which triggers an increase in the volume of the market. Despite the efforts of improving product...

  5. Altered Morphology and Function of the Lacrimal Functional Unit in Protein Kinase Cα Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Li, Zhijie; Basti, Surendra; Farley, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Protein kinase C (PKC) α plays a major role in the parasympathetic neural stimulation of lacrimal gland (LG) secretion. It also has been reported to have antiapoptotic properties and to promote cell survival. Therefore, the hypothesis for the present study was that PKCα knockout (−/−) mice have impaired ocular surface–lacrimal gland signaling, rendering them susceptible to desiccating stress and impaired corneal epithelial wound healing. In this study, the lacrimal function unit (LFU) and the stressed wound-healing response were examined in PKCα−/− mice. Methods. In PKCα+/+ control mice and PKCα−/− mice, tear production, osmolarity, and clearance rate were evaluated before and after experimental desiccating stress. Histology and immunofluorescent staining of PKC and epidermal growth factor were performed in tissues of the LFU. Cornified envelope (CE) precursor protein expression and cell proliferation were evaluated. The time course of healing and degree of neutrophil infiltration was evaluated after corneal epithelial wounding. Results. Compared with the PKCα+/+ mice, the PKCα−/− mice were noted to have significantly increased lacrimal gland weight, with enlarged, carbohydrate-rich, PAS-positive acinar cells; increased corneal epithelia permeability, with reduced CE expression; and larger conjunctival epithelial goblet cells. The PKCα−/− mice showed more rapid corneal epithelial healing, with less neutrophil infiltration and fewer proliferating cells than did the PKCα+/+ mice. Conclusions. The PKCα−/− mice showed lower tear production, which appeared to be caused by impaired secretion by the LG and conjunctival goblet cells. Despite their altered tear dynamics, the PKCα−/− mice demonstrated more rapid corneal epithelial wound healing, perhaps due to decreased neutrophil infiltration. PMID:20505191

  6. A new characterization of Bloch function in the unit ball of Cn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Jihuai.

    1989-07-01

    Bloch function in the unit disc v has many different but equivalent characterizations. Recently, a new characterization has been obtained by the study of Hankel operators. The purpose of this note is to generalize this characterization to the unit ball of C n . 7 refs

  7. On the analytical evaluation of the partition function for unit hypercubes in four dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Dass, N.D.

    1984-10-01

    The group integrations required for the analytic evaluation of the partition function for unit hypercubes in four dimensions are carried out. Modifications of the graphical rules for SU 2 group integrations cited in the literature are developed for this purpose. A complete classification of all surfaces that can be embedded in the unit hypercube is given and their individual contribution to the partition function worked out. Applications are discussed briefly. (orig.)

  8. WIMS-IST/DRAGON-IST side-step calculation of reactivity device and structural material incremental cross sections for Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmani, M.; McArthur, R.; Kim, B.G.; Kim, S.M.; Seo, H.-B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the calculation of two-group incremental cross sections for all of the reactivity devices and incore structural materials for an RFSP-IST full-core model of Wolsong NPP Unit 1, in support of the conversion of the reference plant model to two energy groups. This is of particular interest since the calculation used the new standard 'side-step' approach, which is a three-dimensional supercell method that employs the Industry Standard Toolset (IST) codes DRAGON-IST and WIMS-IST with the ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library. In this technique, the macroscopic cross sections for the fuel regions and the device material specifications are first generated using the lattice code WIMS-IST with 89 energy groups. DRAGON-IST then uses this data with a standard supercell modelling approach for the three-dimensional calculations. Incremental cross sections are calculated for the stainless-steel adjuster rods (SS-ADJ), the liquid zone control units (LZCU), the shutoff rods (SOR), the mechanical control absorbers (MCA) and various structural materials, such as guide tubes, springs, locators, brackets, adjuster cables and support bars and the moderator inlet nozzle deflectors. Isotopic compositions of the Zircaloy-2, stainless steel and Inconel X-750 alloys in these items are derived from Wolsong NPP Unit 1 history dockets. Their geometrical layouts are based on applicable design drawings. Mid-burnup fuel with no moderator poison was assumed. The incremental cross sections and key aspects of the modelling are summarized in this paper. (author)

  9. Energy-efficient specialization of functional units in a Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Essen, B.; Panda, R.; Wood, A.; Ebeling, C.; Hauck, S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional units provide the backbone of any spatial accelerator by providing the computing resources. The desire for having rich and expensive functional units is in tension with producing a regular and energy-efficient computing fabric. This paper explores the design trade-off between complex, universal functional units and simpler, limited functional units. We show that a modest amount of specialization reduces the area-delay-energy product of an optimized architecture to 0.86x a baseline architecture. Furthermore, we provide a design guideline that allows an architect to customize the contents of the computing fabric just by examining the profile of benchmarks within the application domains. Functional units are the core of compute-intensive spatial accelerators. They perform the computation of interest with support from local storage and communication structures. Ideally, the functional units will provide rich functionality, supporting operations ranging from simple addition, to fused multiply-adds, to advanced transcendental functions and domain specific operations like add-compare-select. However, the total opportunity cost to support the more complex operations is a function of the cost of the hardware, the rate of occurrence of the operation in the application domain, and the inefficiency of emulating the operation with simpler operators. Examples of operations that are typically emulated in spatial accelerators are division and trigonometric functions, which can be solved using table-lookup based algorithms and the CORDIC algorithm. One reason to avoid having direct hardware support for complex operations in a tiled architecture like a Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Array (CGRA) is that the expensive hardware will typically need to be replicated in some or all of the architecture's tiles. Tiled architecture are designed such that their tiles are either homogeneous or heterogeneous. Homogeneous architectures are simpler to design but heterogeneous

  10. [Lower limb stump reconstruction with a functional calcaneo-plantar unit free flap. A series of 16 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, S; Dubert, T; Koupatadze, D; Nabokov, V; Polosov, R

    1999-04-01

    The main objective of surgery, once amputation is inevitable, is to preserve a functional stump. This report describes the immediate reconstruction of 16 leg stumps in children by transfer of a functional calcaneo-plantar unit. Of these, 3 were thigh and 13 were lower leg reconstructions. Amputation was performed for tumor in 4 cases, and was due to accidents in the remaining twelve. The main technical features of flap preparation are preservation of the calcaneum branch and attachment of the heel skin to the greater tuberosity of the calcaneum. One case resulted in failure due to vascular thrombosis. The other 15 cases resulted in bone consolidation after an average of 45 days, sensitive protection by 70 days, and very good trophic and protective results. The provision of good distal pressure area encourages overall development of the child. There was no morbidity at the donor site, and because there is no major muscle mass in the distal fragment, the overall risk is very low compared to that of total proximal leg replantation. The transfer of functional calcaneo-plantar tissue as a single unit is the best strategy for one-step restoration of good distal support area for the stump. All surgeons liable to perform leg amputations should be aware of this technical approach.

  11. Fast analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories with graphics processing units-Radial distribution function histogramming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Benjamin G.; Stone, John E.; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU's memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 s per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis.

  12. First steps of integrated spatial modeling of titanium, zirconium, and rare earth element resources within the Coastal Plain sediments of the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Fey, David L.; Budahn, James R.; Smith, Steven M.; Shah, Anjana K.

    2015-01-01

    The Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States has extensive, unconsolidated sedimentary deposits that are enriched in heavy minerals containing titanium, zirconium, and rare earth element resources. Areas favorable for exploration and development of these resources are being identified by geochemical data, which are supplemented with geological, geophysical, hydrological, and geographical data. The first steps of this analysis have been completed. The concentrations of lanthanum, yttrium, and titanium tend to decrease as distance from the Piedmont (which is the likely source of these resources) increases and are moderately correlated with airborne measurements of equivalent thorium concentration. The concentrations of lanthanum, yttrium, and titanium are relatively high in those watersheds that adjoin the Piedmont, south of the Cape Fear Arch. Although this relation suggests that the concentrations are related to the watersheds, it may be simply an independent regional trend. The concentration of zirconium is unrelated to the distance from the Piedmont, the equivalent thorium concentration, and the watershed. These findings establish a foundation for more sophisticated analyses using integrated spatial modeling.

  13. A step forward towards understanding the severe accident evolution in Fukushima: Parametric analyses of Unit-I with MELCOR 2.I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia Martin, M.; Lopez del Pra, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima accident on March 11 2011, largely affected nuclear community all over the world. Immediately, many R and D organizations and companies drew their attention to the facts that were being released by Japanese authorities, so that the most through understanding of the situation could be gained at the moment. This paper synthesizes the major progress achieved by CIEMAT in this international environment. The specific target pursued is the comprehension of the severe accident evolution, particularly the progression followed in the unit 1 of Fukushima Daiichi. To do so, the MELCOR 2.1 code has been used to model 6 Fukushima-like SBO sequences in a BWR-Mark I reactor. Particular emphasis has been given to understand the potential impact of systems like the isolation condenser (IC) and the over-pressure protection system. As expected, availability of AC power from a diesel would have drastically changed the scenario, particularly in the containment, due to actuation of DW (Dry-Well) sprays. IC actuation might have delayed the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure for hours, if they had performed according to their design. Contrarily, a stuck-open safety relief valve would have resulted in an earlier PRV failure. A definitive picture of the scenario is still far away; however, these results may be seen as a step forward. (Author)

  14. A step forward towards understanding the severe accident evolution in Fukushima: Parametric analyses of Unit-I with MELCOR 2.I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia Martin, M.; Lopez del Pra, C.

    2013-03-01

    The Fukushima accident on March 11 2011, largely affected nuclear community all over the world. Immediately, many R and D organizations and companies drew their attention to the facts that were being released by Japanese authorities, so that the most through understanding of the situation could be gained at the moment. This paper synthesizes the major progress achieved by CIEMAT in this international environment. The specific target pursued is the comprehension of the severe accident evolution, particularly the progression followed in the unit 1 of Fukushima Daiichi. To do so, the MELCOR 2.1 code has been used to model 6 Fukushima-like SBO sequences in a BWR-Mark I reactor. Particular emphasis has been given to understand the potential impact of systems like the isolation condenser (IC) and the over-pressure protection system. As expected, availability of AC power from a diesel would have drastically changed the scenario, particularly in the containment, due to actuation of DW (Dry-Well) sprays. IC actuation might have delayed the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure for hours, if they had performed according to their design. Contrarily, a stuck-open safety relief valve would have resulted in an earlier PRV failure. A definitive picture of the scenario is still far away; however, these results may be seen as a step forward. (Author)

  15. The instrument control unit of SPICA SAFARI: a macro-unit to host all the digital control functionalities of the spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Biondi, David; Saggin, Bortolino; Shatalina, Irina; Viterbini, Maurizio; Giusi, Giovanni; Liu, Scige J.; Cerulli-Irelli, Paquale; Van Loon, Dennis; Cara, Christophe

    2012-09-01

    We present the preliminary design of the Instrument Control Unit (ICU) of the SpicA FAR infrared Instrument (SAFARI), an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) designed to give continuous wavelength coverage in both photometric and spectroscopic modes from around 34 to 210 µm. Due to the stringent requirements in terms of mass and volume, the overall SAFARI warm electronics will be composed by only two main units: Detector Control Unit and ICU. ICU is therefore a macro-unit incorporating the four digital sub-units dedicated to the control of the overall instrument functionalities: the Cooler Control Unit, the Mechanism Control Unit, the Digital processing Unit and the Power Supply Unit. Both the mechanical solution adopted to host the four sub-units and the internal electrical architecture are presented as well as the adopted redundancy approach.

  16. Discriminants and functional equations for polynomials orthogonal on the unit circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.E.H.; Witte, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    We derive raising and lowering operators for orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle and find second order differential and q-difference equations for these polynomials. A general functional equation is found which allows one to relate the zeros of the orthogonal polynomials to the stationary values of an explicit quasi-energy and implies recurrences on the orthogonal polynomial coefficients. We also evaluate the discriminants and quantized discriminants of polynomials orthogonal on the unit circle

  17. Performance characterization of Siemens primus linear accelerator under small monitor unit and small segments for the implementation of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reena, P.; Pai, Rajeshri; Gupta, Tejpal; Rajeev, S.; Dayananda, S.; Jamema, S.V.; Deepak, D.

    2006-01-01

    Implementation of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) needs careful understanding of the accelerator start-up characteristic to ensure accurate and precise delivery of radiation dose to patient. The dosimetric characteristic of a Siemens Primus linear accelerator (LA) which delivers 6 and 18 MV x-rays at the dose rate of 300 and 500 monitor unit (MU) per minutes (min) respectively was studied under the condition of small MU ranging from 1 to 100. Dose monitor linearity was studied at different dose calibration parameter (D1 C O) by measuring ionization at 10 cm depth in a solid water phantom using a 0.6 cc ionization chamber. Monitor unit stability was studied from different intensity modulated (IM) groups comprising various combinations of MU per field and number of fields. Stability of beam flatness and symmetry was investigated under normal and IMRT mode for 20x20 cm 2 field under small MU using a 2D Profiler kept isocentrically at 5 cm depth. Inter segment response was investigated form 1 to 10 MU by measuring the dose per MU from various IM groups, each consisting of four segments with inter-segment separation of 2 cm. In the range 1-4 MU, the dose linearity error was more than 5% (max -32% at 1 MU) for 6 MV x-rays at factory calibrated D1 C O value of 6000. The dose linearity error was reduced to -10.95% at 1 MU, within -3% for 2 and 3 MU and ± 1% for MU ≥4 when the D1 C O was subsequently tuned at 4500. For 18 MV x-rays, the dose linearity error at factory calibrated D1 C O value of 4400 was within ± 1% for MU ≥3 with maximum of -13.5 observed at 1 MU. For both the beam energies and MU/field ≥4, the stability of monitor unit tested for different IM groups was within ± 1% of the dose from the normal treatment field. This variation increases to -2.6% for 6 MV and -2.7% for 18 MV x-rays for 2 MU/field. No significant variation was observed in the stability of beam profile measured from normal and IMRT mode. The beam flatness was

  18. Performance characterization of siemens primus linear accelerator under small monitor unit and small segments for the implementation of step-and-shoot intensitymodulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT needs careful understanding of the accelerator start-up characteristic to ensure accurate and precise delivery of radiation dose to patient. The dosimetric characteristic of a Siemens Primus linear accelerator (LA which delivers 6 and 18 MV x-rays at the dose rate of 300 and 500 monitor unit (MU per minutes (min respectively was studied under the condition of small MU ranging from 1 to 100. Dose monitor linearity was studied at different dose calibration parameter (D1_C0 by measuring ionization at 10 cm depth in a solid water phantom using a 0.6 cc ionization chamber. Monitor unit stability was studied from different intensity modulated (IM groups comprising various combinations of MU per field and number of fields. Stability of beam flatness and symmetry was investigated under normal and IMRT mode for 20x20 cm2 field under small MU using a 2D Profiler kept isocentrically at 5 cm depth. Inter segment response was investigated form 1 to 10 MU by measuring the dose per MU from various IM groups, each consisting of four segments with inter-segment separation of 2 cm. In the range 1-4 MU, the dose linearity error was more than 5% (max -32% at 1 MU for 6 MV x-rays at factory calibrated D1_C0 value of 6000. The dose linearity error was reduced to -10.95% at 1 MU, within -3% for 2 and 3 MU and ±1% for MU ≥4 when the D1_C0 was subsequently tuned at 4500. For 18 MV x-rays, the dose linearity error at factory calibrated D1_C0 value of 4400 was within ±1% for MU ≥ 3 with maximum of -13.5 observed at 1 MU. For both the beam energies and MU/field ≥ 4, the stability of monitor unit tested for different IM groups was within ±1% of the dose from the normal treatment field. This variation increases to -2.6% for 6 MV and -2.7% for 18 MV x-rays for 2 MU/field. No significant variation was observed in the stability of beam profile measured from normal and IMRT mode. The beam flatness

  19. Luria’s model of the functional units of the brain and the neuropsychology of dreaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Téllez A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, neuropsychology has focused on identifying the brain mechanisms of specific psychological processes, such as attention, motor skills, perception, memory, language, and consciousness, as well as their corresponding disorders. However, there are psychological processes that have received little attention in this field, such as dreaming. This study examined the clinical and experimental neuropsychological research relevant to dreaming, ranging from sleep disorders in patients with brain damage, to brain functioning during REM sleep, using different methods of brain imaging. These findings were analyzed within the framework of Luria’s Three Functional Unit Model of the Brain, and a proposal was made to explain certain of the essential characteristics of dreaming. This explanation describes how, during dreaming, an activation of the First Functional Unit occurs, comprising the reticular formation of the brainstem; this activates, in turn, the Second Functional Unit — which is formed by the parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes and Unit L, which is comprised of the limbic system, as well as simultaneous hypo-functioning of the Third Functional Unit (frontal lobe. This activity produces a perception of hallucinatory images of various sensory modes, as well as a lack of inhibition, a non-selfreflexive thought process, and a lack of planning and direction of such oneiric images. Dreaming is considered a type of natural confabulation, similar to the one that occurs in patients with frontal lobe damage or schizophrenia. The study also suggests that the confabulatory, bizarre, and impulsive nature of dreaming has a function in the cognitiveemotional homeostasis that aids proper brain function throughout the day.

  20. Power unit impedance and distance protection functions during faults in the external power grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Lizer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the problem of the risk of an unnecessary tripping of a generation unit’s underimpedance protection functions in circumstances of generator power swings following elimination of long-lasting fault in the external power grid. The fi rst part describes typical solutions of a generator impedance protection function (21e and unit distance protection function (21s. Starting characteristics of these protection functions are shown, as well as their typical operating logics and ways of calculating their settings. Then exemplary (the most common solutions of unit under-impedance relays power swing blocking functions are described. Following this introduction, the issues of the threat of unnecessary operation of fast-tripping protection zones of 21e and 21s protection functions are described, which arises in the circumstances of generator asynchronous power swings occurring after elimination of long-lasting faults in the grid supplied by the power unit. The paper also shows that the available power swing blocking functions may not be able to correctly detect the described conditions, thus allowing the unnecessary operation of under-impedance relays. How an impedance calculation algorithm affects the impedance trajectory seen by a protection relay is also resented.

  1. Weighted Anisotropic Integral Representations of Holomorphic Functions in the Unit Ball of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Karapetyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain weighted integral representations for spaces of functions holomorphic in the unit ball and belonging to area-integrable weighted -classes with “anisotropic” weight function of the type ∏=1(1−|1|2−|2|2−⋯−||2, =(1,2,…,∈. The corresponding kernels of these representations are estimated, written in an integral form, and even written out in an explicit form (for =2.

  2. One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tost, H.; Meyer-Lindenberg, A.; Ruf, M.; Demirakca, T.; Grimm, O.; Henn, F.A.; Ende, G.

    2005-01-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes. (orig.) [de

  3. Analytical total reaction cross-section calculations via Fermi-type functions. I. Fermi-step nuclear densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abul-Magd, A.Y.; Talib aly al Hinai, M.

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of Glauber's multiple scattering theory we propose a closed form expression for the total nucleus-nucleus reaction cross-section. We adopt the Gaussian and the two-parameter Fermi step radial shapes to describe the nuclear density distributions of the projectile and the target, respectively. The present formula is used to study different systems over a wide energy range including low energy reactions, where the role of the Coulomb repulsion is taken into account. The present predictions reasonably reproduce experiment

  4. The treatment of climate science in Integrated Assessment Modelling: integration of climate step function response in an energy system integrated assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessens, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) are used as crucial inputs to policy-making on climate change. These models simulate aspect of the economy and climate system to deliver future projections and to explore the impact of mitigation and adaptation policies. The IAMs' climate representation is extremely important as it can have great influence on future political action. The step-function-response is a simple climate model recently developed by the UK Met Office and is an alternate method of estimating the climate response to an emission trajectory directly from global climate model step simulations. Good et al., (2013) have formulated a method of reconstructing general circulation models (GCMs) climate response to emission trajectories through an idealized experiment. This method is called the "step-response approach" after and is based on an idealized abrupt CO2 step experiment results. TIAM-UCL is a technology-rich model that belongs to the family of, partial-equilibrium, bottom-up models, developed at University College London to represent a wide spectrum of energy systems in 16 regions of the globe (Anandarajah et al. 2011). The model uses optimisation functions to obtain cost-efficient solutions, in meeting an exogenously defined set of energy-service demands, given certain technological and environmental constraints. Furthermore, it employs linear programming techniques making the step function representation of the climate change response adapted to the model mathematical formulation. For the first time, we have introduced the "step-response approach" method developed at the UK Met Office in an IAM, the TIAM-UCL energy system, and we investigate the main consequences of this modification on the results of the model in term of climate and energy system responses. The main advantage of this approach (apart from the low computational cost it entails) is that its results are directly traceable to the GCM involved and closely connected to well-known methods of

  5. Synthesis and Excellent Duplex Stability of Oligonucleotides Containing 2'-Amino-LNA Functionalized with Galactose Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Ries, Annika; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of oligonucleotides containing internally-attached galactose and triantennary galactose units has been developed based on click chemistry between 2'-N-alkyne 2'-amino-LNA nucleosides and azido-functionalized galactosyl building blocks. The synthesized...

  6. Biomedical Mathematics, Unit VII: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions. Student Text. Revised Version, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    This collection of lessons, exercises, and experiments deals with exponential and logarithmic mathematical functions in the context of biomedical situations. Typical units in this collection provide discussion of the biomedical problem or setting, discussion of the mathematical concept, several example problems and solutions, and a set of problems…

  7. Unit-based functional IDDT testing for aging degradation monitoring in a VLIW processor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yong; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, functional unit-based IDDT testing has been applied for a 90nm VLIW processor to monitor its aging degradation. This technique can provide health data for reliability evaluation as used in e.g. prognostic software for lifetime prediction. The test-program development based on the

  8. Impact of soil moisture deficit on ecosystem function across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Moran; Morgan Ross; Mallory Burns

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative effect of recent prolonged warm drought on regional ecosystem function is still uncertain. Large regions of the United States are experiencing new hydroclimatic conditions with extreme variability in climate drivers such as total precipitation, precipitation patterns (e.g., storm size, intensity and frequency), and seasonal temperatures.

  9. A PDMS/paper/glass hybrid microfluidic biochip integrated with aptamer-functionalized graphene oxide nano-biosensors for one-step multiplexed pathogen detection

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Peng; Li, XiuJun; Dominguez, Delfina C.; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-01-01

    Infectious pathogens often cause serious public health concerns throughout the world. There is an increasing demand for simple, rapid and sensitive approaches for multiplexed pathogen detection. In this paper we have developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/paper/glass hybrid microfluidic system integrated with aptamer-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) nano-biosensors for simple, one-step, multiplexed pathogen detection. The paper substrate used in this hybrid microfluidic system facilitated ...

  10. Functional SNP associated with birth weight in independent populations identified with a permutation step added to GBLUP-GWAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted as an initial assessment of a newly available genotyping assay containing about 34,000 common SNP included on previous SNP chips, and 199,000 sequence variants predicted to affect gene function. Objectives were to identify functional variants associated with birth weight in...

  11. First Steps in FAP: Experiences of Beginning Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Therapist with an Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Client

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduchi, Katia; Schoendorff, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Practicing Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) for the first time can seem daunting to therapists. Establishing a deep and intense therapeutic relationship, identifying FAP's therapeutic targets of clinically relevant behaviors, and using contingent reinforcement to help clients emit more functional behavior in the therapeutic relationship all…

  12. Functionalization of monolithic and porous three-dimensional graphene by one-step chitosan electrodeposition for enzymatic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiyang; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Tianshu; Li, Dan; Xi, Fengna; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2014-11-26

    Biological modification of monolithic and porous 3D graphene is of great significance for extending its application in fabricating highly sensitive biosensors. The present work reports on the first biofunctionalization of monolithic and freestanding 3D graphene foam for one-step preparation of reagentless enzymatic biosensors by controllable chitosan (CS) electrodeposition technology. Using a homogeneous three-component electrodeposition solution containing a ferrocene (Fc) grafted CS hybrid (Fc-CS), glucose oxidase (GOD), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a homogeneous biocomposite film of Fc-CS/SWNTs/GOD was immobilized on the surface of 3D graphene foam by one-step electrodeposition. The Fc groups grafted on chitosan can be stably immobilized on the 3D graphene surface and keep their original electrochemical activity. The SWNTs doped into the Fc-CS matrix act as a nanowire to facilitate electron transfer and improve the conductivity of the biocomposite film. Combined with the extraordinary properties of 3D graphene foam including large active surface area, high conductivity, and fast mass transport dynamics, the 3D graphene based enzymatic biosensor achieved a large linear range (5.0 μM to 19.8 mM), a low detection limit (1.2 μM), and rapid response (reaching the 95% steady-state response within 8 s) for reagentless detection of glucose in the phosphate buffer solution.

  13. One-step synthesis of DNA functionalized cadmium-free quantum dots and its application in FRET-based protein sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cuiling, E-mail: clzhang@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Ding, Caiping [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhou, Guohua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang, 524048 (China); Xue, Qin [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Xian, Yuezhong, E-mail: yzxian@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2017-03-08

    DNA functionalized quantum dots (QDs) are promising nanoprobes for the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensing. Herein, cadmium-free DNA functionalized Mn-doped ZnS (DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+}) QDs were successfully synthesized by one-step route. As-synthesized QDs show excellent photo-stability with the help of PAA and DNA. Then, we constructed a novel FRET model based on the QDs and WS{sub 2} nanosheets as the energy donor-acceptor pairs, which was successfully applied for the protein detection through the terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA assay. This work not only explores the potential bioapplication of the DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs, but also provides a platform for the investigation of small molecule-protein interaction. - Highlights: • The stable and cadmium-free DNA functionalized ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs were successfully synthesized through a facile one-step route. • We constructed a novel FRET system based on one-step synthesized DNA-ZnS:Mn{sup 2+} QDs (donor) and WS{sub 2} nanosheets (acceptor). • The FRET-based strategy was applied for the detection of streptavidin and folate receptor by combining TPSMLD and Exo III.

  14. Psychiatric disorders in children attending a Nigerian primary care unit: functional impairment and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde-Ayinmode Mosunmola

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is dearth of data on the level of functional impairment and risk factors for psychiatric morbidity in children attending primary care services in developing countries like Nigeria. The risk factors for psychiatric morbidity and functional impairment in children attending the primary care unit of a teaching hospital in Ilorin, Nigeria was therefore investigated to obtain data that could be used in improving service provision by primary care physicians. Methods A cross-sectional two-stage design was employed for the study. The first stage involved administration of the Child Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ to 350 children while the children’s version of the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia was used for the second stage involving 157 children, all high scorers on CBQ (score of ≥ 7 and 30% of low scorers (score  In addition, the Children Global Assessment Scale was used to assess the functional status of the children (score of ≤ 70 indicates functional impairment while the mothers’ mental health status was assessed with the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire, a score of 3 or more on this instrument indicate presence of mental morbidity. Results It was observed that 11.4% of the children had diagnosable psychiatric disorders and 7.1% were functionally impaired; and those with psychiatric disorders were more functionally impaired than those without. Thus, significant negative correlation was noted between CBQ scores and CGAS (r = 0.53; p  Conclusions Child psychiatric disorders are prevalent in the primary care unit studied. Many of the risk factors identified in the study population are modifiable. Collaborative efforts between psychiatrists and primary care physicians could therefore help to reduce level of risk and functional impairment and psychiatric morbidity among children attending the primary care unit studied. It could also help improve referral rates of

  15. Reliability of wireless monitoring using a wearable patch sensor in high-risk surgical patients at a step-down unit in the Netherlands: a clinical validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breteler, Martine J M; Huizinga, Erik; van Loon, Kim; Leenen, Luke P H; Dohmen, Daan A J; Kalkman, Cor J; Blokhuis, Taco J

    2018-02-27

    Intermittent vital signs measurements are the current standard on hospital wards, typically recorded once every 8 hours. Early signs of deterioration may therefore be missed. Recent innovations have resulted in 'wearable' sensors, which may capture patient deterioration at an earlier stage. The objective of this study was to determine whether a wireless 'patch' sensor is able to reliably measure respiratory and heart rate continuously in high-risk surgical patients. The secondary objective was to explore the potential of the wireless sensor to serve as a safety monitor. In an observational methods comparisons study, patients were measured with both the wireless sensor and bedside routine standard for at least 24 hours. University teaching hospital, single centre. Twenty-five postoperative surgical patients admitted to a step-down unit. Primary outcome measures were limits of agreement and bias of heart rate and respiratory rate. Secondary outcome measures were sensor reliability, defined as time until first occurrence of data loss. 1568 hours of vital signs data were analysed. Bias and 95% limits of agreement for heart rate were -1.1 (-8.8 to 6.5) beats per minute. For respiration rate, bias was -2.3 breaths per minute with wide limits of agreement (-15.8 to 11.2 breaths per minute). Median filtering over a 15 min period improved limits of agreement of both respiration and heart rate. 63% of the measurements were performed without data loss greater than 2 min. Overall data loss was limited (6% of time). The wireless sensor is capable of accurately measuring heart rate, but accuracy for respiratory rate was outside acceptable limits. Remote monitoring has the potential to contribute to early recognition of physiological decline in high-risk patients. Future studies should focus on the ability to detect patient deterioration on low care environments and at home after discharge. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of

  16. The role of the lacrimal functional unit in the pathophysiology of dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Michael E; Gao, Jianping; Siemasko, Karyn F; Beuerman, Roger W; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2004-03-01

    The majority of dry eye symptoms are due to a chronic inflammation of the lacrimal functional unit resulting in a loss of tear film integrity and normal function. This leads to a reduction in the ability of the ocular surface to respond to environmental challenges. The underlying cause of tear film dysfunction is the alteration of tear aqueous, mucin, and lipid components. This may result from a systemic autoimmune disease or a local autoimmune event. A lack of systemic androgen support to the lacrimal gland has been shown to be a facilitative factor in the initiation of this type of pathophysiology. Tear secretion is controlled by the lacrimal functional unit consisting of the ocular surface (cornea, conjunctiva, accessory lacrimal glands, and meibomian glands), the main lacrimal gland and the interconnecting innervation. If any portion of this functional unit is compromised, lacrimal gland support to the ocular surface is impeded. Factors such as neurogenic inflammation and T cell involvement in the disease pathogenesis as well as newly developed animal models of ocular surface inflammation are discussed.

  17. Dipole moments associated with edge atoms; a comparative study on stepped Pt, Au and W surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besocke, K.; Krahl-Urban, B.; Wagner, H.

    1977-01-01

    Work function measurements have been performed on stepped Pt and Au surfaces with (111) terraces and on W surfaces with (110) terraces. In each case the work function decreases linearly with increasing step density and depends on the step orientation. The work function changes are attributed to dipole moments associated with the step edges. The dipole moments per unit step length are larger for open edge structures than for densely packed ones. The dipole moments for Pt are about twice as large as for Au and W. (Auth.)

  18. Corelations between the landslides and the morphological and functional units of slopes in the Transylvanian Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. ROȘIAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fluvial morphology in the Transylvanian Basin, in form of an alternation of water divides and valley corridors, indicates favourable conditions for the genesis of geomorphologic processes. Under this aspect two sections stand out within this type of processes: river beds and slopes. In this paper, the emphasis is on the processes, developed on slopes. Water erosion and mass movement processes can be observed on their surface. From all mass movement processes, the emphasis will be put on the landslides. They will be observed in correlation with the morphologic and functional units of the slopes from different regional units of Transylvanian Basin. Eight case studies were taken into consideration regarding this aspect. Thus, we noticed that landslides particularly develop in the median part of the slopes which is corresponding to the maximum processual dynamic and transfer unit.

  19. A case study examination of structure and function in a state health department chronic disease unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Jeanne

    2015-04-01

    I explored the structural and operational practices of the chronic disease prevention and control unit of a state health department and proposed a conceptual model of structure, function, and effectiveness for future study. My exploratory case study examined 7 elements of organizational structure and practice. My interviews with staff and external stakeholders of a single chronic disease unit yielded quantitative and qualitative data that I coded by perspective, process, relationship, and activity. I analyzed these for patterns and emerging themes. Chi-square analysis revealed significant correlations among collaboration with goal ambiguity, political support, and responsiveness, and evidence-based decisions with goal ambiguity and responsiveness. Although my study design did not permit conclusions about causality, my findings suggested that some elements of the model might facilitate effectiveness for chronic disease units and should be studied further. My findings might have important implications for identifying levers around which capacity can be built that may strengthen effectiveness.

  20. The roles and functions of occupational health nurses in Brazil and in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Hong, Oi Saeng; Morris, Judy A; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi

    2010-01-01

    Cross-sectional exploratory research developed to outline the roles and functions of occupational health nurses (OHNs) in Brazil and compare them with those in the United States. The sample consisted of 154 Brazilian occupational health nurses. First, the instrument Job Analysis Survey of Occupational Health Nursing Practice was translated into Portuguese, followed by data collection and data analysis, comparing the results of the proposed study in Brazil with the findings of a job delineation study conducted in the United States. It was found that most were women, white, between 41 and 50 years of age and working primarily at hospitals or medical centers as clinicians and managers/administrators. Besides, it was found that most Brazilian OHNs spend more time in managerial roles, followed by consultant and educator responsibilities while, in the United States, OHNs spend significantly more time in education/advisory roles.

  1. Hydrologic Synthesis Across the Critical Zone Observatory Network: A Step Towards Understanding the Coevolution of Critical Zone Function and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlostowski, A. N.; Harman, C. J.; Molotch, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    The physical and biological architecture of the Earth's Critical Zone controls hydrologic partitioning, storage, and chemical evolution of precipitated water. The Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) Network provides an ideal platform to explore linkages between catchment structure and hydrologic function across a gradient of geologic and climatic settings. A legacy of hypothesis-motivated research at each site has generated a wealth of data characterizing the architecture and hydrologic function of the critical zone. We will present a synthesis of this data that aims to elucidate and explain (in the sense of making mutually intelligible) variations in hydrologic function across the CZO network. Top-down quantitative signatures of the storage and partitioning of water at catchment scales extracted from precipitation, streamflow, and meteorological data will be compared with each other, and provide quantitative benchmarks to assess differences in perceptual models of hydrologic function at each CZO site. Annual water balance analyses show that CZO sites span a wide gradient of aridity and evaporative partitioning. The aridity index (PET/P) ranges from 0.3 at Luquillo to 4.3 at Reynolds Creek, while the evaporative index (E/P) ranges from 0.3 at Luquillo (Rio Mamayes) to 0.9 at Reynolds Creek (Reynolds Creek Outlet). Snow depth and SWE observations reveal that snowpack is an important seasonal storage reservoir at three sites: Boulder, Jemez, Reynolds Creek and Southern Sierra. Simple dynamical models are also used to infer seasonal patterns of subsurface catchment storage. A root-zone water balance model reveals unique seasonal variations in plant-available water storage. Seasonal patterns of plant-available storage are driven by the asynchronicity of seasonal precipitation and evaporation cycles. Catchment sensitivity functions are derived at each site to infer relative changes in hydraulic storage (the apparent storage reservoir responsible for modulating streamflow

  2. Single step 18F-labeling of dimeric cycloRGD for functional PET imaging of tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zhibo; Lozada, Jerome; Wong, May Q.; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Yapp, Donald; Perrin, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Arylboronates afford rapid aqueous 18 F-labeling via the creation of a highly polar 18 F-aryltrifluoroborate anion ( 18 F-ArBF 3 − ). Hypothesis: Radiosynthesis of an 18 F-ArBF 3 − can be successfully applied to a clinically relevant peptide. To test this hypothesis, we labeled dimeric-cylcoRGD, [c(RGDfK)] 2 E because a) it is molecularly complex and provides a challenging substrate to test the application of this technique, and b) [c(RGDfK)] 2 E has already been labeled via several 18 F-labeling methods which provide for a preliminary comparison. Goal: To validate this labeling method in the context of a complex and clinically relevant tracer to show tumor-specific uptake ex vivo with representative PET images in vivo. Methods: An arylborimidine was conjugated to [c(RGDfK)] 2 E to give the precursor [c(RGDfK)] 2 E-ArB(dan), which was aliquoted and stored at − 20 °C. Aliquots of 10 or 25 nmol, containing only micrograms of precursor, were labeled using relatively low levels of 18 F-activity. Following purification eight mice (pre-blocked/unblocked) with U87M xenograft tumors were injected with [c(RGDfK)] 2 E- 18 F-ArBF 3 − (n = 4) for ex vivo tissue dissection. Two sets of mice (pre-blocked/unblocked) were also imaged with PET–CT (n = 2). Results: The [c(RGDfK)] 2 E-ArB(dan) is converted within 15 min to [c(RGDfK)] 2 E- 18 F-ArBF 3 − in isolated radiochemical yields of ∼ 10% (n = 3) at a minimum effective specific activity of 0.3 Ci/μmol. Biodistribution shows rapid clearance to the bladder via the kidney resulting in high tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios of > 9 and > 6 respectively while pre-blocking with [c(RGDfK)] 2 E showed high tumor specificity. PET imaging showed good contrast between tumor and non-target tissues confirming the biodistribution data. Conclusion: An arylborimidine-RGD peptide is rapidly 18 F-labeled in one step, in good yield, at useful specific activity. Biodistribution studies with blocking controls

  3. High-Throughput Behavioral Screens: the First Step towards Finding Genes Involved in Vertebrate Brain Function Using Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gerlai

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish has been in the forefront of developmental biology for three decades and has become a favorite of geneticists. Due to the accumulated genetic knowledge and tools developed for the zebrafish it is gaining popularity in other disciplines, including neuroscience. The zebrafish offers a compromise between system complexity (it is a vertebrate similar in many ways to our own species and practical simplicity (it is small, easy to keep, and prolific. Such features make zebrafish an excellent choice for high throughput mutation and drug screening. For the identification of mutation or drug induced alteration of brain function arguably the best methods are behavioral test paradigms. This review does not present experimental examples for the identification of particular genes or drugs. Instead it describes how behavioral screening methods may enable one to find functional alterations in the vertebrate brain. Furthermore, the review is not comprehensive. The behavioral test examples presented are biased according to the personal interests of the author. They will cover research areas including learning and memory, fear and anxiety, and social behavior. Nevertheless, the general principles will apply to other functional domains and should represent a snapshot of the rapidly evolving behavioral screening field with zebrafish.

  4. The functional unit of Japanese word naming: evidence from masked priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kiyama, Sachiko; Tamaoka, Katsuo; Kinoshita, Sachiko; Heij, Wido La; Schiller, Niels O

    2011-11-01

    Theories of language production generally describe the segment as the basic unit in phonological encoding (e.g., Dell, 1988; Levelt, Roelofs, & Meyer, 1999). However, there is also evidence that such a unit might be language specific. Chen, Chen, and Dell (2002), for instance, found no effect of single segments when using a preparation paradigm. To shed more light on the functional unit of phonological encoding in Japanese, a language often described as being mora based, we report the results of 4 experiments using word reading tasks and masked priming. Experiment 1 demonstrated using Japanese kana script that primes, which overlapped in the whole mora with target words, sped up word reading latencies but not when just the onset overlapped. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated a possible role of script by using combinations of romaji (Romanized Japanese) and hiragana; again, facilitation effects were found only when the whole mora and not the onset segment overlapped. Experiment 4 distinguished mora priming from syllable priming and revealed that the mora priming effects obtained in the first 3 experiments are also obtained when a mora is part of a syllable. Again, no priming effect was found for single segments. Our findings suggest that the mora and not the segment (phoneme) is the basic functional phonological unit in Japanese language production planning.

  5. Assessment of the integrity and functional requirement of moderator pump-motor units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.; Chawla, D.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1995-01-01

    The design of various active components in a nuclear power plant calls for a satisfactory analysis of these components for various loadings from the point of view of safety because a designated number of these components must always remain functional. Presented herein is the structural and seismic qualification of one the active components namely the moderator system pump-motor units for a typical PHWR. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs

  6. Implementation of the Pragmatic Function of Phraseological Units in a Literary Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Yuryevna Belozerova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the identification and study of the pragmatic functions of phraseological units in modern fiction for teenagers using the example of the literary work A Perfect 10 by Chris Higgins (2013. In the present analysis of idioms the author relies on the fact that a language (as a form of expression can act as a key to the study and understanding of human communication. The idioms containing indirect characteristics of an emotional state of a person are chosen to be the object of the study. The analysis of the functional and pragmatic properties of English idioms is chosen to be the subject of the study. It was established that the phraseological units in the text of the novel by Chris Higgins are used in order to: show the emotional state; transmit the emotional stress; express the aggression and confidence in victory; express a negative attitude towards the situation; impose a subjective view on the reader; implement a positive, descriptive and pragmatic attitude with initially negative value; implement positive subjective evaluation. The analyzed phraseological units reveal the conditions and goals of situational dialogues, as well as reflect the knowledge, thoughts and ideas about the world in the field of interpersonal relations of teenagers. The main attention is given to the pragmatic aspect of the idiom function for the transmission of emotional and evaluative (positive and negative values in the process of communication. The targeted effects of phraseological units on the reader are considered as the realization of the pragmatic functions of idioms and are clearly transmitted to the reader

  7. Safety aspects of postanesthesia care unit discharge without motor function assessment after spinal anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postanesthesia care unit (PACU) discharge without observation of lower limb motor function after spinal anesthesia has been suggested to signifcantly reduce PACU stay and enhance resource optimization and early rehabilitation but without enough data to allow clinical recommendations...... or knee arthroplasty was noninferior to motor function assessment in achieving length of stay 4 days or less or 30-day readmissions. Because a nonsignifcant tendency toward increased adverse events during the frst 24h in the ward was discovered, further safety data are needed in patients without...

  8. Functional unit, technological dynamics, and scaling properties for the life cycle energy of residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijia, Stephane; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Williams, Eric

    2012-02-07

    Prior LCA studies take the operational phase to include all energy use within a residence, implying a functional unit of all household activities, but then exclude related supply chains such as production of food, appliances, and household chemicals. We argue that bounding the functional unit to provision of a climate controlled space better focuses the LCA on the building, rather than activities that occur within a building. The second issue explored in this article is how technological change in the operational phase affects life cycle energy. Heating and cooling equipment is replaced at least several times over the lifetime of a residence; improved efficiency of newer equipment affects life cycle energy use. The third objective is to construct parametric models to describe LCA results for a family of related products. We explore these three issues through a case study of energy use of residences: one-story and two-story detached homes, 1,500-3,500 square feet in area, located in Phoenix, Arizona, built in 2002 and retired in 2051. With a restricted functional unit and accounting for technological progress, approximately 30% of a building's life cycle energy can be attributed to materials and construction, compared to 0.4-11% in previous studies.

  9. Understanding the Form, Function, and Logic of Clandestine Insurgent and Terrorist Networks: The First Step in Effective Counternetwork Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    are examples of this external non- professional genre . These groups function much like the U.S. Army Special Forces conducting unconventional warfare...security force vehicle the IED was built to destroy, and conducts the operation. If he films the event, then he drops off the film at a drop-off point...and notifies the cell leader that the operation is complete. The cell leader directs the media cell to pick up the film from the drop-off site, and

  10. Differences in lumbar spine and lower extremity kinematics during a step down functional task in people with and people without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Alejandra; Gross, Karlie; Gombatto, Sara

    2017-08-01

    When functional movements are impaired in people with low back pain, they may be a contributing factor to chronicity and recurrence. The purpose of the current study was to examine lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremity kinematics during a step down functional task between people with and without a history of low back pain. A 3-dimensional motion capture system was used to analyze kinematics during a step down task. Total excursion of the lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremity segments in each plane were calculated from the start to end of the task. Separate analysis of variance tests (α=0.05) were conducted to determine the effect of independent variables of group and plane on lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremity kinematics. An exploratory analysis was conducted to examine kinematic differences among movement-based low back pain subgroups. Subjects with low back pain displayed less lumbar spine movement than controls across all three planes of movement (P-values=0.001-0.043). This group difference was most pronounced in the sagittal plane. For the lower extremity, subjects with low back pain displayed more frontal and axial plane knee movement than controls (P-values=0.001). There were no significant differences in kinematics among movement-based low back pain subgroups. People with low back pain displayed less lumbar region movement in the sagittal plane and more off-plane knee movements than the control group during a step down task. Clinicians can use this information when assessing lumbar spine and lower extremity movement during functional tasks, with the goal of developing movement-based interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Using a divided-attention stepping accuracy task to improve balance and functional outcomes in an individual with incomplete spinal cord injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Susan J; Magill, Richard A; Maring, Joyce R

    2017-01-01

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently results in impaired balance, endurance, and strength with subsequent limitations in functional mobility and community participation. The purpose of this case report was to implement a training program for an individual with a chronic incomplete SCI using a novel divided-attention stepping accuracy task (DASAT) to determine if improvements could be made in impairments, activities, and participation. The client was a 51-year-old male with a motor incomplete C4 SCI sustained 4 years prior. He presented with decreased quality of life (QOL) and functional independence, and deficits in balance, endurance, and strength consistent with central cord syndrome. The client completed the DASAT intervention 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Each session incorporated 96 multi-directional steps to randomly-assigned targets in response to 3-step verbal commands. QOL, measured using the SF-36, was generally enhanced but fluctuated. Community mobility progressed from close supervision to independence. Significant improvement was achieved in all balance scores: Berg Balance Scale by 9 points [Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) = 4.9 in elderly]; Functional Reach Test by 7.62 cm (MDC = 5.16 in C5/C6 SCI); and Timed Up-and-Go by 0.53 s (MDC not established). Endurance increased on the 6-Minute Walk Test, with the client achieving an additional 47 m (MDC = 45.8 m). Lower extremity isokinetic peak torque strength measures were mostly unchanged. Six minutes of DASAT training per session provided an efficient, low-cost intervention utilizing multiple trials of variable practice, and resulted in better performance in activities, balance, and endurance in this client.

  12. [Effects of Square-Stepping Exercise inducing activation of the brain's cognitive function in community-dwelling older Japanese females--Focus on the baseline cognitive function level and age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takumi; Tsuji, Taishi; Kitano, Naruki; Muraki, Toshiaki; Hotta, Kazushi; Okura, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the degree of improvement in cognitive function achieved with an exercise intervention in community-dwelling older Japanese women is affected by the participant's baseline cognitive function and age. Eighty-eight women (mean age: 70.5±4.2 years) participated in a prevention program for long-term care. They completed the Square-Stepping Exercise (SSE) program once a week, 120 minutes/session, for 11 weeks. We assessed participants' cognitive function using 5 cognitive tests (5-Cog) before and after the intervention. We defined cognitive function as the 5-Cog total score and defined the change in cognitive function as the 5-cog post-score minus the pre-score. We divided participants into four groups based on age (≤69 years or ≥70 years) and baseline cognitive function level (above vs. below the median cognitive function level). We conducted two-way analysis of variance. All 4 groups improved significantly in cognitive function after the intervention. There were no baseline cognitive function level×age interactions and no significant main effects of age, although significant main effects of baseline cognitive function level (P=0.004, η(2)=0.09) were observed. Square-Stepping Exercise is an effective exercise for improving cognitive function. These results suggest that older adults with cognitive decline are more likely to improve their cognitive function with exercise than if they start the intervention with high cognitive function. Furthermore, during an exercise intervention, baseline cognitive function level may have more of an effect than a participant's age on the degree of cognitive improvement.

  13. Functionally redundant RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans act at different steps to suppress early flg22-triggered immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzi Zheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequences of several economically important phytopathogenic oomycetes have revealed the presence of large families of so-called RXLR effectors. Functional screens have identified RXLR effector repertoires that either compromise or induce plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms underlying the modes of action of these effectors in planta. The perception of highly conserved pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs, such as flg22, triggers converging signaling pathways recruiting MAP kinase cascades and inducing transcriptional re-programming, yielding a generic anti-microbial response. We used a highly synchronizable, pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify a set of RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans (PiRXLRs, the causal agent of potato and tomato light blight that manipulate early stages of flg22-triggered signaling. Of thirty-three tested PiRXLR effector candidates, eight, called Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response (SFI, significantly suppressed flg22-dependent activation of a reporter gene under control of a typical MAMP-inducible promoter (pFRK1-Luc in tomato protoplasts. We extended our analysis to Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-host plant species of P. infestans. From the aforementioned eight SFI effectors, three appeared to share similar functions in both Arabidopsis and tomato by suppressing transcriptional activation of flg22-induced marker genes downstream of post-translational MAP kinase activation. A further three effectors interfere with MAMP signaling at, or upstream of, the MAP kinase cascade in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis. Transient expression of the SFI effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans and, for the most potent effector, SFI1, nuclear localization is required for both suppression of MAMP signaling and virulence function. The present study provides a framework to decipher the

  14. Feasibility investigation of coupling a desalination prototype functioning by Aero-Evapo-Condensation with solar units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourouni, K.; Bouden, C.; Chaibi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The rural regions of south Mediterranean countries suffer from problems of drinking water supply. However, the majority of these regions have important resources of brackish salt water. Thus, brackish water desalination on a small scale presents a potential solution to this problem. For this reason, a number of small desalination prototypes are being developed worldwide. Bourouni et al. have developed a water desalination unit functioning by the Aero-Evapo-Condensation-Process (AECP) in order to satisfy this kind of water demand. One of the advantages of this prototype is that it allows the use of low temperature energy such as geothermal and solar energies abundant in these countries. An initial experiment was carried on an AECP prototype coupled to a geothermal spring in the south of Tunisia. The results relative to the technical and economic performances of the unit have shown that this kind of coupling is promising. On the other hand, the brackish water springs in these countries are often non-geothermal. In this case, the use of solar energy can be considered. Thus, we develop, in the present article, a feasibility investigation on the coupling of the AECP prototype with solar units. In fact, we analyse, in the first part of this article, the possibilities of this coupling in a manner that the functioning mode of the solar units will be compatible with that of the AECP prototype. To attempt this objective, two kinds of solar installation scenarios are considered and modelled to obtain their energetic contribution. Hence, the elaborated models are coupled to the one developed by Bourouni et al. for the AECP prototype to determine the technical and economic performances of the whole installation. In the last part of this article, a solar unit dimensioning is performed in order to minimise the total cost of the distilled water. (author)

  15. [Influence of functional dependence on the case mix in a geriatric unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, José Luis; Alonso-Fernández, Teresa; Gálvez, Noemí; García-Mayolín, Nieves

    2008-01-01

    To determine the influence of pre-admission functional status on the case mix in a geriatric unit, after adjustment by the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) patient classification system. We performed a retrospective observational study in patients admitted to the geriatric unit of a general hospital over a 2-year period. Patients with a length of stay of less than 2 days and transfers from other medical services and hospitals were excluded. The following data were obtained from the minimum data set and from chart review: age, sex, place of residence before admission, Charlson comorbidity index, pre-admission functional status and mobility, cognitive status, length of hospital stay, rate of in-hospital mortality, and the DRG (and DRG weight) for each patient. A total of 1065 patients were included in this study. The mean age was 84 years (64-102), and 64% were women. Patients with lower functional status were more often female (67.1 vs 55.8%; PDRG weight (P=.03). Once the more frequent DRG were reviewed, patients who were dependent had a greater number of respiratory infections and renal problems and had fewer cerebrovascular diseases. Some clinical characteristics differ in patients with functional dependence. This finding could influence the clinical management of medical services that treat more dependent patients.

  16. Mass transfer with complex chemical reactions in gas–liquid systems : two-step reversible reactions with unit stoichiometric and kinetic orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vas Bhat, R.D.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    An absorption model to study gas–liquid mass transfer accompanied by reversible two-step reactions in the liquid phase has been presented. This model has been used to determine mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and concentration profiles over a wide range of process conditions. Although

  17. Mass transfer with complex chemical reactions in gas-liquid systems: two-step reversible reactions with unit stoichiometric and kinetic orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vas bhat, R.D.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    2000-01-01

    An absorption model to study gas¿liquid mass transfer accompanied by reversible two-step reactions in the liquid phase has been presented. This model has been used to determine mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and concentration profiles over a wide range of process conditions. Although

  18. Effects of a free school breakfast programme on school attendance, achievement, psychosocial function, and nutrition: a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddison Ralph

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 55,000 children in New Zealand do not eat breakfast on any given day. Regular breakfast skipping has been associated with poor diets, higher body mass index, and adverse effects on children's behaviour and academic performance. Research suggests that regular breakfast consumption can improve academic performance, nutrition and behaviour. This paper describes the protocol for a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial of a free school breakfast programme. The aim of the trial is to determine the effects of the breakfast intervention on school attendance, achievement, psychosocial function, dietary habits and food security. Methods/Design Sixteen primary schools in the North Island of New Zealand will be randomised in a sequential stepped wedge design to a free before-school breakfast programme consisting of non-sugar coated breakfast cereal, milk products, and/or toast and spreads. Four hundred children aged 5-13 years (approximately 25 per school will be recruited. Data collection will be undertaken once each school term over the 2010 school year (February to December. The primary trial outcome is school attendance, defined as the proportion of students achieving an attendance rate of 95% or higher. Secondary outcomes are academic achievement (literacy, numeracy, self-reported grades, sense of belonging at school, psychosocial function, dietary habits, and food security. A concurrent process evaluation seeks information on parents', schools' and providers' perspectives of the breakfast programme. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will provide robust evidence of the effects of a school breakfast programme on students' attendance, achievement and nutrition. Furthermore the study provides an excellent example of the feasibility and value of the stepped wedge trial design in evaluating pragmatic public health intervention programmes. Trial Registration Number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry

  19. Effects of a free school breakfast programme on school attendance, achievement, psychosocial function, and nutrition: a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Turley, Maria; Gorton, Delvina; Jiang, Yannan; Michie, Jo; Maddison, Ralph; Hattie, John

    2010-11-29

    Approximately 55,000 children in New Zealand do not eat breakfast on any given day. Regular breakfast skipping has been associated with poor diets, higher body mass index, and adverse effects on children's behaviour and academic performance. Research suggests that regular breakfast consumption can improve academic performance, nutrition and behaviour. This paper describes the protocol for a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial of a free school breakfast programme. The aim of the trial is to determine the effects of the breakfast intervention on school attendance, achievement, psychosocial function, dietary habits and food security. Sixteen primary schools in the North Island of New Zealand will be randomised in a sequential stepped wedge design to a free before-school breakfast programme consisting of non-sugar coated breakfast cereal, milk products, and/or toast and spreads. Four hundred children aged 5-13 years (approximately 25 per school) will be recruited. Data collection will be undertaken once each school term over the 2010 school year (February to December). The primary trial outcome is school attendance, defined as the proportion of students achieving an attendance rate of 95% or higher. Secondary outcomes are academic achievement (literacy, numeracy, self-reported grades), sense of belonging at school, psychosocial function, dietary habits, and food security. A concurrent process evaluation seeks information on parents', schools' and providers' perspectives of the breakfast programme. This randomised controlled trial will provide robust evidence of the effects of a school breakfast programme on students' attendance, achievement and nutrition. Furthermore the study provides an excellent example of the feasibility and value of the stepped wedge trial design in evaluating pragmatic public health intervention programmes. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) - ACTRN12609000854235.

  20. Estimation by radiation inactivation of the size of functional units governing Sendai and influenza virus fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundo-Morita, K.; Gibson, S.; Lenard, J.

    1987-01-01

    The target sizes associated with fusion and hemolysis carried out by Sendai virus envelope glycoproteins were determined by radiation inactivation analysis. The target size for influenza virus mediated fusion with erythrocyte ghosts at pH 5.0 was also determined for comparison. Sendai-mediated fusion with erythrocyte ghosts at pH 7.0 was likewise inactivated exponentially with increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 60 +/- 6 kDa, a value consistent with the molecular weight of a single F-protein molecule. The inactivation curve for Sendai-mediated fusion with cardiolipin liposomes at pH 7.0, however, was more complex. Assuming a multiple target-single hit model, the target consisted of 2-3 units of ca. 60 kDa each. A similar target was seen if the liposome contained 10% gangliosides or if the reaction was measured at pH 5.0, suggesting that fusion occurred by the same mechanism at high and low pH. A target size of 261 +/- 48 kDa was found for Sendai-induced hemolysis, in contrast with influenza, which had a more complex target size for this activity. Sendai virus fusion thus occurs by different mechanisms depending upon the nature of the target membrane, since it is mediated by different functional units. Hemolysis is mediated by a functional unit different from that associated with erythrocyte ghost fusion or with cardiolipin liposome fusion

  1. Comparative studies of upconversion luminescence characteristics and cell bioimaging based on one-step synthesized upconversion nanoparticles capped with different functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Ming-Kiu [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Chi-Fai; Wong, Ka-Leung [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong); Hao, Jianhua, E-mail: jh.hao@polyu.edu.hk [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein, three types of upconverting NaGdF{sub 4}:Yb/Er nanoparticles (UCNPs) have been synthesized via one-step hydrothermal synthesis with polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyethylenimine (PEI) and 6-aminocapronic acid (6AA) functionalization. To evident the presence of these groups, FTIR spectra and ζ-potentials were measured to support the successful capping of PEG, PEI and 6AA on the UCNPs. The regular morphology and cubic phase of these functionalized UCNPs were attributed to the capping effect of the surfactants. Tunable upconversion luminescence (UCL) from red to green were observed under 980 nm laser excitation and the UCL tuning was attributed to the presence of various surface ligands. Moreover, surface group dependent UCL bioimaging was performed in HeLa cells. The enhanced UCL bioimaging demonstrated by PEI functionalized UCNPs evident high cell uptake. The significant cell uptake is explained by the electrostatic attraction between the amino groups (–NH{sub 2}) and the cell membrane. Moreover, the functionalized UCNPs demonstrated low cytotoxicity in MTT assay. Additional, paramagnetic property was presented by these UCNPs under magnetic field. - Highlights: • Tunable upconversion emission by capped functional groups under fixed composition. • Surface dependent upconversion luminescence bioimaging in HeLa cells. • Low cytotoxicity. • Additional paramagnetic property due to Gd{sup 3+} ions.

  2. Interventions to improve executive functioning and working memory in school-aged children with AD(H)D: a randomised controlled trial and stepped-care approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Donk, Marthe L A; Hiemstra-Beernink, Anne-Claire; Tjeenk-Kalff, Ariane C; van der Leij, Aryan V; Lindauer, Ramón J L

    2013-01-11

    Deficits in executive functioning are of great significance in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One of these executive functions, working memory, plays an important role in academic performance and is often seen as the core deficit of this disorder. There are indications that working memory problems and academic performance can be improved by school-oriented interventions but this has not yet been studied systematically. In this study we will determine the short- and long-term effects of a working memory--and an executive function training applied in a school situation for children with AD(H)D, taking individual characteristics, the level of impairment and costs (stepped-care approach) into account. The study consists of two parts: the first part is a randomised controlled trial with school-aged children (8-12 yrs) with AD(H)D. Two groups (each n = 50) will be randomly assigned to a well studied computerized working memory training 'Cogmed', or to the 'Paying attention in class' intervention which is an experimental school-based executive function training. Children will be selected from regular -and special education primary schools in the region of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The second part of the study will determine which specific characteristics are related to non-response of the 'Paying attention in class' intervention. School-aged children (8-12 yrs) with AD(H)D will follow the experimental school-based executive function training 'Paying attention in class' (n = 175). Academic performance and neurocognitive functioning (primary outcomes) are assessed before, directly after and 6 months after training. Secondary outcome measures are: behaviour in class, behaviour problems and quality of life. So far, there is limited but promising evidence that working memory - and other executive function interventions can improve academic performance. Little is know about the applicability and generalization effects of these interventions in a classroom

  3. Interventions to improve executive functioning and working memory in school-aged children with AD(HD: a randomised controlled trial and stepped-care approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Donk Marthe LA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficits in executive functioning are of great significance in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. One of these executive functions, working memory, plays an important role in academic performance and is often seen as the core deficit of this disorder. There are indications that working memory problems and academic performance can be improved by school-oriented interventions but this has not yet been studied systematically. In this study we will determine the short- and long-term effects of a working memory - and an executive function training applied in a school situation for children with AD(HD, taking individual characteristics, the level of impairment and costs (stepped-care approach into account. Methods/design The study consists of two parts: the first part is a randomised controlled trial with school-aged children (8–12 yrs with AD(HD. Two groups (each n = 50 will be randomly assigned to a well studied computerized working memory training ‘Cogmed’, or to the ‘Paying attention in class’ intervention which is an experimental school-based executive function training. Children will be selected from regular -and special education primary schools in the region of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The second part of the study will determine which specific characteristics are related to non-response of the ‘Paying attention in class’ intervention. School-aged children (8–12 yrs with AD(HD will follow the experimental school-based executive function training ‘Paying attention in class’ (n = 175. Academic performance and neurocognitive functioning (primary outcomes are assessed before, directly after and 6 months after training. Secondary outcome measures are: behaviour in class, behaviour problems and quality of life. Discussion So far, there is limited but promising evidence that working memory – and other executive function interventions can improve academic performance. Little is know about the

  4. Statistical theory of multi-step compound and direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feshbach, H.; Kerman, A.; Koonin, S.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of nuclear reactions is extended so as to include a statistical treatment of multi-step processes. Two types are distinguished, the multi-step compound and the multi-step direct. The wave functions for the system are grouped according to their complexity. The multi-step direct process involves explicitly those states which are open, while the multi-step compound involves those which are bound. In addition to the random phase assumption which is applied differently to the multi-step direct and to the multi-step compound cross-sections, it is assumed that the residual interaction will have non-vanishing matrix elements between states whose complexities differ by at most one unit. This is referred to as the chaining hypothesis. Explicit expressions for the double differential cross-section giving the angular distribution and energy spectrum are obtained for both reaction types. The statistical multi-step compound cross-sections are symmetric about 90 0 . The classical statistical theory of nuclear reactions is a special limiting case. The cross-section for the statistical multi-step direct reaction consists of a set of convolutions of single-step direct cross-sections. For the many step case it is possible to derive a diffusion equation in momentum space. Application is made to the reaction 181 Ta(p,n) 181 W using the statistical multi-step compound formalism

  5. Functional planning units for the management of an endangered Brazilian titi monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Sidney F; Souza-Alves, João Pedro; de Souza, Bruno B; Beltrão-Mendes, Raone; Jerusalinsky, Leandro; Ferrari, Stephen F

    2017-05-01

    Conservation practices in the tropics often rely on the data available for a few, better-known species and the adoption of an appropriate spatial scale. By defining a set of landscape units that account for critical aspects of the focal species, the information available on these conservation targets can support regional conservation policies. Here, we define and classify adjacent landscapes, termed planning units, to orientate management decisions within and among these landscapes, which are occupied by an endangered flagship primate species (Coimbra-Filho's titi monkey, Callicebus coimbrai) from eastern Brazil. We use landscape boundaries (highways and river systems), and a high-resolution map of forest remnants to identify continuous and manageable landscapes. We employed functional landscape metrics based on the species' dispersal ability and home range size to characterize and classify these landscapes. We classified planning units by scoring them according to a suite of selected metrics through a Principal Component Analysis. We propose 31 planning units, containing one to six C. coimbrai populations, most with low values of habitat availability, functional connectivity and carrying capacity, and a high degree of degradation. Due to this poor landscape configuration, basic management practices are recommendable. However, additional aspects of the landscapes and the populations they contain (e.g., matrix type and genetic variability) should improve the scheme, which will require a closer integration of research aims with socio-political strategies. Even so, our scheme should prove useful for the combination of information on conservation targets (i.e., focal species) with management strategies on an administrative scale. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Facial transplantation: an anatomic and surgical analysis of the periorbital functional unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilic, Dalibor; Barker, John H; Blagg, Ross; Whitaker, Iain; Kon, Moshe; Gossman, M Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Complete loss of eyelid pair is associated with chronic discomfort, corneal ulceration, and visual impairment. Contemporary reconstructive techniques rarely provide functionally acceptable results. Composite tissue allotransplantation may provide a viable alternative. This study reports on neurovascular anatomy and technical details of harvesting an isolated periorbital unit and discusses its functional potential. Twenty-four hemifaces (12 fresh cadavers) were dissected to study surgically relevant neurovascular structures and to develop an efficient harvest method. Angiographic analysis was performed in seven hemifaces following harvest. The superficial temporal and facial vessels demonstrated consistent location and diameters. Anatomic variability was characterized by the absence of the frontal branch of the superficial temporal artery or facial-to-angular artery continuation, but never of both vessels in the same hemiface. Angiographic analysis demonstrated filling of the eyelid arcades, provided the anastomoses between the internal and external carotid branches were preserved. The facial nerve exhibited consistent planar arrangement and diameters in the intraparotid and proximal extraparotid regions, but less so in the distal nerve course. The inferior zygomatic and buccal branches frequently coinnervated the orbicularis oculi and lower facial muscles with an unpredictable intermuscular course. Based on the foregoing, an effective surgical harvest of the periorbital composite was developed. Surgical harvest of a functional periorbital allotransplant is technically feasible. Revascularization of the isolated periorbital unit is influenced by variations in regional anatomy and cannot be guaranteed by a single vascular pedicle. The orbicularis oculi muscle and its innervation can be preserved, and recovery, albeit without the certainty of reflexive blinking, is expected.

  7. Relative emissions intensity of dairy production systems: employing different functional units in life-cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S A; Topp, C F E; Ennos, R A; Chagunda, M G G

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the merit and suitability of individual functional units (FU) in expressing greenhouse gas emissions intensity in different dairy production systems. An FU provides a clearly defined and measurable reference to which input and output data are normalised. This enables the results from life-cycle assessment (LCA) of different systems to be treated as functionally equivalent. Although the methodological framework of LCA has been standardised, selection of an appropriate FU remains ultimately at the discretion of the individual study. The aim of the present analysis was to examine the effect of different FU on the emissions intensities of different dairy production systems. Analysis was based on 7 years of data (2004 to 2010) from four Holstein-Friesian dairy systems at Scotland's Rural College's long-term genetic and management systems project, the Langhill herd. Implementation of LCA accounted for the environmental impacts of the whole-farm systems and their production of milk from 'cradle to farm gate'. Emissions intensity was determined as kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalents referenced to six FU: UK livestock units, energy-corrected milk yield, total combined milk solids yield, on-farm land used for production, total combined on- and off-farm land used for production, and the proposed new FU-energy-corrected milk yield per hectare of total land used. Energy-corrected milk was the FU most effective for reflecting differences between the systems. Functional unit that incorporated a land-related aspect did not find difference between systems which were managed under the same forage regime, despite their comprising different genetic lines. Employing on-farm land as the FU favoured grazing systems. The proposed dual FU combining both productivity and land use did not differentiate between emissions intensity of systems as effectively as the productivity-based units. However, this dual unit displayed potential to quantify in a simple way

  8. Lead facilitates foci formation in a Balb/c-3T3 two-step cell transformation model: role of Ape1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Franco, Pablo; Silva, Martín; Franco, Rodrigo; Valverde, Mahara; Rojas, Emilio

    2018-04-01

    Several possible mechanisms have been examined to gain an understanding on the carcinogenic properties of lead, which include among others, mitogenesis, alteration of gene expression, oxidative damage, and inhibition of DNA repair. The aim of the present study was to explore if low concentrations of lead, relevant for human exposure, interfere with Ape1 function, a base excision repair enzyme, and its role in cell transformation in Balb/c-3T3. Lead acetate 5 and 30 μM induced APE1 mRNA and upregulation of protein expression. This increase in mRNA expression is consistent throughout the chronic exposure. Additionally, we also found an impaired function of Ape1 through molecular beacon-based assay. To evaluate the impact of lead on foci formation, a Balb/c-3T3 two-step transformation model was used. Balb/c-3T3 cells were pretreated 1 week with low concentrations of lead before induction of transformation with n-methyl-n-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) (0.5 μg/mL) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (0.1 μg/mL) (a classical two-step protocol). Morphological cell transformation increased in response to lead pretreatment that was paralleled with an increase in Ape1 mRNA and protein overexpression and an impairment of Ape1 activity and correlating with foci number. In addition, we found that lead pretreatment and MNNG (transformation initiator) increased DNA damage, determined by comet assay. Our data suggest that low lead concentrations (5, 30 μM) could play a facilitating role in cellular transformation, probably through the impaired function of housekeeping genes such as Ape1, leading to DNA damage accumulation and chromosomal instability, one of the most important hallmarks of cancer induced by chronic exposures.

  9. C30 Support Plate for Replacing Function of Service Pool 1 at Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsoldos, F.

    2006-01-01

    Paks NPP had a serious event at Unit 2 in April 2003. This event was connected to Service Pool 1, there was a cleaning tank int he pool to clean the fuel assemblies from sediments. The sediment problem has occurred at three of our four units, the cause of this problem was the decontamination of the steam generators. We have not made any decontamination at Unit 4 only, and there is no any problem at Unit 4 at all. The plant tried out the mentioned cleaning method at Unit 2 first time, and the event happened at that time. Because of the event the function of Service Pool 1 was not available, the damaged fuel and the cleaning tank is in the pool at this moment. We got the permission from the authority body to operate again Unit 2. This operation, the planned campaign was a short one because of the limited possibility to set up a proper core from the fuel assemblies what were available. Because of the short campaign we had to prepare a proper solution to accomplish the refuelling at Unit 2. The main obstacle was the unavailable functionality of Service Pool 1 which used to carry in fresh fuel and carry out the spent fuel with usage of C30 casks (we have two C30 casks, as it shown in their names the casks can contain 30 fuel assemblies, fresh or spent fuel depending on the given activity have to be done). The plant started to find out what would be the proper solution to replace the function of Service Pool 1 and the C30 support plate was found out as the possible solution to this problem. This C30 support plate is ready to launch the C30 casks or containers with the fresh or spent fuel into the reactor. It means that this C30 support plate is adjusted to the reactor main surface and in this way it ready to serve replacing Service Pool 1. Of course the reactor is empty during the preparation phase of the refuelling. First we carry out the spent fuel from the spent fuel pool, after that the fresh fuel is carried in and just after these preparing activities can be started

  10. Glomerular filtration rate and functional decline in an acute geriatric unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Chaparro, José Mauricio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low estimated Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR is associated with functional decline. Little is known on that association in hospitalized elderly. Objective: Determine if low eGFR is associated with functional decline. Methods: Prospective cohort study that included 1826 patients 60 years and older hospitalized in a Geriatric Acute Unit, admitted between January 2012 and August 2015. The outcome was functional status assessed four times by the Barthel Index (BI. Kidney function was estimated by MDRD-4 IDMS and was grouped into four categories according to eGFR (normal ≥90, mild 60-89, moderate 59-30, severe <30. Multivariate logistic regression models and GLIMMIX procedure for longitudinal analyzes were used. Results: Mean age was 82.3±7.2 years, 51 % were women. In multivariate logistic regression, a BI≤60 at admission was associated with age ≥80, female gender, high comorbidity, social deterioration, hypoalbuminemia, anemia, MMSE<19, while the presence of mild or moderate renal failure reduced this risk. In the longitudinal analysis, lower total BI at follow-up was associated with age ≥80, female gender, social deterioration, hospital stay ≥15 days, high comorbidity, hypoalbuminemia, MMSE<19. The presence of mild, moderate or severe renal impairment was associated with higher BI over time. Conclusions: A low eGFR was associated with lower risk for functional decline at admission and overtime. These findings differ from previous reports in the literature.

  11. One-step electrochemical composite polymerization of polypyrrole integrated with functionalized graphene/carbon nanotubes nanostructured composite film for electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Bing; Lu Xiangjun; Yuan Changzhou; Yang Sudong; Han Yongqin; Zhang Xiaogang; Che Qian

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel one-step electrochemical co-deposition strategy was first proposed to prepare unique polypyrrole/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes (PPy/F-RGO/CNTs) ternary composites, where F-RGO, CNTs, and PPy were electrodeposited simultaneously to construct a three-dimensional (3-D) highly porous film electrode. Highlights: ► Isolated, water-soluble graphene was obtained through benzenesulfonic functionalization. ► PPy/F-RGO/CNTs ternary composite film was prepared via one-step electrochemical co-deposition route. ► PPy/F-RGO/CNTs film shows 3-D highly porous nanostructure and high electrical conductivity. ► PPy/F-RGO/CNTs film exhibits high capacitance, good high-rate performance with a remarkable cycling stability. - Abstract: A novel one-step electrochemical composite polymerization strategy was first proposed to prepare unique polypyrrole/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes (PPy/F-RGO/CNTs) ternary composites, where F-RGO, CNTs, and PPy were electrodeposited simultaneously to construct a three-dimensional (3-D) highly porous film electrode. Such ternary composite film electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance of 300 F g −1 at 1 A g −1 as well as a remarkable cycling stability at high rates, which is related to its unique nanostructure and high electrical conductivity. F-RGO and CNTs act as an electron-transporting backbone of a 3-D porous nanostructure, leaving adequate working space for facile electrolyte penetration and better faradaic utilization of the electro-active PPy. Furthermore, the straightforward approach proposed here can be readily extended to prepare other composite film electrodes with good electrochemical performance for energy storage.

  12. Structure and Function: Planning a New Intensive Care Unit to Optimize Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Kesecioğlu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To survey the recent medical literature reporting effects of intensive care unit (ICU design on patients’ and family members’ well-being, safety and functionality. Features of ICU design linked to the needs of patients and their family are single-rooms, privacy, quiet surrounding, exposure to daylight, views of nature, prevention of infection, a family area and open visiting hours. Other features such as safety, working procedures, ergonomics and logistics have a direct impact on the patient care and the nursing and medical personnel. An organization structured on the needs of the patient and their family is mandatory in designing a new intensive care. The main aims in the design of a new department should be patient centered care, safety, functionality, innovation and a future-proof concept.

  13. Characterizing functional complaints in patients seeking outpatient low-vision services in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie C; Goldstein, Judith E; Chan, Tiffany L; Massof, Robert; Ramulu, Pradeep

    2014-08-01

    To characterize functional complaints of new low-vision rehabilitation patients. Prospective observational study. The Low Vision Rehabilitation Outcomes Study recruited 819 patients between 2008 and 2011 from 28 clinical centers in the United States. New patients referred for low-vision rehabilitation were asked, "What are your chief complaints about your vision?" before their appointment. Full patient statements were transcribed as free text. Two methods assessed whether statements indicated difficulty in each of 13 functional categories: (1) assessment by 2 masked clinicians reading the statement, and (2) a computerized search of the text for specific words or word fragments. Logistic regression models were used to predict the influence of age, gender, and visual acuity on the likelihood of reporting a complaint in each functional category. Prevalence and risk factors for patient concerns within various functional categories. Reading was the most common functional complaint (66.4% of patients). Other functional difficulties expressed by at least 10% of patients included driving (27.8%), using visual assistive equipment (17.5%), mobility (16.3%), performing in-home activities (15.1%), lighting and glare (11.7%), and facial recognition and social interactions (10.3%). Good agreement was noted between the masked clinician graders and the computerized algorithm for categorization of functional complaints (median κ of 0.84 across the 13 categories). Multivariate logistic regression models demonstrated that the likelihood of reading difficulties increased mildly with age (odds ratio, 1.4 per 10-year increment in age; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-1.6), but did not differ with visual acuity (P = 0.09). Additionally, men were more likely to report driving difficulties and difficulties related to lighting, whereas women were more likely to report difficulty with either in-home activities or facial recognition or social interaction (Pvision therapy. Copyright © 2014

  14. On Fréchet theorem in the set of measure preserving functions over the unit interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hsiang Chou

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the Fréchet theorem in the set of measure preserving functions over the unit interval and show that any measure preserving function on [0,1] can be approximated by a sequence of measure preserving piecewise linear continuous functions almost everywhere. Some application is included.

  15. 26 CFR 1.985-2 - Election to use the United States dollar as the functional currency of a QBU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... functional currency of a QBU. 1.985-2 Section 1.985-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Election to use the United States dollar as the functional currency of a QBU. (a) Background and scope—(1... currency for taxable years beginning on or before August 24, 1994. An election to use a dollar functional...

  16. Modified Current Differencing Unit and its Application for Electronically Reconfigurable Simple First-order Transfer Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOTNER, R.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Modified current differencing unit (MCDU and its simple filtering application are introduced in this paper. Modification of the well-known current differencing unit consists in weighted difference of both input currents controlled by adjustable current gain, controllable intrinsic resistance of both current input terminals, and availability of additional voltage terminal(s. Definition of MCDU therefore requires four adjustable parameters (B1, B2, Rp, Rn. A presented active element offers and combines benefits of electronically controllable current conveyor of second generation and current differencing unit and allows synthesis of interesting adjustable applications, which are not available by classical approaches based on simple elements. MCDU brings variability of the transfer function into the structure. It provides several transfer types without necessity of input or output node change by simple electronic tuning. A presented structure represents so-called reconnection-less reconfigurable current-mode filter for realization of all-pass, inverting high-pass, low-pass and direct transfer response. Behavioral model of the MCDU was prepared and carefully tested in filtering application. Spice simulations and measurements confirmed theoretical assumptions.

  17. Motor unit recruitment by size does not provide functional advantages for motor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Farina, Dario

    2013-12-15

    It is commonly assumed that the orderly recruitment of motor units by size provides a functional advantage for the performance of movements compared with a random recruitment order. On the other hand, the excitability of a motor neuron depends on its size and this is intrinsically linked to its innervation number. A range of innervation numbers among motor neurons corresponds to a range of sizes and thus to a range of excitabilities ordered by size. Therefore, if the excitation drive is similar among motor neurons, the recruitment by size is inevitably due to the intrinsic properties of motor neurons and may not have arisen to meet functional demands. In this view, we tested the assumption that orderly recruitment is necessarily beneficial by determining if this type of recruitment produces optimal motor output. Using evolutionary algorithms and without any a priori assumptions, the parameters of neuromuscular models were optimized with respect to several criteria for motor performance. Interestingly, the optimized model parameters matched well known neuromuscular properties, but none of the optimization criteria determined a consistent recruitment order by size unless this was imposed by an association between motor neuron size and excitability. Further, when the association between size and excitability was imposed, the resultant model of recruitment did not improve the motor performance with respect to the absence of orderly recruitment. A consistent observation was that optimal solutions for a variety of criteria of motor performance always required a broad range of innervation numbers in the population of motor neurons, skewed towards the small values. These results indicate that orderly recruitment of motor units in itself does not provide substantial functional advantages for motor control. Rather, the reason for its near-universal presence in human movements is that motor functions are optimized by a broad range of innervation numbers.

  18. Fall risk as a function of time after admission to sub-acute geriatric hospital units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Kilian; Ravindren, Johannes; Becker, Clemens; Lindemann, Ulrich; Jaensch, Andrea; Klenk, Jochen

    2016-10-07

    There is evidence about time-dependent fracture rates in different settings and situations. Lacking are data about underlying time-dependent fall risk patterns. The objective of the study was to analyse fall rates as a function of time after admission to sub-acute hospital units and to evaluate the time-dependent impact of clinical factors at baseline on fall risk. This retrospective cohort study used data of 5,255 patients admitted to sub-acute units in a geriatric rehabilitation clinic in Germany between 2010 and 2014. Falls, personal characteristics and functional status at admission were extracted from the hospital information system. The rehabilitation stay was divided in 3-day time-intervals. The fall rate was calculated for each time-interval in all patients combined and in subgroups of patients. To analyse the influence of covariates on fall risk over time multivariate negative binomial regression models were applied for each of 5 time-intervals. The overall fall rate was 10.2 falls/1,000 person-days with highest fall risks during the first week and decreasing risks within the following weeks. A particularly pronounced risk pattern with high fall risks during the first days and decreasing risks thereafter was observed in men, disoriented people, and people with a low functional status or impaired cognition. In disoriented patients, for example, the fall rate decreased from 24.6 falls/1,000 person-days in day 2-4 to about 13 falls/1,000 person-days 2 weeks later. The incidence rate ratio of baseline characteristics changed also over time. Fall risk differs considerably over time during sub-acute hospitalisation. The strongest association between time and fall risk was observed in functionally limited patients with high risks during the first days after admission and declining risks thereafter. This should be considered in the planning and application of fall prevention measures.

  19. Two-step superresolution approach for surveillance face image through radial basis function-partial least squares regression and locality-induced sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junjun; Hu, Ruimin; Han, Zhen; Wang, Zhongyuan; Chen, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Face superresolution (SR), or face hallucination, refers to the technique of generating a high-resolution (HR) face image from a low-resolution (LR) one with the help of a set of training examples. It aims at transcending the limitations of electronic imaging systems. Applications of face SR include video surveillance, in which the individual of interest is often far from cameras. A two-step method is proposed to infer a high-quality and HR face image from a low-quality and LR observation. First, we establish the nonlinear relationship between LR face images and HR ones, according to radial basis function and partial least squares (RBF-PLS) regression, to transform the LR face into the global face space. Then, a locality-induced sparse representation (LiSR) approach is presented to enhance the local facial details once all the global faces for each LR training face are constructed. A comparison of some state-of-the-art SR methods shows the superiority of the proposed two-step approach, RBF-PLS global face regression followed by LiSR-based local patch reconstruction. Experiments also demonstrate the effectiveness under both simulation conditions and some real conditions.

  20. A PDMS/paper/glass hybrid microfluidic biochip integrated with aptamer-functionalized graphene oxide nano-biosensors for one-step multiplexed pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Peng; Li, XiuJun; Dominguez, Delfina C; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-10-07

    Infectious pathogens often cause serious public health concerns throughout the world. There is an increasing demand for simple, rapid and sensitive approaches for multiplexed pathogen detection. In this paper we have developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/paper/glass hybrid microfluidic system integrated with aptamer-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) nano-biosensors for simple, one-step, multiplexed pathogen detection. The paper substrate used in this hybrid microfluidic system facilitated the integration of aptamer biosensors on the microfluidic biochip, and avoided complicated surface treatment and aptamer probe immobilization in a PDMS or glass-only microfluidic system. Lactobacillus acidophilus was used as a bacterium model to develop the microfluidic platform with a detection limit of 11.0 cfu mL(-1). We have also successfully extended this method to the simultaneous detection of two infectious pathogens - Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica. This method is simple and fast. The one-step 'turn on' pathogen assay in a ready-to-use microfluidic device only takes ~10 min to complete on the biochip. Furthermore, this microfluidic device has great potential in rapid detection of a wide variety of different other bacterial and viral pathogens.

  1. The organization of human epidermis: functional epidermal units and phi proportionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoath, Steven B; Leahy, D G

    2003-12-01

    The concept that mammalian epidermis is structurally organized into functional epidermal units has been proposed on the basis of stratum corneum (SC) architecture, proliferation kinetics, melanocyte:keratinocyte ratios (1:36), and, more recently, Langerhans cell: epidermal cell ratios (1:53). This article examines the concept of functional epidermal units in human skin in which the maintenance of phi (1.618034) proportionality provides a central organizing principle. The following empirical measurements were used: 75,346 nucleated epidermal cells per mm2, 1394 Langerhans cells per mm2, 1999 melanocytes per mm2, 16 (SC) layers, 900-microm2 corneocyte surface area, 17,778 corneocytes per mm2, 14-d (SC) turnover time, and 93,124 per mm2 total epidermal cells. Given these empirical data: (1) the number of corneocytes is a mean proportional between the sum of the Langerhans cell + melanocyte populations and the number of epidermal cells, 3393/17,778-17,778/93,124; (2) the ratio of nucleated epidermal cells over corneocytes is phi proportional, 75,346/17,778 approximately phi3; (3) assuming similar 14-d turnover times for the (SC) and Malpighian epidermis, the number of corneocytes results from subtraction of a cellular fraction equal to approximately 2/phi2 x the number of living cells, 75,436 - (2/phi2 x 75,346) approximately 17,778; and (4) if total epidermal turnover time equals (SC) turnover time x the ratio of living/dead cells, then compartmental turnover times are unequal (14 d for (SC) to 45.3 d for nucleated epidermis approximately 1/2phi) and cellular replacement rates are 52.9 corneocytes/69.3 keratinocytes per mm2 per h approximately 2/phi2. These empirically derived equivalences provide logicomathematical support for the presence of functional epidermal units in human skin. Validation of a phi proportional unit architecture in human epidermis will be important for tissue engineering of skin and the design of instruments for skin measurement.

  2. Estimating Water Footprints of Vegetable Crops: Influence of Growing Season, Solar Radiation Data and Functional Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsie le Roux

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Water footprint (WF accounting as proposed by the Water Footprint Network (WFN can potentially provide important information for water resource management, especially in water scarce countries relying on irrigation to help meet their food requirements. However, calculating accurate WFs of short-season vegetable crops such as carrots, cabbage, beetroot, broccoli and lettuce presented some challenges. Planting dates and inter-annual weather conditions impact WF results. Joining weather datasets of just rainfall, minimum and maximum temperature with ones that include solar radiation and wind-speed affected crop model estimates and WF results. The functional unit selected can also have a major impact on results. For example, WFs according to the WFN approach do not account for crop residues used for other purposes, like composting and animal feed. Using yields in dry matter rather than fresh mass also impacts WF metrics, making comparisons difficult. To overcome this, using the nutritional value of crops as a functional unit can connect water use more directly to potential benefits derived from different crops and allow more straightforward comparisons. Grey WFs based on nitrogen only disregards water pollution caused by phosphates, pesticides and salinization. Poor understanding of the fate of nitrogen complicates estimation of nitrogen loads into the aquifer.

  3. Multiple functional units in the preattentive segmentation of speech in Japanese: evidence from word illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Miyoko; Kolinsky, Régine

    2014-12-01

    We explored the functional units of speech segmentation in Japanese using dichotic presentation and a detection task requiring no intentional sublexical analysis. Indeed, illusory perception of a target word might result from preattentive migration of phonemes, morae, or syllables from one ear to the other. In Experiment I, Japanese listeners detected targets presented in hiragana and/or kanji. Phoneme migrations did occur, suggesting that orthography-independent sublexical constituents play some role in segmentation. However, syllable and especially mora migrations were more numerous. This pattern of results was not observed in French speakers (Experiment 2), suggesting that it reflects native segmentation in Japanese. To control for the intervention of kanji representations (many words are written in kanji, and one kanji often corresponds to one syllable), in Experiment 3, Japanese listeners were presented with target loanwords that can be written only in katakana. Again, phoneme migrations occurred, while the first mora and syllable led to similar rates of illusory percepts. No migration occurred for the second, "special" mora (/J/ or/N/), probably because this constitutes the latter part of a heavy syllable. Overall, these findings suggest that multiple units, such as morae, syllables, and even phonemes, function independently of orthographic knowledge in Japanese preattentive speech segmentation.

  4. Effects of zinc injection from hot functional test at Tomari Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Mino, Yoshitaka; Nakahama, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yamato; Shimizu, Yuichi; Umehara, Ryuji; Kogawa, Noritaka

    2012-09-01

    At Tomari Nuclear Power Station unit 3 (hereafter Tomari unit 3, PWR, commercial operation from December 2009), the zinc injection for dose-rate reduction was started as early as at the Hot Functional Test (hereafter HFT) stage, for the first time in the world. The results of the Steam Generator (hereafter SG) insert plate analysis and the ambient dose-rate measurement till the end of the test operation reported heretofore, show the formation of the robust oxide film on the primary material surfaces and the associated corrosion suppression effect, and a considerable dose-rate reduction of about 40 to 60% lower than a reference plant. (*: Asian Water Chemistry Symposium in Nagoya on 2009 and NPC2010 in Canada). The material of SG tube is Alloy 690TT in Tomari unit 3. Generally, the dose-rates of the plants with Alloy 690TT SG are the highest at the 1. or 2. refueling outage (hereafter RFO), due to the effects of the Ni dissolution from the initial corrosion of Alloy 690TT. Therefore, the dose-rate of Tomari unit 3 at the 1. RFO is compared with those of the other Japanese PWR plants at their 1. RFO. As the result, the dose-rates inside the main components such as SG, Main Coolant Pipe (hereafter MCP) and Reactor Vessel (hereafter RV) are about 50% lower at the 1. RFO of Tomari unit 3 than those of a reference plant (a 3-Loop PWR plant in Japan). Therefore, an additional dose-rate reduction effects is expected by the Ni release rate reduction from Alloy 690TT and the effect of zinc injection. In this report, the actual dose-rates at the primary main components, the trends of the water chemistry and dose rates reduction effect with the zinc injection at the 1. RFO (offline in January 2011) of Tomari unit 3 are introduced. Also, a part of the experiences at the 2. RFO (offline in May 2012) is introduced. (authors)

  5. Optimization of the coherence function estimation for multi-core central processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremnov, A. G.; Faerman, V. A.; Avramchuk, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    The paper considers use of parallel processing on multi-core central processing unit for optimization of the coherence function evaluation arising in digital signal processing. Coherence function along with other methods of spectral analysis is commonly used for vibration diagnosis of rotating machinery and its particular nodes. An algorithm is given for the function evaluation for signals represented with digital samples. The algorithm is analyzed for its software implementation and computational problems. Optimization measures are described, including algorithmic, architecture and compiler optimization, their results are assessed for multi-core processors from different manufacturers. Thus, speeding-up of the parallel execution with respect to sequential execution was studied and results are presented for Intel Core i7-4720HQ и AMD FX-9590 processors. The results show comparatively high efficiency of the optimization measures taken. In particular, acceleration indicators and average CPU utilization have been significantly improved, showing high degree of parallelism of the constructed calculating functions. The developed software underwent state registration and will be used as a part of a software and hardware solution for rotating machinery fault diagnosis and pipeline leak location with acoustic correlation method.

  6. How biological soil crusts became recognized as a functional unit: a selective history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Otto L.; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    It is surprising that despite the world-wide distribution and general importance of biological soil crusts (biocrusts), scientific recognition and functional analysis of these communities is a relatively young field of science. In this chapter, we sketch the historical lines that led to the recognition of biocrusts as a community with important ecosystem functions. The idea of biocrusts as a functional ecological community has come from two main scientific branches: botany and soil science. For centuries, botanists have long recognized that multiple organisms colonize the soil surface in the open and often dry areas occurring between vascular plants. Much later, after the initial taxonomic and phyto-sociological descriptions were made, soil scientists and agronomists observed that these surface organisms interacted with soils in ways that changed the soil structure. In the 1970’s, research on these communities as ecological units that played an important functional role in drylands began in earnest, and these studies have continued to this day. Here, we trace the history of these studies from the distant past until 1990, when biocrusts became well-known to scientists and the public.

  7. Pore size determination using normalized J-function for different hydraulic flow units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abedini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pore size determination of hydrocarbon reservoirs is one of the main challenging areas in reservoir studies. Precise estimation of this parameter leads to enhance the reservoir simulation, process evaluation, and further forecasting of reservoir behavior. Hence, it is of great importance to estimate the pore size of reservoir rocks with an appropriate accuracy. In the present study, a modified J-function was developed and applied to determine the pore radius in one of the hydrocarbon reservoir rocks located in the Middle East. The capillary pressure data vs. water saturation (Pc–Sw as well as routine reservoir core analysis include porosity (φ and permeability (k were used to develop the J-function. First, the normalized porosity (φz, the rock quality index (RQI, and the flow zone indicator (FZI concepts were used to categorize all data into discrete hydraulic flow units (HFU containing unique pore geometry and bedding characteristics. Thereafter, the modified J-function was used to normalize all capillary pressure curves corresponding to each of predetermined HFU. The results showed that the reservoir rock was classified into five separate rock types with the definite HFU and reservoir pore geometry. Eventually, the pore radius for each of these HFUs was determined using a developed equation obtained by normalized J-function corresponding to each HFU. The proposed equation is a function of reservoir rock characteristics including φz, FZI, lithology index (J*, and pore size distribution index (ɛ. This methodology used, the reservoir under study was classified into five discrete HFU with unique equations for permeability, normalized J-function and pore size. The proposed technique is able to apply on any reservoir to determine the pore size of the reservoir rock, specially the one with high range of heterogeneity in the reservoir rock properties.

  8. Loop 7 of E2 enzymes: an ancestral conserved functional motif involved in the E2-mediated steps of the ubiquitination cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Papaleo

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin (Ub system controls almost every aspect of eukaryotic cell biology. Protein ubiquitination depends on the sequential action of three classes of enzymes (E1, E2 and E3. E2 Ub-conjugating enzymes have a central role in the ubiquitination pathway, interacting with both E1 and E3, and influencing the ultimate fate of the substrates. Several E2s are characterized by an extended acidic insertion in loop 7 (L7, which if mutated is known to impair the proper E2-related functions. In the present contribution, we show that acidic loop is a conserved ancestral motif in E2s, relying on the presence of alternate hydrophobic and acidic residues. Moreover, the dynamic properties of a subset of family 3 E2s, as well as their binary and ternary complexes with Ub and the cognate E3, have been investigated. Here we provide a model of L7 role in the different steps of the ubiquitination cascade of family 3 E2s. The L7 hydrophobic residues turned out to be the main determinant for the stabilization of the E2 inactive conformations by a tight network of interactions in the catalytic cleft. Moreover, phosphorylation is known from previous studies to promote E2 competent conformations for Ub charging, inducing electrostatic repulsion and acting on the L7 acidic residues. Here we show that these active conformations are stabilized by a network of hydrophobic interactions between L7 and L4, the latter being a conserved interface for E3-recruitment in several E2s. In the successive steps, L7 conserved acidic residues also provide an interaction interface for both Ub and the Rbx1 RING subdomain of the cognate E3. Our data therefore suggest a crucial role for L7 of family 3 E2s in all the E2-mediated steps of the ubiquitination cascade. Its different functions are exploited thank to its conserved hydrophobic and acidic residues in a finely orchestrate mechanism.

  9. Use of modified Harvard step test for the evaluation of exercise tolerance in patients with a functional single ventricle after total cavopulmonary connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tupikina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature, nearly one-third of patients with congenital heart diseases have signs of heart failure. Objective: to assess the possibility and results of using a modified Harvard step test (MHST for the evaluation of exercise tolerance in children with a functional single ventricle. The investigation covered 110 healthy children aged 6 to 16 years and 29 patients aged 3 to 16 years with a functional single ventricle after total cavopulmonary connection with an extracardiac conduit a year after surgery and fenestration closure. MHST using a complete protocol was carried out in 44,8% of the patients. In the other examinees, the reason for stopping the test was premature muscle weakness and dyspnea. This could establish Functional Class (FC II heart failure in 55,2% of the sick children. In the examinees, the MHST index (MHSTI characterizing exercise tolerance ranged from 22,4 to 111. The median MHSTI scores significantly differed between the groups of patients with FC I and II heart failure (p=0,021. Exercise tolerance was lower in 17,2% of the patients with a functional single ventricle; in the others it was average and above average (41,5 and 41,3%, respectively, which was suggestive of good hemodynamic adaptation in patients after surgery. The findings prove the safety and efficiency of using the above test in the evaluation of exercise tolerance in children 3 years of age and older.

  10. Altered morphology and function of the lacrimal functional unit in protein kinase C{alpha} knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Li, Zhijie; Basti, Surendra; Farley, William J; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2010-11-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) α plays a major role in the parasympathetic neural stimulation of lacrimal gland (LG) secretion. It also has been reported to have antiapoptotic properties and to promote cell survival. Therefore, the hypothesis for the present study was that PKCα knockout ((-/-)) mice have impaired ocular surface-lacrimal gland signaling, rendering them susceptible to desiccating stress and impaired corneal epithelial wound healing. In this study, the lacrimal function unit (LFU) and the stressed wound-healing response were examined in PKCα(-/-) mice. In PKCα(+/+) control mice and PKCα(-/-) mice, tear production, osmolarity, and clearance rate were evaluated before and after experimental desiccating stress. Histology and immunofluorescent staining of PKC and epidermal growth factor were performed in tissues of the LFU. Cornified envelope (CE) precursor protein expression and cell proliferation were evaluated. The time course of healing and degree of neutrophil infiltration was evaluated after corneal epithelial wounding. Compared with the PKCα(+/+) mice, the PKCα(-/-) mice were noted to have significantly increased lacrimal gland weight, with enlarged, carbohydrate-rich, PAS-positive acinar cells; increased corneal epithelia permeability, with reduced CE expression; and larger conjunctival epithelial goblet cells. The PKCα(-/-) mice showed more rapid corneal epithelial healing, with less neutrophil infiltration and fewer proliferating cells than did the PKCα(+/+) mice. The PKCα(-/-) mice showed lower tear production, which appeared to be caused by impaired secretion by the LG and conjunctival goblet cells. Despite their altered tear dynamics, the PKCα(-/-) mice demonstrated more rapid corneal epithelial wound healing, perhaps due to decreased neutrophil infiltration.

  11. Pulmonary function studies in healthy Filipino adults residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F L; Kelso, J M

    1999-08-01

    Differences in lung volumes among various ethnic groups are known to occur; however, this has not been studied in Filipinos. We sought to assess pulmonary function in healthy, nonsmoking Filipinos residing in the United States compared with standards for white subjects. Healthy adult Filipinos, age 18 years or greater, were recruited. All subjects were screened with health questionnaires to exclude those with cardiopulmonary disease. Pulmonary function tests were performed by using forced expiratory maneuvers. Values for FEV(1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV(1 )/FVC, forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% of FVC, and peak expiratory flow rate were compared with predicted values for white subjects (ie, without a racial adjustment). Two hundred twenty-four healthy subjects (121 men and 103 women) completed the study. The group means (as a percentage of the predicted standard for white subjects) were as follows: FEV(1 ), 86%; FVC, 84%; FEV(1 )/FVC, 103%; forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% of FVC, 96%; and peak expiratory flow rate, 107%. These findings are very similar to those for African Americans and other Asians. We conclude that it is appropriate to use an 85% racial adjustment for FEV(1 ) and FVC when interpreting pulmonary function test results in Filipinos.

  12. 'Dose per unit content' functions: A robust tool for the interpretation of bioassay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovski, V.; Bonchuk, Y.; Ratia, G.

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the influence of the consequences of the lack of primary bioassay information and to elaborate approaches which could improve the reliability of dose assessments. The aggregated time-dependent functions 'dose per unit organ (excretion) content' z(t) have been proposed in this study as a convenient and reliable tool for bioassay. The analysis of the variation of z with changes of AMAD has demonstrated the existence of areas of the relative invariance of z, which permits the selection of one (reference) function z for the whole area of stability. Within the framework of such an approach an arbitrary set of bioassay data can be approximated by the linear combination F(t) S i E/ i z(t-t i ), whereI> F(t) function of time t, which approximates the observed bioassay time trend; t i = time shift of the acute intake i; E i effective dose, associated with the acute intake i (the two last parameters are results of the approximation procedure). (author)

  13. Polymer Nanocomposite Film with Metal Rich Surface Prepared by In Situ Single-Step Formation of Palladium Nanoparticles: An Interesting Way to Combine Specific Functional Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Thompson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a continuous single-step route that permits preparation of a thermostable polymer/metal nanocomposite film and to combine different functional properties in a unique material. More precisely, palladium nanoparticles are in situ generated in a polyimide matrix thanks to a designed curing cycle which is applied to a polyamic acid/metal precursor solution cast on a glass plate. A metal-rich surface layer which is strongly bonded to the bulk film is formed in addition to homogeneously dispersed metal nanoparticles. This specific morphology leads to obtaining an optically reflective film. The metal nanoparticles act as gas diffusion barriers for helium, oxygen, and carbon dioxide; they induce a tortuosity effect which allows dividing the gas permeation coefficients by a factor near to 2 with respect to the neat polyimide matrix. Moreover, the ability of the in situ synthesized palladium nanoparticles to entrap hydrogen is evidenced. The nanocomposite film properties can be modulated as a function of the location of the film metal-rich surface with respect to the hydrogen feed. The synthesized nanocomposite could represent a major interest for a wide variety of applications, from specific coatings for aerospace or automotive industry, to catalysis applications or sensors.

  14. One-step production of long-chain hydrocarbons from waste-biomass-derived chemicals using bi-functional heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Cun; Barrow, Elizabeth; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason; Lauterbach, Jochen

    2014-02-21

    In this study, we demonstrate the production of long-chain hydrocarbons (C8+) from 2-methylfuran (2MF) and butanal in a single step reactive process by utilizing a bi-functional catalyst with both acid and metallic sites. Our approach utilizes a solid acid for the hydroalkylation function and as a support as well as a transition metal as hydrodeoxygenation catalyst. A series of solid acids was screened, among which MCM-41 demonstrated the best combination of activity and stability. Platinum nanoparticles were then incorporated into the MCM-41. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst showed 96% yield for C8+ hydrocarbons and the catalytic performance was stable over four reaction cycles of 20 hour each. The reaction pathways for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons is probed with a combination of infrared spectroscopy and steady-state reaction experiments. It is proposed that 2MF and butanal go through hydroalkylation first on the acid site followed by hydrodeoxygenation to produce the hydrocarbon fuels.

  15. Architecture and functional ecology of the human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Erin E; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2016-04-01

    The gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit (MTU) is central to human locomotion. Structural variation in the human gastrocnemius MTU is predicted to affect the efficiency of locomotion, a concept most often explored in the context of performance activities. For example, stiffness of the Achilles tendon varies among individuals with different histories of competitive running. Such a finding highlights the functional variation of individuals and raises the possibility of similar variation between populations, perhaps in response to specific ecological or environmental demands. Researchers often assume minimal variation in human populations, or that industrialized populations represent the human species as well as any other. Yet rainforest hunter-gatherers, which often express the human pygmy phenotype, contradict such assumptions. Indeed, the human pygmy phenotype is a potential model system for exploring the range of ecomorphological variation in the architecture of human hindlimb muscles, a concept we review here. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  16. [Quality planning of Family Health Units using Quality Function Deployment (QFD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Luciana Fernandes; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2010-08-01

    Quality is an indispensible requirement in the health field, and its pursuit is necessary in order to meet demands by a population that is aware of its rights, as part of the essence of good work relations, and to decrease technological costs. Quality thus involves all parties to the process (users and professionals), and is no longer merely an attribute of the health service. This study aimed to verify the possibility of quality planning in the Family Health Units, using Quality Function Deployment (QFD). QFD plans quality according to user satisfaction, involving staff professionals and identifying new approaches to improve work processes. Development of the array, called the House of Quality, is this method's most important characteristics. The results show a similarity between the quality demanded by users and the quality planned by professionals. The current study showed that QFD is an efficient tool for quality planning in public health services.

  17. Application of stepping motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This book is divided into three parts, which is about practical using of stepping motor. The first part has six chapters. The contents of the first part are about stepping motor, classification of stepping motor, basic theory og stepping motor, characteristic and basic words, types and characteristic of stepping motor in hybrid type and basic control of stepping motor. The second part deals with application of stepping motor with hardware of stepping motor control, stepping motor control by microcomputer and software of stepping motor control. The last part mentions choice of stepping motor system, examples of stepping motor, measurement of stepping motor and practical cases of application of stepping motor.

  18. Multi-step surface functionalization of polyimide based evanescent wave photonic biosensors and application for DNA hybridization by Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Eva [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Bruck, Roman [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Hainberger, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.hainberger@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@univie.ac.at [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We realize a biosensing platform for polyimide evanescent photonic wave sensors. {yields} We show that the surface functionalization via silanisation and biotinylation followed by streptavidin immobilization do not destroy or damage the thin polyimide film. {yields} A highly dense streptavidin layer enables the immobilisation of biotinylated ligands such as biotinylated ssDNA for the selective measurement of DNA hybridization. - Abstract: The process of surface functionalization involving silanization, biotinylation and streptavidin bonding as platform for biospecific ligand immobilization was optimized for thin film polyimide spin-coated silicon wafers, of which the polyimide film serves as a wave guiding layer in evanescent wave photonic biosensors. This type of optical sensors make great demands on the materials involved as well as on the layer properties, such as the optical quality, the layer thickness and the surface roughness. In this work we realized the binding of a 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on an oxygen plasma activated polyimide surface followed by subsequent derivatization of the reactive thiol groups with maleimide-PEG{sub 2}-biotin and immobilization of streptavidin. The progress of the functionalization was monitored by using different fluorescence labels for optimization of the chemical derivatization steps. Further, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized for the characterization of the modified surface. These established analytical methods allowed to derive information like chemical composition of the surface, surface coverage with immobilized streptavidin, as well as parameters of the surface roughness. The proposed functionalization protocol furnished a surface density of 144 fmol mm{sup -2} streptavidin with good reproducibility (13.9% RSD, n = 10) and without inflicted damage to the surface. This surface modification was applied to polyimide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer

  19. Parallel Execution of Functional Mock-up Units in Buildings Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmen, Ozgur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutaro, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); New, Joshua Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-30

    A Functional Mock-up Interface (FMI) defines a standardized interface to be used in computer simulations to develop complex cyber-physical systems. FMI implementation by a software modeling tool enables the creation of a simulation model that can be interconnected, or the creation of a software library called a Functional Mock-up Unit (FMU). This report describes an FMU wrapper implementation that imports FMUs into a C++ environment and uses an Euler solver that executes FMUs in parallel using Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP). The purpose of this report is to elucidate the runtime performance of the solver when a multi-component system is imported as a single FMU (for the whole system) or as multiple FMUs (for different groups of components as sub-systems). This performance comparison is conducted using two test cases: (1) a simple, multi-tank problem; and (2) a more realistic use case based on the Modelica Buildings Library. In both test cases, the performance gains are promising when each FMU consists of a large number of states and state events that are wrapped in a single FMU. Load balancing is demonstrated to be a critical factor in speeding up parallel execution of multiple FMUs.

  20. Data Glove System Embedded With Inertial Measurement Units for Hand Function Evaluation in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Hsiao, Pei-Chi; Yang, Shu-Yu; Su, Che-Shih; Lee, I-Jung

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a data glove system integrated with six-axis inertial measurement unit sensors for evaluating the hand function of patients who have suffered a stroke. The modular design of this data glove facilitates its use for stroke patients. The proposed system can use the hand's accelerations, angular velocities, and joint angles as calculated by a quaternion algorithm, to help physicians gain new insights into rehabilitation treatments. A clinical experiment was performed on 15 healthy subjects and 15 stroke patients whose Brunnstrom stages (BSs) ranged from 4 to 6. In this experiment, the participants were subjected to a grip task, thumb task, and card turning task to produce raw data and three features, namely, the average rotation speed, variation of movement completion time, and quality of movement; these features were extracted from the recorded data to form 2-D and 3-D scatter plots. These scatter plots can provide reference information and guidance to physicians who must determine the BSs of stroke patients. The proposed system demonstrated a hit rate of 70.22% on average. Therefore, this system can effectively reduce physicians' load and provide them with detailed information about hand function to help them adjust rehabilitation strategies for stroke patients.

  1. Moment analysis of the time-dependent transmission of a step-function input of a radioactive gas through an adsorber bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.V.; Rothstein, D.; Madey, R.

    1986-01-01

    The time-dependent concentration of a radioactive gas at the outlet of an adsorber bed for a step change in the input concentration is analyzed by the method of moments. This moment analysis yields analytical expressions for calculating the kinetic parameters of a gas adsorbed on a porous solid in terms of observables from a time-dependent transmission curve. Transmission is the ratio of the adsorbate outlet concentration to that at the inlet. The three nonequilibrium parameters are the longitudinal diffusion coefficient, the solid-phase diffusion coefficient, and the interfacial mass-transfer coefficient. Three quantities that can be extracted in principle from an experimental transmission curve are the equilibrium transmission, the average residence (or propagation) time, and the first-moment relative to the propagation time. The propagation time for a radioactive gas is given by the time integral of one minus the transmission (expressed as a fraction of the steady-state transmission). The steady-state transmission, the propagation time, and the first-order moment are functions of the three kinetic parameters and the equilibrium adsorption capacity. The equilibrium adsorption capacity is extracted from an experimental transmission curve for a stable gaseous isotope. The three kinetic parameters can be obtained by solving the three analytical expressions simultaneously. No empirical correlations are required

  2. Validation of a Step Detection Algorithm during Straight Walking and Turning in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease and Older Adults Using an Inertial Measurement Unit at the Lower Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh H. Pham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionInertial measurement units (IMUs positioned on various body locations allow detailed gait analysis even under unconstrained conditions. From a medical perspective, the assessment of vulnerable populations is of particular relevance, especially in the daily-life environment. Gait analysis algorithms need thorough validation, as many chronic diseases show specific and even unique gait patterns. The aim of this study was therefore to validate an acceleration-based step detection algorithm for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD and older adults in both a lab-based and home-like environment.MethodsIn this prospective observational study, data were captured from a single 6-degrees of freedom IMU (APDM (3DOF accelerometer and 3DOF gyroscope worn on the lower back. Detection of heel strike (HS and toe off (TO on a treadmill was validated against an optoelectronic system (Vicon (11 PD patients and 12 older adults. A second independent validation study in the home-like environment was performed against video observation (20 PD patients and 12 older adults and included step counting during turning and non-turning, defined with a previously published algorithm.ResultsA continuous wavelet transform (cwt-based algorithm was developed for step detection with very high agreement with the optoelectronic system. HS detection in PD patients/older adults, respectively, reached 99/99% accuracy. Similar results were obtained for TO (99/100%. In HS detection, Bland–Altman plots showed a mean difference of 0.002 s [95% confidence interval (CI −0.09 to 0.10] between the algorithm and the optoelectronic system. The Bland–Altman plot for TO detection showed mean differences of 0.00 s (95% CI −0.12 to 0.12. In the home-like assessment, the algorithm for detection of occurrence of steps during turning reached 90% (PD patients/90% (older adults sensitivity, 83/88% specificity, and 88/89% accuracy. The detection of steps during non-turning phases

  3. The functional muscle-bone unit in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, I; Schütz, F; Hamacher, S; Semler, O; Stark, C; Schulze, J; Rittweger, J; Schoenau, E

    2017-07-01

    Our results suggest that the prevalence of bone health deficits in children with CP was overestimated, when using only age- and height-adjusted bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD). When applying the functional muscle-bone unit diagnostic algorithm (FMBU-A), the prevalence of positive results decreased significantly. We recommend applying the FMBU-A when assessing bone health in children with CP. The prevalence of bone health deficits in children with cerebral palsy (CP) might be overestimated because age- and height-adjusted reference percentiles for bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) do not consider reduced muscle activity. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of positive DXA-based indicators for bone health deficits in children with CP to the prevalence of positive findings after applying a functional muscle-bone unit diagnostic algorithm (FMBU-A) considering reduced muscle activity. The present study was a monocentric retrospective analysis of 297 whole body DXA scans of children with CP. The prevalence of positive results of age- and height-adjusted BMC and aBMD defined as BMC and aBMD below the P3 percentile and of the FMBU-A was calculated. In children with CP, the prevalence of positive results of age-adjusted BMC were 33.3% and of aBMD 50.8%. Height-adjusted results for BMC and aBMD were positive in 16.8 and 36.0% of cases. The prevalence of positive results applying the FMBU-A regarding BMC and aBMD were significantly (p BMC and aBMD (8.8 and 14.8%). Our results suggest that the prevalence of bone health deficits in children with CP was overestimated, when using age- and height-adjusted BMC and aBMD. When applying the FMBU-A, the prevalence decreased significantly. We recommend applying the FMBU-A when assessing bone health in children with CP.

  4. Step out - Step in Sequencing Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musegaas, M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Quant, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a new class of relaxed sequencing games is introduced: the class of Step out - Step in sequencing games. In this relaxation any player within a coalition is allowed to step out from his position in the processing order and to step in at any position later in the processing order.

  5. Step out-step in sequencing games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musegaas, Marieke; Borm, Peter; Quant, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new class of relaxed sequencing games is introduced: the class of Step out–Step in sequencing games. In this relaxation any player within a coalition is allowed to step out from his position in the processing order and to step in at any position later in the processing order. First,

  6. Avaliation between precocious out of bed in the intensive care unit and functionality after discharge: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana Guterres de Carvalho

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: The incidence of complications arising from the deleterious effects of immobility in the intensive care unit contributes to functional decline, increased length of hospital stay and reduced functionality. Physical therapy is able to promote recovery and preservation of functionality, which can minimize these complications - through early mobilization. To evaluate the functionality and independence of patients who underwent a early bed output in the Intensive Care Unit. Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted with patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of the Santa Cruz Hospital and having a physiotherapy prescription. The patients were divided into conventional therapy group- control group and intervention group, who performed the protocol of early mobilization, promoting the bed output. The functionality was measured three times (retroactive to hospitalization, at discharge from the ICU and on hospital discharge through the instrument Functional Independence Measure (FIM. Results: Preliminary data indicates that the intervention group (n = 4 presented lower loss of functionality after discharge from the ICU, with a deficit of 19%, having recovered until the hospital discharge 97% of the prehospitalization measure. The control group (n = 5 showed higher loss in the ICU of 47.6%, and was discharged from hospital with only 72% of their basal rate. Conclusion: There was a lower loss rate and better recovery of functionality in the studied population when those were submitted to a systematized and early protocol of mobilization as well as shorter hospital stay.

  7. A novel dual-functional MEMS sensor integrating both pressure and temperature units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Tao; Zhang Zhaohua; Ren Tianling; Miao Gujin; Zhou Changjian; Lin Huiwang; Liu Litian, E-mail: RenTL@tsinghua.edu.c [National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a novel miniature dual-functional sensor integrating both pressure and temperature sensitive units on a single chip. The device wafer of SOI is used as a pizeoresistive diaphragm which features excellent consistency in thickness. The conventional anisotropic wet etching has been abandoned, while ICP etching has been employed to etch out the reference cave to minimize the area of individual device in the way that the 57.4{sup 0} slope has been eliminated. As a result, the average cost of the single chip is reduced. Two PN junctions with constant ratio of the areas of depletion regions have also been integrated on the same chip to serve as a temperature sensor, and each PN junction shows high linearity over -40 to 100 {sup 0}C and low power consumption. The iron implanting process for PN junction is exactly compatible with the piezoresistor, with no additional expenditure. The pressure sensitivity is 86 mV/MPa, while temperature sensitivity is 1.43 mV/{sup 0}C, both complying with the design objective.

  8. A novel dual-functional MEMS sensor integrating both pressure and temperature units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tao; Zhang Zhaohua; Ren Tianling; Miao Gujin; Zhou Changjian; Lin Huiwang; Liu Litian

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel miniature dual-functional sensor integrating both pressure and temperature sensitive units on a single chip. The device wafer of SOI is used as a pizeoresistive diaphragm which features excellent consistency in thickness. The conventional anisotropic wet etching has been abandoned, while ICP etching has been employed to etch out the reference cave to minimize the area of individual device in the way that the 57.4 0 slope has been eliminated. As a result, the average cost of the single chip is reduced. Two PN junctions with constant ratio of the areas of depletion regions have also been integrated on the same chip to serve as a temperature sensor, and each PN junction shows high linearity over -40 to 100 0 C and low power consumption. The iron implanting process for PN junction is exactly compatible with the piezoresistor, with no additional expenditure. The pressure sensitivity is 86 mV/MPa, while temperature sensitivity is 1.43 mV/ 0 C, both complying with the design objective.

  9. Function of "nontrauma" surgeons in level I trauma centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, J W

    1997-06-01

    Although the general "trauma" surgeon is usually the team leader in level I trauma centers, the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons is frequently ill-defined. This study was done to gain data in regard to actual use of subspecialists in busy centers. First, a survey of the patterns of staffing in 140 trauma centers was elicited by mail questionnaire, supplemented by telephone cells. Second, records of 400 consecutive patients at the Elvis Presley Trauma Center were reviewed to determine the use of subspecialists during the first 24 hours of care of individual patients. There were differences in the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons at different centers: in receiving, admitting, operating, and critical care areas and in privileges for admission and attending of inpatients. Consultation "guidelines" are used for many specific injuries. At our center, a mean of 1.92 subspecialists, in addition to general surgeons, were involved in the early care of each patient. Problems exist in many centers regarding the use of subspecialists, especially for management of facial and chest injuries. In some centers nonsurgeons function in the intensive care unit, and as admitting and attending physicians of trauma patients.

  10. Zinc injection during Hot Functional Test (HFT) in Tomari Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, H.; Mino, Y.; Nakahama, S.; Aizawa, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Umehara, R.; Shimuz, Y.; Kogawa, N.; Ojima, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc injection is performed to reduce radiation exposure around the world, and its effect is confirmed. In Japanese PWRs, the actual effect is also confirmed. Therefore, number of Japanese PWR plans, where zinc is injected, increase. We conclude that zinc injection from Hot Function Test (HFT), when RCS temperature and corrosion rate of material of primary components are increased firstly, is more effective for reducing radiation exposure, because oxide layer with zinc is more stable than with other metals such as cobalt and it is confirmed that zinc injection reduces corrosion amount of alloy 690TT in laboratory test. Therefore in Tomari Unit 3 (PWR, commercial operation from December 2009) of HOKKAIDO ELECTRIC POWER CO., INC, zinc injection was started from first Heat-up during trial operation. During HFT, zinc consumption coincides with assumed plan and Ni concentration is lower than in reference plant. Therefore we conclude that stable and fine oxide layer including zinc is formed. We hope that radiation exposure reduces because of these results. (We published at Asia Water Chemistry Symposium 2009 in NAGOYA.) Results of analysis of oxide layer on SG insert plate, removed after HFT, will be reported. Also Actual results of water chemistry and zinc injection after HFT will be reported. (author)

  11. Orthogonal rational functions on the unit circle: from the scalar to the matrix case.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bultheel, A.; Gonzalez-Vera, P.; Hendriksen, E.; Njastad, O.

    2006-01-01

    Special functions and orthogonal polynomials in particular have been around for centuries. Can you imagine mathematics without trigonometric functions, the exponential function or polynomials? In the twentieth century the emphasis was on special functions satisfying linear differential equations,

  12. Functional and Mental Health Status of United Kingdom Military Amputees Postrehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladlow, Peter; Phillip, Rhodri; Etherington, John; Coppack, Russell; Bilzon, James; McGuigan, M Polly; Bennett, Alexander N

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the functional and mental health status of severely injured traumatic amputees from the United Kingdom military at the completion of their rehabilitation pathway and to compare these data with the published normative data. Retrospective independent group comparison of descriptive rehabilitation data recorded postrehabilitation. A military complex trauma rehabilitation center. Amputees (N=65; mean age, 29±6 y) were evaluated at the completion of their rehabilitation pathway; of these, 54 were operationally (combat) injured (23 unilateral, 23 bilateral, 8 triple) and 11 nonoperationally injured (all unilateral). Continuous ∼4-week inpatient, physician-led, interdisciplinary rehabilitation followed by ∼4-weeks of patient-led, home-based rehabilitation. The New Injury Severity Score at the point of injury was used as the baseline reference. The 6-minute walk test, Amputee Mobility Predictor with Prosthesis, Special Interest Group in Amputee Medicine, Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre mobility and activity of daily living scores as well as depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), anxiety (General Anxiety Disorder Scale-7), mental health support, and pain scores were recorded at discharge and compared with the published normative data. The mean New Injury Severity Score was 40±15. After 34±14 months of rehabilitation, amputees achieved a mean 6-minute walk distance of 489±117 m compared with age-matched normative distances of 459 to 738 m. The 2 unilateral groups walked (544 m) significantly further (P>.05) than did the bilateral amputee (445±104 m) and triple amputee (387±99 m) groups. All groups demonstrated mean functional mobility scores consistent with scores of either active adults or community ambulators with limb loss. In total, 85% could walk/run independently and 95% could walk and perform activities of daily living independently with an aid/adaptation. No significant difference in mental health outcome was reported between the

  13. Comparison of Nutrition and Lung Function Outcomes in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Living in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Christopher H; Sykes, Jenna; Stanojevic, Sanja; Marshall, Bruce; Petren, Kristofer; Ostrenga, Josh; Fink, Aliza; Elbert, Alexander; Quon, Bradley S; Stephenson, Anne L

    2018-03-15

    A 10-year gap in the median age of survival for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) was reported between patients living in Canada compared with patients living in the United States. Because both malnutrition and poor lung function are associated with an increased risk of mortality in CF, we investigated the temporal and longitudinal trends in lung function and nutrition between Canada and the United States. This cohort study used Canadian CF Registry and U.S. CF Foundation Patient Registry data from 1990 to 2013. A unified dataset was created to harmonize the variables collected within the two registries for the purpose of comparing outcomes between the two countries. We conducted three analyses: survival differences by birth cohort; population trends for FEV 1 and body mass index (BMI) over time; and individual patient FEV 1 and BMI trajectories. The study included a total of 37,772 patients in the United States and 5,149 patients in Canada. Patients with CF experienced significant improvements in nutritional status and lung function in both Canada and the United States during the study. In addition, the survival gap between the two countries is narrowing within younger birth cohorts. The improvements for the patients within the United States were most prominent in the BMI trajectories, where patients born after 1990 in the United States have higher BMI that has persisted over time. The reasons for the observed improvements, and catch-up in the United States, are likely multifactorial and include the introduction of high-fat, high-calorie diets; introduction of newborn screening; and/or improved access to care for CF children in the United States.

  14. One-step synthesis of water-dispersible cysteine functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles for mercury(II) removal from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Xiaofang; Wang, Qin; Chen, WenLing; Pang, Yuehong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Using Fe 2+ as precursors, air as oxidant and cysteine as protectant, this novel cysteine functionalized Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs) was facilely one-pot synthesized at room temperature by oxidation–precipitation method with the assistance of sonication. Then the Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs were demonstrated as an inexpensive and quite efficient magnetic nano-adsorbent for as high as 95% Hg(II) removal efficiency. These results indicated that Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs is a potentially attractive material for the removal of Hg(II) from water. - Highlights: • A simplified one-step synthesis method of superparamagnetic Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs was developed. • It was synthesized at room temperature by oxidation-precipitation method with the assistance of sonication. • It was demonstrated as an inexpensive and quite efficient magnetic nano-adsorbent for Hg(II) removal. - Abstract: Cysteine functionalized Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs) were prepared facilely for Hg(II) removal from aqueous solutions. Using Fe 2+ as precursors, air as oxidant and Cys as protectant, this novel material was one-pot synthesis at room temperature by oxidation–precipitation method with the assistance of sonication. The MNPs were characterized by TEM, VSM, FTIR, X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD) and TGA methods. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the removal efficiency was as high as 95% and the maximum sorption capacity is found to be 380 mg/mol for Hg(II). Study on adsorption kinetics shows that adsorption of Hg(II) onto Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs follows pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the adsorption rate constant was 0.22 min −1 . Additionally, the Hg(II)-loaded Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs could be easily regenerated up to 95% using 1.0 M acetic acid. These results indicated that Cys-Fe 3 O 4 MNPs is a potentially attractive material for the removal of Hg(II) from water

  15. Lithospheric Layering beneath the Contiguous United States Constrained by S-to-P Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Liu, K. H.; Kong, F.; Gao, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    The greatly-improved spatial coverage of broadband seismic stations as a result of the deployment of the EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) stations and the diversity of tectonic environments in the contiguous United States provide a unique opportunity to investigate the depth variation and nature of intra-lithospheric interfaces in different tectonic regimes. A total of 284,121 high-quality S-to-P receiver functions (SRFs) are obtained from 3,809 broadband seismic stations in the TA and other permanent and temporary deployments in the contiguous United States. The SRFs are computed using frequency domain deconvolution, and are stacked in consecutive circles with a radius of 2°. They are converted to depth series after move-out corrections using the IASP91 Earth model. Similar to previous SRF studies, a robust negative arrival, representing a sharp discontinuity of velocity reduction with depth, is visible in virtually all the stacked traces in the depth range of 30-110 km. Beneath the western US, the depth of this discontinuity is 69±17 km, and beneath the eastern US, it ranges from 75 to 90 km, both of which are comparable to the depth of the tomographically-determined lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). In contrast, the depth of the discontinuity beneath the central US is 83±10 km which is significantly smaller than the 250 km LAB depth determined by seismic surface wave tomography. Based on previous seismic tomography, shear-wave splitting and mantle xenolith studies, we interpret this discontinuity as the top of a frozen-in layer of volatile-rich melt beneath the central US. The observations and the discrepancy between the SRF and seismic tomography results for the central US as well as the amplitude of the corresponding arrival on the SRFs may be explained by spatial variations of the thickness of the transitional layer between the "pure" lithosphere and the "pure" asthenosphere. Under this hypothesis, the consistency between the results from the

  16. The distribution of the zeros of holomorphic functions of moderate growth in the unit disc and the representation of meromorphic functions there

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudasheva, E G; Khabibullin, Bulat N

    2009-01-01

    Let D be the unit disc in the complex plane C and H a class of holomorphic functions in D distinguished by a restriction on their growth in a neighbourhood of the boundary of the disc which is stated in terms of weight functions of moderate growth. Some results which describe the sequences of zeros for holomorphic functions in classes H of this type are obtained. The weight functions defining H are not necessarily radial; however the results obtained are new even in the case of radial constraints. Conditions for meromorphic functions in D ensuring that they can be represented as a ratio of two functions in H sharing no zeros are investigated. Bibliography: 28 titles.

  17. Linear step drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.; Elger, R.; Kocandrle, L.; Zdebor, J.

    1986-01-01

    A linear step drive is described developed in Czechoslovak-Soviet cooperation and intended for driving WWER-1000 control rods. The functional principle is explained of the motor and the mechanical and electrical parts of the drive, power control, and the indicator of position are described. The motor has latches situated in the reactor at a distance of 3 m from magnetic armatures, it has a low structural height above the reactor cover, which suggests its suitability for seismic localities. Its magnetic circuits use counterpoles; the mechanical shocks at the completion of each step are damped using special design features. The position indicator is of a special design and evaluates motor position within ±1% of total travel. A drive diagram and the flow chart of both the control electronics and the position indicator are presented. (author) 4 figs

  18. Self-assembly and omniphobic property of fluorinated unit end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junyan, Liang; Pingdi, Xu; Jingxian, Bao; Ling, He; Nan, Zhu

    2018-03-01

    The self-assembly behavior of fluorinated unit end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PDFHM-ef-PMMA) in solution and its influence on the surface microstructure, elemental composition and omniphobic property of cast film was investigated in this work. Specifically, three mixed solutions of tetrahydrofuran (THF)/methanol (MeOH), THF/H2O and THF/H2O/MeOH in various compositions were employed separately as the selective solvents. In THF/MeOH solution, the aggregate morphologies of PDFHM-ef-PMMA changed gradually from core-shell spheres to worm, and then to elliptical vesicles as MeOH content increased. In THF/H2O solution, spherical and bowl-shaped aggregates with significantly larger sizes than those in THF/MeOH solution were favored despite lower H2O content. The further addition of MeOH to THF/H2O mixture could reduce the size of aggregate but hardly change original aggregate morphology. During the film formation process, those self-assembled aggregates in THF/MeOH solution fused with one another to form a smooth surface. When such surface was fully covered by fluorinated segments, the outstanding hexadecane and water slide-off properties and ink-resistant property required for antifouling application were demonstrated. Instead, the aggregates formed in THF/H2O/MeOH mixture were subjected to secondary aggregation of PDFHM-ef-PMMA chains during solvent evaporation, leading to the formation of a particulate film with poor adhesion towards glass plate and hexadecane-repellent property.

  19. The biofilm-controlling functions of rechargeable antimicrobial N-halamine dental unit waterline tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, Nuala; Schoolfield, John; Luo, Jie; Sun, Yuyu

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to test the biofilm-controlling functions of N-halamine tubing over an eight-month period. A laboratory system, simulating a teaching dental clinic, was used to test rechargeable N-halamine tubing (T) compared to an untreated control (C) using the unit manufacturer's tubing. For the long-term study, a recharged tubing (RC) treated with bleach was used to compare with the test (T) and the control (C) tubing. Source tap water was cycled through the lines at 1.4 mL/minute, five minutes on and 25 minutes off, eight hours/day, five days/week. Every three weeks, samples of effluent, recovered adherent bacteria from inside tubing surfaces, and SEM images were examined for bacterial and biofilm growth. After sampling, a recharging solution of chlorine bleach (1 : 10 dilution) was run through T and RC lines, left overnight, and rinsed out the next morning. One-way ANOVAs and Spearman correlations were performed to detect significant differences for T, RC, and C, and determine significance with time period and source water, respectively. Mean log CFU/mL for C effluent > T (p = 0.028), and C tubing > T (p = 0.035). Spearman correlations were significant between effluent and source water level for T (rho = 0.817), and T tubing (0.750); between RC tubing and source water level (rho = 0.836), and time (rho = 0.745); and between C and time (rho = 0.873). SEM imaging confirmed the presence of biofilm inside RC and C, but not inside T. N-halamine tubing completely inhibited biofilm formation without negatively affecting the physical properties of the effluent water. Further research on N-halamine tubing using a pure water source is recommended, as T effluent bacterial levels reflected the source tap water quality and proliferation of planktonic bacteria with no biofilm activity.

  20. Crustal thickness and Vp/Vs beneath the southeastern United States: Constraints from receiver function stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    To provide new constraints on crustal structure and evolution models beneath a collage of tectonic provinces in the southeastern United States, a total of 10,753 teleseismic receiver functions recorded by 125 USArray and other seismic stations are used to compute crustal thickness and Vp/Vs values. The resulting crustal thicknesses range from 25 km at the coast to 51 km beneath the peak of the southern Appalachians with an average of 36.2 km ± 5.5 km. The resulting crustal thicknesses correlate well with surface elevation and Bouguer gravity anomalies. Beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the crustal thicknesses show a clear eastward thinning with a magnitude of 10 km, from about 40 km beneath the western margin to 30 km beneath the coast. The Vp/Vs values for the entire study area range from 1.71 to 1.90 with a mean value of 1.80 ± 0.04. The mean Vp/Vs value is 1.82±0.035 in the southern Appalachian Mountain. The slightly larger than normal crustal Vp/Vs for this area might be the result of significant erosion of the felsic upper crust over the past 300 million years. Alternatively, it could also suggest the existence of pervasive magmatic intrusion into the Appalachian crust. The Vp/Vs measurements in the Atlantic Coastal Plain increase toward the east, ranging from 1.75 to 1.82, probably indicating a gradual increase of mafic magmatic intrusion into thinner crust during the development of the passive continental margin.

  1. Reduced functional measure of cardiovascular reserve predicts admission to critical care unit following kidney transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M S Ting

    Full Text Available There is currently no effective preoperative assessment for patients undergoing kidney transplantation that is able to identify those at high perioperative risk requiring admission to critical care unit (CCU. We sought to determine if functional measures of cardiovascular reserve, in particular the anaerobic threshold (VO₂AT could identify these patients.Adult patients were assessed within 4 weeks prior to kidney transplantation in a University hospital with a 37-bed CCU, between April 2010 and June 2012. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET, echocardiography and arterial applanation tonometry were performed.There were 70 participants (age 41.7±14.5 years, 60% male, 91.4% living donor kidney recipients, 23.4% were desensitized. 14 patients (20% required escalation of care from the ward to CCU following transplantation. Reduced anaerobic threshold (VO₂AT was the most significant predictor, independently (OR = 0.43; 95% CI 0.27-0.68; p<0.001 and in the multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusted OR = 0.26; 95% CI 0.12-0.59; p = 0.001. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve was 0.93, based on a risk prediction model that incorporated VO₂AT, body mass index and desensitization status. Neither echocardiographic nor measures of aortic compliance were significantly associated with CCU admission.To our knowledge, this is the first prospective observational study to demonstrate the usefulness of CPET as a preoperative risk stratification tool for patients undergoing kidney transplantation. The study suggests that VO₂AT has the potential to predict perioperative morbidity in kidney transplant recipients.

  2. The Role of Parents' Control in Early Adolescents' Psychological Functioning: A Longitudinal Investigation in the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Pomerantz, Eva M.; Chen, Huichang

    2007-01-01

    This research compared the effects over time of parents' control and autonomy support on children's functioning in the United States and China. American and Chinese (N = 806) seventh graders (mean age = 12.73 years) participated in a 6-month longitudinal study. Children reported on their parents' psychological control, psychological autonomy…

  3. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Redondo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa. The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. Materials and methods: We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. Results: The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipment utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40°C to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1–5. Conclusions: Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment.

  4. Iridium terpyridine complexes as functional assembling units in arrays for the conversion of light energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamigni, Lucia; Collin, Jean-Paul; Sauvage, Jean-Pierre

    2008-07-01

    In photosynthesis, sunlight energy is converted into a chemical potential by an electron transfer sequence that is started by an excited state and ultimately yields a long-lived charge-separated state. This process can be reproduced by carefully designed multicomponent artificial arrays of three or more components, and the stored energy can be used to oxidize or reduce molecules in solution, to inject electrons or holes, or to create an electron flow. Therefore, the process is important both for artificial-photosynthesis research and for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Molecular arrays for photoinduced charge separation often use chromophores that resemble the natural ones. However, new synthetic components, including transition metal complexes, have had some success. This Account discusses the use of bis-terpyridine (tpy) metal complexes as assembling and functional units of such multicomponent arrays. M(tpy)2(n+) complexes have the advantage of yielding linear arrays with unambiguous geometry. Originally, Ru(tpy)2(2+) and Os(tpy)2(2+) were used as photosensitizers in triads containing typical organic donors and acceptors. However, it soon became evident that the relatively low excited state of these complexes could act as an energy drain of the excited state of the photosensitizer and, thus, seriously compete with charge separation. A new metal complex that preserved the favorable tpy geometry and yet had a higher energy level was needed. We identified Ir(tpy)2(3+), which displayed a higher energy level, a more facile reduction that favored charge separation, a longer excited-state lifetime, and strong spectroscopic features that were useful for the identification of intermediates. Ir(tpy)2(3+) was used in arrays with electron-donating gold porphyrin and electron-accepting free-base porphyrins. A judicious change of the free-base porphyrin photosensitizer with zinc porphyrin allowed us to shape the photoreactivity and led to charge separation with

  5. Step-growth polymerizing systems of general type “AfiBgi” : calculating the radius of gyration and the g-curve using generating functions and recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillegers, L.T.M.E.; Slot, J.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Step-growth polymerized systems of general type “AfiBgi” are considered. One or more of the monomer species carries at least three reactive groups and thus can act as a branching point in a polymeric molecule. An algorithmic method is presented to calculate the topology-averaged square radius of

  6. Changes in Nutritional and Functional Status in Longer Stay Patients Admitted to a Geriatric Evaluation and Management Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, A; Skliros, E; Graven, C; McIntosh, R; Lasry, C; Newsome, C; Bowie, A

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition and functional decline are common in older inpatients admitted to subacute care settings. However the association between changes in nutritional status and relevant functional outcomes remains under-researched. This study examined changes in nutritional status, function and mobility in patients admitted to a Geriatric Evaluation and Management (GEM) unit who had a length of stay (LOS) longer than 21 days. A prospective, observational study. Two GEM units at St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Australia. Patients admitted to the GEM units who stayed longer than 21 days were included in the study. Patients were assessed on admission and prior to discharge using the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Functional Independence Measure (FIM) motor domain and the Modified Elderly Mobility Scale (MEMS). Fifty-nine patients (Mean age 84.0 ± 7 years) met the required length of stay and were included in the study. Fifty-four per cent (n=32) were malnourished on admission (SGA B/C) and 44% (n=26) were malnourished on discharge. Twenty-two per cent (n=13) improved SGA category, 75% remained stable (n=44) and 3% deteriorated (n=2) from admission to discharge. Total Motor FIM scores significantly increased from admission to discharge in both the improved (pnutritional status groups. Subjects who improved in nutritional status had a significantly higher MEMS score at discharge (pnutritional status at the time of discharge. Improvement in nutritional status was associated with greater improvement in mobility scores. Further studies are required to investigate the effectiveness of nutrition interventions, which will inform models of care aiming to optimise nutritional, functional, and associated clinical outcomes in patients admitted to GEM units.

  7. Measurement of the dosimetric parameters for low monitor units in step-and-shoot IMRT delivered by Siemens Artiste linear accelerators; Medida de los parametros dosimetricos para bajo numero de unidades monitor en IMRT segmentada estatica administrada por aceleradores lineales Siemens Artiste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Saez Beltran, M.; Martin Martin, G.; Alonso Iracheta, L.

    2012-07-01

    Absorbed dose linearity and beam stability, both for low monitor units, are important factors for ensuring planned dose delivery in step-and-shoot IMRT. For Siemens Artiste linear accelerators, under IMRT stable irradiation conditions and for a single segment of 20 cm x 20 cm field size, the linearity of the absorbed dose with the monitor units, field flatness and symmetry have been measured for the range between 1 and 10 monitor units. We have found that absorbed dose linearity with monitor units is within 2% down to 2 monitor units and it is about 9% for 1 monitor unit. Flatness and symmetry values show variations within 1% down to 2 monitor units and increase by 9% for lower values. Using our monitor unit distribution per segment in IMRT we estimate that the uncertainty in absorbed dose for a whole treatment due to these factors is less than 1% (k= 3). (Author) 13 refs.

  8. Adsorption-induced step formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thostrup, P.; Christoffersen, Ebbe; Lorensen, Henrik Qvist

    2001-01-01

    Through an interplay between density functional calculations, Monte Carlo simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments, we show that an intermediate coverage of CO on the Pt(110) surface gives rise to a new rough equilibrium structure with more than 50% step atoms. CO is shown to bind...... so strongly to low-coordinated Pt atoms that it can break Pt-Pt bonds and spontaneously form steps on the surface. It is argued that adsorption-induced step formation may be a general effect, in particular at high gas pressures and temperatures....

  9. Reproductive capacity of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae) in function of the number of individuals per unit of rearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, Luis Gustavo Amorim; Freitas, Sergio de

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive capacity of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae) in function of the number of individuals per unit of rearing. This work was carried out to investigate the reproductive potential of Chrysoperla externa subjected to different densities per rearing unit. Adults of the F 4 offspring were kept at 25 ± 1 deg C, RH 70 ± 10% and 12 h photo phase. It was used the following densities per rearing unit (10 cm of diameter by 23 cm of height, and volume of 1650 cm 3 ): 1 male: 3 female, 2 males: 6 females, 3 males: 9 females and 4 males: 12 females. It was evaluated the pre-oviposition period, the daily and total oviposition per female and per rearing unit, the percentage of viable and infertile eggs percentage and the exploitation index per female and per rearing unit. The density 4 males: 12 females presented better exploitation when compared to the other densities thus equalizing the low values obtained for the mean and total egg laying per female. (author)

  10. Social functions of high school athletics in the United States: a historical and comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokvis, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States competitive sport is part of the extra-curricular program of high schools. In the Netherlands, on the other hand, competitive sport is practiced in private clubs which are completely independent of the high schools. The consolidation and continuity of this difference can be

  11. Stability of a simple Levi–Civitá functional equation on non-unital ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ulam stability; Levi–Civitá equation; non-unital semigroup; 2-divisible group. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary: 39B82. 1. Introduction ... for all x ∈ G? These kind of questions form the material for the stability theory of func-.

  12. Internship guide : Work placements step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Internship Guide: Work Placements Step by Step has been written from the practical perspective of a placement coordinator. This book addresses the following questions : what problems do students encounter when they start thinking about the jobs their degree programme prepares them for? How do you

  13. The way to collisions, step by step

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    While the LHC sectors cool down and reach the cryogenic operating temperature, spirits are warming up as we all eagerly await the first collisions. No reason to hurry, though. Making particles collide involves the complex manoeuvring of thousands of delicate components. The experts will make it happen using a step-by-step approach.

  14. Steps to Advanced CANDU 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yongshick; Brooks, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    The CANDU nuclear power system was developed from merging of AECL heavy water reactor technology with Ontario Hydro electrical power station expertise. The original four units of Ontario Hydro's Pickering Generating Station are the first full-scale commercial application of the CANDU system. AECL and Ontario Hydro then moved to the next evolutionary step, a more advanced larger scale design for four units at the Bruce Generating Station. CANDU 600 followed as a single unit nuclear electric power station design derived from an amalgam of features of the multiple unit Pickering and Bruce designs. The design of the CANDU 600 nuclear steam supply system is based on the Pickering design with improvements derived from the Bruce design. For example, most CANDU 600 auxiliary systems are based on Bruce systems, whereas the fuel handling system is based on the Pickering system. Four CANDU 600 units are in operation, and five are under construction in Romania. For the additional four units at Pickering Generating Station 'B', Ontario Hydro selected a replica of the Pickering 'A' design with limited design changes to maintain a high level of standardization across all eight units. Ontario Hydro applied a similar policy for the additional four units at Bruce Generating Station 'B'. For the four unit Darlington station, Ontario Hydro selected a design based on Bruce with improvements derived from operating experience, the CANDU 600 design and development programs

  15. High-density EEG coherence analysis using functional units applied to mental fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caat, Michael ten; Lorist, Monicque M.; Bezdan, Eniko; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) coherence provides a quantitative measure of functional brain connectivity which is calculated between pairs of signals as a function of frequency. Without hypotheses, traditional coherence analysis would be cumbersome for high-density EEG which employs a large number of

  16. Do predictors of smoking relapse change as a function of duration of abstinence? Findings from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hua-Hie; Borland, Ron; Cummings, K Michael; Partos, Timea

    2018-07-01

    To estimate predictors of time to smoking relapse and test if prediction varied by quit duration. Longitudinal cohort data from the International Tobacco Control Four-Country survey with annual follow up collected between 2002 and 2015. Canada, United States, United Kingdom and Australia. A total of 9171 eligible adult smokers who had made at least one quit attempt during the study period. Time to relapse was the main outcome. Predictor variables included pre-quit baseline measures of nicotine dependence, smoking and quitting-related motivations, quitting capacity and social influence, and also two post-quit measures, use of stop-smoking medications and quit duration (1-7 days, 8-14 days, 15-31 days, 1-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months, 1-2 years and 2+ years), along with socio-demographics. All factors were predictive of relapse within the first 6 months of quitting but only wanting to quit, quit intentions and number of friends who smoke were still predictive of relapse in the 6-12-month period of quitting [hazard ratios (HR) = 1.20, P < 0.05; 1.13, P < 0.05; and 1.21, P < 0.001, respectively]. Number of friends smoking was the only remaining predictor of relapse in the 1-2 years quit period (HR = 1.19, P = 0.001) with none predictive beyond the 2-year quit period. Use of stop-smoking medications during quit attempts was related negatively to relapse during the first 2 weeks of quitting (HR = 0.71-0.84), but related positively to relapse in the 1-6-month quit period (HR = 1.29-1.54). Predictive effects of all factors showed significant interaction with quit duration except for perceiving smoking as an important part of life, prematurely stubbing out a cigarette and wanting to quit. Among adult smokers in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Australia, factors associated with smoking relapse differ between the early and later stages of a quit attempt, suggesting that the determinants of relapse change as a function of abstinence

  17. [One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular-genetic oriented imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, H; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Ruf, M; Demirakça, T; Grimm, O; Henn, F A; Ende, G

    2005-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes.

  18. Microsoft Office professional 2010 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce; Frye, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Teach yourself exactly what you need to know about using Office Professional 2010-one step at a time! With STEP BY STEP, you build and practice new skills hands-on, at your own pace. Covering Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel, Access, Publisher, and OneNote, this book will help you learn the core features and capabilities needed to: Create attractive documents, publications, and spreadsheetsManage your e-mail, calendar, meetings, and communicationsPut your business data to workDevelop and deliver great presentationsOrganize your ideas and notes in one placeConnect, share, and accom

  19. Interventions to improve executive functioning and working memory in school-aged children with AD(H)D: a randomised controlled trial and stepped-care approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Donk, Marthe L. A.; Hiemstra-Beernink, Anne-Claire; Tjeenk-Kalff, Ariane C.; van der Leij, Aryan V.; Lindauer, Ramón J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in executive functioning are of great significance in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One of these executive functions, working memory, plays an important role in academic performance and is often seen as the core deficit of this disorder. There are indications that working

  20. Interventions to improve executive functioning and working memory in school-aged children with AD(H)D : A randomised controlled trial and stepped-care approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Donk, M.L.A.; Hiemstra-Beernink, A.-C.; Tjeenk-Kalff, A.C.; van der Leij, A.V.; Lindauer, R.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Deficits in executive functioning are of great significance in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One of these executive functions, working memory, plays an important role in academic performance and is often seen as the core deficit of this disorder. There are indications

  1. Whole-body imaging of whole-organ, subresolution, basic functional unit (BFU) perfusion characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-08-01

    A BFU is an organ's smallest assembly of diverse cells that functions like the organ, such as the liver's hepatic lobules. There are approximately 107 BFUs in a human organ. These 100-200 μm structures are perfused by capillaries fed by a terminal arteriole (15μm diameter). BFU sizes, function and number per organ vary with disease, either by loss of BFUs and/or their decrease in function. The BFU is the upper limit of a spherical assembly of cells, immersed in a suitably nutrient medium, which can survive without its own blood supply. However, each BFU has its own blood supply to support the extra energy and/or solutes needed for providing its physiological function (e.g., contraction or secretion). A BFU function is best evaluated by its micro-perfusion, which can be readily evaluated with whole-body CT. Resolution of individual BFUs within in-situ organs, using clinical imaging devices, would require high radiation doses and/or the intolerably long scan-durations needed for suitable signal-to-noise image-data. However, it is possible to obtain a statistical description of the BFU number, size and function from wholebody CT by way of a model. In this study we demonstrate this capability by using the distribution of myocardial terminal arteriolar perfusion territories by way of a nested, multiple, regions-of-interest analysis of the heart wall imaged during transient opacification of its blood supply.

  2. Automated system of monitoring and positioning of functional units of mining technological machines for coal-mining enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshcheryakov Yaroslav

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is show to the development of an automated monitoring and positioning system for functional nodes of mining technological machines. It describes the structure, element base, algorithms for identifying the operating states of a walking excavator; various types of errors in the functioning of microelectromechanical gyroscopes and accelerometers, as well as methods for their correction based on the Madgwick fusion filter. The results of industrial tests of an automated monitoring and positioning system for functional units on one of the opencast coal mines of Kuzbass are presented. This work is addressed to specialists working in the fields of the development of embedded systems and control systems, radio electronics, mechatronics, and robotics.

  3. The Drosophila melanogaster DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for functionally non-redundant protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Eike; Wecklein, Heike; Stark, Felix; Jauch, Mandy; Raabe, Thomas

    2006-06-07

    Genes encoding for the two evolutionary highly conserved subunits of a heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme are present in all examined eukaryotic genomes. Depending on the organism, multiple transcription units encoding for a catalytically active CK2alpha subunit and/or a regulatory CK2beta subunit may exist. The phosphotransferase activity of members of the protein kinase CK2alpha family is thought to be independent of second messengers but is modulated by interaction with CK2beta-like proteins. In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, one gene encoding for a CK2alpha subunit and three genes encoding for CK2beta-like proteins are present. The X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for several CK2beta protein isoforms due to alternative splicing of its primary transcript. We addressed the question whether CK2beta-like proteins are redundant in function. Our in vivo experiments show that variations of the very C-terminal tail of CK2beta isoforms encoded by the X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit influence their functional properties. In addition, we find that CK2beta-like proteins encoded by the autosomal D. melanogaster genes CK2betates and CK2beta' cannot fully substitute for a loss of CK2beta isoforms encoded by DmCK2beta.

  4. Functioning of primary health care in opinion of managers of primary health care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, I; Wdowiak, L; Kwiatosz-Muc, M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research is to get to know opinions of primary health care managers concerning working of primary health care and concerning quality of medical services offered by family doctors out-patient clinics. The research among managers of primary health care units took place in all out-patient clinics in Lublin province. Research instrument was survey questionnaire of authors own construction. Results were statistically analyzed. From 460 surveys sent, 108 questionnaires were accepted to analysis. Majority of managers of out-patient clinics of primary health care is satisfied with the way and the quality of work of employed staff. In opinion of 71.3% of managers access to family doctor services is very good. Availability of primary health care services is better estimated by managers of not public units. The occupied local provide comfortable work for the staff in opinion of 78.5% of surveyed managers of out-patient clinics. Managers estimate the level of their services as very good (37.96%) and good (37.96%) comparing to other such a subjects present in the market. Internal program of improving quality is run in 22% of out-patient clinics, which were investigated. Managers of primary health care units assess the quality of their services as good and very good. They estimate positively the comfort and politeness in serving patients as well as technical status of equipment and the lodging. They assess availability of their services as very good. Large group of managers of family doctors practices recognizes neighborhood practices as a competitors.

  5. Motor units in the human medial gastrocnemius muscle are not spatially localized or functionally grouped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Martin E; Brown, Harrison J; Inglis, J Timothy; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-08-15

    Human medial gastrocnemius (MG) motor units (MUs) are thought to occupy small muscle territories or regions, with low-threshold units preferentially located distally. We used intramuscular recordings to measure the territory of muscle fibres from MG MUs and determine whether these MUs are grouped by recruitment threshold or joint action (ankle plantar flexion and knee flexion). The territory of MUs from the MG muscle varied from somewhat localized to highly distributed, with approximately half the MUs spanning at least half the length and width of the muscle. There was also no evidence of regional muscle activity based on MU recruitment thresholds or joint action. The CNS does not have the means to selectively activate regions of the MG muscle based on task requirements. Human medial gastrocnemius (MG) motor units (MUs) are thought to occupy small muscle territories, with low-threshold units preferentially located distally. In this study, subjects (n = 8) performed ramped and sustained isometric contractions (ankle plantar flexion and knee flexion; range: ∼1-40% maximal voluntary contraction) and we measured MU territory size with spike-triggered averages from fine-wire electrodes inserted along the length (seven electrodes) or across the width (five electrodes) of the MG muscle. Of 69 MUs identified along the length of the muscle, 32 spanned at least half the muscle length (≥ 6.9 cm), 11 of which spanned all recording sites (13.6-17.9 cm). Distal fibres had smaller pennation angles (P recruitment threshold or contraction type, nor was there a relationship between MU territory size and recruitment threshold (Spearman's rho = -0.20 and 0.13, P > 0.18). MUs in the human MG have larger territories than previously reported and are not localized based on recruitment threshold or joint action. This indicates that the CNS does not have the means to selectively activate regions of the MG muscle based on task requirements. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of

  6. Study on unitized inverter with photovoltaic grid-connected and stand-alone functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haining; Su, Jianhui; Ding, Ming [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei (China)

    2008-07-01

    The main circuit and algorithm of unitized single phase inverter are presented, in which photovoltaic (PV) grid-connected algorithm, independency sine inverter algorithm and storage battery charge administer are all integrated basing on DSP (Digital Signal Processor). The control system identifies utility failure initiatively and then switches to independency power supply automatically. The methods of charging battery are multiform. Basing on material term to use utility or solar array to charge can optimize charge efficiency, assure the capacitance of battery and prolong life-span of battery. In addition, some results are offered basing on the prototype of a 2.5kW single phase inverter. (orig.)

  7. Telomere attrition, kidney function, and prevalent chronic kidney disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Moshen; Rezaie, Peyman; Covic, Adriac; Malyszko, Jolanta; Rysz, Jacek; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Banach, Maciej

    2017-10-06

    Telomere length is an emerging novel biomarker of biologic age, cardiovascular risk and chronic medical conditions. Few studies have focused on the association between telomere length (TL) and kidney function. We investigated the association between TL and kidney function/prevalent chronic kidney disease (CKD) in US adults. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) participants with measured data on kidney function and TL from 1999 to 2002 were included. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was based on CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Urinary albumin excretion was assessed using urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR). We used multivariable adjusted linear and logistic regression models, accounting for the survey design and sample weights. Of the 10568 eligible participants, 48.0% ( n =5020) were men. Their mean age was 44.1 years. eGFR significantly decreased and ACR significantly increased across increasing quarters of TL (all p function remained robust even after adjusting for potential confounding factors, but the association between TL and ACR was only borderline significant (β-coefficient= -0.012, p =0.056). The association of kidney function with a marker of cellular senescence suggests an underlying mechanism influencing the progression of nephropathy.

  8. Immigration in the United States 2016 Presidential Debates: A Functional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hasani Yaseen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an analysis of the three U.S. 2016 presidential debates published in The New York Times using Benoit’s (2007a functional theory. The three presidential debates in the U.S., which occur every four years, remain as the most sensitive political rhetoric that lead to the election of the next U.S. President. These debates include discussion of different issues between the two presidential candidates. One of these issues is immigration. The U.S. presidential debates have been researched by many on various aspects but there has not been a study that focus primarily on the issue of immigration in the three 2016 U.S. presidential debates. All statements regarding this issue between the two presidential candidates, Trump and Clinton, were extracted from these debates and analyzed using Benoit's (2007a functional theory. Findings revealed that attack statements occurred more than acclaims, and defences were less used than acclaims. The statements included in these debates pertained to policy (30% and character (70%. As expected, general goals were employed more often using acclaim function rather than attack and defend. However, ideals were employed more often using defence than to acclaim and attack. Due to different contexts, situations, and participants, Benoit's (2007a functional theory may not be generalized for all debates. This study reveals certain inconsistencies regarding some of the hypotheses of Benoit's (2007a functional theory in relation to our knowledge of the presidential debates, specifically the issue of immigration.

  9. HAL/SM system functional design specification. [systems analysis and design analysis of central processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C.; Williams, G. P. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The functional design of a preprocessor, and subsystems is described. A structure chart and a data flow diagram are included for each subsystem. Also a group of intermodule interface definitions (one definition per module) is included immediately following the structure chart and data flow for a particular subsystem. Each of these intermodule interface definitions consists of the identification of the module, the function the module is to perform, the identification and definition of parameter interfaces to the module, and any design notes associated with the module. Also described are compilers and computer libraries.

  10. Preimages for Step-Reduced SHA-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoki, Kazumaro; Guo, Jian; Matusiewicz, Krystian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present preimage attacks on up to 43-step SHA-256 (around 67% of the total 64 steps) and 46-step SHA-512 (around 57.5% of the total 80 steps), which significantly increases the number of attacked steps compared to the best previously published preimage attack working for 24 steps....... The time complexities are 2^251.9, 2^509 for finding pseudo-preimages and 2^254.9, 2^511.5 compression function operations for full preimages. The memory requirements are modest, around 2^6 words for 43-step SHA-256 and 46-step SHA-512. The pseudo-preimage attack also applies to 43-step SHA-224 and SHA-384...

  11. Microcomputer-based stepping-motor controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.

    1983-04-01

    A microcomputer-controlled stepping motor is described. A Motorola MC68701 microcomputer unit is interfaced to a Cybernetic CY500 stored-program controller that outputs through Motorola input/output isolation modules to the stepping motor. A complex multifunction controller with enhanced capabilities is thus available with a minimum number of parts

  12. Biological markers for kidney injury and renal function in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, A.A.N.M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the investigations described in this thesis was to seek for answers to two relevant questions in ICUs in resource-rich settings, i.e., can new biological markers play a role in early recognition of AKI, and can new biological markers predict recovery of renal function in patients who

  13. Clinical features of unspecified functional bowel disorder in servicemen from a Chinese army unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin YAO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate clinical manifestation of unspecified functional bowel disorder (UFBD, the features of coexistence with functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID and its relationship with psychological factors and sleep disturbance in the Chinese Army servicemen. Methods cFGIDs were diagnosed based on the Rome Ⅲ Modular Questionnaire. The subjects were 189 servicemen with UFBD (UFBD group and 372 without FGID (control group. All subjects completed symptom checklist 90 (SCL-90 and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI questionnaire. Results 'Have to rush to the toilet when having a desire to defecate' was the most frequent symptom of UFBD (93.7%. More than one half of UFBD patients had the symptom 'a feeling of incomplete emptying as bowel movements' or 'straining during bowel movements'. Twenty-eight percent of UFBD subjects had combined FGID (namely cFGID. Among them, the most frequent was proctalgia fugax (7.9%, followed by cyclic vomiting syndrome (6.3%, functional fecal incontinence (6.3%, functional dyspepsia (4.8% and belching (4.8%. The UFBD group scored significantly higher than the control group in the global severity index (GSI and in all SCL-90 subscales (P0.05. Conclusion Pathogenesis of UFBD may be closely correlated with psychiatric and psychological factors and sleep disturbance. cFGID are associated with an increased severity of psychopathological features. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.15

  14. Functions in Contemporary Secondary Mathematics Textbook Series in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Textbooks play a central role in US mathematics classrooms (Stein, Remillard, & Smith, 2007) and functions are a key topic in secondary mathematics (Carlson, Jacobs, Coe, Larsen, & Hsu, 2002). This study presents results from an analysis of this essential topic in the latest editions of three textbook series: the Glencoe Mathematics…

  15. Evaluation of several two-step scoring functions based on linear interaction energy, effective ligand size, and empirical pair potentials for prediction of protein-ligand binding geometry and free energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Estrada, Trilce P; Doren, Douglas J; Taufer, Michela; Brooks, Charles L; Armen, Roger S

    2011-09-26

    The performances of several two-step scoring approaches for molecular docking were assessed for their ability to predict binding geometries and free energies. Two new scoring functions designed for "step 2 discrimination" were proposed and compared to our CHARMM implementation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) approach using the Generalized-Born with Molecular Volume (GBMV) implicit solvation model. A scoring function S1 was proposed by considering only "interacting" ligand atoms as the "effective size" of the ligand and extended to an empirical regression-based pair potential S2. The S1 and S2 scoring schemes were trained and 5-fold cross-validated on a diverse set of 259 protein-ligand complexes from the Ligand Protein Database (LPDB). The regression-based parameters for S1 and S2 also demonstrated reasonable transferability in the CSARdock 2010 benchmark using a new data set (NRC HiQ) of diverse protein-ligand complexes. The ability of the scoring functions to accurately predict ligand geometry was evaluated by calculating the discriminative power (DP) of the scoring functions to identify native poses. The parameters for the LIE scoring function with the optimal discriminative power (DP) for geometry (step 1 discrimination) were found to be very similar to the best-fit parameters for binding free energy over a large number of protein-ligand complexes (step 2 discrimination). Reasonable performance of the scoring functions in enrichment of active compounds in four different protein target classes established that the parameters for S1 and S2 provided reasonable accuracy and transferability. Additional analysis was performed to definitively separate scoring function performance from molecular weight effects. This analysis included the prediction of ligand binding efficiencies for a subset of the CSARdock NRC HiQ data set where the number of ligand heavy atoms ranged from 17 to 35. This range of ligand heavy atoms is where improved accuracy of predicted ligand

  16. Comparative functional analyses of ultrabithorax reveal multiple steps and paths to diversification of legs in the adaptive radiation of semi-aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khila, Abderrahman; Abouheif, Ehab; Rowe, Locke

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of new ecological habitats is often associated with lineage diversification, yet the genetic changes underlying invasions and radiations are poorly understood. Over 200 million years ago, the semi-aquatic insects invaded water surface from a common terrestrial ancestor and diversified to exploit a wide array of niches. Here, we uncover the changes in regulation and function of the gene Ultrabithorax associated with both the invasion of water surface and the subsequent diversification of the group. In the common ancestor of the semi-aquatic insects, a novel deployment of Ubx protein in the mid-legs increased their length, thereby enhancing their role in water surface walking. In derived lineages that specialize in rowing on the open water, additional changes in the timing of Ubx expression further elongated the mid-legs thereby facilitating their function as oars. In addition, Ubx protein function was selectively reversed to shorten specific rear-leg segments, thereby enabling their function as rudders. These changes in Ubx have generated distinct niche-specialized morphologies that account for the remarkable diversification of the semi-aquatic insects. Therefore, changes in the regulation and function of a key developmental gene may facilitate both the morphological change necessary to transition to novel habitats and fuel subsequent morphological diversification. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. FabQ, a Dual-Function Dehydratase/Isomerase, Circumvents the Last Step of the Classical Fatty Acid Synthesis Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Hongkai; Wang, Haihong; Cronan, John E.

    2013-01-01

    In the classical anaerobic pathway of unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis, that of Escherichia coli, the double bond is introduced into the growing acyl chain by the FabA dehydratase/isomerase. Another dehydratase, FabZ, functions in the chain elongation cycle. In contrast, Aerococcus viridans has only a single FabA/FabZ homolog we designate FabQ. FabQ can not only replace the function of E. coli FabZ in vivo, but it also catalyzes the isomerization required for unsaturated fatty acid biosynt...

  18. An updated view of hypothalamic-vascular-pituitary unit function and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tissier, Paul; Campos, Pauline; Lafont, Chrystel; Romanò, Nicola; Hodson, David J; Mollard, Patrice

    2017-05-01

    The discoveries of novel functional adaptations of the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary gland for physiological regulation have transformed our understanding of their interaction. The activity of a small proportion of hypothalamic neurons can control complex hormonal signalling, which is disconnected from a simple stimulus and the subsequent hormone secretion relationship and is dependent on physiological status. The interrelationship of the terminals of hypothalamic neurons and pituitary cells with the vasculature has an important role in determining the pattern of neurohormone exposure. Cells in the pituitary gland form networks with distinct organizational motifs that are related to the duration and pattern of output, and modifications of these networks occur in different physiological states, can persist after cessation of demand and result in enhanced function. Consequently, the hypothalamus and pituitary can no longer be considered as having a simple stratified relationship: with the vasculature they form a tripartite system, which must function in concert for appropriate hypothalamic regulation of physiological processes, such as reproduction. An improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying these regulatory features has implications for current and future therapies that correct defects in hypothalamic-pituitary axes. In addition, recapitulating proper network organization will be an important challenge for regenerative stem cell treatment.

  19. The role of ether-functionalized ionic liquids in the sol–gel process: effects on the initial alkoxide hydrolysis steps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Donato, Ricardo Keitel; Lavorgna, M.; Musto, P.; Donato, Katarzyna Zawada; Jäger, Alessandro; Štěpánek, Petr; Schrekker, H. S.; Matějka, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 447, 1 June (2015), s. 77-84 ISSN 0021-9797 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/1459; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14292 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : ether-functionalized ionic liquids * sol–gel silica * multiple hydrogen -bonds Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.782, year: 2015

  20. Single-step laser deposition of functionally graded coating by dual ‘wire powder’ or ‘powder powder’ feeding—A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Waheed Ul Haq; Pinkerton, Andrew J.; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin

    2007-07-01

    The creation of iron-copper (Fe-Cu) alloys has practical application in improving the surface heat conduction and corrosion resistance of, for example, conformal cooling channels in steel moulds, but is difficult to achieve because the elements have got low inter-solubility and are prone to solidification cracking. Previous work by these authors has reported a method to produce a graded iron-nickel-copper coating in a single-step by direct diode laser deposition (DLD) of nickel wire and copper powder as a combined feedstock. This work investigates whether dual powder feeds can be used in that process to afford greater geometric flexibility and compares attributes of the 'nickel wire and copper powder' and 'nickel powder and copper powder' processes for deposition on a H13 tool steel substrate. In wire-powder deposition, a higher temperature developed in the melt pool causing a clad with a smooth gradient structure. The nickel powder in powder-powder deposition did not impart much heat into the melt pool so the melt pool solidified with sharp composition boundaries due to single metal melting in some parts. In wire-powder experiments, a graded structure was obtained by varying the flow rates of wire and powder. However, a graded structure was not realised in powder-powder experiments by varying either the feed or the directions. Reasons for the differences and flow patterns in the melt pools and their effect on final part properties of parts produced are discussed.

  1. Contractile function and motor unit firing rates of the human hamstrings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Eric A; Rice, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    Neuromuscular properties of the lower limb in health, aging, and disease are well described for major lower limb muscles comprising the quadriceps, triceps surae, and dorsiflexors, with the notable exception of the posterior thigh (hamstrings). The purpose of this study was to further characterize major muscles of the lower limb by comprehensively exploring contractile properties in relation to spinal motor neuron output expressed as motor unit firing rates (MUFRs) in the hamstrings of 11 (26.5 ± 3.8) young men. Maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation, stimulated contractile properties including a force-frequency relationship, and MUFRs from submaximal to maximal voluntary contractile intensities were assessed in the hamstrings. Strength and MUFRs were assessed at two presumably different muscle lengths by varying the knee joint angles (90° and 160°). Knee flexion MVCs were 60-70% greater in the extended position (160°). The frequency required to elicit 50% of maximum tetanic torque was 16-17 Hz. Mean MUFRs at 25-50% MVC were 9-31% less in the biceps femoris compared with the semimembranosus-semitendinosus group. Knee joint angle (muscle length) influenced MUFRs such that mean MUFRs were greater in the shortened (90°) position at 50% and 100% MVC. Compared with previous reports, mean maximal MUFRs in the hamstrings are greater than those in the quadriceps and triceps surae and somewhat less than those in the tibialis anterior. Mean maximal MUFRs in the hamstrings are influenced by changes in knee joint angle, with lower firing rates in the biceps femoris compared with the semimembranosus-semitendinosus muscle group. We studied motor unit firing rates (MUFRs) at various voluntary contraction intensities in the hamstrings, one of the only major lower limb muscles to have MUFRs affected by muscle length changes. Within the hamstrings muscle-specific differences have greater impact on MUFRs than length changes, with the biceps femoris

  2. Asymptotic formula for the Riesz means of the spectral functions of Laplace-Beltrami operator on unit sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadly Nurullah Rasedee, Ahmad; Ahmedov, Anvarjon; Sathar, Mohammad Hasan Abdul

    2017-09-01

    The mathematical models of the heat and mass transfer processes on the ball type solids can be solved using the theory of convergence of Fourier-Laplace series on unit sphere. Many interesting models have divergent Fourier-Laplace series, which can be made convergent by introducing Riesz and Cesaro means of the series. Partial sums of the Fourier-Laplace series summed by Riesz method are integral operators with the kernel known as Riesz means of the spectral function. In order to obtain the convergence results for the partial sums by Riesz means we need to know an asymptotic behavior of the latter kernel. In this work the estimations for Riesz means of spectral function of Laplace-Beltrami operator which guarantees the convergence of the Fourier-Laplace series by Riesz method are obtained.

  3. Step by Step Microsoft Office Visio 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Visio 2003, the Microsoft Office business and technical diagramming program. With STEP BY STEP, you can take just the lessons you need, or work from cover to cover. Either way, you drive the instruction-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Produce computer network diagrams, organization charts, floor plans, and moreUse templates to create new diagrams and drawings quicklyAdd text, color, and 1-D and 2-D shapesInsert graphics and pictures, such as company logosConnect shapes to create a basic f

  4. Functional and Esthetic Comparison of Metal-Ceramic and All-Ceramic Posterior Three-Unit Fixed Dental Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaisen, Maj H; Bahrami, Golnosh; Schropp, Lars; Isidor, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess functional and esthetic satisfaction plus evaluate changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) after insertion of a metal-ceramic (MC-FDP) or a veneered zirconia all-ceramic (AC-FDP) posterior three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Additionally, patients' and professionals' esthetic evaluations were compared. A convenience sample of 34 patients was randomized to receive a MC-FDP (n = 17) or an AC-FDP (n = 17). Patients were assessed using the OHIP-14 and also answered a questionnaire regarding satisfaction with function and esthetics using visual analog scales (VAS) before treatment and after 2 weeks, after 3 months, and after 1, 2, and 3 years. A fully dentate control group (n = 20) was also assessed using the OHIP-14. The operator and another observer evaluated the esthetics of the FDPs using VAS. The patients assessed the two FDP types similarly for all parameters. In contrast, there was a statistically significant difference in OHIP-14 results between the treated patients and the control group before treatment. After treatment, a statistically significant improvement in OHIP-14 was observed at all examinations. Patients were highly satisfied with the function and esthetics of the FDPs. The overall satisfaction with esthetics was statistically significantly higher among the patients than among the professionals at three out of five examinations. The patients experienced improved OHRQoL and increased satisfaction with function and esthetics after receiving a posterior three-unit FDP. No important differences were observed between the two types of FDPs when evaluated by the patient or the professionals.

  5. Organizational structuring and strategic business units in function of an effective management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern business conditions, in the conditions of extremely fast market changes which affect the way and the organization of a company's business, it is necessary to set up such an organizational structure which will provide the necessary flexibility and the base for further growth and development of the company. Each wrong business decision results in a waste of time, money and energy. In order to minimize mistakes as much as possible it is necessary to have a quality system of accounting information which is essential for making business decisions. In that sense, in order to provide quality accounting information and to enable the monitoring of the performances of particular parts of the company by the central management, forming and organizational structuring of the strategic business units is an effective way to answer the challenges of the business environment. Recently, a certain tendency of changes in the field of organizational structuring is noticeable, or, more precisely, of organizational restructuring of the business systems in closer and wider environment with a goal of delegating authorities and responsibilities to the organizational divisions. Profit centre, as an organizational part of a company which does not have a legal status, is of an exceptional importance.

  6. Radiological mapping of functional transcription units of bacteriophage phiX174 and S13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, T.J.; Tessman, I.; Tessman, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    It has been found that the nearest promoter is not always the primary promoter for making translatable message. The technique of ultraviolet mapping was used to determine the location of promoter sites for translated mRNA coded for by bacteriophages phiX174 and S13. The method is based on the theory that the 'target size' for u.v. inactivation of expression of a gene is proportional to the distance between the promoter and the 3' end of the gene. This method has revealed an expected and some unexpected locations for the promoters responsible for gene expression. Ultraviolet-survival curves for expression of phage genes were interpreted in the following way. The contiguous genes D, F, G and H are expressed as a unit under the control of a promoter located near gene D. However, gene B (and probably the adjacent genes K and C) are controlled by a promoter distant from gene B, possibly in the region of gene H, rather than from a promoter located just before gene B. Likewise, gene A is controlled by a promoter distant from gene A. (author)

  7. "Fire Moss" Cover and Function in Severely Burned Forests of the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, H.; Doherty, K.; Sieg, C.; Robichaud, P. R.; Fulé, P. Z.; Bowker, M.

    2017-12-01

    With wildfires increasing in severity and extent throughout the Western United States, land managers need new tools to stabilize recently burned ecosystems. "Fire moss" consists of three species, Ceratodon purpureus, Funaria hygrometrica, and Bryum argentum. These mosses colonize burned landscapes quickly, aggregate soils, have extremely high water holding capacity, and can be grown rapidly ex-situ. In this talk, I will focus on our efforts to understand how Fire Moss naturally interacts with severely burned landscapes. We examined 14 fires in Arizona, New Mexico, Washington, and Idaho selecting a range of times since fire, and stratified plots within each wildfire by winter insolation and elevation. At 75+ plots we measured understory plant cover, ground cover, Fire Moss cover, and Fire Moss reproductive effort. On plots in the Southwest, we measured a suite of soil characteristics on moss covered and adjacent bare soil including aggregate stability, shear strength, compressional strength, and infiltration rates. Moss cover ranged from 0-75% with a mean of 16% across all plots and was inversely related to insolation (R2 = .32, p = stability and infiltration rates as adjacent bare ground. These results will allow us to model locations where Fire Moss will naturally increase postfire hillslope soil stability, locations for targeting moss restoration efforts, and suggest that Fire Moss could be a valuable tool to mitigate post wildfire erosion.

  8. On the applicability of the critical safety function concept to a uranium hexafluoride conversion unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, F.C.; Goncalves, J.S.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e; Medeiros, J.A.C.C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the applicability on the critical safety function (CSF) concept as a design criterion for the new UF 6 conversion plant of Industrias Nucleares do Brazil (INB). This discussion is in the context of accident management, under the safety function oriented management. Safety functions may be understood as those whose loss may lead to releases of radioactive material or highly toxic chemicals, having possible radiological and/or occupational consequences for workers, the public or the environment. They should be designed to prevent criticality and to ensure adequate process confinement, thus preventing radioactive material releases that might lead to internal or external exposure and highly toxic chemical releases and exposure. The main hazards is the potential release of chemicals, especially HF and UF 6 . A criticality hazard exists only if the conversion facility processes uranium with a 235 U concentration greater than 1% Industrial activities for UF 6 production include handling and processing explosive, toxic and lethal chemicals, such as HF, H 2 and elemental F 2 , besides intermediate compounds containing uranium. State trees and definition of logical arrangements to construct an annunciation system are the next development stages, resulting form the establishment of applicable CSFs as representative of the next development stages, resulting from the establishment of applicable CSFs as representative of the various systems that make up the conversion plant. Discussed also in the biggest challenge of the development of this innovation, that is, the uncertainties related to the impact of human factors (not subject to monitoring by sensors or process conventional instrumentation). (author)

  9. On the applicability of the critical safety function concept to a uranium hexafluoride conversion unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, F.C.; Goncalves, J.S.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e; Medeiros, J.A.C.C., E-mail: fcruz@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: jsgoncalves@inb.gov.br, E-mail: frutuoso@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: canedo@imp.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the applicability on the critical safety function (CSF) concept as a design criterion for the new UF{sub 6} conversion plant of Industrias Nucleares do Brazil (INB). This discussion is in the context of accident management, under the safety function oriented management. Safety functions may be understood as those whose loss may lead to releases of radioactive material or highly toxic chemicals, having possible radiological and/or occupational consequences for workers, the public or the environment. They should be designed to prevent criticality and to ensure adequate process confinement, thus preventing radioactive material releases that might lead to internal or external exposure and highly toxic chemical releases and exposure. The main hazards is the potential release of chemicals, especially HF and UF{sub 6}. A criticality hazard exists only if the conversion facility processes uranium with a {sup 235}U concentration greater than 1% Industrial activities for UF{sub 6} production include handling and processing explosive, toxic and lethal chemicals, such as HF, H{sub 2} and elemental F{sub 2}, besides intermediate compounds containing uranium. State trees and definition of logical arrangements to construct an annunciation system are the next development stages, resulting form the establishment of applicable CSFs as representative of the next development stages, resulting from the establishment of applicable CSFs as representative of the various systems that make up the conversion plant. Discussed also in the biggest challenge of the development of this innovation, that is, the uncertainties related to the impact of human factors (not subject to monitoring by sensors or process conventional instrumentation). (author)

  10. Estimating soil hydrological response by combining precipitation-runoff modeling and hydro-functional soil homogeneous units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca-Jimenez, Estefania; Bodoque, Jose Maria; Diez-Herrero, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Flash floods constitute one of the natural hazards better able to generate risk, particularly with regard to Society. The complexity of this process and its dependence on various factors related to the characteristics of the basin and rainfall make flash floods are difficult to characterize in terms of their hydrological response.To do this, it is essential a proper analysis of the so called 'initial abstractions'. Among all of these processes, infiltration plays a crucial role in explaining the occurrence of floods in mountainous basins.For its characterization the Green-Ampt model , which depends on the characteristics of rainfall and physical properties of soil has been used in this work.This is a method enabling to simulate floods in mountainous basins where hydrological response is sub-daily. However, it has the disadvantage that it is based on physical properties of soil which have a high spatial variability. To address this difficulty soil mapping units have been delineated according to the geomorphological landforms and elements. They represent hydro-functional mapping units that are theoretically homogeneous from the perspective of the pedostructure parameters of the pedon. So the soil texture of each homogeneous group of landform units was studied by granulometric analyses using standarized sieves and Sedigraph devices. In addition, uncertainty associated with the parameterization of the Green-Ampt method has been estimated by implementing a Monte Carlo approach, which required assignment of the proper distribution function to each parameter.The suitability of this method was contrasted by calibrating and validating a hydrological model, in which the generation of runoff hydrograph has been simulated using the SCS unit hydrograph (HEC-GeoHMS software), while flood wave routing has been characterized using the Muskingum-Cunge method. Calibration and validation of the model was from the use of an automatic routine based on the employ of the search algorithm

  11. Effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 on counterregulatory hormone responses, cognitive functions, and insulin secretion during hyperinsulinemic, stepped hypoglycemic clamp experiments in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauck, Michael A; Heimesaat, Markus M; Behle, Kai

    2002-01-01

    and neuroglucopenic symptoms were assessed, and cognitive function was tested at each plateau. Insulin secretion rates were estimated by deconvolution (two-compartment model of C-peptide kinetics). At insulin concentrations of approximately 45 mU/liter, glucose infusion rates were similar with and without GLP-1 (P......Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and analogues are being evaluated as a new therapeutic principle for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 suppresses glucagon secretion, which could lead to disturbances of hypoglycemia counterregulation. This has, however, not been tested. Nine healthy volunteers.......97). The other counterregulatory hormones and autonomic or neuroglucopenic symptom scores increased, and cognitive functions decreased with decreasing glucose concentrations, but there were no significant differences comparing experiments with GLP-1 or placebo, except for a significant reduction of GH responses...

  12. Locating the rate-limiting step for the interaction of hydrogen with Mg(0001) using density-functional theory calculations and rate theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of molecular hydrogen on a Mgs0001d surface and the subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the magnesium substrate is investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and rate theory. The minimum energy path and corresponding transition states are located usi...... to be rate-limiting for the ab- and desorption of hydrogen, respectively. Zero-point energy contributions are found to be substantial for the diffusion of atomic hydrogen, but classical rates are still found to be within an order of magnitude at room temperature.......The dissociation of molecular hydrogen on a Mgs0001d surface and the subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the magnesium substrate is investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and rate theory. The minimum energy path and corresponding transition states are located using...

  13. Generic functional modelling of multi-pulse auto-transformer rectifier units for more-electric aircraft applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao YANG

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Auto-Transformer Rectifier Unit (ATRU is one preferred solution for high-power AC/DC power conversion in aircraft. This is mainly due to its simple structure, high reliability and reduced kVA ratings. Indeed, the ATRU has become a preferred AC/DC solution to supply power to the electric environment control system on-board future aircraft. In this paper, a general modelling method for ATRUs is introduced. The developed model is based on the fact that the DC voltage and current are strongly related to the voltage and current vectors at the AC terminals of ATRUs. In this paper, we carry on our research in modelling symmetric 18-pulse ATRUs and develop a generic modelling technique. The developed generic model can study not only symmetric but also asymmetric ATRUs. An 18-pulse asymmetric ATRU is used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the developed model by comparing with corresponding detailed switching SABER models provided by our industrial partner. The functional models also allow accelerated and accurate simulations and thus enable whole-scale more-electric aircraft electrical power system studies in the future. Keywords: Asymmetric transformer, Functional modelling, More-Electric Aircraft, Multi-pulse rectifier, Transformer rectifier unit

  14. Free Modal Algebras Revisited: The Step-by-Step Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezhanishvili, N.; Ghilardi, Silvio; Jibladze, Mamuka

    2012-01-01

    We review the step-by-step method of constructing finitely generated free modal algebras. First we discuss the global step-by-step method, which works well for rank one modal logics. Next we refine the global step-by-step method to obtain the local step-by-step method, which is applicable beyond

  15. Terminal Differentiation of Adult Hippocampal Progenitor Cells Is a Step Functionally Dissociable from Proliferation and Is Controlled by Tis21, Id3 and NeuroD2

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Micheli; Manuela Ceccarelli; Roberta Gioia; Giorgio D’Andrea; Stefano Farioli-Vecchioli; Marco Costanzi; Daniele Saraulli; Daniele Saraulli; Vincenzo Cestari; Felice Tirone

    2017-01-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are interdependent processes. Here, we have asked to what extent the two processes of neural progenitor cell amplification and differentiation are functionally separated. Thus, we analyzed whether it is possible to rescue a defect of terminal differentiation in progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus, where new neurons are generated throughout life, by inducing their proliferation and/or their differentiation with different stimuli appropriately timed. As ...

  16. Single turnover studies of oxidative halophenol dehalogenation by horseradish peroxidase reveal a mechanism involving two consecutive one electron steps: toward a functional halophenol bioremediation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumithran, Suganya; Sono, Masanori; Raner, Gregory M; Dawson, John H

    2012-12-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes the oxidative para-dechlorination of the environmental pollutant/carcinogen 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). A possible mechanism for this reaction is a direct oxygen atom transfer from HRP compound I (HRP I) to trichlorophenol to generate 2,6-dichloro 1,4-benzoquinone, a two-electron transfer process. An alternative mechanism involves two consecutive one-electron transfer steps in which HRP I is reduced to compound II (HRP II) and then to the ferric enzyme as first proposed by Wiese et al. [F.W. Wiese, H.C. Chang, R.V. Lloyd, J.P. Freeman, V.M. Samokyszyn, Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 34 (1998) 217-222]. To probe the mechanism of oxidative halophenol dehalogenation, the reactions between 2,4,6-TCP and HRP compounds I or II have been investigated under single turnover conditions (i.e., without excess H(2)O(2)) using rapid scan stopped-flow spectroscopy. Addition of 2,4,6-TCP to HRP I leads rapidly to HRP II and then more slowly to the ferric resting state, consistent with a mechanism involving two consecutive one-electron oxidations of the substrate via a phenoxy radical intermediate. HRP II can also directly dechlorinate 2,4,6-TCP as judged by rapid scan stopped-flow and mass spectrometry. This observation is particularly significant since HRP II can only carry out one-electron oxidations. A more detailed understanding of the mechanism of oxidative halophenol dehalogenation will facilitate the use of HRP as a halophenol bioremediation catalyst. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-step selection of drug resistant Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 mutants reveals a functional redundancy in the recruitment of multidrug efflux systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Brzoska

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Acinetobacter have been the focus recent attention due to both their clinical significance and application to molecular biology. The soil commensal bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 has been proposed as a model system for molecular and genetic studies, whereas in a clinical environment, Acinetobacter spp. are of increasing importance due to their propensity to cause serious and intractable systemic infections. Clinically, a major factor in the success of Acinetobacter spp. as opportunistic pathogens can be attributed to their ability to rapidly evolve resistance to common antimicrobial compounds. Whole genome sequencing of clinical and environmental Acinetobacter spp. isolates has revealed the presence of numerous multidrug transporters within the core and accessory genomes, suggesting that efflux is an important host defense response in this genus. In this work, we used the drug-susceptible organism A. baylyi ADP1 as a model for studies into the evolution of efflux mediated resistance in genus Acinetobacter, due to the high level of conservation of efflux determinants across four diverse Acinetobacter strains, including clinical isolates. A single exposure of therapeutic concentrations of chloramphenicol to populations of A. baylyi ADP1 cells produced five individual colonies displaying multidrug resistance. The major facilitator superfamily pump craA was upregulated in one mutant strain, whereas the resistance nodulation division pump adeJ was upregulated in the remaining four. Within the adeJ upregulated population, two different levels of adeJ mRNA transcription were observed, suggesting at least three separate mutations were selected after single-step exposure to chloramphenicol. In the craA upregulated strain, a T to G substitution 12 nt upstream of the craA translation initiation codon was observed. Subsequent mRNA stability analyses using this strain revealed that the half-life of mutant craA mRNA was significantly

  18. Preparation of silane-functionalized silica films via two-step dip coating sol–gel and evaluation of their superhydrophobic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramezani, Maedeh; Vaezi, Mohammad Reza; Kazemzadeh, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Superhydrophobic silica film was prepared by sol–gel process. • The surfaces exhibited superhydrophobicity with water contact angle greater than 150°. • AFM images showed the roughness increases with increasing the percentage of silylation agent. • Before and after modification, the particle size of silica was lower than 50 nm. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the surface modification of the silica nanoparticle by iso-OTMS on the glass substrate. - Abstract: In this paper, we study the two-step dip coating via a sol–gel process to prepare superhydrophobic silica films on the glass substrate. The water repellency of the silica films was controlled by surface silylation method using isooctyltrimethoxysilane (iso-OTMS) as a surface modifying agent. Silica alcosol was synthesized by keeping the molar ratio of ethyltriethoxysilane (ETES) precursor, ethanol (EtOH) solvent, water (H 2 O) was kept constant at 1:36:6.6 respectively, with 6 M NH 4 OH throughout the experiment and the percentages of hydrophobic agent in hexane bath was varied from 0 to 15 vol.%. The static water contact angle values of the silica films increased from 108° to 160° with an increase in the vol.% of iso-OTMS. At 15 vol%. of iso-OTMS, the silica film shows static water contact angle as high as 160°. The superhydrophobic silica films are thermally stable up to 440 °C and above this temperature, the silica films lose superhydrophobicity. By controlling the primer particle size of SiO 2 about 26 nm, leading to decrease the final size of silica nanoparticles after modification of nanoparticles by isooctyltrimethoxysilane about 42 nm. The films are transparent and have uniform size on the surface. The silica films have been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transparency, contact angle measurement (CA), Zeta-potential, Thermal stability by TG–DTA analysis

  19. Developing a New Two-Step Protocol to Generate Functional Hepatocytes from Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Hypoxic Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharee Prasajak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of donor livers and hepatocytes is a major limitation of liver transplantation. Thus, generation of hepatocyte-like cells may provide alternative choice for therapeutic applications. In this study, we developed a new method to establish hepatocytes from Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs cell lines named WJMSCs-SUT1 and WJMSCs-SUT2 under hypoxic condition. This new method could rapidly drive both WJ-MSCs cell lines into hepatic lineage within 18 days. The achievement of hepatogenic differentiation was confirmed by the characterization of both phenotypes and functions. More than 80% MSCs-derived hepatocyte-like cells (MSCDHCs achieved functional hepatocytes including hepatic marker expressions both at gene and protein levels, glycogen storage, low-density lipoprotein uptake, urea production, and albumin secretion. This study highlights the establishment of new hepatogenic induction protocol under hypoxic condition in order to mimic hypoxic microenvironment in typical cell physiology. In conclusion, we present a simple, high-efficiency, and time saving protocol for the generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from WJ-MSCs in hypoxic condition. The achievement of this method may overcome the limitation of donor hepatocytes and provides a new avenue for therapeutic value in cell-based therapy for life-threatening liver diseases, regenerative medicine, toxicity testing for pharmacological drug screening, and other medical related applications.

  20. Diabetes PSA (:30) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  1. Diabetes PSA (:60) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  2. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Functions of N-halamine Dental Unit Waterline Tubing for One Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, N; Dang, S; Schoolfield, J; Sun, Y

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test the biofilm-controlling properties of N-halamine antimicrobial dental unit waterline (DUWL) tubing (T) tubing, without recharging over one year, compared to a control line (C). A simulated clinical model was used to pump ultrapure water through T and C lines at a rate of 1.4 mL/min, five minutes on, 15 minutes off, eight hours/day, five days a week. Samples of source water, effluent from T and C, and from the stagnant water in the carboy (liquid container) after bench work was completed (S2), were collected aseptically, serially diluted, and cultured on R2A agar for seven days every six weeks. SEM images of the inside surfaces of detached tubing sections were also taken. The carboy was rinsed with a 1:10 dilution of sodium hypochlorite after six months. Means of log transformed CFU values obtained in triplicate were paired by T and C lines across months for comparison by paired Student's t-tests. An increase in effluent and carboy bacterial counts were noted after six months, but decreased after bleach rinse of the carboy. No significant difference (p > 0.25) between T and C lines were observed; similarly, T and carboy were not significantly different (p > 0.30). SEM images showed biofilm attachment on the inside surface of C after two months, but not on T. Organisms identified in the effluent reflected those in the source carboy. No biofilm attachment was detected on the N-halamine test line after 12 months, indicating its antimicrobial properties were retained. Further evaluation is recommended to determine the optimal recharge interval for N-halamine DUWL tubing when ultrapure source water is used.

  3. Understanding Trends in Kidney Function 1 Year after Kidney Transplant in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yihung; Tilea, Anca; Gillespie, Brenda; Shahinian, Vahakn; Banerjee, Tanushree; Grubbs, Vanessa; Powe, Neil; Rios-Burrows, Nilka; Pavkov, Meda; Saran, Rajiv

    2017-08-01

    Lower eGFR 1 year after kidney transplant is associated with shorter allograft and patient survival. We examined how practice changes in the past decade correlated with time trends in average eGFR at 1 year after kidney transplant in the United States in a cohort of 189,944 patients who received a kidney transplant between 2001 and 2013. We calculated the average eGFR at 1 year after transplant for the recipient cohort of each year using the appropriate Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation depending on the prevailing methodology of creatinine measurement, and used linear regression to model the effects of practice changes on the national post-transplant eGFR trend. Between the 2001-2005 period and the 2011-2013 period, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained essentially unchanged, with differences of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.65) ml/min per 1.73 m 2 and 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.01) ml/min per 1.73 m 2 among deceased and living donor kidney transplant recipients, respectively. Over time, the mean age of recipients increased and more marginal organs were used; adjusting for these trends unmasked a larger temporal improvement in post-transplant eGFR. However, changes in immunosuppression practice had a positive effect on average post-transplant eGFR and balanced out the negative effect of recipient/donor characteristics. In conclusion, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained stable, despite increasingly unfavorable attributes in recipients and donors. With an aging ESRD population and continued organ shortage, preservation of average post-transplant eGFR will require sustained improvement in immunosuppression and other aspects of post-transplant care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Tetraspanin-enriched microdomains: a functional unit in cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Barreiro, Olga; Gordon-Alonso, Mónica; Sala-Valdés, Mónica; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-09-01

    Membrane lipids and proteins are non-randomly distributed and are unable to diffuse freely in the plane of the membrane. This is because of multiple constraints imposed both by the cortical cytoskeleton and by the preference of lipids and proteins to cluster into diverse and specialized membrane domains, including tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-linked proteins nanodomains and caveolae, among others. Recent biophysical characterization of tetraspanin-enriched microdomains suggests that they might be specially suited for the regulation of avidity of adhesion receptors and the compartmentalization of enzymatic activities. Moreover, modulation by tetraspanins of the function of adhesion receptors involved in inflammation, lymphocyte activation, cancer and pathogen infection suggests potential as therapeutic targets. This review explores this emerging picture of tetraspanin microdomains and discusses the implications for cell adhesion, proteolysis and pathogenesis.

  5. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  6. Signaling triggered by Thy-1 interaction with ß3 integrin on astrocytes is an essential step towards unraveling neuronal Thy-1 function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA AVALOS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thy-1 is an abundant neuronal glycoprotein in mammals. Despite such prevalence, Thy-1 function remains largely obscure in the absence of a defined ligand. Recently described evidence that Thy-1 interacts with ß3 integrin on astrocytes will be discussed. Thy-1 binding to ß3 integrin triggers tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins in astrocytes, thereby promoting focal adhesion formation, cell attachment and spreading. Thy-1 has been reported to modulate neurite outgrowth by triggering a cellular response in neurons. However, our data indicate that Thy-1 can also initiate signaling events that promote adhesion of adjacent astrocytes to the underlying surface. Preliminary results suggest that morphological changes observed in the actin cytoskeleton of astrocytes as a consequence of Thy-1 binding is mediated by small GTPases from the Rho family. Our findings argue that Thy-1 functions in a bimodal fashion, as a receptor on neuronal cells and as a ligand for ß3 integrin receptor on astrocytes. Since Thy-1 is implicated in the inhibition of neurite outgrowth, signaling events in astrocytes are likely to play an important role in this process

  7. A Survey of Acute Pain Service Structure and Function in United States Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawood Nasir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the number of U.S. hospitals offering an acute pain service (APS is increasing, the typical structure remains unknown. This survey was undertaken to describe the structure and function of the APS in U.S. hospitals only. We contacted 200 non-teaching and 101 teaching U.S. hospitals. The person in charge of postoperative pain management completed and returned the survey. Seventy-four percent of responding hospitals had an organized APS. An APS was significantly more formally organized in academic/teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching hospitals. Pain assessments included “pain at rest” (97%, “pain on activity” (63%, and reassessment after pain therapy intervention (88.8%. Responding hospitals utilized postoperative pain protocols significantly more commonly in teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching and VA hospitals. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV-PCA was managed most commonly by surgeons (75%, while epidural analgesia and peripheral nerve block infusions were exclusively managed by anesthesiologists. For improved analgesia, 62% allowed RNs to adjust the IV-PCA settings within set parameters, 43% allowed RN adjustment of epidural infusion rates, and 21% allowed RN adjustment of peripheral nerve catheter local anesthetic infusion rates.

  8. Universal failure model for multi-unit systems with shared functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovoi, Vitali

    2013-01-01

    A Universal Failure Model (UFM) is proposed for complex systems that rely on a large number of entities for performing a common function. Economy of scale or other considerations may dictate the need to pool resources for common purpose, but the resulting strong coupling precludes the grouping of those components into modules. Existing system-level failure models rely on modularity for reducing modeling complexity, so the UFM will fill an important gap in constructing efficient system-level models. Conceptually, the UFM resembles cellular automata (CA) infused with realistic failure mechanisms. Components’ behavior is determined based on the balance between their strength (capacity) and their load (demand) share. If the load exceeds the components’ capacity, the component fails and its load share is distributed among its neighbors (possibly with a time delay and load losses). The strength of components can degrade with time if the load exceeds an elastic threshold. The global load (demand) carried by the system can vary over time, with the peak values providing shocks to the system (e.g., wind loads in civil structures, electricity demand, stressful activities to human bodies, or drought in an ecosystem). Unlike the models traditionally studied by CA, the focus of the presented model is on the system reliability, and specifically on the study of time-to-failure distributions, rather than steady-state patterns and average time-to-failure characteristics. In this context, the relationships between the types of failure distributions and the parameters of the failure model are discussed

  9. 功能用語請求項明確性之臺灣判決案例研究 Definiteness of Means/Steps-Plus-Function Clams—A Cases Study of Taiwan’s Courts Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    郭榮光 Jung-Kuang Kuo

    2015-12-01

    、流程,二者不得互換,否則該請求項即不明確。 Article 19(4 of Taiwan’s Enforcement Rules of the Patent Act permits meansplus- function and steps-plus-function claims. However, without reciting the structure, material or acts performing the claimed function, claims may face challenges about the definiteness requirement. One of the related debates is whether the specification should recite the corresponding structure, material or acts of the claimed function. This issue has been brought up both in Taiwan and U.S. jurisdictions. This study compares Taiwan court decisions with the U.S. decisions which touch on the definiteness of means-plus-function and steps-plus-function claims. We find that while the U.S. courts require that the specification has to recite the corresponding structure, material or acts of means-plus-function and steps-plus-function claims to satisfy the definiteness requirement, Taiwan courts do not adopt the same standard. This study argues that by requiring specifications disclose the corre-sponding structure, material or acts implementing claimed function to satisfy the definiteness requirement, the standard made by U.S. court decisions limits the metes and bounds of means-plus-function and steps-plus-function claims to a more reasonable extent in order to prevent the abuse of functional claims. This study further suggests that Taiwan’s legislative and judicial branches of the government should adopt the same standard to prevent future definiteness disputes. Additionally, this study contends that means-plus-function can be used for device claims while steps-plus-function can be used for method claims. Due to this distinction, this study concludes that the corresponding disclosure of means-plus-function claims in the specification should be structures or materials which have concrete forms, while the corresponding disclosure of steps-plus-function claims in the specification should be acts which should have no concrete forms.

  10. Restoring susceptibility induced MRI signal loss in rat brain at 9.4 T: A step towards whole brain functional connectivity imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupeng Li

    Full Text Available The aural cavity magnetic susceptibility artifact leads to significant echo planar imaging (EPI signal dropout in rat deep brain that limits acquisition of functional connectivity fcMRI data. In this study, we provide a method that recovers much of the EPI signal in deep brain. Needle puncture introduction of a liquid-phase fluorocarbon into the middle ear allows acquisition of rat fcMRI data without signal dropout. We demonstrate that with seeds chosen from previously unavailable areas, including the amygdala and the insular cortex, we are able to acquire large scale networks, including the limbic system. This tool allows EPI-based neuroscience and pharmaceutical research in rat brain using fcMRI that was previously not feasible.

  11. Microsoft Office Word 2007 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to create impressive documents with Word 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them!Apply styles and themes to your document for a polished lookAdd graphics and text effects-and see a live previewOrganize information with new SmartArt diagrams and chartsInsert references, footnotes, indexes, a table of contentsSend documents for review and manage revisionsTurn your ideas into blogs, Web pages, and moreYour all-in-one learning experience includes:Files for building sk

  12. A physical function test for use in the intensive care unit: validity, responsiveness, and predictive utility of the physical function ICU test (scored).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Linda; de Morton, Natalie A; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Edbrooke, Lara; Haines, Kimberley; Warrillow, Stephen; Berney, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Several tests have recently been developed to measure changes in patient strength and functional outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU). The original Physical Function ICU Test (PFIT) demonstrates reliability and sensitivity. The aims of this study were to further develop the original PFIT, to derive an interval score (the PFIT-s), and to test the clinimetric properties of the PFIT-s. A nested cohort study was conducted. One hundred forty-four and 116 participants performed the PFIT at ICU admission and discharge, respectively. Original test components were modified using principal component analysis. Rasch analysis examined the unidimensionality of the PFIT, and an interval score was derived. Correlations tested validity, and multiple regression analyses investigated predictive ability. Responsiveness was assessed using the effect size index (ESI), and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was calculated. The shoulder lift component was removed. Unidimensionality of combined admission and discharge PFIT-s scores was confirmed. The PFIT-s displayed moderate convergent validity with the Timed "Up & Go" Test (r=-.60), the Six-Minute Walk Test (r=.41), and the Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score (rho=.49). The ESI of the PFIT-s was 0.82, and the MCID was 1.5 points (interval scale range=0-10). A higher admission PFIT-s score was predictive of: an MRC score of ≥48, increased likelihood of discharge home, reduced likelihood of discharge to inpatient rehabilitation, and reduced acute care hospital length of stay. Scoring of sit-to-stand assistance required is subjective, and cadence cutpoints used may not be generalizable. The PFIT-s is a safe and inexpensive test of physical function with high clinical utility. It is valid, responsive to change, and predictive of key outcomes. It is recommended that the PFIT-s be adopted to test physical function in the ICU.

  13. The post-stroke depression and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients of a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaricai, Elena; Poenaru, Dan V

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and a major public health problem. To determine frequency and degree of post-stroke depression (PSD) and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit. The study included 72 stroke patients (aged 29-59 years) who were attending rehabilitation. The patients were assessed for depressive symptoms by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and their functioning by using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Forty-eight patients had different degrees of depression: borderline clinical depression (13.8%), moderate depression (34.7%), severe depression (15.2%) or extreme depression (2.9%). There were no significant differences of BDI scores in 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years groups. Statistically significant correlations were between BDI score and SIS score, between BDI score and ADL index, and between SIS score and ADL index in men, women and total study patients. More than half of the PSD patients had a moderate degree of depression. Significant correlations were noticed between depressive symptoms and functional status evaluated both by an instrument of assessing stroke impact upon general health and an instrument for assessing the everyday activities.

  14. Functional level at admission is a predictor of survival in older patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Lars E; Jepsen, Ditte B; Ryg, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Functional decline is associated with increased risk of mortality in geriatric patients.Assessment of activities of daily living (ADL) with the Barthel Index (BI) at admission wasstudied as a predictor of survival in older patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit. METHODS......: All first admissions of patients with age >65 years between January 1st 2005 and December31st 2009 were included. Data on BI, sex, age, and discharge diagnoses were retrieved fromthe hospital patient administrative system, and data on survival until September 6th 2010 wereretrieved from the Civil...... Personal Registry. Co-morbidity was measured with Charlson ComorbidityIndex (CCI). Patients were followed until death or end of study. RESULTS: 5,087 patients were included, 1,852 (36.4%) men and 3,235 (63.6%) women with mean age(SD) 82.0 (6.8) and 84.0 (7.0) years respectively. The median [IQR] length...

  15. Terminal Differentiation of Adult Hippocampal Progenitor Cells Is a Step Functionally Dissociable from Proliferation and Is Controlled by Tis21, Id3 and NeuroD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Micheli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation and differentiation are interdependent processes. Here, we have asked to what extent the two processes of neural progenitor cell amplification and differentiation are functionally separated. Thus, we analyzed whether it is possible to rescue a defect of terminal differentiation in progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus, where new neurons are generated throughout life, by inducing their proliferation and/or their differentiation with different stimuli appropriately timed. As a model we used the Tis21 knockout mouse, whose dentate gyrus neurons, as demonstrated by us and others, have an intrinsic defect of terminal differentiation. We first tested the effect of two proliferative as well as differentiative neurogenic stimuli, one pharmacological (fluoxetine, the other cognitive (the Morris water maze (MWM training. Both effectively enhanced the number of new dentate gyrus neurons produced, and fluoxetine also reduced the S-phase length of Tis21 knockout dentate gyrus progenitor cells and increased the rate of differentiation of control cells, but neither factor enhanced the defective rate of differentiation. In contrast, the defect of terminal differentiation was fully rescued by in vivo infection of proliferating dentate gyrus progenitor cells with retroviruses either silencing Id3, an inhibitor of neural differentiation, or expressing NeuroD2, a proneural gene expressed in terminally differentiated dentate gyrus neurons. This is the first demonstration that NeuroD2 or the silencing of Id3 can activate the differentiation of dentate gyrus neurons, complementing a defect of differentiation. It also highlights how the rate of differentiation of dentate gyrus neurons is regulated genetically at several levels and that a neurogenic stimulus for amplification of neural stem/progenitor cells may not be sufficient in itself to modify this rate.

  16. Functional characterization of O-methyltransferases used to catalyse site-specific methylation in the post-tailoring steps of pradimicin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J W; Ng, B G; Sohng, J K; Yoon, Y J; Choi, G J; Kim, B S

    2018-01-01

    To identify the roles of the two O-methyltransferase homologous genes pdmF and pdmT in the pradimicin biosynthetic gene cluster of Actinomadura hibisca P157-2. Pradimicins are pentangular polyphenol antibiotics synthesized by bacterial type II polyketide synthases (PKSs) and tailoring enzymes. Pradimicins are naturally derivatized by combinatorial O-methylation at two positions (i.e., 7-OH and 11-OH) of the benzo[α]naphthacenequinone structure. PdmF and PdmT null mutants (PFKO and PTKO) were generated. PFKO produced the 11-O-demethyl shunt metabolites 11-O-demethylpradimicinone II (1), 11-O-demethyl-7-methoxypradimicinone II (2), 11-O-demethylpradimicinone I (3) and 11-O-demethylpradimicin A (4), while PTKO generated the 7-O-demethyl derivatives pradimicinone II (5) and 7-hydroxypradimicin A (6). Pradimicinones 1, 2, 3, and 5 were fed to a heterologous host Escherichia coli harbouring expression plasmid pET-22b::pdmF or pET-28a::pdmT. PdmF catalysed 11-O-methylation of pradimicinones 1, 2, and 3 regardless of O-methylation at the C-7 position, while PdmT was unable to catalyse 7-O-methylation when the C-11 hydroxyl group was methylated (5). PdmF and PdmT were involved in 11-O- and 7-O-methylations of the benzo[α]naphthacenequinone moiety of pradimicin, respectively. Methylation of the C-7 hydroxyl group precedes methylation of the C-11 hydroxyl group in pradimicin biosynthesis. This is the first reported demonstration of the functions of PdmF and PdmT for regiospecific O-methylation, which contributes to better understanding of the post-PKS modifications in pradimicin biosynthesis as well as to rational engineering of the pradimicin biosynthetic machinery. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. The contribution of maternal psychological functioning to infant length of stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherry AS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Amanda S Cherry,1 Melissa R Mignogna,1 Angela Roddenberry Vaz,1 Carla Hetherington,2 Mary Anne McCaffree,2 Michael P Anderson,3 Stephen R Gillaspy1 1Section of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, 2Neonatal Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma, College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, OK, 3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Public Health, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Objective: Assess maternal psychological functioning within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU and its contribution to neonate length of stay (LOS in the NICU.Study design: Mothers of infants admitted to the NICU (n=111 were assessed regarding postpartum depression, postpartum social support, postpartum NICU stress, and maternal anxiety at 2 weeks postpartum. Illness severity was assessed with the Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB.Results: Postpartum depression was not significantly correlated with LOS, but was significantly correlated with trait anxiety (r=0.620, which was significantly correlated with LOS (r=0.227. Among mothers with previous mental health history, substance abuse history and CRIB score were the best predictors of LOS. For mothers without a prior mental health issues, delivery type, stress associated with infant appearance, and CRIB scores were the best predictors of LOS. In this group, LOS was found to increase on average by 7.06 days per one unit increase in stress associated with infant appearance among mothers with the same delivery type and CRIB score.Conclusion: Significant correlations of trait anxiety, stress associated with infant appearance, and parental role with LOS support the tenet that postpartum psychological functioning can be associated with NICU LOS. Keywords: NICU, postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety, parental stress, CRIB

  18. The micro-step motor controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Myung Kook; Choi, Bung Hun; Choi, Young Hyun; Cheon, Jong Gu

    2004-11-01

    The developed micro-step motor controller can handle 4 axes stepping motor drivers simultaneously and provide high power bipolar driving mechanism with constant current mode. It can be easily controlled by manual key functions and the motor driving status is displayed by the front panel VFD. Due to the development of several kinds of communication and driving protocol, PC can operate even several micro-step motor controllers at once by multi-drop connection

  19. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  20. Modeling of Tsunami Equations and Atmospheric Swirling Flows with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Radial Basis Functions (RBF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.; Piret, C.; Zhang, N.; Kadlec, B. J.; Liu, Y.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Sevre, E. O.

    2008-12-01

    The faster growth curves in the speed of GPUs relative to CPUs in recent years and its rapidly gained popularity has spawned a new area of development in computational technology. There is much potential in utilizing GPUs for solving evolutionary partial differential equations and producing the attendant visualization. We are concerned with modeling tsunami waves, where computational time is of extreme essence, for broadcasting warnings. In order to test the efficacy of the GPU on the set of shallow-water equations, we employed the NVIDIA board 8600M GT on a MacBook Pro. We have compared the relative speeds between the CPU and the GPU on a single processor for two types of spatial discretization based on second-order finite-differences and radial basis functions. RBFs are a more novel method based on a gridless and a multi- scale, adaptive framework. Using the NVIDIA 8600M GT, we received a speed up factor of 8 in favor of GPU for the finite-difference method and a factor of 7 for the RBF scheme. We have also studied the atmospheric dynamics problem of swirling flows over a spherical surface and found a speed-up of 5.3 using the GPU. The time steps employed for the RBF method are larger than those used in finite-differences, because of the much fewer number of nodal points needed by RBF. Thus, in modeling the same physical time, RBF acting in concert with GPU would be the fastest way to go.

  1. Parallel Implementation of the Discrete Green's Function Formulation of the FDTD Method on a Multicore Central Processing Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stefański

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parallel implementation of the discrete Green's function formulation of the finite-difference time-domain (DGF-FDTD method was developed on a multicore central processing unit. DGF-FDTD avoids computations of the electromagnetic field in free-space cells and does not require domain termination by absorbing boundary conditions. Computed DGF-FDTD solutions are compatible with the FDTD grid enabling the perfect hybridization of FDTD with the use of time-domain integral equation methods. The developed implementation can be applied to simulations of antenna characteristics. For the sake of example, arrays of Yagi-Uda antennas were simulated with the use of parallel DGF-FDTD. The efficiency of parallel computations was investigated as a function of the number of current elements in the FDTD grid. Although the developed method does not apply the fast Fourier transform for convolution computations, advantages stemming from the application of DGF-FDTD instead of FDTD can be demonstrated for one-dimensional wire antennas when simulation results are post-processed by the near-to-far-field transformation.

  2. Cholesterol as a modifying agent of the neurovascular unit structure and function under physiological and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Ewelina; Steliga, Aleksandra; Lietzau, Grażyna; Kowiański, Przemysław

    2017-08-01

    The brain, demanding constant level of cholesterol, precisely controls its synthesis and homeostasis. The brain cholesterol pool is almost completely separated from the rest of the body by the functional blood-brain barrier (BBB). Only a part of cholesterol pool can be exchanged with the blood circulation in the form of the oxysterol metabolites such, as 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) and 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC). Not only neurons but also blood vessels and neuroglia, constituting neurovascular unit (NVU), are crucial for the brain cholesterol metabolism and undergo precise regulation by numerous modulators, metabolites and signal molecules. In physiological conditions maintaining the optimal cholesterol concentration is important for the energetic metabolism, composition of cell membranes and myelination. However, a growing body of evidence indicates the consequences of the cholesterol homeostasis dysregulation in several pathophysiological processes. There is a causal relationship between hypercholesterolemia and 1) development of type 2 diabetes due to long-term high-fat diet consumption, 2) significance of the oxidative stress consequences for cerebral amyloid angiopathy and neurodegenerative diseases, 3) insulin resistance on progression of the neurodegenerative brain diseases. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the cholesterol influence upon functioning of the NVU under physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. Akt2 and nucleophosmin/B23 function as an oncogenic unit in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Sang Bae; Park, Sang Bum; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Cho, Sung-Woo; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2011-01-01

    The signaling network of protein kinase B(PKB)/Akt has been implicated in survival of lung cancer cells. However, understanding the relative contribution of the different isoform of Akt network is nontrival. Here, we report that Akt2 is highly expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 cells. Suppression of Akt2 expression in A549 cells results in notable inhibition of cell poliferation, soft agar growth, and invasion, accompanying by a decrease of nucleophosmin/B23 protein. Overexpression of Akt1 restores cancerous growth of A549 cells in B23-knockdown (KD) cells while Akt2 overexpression did not restore proliferating potential in cells with downregulated B23, thus suggesting Akt2 requires B23 to drive proliferation of lung cancer cell. Loss of functional Akt2 and B23 has similar defects on cell proliferation, apoptotic resistance and cell cycle regulation, while loss of Akt1 has less defects on cell proliferation, survial and cell cycle progression in A549 cells. Moreover, overexpression of B23 rescues the proliferative block induced as a consequence of loss of Akt2. Thus our data suggest that Akt2/B23 functions as an oncogenic unit to drive tumorigenesis of A549 lung cancer cells.

  4. Achieving world class performance step by step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, L J

    1992-02-01

    Bridgestone of Japan acquired Firestone, a United States corporation, in early 1988. This article describes the integration process of the two organizations' cultures. There are many lessons in the approach that should apply to a variety of organizations. The Strategic Improvement Process, a rather highly structured approach, harnesses the strengths of both the Japanese and American organizations and starts the manufacturing and technical departments on the road to excellence.

  5. Nine Steps to a Successful Lighting Retrofit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Presents the steps needed to successfully design a lighting retrofit of school classrooms. Tips cover budgeting, technology, financing, contractor selection, assessing area function, and choosing a light source. (GR)

  6. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-01-01

    Greenhouse gas (CO 2 , CH 4 and N 2 O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO x , VOC, PM 10 , PM 2.5 and SO x , hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  7. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life

  8. Converting lignin to aromatics: step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.I.

    2014-01-01

    Lignin, the glue that holds trees together, is the most abundant natural resource of aromatics. In that respect, it is a far more advanced resource than crude oil. This is because lignin already contains the aromatic functional groups. Thus, catalytic conversion of lignin to high-value aromatics is

  9. Step-by-step cyclic processes scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocewicz, G.; Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaszak, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) fleet scheduling is one of the big problems in Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) control. The problem is more complicated when concurrent multi-product manufacturing and resource deadlock avoidance policies are considered. The objective of the research is to pro......Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) fleet scheduling is one of the big problems in Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) control. The problem is more complicated when concurrent multi-product manufacturing and resource deadlock avoidance policies are considered. The objective of the research...... is to provide a declarative model enabling to state a constraint satisfaction problem aimed at AGVs fleet scheduling subject to assumed itineraries of concurrently manufactured product types. In other words, assuming a given layout of FMS’s material handling and production routes of simultaneously manufactured...... orders, the main objective is to provide the declarative framework aimed at conditions allowing one to calculate the AGVs fleet schedule in online mode. An illustrative example of the relevant algebra-like driven step-by-stem cyclic scheduling is provided....

  10. Assistive technology needs, functional difficulties, and services utilization and coordination of children with developmental disabilities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sue C; Gold, Robert S

    2018-01-01

    Assistive technology (AT) enhances the ability of individuals with disabilities to be fully engaged in activities at home, at school, and within their communities-especially for children with developmental disabilities (DD) with physical, sensory, learning, and/or communication impairments. The prevalence of children with DD in the United States has risen from 12.84% in 1997 to 15.04% in 2008. Thus, it is important to monitor the status of their AT needs, functional difficulties, services utilization, and coordination. Using data from the 2009-2010 National Survey on Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), we conducted bivariate and multivariate statistical analysis, which found that 90% or more of parents of both children with DD and other CSHCN reported that their child's AT needs were met for vision, hearing, mobility, communication, and durable medical equipment; furthermore, children with DD had lower odds of AT needs met for vision and hearing and increased odds for meeting AT needs in mobility and communication. Our findings outline the current AT needs of children with DD nationally. Fulfilling these needs has the potential to engender positive lifelong effects on the child's disabilities, sense of independence, self-confidence, and productivity.

  11. Allowable CO2 concentrations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change as a function of the climate sensitivity probability distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, L D Danny

    2007-01-01

    Article 2 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) calls for stabilization of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations at levels that prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference (DAI) in the climate system. Until recently, the consensus viewpoint was that the climate sensitivity (the global mean equilibrium warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO 2 concentration) was 'likely' to fall between 1.5 and 4.5 K. However, a number of recent studies have generated probability distribution functions (pdfs) for climate sensitivity with the 95th percentile of the expected climate sensitivity as large as 10 K, while some studies suggest that the climate sensitivity is likely to fall in the lower half of the long-standing 1.5-4.5 K range. This paper examines the allowable CO 2 concentration as a function of the 95th percentile of the climate sensitivity pdf (ranging from 2 to 8 K) and for the following additional assumptions: (i) the 50th percentile for the pdf of the minimum sustained global mean warming that causes unacceptable harm equal to 1.5 or 2.5 K; and (ii) 1%, 5% or 10% allowable risks of unacceptable harm. For a 1% risk tolerance and the more stringent harm-threshold pdf, the allowable CO 2 concentration ranges from 323 to 268 ppmv as the 95th percentile of the climate sensitivity pdf increases from 2 to 8 K, while for a 10% risk tolerance and the less stringent harm-threshold pdf, the allowable CO 2 concentration ranges from 531 to 305 ppmv. In both cases it is assumed that non-CO 2 GHG radiative forcing can be reduced to half of its present value, otherwise; the allowable CO 2 concentration is even smaller. Accounting for the fact that the CO 2 concentration will gradually fall if emissions are reduced to zero, and that peak realized warming will then be less than the peak equilibrium warming (related to peak radiative forcing) allows the CO 2 concentration to peak at 10-40 ppmv higher than the limiting values given above for a climate

  12. Nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to role and function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit-A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mia I; Poulsen, Ingrid; Esbensen, Bente A

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to their function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. BACKGROUND: Several attempts have been made to describe nurses' roles and functions in inpatient neurorehabilitation. However, current...... understandings of the contributions that nurses and nurse assistants make to neurorehabilitation remain sparse. DESIGN: Descriptive, interpretive qualitative study. METHODS: Participant observations were conducted during 1 month in a stroke rehabilitation unit at a university hospital in the Capital Region...... stroke rehabilitation. We obtained insights into nursing staff's beliefs and attitudes about rehabilitation-as well as their own role and function-and furthermore how the latter affects their actions in daily practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The nursing role and function are still not clearly...

  13. Are gains in decision-making autonomy during early adolescence beneficial for emotional functioning? The case of the United States and china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lili; Pomerantz, Eva M; Wang, Qian

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the role of children's decision-making autonomy in their emotional functioning during early adolescence in the United States and China. Four times over the 7th and 8th grades, 825 American and Chinese children (M = 12.73 years) reported on the extent to which they versus their parents make decisions about issues children often deem as under their authority. Children also reported on their emotional functioning. American children made greater gains over time in decision-making autonomy than did Chinese children. Initial decision-making autonomy predicted enhanced emotional functioning similarly among American and Chinese children. However, gains over time in decision-making autonomy predicted enhanced emotional functioning more in the United States (vs. China) where such gains were normative.

  14. "The Role of the Unit in Physics and Psychometrics" by Stephen Humphry--One Small Step for the Rasch Model, but Possibly One Giant Leap for Measurement in the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Compared to traditional test theory, where person measures are typically referenced to the distribution of a population, item response theory allows for a much more meaningful interpretation of measures as they can be directly compared to item locations. However, Stephen Humphry shows that the crucial role of the unit of measurement has been…

  15. The Seven Step Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Connie

    2017-01-01

    Many well-intended instructors use Socratic or leveled questioning to facilitate the discussion of an assigned reading. While this engages a few students, most can opt to remain silent. The seven step strategy described in this article provides an alternative to classroom silence and engages all students. Students discuss a single reading as they…

  16. Recent Marijuana Use and Associations With Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Pulmonary Function in Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Stefania I; Buettner, Hannah; Rice, Mary B; Mittleman, Murray A

    2016-06-01

    The medical and recreational use of marijuana is now legal in some parts of the United States; the health effects are unknown. We aimed to evaluate associations between recent marijuana use and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and pulmonary function. We performed a cross-sectional study of 10,327 US adults participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in the years 2007 to 2012. We examined associations between marijuana use and eNO, FEV1, FVC, the FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow (midexpiratory phase) (FEF25%-75%) by weighted linear regression. In the study population, there were 4,797 never users, 4,084 past marijuana users, 555 participants who used marijuana 5 to 30 days before the examination, and 891 participants who used marijuana 0 to 4 days before the examination. Current marijuana use in the past 4 days was associated with 13% lower eNO (95% CI, -18% to 8%). FVC was higher in past users (75 mL; 95% CI, 38-112) and current users in the past 5 to 30 days (159 mL; 95% CI, 80-237) and in users within 0 to 4 days of the examination (204 mL; 95% CI, 139-270) compared with never users. All associations remained unchanged and statistically significant in sensitivity analyses excluding current and past tobacco users. Current marijuana use was associated with lower levels of eNO and higher FVC. The lower eNO in marijuana smokers suggests that short-term exposure to marijuana may, like tobacco, acutely affect the pulmonary vascular endothelium and impair airflow through the small airways. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging Crustal Structure of East Central United States using receiver function and implications for the accretion of juvenile crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, S.; Levander, A.

    2017-12-01

    Almost half of the North American continental plate is formed by the juvenile terrane accretion between 1.8-1.0 Ga, therefore, the suturing process of juvenile crust in East Central United States, not receiving as much attention probably due to low station coverage before the deployment of US transportable array, is of great importance to better understand the evolution of North American Plate. The Yavapai province is formed by the accretion of juvenile crust during 1.8-1.7 Ga. The northeastern part of Yavapai province is accreted to the Superior province along the Spirit Lake Tectonic Zone (SLTZ). During the period of 1.7-1.6 Ga, the Mazatzal Province, bounded the south of Yavapai Province, was added to Laurentia. The previous research mainly focuses on the southwestern Yavapai-Mazatzal boundary (Karlstrom et.al 2002, Magnani et.al 2004) but less in the northeastern area that we are interested in. The Granite-Rhyolite province is the product of the suturing event of juvenile arc crust reoccurring along the southeast margin of Laurentia between 1.55-1.35 Ga, which has been proved by the Nd model age (Whitmeyer et.al 2007). Here we will select the Mw>=5.5 teleseismic events with epicenter distance between 35 and 90 recorded by 300 available seismic stations in our study region. The receiver functions will be calculated by the water-level deconvolution in frequency domain (Langston 1979) and iterative deconvolution in time domain (Ligorria et.al 1999). The common conversion point (CCP) stacking method will then be applied to the receiver functions to create the 3-D image volume by imaging the conversion points in space from the time domain signals (Levander and Miller 2012). The preliminary results show that the accretion process of the tectonic provinces may have different models. The profiles of CCP image volume will inform us the seismic evidence to model the suturing process of juvenile Yavapai, Mozatzal and Granite-Rhyolite crust, hence providing great

  18. Are Gains in Decision-Making Autonomy during Early Adolescence Beneficial for Emotional Functioning? The Case of the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lili; Pomerantz, Eva M.; Wang, Qian

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the role of children's decision-making autonomy in their emotional functioning during early adolescence in the United States and China. Four times over the 7th and 8th grades, 825 American and Chinese children (M = 12.73 years) reported on the extent to which they versus their parents make decisions about issues children…

  19. A step toward nuclear sanity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, K.; Long, F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that Reykjavik formally ended as a diplomatic failure, but it has begun an overdue revolution in perceptions. At long last, both superpowers have the in concrete terms that vastly smaller nuclear arsenals would make them safer. Implicitly, they are saying that nuclear weapons are not useful weapons. Those insights are a prerequisite to nuclear sanity. The United States has proposed to eliminate all strategic ballistic missiles, on land and submarines, in two five-year steps. During that period, we (and presumably the Soviet Union) would develop missile defenses to be deployed in ten years. The first part of this plan makes excellent sense. Ballistic missiles explode on their targets ten to thirty minutes after launch. Today's huge and accurate missile arsenals have forced both superpowers to adopt a hair-trigger stance: they might launch missiles simply on warning of attack

  20. Direct and Lead Units During Preparation for the Battle (Battlefield Function 19) as Accomplished by an Engineer Battalion Supporting a Heavy Brigade. Volume 1: Function Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clagg, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the overall research program was to document the synchronization required by command and control tasks performed within the armored brigade, to include combat support and combat service support units...

  1. [Endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit: dependence of respiration of secretory cells on activity of ryanodine- and IP3 - sensitive Ca(2+)-channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velykopols'ka, O Iu; Man'ko, B O; Man'ko, V V

    2012-01-01

    Using Clark oxygen electrode, dependence of mitochondrial functions on Ca(2+)-release channels activity of Chironomus plumosus L. larvae salivary glands suspension was investigated. Cells were ATP-permeabilized in order to enable penetration of exogenous oxidative substrates. Activation of plasmalemmal P2X-receptors (as well as P2Y-receptors) per se does not modify the endogenous respiration of salivary gland suspension. That is, Ca(2+)-influx from extracellular medium does not influence functional activity of mitochondria, although they are located along the basal part of the plasma membrane. Activation of RyRs intensifies endogenous respiration and pyruvate-malate-stimulated respiration, but not succinate-stimulated respiration. Neither activation of IP3Rs (via P2Y-receptors activation), nor their inhibition alters endogenous respiration. Nevertheless, IP3Rs inhibition by 2-APB intensifies succinate-stimulated respiration. All abovementioned facts testify that Ca2+, released from stores via channels, alters functional activity of mitochondria, and undoubtedly confirm the existence of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit in Ch. plumosus larvae salivary glands secretory cells. In steady state of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit the spontaneous activity of IP3Rs is observed; released through IP3Rs, Ca2+ is accumulated in mitochondria via uniporter and modulates oxidative processes. Activation of RyRs induces the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to the active state, which is required to intensify cell respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. As expected, the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to inactivated state (i. e. inhibition of Ca(2+)-release channels at excessive [Ca2+]i) limits the duration of signal transduction, has protective nature and prevents apoptosis.

  2. 2-Step IMAT and 2-Step IMRT in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratengeier, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    In two dimensions, 2-Step Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy (2-Step IMAT) and 2-Step Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) were shown to be powerful methods for the optimization of plans with organs at risk (OAR) (partially) surrounded by a target volume (PTV). In three dimensions, some additional boundary conditions have to be considered to establish 2-Step IMAT as an optimization method. A further aim was to create rules for ad hoc adaptations of an IMRT plan to a daily changing PTV-OAR constellation. As a test model, a cylindrically symmetric PTV-OAR combination was used. The centrally placed OAR can adapt arbitrary diameters with different gap widths toward the PTV. Along the rotation axis the OAR diameter can vary, the OAR can even vanish at some axis positions, leaving a circular PTV. The width and weight of the second segment were the free parameters to optimize. The objective function f to minimize was the root of the integral of the squared difference of the dose in the target volume and a reference dose. For the problem, two local minima exist. Therefore, as a secondary criteria, the magnitude of hot and cold spots were taken into account. As a result, the solution with a larger segment width was recommended. From plane to plane for varying radii of PTV and OAR and for different gaps between them, different sets of weights and widths were optimal. Because only one weight for one segment shall be used for all planes (respectively leaf pairs), a strategy for complex three-dimensional (3-D) cases was established to choose a global weight. In a second step, a suitable segment width was chosen, minimizing f for this global weight. The concept was demonstrated in a planning study for a cylindrically symmetric example with a large range of different radii of an OAR along the patient axis. The method is discussed for some classes of tumor/organ at risk combinations. Noncylindrically symmetric cases were treated exemplarily. The product of width and weight of

  3. Computational Abstraction Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lone Leth; Thomsen, Bent; Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    and class instantiations. Our teaching experience shows that many novice programmers find it difficult to write programs with abstractions that materialise to concrete objects later in the development process. The contribution of this paper is the idea of initiating a programming process by creating...... or capturing concrete values, objects, or actions. As the next step, some of these are lifted to a higher level by computational means. In the object-oriented paradigm the target of such steps is classes. We hypothesise that the proposed approach primarily will be beneficial to novice programmers or during...... the exploratory phase of a program development process. In some specific niches it is also expected that our approach will benefit professional programmers....

  4. Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  5. Editor's Choice - Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units: An update on their definition, structure, organisation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni; De Maria, Elia; Fitzsimons, Donna; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hassager, Christian; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Magdy, Ahmed; Marandi, Toomas; Mimoso, Jorge; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Price, Susana; Rokyta, Richard; Roubille, Francois; Serpytis, Pranas; Shimony, Avi; Stepinska, Janina; Tint, Diana; Trendafilova, Elina; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Zahger, Doron; Zima, Endre; Zukermann, Robert; Lettino, Maddalena

    2018-02-01

    Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper on acute cardiovascular care organisation, using a multinational working group. The patient population has changed, and intensive cardiovascular care units now manage a large range of conditions from those simply requiring specialised monitoring, to critical cardiovascular diseases with associated multi-organ failure. To describe better intensive cardiovascular care units case mix, acuity of care has been divided into three levels, and then defining intensive cardiovascular care unit functional organisation. For each level of intensive cardiovascular care unit, this document presents the aims of the units, the recommended management structure, the optimal number of staff, the need for specially trained cardiologists and cardiovascular nurses, the desired equipment and architecture, and the interaction with other departments in the hospital and other intensive cardiovascular care units in the region/area. This update emphasises cardiologist training, referring to the recently updated Acute Cardiovascular Care Association core curriculum on acute cardiovascular care. The training of nurses in acute cardiovascular care is additionally addressed. Intensive cardiovascular care unit expertise is not limited to within the unit's geographical boundaries, extending to different specialties and subspecialties of cardiology and other specialties in order to optimally manage the wide scope of acute cardiovascular conditions in frequently highly complex patients. This position paper therefore addresses the need for the inclusion of acute cardiac care and intensive cardiovascular care units within a hospital network, linking university medical centres, large community hospitals, and smaller

  6. The Vertebrate Brain, Evidence of Its Modular Organization and Operating System: Insights into the Brain's Basic Units of Structure, Function, and Operation and How They Influence Neuronal Signaling and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslow, Morris H

    2011-01-01

    The human brain is a complex organ made up of neurons and several other cell types, and whose role is processing information for use in eliciting behaviors. However, the composition of its repeating cellular units for both structure and function are unresolved. Based on recent descriptions of the brain's physiological "operating system", a function of the tri-cellular metabolism of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) for supply of energy, and on the nature of "neuronal words and languages" for intercellular communication, insights into the brain's modular structural and functional units have been gained. In this article, it is proposed that the basic structural unit in brain is defined by its physiological operating system, and that it consists of a single neuron, and one or more astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and vascular system endothelial cells. It is also proposed that the basic functional unit in the brain is defined by how neurons communicate, and consists of two neurons and their interconnecting dendritic-synaptic-dendritic field. Since a functional unit is composed of two neurons, it requires two structural units to form a functional unit. Thus, the brain can be envisioned as being made up of the three-dimensional stacking and intertwining of myriad structural units which results not only in its gross structure, but also in producing a uniform distribution of binary functional units. Since the physiological NAA-NAAG operating system for supply of energy is repeated in every structural unit, it is positioned to control global brain function.

  7. MODELING OF THE FUNCTIONING UNITS OF FUEL SYSTEM OF GAS TURBINE ENGINE AIRCRAFT IN VIEW OF AVIATION FUEL QUALITY CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    I. I. Zavyalik; V. S. Oleshko; V. M. Samoylenko; E. V. Fetisov

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the developed modeling system in MATLAB Simulink which allows to simulate, explore and pre- dict the technical condition of the units of the aircraft gas turbine engine fuel system depending on aviation fuel quality changes.

  8. Sensitive and selective electrochemical determination of quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid based on bilayer of novel poly(pyrrole) functional composite using one-step electro-polymerization and molecularly imprinted poly(o-phenylenediamine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Xiaomin; Pan, Mingfei; Qian, Hailong; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •PPY-GO-BiCoPc composite was formed using a simple electrochemical method for the first time. •A novel PoPD-MIP sensor based on PPY-GO-BiCoPc composite had been fabricated. •The PPY-GO-BiCoPc functional composite was introduced to improve performance of the sensor. •Highly sensitive, selective and stable sensor had been achieved. •The established MIP sensor could be promising in food safety analysis. -- Abstract: A facile and efficient molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) recognition element of electrochemical sensor was fabricated by directly electro-polymerizing monomer o-phenylenediamine (oPD) in the presence of template quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (QCA), based on one-step controllable electrochemical modification of poly(pyrrole)-graphene oxide-binuclear phthalocyanine cobalt (II) sulphonate (PPY-GO-BiCoPc) functional composite on glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The MIP film coated on PPY-GO-BiCoPc functional composite decorated GCE (MIP/PPY-GO-BiCoPc/GCE) was presented for the first time. The synergistic effect and electro-catalytic activity toward QCA redox of PPY-GO-BiCoPc functional composite were discussed using various contrast tests. Also, the effect of experimental variables on the current response such as, electro-polymerization cycles, template/monomer ratio, elution condition for template removal, pH of the supporting electrolyte and accumulation time, were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed MIP sensor possessed a fast rebinding dynamics and an excellent recognition capacity to QCA, while the anodic current response of square wave voltammetry (SWV) was well-proportional to the concentration of QCA in the range of 1.0 × 10 −8 –1.0 × 10 −4 and 1.0 × 10 −4 –5.0 × 10 −4 mol L −1 with a low detection limit of 2.1 nmol L −1 . The established sensor was applied successfully to determine QCA in commercial pork and chicken muscle samples with acceptable

  9. Sensitive and selective electrochemical determination of quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid based on bilayer of novel poly(pyrrole) functional composite using one-step electro-polymerization and molecularly imprinted poly(o-phenylenediamine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Xiaomin; Pan, Mingfei; Qian, Hailong; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Shuo, E-mail: s.wang@tust.edu.cn

    2014-01-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •PPY-GO-BiCoPc composite was formed using a simple electrochemical method for the first time. •A novel PoPD-MIP sensor based on PPY-GO-BiCoPc composite had been fabricated. •The PPY-GO-BiCoPc functional composite was introduced to improve performance of the sensor. •Highly sensitive, selective and stable sensor had been achieved. •The established MIP sensor could be promising in food safety analysis. -- Abstract: A facile and efficient molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) recognition element of electrochemical sensor was fabricated by directly electro-polymerizing monomer o-phenylenediamine (oPD) in the presence of template quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (QCA), based on one-step controllable electrochemical modification of poly(pyrrole)-graphene oxide-binuclear phthalocyanine cobalt (II) sulphonate (PPY-GO-BiCoPc) functional composite on glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The MIP film coated on PPY-GO-BiCoPc functional composite decorated GCE (MIP/PPY-GO-BiCoPc/GCE) was presented for the first time. The synergistic effect and electro-catalytic activity toward QCA redox of PPY-GO-BiCoPc functional composite were discussed using various contrast tests. Also, the effect of experimental variables on the current response such as, electro-polymerization cycles, template/monomer ratio, elution condition for template removal, pH of the supporting electrolyte and accumulation time, were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed MIP sensor possessed a fast rebinding dynamics and an excellent recognition capacity to QCA, while the anodic current response of square wave voltammetry (SWV) was well-proportional to the concentration of QCA in the range of 1.0 × 10{sup −8}–1.0 × 10{sup −4} and 1.0 × 10{sup −4}–5.0 × 10{sup −4} mol L{sup −1} with a low detection limit of 2.1 nmol L{sup −1}. The established sensor was applied successfully to determine QCA in commercial pork and chicken muscle

  10. Stepping Stones through Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lyle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Indo-European mythology is known only through written records but it needs to be understood in terms of the preliterate oral-cultural context in which it was rooted. It is proposed that this world was conceptually organized through a memory-capsule consisting of the current generation and the three before it, and that there was a system of alternate generations with each generation taking a step into the future under the leadership of a white or red king.

  11. SYSTEMATIZATION OF THE BASIC STEPS OF THE STEP-AEROBICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darinka Korovljev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the development of the powerful sport industry, in front of us appeared a lot of new opportunities for creating of the new programmes of exercising with certain requisites. One of such programmes is certainly step-aerobics. Step-aerobics can be defined as a type of aerobics consisting of the basic aerobic steps (basic steps applied in exercising on stepper (step bench, with a possibility to regulate its height. Step-aerobics itself can be divided into several groups, depending on the following: type of music, working methods and adopted knowledge of the attendants. In this work, the systematization of the basic steps in step-aerobics was made on the basis of the following criteria: steps origin, number of leg motions in stepping and relating the body support at the end of the step. Systematization of the basic steps of the step-aerobics is quite significant for making a concrete review of the existing basic steps, thus making creation of the step-aerobics lesson easier

  12. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galyean, W.J.; Whaley, A.M.; Kelly, D.L.; Boring, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    This guide provides step-by-step guidance on the use of the SPAR-H method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This guide is intended to be used with the worksheets provided in: 'The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method,' NUREG/CR-6883, dated August 2005. Each step in the process of producing a Human Error Probability (HEP) is discussed. These steps are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff. The discussions on dependence are extensive and include an appendix that describes insights obtained from the psychology literature.

  13. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Galyean; A. M. Whaley; D. L. Kelly; R. L. Boring

    2011-05-01

    This guide provides step-by-step guidance on the use of the SPAR-H method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This guide is intended to be used with the worksheets provided in: 'The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method,' NUREG/CR-6883, dated August 2005. Each step in the process of producing a Human Error Probability (HEP) is discussed. These steps are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff. The discussions on dependence are extensive and include an appendix that describes insights obtained from the psychology literature.

  14. Hippocampus discovery First steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available The first steps of the discovery, and the main discoverers, of the hippocampus are outlined. Arantius was the first to describe a structure he named "hippocampus" or "white silkworm". Despite numerous controversies and alternate designations, the term hippocampus has prevailed until this day as the most widely used term. Duvernoy provided an illustration of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, considered the first by most authors, which appeared more than one and a half century after Arantius' description. Some authors have identified other drawings and texts which they claim predate Duvernoy's depiction, in studies by Vesalius, Varolio, Willis, and Eustachio, albeit unconvincingly. Considering the definition of the hippocampal formation as comprising the hippocampus proper, dentate gyrus and subiculum, Arantius and Duvernoy apparently described the gross anatomy of this complex. The pioneering studies of Arantius and Duvernoy revealed a relatively small hidden formation that would become one of the most valued brain structures.

  15. MODELING OF THE FUNCTIONING UNITS OF FUEL SYSTEM OF GAS TURBINE ENGINE AIRCRAFT IN VIEW OF AVIATION FUEL QUALITY CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Zavyalik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the developed modeling system in MATLAB Simulink which allows to simulate, explore and pre- dict the technical condition of the units of the aircraft gas turbine engine fuel system depending on aviation fuel quality changes.

  16. Translanguaging in the Borderlands: Language Function in Theatre for Young Audiences Written in Spanish and English in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildkret, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, we tend to understand linguistic systems as separate and autonomous, and by this understanding, bilinguals are people who speak two different languages and switch between them. This understanding of bilingualism, however, does not reflect the reality of the way many bilinguals use language. Rather than "code-switch"…

  17. The structure of stepped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) as far as multiple scattering effects are concerned, is discussed. The ion fractions of lithium, sodium and potassium scattered from a copper (100) surface have been measured as a function of several experimental parameters. The ratio of the intensities of the single and double scattering peaks observed in ion scattering spectroscopy has been determined and ion scattering spectroscopy applied in the multiple scattering mode is used to determine the structure of a stepped Cu(410) surface. The average relaxation of the (100) terraces of this surface appears to be very small. The adsorption of oxygen on this surface has been studied with LEIS and it is indicated that oxygen absorbs dissociatively. (C.F.)

  18. Steps towards an evolutionary physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiezzi, E

    2006-01-01

    If thermodynamics is to physics as logic is to philosophy, recent theoretical advancements lend new coherence to the marvel and dynamism of life on Earth. Enzo Tiezzi's "Steps Towards an Evolutionary Physics" is a primer and guide, to those who would to stand on the shoulders of giants to attain this view: Heisenberg, Planck, Bateson, Varela, and Prigogine as well as notable contemporary scientists. The adventure of such a free and enquiring spirit thrives not so much on answers as on new questions. The book offers a new gestalt on the uncertainty principle and concept of probability. A wide range of examples, enigmas, and paradoxes lead one's imagination on an exquisite dance. Among the applications are: songs and shapes of nature, oscillatory reactions, orientors, goal functions and configurations of processes, and "dissipative structures and the city". Ecodynamics is a new science, which proposes a cross-fertilization between Charles Darwin and Ilya Prigogine. As an enigma in thermodynamics, Entropy forms ...

  19. The impact of socioeconomic inequalities and lack of health insurance on physical functioning among middle-aged and older adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhyun; Richardson, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Socioeconomic inequalities and lack of private health insurance have been viewed as significant contributors to health disparities in the United States. However, few studies have examined their impact on physical functioning over time, especially in later life. The current study investigated the impact of socioeconomic inequalities and lack of private health insurance on individuals' growth trajectories in physical functioning, as measured by activities of daily living. Data from the Health and Retirement Study (1994-2006) were used for this study, 6519 black and white adults who provided in-depth information about health, socioeconomic, financial and health insurance information were analysed. Latent growth curve modelling was used to estimate the initial level of physical functioning and its rate of change over time. Results showed that higher level of income and assets and having private health insurance significantly predicted better physical functioning. In particular, decline in physical functioning was slower among those who had private health insurance. Interestingly, changes in economic status, such as decreases in income and assets, had a greater impact on women's physical functioning than on men's. Black adults did not suffer more rapid declines in physical functioning than white adults after controlling for socioeconomic status. The current longitudinal study suggested that anti-poverty and health insurance policies should be enhanced to reduce the negative impact of socioeconomic inequalities on physical functioning throughout an individual's life course. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Astronomical sketching a step-by-step introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Handy, Richard; Perez, Jeremy; Rix, Erika; Robbins, Sol

    2007-01-01

    This book presents the amateur with fine examples of astronomical sketches and step-by-step tutorials in each medium, from pencil to computer graphics programs. This unique book can teach almost anyone to create beautiful sketches of celestial objects.

  1. Pacific Association for Clinical Training (PACT): lessons learned and next steps in developing a sustainable continuing health professionals education system in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Maskarinec, Gregory G; Palafox, Neal A

    2007-03-01

    In response to the 1998 Institute of Medicine report, "Pacific Partnerships for Health ", acknowledging the need for the continuing education of health workers in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions, the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) awarded a grant (1999-2003) to the University of Washington for a continuing education project in the Pacific. When shortfalls in HRSA funding threatened continuation of the program, Pacific advocates aggressively made a case for refunding of this important project. In 2003, HRSA announced competitive funding for a new program for continuing education. The Department of Family Medicine and Community Health (DFMCH) at the University of Hawai'i (UH), John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) was awarded the HRSA Cooperative Agreement to run from September 2003 through August 2007, creating PACT the Pacific Association for Clinical Training. PACT assembled a professional, community-based advisory board, most of whom were indigenous Pacific Islanders, and conducted a continuing clinical education needs assessment in every jurisdiction, subsequently developing and delivering programs utilizing distance education relevant to the needs of each USAPI jurisdiction. Priority health areas included diabetes, oral health and geriatrics, as mandated by HRSA. This report describes the processes, accomplishments, challenges and lessons learned from the project. PACT needs assessment reports for each jurisdiction and an executive summary are published as Original Articles in this issue of Pacific Health Dialog. As funding for PACT comes to an end, it is clear that much work remains to be done in the region. "Continuing clinical education" is only one part of a continuum of human resources for health (HRH) workforce development. Continued USAPI regional, U.S. national and international collaboration and resources are needed to achieve the ultimate goal of improved health and health care delivery

  2. Self-Adaptive Step Firefly Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhao Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the standard firefly algorithm, each firefly has the same step settings and its values decrease from iteration to iteration. Therefore, it may fall into the local optimum. Furthermore, the decreasing of step is restrained by the maximum of iteration, which has an influence on the convergence speed and precision. In order to avoid falling into the local optimum and reduce the impact of the maximum of iteration, a self-adaptive step firefly algorithm is proposed in the paper. Its core idea is setting the step of each firefly varying with the iteration, according to each firefly’s historical information and current situation. Experiments are made to show the performance of our approach compared with the standard FA, based on sixteen standard testing benchmark functions. The results reveal that our method can prevent the premature convergence and improve the convergence speed and accurateness.

  3. Physical functional outcome assessment of patients with major burns admitted to a UK Burn Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailes, Sarah T; Engelsman, Kayleen; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Determining the discharge outcome of burn patients can be challenging and therefore a validated objective measure of functional independence would assist with this process. We developed the Functional Assessment for Burns (FAB) score to measure burn patients' functional independence. FAB scores were taken on discharge from ICU (FAB 1) and on discharge from inpatient burn care (FAB 2) in 56 patients meeting the American Burn Association criteria for major burn. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data to measure the progress of patients' physical functional outcomes and to evaluate the predictive validity of the FAB score for discharge outcome. Mean age was 38.6 years and median burn size 35%. Significant improvements were made in the physical functional outcomes between FAB 1 and FAB 2 scores (pburn patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. The increase performance BMF-14 calcination unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triyono

    2013-01-01

    The heating element of performance increase BMF-14 calcination unit has been installed. The activity includes: installation and function test heating element step by step. The main component includes: kanthal heating element type with size long 58,2 cm diameter 0,9 cm slot total 28, flexible cable resists heat 30 Amperes, band cable heat resists and flexible clamp. The heating elements installation includes from 3 groups and every groups have 4 heating elements to connectly series. Every group connecting to every phase RST and neutral for getting electric voltage 380 Volts follow contact relay 3 phases to controlling by digital temperature control. The resulting installation of heating element in the BMF-14 calcination unit showed that: BMF-14 calcination unit can be again of the setting temperature step by step. In the step I get optimal temperature 560 °C test time 1068 minutes with rate velocity heat 0 to 18,0 °C/minutes with current between 5,8 to 6,4 Amperes voltage 103 to 123 Volts (phase R and T). In the step II gets optimal temperature 600 °C test time 265 minutes getting rate velocity heat 0 to 40,3 °C/minutes with current 3,8 to 8,5 Amperes voltage 76 to 142 Volts (phase RST). In the step III gets optimal temperature 1000 °C test time 107 minutes getting rate velocity heat 0 to 53,5 °C/minutes with current 9,7 to 12,5 Amperes voltage 215 to 225 Volts (phase RST). (author)

  5. How Many Feathers for the War Bonnet? A Groundwork for Distributing the Planning Function in Objectives Force Units of Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-23

    22/02; David Tate, “VR in the Field: Hunter Warrior & JCOS/MCM Situational Awareness Using the Virtual Reality Responsive Workbench;” available from... Fetterman Union-Pacific Railroad N. Platte River Missouri River Missouri River Yellowstone River Bighorn R. Black Hills Powder R. Little Missouri R... Fetterman on March 1, 1876, and made contact with a Sioux band on the Powder River two weeks later. However, the lead Unit of Action failed to defeat

  6. Symplectic integrators with adaptive time steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. S.; Finn, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, there have been many attempts to construct symplectic integrators with variable time steps, with rather disappointing results. In this paper, we identify the causes for this lack of performance, and find that they fall into two categories. In the first, the time step is considered a function of time alone, Δ = Δ(t). In this case, backward error analysis shows that while the algorithms remain symplectic, parametric instabilities may arise because of resonance between oscillations of Δ(t) and the orbital motion. In the second category the time step is a function of phase space variables Δ = Δ(q, p). In this case, the system of equations to be solved is analyzed by introducing a new time variable τ with dt = Δ(q, p) dτ. The transformed equations are no longer in Hamiltonian form, and thus do not benefit from integration methods which would be symplectic for Hamiltonian systems. We analyze two methods for integrating the transformed equations which do, however, preserve the structure of the original equations. The first is an extended phase space method, which has been successfully used in previous studies of adaptive time step symplectic integrators. The second, novel, method is based on a non-canonical mixed-variable generating function. Numerical trials for both of these methods show good results, without parametric instabilities or spurious growth or damping. It is then shown how to adapt the time step to an error estimate found by backward error analysis, in order to optimize the time-stepping scheme. Numerical results are obtained using this formulation and compared with other time-stepping schemes for the extended phase space symplectic method.

  7. STEP and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, James; Everitt, Francis; Worden, Paul; Mester, John

    2012-09-01

    The Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) will advance experimental limits on violations of Einstein's equivalence principle from their present sensitivity of two parts in 1013 to one part in 1018 through multiple comparison of the motions of four pairs of test masses of different compositions in a drag-free earth-orbiting satellite. We describe the experiment, its current status and its potential implications for fundamental physics. Equivalence is at the heart of general relativity, our governing theory of gravity and violations are expected in most attempts to unify this theory with the other fundamental interactions of physics, as well as in many theoretical explanations for the phenomenon of dark energy in cosmology. Detection of such a violation would be equivalent to the discovery of a new force of nature. A null result would be almost as profound, pushing upper limits on any coupling between standard-model fields and the new light degrees of freedom generically predicted by these theories down to unnaturally small levels.

  8. STEP and fundamental physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overduin, James; Everitt, Francis; Worden, Paul; Mester, John

    2012-01-01

    The Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) will advance experimental limits on violations of Einstein's equivalence principle from their present sensitivity of two parts in 10 13 to one part in 10 18 through multiple comparison of the motions of four pairs of test masses of different compositions in a drag-free earth-orbiting satellite. We describe the experiment, its current status and its potential implications for fundamental physics. Equivalence is at the heart of general relativity, our governing theory of gravity and violations are expected in most attempts to unify this theory with the other fundamental interactions of physics, as well as in many theoretical explanations for the phenomenon of dark energy in cosmology. Detection of such a violation would be equivalent to the discovery of a new force of nature. A null result would be almost as profound, pushing upper limits on any coupling between standard-model fields and the new light degrees of freedom generically predicted by these theories down to unnaturally small levels. (paper)

  9. One-step microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlen, Franz-Josef; Sankaranarayanan, Srikanth; Kar, Aravinda

    1997-09-01

    Subject of this investigation is a one-step rapid machining process to create miniaturized 3D parts, using the original sample material. An experimental setup where metal powder is fed to the laser beam-material interaction region has been built. The powder is melted and forms planar, 2D geometries as the substrate is moved under the laser beam in XY- direction. After completing the geometry in the plane, the substrate is displaced in Z-direction, and a new layer of material is placed on top of the just completed deposit. By continuous repetition of this process, 3D parts wee created. In particular, the impact of the focal spot size of the high power laser beam on the smallest achievable structures was investigated. At a translation speed of 51 mm/s a minimum material thickness of 590 micrometers was achieved. Also, it was shown that a small Z-displacement has a negligible influence on the continuity of the material deposition over this power range. A high power CO2 laser was used as energy source, the material powder under investigation was stainless steel SS304L. Helium was used as shield gas at a flow rate of 15 1/min. The incident CO2 laser beam power was varied between 300 W and 400 W, with the laser beam intensity distribute in a donut mode. The laser beam was focused to a focal diameter of 600 (Mu) m.

  10. Step 1: Learn about Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 1: Learn About Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... the whole family healthy! Here are four key steps to help you control your diabetes and live ...

  11. First generation TREN dendrimers functionalized with naphthyl and/or dansyl units. Ground and excited state electronic interactions and protonation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaniti, Paolo; Maestri, Mauro; Ceroni, Paola; Bergamini, Giacomo; Vögtle, Fritz; Fakhrnabavi, Hassan; Lukin, Oleg

    2007-04-01

    We report the photophysical properties (absorption and emission spectra, quantum yield, and lifetime) of five dendrimers of first generation based on a TREN (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) skeleton functionalized at the periphery with naphthyl and/or 5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (hereafter called dansyl) chromophores. Each dendrimer comprises one tertiary amine unit in the core and three branches carrying a sulfonimido unit at the periphery, each one substituted by two identical or different moieties. In particular, TD6 and TN6 contain dansyl (D) or naphthyl (N) units, respectively, while TD3B3, TN3B3 and TN3D3 contain dansyl, naphthyl or benzyl (B) units at the periphery. The spectroscopic behaviour of these dendrimers has been investigated in acetonitrile solution and compared with that of reference compounds. For all dendrimers the absorption bands are red shifted compared to those of monomeric naphthyl and dansyl reference compounds. Moreover, the intense naphthyl and dansyl fluorescence is greatly quenched because of strong interactions between the two aromatic moieties linked by a sulfonimido unit. Protonation of the amine units of the dendrimers by addition of CF(3)SO(3)H (triflic) acid causes a decrease in intensity of the luminescence and a change in the shape of the emission bands. The shapes of the titration curves depend on the dendrimer, but in any case the effect of acid can be fully reversed by successive addition of base (tributylamine). The obtained results reveal that among the intradendrimer interactions the most important one is that taking place (via mesomeric interaction) between the various chromophores and a pair of sulfonimido groups.

  12. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    April M. Whaley; Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; William J. Galyean

    2012-06-01

    Step-by-step guidance was developed recently at Idaho National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the use of the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This work was done to address SPAR-H user needs, specifically requests for additional guidance on the proper application of various aspects of the methodology. This paper overviews the steps of the SPAR-H analysis process and highlights some of the most important insights gained during the development of the step-by-step directions. This supplemental guidance for analysts is applicable when plant-specific information is available, and goes beyond the general guidance provided in existing SPAR-H documentation. The steps highlighted in this paper are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff.

  13. Functional needs which led to the use of digital computing devices in the protection system of 1300 MW units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle, H.

    1986-01-01

    After a review of classical protection functions used in 900 MW power plants, it is concluded that in order to have functioning margins it is useful to calculate more finely the controled parameters. These calculating needs lead to the use of digital computing devices. Drawing profit from the new possibilities one can improve the general performances of the protection system with regard to availability, safety and maintenance. These options in the case of PALUEL led to the realization of SPIN, described here

  14. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niven, W.A.; Shikany, S.D.; Shira, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed

  15. Step growth of two flexible ABf monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Colin; Fawcett, Allan H.; Hetherington, Cecil R.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional lattice model was used to simulate the competition between the growth of hyperbranched structures and cycle formation that occurs when flexible ABf monomers undergo step growth. The monomers in the model are mapped onto several lattice sites. The effect of functionality...

  16. Change in cognitive performance is associated with functional recovery during post-acute stroke rehabilitation: a multi-centric study from intermediate care geriatric rehabilitation units of Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Laura Mónica; Inzitari, Marco; Roqué, Marta; Duarte, Esther; Vallés, Elisabeth; Rodó, Montserrat; Gallofré, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Recovery after a stroke is determined by a broad range of neurological, functional and psychosocial factors. Evidence regarding these factors is not well established, in particular influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate whether selective characteristics, including cognitive performance and its change over time, modulate functional recovery with home discharge in stroke survivors admitted to post-acute rehabilitation units. We undertook a multicenter cohort study, including all patients discharged from acute wards to any geriatric rehabilitation unit in Catalonia-Spain during 2008. Patients were assessed for demographics, clinical and functional variables using Conjunt Mínim Bàsic de Dades dels Recursos Sociosanitaris (CMBD-RSS), which adapts the Minimum Data Set tool used in America's nursing homes. Baseline-to-discharge change in cognition was calculated on repeated assessments using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS, range 0-6, best-worst cognition). The multivariable effect of these factors was analyzed in relation to the outcome. 879 post-stroke patients were included (mean age 77.48 ± 10.18 years, 52.6% women). A worse initial CPS [OR (95% CI) = 0.851 (0.774-0.935)] and prevalent fecal incontinence [OR (95% CI) = 0.560 (0.454-0.691)] reduced the likelihood of returning home with functional improvement; whereas improvement of CPS, baseline to discharge, [OR (95% CI) = 1.348 (1.144-1.588)], more rehabilitation days within the first 2 weeks [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] and a longer hospital stay [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] were associated with the outcome. In our sample, different clinical characteristics, including cognitive function and its improvement over time, are associated with functional improvement in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. Our results might provide information to further studies aimed at exploring the influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation.

  17. On the equivalence between small-step and big-step abstract machines: a simple application of lightweight fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Millikin, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    -step specification. We illustrate this observation here with a recognizer for Dyck words, the CEK machine, and Krivine’s machine with call/cc. The need for such a simple proof is motivated by our current work on small-step abstract machines as obtained by refocusing a function implementing a reduction semantics (a...... syntactic correspondence), and big-step abstract machines as obtained by CPStransforming and then defunctionalizing a function implementing a big-step semantics (a functional correspondence). © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. The prevalence of post traumatic stress disorder in an army unit and its relationship with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian WANG

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the prevalence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD in the army officers and soldiers (AOSs, and identify its relationship with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs. Methods PTSD and FGIDs were diagnosed based on the PTSD checklist-civilian (PCL-C and Rome Ⅲ Modular Questionnaire respectively, the overlaps of PTSD and FGIDs and their correlation were diagnosed. The correlation of PTSD with traumatic and stressful events was investigated using Trauma History and Stressful Event Screening Questionnaire. The coexistence and relationship of PTSD and FGIDs were analyzed. Results Of 927 AOSs, 33 were diagnosed with PTSD. The prevalence of PTSD was 3.56%. FGIDs were identified in 435 subjects and the incidence of FGIDs was 46.93%. Among 33 AOSs with PTSD, 28 were diagnosed as having FGIDs and the prevalence of FGIDs was 84.85%, which was significantly higher than that of non-PTSD group (45.53%, P<0.05. Moreover, the FGIDs group had a higher prevalence of PTSD, compared with the non-FGID group (6.43% vs. 1.02%, P<0.05. Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS, 33.33%, unspecified functional bowel disorder (24.24%, functional bloating (18.18% and functional anorectal pain (18.18% were the four most frequent FGIDs in PTSD AOSs. Multiple regression analysis showed PTSD was the risk factor for CVS (OR=9.118, functional anorectal pain (OR=3.373, functional bloating (OR=4.772, irritable bowel syndrome (OR=3.438, rumination syndrome (OR=16.033, functional vomiting (OR=10.329, functional dysphagia (OR=9.891(P<0.05. CVS (OR=4.063, the number of traumatic (OR=1.159 and stress events (OR=1.401 were the risk factors for PTSD in AOSs (P<0.05. Conclusions PTSD and FGID interact as risk factor each other. The prevalence of PTSD differs significantly in different FGIDs. CVS is the most frequent FGID in PTSD AOSs and risk factor for PTSD, which deserves more concerns. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2018.02.14

  19. Effects of walking speed on the step-by-step control of step width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Katy H; Heitkamp, Lauren N; Horne, Joscelyn S; Dean, Jesse C

    2018-02-08

    Young, healthy adults walking at typical preferred speeds use step-by-step adjustments of step width to appropriately redirect their center of mass motion and ensure mediolateral stability. However, it is presently unclear whether this control strategy is retained when walking at the slower speeds preferred by many clinical populations. We investigated whether the typical stabilization strategy is influenced by walking speed. Twelve young, neurologically intact participants walked on a treadmill at a range of prescribed speeds (0.2-1.2 m/s). The mediolateral stabilization strategy was quantified as the proportion of step width variance predicted by the mechanical state of the pelvis throughout a step (calculated as R 2 magnitude from a multiple linear regression). Our ability to accurately predict the upcoming step width increased over the course of a step. The strength of the relationship between step width and pelvis mechanics at the start of a step was reduced at slower speeds. However, these speed-dependent differences largely disappeared by the end of a step, other than at the slowest walking speed (0.2 m/s). These results suggest that mechanics-dependent adjustments in step width are a consistent component of healthy gait across speeds and contexts. However, slower walking speeds may ease this control by allowing mediolateral repositioning of the swing leg to occur later in a step, thus encouraging slower walking among clinical populations with limited sensorimotor control. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Deterioro funcional en ancianos ingresados en un hospital sin unidades geriátricas Functional impairment in elderly inpatients in a hospital without geriatric units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Jesús Cruz Lendínez

    2010-03-01

    ás influyen en la variación de la capacidad funcional durante la hospitalización. La hospitalización de ancianos en un hospital sin unidad geriátrica supone peores resultados en la capacidad funcional de los pacientes frente a los hospitales que cuentan con unidad de hospitalización geriátrica.Introduction: Increased population of elderly people is becoming more frequent admission to hospitals of people older than 65 years. Hospital stay in conventional units can lead to functional worsening in the elderly. Aim: To identify the profile of elderly patients treated in the Internal Medicine Hospital of Jaén. To analyze variation in functional ability of elderly people following admission to inpatient units of a public hospital. To identify variables that influence the changes in the functional ability of elderly inpatients in hospitals without geriatric units. Methods: Prospective observational study in 3 units of internal medicine units in a hospital belonging to the Andalusian Health Service. A sample of 190 hospitalized elderly patients has been included. Variables related to demographic, hospitalization and functional ability using Barthel Index, were reported. Results: Hospitalization in internal medicine units did not help to improve functional ability in older people; rather, they had a negative effect, promoting functional worsening in an important group of these patients. Depending on the age, among patients studied (65-85 and over, younger patients got better results on functional recovery at discharge, while those above 85 years got worst results. 16% under 85 years and 67.5% of those over 85 lose functional capacity. Conclusions: Most important factors affecting functional ability change during hospitalization were age, functional ability at admission, functional ability at discharge, the presence of companions during hospitalization and discharge destination. Hospitalization of elderly in a nongeriatric inpatient unit at hospital assumes no worse results in

  1. When a Step Is Not a Step! Specificity Analysis of Five Physical Activity Monitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra O'Connell

    Full Text Available Physical activity is an essential aspect of a healthy lifestyle for both physical and mental health states. As step count is one of the most utilized measures for quantifying physical activity it is important that activity-monitoring devices be both sensitive and specific in recording actual steps taken and disregard non-stepping body movements. The objective of this study was to assess the specificity of five activity monitors during a variety of prescribed non-stepping activities.Participants wore five activity monitors simultaneously for a variety of prescribed activities including deskwork, taking an elevator, taking a bus journey, automobile driving, washing and drying dishes; functional reaching task; indoor cycling; outdoor cycling; and indoor rowing. Each task was carried out for either a specific duration of time or over a specific distance. Activity monitors tested were the ActivPAL micro™, NL-2000™ pedometer, Withings Smart Activity Monitor Tracker (Pulse O2™, Fitbit One™ and Jawbone UP™. Participants were video-recorded while carrying out the prescribed activities and the false positive step count registered on each activity monitor was obtained and compared to the video.All activity monitors registered a significant number of false positive steps per minute during one or more of the prescribed activities. The Withings™ activity performed best, registering a significant number of false positive steps per minute during the outdoor cycling activity only (P = 0.025. The Jawbone™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the functional reaching task and while washing and drying dishes, which involved arm and hand movement (P < 0.01 for both. The ActivPAL™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the cycling exercises (P < 0.001 for both.As a number of false positive steps were registered on the activity monitors during the non-stepping activities, the authors conclude that non-stepping

  2. When a Step Is Not a Step! Specificity Analysis of Five Physical Activity Monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Sandra; ÓLaighin, Gearóid; Quinlan, Leo R

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is an essential aspect of a healthy lifestyle for both physical and mental health states. As step count is one of the most utilized measures for quantifying physical activity it is important that activity-monitoring devices be both sensitive and specific in recording actual steps taken and disregard non-stepping body movements. The objective of this study was to assess the specificity of five activity monitors during a variety of prescribed non-stepping activities. Participants wore five activity monitors simultaneously for a variety of prescribed activities including deskwork, taking an elevator, taking a bus journey, automobile driving, washing and drying dishes; functional reaching task; indoor cycling; outdoor cycling; and indoor rowing. Each task was carried out for either a specific duration of time or over a specific distance. Activity monitors tested were the ActivPAL micro™, NL-2000™ pedometer, Withings Smart Activity Monitor Tracker (Pulse O2)™, Fitbit One™ and Jawbone UP™. Participants were video-recorded while carrying out the prescribed activities and the false positive step count registered on each activity monitor was obtained and compared to the video. All activity monitors registered a significant number of false positive steps per minute during one or more of the prescribed activities. The Withings™ activity performed best, registering a significant number of false positive steps per minute during the outdoor cycling activity only (P = 0.025). The Jawbone™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the functional reaching task and while washing and drying dishes, which involved arm and hand movement (P positive steps during the cycling exercises (P positive steps were registered on the activity monitors during the non-stepping activities, the authors conclude that non-stepping physical activities can result in the false detection of steps. This can negatively affect the quantification of physical

  3. The Vertebrate Brain, Evidence of Its Modular Organization and Operating System: Insights into the Brain's Basic Units of Structure, Function, and Operation and How They Influence Neuronal Signaling and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslow, Morris H.

    2011-01-01

    The human brain is a complex organ made up of neurons and several other cell types, and whose role is processing information for use in eliciting behaviors. However, the composition of its repeating cellular units for both structure and function are unresolved. Based on recent descriptions of the brain's physiological “operating system”, a function of the tri-cellular metabolism of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) for supply of energy, and on the nature of “neuronal words and languages” for intercellular communication, insights into the brain's modular structural and functional units have been gained. In this article, it is proposed that the basic structural unit in brain is defined by its physiological operating system, and that it consists of a single neuron, and one or more astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and vascular system endothelial cells. It is also proposed that the basic functional unit in the brain is defined by how neurons communicate, and consists of two neurons and their interconnecting dendritic–synaptic–dendritic field. Since a functional unit is composed of two neurons, it requires two structural units to form a functional unit. Thus, the brain can be envisioned as being made up of the three-dimensional stacking and intertwining of myriad structural units which results not only in its gross structure, but also in producing a uniform distribution of binary functional units. Since the physiological NAA–NAAG operating system for supply of energy is repeated in every structural unit, it is positioned to control global brain function. PMID:21720525

  4. Descriptive, inferential, functional outcome data on 9,025 torture survivors over six years in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The National Consortium of Torture Treatment Programs conducted a large voluntary research project among torture rehabilitation centers in the United States (US). Its goal is to fill the void in the literature on demographic and diagnostic data of torture survivors across a large country. Twenty-three centers across the US collaborated over six years, utilizing training and making decisions via conference calls and webinars. A data use agreement signed by all the participating centers governed plans and the use of the data. This study reports on torture survivors from 125 countries, 109 of which signed the United Nations Convention against Torture (UNCAT). Of the 9,025 torture survivors represented, most came from Africa and Asia and reported an average of 3.5 types of torture. Asylum seekers have different immigration experiences and show significantly higher rates of major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than refugees. Torture survivors at high risk of PTSD and MDD in this sample reported three or more types of torture, reported rape, and had the immigration status of asylum seeker. At one and two years after beginning treatment, both asylum seekers and refugees reported increased rates of employment and improvements in their immigration status. This longitudinal project provides basic data on a large number of torture survivors who accessed services in the US, and provides a foundation for long-term follow up on immigration status, employment status, diagnostic status, medical diagnoses, and eventually, the effectiveness of treatment for torture survivors in the US. This article shares demographic and diagnostic findings useful for informing programmatic and policy decisions. However, these findings on refugees and asylum seekers in the US may not reflect the experience in other receiving countries. Collaboration with other researchers across continents is required to provide a much needed, more complete picture of torture

  5. One-step lowrank wave extrapolation

    KAUST Repository

    Sindi, Ghada Atif

    2014-01-01

    Wavefield extrapolation is at the heart of modeling, imaging, and Full waveform inversion. Spectral methods gained well deserved attention due to their dispersion free solutions and their natural handling of anisotropic media. We propose a scheme a modified one-step lowrank wave extrapolation using Shanks transform in isotropic, and anisotropic media. Specifically, we utilize a velocity gradient term to add to the accuracy of the phase approximation function in the spectral implementation. With the higher accuracy, we can utilize larger time steps and make the extrapolation more efficient. Applications to models with strong inhomogeneity and considerable anisotropy demonstrates the utility of the approach.

  6. 'Steps in the learning Process'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Kyung Mo; Cheung, Hwan

    1984-01-01

    The process by which a student learns is extremely complicated. Whether he is simply learning facts, laws or formulae, changing his values or mastering a skill the way in which his brain functions is impossible to describe. The idea of learning domains is put forward not to explain in biological terms what happens in the brain but simply to attempt to break the system down into simpler units so that the learning process can be organized in an easier, more systematic way. In the most commonly used description of this process, the one described by BLOOM, this is BLOOM's Taxonomy. In addition to, I'd like to compare with the work of Lewis (Levels of Knowledge and Understanding). As a result, let us discuss about the most effective method in teaching in order to supply high-quality education

  7. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  8. Acomparative Study Comparing Low-dose Step-up Versus Step-down in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Resistant to Clomiphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Peivandi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS is one of the most common cause of infertility in women. clomiphene is the first line of treatment. however 20% of patients are resistant to clomiphene. because of follicular hypersensitivity to gonadotropins in pcod, multiple follicular growth and development occurs which is cause of OHSS and multiple pregnancy. Our aim of this random and clinical study was comparation between step-down and low dose step-up methods for induction ovulation in clomiphene resistant. Methods: 60 cases were included 30 women in low-dose step-up group and 30 women in step-down group. In low-dose step-up HMG 75u/d and in step-down HMG 225u/d was started on 3th days of cycle, monitoring with vaginal sonography was done on 8th days of cycle. When follicle with>14 mm in diameter was seen HMG dose was continued in low-dose step-up and was decreased in step-down group. When follicle reached to 18mm in diameter, amp HCG 10000 unit was injected and IUI was performed 36 hours later. Results: Number of HMG ampules, number of follicles> 14mm on the day of HCG injection and level of serum estradiol was greater in low dose step up protocol than step down protocol(p<0/0001. Ovulation rate and pregnancy rate was greater in lowdose step up group than step down group with significant difference (p<0/0001. Conclusion: Our study showed that low-dose step-up regimen with HMG is effective for stimulating ovulation and clinical pregnancy but in view of monofollicular growth, the step down method was more effective and safe. In our study multifolliular growth in step-up method was higher than step-down method. We can predict possibility of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome syndrome in highly sensitive PCOS patients.

  9. Steps to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The recent increase in oil prices will undoubtedly cause the pace at which nuclear power is introduced in developing countries to quicken in the next decade, with many new countries beginning to plan nuclear power programmes. The guidebook is intended for senior government officials, policy makers, economic and power planners, educationalists and economists. It assumes that the reader has relatively little knowledge of nuclear power systems or of nuclear physics but does have a general technical or management background. Nuclear power is described functionally from the point of view of an alternative energy source in power system expansion. The guidebook is based on an idealized approach. Variations on it are naturally possible and will doubtless be necessary in view of the different organizational structures that already exist in different countries. In particular, some countries may prefer an approach with a stronger involvement of their Atomic Energy Commission or Authority, for which this guidebook has foreseen mainly a regulatory and licensing role. It is intended to update this booklet as more experience becomes available. Supplementary guidebooks will be prepared on certain major topics, such as contracting for fuel supply and fuel cycle requirements, which the present book does not go into very deeply

  10. A Ten-Step Process for Developing Teaching Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Geoffrey; Heslup, Simon; Kurth, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum design and implementation can be a daunting process. Questions quickly arise, such as who is qualified to design the curriculum and how do these people begin the design process. According to Graves (2008), in many contexts the design of the curriculum and the implementation of the curricular product are considered to be two mutually…

  11. HTSC-Josephson step contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, K.

    1994-03-01

    In this work the properties of josephson step contacts are investigated. After a short introduction into Josephson step contacts the structure, properties and the Josphson contacts of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x high-T c superconductors is presented. The fabrication of HTSC step contacts and the microstructure is discussed. The electric properties of these contacts are measured together with the Josephson emission and the magnetic field dependence. The temperature dependence of the stationary transport properties is given. (WL)

  12. The ATLAS FTK Auxiliary Card: A Highly Functional VME Rear Transition Module for a Hardware Track Finding Processing Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Alison, John; The ATLAS collaboration; Bogdan, Mircea; Bryant, Patrick; Cheng, Yangyang; Krizka, Karol; Shochet, Mel; Tompkins, Lauren; Webster, Jordan S

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Fast TracKer is a hardware-based charged particle track finder for the High Level Trigger system of the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC. Using a multi-component system, it finds charged particle trajectories of 1 GeV/c and greater using data from the full ATLAS silicon tracking detectors at a rate of 100 kHz. Pattern recognition and preliminary track fitting are performed by VME Processing Units consisting of an Associative Memory Board containing custom associative memory chips for pattern recognition, and the Auxiliary Card (AUX), a powerful rear transition module which formats the data for pattern recognition and performs linearized fits on track candidates. We report on the design and testing of the AUX, which utilizes six FPGAs to process up to 32 Gbps of hit data, as well as fit the helical trajectory of one track candidate per nanosecond through a highly parallel track fitting architecture. Both the board and firmware design will be discussed, as well as the performance observed in tests at CERN ...

  13. The NIST Step Class Library (Step Into the Future)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Figure 6. Excerpt from a STEP exclange file based on the Geometry model 1be NIST STEP Class Libary Page 13 An issue of concern in this...Scheifler, R., Gettys, J., and Newman, P., X Window System: C Library and Protocol Reference. Digital Press, Bedford, Mass, 1988. [Schenck90] Schenck, D

  14. Step-by-Step Visual Manuals: Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    The types of handouts and manuals that are used in technology training vary. Some describe procedures in a narrative way without graphics; some employ step-by-step instructions with screen captures. According to Thirlway (1994), a training manual should be like a tutor that permits a student to learn at his own pace and gives him confidence for…

  15. On the Convexity of Step out - Step in Sequencing Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musegaas, Marieke; Borm, Peter; Quant, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    The main result of this paper is the convexity of Step out - Step in (SoSi) sequencing games, a class of relaxed sequencing games first analyzed by Musegaas, Borm, and Quant (2015). The proof makes use of a polynomial time algorithm determining the value and an optimal processing order for an

  16. Valve cam design using numerical step-by-step method

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Bakhracheva, Yuliya; Kabore, Ousman; Zelenskiy, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    This article studies the numerical step-by-step method of cam profile design. The results of the study are used for designing the internal combustion engine valve gear. This method allows to profile the peak efficiency of cams in view of many restrictions, connected with valve gear serviceability and reliability.

  17. The bounded proof property via step algebras and step frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezhanishvili, N.; Ghilardi, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    We develop a semantic criterion for a specific rule-based calculus Ax axiomatizing a given logic L to have the so-called bounded proof property. This property is a kind of an analytic subformula property limiting the proof search space. Our main tools are one-step frames and one-step algebras. These

  18. Leading Change Step-by-Step: Tactics, Tools, and Tales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Jody

    2010-01-01

    "Leading Change Step-by-Step" offers a comprehensive and tactical guide for change leaders. Spiro's approach has been field-tested for more than a decade and proven effective in a wide variety of public sector organizations including K-12 schools, universities, international agencies and non-profits. The book is filled with proven tactics for…

  19. One-step fabrication of multifunctional micromotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenlong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y.

    2015-08-01

    Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications.Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Videos S1-S4 and Fig. S1-S3. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03574k

  20. Sexual Health Care, Sexual Behaviors and Functioning, and Female Genital Cutting: Perspectives From Somali Women Living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jennifer Jo; Hunt, Shanda; Finsaas, Megan; Ciesinski, Amanda; Ahmed, Amira; Robinson, Beatrice Bean E

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the sexual values, attitudes, and behaviors of 30 Somali female refugees living in a large metropolitan area of Minnesota by collecting exploratory sexual health information based on the components of the sexual health model-components posited to be essential aspects of healthy human sexuality. A Somali-born bilingual interviewer conducted the semistructured interviews in English or Somali; 22 participants chose to be interviewed in Somali. Interviews were translated, transcribed, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analyses. Our study findings highlighted a sexually conservative culture that values sexual intimacy, female and male sexual pleasure, and privacy in marriage; vaginal sexual intercourse as the only sanctioned sexual behavior; and the importance of Islamic religion in guiding sexual practices. Findings related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) revealed HIV testing at immigration, mixed attitudes toward condom use, and moderate knowledge about HIV transmission modes. Female genital cutting (FGC) was a pervasive factor affecting sexual functioning in Somali women, with attitudes about the controversial practice in transition. We recommend that health professionals take the initiative to discuss sexual health care and safer sex, sexual behaviors/functioning, and likely challenges to sexual health with Somali women--as they may be unlikely to broach these subjects without permission and considerable encouragement.

  1. Efficiency of Executive Function: A Two-Generation Cross-Cultural Comparison of Samples From Hong Kong and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefson, Michelle R; Ng, Florrie Fei-Yin; Wang, Qian; Hughes, Claire

    2017-05-01

    Although Asian preschoolers acquire executive functions (EFs) earlier than their Western counterparts, little is known about whether this advantage persists into later childhood and adulthood. To address this gap, in the current study we gave four computerized EF tasks (providing measures of inhibition, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and planning) to a large sample ( n = 1,427) of 9- to 16-year-olds and their parents. All participants lived in either the United Kingdom or Hong Kong. Our findings highlight the importance of combining developmental and cultural perspectives and show both similarities and contrasts across sites. Specifically, adults' EF performance did not differ between the two sites; age-related changes in executive function for both the children and the parents appeared to be culturally invariant, as did a modest intergenerational correlation. In contrast, school-age children and young adolescents in Hong Kong outperformed their United Kingdom counterparts on all four EF tasks, a difference consistent with previous findings from preschool children.

  2. Extra cogeneration step seen boosting output 20%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, P.

    1984-10-08

    Cogenerators can now buy a prototype 6.5 MW, pre-packaged cogeneration system that incorporates an added step to its cycle to reduce fuel use by 21%. Larger, custom-designed systems will be on the market in 1985. Fayette Manufacturing Co. will offer the Kalina Cycle system at a discount price of $8.2 million (1200/kW) until the systems are competitive with conventional units. The system varies from conventional cogeneration systems by adding a distillation step, which permits the use of two fluids for the turbine steam and operates at a higher thermodynamic efficiency, with boiling occuring at high temperature and low pressure. Although theoretically correct, DOE will withhold judgment on the system's efficiency until the first installation is operating.

  3. A small step for mankind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, C.; Koymans, R.L.C.; Kuiper, R.; Dams, D.; Hannemann, U.; Steffen, M.

    2010-01-01

    For many programming languages, the only formal semantics published is an SOS big-step semantics. Such a semantics is not suited for investigations that observe intermediate states, such as invariant techniques. In this paper, a construction is proposed that generates automatically a small-step SOS

  4. Grief: Difficult Times, Simple Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Emily Lane

    This guide presents techniques to assist others in coping with the loss of a loved one. Using the language of 9 layperson, the book contains more than 100 tips for caregivers or loved ones. A simple step is presented on each page, followed by reasons and instructions for each step. Chapters include: "What to Say"; "Helpful Things to Do"; "Dealing…

  5. The acceptance of functional foods in Denmark, Finland and the United States: A study of consumers' conjoint evaluations of the qualities of functional foods and perceptions of general health factors and cultural values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.; Poulsen, Jacob

    2001-01-01

    1. Functional foods is a relatively new concept covering food products enriched with various kinds of (natural) substances (eg vitamins, minerals or probiotic cultures) or modified so as to provide consumers with an additional physiological benefit presumed to prevent disease or promote health......; another explanation may be differences in cultural values, which possibly lead to different associations between wholesomeness and other quality aspects, such as taste, convenience and method of processing. 4. Using conjoint analysis and survey questions (n=1500), the aim of the study presented...... in this paper is to investigate whether there are differences in the acceptance of functional foods in Denmark, Finland and the United States, and to which extent they are related to differences in consumers' nutritional knowledge, health associations and cultural values. The general results of the study...

  6. Preparation for Compensatory Forward Stepping in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laurie A.; St George, Rebecca J.; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To characterize preparation for compensatory stepping in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared with healthy control subjects, and to determine whether levodopa medication improves preparation or the execution phases of the step. Design Observational study. Setting Outpatient neuroscience laboratory. Participants Nineteen participants with idiopathic PD tested both in the on and off levodopa states and 17 healthy subjects. Intervention Moveable platform with posterior translations of 24cm at 56cm/s. Main Outcome Measures Compensatory steps forward, in response to a backward surface translation (24cm amplitude at 56cm/s), were categorized according to the presence of an anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) before stepping: no APA, single APA, or multiple APAs. The following step parameters were calculated: step latency, step length, center of mass (CoM) average velocity, and CoM displacement at the step initiation. Results Lateral APAs were evident in 57% and 42% of trials for people with PD in the off and on medication states, respectively, compared with only 10% of trials for control subjects. Compared with subjects with PD who did not have APAs, those subjects with PD who did make an APA prior to stepping had significantly later (mean ± SEM, 356 ± 16ms vs 305 ± 8ms) and shorter (mean ± SEM, 251 ± 27mm vs 300 ± 16mm) steps, their CoM was significantly farther forward (185 ± 7mm vs 171 ± 5mm) at foot-off, and they took significantly more steps to regain equilibrium. Levodopa did not affect the preparation or execution phase of compensatory stepping. Poor axial scores and reports of freezing in the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale were associated with use of 1 or more APAs before compensatory stepping. Conclusions Lateral postural preparation prior to compensatory stepping in subjects with PD was associated with inefficient balance recovery from external perturbations. PMID:20801249

  7. Highly functionalized organic nitrates in the southeast United States: Contribution to secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ben H.; Mohr, Claudia; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Lutz, Anna; Hallquist, Mattias; Lee, Lance; Romer, Paul; Cohen, Ronald C.; Iyer, Siddharth; Kurtén, Theo; Hu, Weiwei; Day, Douglas A.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga Lee; Guo, Hongyu; Weber, Rodney J.; Wild, Robert J.; Brown, Steven S.; Koss, Abigail; de Gouw, Joost; Olson, Kevin; Goldstein, Allen H.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; McAvey, Kevin; Shepson, Paul B.; Starn, Tim; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S.; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Miller, David O.; Brune, William; Schobesberger, Siegfried; D' Ambro, Emma L.; Thornton, Joel A.

    2016-01-25

    Organic nitrates (ON = RONO2 + RO2NO2) are an important reservoir, if not sink, of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2). ON formed from isoprene oxidation alone are responsible for the export of 8 to 30% of anthropogenic NOx out of the U.S. continental boundary layer [Horowitz et al., 1998; Liang et al., 1998]. Regional NOx budgets and tropospheric ozone (O3) production, are therefore particularly sensitive to uncertainties in the yields and fates of ON [Beaver et al., 2012; Browne et al., 2013]. The yields implemented in modeling studies are determined from laboratory experiments in which only a few of the first generation gaseous ON or the total gas and particle-phase ON have been quantified [Perring et al., 2013 and references therein], while production of highly functionalized ON capable of strongly partitioning to the particle-phase have been inferred [Farmer et al., 2010; Ng et al., 2007; Nguyen et al., 2011; Perraud et al., 2012; Rollins et al., 2012], or directly measured [Ehn et al., 2014]. Addition of a nitrate (–ONO2) functional group to a hydrocarbon is estimated to lower the equilibrium saturation vapor pressure by 2.5 to 3 orders of magnitude [e.g. Capouet and Muller, 2006]. Thus, organic nitrate formation can potentially enhance particle-phase partitioning of hydrocarbons in regions with elevated levels of nitrogen oxides, contributing to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation [Ng et al., 2007]. There has, however, been no high time-resolved measurements of speciated ON in the particle-phase. We utilize a newly developed high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) using Iodide-adduct ionization [B H Lee et al., 2014a] with a filter inlet for gases and aerosols (FIGAERO) [Lopez-Hilfiker et al., 2014] that allows alternating in situ measurement of the molecular composition of gas and particle phases. We present observations of speciated ON in the particle-phase obtained during the 2013 Southern Oxidant

  8. Microprocessor controller for stepping motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, B.G.; Thuot, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for digital computer control of multiple stepping motors which operate in a severe electromagnetic pulse environment is presented. The motors position mirrors in the beam-alignment system of a 100-kJ CO 2 laser. An asynchronous communications channel of a computer is used to send coded messages, containing the motor address and stepping-command information, to the stepping-motor controller in a bit serial format over a fiber-optics communications link. The addressed controller responds by transmitting to the computer its address and other motor information, thus confirming the received message. Each controller is capable of controlling three stepping motors. The controller contains the fiber-optics interface, a microprocessor, and the stepping-motor driven circuits. The microprocessor program, which resides in an EPROM, decodes the received messages, transmits responses, performs the stepping-motor sequence logic, maintains motor-position information, and monitors the motor's reference switch. For multiple stepping-motor application, the controllers are connected in a daisy chain providing control of many motors from one asynchronous communications channel of the computer

  9. The Effects of Kangaroo Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit on the Physiological Functions of Preterm Infants, Maternal-Infant Attachment, and Maternal Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun-Sook; Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kwon, Myung Soon; Cho, Haeryun; Kim, Eun Hye; Jun, Eun Mi; Lee, Sunhee

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effects of kangaroo care on the physiological functions of preterm infants, maternal-infant attachment, and maternal stress. For this study, a quasi-experiment design was used with a nonequivalent control group, and a pre- and post-test. Data were collected from preterm infants with corrected gestational ages of ≥33weeks who were hospitalized between May and October 2011. Twenty infants were assigned to the experimental group and 20 to the control group. As an intervention, kangaroo care was provided in 30-min sessions conducted thrice a week for a total of 10 times. The collected data were analyzed by using the t test, repeated-measures ANOVA, and the ANCOVA test. After kangaroo care, the respiration rate significantly differed between the two groups (F=5.701, p=.020). The experimental group had higher maternal-infant attachment scores (F=25.881, pinfant physiological functions such as respiration rate, increasing maternal-infant attachment, and reducing maternal stress. This study suggests that kangaroo care can be used to promote emotional bonding and support between mothers and their babies, and to stabilize the physiological functions of premature babies. Kangaroo care may be one of the most effective nursing interventions in the neonatal intensive care unit for the care of preterm infants and their mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitochondrial Function in an In Vitro Model of Skeletal Muscle of Patients With Protracted Critical Illness and Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiroutková, Kateřina; Krajčová, Adéla; Žiak, Jakub; Fric, Michal; Gojda, Jan; Džupa, Valér; Kalous, Martin; Tůmová, Jana; Trnka, Jan; Duška, František

    2017-09-01

    Functional mitochondria in skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness and intensive care unit-acquired weakness are depleted, but remaining mitochondria have increased functional capacities of respiratory complexes II and III. This can be an adaptation to relative abundancy of fatty acid over glucose caused by insulin resistance. We hypothesized that the capacity of muscle mitochondria to oxidize fatty acid is increased in protracted critical illness. We assessed fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and mitochondrial functional indices in vitro by using extracellular flux analysis in cultured myotubes obtained by isolating and culturing satellite cells from vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples from patients with ICU-acquired weakness (n = 6) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 7). Bioenergetic measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 days of exposure to free fatty acids (FFAs). Mitochondrial density in myotubes from ICU patients was 69% of healthy controls ( P = .051). After adjustment to mitochondrial content, there were no differences in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or the capacity and coupling of the respiratory chain. FAO capacity in ICU patients was 157% of FAO capacity in controls ( P = .015). In myotubes of ICU patients, unlike healthy controls, the exposure to FFA significantly ( P = .009) increased maximum respiratory chain capacity. In an in vitro model of skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness, we have shown signs of adaptation to increased FAO. Even in the presence of glucose and insulin, elevation of FFAs in the extracellular environment increased maximal capacity of the respiratory chain.

  11. Optimization Solutions for Improving the Performance of the Parallel Reduction Algorithm Using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion LUNGU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we research, analyze and develop optimization solutions for the parallel reduction function using graphics processing units (GPUs that implement the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA, a modern and novel approach for improving the software performance of data processing applications and algorithms. Many of these applications and algorithms make use of the reduction function in their computational steps. After having designed the function and its algorithmic steps in CUDA, we have progressively developed and implemented optimization solutions for the reduction function. In order to confirm, test and evaluate the solutions' efficiency, we have developed a custom tailored benchmark suite. We have analyzed the obtained experimental results regarding: the comparison of the execution time and bandwidth when using graphic processing units covering the main CUDA architectures (Tesla GT200, Fermi GF100, Kepler GK104 and a central processing unit; the data type influence; the binary operator's influence.

  12. Step sites in syngas catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2006-01-01

    Step sites play an important role in many catalytic reactions. This paper reviews recent results on metal catalysts for syngas reactions with emphasis on steam reforming. Modern characterization techniques (STEM, HREM...) and theoretical calculations (DFT) has allowed a more quantitative explanat......Step sites play an important role in many catalytic reactions. This paper reviews recent results on metal catalysts for syngas reactions with emphasis on steam reforming. Modern characterization techniques (STEM, HREM...) and theoretical calculations (DFT) has allowed a more quantitative...... explanation of the impact of step sites on catalyst activity and side reactions such as carbon formation. This leads to a discussion of principles for catalyst promotion....

  13. Self Blocking of CO Dissociation on a Stepped Ruthenium Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm; Johansson, Martin; Mowbray, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    The influence of steps on CO reactions has been studied on a Ru(0 1 (1) over bar 5 4) single crystal with a step density of 4%. Based on temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and oxygen titration experiments as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that the CO dissociation...

  14. The primary steps of photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, G.R.; Van Grondelle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The two important initial steps of photosynthesis-electron transfer and energy transfer occur with great speed and efficiency. New techniques in laser optics and genetic engineering age helping us to understand why. (author). 24 refs. 8 figs

  15. 7 Steps to Aging Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section 7 Steps to Aging Well Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute on Aging is a publication from NIA that has strength, ...

  16. Alternative Procedure of Heat Integration Tehnique Election between Two Unit Processes to Improve Energy Saving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, S. S.; Renanto; Altway, A.

    2018-01-01

    The energy use system in a production process, in this case heat exchangers networks (HENs), is one element that plays a role in the smoothness and sustainability of the industry itself. Optimizing Heat Exchanger Networks (HENs) from process streams can have a major effect on the economic value of an industry as a whole. So the solving of design problems with heat integration becomes an important requirement. In a plant, heat integration can be carried out internally or in combination between process units. However, steps in the determination of suitable heat integration techniques require long calculations and require a long time. In this paper, we propose an alternative step in determining heat integration technique by investigating 6 hypothetical units using Pinch Analysis approach with objective function energy target and total annual cost target. The six hypothetical units consist of units A, B, C, D, E, and F, where each unit has the location of different process streams to the temperature pinch. The result is a potential heat integration (ΔH’) formula that can trim conventional steps from 7 steps to just 3 steps. While the determination of the preferred heat integration technique is to calculate the potential of heat integration (ΔH’) between the hypothetical process units. Completion of calculation using matlab language programming.

  17. On the Equivalence between Small-Step and Big-Step Abstract Machines: A Simple Application of Lightweight Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Millikin, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    -step specification. We illustrate this observation here with a recognizer for Dyck words, the CEK machine, and Krivine's machine with call/cc. The need for such a simple proof is motivated by our current work on small-step abstract machines as obtained by refocusing a function implementing a reduction semantics (a...

  18. A consideration of the functional fixation hypothesis, and the effects of accounting data on managerial decision-making in the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.

    1980-01-01

    The study involves the application of the functional fixation hypothesis, developed by psychology researchers, to accounting. In this context one is concerned with the effect of previous experience with accounting reports, which may condition an individual to assign meanings to accounting outputs according to the label used, regardless of the accounting methods employed. The study then proceeds to look at its effects on the aggregate of investors comprising the capital market. The study then concentrates on the effects of fixation on managers in the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. Managers from two establishments, divided into four experimental groups made decisions on two case studies, which differed only in the accounting method used, and which provided sufficient footnote information to allow conversion to the other method. Differences in decisions were measured, the results showing that, to varying degrees, managers were fixated with 'total costs' and that those who had greater experience of using reports for a variety of decisions, over a period of time, tended to be less fixated and more likely to adjust the numbers presented, where appropriate. Resource allocation appeared to be influenced by changes in overhead allocation procedures. Finally the specific implications of the results to management accounting and to accounting in the Authority are considered, and the importance of producing accounting reports which accurately model reality and which are decision-orientated is stressed, as is the need to break down restricting functional barriers. (author)

  19. Microsoft® Office Access™ 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, Steve; Lambert, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to build database solutions with Access 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build databases from scratch or from templatesExchange data with other databases and Office documentsCreate forms to simplify data entryUse filters and queries to find and analyze informationDesign rich reports that help make your data meaningfulHelp prevent data corruption and unauthorized access Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Files for building skills and practic

  20. Microsoft Windows Sharepoint Services 3.0 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Londer, Olga; Bleeker, Todd; Coventry, Penelope

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Windows SharePoint Services to enable effective team collaboration. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build your own SharePoint site with easy-to-use templatesCreate lists and libraries to store informationAdd discussion boards, wikis, and blogsSet up Document and Meeting Workspaces for easy collaborationShare calendars, contacts, and data from Microsoft Office programsCustomize your pages with Web Parts Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Fi

  1. Linear, Step by Step Managerial Performance, versus Exponential Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George MOLDOVEANU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes the transition from the potential management concept, which its authors approached by determining its dimension (Roşca, Moldoveanu, 2009b, to the linear, step by step performance concept, as an objective result of management process. In this way, we “answer” the theorists and practitioners, who support exponential management performance. The authors, as detractors of the exponential performance, are influenced by the current crisis (Roşca, Moldoveanu, 2009a, by the lack of organizational excellence in many companies, particularly in Romanian ones and also reaching “the finality” in the evolved companies, developed into an uncontrollable speed.

  2. Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Coventry, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    The smart way to learn Office SharePoint Designer 2007-one step at a time! Work at your own pace through the easy numbered steps, practice files on CD, helpful hints, and troubleshooting tips to master the fundamentals of building customized SharePoint sites and applications. You'll learn how to work with Windows® SharePoint Services 3.0 and Office SharePoint Server 2007 to create Web pages complete with Cascading Style Sheets, Lists, Libraries, and customized Web parts. Then, make your site really work for you by adding data sources, including databases, XML data and Web services, and RSS fe

  3. A step-by-step methodology for enterprise interoperability projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmeta, Ricardo; Pazos, Verónica

    2015-05-01

    Enterprise interoperability is one of the key factors for enhancing enterprise competitiveness. Achieving enterprise interoperability is an extremely complex process which involves different technological, human and organisational elements. In this paper we present a framework to help enterprise interoperability. The framework has been developed taking into account the three domains of interoperability: Enterprise Modelling, Architecture and Platform and Ontologies. The main novelty of the framework in comparison to existing ones is that it includes a step-by-step methodology that explains how to carry out an enterprise interoperability project taking into account different interoperability views, like business, process, human resources, technology, knowledge and semantics.

  4. One step beyond: Different step-to-step transitions exist during continuous contact brachiation in siamangs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fana Michilsens

    2012-02-01

    In brachiation, two main gaits are distinguished, ricochetal brachiation and continuous contact brachiation. During ricochetal brachiation, a flight phase exists and the body centre of mass (bCOM describes a parabolic trajectory. For continuous contact brachiation, where at least one hand is always in contact with the substrate, we showed in an earlier paper that four step-to-step transition types occur. We referred to these as a ‘point’, a ‘loop’, a ‘backward pendulum’ and a ‘parabolic’ transition. Only the first two transition types have previously been mentioned in the existing literature on gibbon brachiation. In the current study, we used three-dimensional video and force analysis to describe and characterize these four step-to-step transition types. Results show that, although individual preference occurs, the brachiation strides characterized by each transition type are mainly associated with speed. Yet, these four transitions seem to form a continuum rather than four distinct types. Energy recovery and collision fraction are used as estimators of mechanical efficiency of brachiation and, remarkably, these parameters do not differ between strides with different transition types. All strides show high energy recoveries (mean  = 70±11.4% and low collision fractions (mean  = 0.2±0.13, regardless of the step-to-step transition type used. We conclude that siamangs have efficient means of modifying locomotor speed during continuous contact brachiation by choosing particular step-to-step transition types, which all minimize collision fraction and enhance energy recovery.

  5. High accuracy step gauge interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byman, V.; Jaakkola, T.; Palosuo, I.; Lassila, A.

    2018-05-01

    Step gauges are convenient transfer standards for the calibration of coordinate measuring machines. A novel interferometer for step gauge calibrations implemented at VTT MIKES is described. The four-pass interferometer follows Abbe’s principle and measures the position of the inductive probe attached to a measuring head. The measuring head of the instrument is connected to a balanced boom above the carriage by a piezo translation stage. A key part of the measuring head is an invar structure on which the inductive probe and the corner cubes of the measuring arm of the interferometer are attached. The invar structure can be elevated so that the probe is raised without breaking the laser beam. During probing, the bending of the probe and the interferometer readings are recorded and the measurement face position is extrapolated to zero force. The measurement process is fully automated and the face positions of the steps can be measured up to a length of 2 m. Ambient conditions are measured continuously and the refractive index of air is compensated for. Before measurements the step gauge is aligned with an integrated 2D coordinate measuring system. The expanded uncertainty of step gauge calibration is U=\\sqrt{{{(64 nm)}2}+{{(88× {{10}-9}L)}2}} .

  6. FIRST STEP towards ICF commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saylor, W.W.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Production of tritium for weapons and fusion R and D programs and successful development of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) technologies are important national goals. A conceptual design for an ICF facility to meet these goals is presented. FIRST STEP (Fusion, Inertial, Reduced-Requirements Systems Test for Special Nuclear Material, Tritium, and Energy Production) is a concept for a plant to produce SNM, tritium, and energy while serving as a test bed for ICF technology development. A credible conceptual design for an ICF SNM and tritium production facility that competes favorably with fission technology on the bases of cost, production quality, and safety was sought. FIRST STEP is also designed to be an engineering test facility that integrates systems required for an ICF power plant and that is intermediate in scale between proof-of-principle experiment and commercial power plant. FIRST STEP driver and pellet performance requirements are moderate and represent reasonable intermediate goals in an R and D plan for ICF commercialization. Repetition rate requirements for FIRST STEP are similar to those of commercial size plants and FIRST STEP can be used to integrate systems under realistic ICF conditions

  7. Microcontroller Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulaev, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    The general purpose micro controller unit based on 8-bit single-chip microcomputer of the MCS-51 family is described. The controller has the data and program memories, a serial interface and an external bus for functional I/O extensions. The controller consists of a microcomputer chip, up to 4 ROM-RAM chips and 10 SSI and MSI chips, and it measures 160x120 mm. Both hardware and software micro system debugging tools are described. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. From raw material to dish: pasta quality step by step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicignano, Angelo; Di Monaco, Rossella; Masi, Paolo; Cavella, Silvana

    2015-10-01

    Pasta is a traditional Italian cereal-based food that is popular worldwide because of its convenience, versatility, sensory and nutritional value. The aim of this review is to present a step-by-step guide to facilitate the understanding of the most important events that can affect pasta characteristics, directing the reader to the appropriate production steps. Owing to its unique flavor, color, composition and rheological properties, durum wheat semolina is the best raw material for pasta production. Although pasta is traditionally made from only two ingredients, sensory quality and chemical/physical characteristics of the final product may vary greatly. Starting from the same ingredients, there are a lot of different events in each step of pasta production that can result in the development of varieties of pasta with different characteristics. In particular, numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of temperature and humidity conditions of the pasta drying operation as well as the significance of the choice of raw material and operating conditions on pasta quality. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Step by step parallel programming method for molecular dynamics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orii, Shigeo; Ohta, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    Parallel programming for a numerical simulation program of molecular dynamics is carried out with a step-by-step programming technique using the two phase method. As a result, within the range of a certain computing parameters, it is found to obtain parallel performance by using the level of parallel programming which decomposes the calculation according to indices of do-loops into each processor on the vector parallel computer VPP500 and the scalar parallel computer Paragon. It is also found that VPP500 shows parallel performance in wider range computing parameters. The reason is that the time cost of the program parts, which can not be reduced by the do-loop level of the parallel programming, can be reduced to the negligible level by the vectorization. After that, the time consuming parts of the program are concentrated on less parts that can be accelerated by the do-loop level of the parallel programming. This report shows the step-by-step parallel programming method and the parallel performance of the molecular dynamics code on VPP500 and Paragon. (author)

  10. One step versus two step approach for gestational diabetes screening: systematic review and meta-analysis of the randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Caissutti, Claudia; Khalifeh, Adeeb; Meltzer, Sara; Scifres, Christina; Simhan, Hyagriv N; Kelekci, Sefa; Sevket, Osman; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2017-12-03

    To compare both the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as well as maternal and neonatal outcomes by either the one-step or the two-step approaches. Electronic databases were searched from their inception until June 2017. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the one-step with the two-step approaches for the screening and diagnosis of GDM. The primary outcome was the incidence of GDM. Three RCTs (n = 2333 participants) were included in the meta-analysis. 910 were randomized to the one step approach (75 g, 2 hrs), and 1423 to the two step approach. No significant difference in the incidence of GDM was found comparing the one step versus the two step approaches (8.4 versus 4.3%; relative risk (RR) 1.64, 95%CI 0.77-3.48). Women screened with the one step approach had a significantly lower risk of preterm birth (PTB) (3.7 versus 7.6%; RR 0.49, 95%CI 0.27-0.88), cesarean delivery (16.3 versus 22.0%; RR 0.74, 95%CI 0.56-0.99), macrosomia (2.9 versus 6.9%; RR 0.43, 95%CI 0.22-0.82), neonatal hypoglycemia (1.7 versus 4.5%; RR 0.38, 95%CI 0.16-0.90), and admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (4.4 versus 9.0%; RR 0.49, 95%CI 0.29-0.84), compared to those randomized to screening with the two step approach. The one and the two step approaches were not associated with a significant difference in the incidence of GDM. However, the one step approach was associated with better maternal and perinatal outcomes.

  11. One decade of functional imaging in schizophrenia research. From visualisation of basic information processing steps to molecular brain imaging; Zehn Jahre funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie in der Schizophrenieforschung. Von der Abbildung einfacher Informationsverarbeitungsprozesse zur molekulargenetisch orientierten Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tost, H. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie (Germany); Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer-Lindenberg, A. [Genes, Neuroimaging Core Facility and Unit on Integrative Neuroimaging, Cognition and Psychosis Program, National Institute of Mental Health (United States); Ruf, M.; Demirakca, T.; Grimm, O.; Henn, F.A.; Ende, G. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, NMR-Forschung in der Psychiatrie (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have contributed tremendously to our current understanding of psychiatric disorders in the context of functional, biochemical and microstructural alterations of the brain. Since the mid-nineties, functional MRI has provided major insights into the neurobiological correlates of signs and symptoms in schizophrenia. The current paper reviews important fMRI studies of the past decade in the domains of motor, visual, auditory, attentional and working memory function. Special emphasis is given to new methodological approaches, such as the visualisation of medication effects and the functional characterisation of risk genes. (orig.) [German] Bildgebende Verfahren wie die Magnetresonanz- und Positronenemissionstomographie haben entscheidend dazu beigetragen, dass psychiatrische Erkrankungen heutzutage im Kontext funktioneller, biochemischer und feinstruktureller Veraenderungen des Gehirns verstanden werden. Im Bereich der Schizophrenieforschung gibt insbesondere die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie seit Mitte der 90er-Jahre wichtige Einblicke in die neurobiologischen Grundlagen schizophrener Defizitbereiche. Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt die wichtigsten fMRT-Befunde der letzten Dekade in den Bereichen Psychomotorik, visuelle bzw. akustische Informationsverarbeitung, Aufmerksamkeit und Arbeitsgedaechtnis vor. Die Betrachtung erfolgt dabei unter der besonderen Beruecksichtigung aktueller methodischer Ansaetze wie der Darstellung von Therapieeffekten und der funktionellen Charakterisierung psychiatrischer Risikogene. (orig.)

  12. Exploring differential item functioning (DIF) with the Rasch model: A comparison of gender differences on eighth-grade science items in the United States and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Tasha

    Despite the attention that has been given to gender and science, boys continue to outperform girls in science achievement, particularly by the end of secondary school. Because it is unclear whether gender differences have narrowed over time (Leder, 1992; Willingham & Cole, 1997), it is important to continue a line of inquiry into the nature of gender differences, specifically at the international level. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in science achievement across two countries: United States and Spain. A secondary purpose was to demonstrate an alternative method for exploring gender differences based on the many-faceted Rasch model (1980). A secondary analysis of the data from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) was used to examine the relationship between gender DIF (differential item functioning) and item characteristics (item type, content, and performance expectation) across both countries. Nationally representative samples of eighth grade students in the United States and Spain who participated in TIMSS were analyzed to answer the research questions in this study. In both countries, girls showed an advantage over boys on life science items and most extended response items, whereas boys, by and large, had an advantage on earth science, physics, and chemistry items. However, even within areas that favored boys, such as physics, there were items that were differentially easier for girls. In general, patterns in gender differences were similar across both countries although there were a few differences between the countries on individual items. It was concluded that simply looking at mean differences does not provide an adequate understanding of the nature of gender differences in science achievement.

  13. Step-by-step phacoemulsification training program for ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yulan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to analyze the learning curve of phacoemulsification (phaco performed by residents without experience in performing extra-capsular cataract extraction (ECCE in a step-by-step training program (SBSTP. Materials and Methods: Consecutive surgical records of phaco performed from March 2009 to Sept 2011 by four residents without previous ECCE experience were retrospectively reviewed. The completion rate of the first 30 procedures by each resident was calculated. The main intraoperative phaco parameter records for the first 30 surgeries by each resident were compared with those for their last 30 surgeries. Intraoperative complications in the residents′ procedures were also recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 1013 surgeries were performed by residents. The completion rate for the first 30 phaco procedures was 79.2 μ 5.8%. The main reasons for halting the procedure were as follows: Anterior capsule tear, inability to crack the nucleus, and posterior capsular rupture during phaco or cortex removal. Cumulative dissipated energy of phaco power used during the surgeries was significantly less in the last 30 cases compared with the first 30 cases (30.10 μ 17.58 vs. 55.41 μ 37.59, P = 0.021. Posterior capsular rupture rate was 2.5 μ 1.2% in total (10.8 μ 4.2% in the first 30 cases and 1.7 μ 1.9% in the last 30 cases, P = 0.008; a statistically significant difference. Conclusion:The step-by-step training program might be a necessary process for a resident to transit from dependence to a self-supported operator. It is also an essential middle step between wet lab training to performing the entire phaco procedure on the patient both effectively and safely.

  14. Time step MOTA thermostat simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, G.L.

    1978-09-01

    The report details the logic, program layout, and operating procedures for the time-step MOTA (Materials Open Test Assembly) thermostat simulation program known as GYRD. It will enable prospective users to understand the operation of the program, run it, and interpret the results. The time-step simulation analysis was the approach chosen to determine the maximum value gain that could be used to minimize steady temperature offset without risking undamped thermal oscillations. The advantage of the GYRD program is that it directly shows hunting, ringing phenomenon, and similar events. Programs BITT and CYLB are faster, but do not directly show ringing time

  15. A mechanism for leader stepping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, U.; Carlson, B. E.; Koehn, C.

    2013-12-01

    The stepping of negative leaders is well observed, but not well understood. A major problem consists of the fact that the streamer corona is typically invisible within a thunderstorm, but determines the evolution of a leader. Motivated by recent observations of streamer and leader formation in the laboratory by T.M.P. Briels, S. Nijdam, P. Kochkin, A.P.J. van Deursen et al., by recent simulations of these processes by J. Teunissen, A. Sun et al., and by our theoretical understanding of the process, we suggest how laboratory phenomena can be extrapolated to lightning leaders to explain the stepping mechanism.

  16. Dynamic balance and stepping versus tai chi training to improve balance and stepping in at-risk older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnodim, Joseph O; Strasburg, Debra; Nabozny, Martina; Nyquist, Linda; Galecki, Andrzej; Chen, Shu; Alexander, Neil B

    2006-12-01

    To compare the effect of two 10-week balance training programs, Combined Balance and Step Training (CBST) versus tai chi (TC), on balance and stepping measures. Prospective intervention trial. Local senior centers and congregate housing facilities. Aged 65 and older with at least mild impairment in the ability to perform unipedal stance and tandem walk. Participants were allocated to TC (n = 107, mean age 78) or CBST, an intervention focused on improving dynamic balance and stepping (n = 106, mean age 78). At baseline and 10 weeks, participants were tested in their static balance (Unipedal Stance and Tandem Stance (TS)), stepping (Maximum Step Length, Rapid Step Test), and Timed Up and Go (TUG). Performance improved more with CBST than TC, ranging from 5% to 10% for the stepping tests (Maximum Step Length and Rapid Step Test) and 9% for TUG. The improvement in TUG represented an improvement of more than 1 second. Greater improvements were also seen in static balance ability (in TS) with CBST than TC. Of the two training programs, in which variants of each program have been proven to reduce falls, CBST results in modest improvements in balance, stepping, and functional mobility versus TC over a 10-week period. Future research should include a prospective comparison of fall rates in response to these two balance training programs.

  17. The functional role of dorso-lateral premotor cortex during mental rotation: an event-related fMRI study separating cognitive processing steps using a novel task paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Claus; Windischberger, Christian; Moser, Ewald; Bauer, Herbert

    2007-07-15

    Subjects deciding whether two objects presented at angular disparity are identical or mirror versions of each other usually show response times that linearly increase with the angle between objects. This phenomenon has been termed mental rotation. While there is widespread agreement that parietal cortex plays a dominant role in mental rotation, reports concerning the involvement of motor areas are less consistent. From a theoretical point of view, activation in motor areas suggests that mental rotation relies upon visuo-motor rather than visuo-spatial processing alone. However, the type of information that is processed by motor areas during mental rotation remains unclear. In this study we used event-related fMRI to assess whether activation in parietal and dorsolateral premotor areas (dPM) during mental rotation is distinctively related to processing spatial orientation information. Using a newly developed task paradigm we explicitly separated the processing steps (encoding, mental rotation proper and object matching) required by mental rotation tasks and additionally modulated the amount of spatial orientation information that had to be processed. Our results show that activation in dPM during mental rotation is not strongly modulated by the processing of spatial orientation information, and that activation in dPM areas is strongest during mental rotation proper. The latter finding suggests that dPM is involved in more generalized processes such as visuo-spatial attention and movement anticipation. We propose that solving mental rotation tasks is heavily dependent upon visuo-motor processes and evokes neural processing that may be considered as an implicit simulation of actual object rotation.

  18. Driver training in steps (DTS).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    For some years now, it has been possible in the Netherlands to follow a Driver Training in Steps (DTS) as well as the regular driver training. The DTS is a structured training method with clear training objectives which are categorized in four modules. Although the DTS is considerably better than

  19. Stepping out: dare to step forward, step back, or just stand still and breathe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Mary Sue

    2012-01-01

    It is important to step out and make a difference. We have one of the most unique and diverse professions that allows for diversity in thought and practice, permitting each of us to grow in our unique niches and make significant contributions. I was frightened to 'step out' to go to culinary school at the age of 46, but it changed forever the way I look at my profession and I have since experienced the most enjoyable and innovative career. There are also times when it is important to 'step back' to relish the roots of our profession; to help bring food back into nutrition; to translate all of our wonderful science into a language of food that Canadians understand. We all need to take time to 'just stand still and breathe': to celebrate our accomplishments, reflect on our actions, ensure we are heading toward our vision, keep the profession vibrant and relevant, and cherish one another.

  20. Electrochromic properties of multicolored novel polymer synthesized via combination of benzotriazole and N-functionalized 2,5-di(2-thienyl)-1H-pyrrole units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rende, Eda; Kilic, Cihan E.; Udum, Yasemin Arslan; Toffoli, Daniele; Toppare, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of new conducting polymers is desired since their electrochemical and optical properties enable them to be used as active layers in many device applications. Benzotriazole and N-functionalized 2,5-di(2-thienyl)-1H-pyrrole (SNS Series) containing polymers showed very promising results as electrochromic materials. In order to observe the effect of the combination of these two units, three new monomers; 2-(6-(2,5-bis(5-methylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)hexyl)-4,7-di (thiophen-2-yl)-2H benzo[d][1,2,3]triazole (M1), 2-(6-(2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)hexyl)-4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl) -2H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazole (M2) and 2-(6-(2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)hexyl)-4,7-bis (5-methylthiophen-2-yl)-2H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazole (M3) were synthesized. To better characterize the electronic and spectroscopic properties of the monomers, density functional theory (DFT) and its time-dependent generalization (TD-DFT) were used to calculate their vertical ionization potentials, vertical electron affinity and to simulate and interpret their infrared and UV-vis spectra. The monomers were electrochemically polymerized and the resultant polymers were characterized with cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy techniques. An electrochromic device was constructed with electrochemical polymer of M2. The device switched between red and blue colors and showed exceptional optical memory

  1. The Use of Hydrograph Analysis and Impulse Response Functions to Improve Understanding of Groundwater Flooding: A Case Study from the Chalk Aquifer, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascott, M.; Bloomfield, J.; Macdonald, D.; Marchant, B.; McKenzie, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Cretaceous Chalk, the most important aquifer in the United Kingdom (UK) for public water supply, underlies many large cities in southern and eastern England including parts of London, however, it is prone to groundwater flooding. We have developed a new approach to analyse the spatio-temporal extent of groundwater flooding using statistical analysis of groundwater level hydrographs and impulse response functions (IRFs) applied to a major Chalk groundwater flooding event in the UK during winter 2013/14. Using monthly groundwater levels for 26 boreholes in the Chalk and a new standardised index for groundwater flooding, we have: estimated standardised series; grouped them using k-means cluster analysis; and, cross-correlated the cluster centroids with the Standardised Precipitation Index accumulated over time intervals between 1 and 60 months. This analysis reveals two spatially coherent groups of standardised hydrographs which respond to precipitation over different timescales. We estimate IRF models of the groundwater level response to effective precipitation for three boreholes in each group. The IRF models support the SPI analysis showing different response functions between the two groups. If we apply identical effective precipitation inputs to each of the IRF models we see differences between the hydrographs from each group. It is proposed that these differences are due to the intrinsic, hydrogeological properties of the Chalk and of overlying relatively low permeability superficial deposits. Consequently, it is concluded that the overarching controls on groundwater flood response are a complex combination of antecedent conditions, rainfall and catchment hydrogeological properties. These controls should be taken into consideration when anticipating and managing future groundwater flood events.

  2. Physical Function After Total Knee Replacement: An Observational Study Describing Outcomes in a Small Group of Women From China and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniel K; Li, Zhichang; Zhang, Yuqing; Marmon, Adam R; Master, Hiral; Zeni, Joseph; Niu, Jingbo; Jiang, Long; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Jianhao

    2018-01-01

    To describe physical function before and six months after Total Knee Replacement (TKR) in a small sample of women from China and the United States. Observational. Community environment. Both groups adhered to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) protocols for the 6-minute walk and 30-second chair stand. We compared physical function prior to TKR and 6 months after using linear regression adjusted for covariates. Women (N=60) after TKR. Not applicable. Age and body mass index in the China group (n=30; 66y and 27.0kg/m 2 ) were similar to those in the U.S. group (n=30; 65y and 29.6kg/m 2 ). Before surgery, the China group walked 263 (95% confidence interval [CI], -309 to -219) less meters and had 10.2 (95% CI, -11.8 to -8.5) fewer chair stands than the U.S. group. At 6 months when compared with the U.S. group, the China group walked 38 more meters, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (95% CI, -1.6 to 77.4), and had 3.1 (95% CI, -4.4 to -1.7) fewer chair stands. The China group had greater improvement in the 6-minute walk test than did the U.S. group (PChina group had greater gains in walking endurance and similar gains in repeated chair stands than did the U.S. group after surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stability study in one step steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, P.

    1990-01-01

    The TWO program is presented developed for the behaviour limit calculation stable in one step steam generators for the case of Density Waves phenomenom. The program is based on a nodal model which, using Laplace transformation equations, allows to study the system's transfer functions and foresee the beginning of the unstable behaviour. This program has been satisfactorily validated against channels data uniformly heated in the range from 4.0 to 6.0 Mpa. Results on the CAREM reactor's steam generator analysis are presented. (Author) [es

  4. Personal customizing exercise with a wearable measurement and control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Kiryu, Tohru; Tamura, Naoki

    2005-06-28

    Recently, wearable technology has been used in various health-related fields to develop advanced monitoring solutions. However, the monitoring function alone cannot meet all the requirements of customizing machine-based exercise on an individual basis by relying on biosignal-based controls. We propose a new wearable unit design equipped with measurement and control functions to support the customization process. The wearable unit can measure the heart rate and electromyogram signals during exercise performance and output workload control commands to the exercise machines. The workload is continuously tracked with exercise programs set according to personally customized workload patterns and estimation results from the measured biosignals by a fuzzy control method. Exercise programs are adapted by relying on a computer workstation, which communicates with the wearable unit via wireless connections. A prototype of the wearable unit was tested together with an Internet-based cycle ergometer system to demonstrate that it is possible to customize exercise on an individual basis. We tested the wearable unit in nine people to assess its suitability to control cycle ergometer exercise. The results confirmed that the unit could successfully control the ergometer workload and continuously support gradual changes in physical activities. The design of wearable units equipped with measurement and control functions is an important step towards establishing a convenient and continuously supported wellness environment.

  5. Personal customizing exercise with a wearable measurement and control unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Naoki

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, wearable technology has been used in various health-related fields to develop advanced monitoring solutions. However, the monitoring function alone cannot meet all the requirements of customizing machine-based exercise on an individual basis by relying on biosignal-based controls. We propose a new wearable unit design equipped with measurement and control functions to support the customization process. Methods The wearable unit can measure the heart rate and electromyogram signals during exercise performance and output workload control commands to the exercise machines. The workload is continuously tracked with exercise programs set according to personally customized workload patterns and estimation results from the measured biosignals by a fuzzy control method. Exercise programs are adapted by relying on a computer workstation, which communicates with the wearable unit via wireless connections. A prototype of the wearable unit was tested together with an Internet-based cycle ergometer system to demonstrate that it is possible to customize exercise on an individual basis. Results We tested the wearable unit in nine people to assess its suitability to control cycle ergometer exercise. The results confirmed that the unit could successfully control the ergometer workload and continuously support gradual changes in physical activities. Conclusion The design of wearable units equipped with measurement and control functions is an important step towards establishing a convenient and continuously supported wellness environment.

  6. Energetics of highly kinked step edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the step edge free energy, the step edge stiffness and dimensionless inverse step edge stiffness of the highly kinked < 010> oriented step on a (001) surface of a simple square lattice within the framework of a solid-on-solid model. We have found an exact expression for the step

  7. Step Density Profiles in Localized Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roeck, Wojciech; Dhar, Abhishek; Huveneers, François; Schütz, Marius

    2017-06-01

    We consider two types of strongly disordered one-dimensional Hamiltonian systems coupled to baths (energy or particle reservoirs) at the boundaries: strongly disordered quantum spin chains and disordered classical harmonic oscillators. These systems are believed to exhibit localization, implying in particular that the conductivity decays exponentially in the chain length L. We ask however for the profile of the (very slowly) transported quantity in the steady state. We find that this profile is a step-function, jumping in the middle of the chain from the value set by the left bath to the value set by the right bath. This is confirmed by numerics on a disordered quantum spin chain of 9 spins and on much longer chains of harmonic oscillators. From theoretical arguments, we find that the width of the step grows not faster than √{L}, and we confirm this numerically for harmonic oscillators. In this case, we also observe a drastic breakdown of local equilibrium at the step, resulting in a heavily oscillating temperature profile.

  8. Foot and Ankle Kinematics During Descent From Varying Step Heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstle, Emily E; O'Connor, Kristian; Keenan, Kevin G; Cobb, Stephen C

    2017-12-01

    In the general population, one-third of incidences during step negotiation occur during the transition to level walking. Furthermore, falls during curb negotiation are a common cause of injury in older adults. Distal foot kinematics may be an important factor in determining injury risk associated with transition step negotiation. The purpose of this study was to identify foot and ankle kinematics of uninjured individuals during descent from varying step heights. A 7-segment foot model was used to quantify kinematics as participants walked on a level walkway, stepped down a single step (heights: 5 cm, 15 cm, 25 cm), and continued walking. As step height increased, landing strategy transitioned from the rearfoot to the forefoot, and the rearfoot, lateral and medial midfoot, and medial forefoot became more plantar flexed. During weight acceptance, sagittal plane range of motion of the rearfoot, lateral midfoot, and medial and lateral forefoot increased as step height increased. The changes in landing strategy and distal foot function suggest a less stable ankle position at initial contact and increased demand on the distal foot at initial contact and through the weight acceptance phase of transition step negotiation as step height increases.

  9. Alternate mutation based artificial immune algorithm for step fixed charge transportation problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Moustafa El-Sherbiny

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Step fixed charge transportation problem (SFCTP is considered as a special version of the fixed-charge transportation problem (FCTP. In SFCTP, the fixed cost is incurred for every route that is used in the solution and is proportional to the amount shipped. This cost structure causes the value of the objective function to behave like a step function. Both FCTP and SFCTP are considered to be NP-hard problems. While a lot of research has been carried out concerning FCTP, not much has been done concerning SFCTP. This paper introduces an alternate Mutation based Artificial Immune (MAI algorithm for solving SFCTPs. The proposed MAI algorithm solves both balanced and unbalanced SFCTP without introducing a dummy supplier or a dummy customer. In MAI algorithm a coding schema is designed and procedures are developed for decoding such schema and shipping units. MAI algorithm guarantees the feasibility of all the generated solutions. Due to the significant role of mutation function on the MAI algorithm’s quality, 16 mutation functions are presented and their performances are compared to select the best one. For this purpose, forty problems with different sizes have been generated at random and then a robust calibration is applied using the relative percentage deviation (RPD method. Through two illustrative problems of different sizes the performance of the MAI algorithm has been compared with most recent methods.

  10. Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs Past Issues / Fall ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  11. Examining the similarities and differences of OMERACT core sets using the ICF: first step towards an improved domain specification and development of an item pool to measure functioning and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorpizo, Reuben; Boers, Maarten; Stucki, Gerold; Boonen, Annelies

    2011-08-01

    To contribute to the discussion on a common approach for domain selection in the Outcomes in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) process. First, this article reports on the consistency in the selection and names of the domains of the current OMERACT core set, and next on the comparability of the specifications of concepts that are relevant within the domains. For this purpose, a convenience sample of 4 OMERACT core sets was used: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), longitudinal observational studies (LOS) in rheumatology, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Domains from the different core sets were compared directly. To be able to compare the specific content of the domains, the concepts contained in the questionnaires that were considered or proposed to measure the domains were identified and linked to the category of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) that best fit that construct. Large differences in the domains, and lack of domain definitions, were noted among the 4 OMERACT core sets. When comparing the concepts in the questionnaires that represent the domains, core sets differed also in the number and type of constructs that were addressed within each of the domains. Especially for the specification of the concepts within the domains Discomfort and Disability, the ICF proved to be useful as external reference to classify the different constructs. Our exercise suggests that the OMERACT process could benefit from a standardized approach to select, define, and specify domains, and demonstrated that the ICF is useful for further classification of the more specific concepts of "what to measure" within the domains. A clear definition and classification of domains and their specification can be useful as a starting point to build a pool of items that could then be used to develop new instruments to assess functioning and health for rheumatological conditions.

  12. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Evidence for the Dissociation of Carbon Monoxide on Ruthenium Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tison, Yann; Nielsen, Kenneth; Mowbray, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    –Tropsch processes under certain conditions, has been debated for years. Here, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) are used to clarify the role of monatomic steps in the splitting of CO on a stepped Ru(0 1 54) crystal, which displays alternating steps with either 4-fold or 3-fold...... symmetry. After CO doses at elevated temperatures, the STM images reveal step decorations characteristic of atomic oxygen resulting from CO dissociation on every second step. The comparison of the STM images with the results of DFT calculations shows that the step decoration occurs on the steps displaying...

  13. Determination of the step dipole moment and the step line tension on Ag(0 0 1) electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltramo, G.L.; Ibach, H.; Linke, U.; Giesen, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using impedance spectroscopy, we determined the step dipole moment and the potential dependence of the step line tension of silver electrodes in contact with an electrolyte: (0 0 1) and vicinal surfaces (1 1 n) with n = 5, 7, 11 in 10 mM ClO 4 - -solutions were investigated. The step dipole moment is determined from the shift of the potential of zero charge (pzc) as a function of the surface step density. The dipole moment per step atom was found to be 3.5 ± 0.5 x 10 -3 e A. From the pzc and the potential dependence of the capacitance curves, the potential dependence of the surface tension of the vicinal surfaces is determined. The line tension of the steps is then calculated from the difference between the surface tensions of stepped (1 1 n) and the nominally step-free (0 0 1) surfaces. The results are compared to a previous study on Au(1 1 n) surfaces. For gold, the step line tension decreases roughly linear with potential, whereas a parabolic shape is observed for silver

  14. Configurable multi-step linear feedback shift register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    The state transition of a linear feedback shift register (LFSR) controlled by a clock (310) with length N and step size W, W being at least two, is accomplished via a next-state function (320). The next-state function deploys a state transition matrix (350). The state vector (330), which represents

  15. Step-By-Step: Life Cycle Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste is an unavoidable by-product when nuclear technologies are used for electricity production and for beneficial practices in medicine, agriculture, research and industry. When the radioactivity of the waste is above a certain threshold, the waste requires special disposal methods. Through extensive research, standards and approaches have been developed for safely and securely preparing for and managing radioactive waste disposal. In the course of its journey from the point of generation to disposal, radioactive waste undergoes a number of predisposal management treatment steps to transform it into a safe, stable and manageable form suitable for transport, storage and disposal

  16. Blogging business step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2014-01-01

    This kit includes: Essential industry and business-specific startup steps with worksheets, calculators, checklists and more. Entrepreneur Editors' Start Your Own Business, a guide to starting any business and surviving the first three years. Downloadable, customizable business letters, sales letters, and other sample documents. Entrepreneur's Small Business Legal Toolkit. Blogs are still one of the internet's fastest-growing phenomena–and one of the best and easiest ways to make money online. Packed with the latest blog tools, tricks, and up-and-coming trends, this fully revised edition teache

  17. Robotic retroperitoneal partial nephrectomy: a step-by-step guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Khurshid R; Porter, James; Menon, Mani; Rogers, Craig

    2014-08-01

    To describe a step-by-step guide for successful implementation of the retroperitoneal approach to robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) PATIENTS AND METHODS: The patient is placed in the flank position and the table fully flexed to increase the space between the 12th rib and iliac crest. Access to the retroperitoneal space is obtained using a balloon-dilating device. Ports include a 12-mm camera port, two 8-mm robotic ports and a 12-mm assistant port placed in the anterior axillary line cephalad to the anterior superior iliac spine, and 7-8 cm caudal to the ipsilateral robotic port. Positioning and port placement strategies for successful technique include: (i) Docking robot directly over the patient's head parallel to the spine; (ii) incision for camera port ≈1.9 cm (1 fingerbreadth) above the iliac crest, lateral to the triangle of Petit; (iii) Seldinger technique insertion of kidney-shaped balloon dilator into retroperitoneal space; (iv) Maximising distance between all ports; (v) Ensuring camera arm is placed in the outer part of the 'sweet spot'. The retroperitoneal approach to RPN permits direct access to the renal hilum, no need for bowel mobilisation and excellent visualisation of posteriorly located tumours. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  18. Role of steps in N-2 activation on Ru(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Søren; Logadottir, Ashildur; Egeberg, Rasmus

    1999-01-01

    Using adsorption experiments and density functional calculations we show that N-2 dissociation on the Ru(0001) surface is totally dominated by steps. The measured adsorption rate at the steps is at least 9 orders of magnitude higher than on the terraces at 500 K, and the corresponding calculated ...... difference in activation energy is 1.5 eV. The low barrier at the step is shown to be due to a combination of electronic and geometrical effects. The consequences for Ru as a catalyst for ammonia synthesis are discussed....

  19. A Differential Item Functioning (DIF) Analysis of the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): Comparing Individuals with Parkinson's Disease from the United States and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, Carolyn; McAuliffe, Megan J.; Hughes, Louise E.; Yorkston, Kathryn; Anderson, Tim; Jiseon, Kim; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the cross-cultural applicability of the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) through a comparison of respondents with Parkinson's disease (PD) from the United States and New Zealand. Method: A total of 428 respondents--218 from the United States and 210 from New Zealand-completed the self-report CPIB and a series of…

  20. Comparative analysis of single-step and two-step biodiesel production using supercritical methanol on laboratory-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micic, Radoslav D.; Tomić, Milan D.; Kiss, Ferenc E.; Martinovic, Ferenc L.; Simikić, Mirko Ð.; Molnar, Tibor T.

    2016-01-01

    and methanol consumption per unit of biodiesel, and higher market value of the glycerol obtained in the two-step process explain this observation.

  1. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  2. Square function analysis of the Inductor-Converter Bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehsani, M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1979-03-01

    The transfer of energy between two superconducting coils can be controlled with an Inductor-Converter Bridge (ICB) by changing the relative timing between the storage side bridge and the load side bridge. The average voltages on the coils have been previously derived as a function of relative timing between the two halves of the bridges and the relative currents in the two coils using a one-line, harmonic current source representation of each coil and its bridge network. Since the coil current in each of the ICB phases appears as bipolar rectangular pulses, an analysis based on unit step functions has been developed. The unit step function analysis leads to simple polynomial expressions relating the average coil voltages to relative timing. The new derivations are shown to have the same harmonic representation as previously developed. The polynomial expressions are more compatible to microprocessor control than are the harmonic function expressions

  3. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  4. Steps in Researching the Music in Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2007-01-01

    The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy.......The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy....

  5. Two-step estimation for inhomogeneous spatial point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Guan, Yongtao

    This paper is concerned with parameter estimation for inhomogeneous spatial point processes with a regression model for the intensity function and tractable second order properties (K-function). Regression parameters are estimated using a Poisson likelihood score estimating function and in a second...... step minimum contrast estimation is applied for the residual clustering parameters. Asymptotic normality of parameter estimates is established under certain mixing conditions and we exemplify how the results may be applied in ecological studies of rain forests....

  6. Lateral step initiation behavior in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sparto, Patrick J; Jennings, J Richard; Furman, Joseph M; Redfern, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Older adults have varied postural responses during induced and voluntary lateral stepping. The purpose of the research was to quantify the occurrence of different stepping strategies during lateral step initiation in older adults and to relate the stepping responses to retrospective history of falls. Seventy community-ambulating older adults (mean age 76 y, range 70–94 y) performed voluntary lateral steps as quickly as possible to the right or left in response to a visual cue, in a blocked de...

  7. Biomechanical influences on balance recovery by stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, E T; Robinovitch, S N

    1999-10-01

    Stepping represents a common means for balance recovery after a perturbation to upright posture. Yet little is known regarding the biomechanical factors which determine whether a step succeeds in preventing a fall. In the present study, we developed a simple pendulum-spring model of balance recovery by stepping, and used this to assess how step length and step contact time influence the effort (leg contact force) and feasibility of balance recovery by stepping. We then compared model predictions of step characteristics which minimize leg contact force to experimentally observed values over a range of perturbation strengths. At all perturbation levels, experimentally observed step execution times were higher than optimal, and step lengths were smaller than optimal. However, the predicted increase in leg contact force associated with these deviations was substantial only for large perturbations. Furthermore, increases in the strength of the perturbation caused subjects to take larger, quicker steps, which reduced their predicted leg contact force. We interpret these data to reflect young subjects' desire to minimize recovery effort, subject to neuromuscular constraints on step execution time and step length. Finally, our model predicts that successful balance recovery by stepping is governed by a coupling between step length, step execution time, and leg strength, so that the feasibility of balance recovery decreases unless declines in one capacity are offset by enhancements in the others. This suggests that one's risk for falls may be affected more by small but diffuse neuromuscular impairments than by larger impairment in a single motor capacity.

  8. Cyclopentadiene-functionalized polyketone as self-cross-linking thermo-reversible thermoset with increased softening temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toncelli, Claudio; Bouwhuis, Stephan; Broekhuis, Antonius Augustinus; Picchioni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Self-cross-linkable thermo-reversible thermosets were obtained by a two-steps post-functionalization of aliphatic alternating polyketones yielding two different cyclopentadiene functionalization degree of 9 and 22% (with the respect of initial 1,4-dicarbonyl units). Thermo-reversibility was verified

  9. Direct and Lead Units in Execution of Battle (Battlefield Function 20) as Accomplished by a Heavy Brigade. Volume 2: Assessment Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mullen, William

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the overall research program was to document the synchronization required by command and control tasks performed within the armored brigade, to include combat support and combat service support units...

  10. Direct and Lead Units During Preparation for the Battle (Battlefield Function 19) as Accomplished by a Direct Support Field Artillery Battalion. Volume 2: Assessment Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mullen, William

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the overall research program was to document the synchronization required by command and control tasks performed within the armored brigade, to include combat support and combat service support units...

  11. Direct and Lead Units in Execution of Battle (Battlefield Function 20) as Accomplished by an Engineer Battalion Supporting a Heavy Brigade. Volume 2: Assessment Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mullen, William

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the overall research program was to document the synchronization required by command and control tasks performed within the armored brigade to include combat support and combat service support units...

  12. Boris push with spatial stepping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, G; Stoltz, P H; Cary, J R; Wurtele, J

    2003-01-01

    The Boris push is commonly used in plasma physics simulations because of its speed and stability. It is second-order accurate, requires only one field evaluation per time step, and has good conservation properties. However, for accelerator simulations it is convenient to propagate particles in z down a changing beamline. A 'spatial Boris push' algorithm has been developed which is similar to the Boris push but uses a spatial coordinate as the independent variable, instead of time. This scheme is compared to the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm, for two simplified muon beam lattices: a uniform solenoid field, and a 'FOFO' lattice where the solenoid field varies sinusoidally along the axis. Examination of the canonical angular momentum, which should be conserved in axisymmetric systems, shows that the spatial Boris push improves accuracy over long distances

  13. Design of the environment of care for safety of patients and personnel: does form follow function or vice versa in the intensive care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Judene; Streifel, Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    We review the context of the environment of care in the intensive care unit setting in relation to patient safety and quality, specifically addressing healthcare-associated infection issues and solutions involving interdisciplinary teams. Issues addressed include current and future architectural design and layout trends, construction trends affecting intensive care units, and prevention of construction-associated healthcare-associated infections related to airborne and waterborne risks and design solutions. Specific elements include single-occupancy, acuity-scalable intensive care unit rooms; environmental aspects of hand hygiene, such as water risks, sink design/location, human waste management, surface selection (floor covering, countertops, furniture, and equipment) and cleaning, antimicrobial-treated or similar materials, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation, specialized rooms (airborne infection isolation and protective environments), and water system design and strategies for safe use of potable water and mitigation of water intrusion. Effective design and operational use of the intensive care unit environment of care must engage critical care personnel from initial planning and design through occupancy of the new/renovated intensive care unit as part of the infection control risk assessment team. The interdisciplinary infection control risk assessment team can address key environment of care design features to enhance the safety of intensive care unit patients, personnel, and visitors. This perspective will ensure the environment of care supports human factors and behavioral aspects of the interaction between the environment of care and its occupants.

  14. The Throw-and-Catch Model of Human Gait: Evidence from Coupling of Pre-Step Postural Activity and Step Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Matthew J.; Day, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    Postural activity normally precedes the lift of a foot from the ground when taking a step, but its function is unclear. The throw-and-catch hypothesis of human gait proposes that the pre-step activity is organized to generate momentum for the body to fall ballistically along a specific trajectory during the step. The trajectory is appropriate for the stepping foot to land at its intended location while at the same time being optimally placed to catch the body and regain balance. The hypothesis therefore predicts a strong coupling between the pre-step activity and step location. Here we examine this coupling when stepping to visually-presented targets at different locations. Ten healthy, young subjects were instructed to step as accurately as possible onto targets placed in five locations that required either different step directions or different step lengths. In 75% of trials, the target location remained constant throughout the step. In the remaining 25% of trials, the intended step location was changed by making the target jump to a new location 96 ms ± 43 ms after initiation of the pre-step activity, long before foot lift. As predicted by the throw-and-catch hypothesis, when the target location remained constant, the pre-step activity led to body momentum at foot lift that was coupled to the intended step location. When the target location jumped, the pre-step activity was adjusted (median latency 223 ms) and prolonged (on average by 69 ms), which altered the body’s momentum at foot lift according to where the target had moved. We conclude that whenever possible the coupling between the pre-step activity and the step location is maintained. This provides further support for the throw-and-catch hypothesis of human gait. PMID:28066208

  15. The Throw-and-Catch Model of Human Gait: Evidence from Coupling of Pre-Step Postural Activity and Step Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Matthew J; Day, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    Postural activity normally precedes the lift of a foot from the ground when taking a step, but its function is unclear. The throw-and-catch hypothesis of human gait proposes that the pre-step activity is organized to generate momentum for the body to fall ballistically along a specific trajectory during the step. The trajectory is appropriate for the stepping foot to land at its intended location while at the same time being optimally placed to catch the body and regain balance. The hypothesis therefore predicts a strong coupling between the pre-step activity and step location. Here we examine this coupling when stepping to visually-presented targets at different locations. Ten healthy, young subjects were instructed to step as accurately as possible onto targets placed in five locations that required either different step directions or different step lengths. In 75% of trials, the target location remained constant throughout the step. In the remaining 25% of trials, the intended step location was changed by making the target jump to a new location 96 ms ± 43 ms after initiation of the pre-step activity, long before foot lift. As predicted by the throw-and-catch hypothesis, when the target location remained constant, the pre-step activity led to body momentum at foot lift that was coupled to the intended step location. When the target location jumped, the pre-step activity was adjusted (median latency 223 ms) and prolonged (on average by 69 ms), which altered the body's momentum at foot lift according to where the target had moved. We conclude that whenever possible the coupling between the pre-step activity and the step location is maintained. This provides further support for the throw-and-catch hypothesis of human gait.

  16. Delivering stepped care: an analysis of implementation in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards David A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United Kingdom, clinical guidelines recommend that services for depression and anxiety should be structured around a stepped care model, where patients receive treatment at different 'steps,' with the intensity of treatment (i.e., the amount and type increasing at each step if they fail to benefit at previous steps. There are very limited data available on the implementation of this model, particularly on the intensity of psychological treatment at each step. Our objective was to describe patient pathways through stepped care services and the impact of this on patient flow and management. Methods We recorded service design features of four National Health Service sites implementing stepped care (e.g., the types of treatments available and their links with other treatments, together with the actual treatments received by individual patients and their transitions between different treatment steps. We computed the proportions of patients accessing, receiving, and transiting between the various steps and mapped these proportions visually to illustrate patient movement. Results We collected throughput data on 7,698 patients referred. Patient pathways were highly complex and very variable within and between sites. The ratio of low (e.g., self-help to high-intensity (e.g., cognitive behaviour therapy treatments delivered varied between sites from 22:1, through 2.1:1, 1.4:1 to 0.5:1. The numbers of patients allocated directly to high-intensity treatment varied from 3% to 45%. Rates of stepping up from low-intensity treatment to high-intensity treatment were less than 10%. Conclusions When services attempt to implement the recommendation for stepped care in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines, there were significant differences in implementation and consequent high levels of variation in patient pathways. Evaluations driven by the principles of implementation science (such as targeted planning

  17. Linking pedestrian flow characteristics with stepping locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayue; Boltes, Maik; Seyfried, Armin; Zhang, Jun; Ziemer, Verena; Weng, Wenguo

    2018-06-01

    While properties of human traffic flow are described by speed, density and flow, the locomotion of pedestrian is based on steps. To relate characteristics of human locomotor system with properties of human traffic flow, this paper aims to connect gait characteristics like step length, step frequency, swaying amplitude and synchronization with speed and density and thus to build a ground for advanced pedestrian models. For this aim, observational and experimental study on the single-file movement of pedestrians at different densities is conducted. Methods to measure step length, step frequency, swaying amplitude and step synchronization are proposed by means of trajectories of the head. Mathematical models for the relations of step length or frequency and speed are evaluated. The problem how step length and step duration are influenced by factors like body height and density is investigated. It is shown that the effect of body height on step length and step duration changes with density. Furthermore, two different types of step in-phase synchronization between two successive pedestrians are observed and the influence of step synchronization on step length is examined.

  18. Step one within stepped care trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy for young children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alison; Robst, John; Scheeringa, Michael S; Cohen, Judith A; Wang, Wei; Murphy, Tanya K; Tolin, David F; Storch, Eric A

    2014-02-01

    This pilot study explored the preliminary efficacy, parent acceptability and economic cost of delivering Step One within Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (SC-TF-CBT). Nine young children ages 3-6 years and their parents participated in SC-TF-CBT. Eighty-three percent (5/6) of the children who completed Step One treatment and 55.6 % (5/9) of the intent-to-treat sample responded to Step One. One case relapsed at post-assessment. Treatment gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Generally, parents found Step One to be acceptable and were satisfied with treatment. At 3-month follow-up, the cost per unit improvement for posttraumatic stress symptoms and severity ranged from $27.65 to $131.33 for the responders and from $36.12 to $208.11 for the intent-to-treat sample. Further research on stepped care for young children is warranted to examine if this approach is more efficient, accessible and cost-effective than traditional therapy.

  19. A step towards a new delimitation of functional somatic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Schröder, Andreas; Fink, Per

    2018-01-01

    (17%), gastrointestinal symptoms (6%), and general symptoms (13%). Three profiles had multiple symptoms in specific combinations: musculoskeletal and general symptoms (7%); fatigue, musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms (3%); and cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal and general symptoms (3......%). Lastly, one profile (2%) had high probability of all symptoms. The last four profiles (15%) were strongly associated with BDS case-status, poor self-perceived health and high impact of symptoms. Analyses excluding persons with multi-symptomatic chronic disease showed similar results. CONCLUSIONS: We...... identified eight symptom profiles characterized by specific combinations of symptoms. Four of these had multiple symptoms from several bodily systems showing large overlap with BDS, possibly indicating subtypes of FSS. The profiles contribute to a new delimitation of FSS by illustrating the importance...

  20. Biobased step-growth polymers : chemistry, functionality and applicability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordover, B.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by the opportunity to obtain materials with interesting new properties and further stimulated by the increasing oil prices and the augmenting environmental concerns, renewed interest in biobased polymers has recently arisen. Extensive efforts are being invested in extracting useful starting

  1. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 MDX Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Bryan; Consulting, Hitachi

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself the Multidimensional Expressions (MDX) query language-one step at a time. With this practical, learn-by-doing tutorial, you'll build the core techniques for using MDX with Analysis Services to deliver high-performance business intelligence solutions. Discover how to: Construct and execute MDX queriesWork with tuples, sets, and expressionsBuild complex sets to retrieve the exact data users needPerform aggregation functions and navigate data hierarchiesAssemble time-based business metricsCustomize an Analysis Services cube through the MDX scriptImplement dynamic security to cont

  2. Fluorescence study of some xanthine dyes under stepped laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkova, L.V.; Ketsle, G.A.; Ermagambetov, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Paper is devoted to definition of triplet state in molecules of xanthine dyes and study of intramolecular energy circulation. Stepped two-quanta excitation of dyes has been carried out with help of experimental unit. Intensive luminescence activated by excitation of triplet molecules of dyes within triplet-triplet band with wave length of 1060 nm was registered for eosin. Given luminescence spectrally coincides with fast fluorescence. 5 refs., 6 figs

  3. 77 FR 43481 - Taking Additional Steps to Address the National Emergency With Respect to Somalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Additional Steps to Address the National Emergency With Respect to Somalia #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents... Additional Steps to Address the National Emergency With Respect to Somalia By the authority vested in me as... Somalia declared in Executive Order 13536 of April 12, 2010, in view of United Nations Security Council...

  4. A Step-by-Step Framework on Discrete Events Simulation in Emergency Department; A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Mahsa; Moftian, Nazila; Rezaei-Hachesu, Peyman; Samad-Soltani, Taha

    2017-04-01

    To systematically review the current literature of simulation in healthcare including the structured steps in the emergency healthcare sector by proposing a framework for simulation in the emergency department. For the purpose of collecting the data, PubMed and ACM databases were used between the years 2003 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were to select English-written articles available in full text with the closest objectives from among a total of 54 articles retrieved from the databases. Subsequently, 11 articles were selected for further analysis. The studies focused on the reduction of waiting time and patient stay, optimization of resources allocation, creation of crisis and maximum demand scenarios, identification of overcrowding bottlenecks, investigation of the impact of other systems on the existing system, and improvement of the system operations and functions. Subsequently, 10 simulation steps were derived from the relevant studies after an expert's evaluation. The 10-steps approach proposed on the basis of the selected studies provides simulation and planning specialists with a structured method for both analyzing problems and choosing best-case scenarios. Moreover, following this framework systematically enables the development of design processes as well as software implementation of simulation problems.

  5. Security steps for smartphone users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pieterse, H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are an important asset for people living in the 21st century.With functionality similar to computers, smartphones have become all-in-one portable devices providing interconnectivity and device-to-device communication. Such continuous...

  6. Multi-step direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    In recent years a variety of statistical theories has been developed concerning multistep direct (MSD) nuclear reactions. In addition, dominant in applications is a whole class of semiclassical models that may be subsumed under the heading of 'generalized exciton models'; these are basically MSD-type extensions on top of compound-like concepts. In this report the relation between their underlying statistical MSD-postulates are highlighted. A command framework is sketched that enables to generate the various MSD theories through assigning statistical properties to different parts of the nuclear Hamiltonian. Then it is shown that distinct forms of nuclear randomness are embodied in the mentioned theories. All these theories appear to be very similar at a qualitative level. In order to explain the high energy-tails and forward-peaked angular distribution typical for particles emitted in MSD reactions, it is imagined that the incident continuum particle stepwise looses its energy and direction in a sequence of collisions, thereby creating new particle-hole pairs in the target system. At each step emission may take place. The statistical aspect comes in because many continuum states are involved in the process. These are supposed to display chaotic behavior, the associated randomness assumption giving rise to important simplifications in the expression for MSD emission cross sections. This picture suggests that mentioned MSD models can be interpreted as a variant of essentially one and the same theory. 113 refs.; 25 figs.; 9 tabs

  7. Doubled Shapiro steps in a topological Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Hang; Song, Juntao; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X. C.

    2018-01-01

    We study the transport properties of a superconductor-quantum spin Hall insulator-superconductor hybrid system in the presence of microwave radiation. Instead of adiabatic analysis or use of the resistively shunted junction model, we start from the microscopic Hamiltonian and calculate the d.c. current directly with the help of the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The numerical results show that (i) the I-V curves of background current due to multiple Andreev reflections exhibit a different structure from those in the conventional junctions, and (ii) all Shapiro steps are visible and appear one by one at high frequencies, while at low frequencies, the steps evolve exactly as the Bessel functions and the odd steps are completely suppressed, implying a fractional Josephson effect.

  8. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  9. Reproductive capacity of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae) in function of the number of individuals per unit of rearing; Potencial reprodutivo de Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera,Chrysopidae) em funcao do numero de individuos por unidade de criacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Luis Gustavo Amorim [Centro Universitario de Varzea Grande (UNIVAG), Varzea Grande, MT (Brazil). GPA de Ciencias Agrarias e Biologicas], e-mail: gugamorim@yahoo.com.br; Freitas, Sergio de [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Fitossanidade], e-mail: serfre@fcav.unesp.br

    2008-09-15

    Reproductive capacity of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae) in function of the number of individuals per unit of rearing. This work was carried out to investigate the reproductive potential of Chrysoperla externa subjected to different densities per rearing unit. Adults of the F{sub 4} offspring were kept at 25 {+-} 1 deg C, RH 70 {+-} 10% and 12 h photo phase. It was used the following densities per rearing unit (10 cm of diameter by 23 cm of height, and volume of 1650 cm{sup 3}): 1 male: 3 female, 2 males: 6 females, 3 males: 9 females and 4 males: 12 females. It was evaluated the pre-oviposition period, the daily and total oviposition per female and per rearing unit, the percentage of viable and infertile eggs percentage and the exploitation index per female and per rearing unit. The density 4 males: 12 females presented better exploitation when compared to the other densities thus equalizing the low values obtained for the mean and total egg laying per female. (author)

  10. Step dynamics and terrace-width distribution on flame-annealed gold films: The effect of step-step interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoni, Nira; Ayal, Shai; Millo, Oded

    2000-01-01

    Dynamics of atomic steps and the terrace-width distribution within step bunches on flame-annealed gold films are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. The distribution is narrower than commonly observed for vicinal planes and has a Gaussian shape, indicating a short-range repulsive interaction between the steps, with an apparently large interaction constant. The dynamics of the atomic steps, on the other hand, appear to be influenced, in addition to these short-range interactions, also by a longer-range attraction of steps towards step bunches. Both types of interactions promote self-ordering of terrace structures on the surface. When current is driven through the films a step-fingering instability sets in, reminiscent of the Bales-Zangwill instability

  11. Ten steps to successful software process improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandt, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies ten steps for managing change that address organizational and cultural issues. Four of these steps are critical, that if not done, will almost guarantee failure. This ten-step program emphasizes the alignment of business goals, change process goals, and the work performed by the employees of an organization.

  12. 7 CFR 65.230 - Production step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production step. 65.230 Section 65.230 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.230 Production step. Production step means, in...

  13. Illness Progression as a Function of Independent and Accumulating Poor Prognosis Factors in Outpatients With Bipolar Disorder in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R.M.; Altshuler, L.L.; Leverich, G.S.; Nolen, W.A.; Kupka, R.W.; Grunze, H.; Frye, M.A.; Suppes, T.; McElroy, S.L.; Keck, P.E.; Rowe, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with bipolar disorder in the United States experience a deteriorating course of illness despite naturalistic treatment in the community. We examined a variety of factors associated with this pattern of illness progression. Method: From 1995 to 2002, we studied 634 adult

  14. Evaluation of Functional Preparedness and Non Structural Safety of Different Health Units of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in Coping With Natural Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Dargahi

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: In general, the results showed that the average performance percentage and non-structural vulnerability of health units and various other departments are moderate at the headquarters of health centers. According to the study results, disasters like earthquake, dust, flood, and landslide frequently required preparedness in the whole region.

  15. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  16. Traffic safety and step-by-step driving licence for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2017-01-01

    presents a review of safety effects from step-by-step driving licence schemes. Most of the investigated schemes consist of a step-by-step driving licence with Step 1) various tests and education, Step 2) a period where driving is only allowed together with an experienced driver and Step 3) driving without...... companion is allowed but with various restrictions and, in some cases, additional driving education and tests. In general, a step-by-step driving licence improves traffic safety even though the young people are permitted to drive a car earlier on. The effects from driving with an experienced driver vary......Young novice car drivers are much more accident-prone than other drivers - up to 10 times that of their parents' generation. A central solution to improve the traffic safety for this group is implementation of a step-by-step driving licence. A number of countries have introduced a step...

  17. Steps to Opening the Skilled Trades to Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Women's Bureau.

    Employers' and unions' acceptance in attitude and practice of the equal capacity of women to function in the skilled trades and other apprentice-type jobs depends upon knowledge of facts, actual experience, and understanding of equal opportunity laws, according to the authors of the document, which offers to employers first steps to take to…

  18. Initial steps of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Paulsen, H.N.; Thøgersen, J.

    2003-01-01

    The onset of supercontinuum generation in a photonic crystal fiber is investigated experimentally and numerically as a function of pump wavelength and intensity with 100-fs pulses. Soliton formation is found to be the determining factor in the initial step. The formation and behavior of a blueshi...

  19. Step-Indexed Relational Reasoning for Countable Nondeterminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Bizjak, Aleš; Schwinghamme, Jan

    2013-01-01

    for programming languages with countable nondeterminism is challenging. We present a step-indexed logical relations model of a higher-order functional programming language with countable nondeterminism and demonstrate how it can be used to reason about contextually defined may- and must-equivalence. In earlier...

  20. Neuregulin: First Steps Towards a Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferree, D. S.; Malone, C. C.; Karr, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuregulins are growth factor domain proteins with diverse bioactivities, such as cell proliferation, receptor binding, and differentiation. Neureguh- 1 binds to two members of the ErbB class I tyrosine kinase receptors, ErbB3 and ErbB4. A number of human cancers overexpress the ErbB receptors, and neuregulin can modulate the growth of certain cancer types. Neuregulin-1 has been shown to promote the migration of invasive gliomas of the central nervous system. Neuregulin has also been implicated in schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis and abortive cardiac abnormalities. The full function of neuregulin-1 is not known. In this study we are inserting a cDNA clone obtained from American Type Culture Collection into E.coli expression vectors to express neuregulin- 1 protein. Metal chelate affinity chromatography is used for recombinant protein purification. Crystallization screening will proceed for X-ray diffraction studies following expression, optimization, and protein purification. In spite of medical and scholarly interest in the neuregulins, there are currently no high-resolution structures available for these proteins. Here we present the first steps toward attaining a high-resolution structure of neuregulin- 1, which will help enable us to better understand its function