WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit science night

  1. Science Night

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Would it surprise you to know that you can measure the speed of light using chocolate and a microwave oven? If you're interested in this and in finding out much more, come along to the Museum of the History of Science on 3 and 4 July 2004, when dozens of companies, institutions, colleges and organizations will be running exhibits, shows, and displays on the theme of counting and measuring. CERN will be there with a display stand that includes two particle detectors. Full details are available from the Museum website at: http://www.lanuitdelascience.ch/

  2. A Midsummer Night's Science

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Last year, the first Science Night attracted nearly 1500 people. Dipping into history for the space of one night? This is the idea of Geneva's Museum of the History of Science, which is organizing its second Science Night, on 7 and 8 July, on the history of science. The first such event, held last year, was a considerable success with almost 15 000 visitors. The second Science Night, to be held in the magnificent setting of the Perle du Lac Park in Geneva, promises to be a winner too. By making science retell its own history, this major event is intended to show how every scientific and technical breakthrough is the culmination of a long period of growth that began hundreds of years in the past. Dozens of activities and events are included in this programme of time travel: visitors can study the night sky through telescopes and see what Galileo first observed, and then go to see a play on the life of the Italian scientist. Another play, commissioned specially for the occasion, will honour Geneva botanist De ...

  3. Methods and Strategies: Math and Science Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joan; Hatton, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Family Math and Science Nights engage students and parents in active investigations tied to the curriculum in a fun, informal environment. Through this program, families actively explore math and science ideas, discover together through guided inquiry, and apply their discoveries to solve a problem at the end. All activities are hands-on, use…

  4. A Science Night of Fun!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Castellitto, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    Describes a science learning program sponsored by the State University of New York College (SUNY) at Geneseo which brings together elementary students, parents, and university students and faculty for an evening of fun, meaningful science experiments, demonstrations, and activities. Includes sample activities. (KHR)

  5. Multitudes attend the Night of Science

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Night of Science, which took place in the Parc de la Perle du Lac in Geneva last weekend, was a great success, with 30 000 visitors attending according to the organisers. Many curious people flocked to the stands and animations until late on Saturday night and all afternoon on Sunday. The CERN stand (photo) received a great amount of interest from participants. Both kids and adults discovered the activities of the Laboratory and the data-processing revolution initiated by CERN, from the Web to the Computing Grid. Hats off to the CERN collaborators in the Communication Group and IT Department who made this event a success.

  6. Researchers' Night: science at the shops

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    On 25 September, as part of European Researchers’ Night, CERN and POPScience joined forces to welcome the public at the Balexert shopping centre in Geneva. The Bulletin presents its gallery of photographs from the exciting and educational event.   Science through comic strips, games, cinema and television: POPScience approaches scientific questions through popular culture, with great success! Around 500 children attended the sessions for schools at Balexert's multiplex cinema, and 600 spectators flocked to the public screenings.  Using the big screen, scientists, directors and authors were on hand to disentangle truth from untruths and science from science fiction. The guests, some of whom appeared in person and others via video link, included Jorge Cham, author of PhD Comics and the spin-off film; David Saltzberg, physicist at CMS and scientific consultant for the television series The Big Bang Theory; Kip Thorne, scientific consultant for the film Interstellar; Lawrence ...

  7. Adults' Perceptions of Children's Science Abilities and Interest after Participating in a Family Science Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanowitz, Karen L.; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research was to examine adults' and children's perceptions of participating in a family science night event, especially in the context of parental belief about children's science abilities. Family science nights are becoming increasingly popular and are used in a wide range of settings. During family science nights, adults and…

  8. Science by night – it's magic!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The control rooms of the LHC and its experiments threw open their doors to 150 youngsters on European Researchers Night and the place was buzzing with excitement all evening!    It's just possible that a few scientists' vocations were born last Friday night, as the sixth European Researchers Night took place across Europe. CERN was taking part for the first time and invited young people aged from 12 to 19 into the control rooms of the LHC machine and five experiments. From 5.00 in the afternoon until 1.00 in the morning, 150 youngsters and physics teachers got the opportunity to sit with scientists at the controls of the accelerator and experiments. This meeting of minds went down very well for all concerned, the scientists being only too happy to wax lyrical about their passion. The youngsters were thrilled with their visit and amazed at being allowed so close to the controls of these mighty machines. The night-time setting added an extra touch of magic to the whole event. Some just could...

  9. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Parsons, D [NCAR; Geerts, B [Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Wyoming

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  10. A night without limits for science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    On 10 and 11 July some 400 scientists came down to Geneva's Perle du Lac park to meet the public for the Nuit de la Science.   One of the many attractions at the Nuit de la Science. The theme of this year's event, now in its eighth year, was "Extremes and Limits". Numerous attractions including stands, workshops, mini-conferences and plays were set up in the park, all with the aim of conveying their passion for research and thirst for knowledge to the visitors. Several CERN guides were on hand to tell the public about that machine of the extreme, the LHC. CERN was also represented on the stand of the Réseau romand science & cité. For more information, clic here.      

  11. Public outreach: Multitudes attend the Night of Science

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Night of Science, which took place in the parc de la Perle du Lac in Geneva last weekend, was a great success, with 30000 visitors attending according to the organisers. Many curious people flocked to the stands and animations until late on Saturday night and all afternoon on Sunday. The CERN stand (photo) received a great amount of interest from participants. Both kids and adults discovered the activities of the Laboratory and the data-processing revolution initiated by CERN, from the Web to the Computing Grid. Hats off to the CERN collaborators in the Communication Group and IT Department who made this event a success.

  12. Science Night at the Museum of the History of Science

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Would it surprise you to know that you can measure the speed of light using chocolate and a microwave oven? If you're interested in this and in finding out much more, come along to the Museum of the History of Science on 3 and 4 July 2004, when dozens of companies, institutions, colleges and organizations will be running exhibits, shows, and displays on the theme of counting and measuring. CERN will be there with a display stand that includes two particle detectors; one to sense muons arriving from cosmic rays that strike the Earth's atmosphere, and the other a prototype of an element of the OPAL detector which was used in the LEP to measure particle tracks from high energy electron-positron collisions. Full details are available from the Museum website at: http://www.lanuitdelascience.ch/

  13. GLOBE at Night: a Worldwide Citizen-Science Program to Increase Awareness of Light Pollution by Measuring Night Sky Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The emphasis in the international citizen-science, star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, is in bringing awareness to the public on issues of light pollution. Light pollution threatens not only observatory sites and our "right to starlight", but can affect energy consumption, wildlife and health. GLOBE at Night has successfully reached a few 100,000 citizen-scientists. What has contributed to its success? Foundational resources are available to facilitate the public's participation in promoting dark skies awareness. The GLOBE at Night website explains clearly the simple-to-participate-in 5 step program and offers background information and interactive games on key concepts. To promote the campaign via popular social media, GLOBE at Night created Facebook and Twitter pages. The program has been expanded to include trainings of the general public, but especially educators in schools, museums and science centers, in unique ways. Education kits for dark skies awareness have been distributed at the training workshops. The kit includes material for a light shielding demonstration, a digital Sky Quality Meter and "Dark Skies Rangers" activities. The activities are on how unshielded light wastes energy, how light pollution affects wildlife and how one can participate in a citizen-science star-hunt like GLOBE at Night. To increase participation in the 2011 campaign, children and adults submitted their sky brightness measurements in real time with smart phones or tablets using the web application at www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time register automatically. For those without smart mobile devices, user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page were reconfigured to determine latitude and longitude more easily and accurately. As a proto-type for taking multiple measurements, people in Tucson found it easy to adopt a street and take measurements every mile for the length of the street. The grid of measurements

  14. NASA Family Science Night: Changing perceptions one family at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sara E.; Drobnes, Emilie; Sol Colina-Trujillo, M.; Noel-Storr, Jacob

    2008-12-01

    Parents and families have the greatest influence on children's attitudes towards education and career choices. If students' attitudes towards science, particularly the physical sciences, are not influenced positively by parental/familial attitudes, efforts to improve the quality of content and teaching of these subjects in school may be futile. Research shows that parental involvement increases student achievement outcomes, and family-oriented programs have a direct impact on student performance. Based on this premise, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center started a series of Family Science Nights for middle school students and their families. The program provides a non-threatening venue for families to explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by engaging in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science - making it more practical and approachable for participants of all ages. Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond.

  15. Why do science in space? Researchers' Night at CERN 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Nellist, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Space topic and debate "Why do science in space?" With the special presence of Matthias Maurer, European Space Agency astronaut, and Mercedes Paniccia, PhD, Senior Research Associate for space experiment AMS.

  16. [Perception of night-time sleep by the surgical patients in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás, A; Aizpitarte, E; Iruarrizaga, A; Vázquez, M; Margall, M A; Asiain, M C

    2002-01-01

    Night-time rest of the patients hospitalized in Intensive Care is a very important feature within the health/disease process since it has a direct repercussion on their adequate recovery. The objectives of this investigation are: 1) describe how the surgical patients perceive their night-time sleep in the Polyvalent Intensive Care Unit: 2) compare the subjective perception of the patients with the nursing record in the care plan and analyze the degree of agreement between both assessments. Night-time sleep has been studied in 104 patients; surgery patients from emergencies, patients who are intubated, with previous psychiatric treatment, sleep apnea, drinking habit or impossibility of adequate communication were not included. To measure the patient's perception, the five item sleep questionnaire of Richards-Campbell and the assessment of sleep by the nurse, as well as the remaining variables included in a computerized care plan, were used. The total mean score of the sleep on the first post-operative night was 51.42 mm. When the scores obtained in each one of the questionnaire items are analyzed, it is seen that the sleep profile of these patients has been characterized by being light sleep, with frequent wakenings and generally with little difficulty to go back to sleep when woke op or were awakened. The assessment of the night-time sleep performed by the nurse coincides with the perception of the patients on many occasions, and when there is discrepancy, the nurse has overestimated the patient's sleep.

  17. The Excitement and Wonder of Teaching Science: What Pre-service Teachers Learn from Facilitating Family Science Night Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle B.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, pre-service teachers facilitated stations at a family science night as a context to learn to identify, assess, and use children's science ideas. Assessment is already difficult in K-12 classrooms. Assessing learning in informal learning environments adds the complication that participation is largely voluntary. As such, controlling the learners' participation to systematically assess learning is counter to the intents of informal environments. The pre-service teachers in this study experienced success at teaching science and developed understandings about children's science ideas. Data included reflective postings, class discussions, observations, artifacts, and photographs. The findings contribute to understanding the value of multiple learning contexts in teacher preparation and lead to implications about leveraging informal science contexts for educating teachers.

  18. North Carolina Statewide Star Party: 45 Sites Offer Skywatching and Citizen Science the Same Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayle, A. E.; Sorrell, M. J.; Frederick, J.; Young, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    As the kickoff to the 2013 North Carolina Science Festival, 45 sites across the state planned skywatching sessions for the public on April 5, 2013. The Statewide Star Party sites stretched across 500 miles, from the mountains to the Outer Banks, and included large cities as well as rural areas. Hosts included parks, planetariums, museums, nature centers, and universities. Many sites were aided by local amateur astronomers who provided their telescopes and expertise. Because the star party date fell during International Dark Sky Week and a GLOBE at Night citizen-science campaign, each host was encouraged to teach their audiences about light pollution and GLOBE at Night, and was provided with a kit of relevant materials to support them in planning their events and educating the public. Two hosts canceled their events because of poor weather. The 43 star party events that took place attracted 4,926 participants and were held in 31 counties across the state. The North Carolina Statewide Star Party will become an annual event during the North Carolina Science Festival. Other states and regions are encouraged to plan similar star parties to help educate and inspire the public about astronomy and citizen science.

  19. Perception of night-time sleep by surgical patients in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás, Ana; Aizpitarte, Eva; Iruarrizaga, Angélica; Vázquez, Mónica; Margall, Angeles; Asiain, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The night-time sleep of patients hospitalized in intensive care is a very important feature within the health or disease process, as it has a direct repercussion on their adequate recovery. (1) To describe how surgical patients perceive their sleep in the intensive care unit; (2) to compare the subjective perception of patients with the nursing records and analyse these for the degree of agreement. Descriptive research. One hundred and four surgical patients were recruited to the study. Patients completed the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire, a five-item visual analogue scale, to subjectively measure their perceived level of sleep (range 0-100 mm). The observation of patient sleep by nurses, demographic data, nursing care during the night and use of specific pharmacological treatments were also collected from the nursing records. The total mean score of sleep on the first post-operative night was 51.42 mm, 28% of patients had a good sleep, 46% a regular sleep and 26% a bad sleep. The sleep profile of these patients has been characterized by the patients having a light sleep, with frequent awakening and generally little difficulty to go back to sleep after the awakenings. The agreement between the nurses' perceptions of patients' sleep and the patients' perception of their sleep was tested by means of one-factor analysis of variance (p nurse-patient perception, we obtained 44% of total agreement and 56% of disagreement. When discrepancy was found, the nurse generally overestimated the patients' perception. Surgical patients' perceptions of their sleep in the ICU suggest that this is inadequate. Nurses' perceptions of patients' sleep partially coincides with the latter's perception, but we have also found that the former frequently overestimate patients' sleep.

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room during Researchers Night by Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    We invite our "6-th Ma?opolska Researchers Night" guests for Virtual Visits in ATLAS Control Room. They could ask Polish scientists and experts during a lecture "How a mass is created - the Higgs boson discovery" to be given by dr Anna Kaczmarska. "Ma?opolska Researchers Night" is a part of European Researchers Night events to be held in more than 200 cities. Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences invites Cracow citizens and tourists visiting our town to its laboratories and to the "Science Garden" formed, especially for this event, in front of the main building. Visitors will have an unique opportunity to discuss science problems with researches and students. Wide range of demonstrations of interesting activities performed in our institute will be presented, these include among others: - AIC 144 Cyclotron with hadrons' therapy facility for eye treatment - Dosimetry and environmental pollution monitoring - Large Hadron Collider experiments - Van de Graff linear accelerator with proton micro b...

  1. The ESL Family Science Night: a model for culturally sensitive science education pedagogy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valadez, Gilbert; Moineau, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    ... general findings and suggestions for further research and pre-service teacher education as it relates to teaching science pedagogy in a way that better serves minority children and their parents and/or guardians. Here, we are defining minority children as those that come from non-mainstream Anglo-American culture and are second language learners. L...

  2. "Saturday Night Live" Goes to High School: Conducting and Advising a Political Science Fair Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Meg; Brewer, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses a case study to illustrate how science fair projects--which traditionally focus on "hard science" topics--can contribute to political science education. One of the authors, a high school student, conducted an experimental study of politics for her science fair project. The other author, a faculty member, was asked to advise the…

  3. "Saturday Night Live" Goes to High School: Conducting and Advising a Political Science Fair Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Meg; Brewer, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses a case study to illustrate how science fair projects--which traditionally focus on "hard science" topics--can contribute to political science education. One of the authors, a high school student, conducted an experimental study of politics for her science fair project. The other author, a faculty member, was asked to advise the…

  4. Researchers’ Night 2015: exploring science in movies, comics, poetry and games

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    On Friday, 25 September, CERN will be celebrating the European Researchers’ Night with a series of events and activities at the Balexert shopping centre. From celebrity Q&A sessions to author signings, there’s something for everyone!   The fun will kick off prior to the night itself, with a number of pre-events held throughout September. From 8 to 12 September, a mock-up of the LHC tunnel will be installed in the central court of the Balexert shopping centre. Representatives from CERN will be on hand to speak to shoppers, and to encourage them to participate in Researchers’ Night. On 24 September, at “Made of shadow and light”, an event hosted by the University of Geneva, Nobel laureate in Literature Gao Xingjian, will present poems and drawings created specifically for the event. Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director of Research and Computing, will provide a scientific perspective on the content. Three POPScience poets - Gwyneth Lewis, Deborah D&a...

  5. The United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, Hans; Balogh, Werner

    2014-05-01

    The basic space science initiative was a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis, particularly in developing nations. Basic space science workshops were co-sponsored and co-organized by ESA, JAXA, and NASA. A series of workshops on basic space science was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004; http://neutrino.aquaphoenix.com/un-esa/) and addressed the status of astronomy in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Western Asia. Through the lead of the National Astronomical Observatory Japan, astronomical telescope facilities were inaugurated in seven developing nations and planetariums were established in twenty developing nations based on the donation of respective equipment by Japan.Pursuant to resolutions of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space of the United Nations (COPUOS) and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee, since 2005, these workshops focused on the preparations for and the follow-ups to the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (UAE 2005, India 2006, Japan 2007, Bulgaria 2008, South Korea 2009; www.unoosa.org/oosa/SAP/bss/ihy2007/index.html). IHY's legacy is the current operation of 16 worldwide instrument arrays with more than 1000 instruments recording data on solar-terrestrial interaction from coronal mass ejections to variations of the total electron content in the ionosphere (http://iswisecretariat.org/). Instruments are provided to hosting institutions by entities of Armenia, Brazil, France, Israel, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States. Starting in 2010, the workshops focused on the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) as mandated in a three-year-work plan as part of the deliberations of COPUOS. Workshops on ISWI

  6. Night terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavor nocturnus; Sleep terror disorder ... The cause is unknown, but night terrors may be triggered by: Fever Lack of sleep Periods of emotional tension , stress , or conflict Night terrors are most common in children ...

  7. Dominance, politics, and physiology: voters' testosterone changes on the night of the 2008 United States presidential election.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Stanton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Political elections are dominance competitions. When men win a dominance competition, their testosterone levels rise or remain stable to resist a circadian decline; and when they lose, their testosterone levels fall. However, it is unknown whether this pattern of testosterone change extends beyond interpersonal competitions to the vicarious experience of winning or losing in the context of political elections. Women's testosterone responses to dominance competition outcomes are understudied, and to date, a clear pattern of testosterone changes in response to winning and losing dominance competitions has not emerged. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study investigated voters' testosterone responses to the outcome of the 2008 United States Presidential election. 183 participants provided multiple saliva samples before and after the winner was announced on Election Night. The results show that male Barack Obama voters (winners had stable post-outcome testosterone levels, whereas testosterone levels dropped in male John McCain and Robert Barr voters (losers. There were no significant effects in female voters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The findings indicate that male voters exhibit biological responses to the realignment of a country's dominance hierarchy as if they participated in an interpersonal dominance contest.

  8. Effect of roughness geometry on heat transfer and friction characteristics of PCM storage unit for night coolness storage in summer season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Shailndra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis of thermal storage unit using phase change material (PCM as storage medium. Storage unit consists of parallel rectangular channels for the air flow which are separated by phase change storage material. The purpose of storage unit is to absorb the night coolness and to provide cooled air at comfort temperature during day time in summer season. MATLsimulation tool has been used to compute the air temperature variation with location as well as time, charging and discharging time of storage unit. Phase change material used for analysis is selected in such a way that it’s Melting point lies between comfort temperature and minimum night ambient temperatures. The air flow rate needed for charging of PCM is approximately four times greater than the flow rate required during day time to achieve comfort temperature for approximately eight hours, due to limited summer night time (only eight hours. The length of storage unit for which NTU value is greater than or equal to five will give the exit air temperature equal to PCM temperature for the case of latent heat utilization. It is found that artificial roughness on the duct surface effectively reduces the length of storage unit in the cost of some extra pressure drop across the duct.

  9. THE ELECTROMAGNET. A SUPPLEMENTARY READING UNIT IN SCIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KINNEY, RICHARD; MOBILIZATION FOR YOUTH CURRICULUM STAFF

    A SAMPLE READING UNIT IN SCIENCE IS PRESENTED FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS AT THREE LEVELS OF ABILITY. THE READING LESSON IS COMPLETE WITH ILLUSTRATIONS OF ELECTROMAGNETS. FOLLOWING THE SUPPLEMENTARY UNIT ARE THREE SAMPLE OBJECTIVE TESTS FOR THE DIFFERENT ABILITY LEVELS. EACH SET OF QUESTIONS IS DESIGNED BOTH TO TEST KNOWLEDGE OF SCIENCE FACTS…

  10. Disseminating Library and Information Science Research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Douglas

    1975-01-01

    A descriptive survey of the organizations and institutions which conduct and support current research in library and information science in the United States of America and of the major sources of research information. (Author)

  11. MSc Science Communication, Science Communication Unit, UWE, Bristol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wilkinson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The MSc in Science Communication offered by the University of the West of England is taught in short three day blocks, designed specifically to cater for both full and part time students wishing to combine work and study effectively. Started in 2004, the programme emphasises the development of practical skills as well as developing a wider understanding of the key issues facing science communicators today. With this in mind, workshops explore theory and practice, considering the potential of a range of creative, targeted and innovative opportunities to enable greater community participation in scientific issues.

  12. ORGANIZATION 6, NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964

    DIRECTIONS FOR CONDUCTING A SERIES OF SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS ARE PRESENTED. THE EXPERIMENTS CONCERN THE STUDY OF HEAT AND MOLECULAR MOTION, HEAT EXCHANGE IN A MIXTURE, SPECIFIC HEAT, HEAT AND SIZE, EXPANSION OF LIQUID, EXPANSION OF AIR, HEAT OF FUSION OF ICE, HEAT OF VAPORIZATION OF WATER, LIGHT AND SOUND, LAW OF REFLECTION, PLANE MIRROR IMAGES,…

  13. ORGANIZATION 6, NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964

    DIRECTIONS FOR CONDUCTING A SERIES OF SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS ARE PRESENTED. THE EXPERIMENTS CONCERN THE STUDY OF HEAT AND MOLECULAR MOTION, HEAT EXCHANGE IN A MIXTURE, SPECIFIC HEAT, HEAT AND SIZE, EXPANSION OF LIQUID, EXPANSION OF AIR, HEAT OF FUSION OF ICE, HEAT OF VAPORIZATION OF WATER, LIGHT AND SOUND, LAW OF REFLECTION, PLANE MIRROR IMAGES,…

  14. Social science findings in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah McCaffrey; Eric Toman; Melanie Stidham; Bruce. Shindler

    2015-01-01

    The rising number of acres burned annually and growing number of people living in or adjacent to fire-prone areas in the United States make wildfire management an increasingly complex and challenging problem. Given the prominence of social issues in shaping the current challenges and determining paths forward, it will be important to have an accurate understanding of...

  15. Mechanical engineering science in SI units

    CERN Document Server

    Gwyther, J L; Williams, G

    1970-01-01

    0.1 Mechanical Engineering Science covers various fundamental concepts that are essential in the practice of mechanical engineering. The title is comprised of 19 chapters that detail various topics, including chemical and physical laws. The coverage of the book includes Newtonian laws, mechanical energy, friction, stress, and gravity. The text also discusses the chemical aspects of mechanical engineering, which include gas laws, states of matter, and fuel combustion. The last chapter tackles concerns in laboratory experiments. The book will be of great use to students of mechanical eng

  16. Big science transformed science, politics and organization in Europe and the United States

    CERN Document Server

    Hallonsten, Olof

    2016-01-01

    This book analyses the emergence of a transformed Big Science in Europe and the United States, using both historical and sociological perspectives. It shows how technology-intensive natural sciences grew to a prominent position in Western societies during the post-World War II era, and how their development cohered with both technological and social developments. At the helm of post-war science are large-scale projects, primarily in physics, which receive substantial funds from the public purse. Big Science Transformed shows how these projects, popularly called 'Big Science', have become symbols of progress. It analyses changes to the political and sociological frameworks surrounding publicly-funding science, and their impact on a number of new accelerator and reactor-based facilities that have come to prominence in materials science and the life sciences. Interdisciplinary in scope, this book will be of great interest to historians, sociologists and philosophers of science.

  17. Discover POPSCIENCE on Researchers' Night

    CERN Multimedia

    The POPSCIENCE Team

    2014-01-01

    On Friday 26 September 2014, CERN will be celebrating European Researchers' Night at three venues in Geneva and St. Genis-Pouilly. Inspired by Andy Warhol, this year's theme is “Pop science is for everyone”.     Every year, on the last Friday of September, the European Researchers’ Night takes place in about 300 cities all over Europe, with funding from the EU, to promote research and highlight researchers in engaging and fun ways for the general public. Andy Warhol said, “Pop art is for everyone”. This year, “Pop science is for everyone” is the motto of the Researchers’ Night event organised by CERN and its partners*. The night will offer everyone the opportunity to learn about the latest discoveries in physics and cosmology through poetry, theatre and music. This will be in addition to the event's traditional activities for the general public. To attract new audiences,...

  18. Discover POPSCIENCE on Researchers' Night

    CERN Multimedia

    The POPSCIENCE Team

    2014-01-01

    On Friday 26 September 2014, CERN will be celebrating European Researchers' Night at three venues in Geneva and St. Genis-Pouilly. Inspired by Andy Warhol, this year's theme is “Pop science is for everyone”.     Every year, on the last Friday of September, the European Researchers’ Night takes place in about 300 cities all over Europe, with funding from the EU, to promote research and highlight researchers in engaging and fun ways for the general public. Andy Warhol said, “Pop art is for everyone”. This year, “Pop science is for everyone” is the motto of the Researchers’ Night event organised by CERN and its partners*. The night will offer everyone the opportunity to learn about the latest discoveries in physics and cosmology through poetry, theatre and music. This will be in addition to the event's traditional activities for the general public. To attract new audiences,...

  19. Classifying Floating Potential Measurement Unit Data Products as Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria; Minow, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We are Co-Investigators for the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) on the International Space Station (ISS) and members of the FPMU operations and data analysis team. We are providing this memo for the purpose of classifying raw and processed FPMU data products and ancillary data as NASA science data with unrestricted, public availability in order to best support science uses of the data.

  20. United Nations Illiteracy in America: Thoughts on Integrating the United Nations into the Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klock, John

    2003-01-01

    To provide an international perspective, and to get American students focused on the United Nations (UN) as a legitimate scientific institution, the United Nations and its role in addressing global environmental concerns should be taught in the American science classroom. The target audience for this paper is high school teachers. The United…

  1. A History of Soil Science Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.

    2017-04-01

    The formal study of soil science is a fairly recent undertaking in academics. Fields like biology, chemistry, and physics date back hundreds of years, but the scientific study of soils only dates to the late 1800s. Academic programs to train students in soil science are even more recent, with the first such programs only developing in the USA in the early 1900s. Some of the first schools to offer soil science training at the university level included the University of North Carolina (UNC), Earlham College (EC), and Cornell University. The first modern soil science textbook published in the United States was "Soils, Their Properties and Management" by Littleton Lyon, Elmer Fippin and Harry Buckman in 1909. This has evolved over time into the popular modern textbook "The Nature and Properties of Soils", most recently authored by Raymond Weil and Nyle Brady. Over time soil science education moved away from liberal arts schools such as UNC and EC and became associated primarily with land grant universities in their colleges of agriculture. There are currently about 71 colleges and universities in the USA that offer bachelors level soil science degree programs, with 54 of these (76%) being land grant schools. In the 1990s through the early 2000s enrollment in USA soil science programs was on the decline, even as overall enrollment at USA colleges and universities increased. This caused considerable concern in the soil science community. More recently there is evidence that soil science student numbers may be increasing, although additional information on this potential trend is desirable. One challenge soil science faces in the modern USA is finding an academic home, as soils are taught by a wide range of fields and soils classes are taken by students in many fields of study, including soil science, a range of agricultural programs, environmental science, environmental health, engineering, geology, geography, and others.

  2. A night with good vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Next week-end, the Geneva Science History Museum invites you to a Science Night under the banner of waves and vibrations. Scientists, artists and storytellers from more than forty institutes and local or regional associations will show that waves and vibrations form an integral part of our environment. You will be able to get in contact with the nature of waves through interactive exhibitions on sound and light and through hands-on demonstrations arranged in the Park of the Perle du Lac. On the CERN stand, you will be able to measure the speed of light with a bar of chocolate, and understand the scattering of waves with plastic ducks. Amazing, no? In addition to the stands, the Night will offer many other activities: reconstructions of experiments, a play, a concert of crystal glasses, an illuminated fountain, a house of spirits. More information Science Night, 6 and 7 July, Park of the Perle du Lac, Geneva

  3. Night Terrors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Night Terrors KidsHealth > For Parents > Night Terrors Print A A A en español Terrores nocturnos What Are Night Terrors? Most parents have comforted their child after the ...

  4. Race-mixing and science in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Paul

    2003-12-01

    Scientific racism was widely used as a justification to oppose race-mixing in the United States. Historians have justly criticized this abuse of science, but have overlooked some of the important ways in which science was used in the 1930s and 1940s to overturn scientific racism and opposition to race-mixing. Of particular importance was the cultural anthropology of Franz Boas and the evolutionary biology of Theodosius Dobzhansky, which supplied arguments against racism and fundamentally altered the scientific understanding of race.

  5. Information Science and integrative Science. A sistemic approach to information units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Dolores Santaella Ruiz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Structured in two parts: The Documentation like integrating science and Systematics approach to the documentary units, this work understands the Documentation from a brought integrating perspective of the twinning that supposes same modus operandi in the information systems through the use of the technologies of the communication. From the General Theory of Systems, the present work interprets this science to multidiscipline like a system formed by the technical subsystems, of elements and individuals

  6. A night with good vibrations

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    For its third edition, the Museum d'histoire des sciences invites you to a Science Night under the banner of waves and undulations. Scientists, artists and storytellers from more than forty institutes and local or regional associations will show in only one weekend that waves and undulations form an integral part of our daily environment. Telephones, televisions, radios, irons, lighting, music, sun rays, stars, rainbows, earthquakes and other natural phenomena - all produce, emit or receive waves or undulations. The visitors attending the Night will be able to get in contact with the nature of waves through interactive exhibitions on sound and light and through hands-on demonstrations arranged around the Bartholoni villa and in the Park of the Perle du lac. An amusing and distracting way to familiarize yourself with the concepts of wavelength, frequency and interference lengths... In addition to the stands, the Night will offer many other activities: reconstructions of critical experiments, scientific consu...

  7. The New Outlook for Science. Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin, Block VI, Units 15-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open Univ., Walton, Bletchley, Bucks (England).

    This text contains units 15-16 in the Open University course, Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin. It is an inter-faculty second level course in the history of science. Unit 15 is concerned with Nature and History and includes uniformitarianism, human history, evolutionism, and Darwinism. Unit objectives, readings, and questions with the…

  8. The New Outlook for Science. Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin, Block VI, Units 15-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open Univ., Walton, Bletchley, Bucks (England).

    This text contains units 15-16 in the Open University course, Science and Belief: from Copernicus to Darwin. It is an inter-faculty second level course in the history of science. Unit 15 is concerned with Nature and History and includes uniformitarianism, human history, evolutionism, and Darwinism. Unit objectives, readings, and questions with the…

  9. Nightly Test system migration

    CERN Document Server

    Win-Lime, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The summer student program allows students to participate to the Cern adventure. They can follow several interesting lectures about particle science and participate to the experiment work. As a summer student, I had worked for LHCb experiment. LHCb uses a lot of software to analyze its data. All this software is organized in packages and projects. They are built and tested during the night using an automated system and the results are displayed on a web interface. Actually, LHCb is changing this system. It is looking for a replacement candidate. So I was charged to unify some internal interfaces to permit a swift migration. In this document, I will describe shortly the system used by LHCb, then I will explain what I have done in detail.

  10. Science and society: art and science collaborations in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Stephen

    2005-12-01

    In this Perspective article, I consider ways in which the contemporary arts and sciences can interact with each other, and I outline the current opportunities for funding in the United Kingdom. I examine the view that, in an art-science collaboration, it is the artist who benefits most, and I cautiously suggest that this is an oversimplification. Evidence from interviews with scientists who have been involved in these collaborations shows that artistic experience and skills are of value in the scientific research process.

  11. GLOBE at Night: Scientific Research outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Walker, C. E.; Geary, E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Increased and robust understanding of our environment requires learning opportunities that take place outside of the traditional K-12 classroom and beyond the confines of the school day. GLOBE at Night is a new event within The GLOBE Program that provides a mechanism for a nontraditional learning activity involving teachers, students, and their families taking observations of the night sky around the world and reporting their observations via a central data base for analysis. To support activities centered on authentic research experiences such as GLOBE at Night, The GLOBE Program has changed its approach to professional development (PD). The new focus of GLOBE PD efforts is centered on teachers being able to facilitate student research in and out of the classroom reflective of authentic scientific research experiences. It has been recognized that there is a critical need for effective teacher professional development programs that support teacher involvement in meaningful scientific research that encourages partnerships between scientists, teachers, and students. Partnerships promoting scientific research for K-12 audiences provides the foundation for The GLOBE Program, an international inquiry-based program designed to engage teachers with their students in partnership with research scientists to better understand the environment at local, regional, and global scales. GLOBE is an ongoing international science and education program that unites students, teachers, and scientists in the study of the Earth System. Students participating in GLOBE engage in hands-on activities, including the collection, analysis, and sharing of research quality scientific data with their peers around the world. Students interact with members of the science community who use the data collected from locations around the world in their research - data that would often not be available otherwise. As of September 2005, over 30,000 teachers representing over 16,000 schools worldwide have

  12. Vision - night blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with night blindness often have trouble seeing stars on a clear night or walking through a ... certain drugs Vitamin A deficiency (rare) Nontreatable causes: Birth defects Retinitis pigmentosa

  13. Sleep Terrors (Night Terrors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep terrors (night terrors) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sleep terrors are episodes of screaming, intense fear and flailing while still asleep. Also known as night terrors, sleep terrors often are paired with sleepwalking. Like ...

  14. Family Reading Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  15. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Science Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, A; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities; creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications; and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has been conducting various scientific activities to promote microgravity education and research. The primary science activity is called 'Zero-gravity Instrument Distribution Project', in which one-axis clinostats will be distributed worldwide. The distribution project will provide unique opportunities for students and researchers to observe the growth of indigenous plants in their countries in a simulated microgravity condition and is expected to create a huge dataset of plant species with their responses to gravity.

  16. popscience - European Researchers Night 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeanneret, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Vendredi 26 septembre 2014, le CERN célèbrera la Nuit européenne des chercheurs à Genève et à St-Genis-Pouilly. Le thème de l’édition 2014 est inspiré d’Andy Warhol : « Pop science is for everyone ». On Friday 26 September 2014, CERN will be celebrating European Researchers' Night at three venues in Geneva and St. Genis-Pouilly. Inspired by Andy Warhol, this year's theme is “Pop science is for everyone”.

  17. SkyGlowNet: Multi-Disciplinary Independent Student Research in Environmental Light at Night Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; DeBenedetti, J. C.; Flurchick, K. M.

    2014-07-01

    SkyGlowNet uses Internet-enabled sky brightness meters (iSBM) to monitor sky brightness over school sites. The data are used professionally and in STEM outreach to study natural and artificial sources of sky brightness, light pollution, energy efficiency, and environmental and health impacts of artificial night lighting. The iSBM units are owned by participating institutions and managed by faculty or students via proprietary Internet links. Student data are embargoed for two semesters to allow students to analyze data and publish results, then they are moved to a common area where students from different institutions can collaborate. The iSBM units can be set to operate automatically each night. Their data include time, sky brightness, weather conditions, and other related parameters. The data stream can be viewed and processed online or downloaded for study. SkyGlowNet is a unique, multi-disciplinary, real science program aiding research for science and non-science students.

  18. "Starry Night" on Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifeld, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an exploration of depth in landscape painting using Vincent van Gogh's "Starry Night" as an example. Used computer drawing software for children to allow students to create their own interpretations of "Starry Night" while exploring means of portraying depth in two-dimensional art. (DSK)

  19. Synthesized night vision goggle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haixian

    2000-06-01

    A Synthesized Night Vision Goggle that will be described int his paper is a new type of night vision goggle with multiple functions. It consists of three parts: main observing system, picture--superimposed system (or Cathode Ray Tube system) and Charge-Coupled Device system.

  20. 75 FR 22756 - Federal Advisory Committee; United States Army Science Board; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; United States Army Science Board; Charter Renewal AGENCY... the charter for the United States Army Science Board (hereafter referred to as the Board). FOR FURTHER..., 703-601-6128. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Board is a discretionary Federal advisory committee...

  1. Earth Science Research in DUSEL; a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, C.; Onstott, T. C.; Tiedje, J. M.; McPherson, B.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Wang, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    A summary of efforts to create one or more Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratories (DUSEL) in the United States is presented. A workshop in Berkeley, August 11-14, 2004, explored the technical requirements of DUSEL for research in basic and applied geological and microbiological sciences, together with elementary particle physics and integrated education and public outreach. The workshop was organized by Bernard Sadoulet, an astrophysicist and the principal investigator (PI) of a community-wide DUSEL program evolving in coordination with the National Science Foundation. The PI team has three physicists (in nuclear science, high-energy physics, and astrophysics) and three earth scientists (in geoscience, biology and engineering). Presentations, working group reports, links to previous workshop/meeting talks, and information about DUSEL candidate sites, are presented in http://neutrino.lbl.gov/DUSELS-1. The Berkeley workshop is a continuation of decades of efforts, the most recent including the 2001 Underground Science Conference's earth science and geomicrobiology workshops, the 2002 International Workshop on Neutrino and Subterranean Science, and the 2003 EarthLab Report. This perspective (from three earth science co-PIs, the lead author of EarthLab report, the lead scientist of education/outreach, and the local earth science organizer) is to inform the community on the status of this national initiative, and to invite their active support. Having a dedicated facility with decades-long, extensive three-dimensional underground access was recognized as the most important single attribute of DUSEL. Many research initiatives were identified and more are expected as the broader community becomes aware of DUSEL. Working groups were organized to evaluate hydrology and coupled processes; geochemistry; rock mechanics/seismology; applications (e.g., homeland security, environment assessment, petroleum recovery, and carbon sequestration); geomicrobiology and

  2. The "Earth Physics" Workshops Offered by the Earth Science Education Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Earth science has a part to play in broadening students' learning experience in physics. The Earth Science Education Unit presents a range of (free) workshops to teachers and trainee teachers, suggesting how Earth-based science activities, which show how we understand and use the planet we live on, can easily be slotted into normal science…

  3. The "Earth Physics" Workshops Offered by the Earth Science Education Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Earth science has a part to play in broadening students' learning experience in physics. The Earth Science Education Unit presents a range of (free) workshops to teachers and trainee teachers, suggesting how Earth-based science activities, which show how we understand and use the planet we live on, can easily be slotted into normal science…

  4. Uniting Science and Literacy: A WIn for All (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Science is all about inquiry in our natural world. Yet all of the observational skills at our fingertips are useless if we don’t have the ability to communicate it effectively to our friends, family, and classmates. The development of language skills is critical for students to be able to codify their ideas, integrate observations from the outside, and synthesize both to create the next step in their educational journey. The connections between science and literacy in the classroom have received increasing attention over the last two decades, as more and more evidence demonstrates that science offers an important opportunity to excite and engage students in the area of literacy improvement. When students are actively participating in science activities, including making observations, formulating hypotheses, and explicating their findings, they are also learning to utilize language to express then ideas. In addition, combining literacy with science allows students to increase their ability to explore their world or universe by taking vicarious journeys to the bottom of the ocean or the edge of our solar system. Combining science and literacy helps both, improving both reading and science scores, as well as increasing students’ interest in science. This talk explores the importance of connecting science and literacy as a pathway to allowing students to excel at both.

  5. The Starry Night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Jerome J.

    1985-01-01

    Vincent Van Gogh's painting "The Starry Night" is discussed, and ways that an art teacher can use this painting as a resource for learning are suggested. Specific activities to use with elementary and secondary students are included. (RM)

  6. Urinating more at night

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium level Certain medicines, including water pills (diuretics) Diabetes insipidus Waking often during the night to urinate can ... medicines are you taking? Have you changed your diet? Do you drink caffeine and alcohol? If so, ...

  7. Night Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Tuncel; Fatma Özlem Orhan

    2009-01-01

    Hunger is an awakening related biological impulse. The relationship between hunger and sleep is moderated by the control of homeostatic and circadian rhytms of the body. Abnormal eating behavior during sleep period could result from different causes. Abnormal eating during the main sleep period has been categorized as either night eating syndrome or sleep related eating disorder. Night eating syndrome (NES) is an eating disorder characterised by the clinical features of morning anorexia, even...

  8. Numbers and Measuring, Learning With TOR: MINNEMAST Coordinated Mathematics - Science Series, Unit 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Elaine E., Ed.

    This volume is the sixteenth in a series of 29 coordinated MINNEMAST units in mathematics and science for kindergarten and the primary grades. Intended for use by second-grade teachers, this unit guide provides a summary and overview of the unit, a list of materials needed, and descriptions of five groups of lessons. The purposes and procedures…

  9. A critical history of United States science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausch, Robert

    The dissertation argues that one cannot fully appreciate US science education without recognizing the rationalizing and legitimating role particular versions of science (e.g. instrumental, empiricist, value-neutral), scientific knowledge/technology and education (e.g. schooling-dominated, skills transmission oriented, non-critical) have come to play in liberal-democratic societies as well as the ways in which science and education use each other for mutual legitimation all in the service of reproducing the status quo with respect to the inequities which pervade US society. The dissertation offers a "critical"---that is, anti-foundational, skeptical, conceptual, and political---history of US science education with a focus on two specific aspects of science education which lie at the conceptual heart of US society in general: the logics of technology---expressed as a tension between facts and inquiry---and evolution. The entry of science education into schools must be understood in the context of modernization, industrialization and the changing makeup of American society, all of which precipitated a crisis in traditional notions of American exceptionalism which was reconfigured as science and technology become signs of progress and modernity. Further, the call of the Progressive era---in educational policy documents, texts, in John Dewey, etc.---to make sure school-science contains a prominent laboratory component reflected a broader debate around values, in this case the idea that freedom of thought in science was an expression of (even guaranteed) a more general freedom, the kind found in liberal democratic societies. Today, globalization, corporatization, fundamentalism and the new science standards effect these questions, particularly as the vocabularies of science are used to further legitimate certain educational reforms and disguise the politics they import. Finally, I consider the implications of this critical history for the actual practices of science

  10. History of the Night

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The definition of the night, as the period between sunset and sunrise, is consistent and unalterable, regardless of culture and time. However the perception of the night and its economic, social, and cultural roles are subject to change. Which parameters determine these changes? What can we learn by studying them about the specific character of a culture? Why do people experience the night in different ways in different historical periods and how did this affect their lives? How do references to nocturnal activities in historical sources (works of art, narratives) reveal what the artists/authors wish to communicate to their audiences? Can the night be a meaningful subject of historical and archaeological enquiry? A study of the source material in the Greek world (ca. 400 BC-ca. AD 400) shows a continuous effort to colonize the night with activities of the day, to make the night safer, more productive, more rational, more efficient. The main motors for this change were social developments and religion, no...

  11. Soils. Science Education Research Unit. Working Paper 201.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happs, John C.

    The Learning in Science Project has adopted the view that science teaching might be improved if teachers can be given some appreciation of students' views of the world and the beliefs, expectations, and language that learners bring to new learning situations. This investigation looks at the topic of soil, one of the basic resources of New Zealand…

  12. Connectivity Theory at Work: The Referrals between Science and Mathematics in a Science Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmetlioglu, Deniz; Ozdem, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    Researches carried out all around the world showed that students learn more effectively if they are able to make connections between subjects. This case reports based on an investigation of how mathematics concepts were connected to science concepts by a science teacher in an elementary science classroom, and on the science teacher's views…

  13. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    CERN Document Server

    Undrus, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    For over 10 years of development the ATLAS Nightly Build System has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The numerous branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains ~2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by ~1000 developers. The nightly releases lead up to stable releases used for data processing and analysis worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on the ATLAS Build Farm. The ATN testing framework runs unit and integration tests for the nightly releases.

  14. United States Science Policy: from Conceptions to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Konnov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyze the organizational structure of the U.S. scientific community, examining the V. Bush report Science: the Endless Frontier (1945 as its conceptual basis, which remains the cornerstone of the American science policy. The authors point out decentralization as the key trait of this structure, which reveals itself in the absence of a unitary centre with a mission to formulate and implement science policy and high level of dissemination of self-government practices supported by a wide range of government agencies. This configuration determines the special position, occupied by the universities as universal research establishments possessing flexibility in cooperation with state agencies and private sector.

  15. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) 1991-2012 and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, A M; Balogh, W R

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains an overview and summary on the achievements of the United Nations basic space science initiative in terms of donated and provided planetariums, astronomical telescopes, and space weather instruments, particularly operating in developing nations. This scientific equipment has been made available to respective host countries, particularly developing nations, through the series of twenty basic space science workshops, organized through the United Nations Programme on Space Applications since 1991. Organized by the United Nations, the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States of America, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the basic space science workshops were organized as a series of workshops that focused on basic space science (1991-2004), the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (2005-2009), and the International Space Weather Initiative (2010-2012) proposed by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Spac...

  16. Enhancement of the United States Naval Academy (USNA) Polar Science Program (PSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Polar Science Program ( PSP ) LCDR John Woods United States Naval Academy Oceanography Department 572C Holloway Road Annapolis, MD 21402-1363...email: Pablo.Clemente-Colon@noaa.gov Award Number: N00014-13-WX20820 www.usna.edu/ PSP LONG-TERM GOALS The United States Naval Academy’s...Academy (USNA) Polar Science Program ( PSP ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  17. Anthropogenic Climate Change in Undergraduate Marine and Environmental Science Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlietstra, Lucy S.; Mrakovcich, Karina L.; Futch, Victoria C.; Stutzman, Brooke S.

    2016-01-01

    To develop a context for program-level design decisions pertaining to anthropogenic climate change, the authors studied the prevalence of courses focused on human-induced climate change in undergraduate marine science and environmental science degree programs in the United States. Of the 86 institutions and 125 programs the authors examined, 37%…

  18. Heat and Molecules. Seychelles Integrated Science. [Teacher and Pupil Booklets]. Unit 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, M.; Fryars, M.

    Seychelles Integrated Science (SIS), a 3-year laboratory-based science program for students (ages 11-15) in upper primary grades 7, 8, and 9, was developed from an extensive evaluation and modification of previous P7-P9 materials. This P8 SIS unit deals with: (1) changes in temperature which make matter expand and contract (and how this affects…

  19. United-Unidos: Mathematics and Science for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Estrella M.; Rodriguez, Manuel Gomez

    Professional and community organizations gathered for a weekend summit in May 1992 to articulate how the National Education Goal 4 ("U.S. students will be first in the world in science and mathematics achievement") could be achieved within the Hispanic community. This publication summarizes the major education issues, and highlights the…

  20. Night Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Tuncel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hunger is an awakening related biological impulse. The relationship between hunger and sleep is moderated by the control of homeostatic and circadian rhytms of the body. Abnormal eating behavior during sleep period could result from different causes. Abnormal eating during the main sleep period has been categorized as either night eating syndrome or sleep related eating disorder. Night eating syndrome (NES is an eating disorder characterised by the clinical features of morning anorexia, evening hyperphagia, and insomnia with awakenings followed by nocturnal food ingestion. Recently night eating syndrome, conceptualized as a delayed circadian intake of food. Sleep-related eating disorder, thought to represent a parasomnia and as such included within the revised International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2, and characterized by nocturnal partial arousals associated with recurrent episodes of involuntary food consumption and altered levels of consciousness. Whether, however, sleep-related eating disorder and night eating syndrome represent different diseases or are part of a continuum is still debated. This review summarizes their characteristics, treatment outcomes and differences between them.

  1. A Night's Sleep, Ultracheap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ You tote your own luggage, the bed's a bit stiff, and the decor in the spartan rooms and lobby is reminiscent of a college dorm. Oh-and you can't buy a beer. But for $22 a night,the indi One Hotel is one heck of a bargain.

  2. A night sky model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpylev, N. P.; Smirnov, M. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    A night sky model is proposed. It includes different components of light polution, such as solar twilight, moon scattered light, zodiacal light, Milky Way, air glow and artificial light pollution. The model is designed for calculating the efficiency of astronomical installations.

  3. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Ionizing Radiation, Unit 2. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 2 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to convey factual information relevant to radioactivity and radiation and relate that information both to the personal lives of students…

  4. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Waste Management System, Unit 4. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 4 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to explain how transportation, a geologic repository, and the multi-purpose canister will work together to provide short-term and long-term…

  5. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Nuclear Waste, Unit 1. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 1 of the four-part series Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to help students establish the relevance of the topic of nuclear waste to their everyday lives and activities. Particular attention is…

  6. Agricultural Mechanics Unit for Plant Science Core Curriculum. Volume 15, Number 4. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Hunter, Bill

    This instructor's guide is intended for use in teaching the agricultural mechanics unit of a plant science core curriculum. Covered in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: arc welding (following safety procedures, controlling distortion, selecting and caring for electrodes, identifying the material to be welded, and welding…

  7. Implicit Theories of Creativity in Computer Science in the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chaoying; Baer, John; Kaufman, James C.

    2015-01-01

    To study implicit concepts of creativity in computer science in the United States and mainland China, we first asked 308 Chinese computer scientists for adjectives that would describe a creative computer scientist. Computer scientists and non-computer scientists from China (N = 1069) and the United States (N = 971) then rated how well those…

  8. Implicit Theories of Creativity in Computer Science in the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chaoying; Baer, John; Kaufman, James C.

    2015-01-01

    To study implicit concepts of creativity in computer science in the United States and mainland China, we first asked 308 Chinese computer scientists for adjectives that would describe a creative computer scientist. Computer scientists and non-computer scientists from China (N = 1069) and the United States (N = 971) then rated how well those…

  9. Teaching Basic Classification through an Elementary Science Unit on Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Nancy A.

    Five lesson plans are included in this unit designed to teach basic classification skills through the study of food. Each lesson plan contains an objective, list of materials needed, statement of the lesson problem, instructional strategies, learning outcomes, and evaluation method(s). Objectives of the lessons include: (1) grouping common animals…

  10. Investigation of science faculty with education specialties within the largest university system in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Seth D; Pelaez, Nancy J; Rudd, James A; Stevens, Michael T; Tanner, Kimberly D; Williams, Kathy S

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to improve science education include university science departments hiring Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES), scientists who take on specialized roles in science education within their discipline. Although these positions have existed for decades and may be growing more common, few reports have investigated the SFES approach to improving science education. We present comprehensive data on the SFES in the California State University (CSU) system, the largest university system in the United States. We found that CSU SFES were engaged in three key arenas including K-12 science education, undergraduate science education, and discipline-based science education research. As such, CSU SFES appeared to be well-positioned to have an impact on science education from within science departments. However, there appeared to be a lack of clarity and agreement about the purpose of these SFES positions. In addition, formal training in science education among CSU SFES was limited. Although over 75% of CSU SFES were fulfilled by their teaching, scholarship, and service, our results revealed that almost 40% of CSU SFES were seriously considering leaving their positions. Our data suggest that science departments would likely benefit from explicit discussions about the role of SFES and strategies for supporting their professional activities.

  11. The Units Ontology: a tool for integrating units of measurement in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkoutos, Georgios V; Schofield, Paul N; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Units are basic scientific tools that render meaning to numerical data. Their standardization and formalization caters for the report, exchange, process, reproducibility and integration of quantitative measurements. Ontologies are means that facilitate the integration of data and knowledge allowing interoperability and semantic information processing between diverse biomedical resources and domains. Here, we present the Units Ontology (UO), an ontology currently being used in many scientific resources for the standardized description of units of measurements.

  12. How Superstition Won and Science Lost. Popularizing Science and Health in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, John C.

    This book studies the history of changing patterns in the dissemination, or popularization of scientific findings, to the general public since 1830. It focuses on three different areas of science: (1) health; (2) psychology; and (3) the natural sciences. The document explores the ways in which this process of popularization has deteriorated. It…

  13. Advanced night vision goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Clinton

    2003-02-01

    The Advanced Night Vision Goggle (ANVG) program is developing integrated wide field of view (WFOV) helmet-mounted image intensifier night vision goggle systems. ANVG will provide a FOV of approximately 40° (vertical) × 100° (horizontal) and an integrated heads-up display for overlay of flight symbology and/or FLIR imagery. The added FLIR complements the I2 imagery in out of the window or ground applications. ANVG will significantly improve safety, situational awareness, and mission capabilities in differing environments. ANVG achieves the ultra wide FOV using four image intensifier tubes in a head-mounted configuration. Additional features include a miniature flat panel display and a lightweight uncooled FLIR. The integrated design will demonstrate the capability of helmet-mounted I2 and FLIR image fusion. Fusion will be accomplished optically and will offer significant opportunities for ground applications. This paper summarizes the basic technologies, lessons learned, and program status.

  14. Emergency/Night Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    UDEC's highly efficient lighting system is finding wide acceptance among industrial and commercial firms as an energy savings means of providing emergency and night lighting. Originating from Skylab, the system consists of small high frequency fluorescent light fixtures powered by solar cells. Advantages of UDEC's lighting system stem from high reliability and high light output with very low energy drain. Principal components of system are long life fluorescent lamps operated by electronic circuitry, a sealed gelatine cell battery that needs no maintenance for eight years and a solid-state automatic battery charger. Installation of UDEC lighting in a company's six-and-a-half acre warehouse office cut the annual night lighting electric bill from $8,000 a year to $300 per year.

  15. Thanks to CERN's team of surveyors, the Organization's stand at the Night of Science attracted a large number of visitors : the technology and tools used by the surveyors, such as the Terrameter shown here, attracted many visitors to the CERN stand

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Thanks to CERN's team of surveyors, the Organization's stand at the Night of Science attracted a large number of visitors : the technology and tools used by the surveyors, such as the Terrameter shown here, attracted many visitors to the CERN stand

  16. Computer Science Teacher Professional Development in the United States: A Review of Studies Published between 2004 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menekse, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    While there has been a remarkable interest to make computer science a core K-12 academic subject in the United States, there is a shortage of K-12 computer science teachers to successfully implement computer sciences courses in schools. In order to enhance computer science teacher capacity, training programs have been offered through teacher…

  17. Computer Science Teacher Professional Development in the United States: A Review of Studies Published between 2004 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menekse, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    While there has been a remarkable interest to make computer science a core K-12 academic subject in the United States, there is a shortage of K-12 computer science teachers to successfully implement computer sciences courses in schools. In order to enhance computer science teacher capacity, training programs have been offered through teacher…

  18. ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Simmons, B; Undrus, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nigh...

  19. ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Simmons, B; Undrus, A

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nigh...

  20. The Cuba–United States Thaw: Building Bridges through Science and Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G.; Kouri, Vivian; Resik, Sonia; Acosta, Belsy; Guillen, Gerardo; Goraleski, Karen; Espinal, Marcos; Guzman, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Beginning in 2014, there has been significant progress in normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. Herein, we discuss the history and recent progress in scientific collaboration between the two countries as well as the continued challenges. Science and global health diplomacy can be key tools in reestablishing a trusting and productive relationship of mutual and global benefit, bringing about better and healthier lives for people in both Cuba and the United States. PMID:28719268

  1. The Cuba-United States Thaw: Building Bridges Through Science and Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G; Kouri, Vivian; Resik, Sonia; Acosta, Belsy; Guillen, Gerardo; Goraleski, Karen; Espinal, Marcos; Guzman, Maria G

    2017-06-01

    AbstractBeginning in 2014, there has been significant progress in normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States. Herein, we discuss the history and recent progress in scientific collaboration between the two countries as well as the continued challenges. Science and global health diplomacy can be key tools in reestablishing a trusting and productive relationship of mutual and global benefit, bringing about better and healthier lives for people in both Cuba and the United States.

  2. An Investigation into Teacher Support of Scientific Explanation in High School Science Inquiry Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffenberg, Rebecca

    The Framework for K-12 Science Education, the foundation for the Next Generation Science Standards, identifies scientific explanation as one of the eight practices "essential for learning science." In order to design professional development to help teachers implement these new standards, we need to assess students' current skill level in explanation construction, characterize current teacher practice surrounding it, and identify best practices for supporting students in explanation construction. This multiple-case study investigated teacher practice in eight high school science inquiry units in the Portland metro area and the scientific explanations the students produced in their work samples. T eacher Instructional Portfolios (TIPs) were analyzed with a TIP rubric based on best practices in teaching science inquiry and a qualitative coding scheme. Written scientific explanations were analyzed with an explanation rubric and qualitative codes. Relationships between instructional practices and explanation quality were examined. The study found that students struggle to produce high quality explanations. They have the most difficulty including adequate reasoning with science content. Also, teachers need to be familiar with the components of explanation and use a variety of pedagogical techniques to support students' explanation construction. Finally, the topic of the science inquiry activity should be strongly connected to the content in the unit, and students need a firm grasp of the scientific theory or model on which their research questions are based to adequately explain their inquiry results.

  3. Night-Lighting as a Waterfowl Capture Technique

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In recent years considerable experimentation with the night-lighting technique for capturing waterfowl has been conducted in the United State s and Canada....

  4. CMS Virtual Visit - Researchers Night in Portugal

    CERN Multimedia

    Abreu, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Researchers Night at Planetarium Calouste Gulbenkian - Ciência Viva Centre in Lisbon. Organised by researchers from LIP (Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas) and including CMS Virtual Visit during which André David Tinoco Mendes and José Rasteiro da Silva, based at Cessy, France, "virtually" discussed science and technology behind the CMS detector with the audience in Lisbon.

  5. Use of Jigsaw Technique to Teach the Unit "Science within Time" in Secondary 7th Grade Social Sciences Course and Students' Views on This Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to apply the jigsaw technique in Social Sciences teaching and to unroll the effects of this technique on learning. The unit "Science within Time" in the secondary 7th grade Social Sciences text book was chosen for the research. It is aimed to compare the jigsaw technique with the traditional teaching method in…

  6. The Sky at Night

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    For more than 50 years now Sir Patrick Moore has presented the BBC Television series Sky at Night; not a month has been missed – a record for any television series, and a record which may never be broken. Every three years or so a book is published covering the main events in both astronomy and space research. This is the 13th volume, not only a record of the programmes but also of the great advances and discoveries during the period covered - eclipses, comets, and the strange chemical lakes of Titan, for instance, but also anniversaries such as the fifteenth “birthday” of the Hubble Space Telescope, and not forgetting the programme celebrating the Sky at Night’s 50th year, attended by astronaut Piers Sellars and many others who appeared on the programme over the years. All the chapters are self-contained, and fully illustrated. In this new Sky at Night book you will find much to entertain you. It will appeal to amateurs and professionals alike.

  7. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  8. USDA-ARS Plant Science Research Unit, St. Paul Alfalfa/Forage Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Plant Science Research Unit (PSRU) located at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul receives approximately $1.5 million to fund the research of six scientists who direct their research efforts toward developing new uses and improved traits for alfalfa. Our overarching goal is to develop alfalf...

  9. Fruit and Vegetable Production Unit for Plant Science Core Curriculum. Instructor's Guide. Volume 16, Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bob R.; Mullinix, Mark K.

    This curriculum guide, part of a plant science core curriculum, consists of materials for use in teaching a unit on fruit and vegetable production. Provided in the first part of the guide are a list of objectives, a bibliography, and a competency profile. The remainder of the guide consists of 11 lessons dealing with the following topics: planning…

  10. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  11. Looking for Partners to Engage the Global Community in Connecting to the Sky through International Observe the Moon Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Jones, Andrea; Bleacher, Lora; Shaner, Andrew; Day, Brian

    2015-08-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN), sponosored by NASA, is an annual worldwide public event that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of Earth's Moon and its connection to planetary science and exploration. Everyone on Earth is invited to participate by hosting or attending an InOMN event, uniting on one day each year to look at and learn about the Moon together. Over the past five years, we have supported thousands of events in over 50 countries at schools, museums, observatories, libraries, community centers, and backyards around the world. The Moon is an ideal avenue for engaging all audiences in planetary science: it is a constant fixture in our skies, visible both day and night, and requires no special equipment for safe observation.We are seeking partners from all countries to help engage diverse audiences across the world in lunar observation and to use this yearly event to engage the global community in the excitiment of science and exploration. We are looking for partners to bring their strengths, connections, and innovative ideas to share International Observe the Moon Night with the world and to help us understand how we can support your audiences in connecting to sky.For more information about International Observe the Moon Night and related resources, visit observethemoonnight.org.

  12. Cleaning up the streets : Newcastle-upon-Tyne’s night-time neighbourhood services team.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The streets of Britain’s city centres are busy at night: taxi drivers, ‘revellers’, fast food sellers, bouncers, policemen, street pastors, leafleteers and more take to the streets to promote, produce or consume the night-time economy. ‘Night-time economy studies’ has catalogued this vast range of activities associated with consumption in city centres at night, particularly within a British context. Roberts and Eldridge’s comprehensive overview of research across social science...

  13. High magnetic field science and its application in the United States current status and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2013-01-01

    The Committee to Assess the Current Status and Future Direction of High Magnetic Field Science in the United States was convened by the National Research Council in response to a request by the National Science Foundation. This report answers three questions: (1) What is the current state of high-field magnet science, engineering, and technology in the United States, and are there any conspicuous needs to be addressed? (2) What are the current science drivers and which scientific opportunities and challenges can be anticipated over the next ten years? (3) What are the principal existing and planned high magnetic field facilities outside of the United States, what roles have U.S. high field magnet development efforts played in developing those facilities, and what potentials exist for further international collaboration in this area? A magnetic field is produced by an electrical current in a metal coil. This current exerts an expansive force on the coil, and a magnetic field is "high" if it challenges the str...

  14. Advancing science diplomacy: Indonesia and the US Naval Medical Research Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frank L

    2014-12-01

    Science diplomacy supposedly builds international cooperation through scientific and technical exchange. In practice, however, there are important but often overlooked instances where it might create conflict instead--as with accusations of espionage surrounding the US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 (NAMRU-2) in Indonesia. Did American science diplomacy backfire in Indonesia and, if so, why? Most literature fails to anticipate this possibility, let alone explain it, since science diplomacy is rarely subject to critical analysis. Rather than shun politics or, similarly, simply blame the demise of NAMRU-2 on the military or avian influenza, I consider both the successes and failures of this research unit in the context of Indonesia's transition to democracy and America's legacy from the Cold War. Based on this history, I propose that the effects of science diplomacy depend on strategic communication and exchange, as well as elite influence and material incentives. Therefore, by challenging the conventional wisdom about science diplomacy, NAMRU-2 can help advance the theory and practice of this potentially useful tool of statecraft.

  15. A Survey of Science Teaching in Public Schools of the United States (1971), Volume 1, Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Fred R.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to collect "bench mark" data on the teaching of science that could serve as a basis of comparison for trend analysis. The information obtained in this survey presents a description of science teaching practices and selected science teacher characteristics in the United States. Descriptive information…

  16. The ChemCam Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover: Science Objectives and Mast Unit Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Saccoccio, M.; Barraclough, B.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Mangold, N.; Baratoux, D.; Bender, S.; Berger, G.; Bernardin, J.; Berthé, M.; Bridges, N.; Blaney, D.; Bouyé, M.; Caïs, P.; Clark, B.; Clegg, S.; Cousin, A.; Cremers, D.; Cros, A.; DeFlores, L.; Derycke, C.; Dingler, B.; Dromart, G.; Dubois, B.; Dupieux, M.; Durand, E.; d'Uston, L.; Fabre, C.; Faure, B.; Gaboriaud, A.; Gharsa, T.; Herkenhoff, K.; Kan, E.; Kirkland, L.; Kouach, D.; Lacour, J.-L.; Langevin, Y.; Lasue, J.; Le Mouélic, S.; Lescure, M.; Lewin, E.; Limonadi, D.; Manhès, G.; Mauchien, P.; McKay, C.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Michel, Y.; Miller, E.; Newsom, H. E.; Orttner, G.; Paillet, A.; Parès, L.; Parot, Y.; Pérez, R.; Pinet, P.; Poitrasson, F.; Quertier, B.; Sallé, B.; Sotin, C.; Sautter, V.; Séran, H.; Simmonds, J. J.; Sirven, J.-B.; Stiglich, R.; Striebig, N.; Thocaven, J.-J.; Toplis, M. J.; Vaniman, D.

    2012-09-01

    ChemCam is a remote sensing instrument suite on board the "Curiosity" rover (NASA) that uses Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to provide the elemental composition of soils and rocks at the surface of Mars from a distance of 1.3 to 7 m, and a telescopic imager to return high resolution context and micro-images at distances greater than 1.16 m. We describe five analytical capabilities: rock classification, quantitative composition, depth profiling, context imaging, and passive spectroscopy. They serve as a toolbox to address most of the science questions at Gale crater. ChemCam consists of a Mast-Unit (laser, telescope, camera, and electronics) and a Body-Unit (spectrometers, digital processing unit, and optical demultiplexer), which are connected by an optical fiber and an electrical interface. We then report on the development, integration, and testing of the Mast-Unit, and summarize some key characteristics of ChemCam. This confirmed that nominal or better than nominal performances were achieved for critical parameters, in particular power density (>1 GW/cm2). The analysis spot diameter varies from 350 μm at 2 m to 550 μm at 7 m distance. For remote imaging, the camera field of view is 20 mrad for 1024×1024 pixels. Field tests demonstrated that the resolution (˜90 μrad) made it possible to identify laser shots on a wide variety of images. This is sufficient for visualizing laser shot pits and textures of rocks and soils. An auto-exposure capability optimizes the dynamical range of the images. Dedicated hardware and software focus the telescope, with precision that is appropriate for the LIBS and imaging depths-of-field. The light emitted by the plasma is collected and sent to the Body-Unit via a 6 m optical fiber. The companion to this paper (Wiens et al. this issue) reports on the development of the Body-Unit, on the analysis of the emitted light, and on the good match between instrument performance and science specifications.

  17. The ChemCam Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover: Science Objectives and Mast Unit Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, S.; Wiens, R.C.; Saccoccio, M.; Barraclough, B.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Mangold, N.; Baratoux, D.; Bender, S.; Berger, G.; Bernardin, J.; Berthé, M.; Bridges, N.; Blaney, D.; Bouyé, M.; Caïs, P.; Clark, B.; Clegg, S.; Cousin, A.; Cremers, D.; Cros, A.; DeFlores, L.; Derycke, C.; Dingler, B.; Dromart, G.; Dubois, B.; Dupieux, M.; Durand, E.; d'Uston, L.; Fabre, C.; Faure, B.; Gaboriaud, A.; Gharsa, T.; Herkenhoff, K.; Kan, E.; Kirkland, L.; Kouach, D.; Lacour, J.-L.; Langevin, Y.; Lasue, J.; Le Mouélic, S.; Lescure, M.; Lewin, E.; Limonadi, D.; Manhès, G.; Mauchien, P.; McKay, C.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Michel, Y.; Miller, E.; Newsom, Horton E.; Orttner, G.; Paillet, A.; Parès, L.; Parot, Y.; Pérez, R.; Pinet, P.; Poitrasson, F.; Quertier, B.; Sallé, B.; Sotin, C.; Sautter, V.; Séran, H.; Simmonds, J.J.; Sirven, J.-B.; Stiglich, R.; Striebig, N.; Thocaven, J.-J.; Toplis, M.J.; Vaniman, D.

    2012-01-01

    ChemCam is a remote sensing instrument suite on board the "Curiosity" rover (NASA) that uses Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to provide the elemental composition of soils and rocks at the surface of Mars from a distance of 1.3 to 7 m, and a telescopic imager to return high resolution context and micro-images at distances greater than 1.16 m. We describe five analytical capabilities: rock classification, quantitative composition, depth profiling, context imaging, and passive spectroscopy. They serve as a toolbox to address most of the science questions at Gale crater. ChemCam consists of a Mast-Unit (laser, telescope, camera, and electronics) and a Body-Unit (spectrometers, digital processing unit, and optical demultiplexer), which are connected by an optical fiber and an electrical interface. We then report on the development, integration, and testing of the Mast-Unit, and summarize some key characteristics of ChemCam. This confirmed that nominal or better than nominal performances were achieved for critical parameters, in particular power density (>1 GW/cm2). The analysis spot diameter varies from 350 μm at 2 m to 550 μm at 7 m distance. For remote imaging, the camera field of view is 20 mrad for 1024×1024 pixels. Field tests demonstrated that the resolution (˜90 μrad) made it possible to identify laser shots on a wide variety of images. This is sufficient for visualizing laser shot pits and textures of rocks and soils. An auto-exposure capability optimizes the dynamical range of the images. Dedicated hardware and software focus the telescope, with precision that is appropriate for the LIBS and imaging depths-of-field. The light emitted by the plasma is collected and sent to the Body-Unit via a 6 m optical fiber. The companion to this paper (Wiens et al. this issue) reports on the development of the Body-Unit, on the analysis of the emitted light, and on the good match between instrument performance and science specifications.

  18. [Night workers and plasmatic cortisol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, P; Rosati, M V; Ciarrocca, M; Nicassio, P; Piccoli, F; Cerratti, D; Anzani, M F; Tomei, G; Perugi, F; Monti, C; Palitti, T; Tomao, E; Caciari, T; Tomei, F

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate whether occupational exposure to night work could cause alterations in the levels of plasmatic cortisol. The interest toward this argument arises form several studies in scientific literature referring the presence of an alteration in the synthesis and release of cortisol in workers exposed to night work. We studied a population of workers employed in night security service and monitoring service of alarm systems in different museums compared to a control group not performing shift-work and/or night work. The exposed and control subjects were compared by age, length of service, smoking habit (n. cigarettes per day), habitual consumption of alcoholic drinks (n. glass of wine/beer per day). We evaluated the levels of plasmatic cortisol on 50 workers exposed to night work, all males of whom 30 smokers and 20 non-smokers and on 50 controls of whom 30 smokers and 20 non-smokers.

  19. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undrus, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Build and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, testing, and creation of distribution kits. The ATN testing framework of the Nightly System runs unit and integration tests in parallel suites, fully utilizing the resources of multi-core machines, and provides the first results even before compilations complete. The NICOS error detection system is based on several techniques and classifies the compilation and test errors according to their severity. It is periodically tuned to place greater emphasis on certain software defects by highlighting the problems on NICOS web pages and sending automatic e-mail notifications to responsible developers. These and other recent developments will be presented and future plans will be described.

  20. Status Report on the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI)

    CERN Document Server

    Haubold, H J

    2010-01-01

    Since 1990, the UN Programme on Space Applications leads the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative by contributing to the international and regional development of astronomy and space science through annual UN/ESA/NASA/JAXA workshops on basic space science, International Heliophysical Year 2007, and the International Space Weather Initiative. Space weather is the conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and can endanger human life or health. The programme also coordinates the development of IHY/ISWI low-cost, ground-based, world-wide instrument arrays. To date, 14 world-wide instrument arrays comprising approximately 1000 instruments (GPS receivers, magnetometers, spectrometers, particle detectors) are operating in more than 71 countries. The most recent workshop was hosted by the Republic of Korea in 2009 for Asia and the Pacific. Annual workshops on ...

  1. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, Unit 3. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 3 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to identify the key elements of the United States' nuclear waste dilemma and introduce the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the role of the…

  2. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Public comments are sought on the entirety of the proposed United States Government Policy for... TECHNOLOGY POLICY United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use... responsible conduct and communication of such research. The proposed Policy herein, United States...

  3. Multi-channel automotive night vision system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; Wang, Li-jun; Zhang, Yi

    2013-09-01

    A four-channel automotive night vision system is designed and developed .It is consist of the four active near-infrared cameras and an Mulit-channel image processing display unit,cameras were placed in the automobile front, left, right and rear of the system .The system uses near-infrared laser light source,the laser light beam is collimated, the light source contains a thermoelectric cooler (TEC),It can be synchronized with the camera focusing, also has an automatic light intensity adjustment, and thus can ensure the image quality. The principle of composition of the system is description in detail,on this basis, beam collimation,the LD driving and LD temperature control of near-infrared laser light source,four-channel image processing display are discussed.The system can be used in driver assistance, car BLIS, car parking assist system and car alarm system in day and night.

  4. Science and Technology Teachers' Opinions about Problems Faced While Teaching 8th Grade Science Unit "Force and Motion" and Suggestions for Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Uzoglu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the problems encountered while teaching force and motion unit in 8th grade science and technology course from teachers' perspectives and offer solutions to eliminate these problems. The study was conducted with 248 science and technology teachers working in 7 regions in Turkey in 2012-2013 academic year.…

  5. United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops on Basic Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, H. J.; Ocampo, A.; Torres, S.; Wamsteker, W.

    1995-01-01

    In 1958, the United Nations (UN) formally recognized a new potential for international cooperation by establishing an ad hoc Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS). A year later the Committee became a permanent body, and by 1983 membership had expanded to 53 states, with more than half of the members coming from the developing world. In 1970, COPUOS established the UN Program on Space Applications in order to strengthen cooperation in space science and technology between non-industrialized and industrialized countries. In the last few years, the UN and its COPUOS have paid increasing attention to education and research in space science and technology, including basic space science. In 1991 the UN, in cooperation with ESA, initiated the organization of annual Workshops in Basic Space Science for developing countries. These Workshops are designed to be held in one of the following major regions: Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Western Asia, and Europe. Accordingly, Basic Space Science Workshops have already been held in India (1991), Costa Rica andColombia (1992), and Nigeria (1993). The fourth Workshop was held from 27 June to 1 July 1994 at the Cairo University, in Egypt, for Western Asia.

  6. United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops on Basic Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, H. J.; Ocampo, A.; Torres, S.; Wamsteker, W.

    1995-02-01

    In 1958, the United Nations (UN) formally recognized a new potential for international cooperation by establishing an ad hoc Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS). A year later the Committee became a permanent body, and by 1983 membership had expanded to 53 states, with more than half of the members coming from the developing world. In 1970, COPUOS established the UN Program on Space Applications in order to strengthen cooperation in space science and technology between non-industrialized and industrialized countries. In the last few years, the UN and its COPUOS have paid increasing attention to education and research in space science and technology, including basic space science. In 1991 the UN, in cooperation with ESA, initiated the organization of annual Workshops in Basic Space Science for developing countries. These Workshops are designed to be held in one of the following major regions: Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Western Asia, and Europe. Accordingly, Basic Space Science Workshops have already been held in India (1991), Costa Rica and Colombia (1992), and Nigeria (1993). The fourth Workshop was held from 27 June to 1 July 1994 at the Cairo University, in Egypt, for Western Asia.

  7. Traffic Light Detection at Night

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Bornø; Philipsen, Mark Philip; Bahnsen, Chris

    2015-01-01

    of three detectors based on heuristic models and one learning-based detector. Evaluation is done on night-time data from the public LISA Traffic Light Dataset. The learning-based detector out- performs the model-based detectors in both precision and recall. The learning-based detector achieves an average......Traffic light recognition (TLR) is an integral part of any in- telligent vehicle, it must function both at day and at night. However, the majority of TLR research is focused on day-time scenarios. In this paper we will focus on detection of traffic lights at night and evalu- ate the performance...

  8. Interdisciplinary Navigation Unit for Mathematics and Earth Science Using Geospatial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaglik, S. M.; Harris, V.

    2006-12-01

    Central Wyoming College (CWC) is located northeast of the Wind River Mountains. Although many people find recreation in the wilderness and remote areas surrounding the area, people still lose their lives because they become lost or disoriented. Creating an interdisciplinary field-based curriculum unit within mathematics (MATH 1000) and earth science (GEOL 1070) courses for non-science and education majors, provides students an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills and quantitative literacy. It also provides some necessary skills for survival and an understanding of landscape formation and wilderness navigation using geoscience. A brief history of navigation, including the importance of finding latitude and longitude, and the fairly recent implementation of the Global Positioning System, precedes activities in which students learn to use a basic compass. In addition to learning how to adjust for magnetic declination they read topographic maps, specifically USGS quadrangles, and learn how to use the scale in the legend to verify calculations using the Pythagorean Theorem. Students learn how to estimate distance and time required for traveling a pre- determined distance while using dimensional analysis to convert from the English system to metric. They learn how to read and measure latitude and longitude, as well as universal transverse Mercator projection measurements (UTM's), to find their position. The basic mathematical skills are assessed through hands-on activities such as finding their location on a map using a compass, a GPS unit, and Google Earth, and using a combination of maps, compasses, and GPS units to navigate through a course. Our goal is to provide life-saving information to students while incorporating necessary core curriculum from both mathematics and earth science classes. We work to create field-based activities, as well as assessments, to insure that students who complete the course are prepared to safely enjoy the outdoors and are

  9. The night before your surgery - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - child; Preoperative - night before ... food after 11 p.m. the night before surgery. Your child should not eat or drink any ... child the night before or the day of surgery, call the doctor. Stop giving your child any ...

  10. World-Wide Outreach through International Observe the Moon Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Jones, A. P.; Bleacher, L.; Shaner, A. J.; Day, B. H.; Wenger, M.; Joseph, E.; Canipe, M.

    2016-12-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual worldwide public event that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of our Moon and its connection to NASA planetary science and exploration. Everyone on Earth is invited to join the celebration by hosting or attending an InOMN event - and uniting on one day each year to look at and learn about the Moon together. Events are hosted by a variety of institutions including astronomy clubs, observatories, schools, and universities, museums, planetaria, schools, universities, observatories, parks, private businesses and private homes. Events hosts are supported with event flyers, information sheets, Moon maps for observing, activities to use during events, presentations, certificates of participation, and evaluation materials to be used by hosts. 2016 is the seventh year of worldwide participation in InOMN which will be held on October 8th. In the last six years, over 3,000 events were registered worldwide from almost 100 different countries and almost all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the United States. Evaluation of InOMN is conducted by an external evaluation group and includes analysis of event registrations, facilitator surveys, and visitor surveys. Evaluation results demonstrate that InOMN events are successful in raising visitors' awareness of lunar science and exploration, providing audiences with information about lunar science and exploration, and inspiring visitors to want to learn more about the Moon. Additionally, preliminary analysis of social media has shown that there is a virtual network of individuals connecting about InOMN. A large fraction of events have been held by institutions for more than one year showing sustained interest in participation. During this presentation, we will present data for all seven years of InOMN including lessons learned through supporting and evaluating a worldwide event. InOMN is sponsored by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA

  11. Science Roles and Interactions in Adaptive Management of Large River Restoration Projects, Midwest United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, R. B.; Galat, D. L.; Smith, C. B.

    2010-12-01

    Most large-river restoration projects include formal or informal implementations of adaptive management strategies which acknowledge uncertainty and use scientific inquiry to learn and refine management options. Although the central role of science in reducing uncertainty is acknowledged in such projects, specific roles and interactions can vary widely, including how science relates to decision-making within the governance of these projects. Our objective is to present some structured generalizations about science roles and interactions as developed from the authors’ experiences in adaptive management of large river restoration in the Midwest United States. Scientific information may be introduced into decision making by scientists acting in any of the three roles common to adaptive management -- action agency representative, stakeholder, or science provider. We have observed that confusion and gridlock can arise when it is unclear if a scientist is acting as an advocate for a stakeholder or management position, or instead as an independent, “honest broker” of science. Although both advocacy and independence are proper and expected in public decision making, it is useful when scientists unambiguously identify their role. While complete scientific independence may be illusory, transparency and peer review can promote the ideal. Transparency comes from setting clear directions and objectives at the decision-making level and defining at the outset how learning will help assess progress and inform decisions. Independent peer reviews of proposals, study plans, and publications serve as a powerful tool to advance scientific independence, even if funding sources present a potential conflict of interest. Selection of experts for scientific advice and review often requires consideration of the balance between benefits of the “outside” expert (independent, knowledgeable but with little specific understanding of the river system), compared to those provided by the

  12. Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, United States of America

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, USA (second from right) in the ATLAS assembly hall with from left to right Randi Ruchti, Peter Jenni and Robert Eisenstein, Senior Science Advisor, National Science Foundation, USA. Photo 02: Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, USA (second from right) in the ATLAS assembly hall with from left to right Randi Ruchti, Robert Eisenstein, Senior Science Advisor, National Science Foundation, USA and Peter Jenni. Photo 03: Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, USA (second from right) in front of the ATLAS End-Cap Toroid vacuum vessel in the ATLAS assembly hall with from left to right Peter Jenni, Robert Eisenstein, Senior Science Advisor, National Science Foundation, USA and Randi Ruchti ________________________________

  13. Citizen Science Observations of Monarch Butterfly Overwintering in the Southern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Howard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the public have long had a fascination with the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, because of its amazing long-distance migration to overwintering sites in central Mexico, and many participate in online citizen-science programs where they report observations of its life history in North America. Here, we examine a little-studied aspect of monarch biology, the degree of overwintering in the southern United States. We compiled 9 years of sightings of overwintering monarchs in the southern United States that were reported to Journey North, a web-based citizen science program, to map the distribution of areas where monarchs are capable of surviving during the winter (i.e., in January and February, differentiating between adult sightings and sightings of breeding activity. We also statistically compared the latitudes of adult and breeding sightings, examined differences across years in latitude of sightings, and quantified the number of monarchs reported with each sighting. Of all 254 sightings, 80% came from Florida and Texas, with the remainder coming from South Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, and even one in Virginia. This distribution was generally consistent with the winter range predicted by prior investigators based on climatic conditions of this region. Sightings of adults were on average from higher latitudes than reports of breeding activity and there was significant variation across years in the average latitude of all sightings. The majority of sightings (94.2% were of fewer than 10 adult monarchs per location, and there were no reports of clustering behavior that is typical of monarch overwintering in California and Mexico. The results of this investigation broaden our collective understanding of this stage of the monarch life cycle and, more generally, highlight the value of citizen science programs in advancing science.

  14. Gender in STEM Education: An Exploratory Study of Student Perceptions of Math and Science Instructors in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha-Zaidi, Nausheen; Afari, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The current study addresses student perceptions of math and science professors in the Middle East. Gender disparity in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education continues to exist in higher education, with male professors holding a normative position. This disparity can also be seen in the United Arab Emirates. As female…

  15. Science Policy Advisory Councils in France, the Netherlands and the United States, 1957-77: A Comparative Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brickman, Ronald; Rip, Arie

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of high-level science advisory councils in France, the Netherlands and the United States is reviewed in the light of common trends in the relationship of science and government over the past twenty years. The creation of the councils came as a response to similar needs of governments i

  16. Key-Aspects of Scientific Modeling Exemplified by School Science Models: Some Units for Teaching Contextualized Scientific Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Develaki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Models and modeling are core elements of scientific methods and consequently also are of key importance for the conception and teaching of scientific methodology. The epistemology of models and its transfer and adaption to nature of science education are not, however, simple themes. We present some conceptual units in which school science models…

  17. A science confidence gap : Education, trust in scientific methods, and trust in scientific institutions in the United States, 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, P.H.J.; De Koster, W.; van der Waal, J.

    2017-01-01

    Following up on suggestions that attitudes toward science are multi-dimensional, we analyze nationally representative survey data collected in the United States in 2014 (N = 2006), and demonstrate the existence of a science confidence gap: some people place great trust in scientific methods and

  18. A science confidence gap : Education, trust in scientific methods, and trust in scientific institutions in the United States, 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, P.H.J.; De Koster, W.; van der Waal, J.

    2017-01-01

    Following up on suggestions that attitudes toward science are multi-dimensional, we analyze nationally representative survey data collected in the United States in 2014 (N = 2006), and demonstrate the existence of a science confidence gap: some people place great trust in scientific methods and prin

  19. A science confidence gap : Education, trust in scientific methods, and trust in scientific institutions in the United States, 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, P.H.J.; De Koster, W.; van der Waal, J.

    2016-01-01

    Following up on suggestions that attitudes toward science are multi-dimensional, we analyze nationally representative survey data collected in the United States in 2014 (N = 2006), and demonstrate the existence of a science confidence gap: some people place great trust in scientific methods and prin

  20. New night vision goggle gain definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobedov, Vyacheslav B.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Larason, Thomas C.

    2015-05-01

    A new definition is proposed for the calibration of Night Vision Goggle (NVG) gains. This definition is based on the measurement of radiometric input and output quantities of the NVG. While the old definition used the "equivalent fL" which is a non SI traceable luminance unit, the new definition utilizes the radiance quantities that are traceable to the SI units through NIST standards. The new NVG gain matches the previous one as a result of the application of a correction coefficient originating from the conversion of the radiance to luminance units. The new definition was tested at the NIST Night Vision Calibration Facility and the measurement results were compared to the data obtained with a Hoffman Test Set Model ANV-126. Comparing the radiometric quantities of the Hoffman Test Set and those measured by the NIST transfer standard radiometer, indicates that the observed differences up to 15% were due to the calibration and experimental errors of the ANV-126 Test Set. In view of different spectral characteristics of luminophores that can be utilized in the NVG design, the simulation of the NVG output for gain measurement was performed. The NVG output was simulated with a sphere-based source using different LEDs and the measured gain was compared to that obtained with the ANV-126 internal luminance meter. The NVG gain uncertainty analysis was performed for the Type A, B, and C goggles.

  1. United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum Progress Report. Data Studies during 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, N.P. (ed.) [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) meets twice a year to discuss issues relating to the measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. Topics cover a wide range of applications in the UK nuclear industry. Links between members are maintained throughout the year, mainly through e-mail and the UKNSF website (www.uknsf.ofg.uk). Work of primary interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g. half-lives and gamma ray emission probabilities), fission yields, and neutron cross sections for fission and fusion. All known studies within the UK are summarised in this report. Specific applications and international links of relevance are also described. (author)

  2. The emergence of computer science instructional units in American colleges and universities (1950--1975): A history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Susan Elaine

    The purpose and scope of this dissertation is to investigate the origins and development of academic computer science units in American higher education and examine the intent and structure of their curricula. Specifically the study examines selected undergraduate and graduate curricula that developed from 1950 to 1975. This dissertation examines several of the earliest academic units formed and the issues surrounding their formation. This study examines some of the variety of courses and programs that existed among the early computer science programs. The actual titles of the units varied but they shared a common overreaching goal to study computers. The departments formed in various methods and some units were a subset of other departments. Faculties of these new units were often comprised of faculty members from various other disciplines. This dissertation is an exploration of the connections between a variety of diverse institutions and the new computer science discipline that formed from these early academic roots. While much has been written about the history of hardware and software development and the individual pioneers in the relatively new computer science discipline, the history of the academic units was documented primarily based on individual institutions. This study uses a wider lens to examine the patterns of these early academic units as they formed and became computer science units. The successes of these early pioneers resulted in a proliferation of academic computer programs in the following decades. The curricular debates continue as the number and purposes of these programs continue to expand. This dissertation seeks to provide useful information for future curricular decisions by examining the roots of the academic computer science units.

  3. Clinical medical sciences for undergraduate dental students in the United Kingdom and Ireland - a curriculum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mighell, A J

    2011-08-01

    The technical aspects of dentistry need to be practised with insight into the spectrum of human diseases and illnesses and how these impact upon individuals and society. Application of this insight is critical to decision-making related to the planning and delivery of safe and appropriate patient-centred healthcare tailored to the needs of the individual. Provision for the necessary training is included in undergraduate programmes, but in the United Kingdom and Ireland there is considerable variation between centres without common outcomes. In 2009 representatives from 17 undergraduate dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland agreed to move towards a common, shared approach to meet their own immediate needs and that might also be of value to others in keeping with the Bologna Process. To provide a clear identity the term \\'Clinical Medical Sciences in Dentistry\\' was agreed in preference to other names such as \\'Human Disease\\' or \\'Medicine and Surgery\\'. The group was challenged to define consensus outcomes. Contemporary dental education documents informed, but did not drive the process. The consensus curriculum for undergraduate Clinical Medical Sciences in Dentistry teaching agreed by the participating centres is reported. Many of the issues are generic and it includes elements that are likely to be applicable to others. This document will act as a focus for a more unified approach to the outcomes required by graduates of the participating centres and act as a catalyst for future developments that ultimately aim to enhance the quality of patient care.

  4. CMS Virtual Visits @ European Researchers Night, 30 September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    CMS hosted four virtual visits during European Researchers Night. Audience from Greece (NCRS Demokritos, Athens), Poland (University of Science and Technology in Krakow), Italy (Psiquadro in Perugia & INFN in Pisa) and Portugal (Planetarium Calouste Gulbenkian, organised by LIP) had an occasion to converse with CMS researchers and "virtually" visit CMS Control Room and underground facilities.

  5. Particulate organic nitrates: Sampling and night/day variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Platz, J.; Granby, K.

    1998-01-01

    correlation between the PON to NO, ratio and the inverse temperature may indicate that the organic nitrates associated with particles also may be present in the gas phase. The deserved day and nighttime levels of PON were of the same magnitude, although the day to night ratio vaned from 0.4 to 4.4. (C) 1998...... Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Computer availability and students' science achievement in Taiwan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Meichun Lydia

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differences associated with nationality, computer availability at school, and computer availability at home on eighth-grade students' science achievement. Achievement scores were obtained from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study---Repeat dataset for Taiwan and the United States (U.S.) students. One hundred thirty-seven schools in Taiwan and 152 schools in the U.S. were selected with 5270 Taiwanese students and 6236 American students. A three-way analysis of variance was conducted using house weight to weight the selected sample. The dependent variable was TIMSS 1999 science overall score, and the independent variables were nationality, four levels of number of students per computer, and two levels of computer availability at home. An Omega Squared (o2) was calculated for each of the significant main effects. Follow-up analyses were included for statistically significant interactions. Descriptive statistics revealed that the average class size in Taiwan was significantly larger than the class size in the U.S. The statistical analysis found a difference in mean science achievement score between Taiwan and the United States, among the four levels of number of students per computer, and between the two levels of computer availability at home. Taiwanese students performed significantly better than American students (o2 = 5.8%). Students in the group with the least number of students per computer performed significantly better than rest of the three groups (o 2 = 0.3%). The statistically significant difference among the levels of computer availability at school might be due to large sample size rather than true differences among groups because of the small amount of variance accounted. Furthermore, students who had a computer at home had significantly higher achievement in science than those without a computer at home (o 2 = 4.8%). Statistically significant interactions were found between (1) nationality and

  7. Night blindness and ancient remedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Hajar Al Binali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to briefly review the history of night blindness and its treatment from ancient times until the present. The old Egyptians, the Babylonians, the Greeks and the Arabs used animal liver for treatment and successfully cured the disease. The author had the opportunity to observe the application of the old remedy to a patient. Now we know what the ancients did not know, that night blindness is caused by Vitamin A deficiency and the animal liver is the store house for Vitamin A.

  8. Volunteers for Researchers’ Night wanted

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Every year, on the last Friday of September, the European Researchers’ Night (see here) takes place in about 300 cities all over Europe - promoting research in engaging and fun ways for the general public. This year, CERN will be participating once again, hosting dozens of events across the Balexert shopping centre – and we’ll need YOUR help to make the celebration a success.   From film screenings and celebrity Q&A sessions to “Ask a Researcher” and build-your-own LEGO LHC events, this year’s Researchers’ Night is going to be jam-packed! The fun will kick off prior to the night itself with a mock-up of the LHC tunnel installed in the central court of the Balexert shopping centre, 8-12 September*. CERN people will be on hand to speak to shoppers about the LHC, and to encourage them to participate in Researchers’ Night! The CERN organisers are recruiting volunteers and support staff for Researchers’ ...

  9. Progress in color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused

  10. Night Operations - The Soviet Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-09

    Battle of Berlin reveal the purpose for the night tactic of il- * ilumination : surprise and psychological impact, both on the enemy and friendly forces. An...attack Ilumination by shell Tn in k* Illumination by flare a Tank In firing position Observation post Antitank missle in firing position APC C3 APC

  11. Progress in color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused fal

  12. Progress in color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused fal

  13. Shedding Light on Night Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Bert

    1986-01-01

    Shows how darkness and night provide a potentially excellent arena for experiential learning opportunities. Recommends learning must be gradual, beginning with appreciation and allaying fear of the dark. Suggests sensory activities, hikes, games, aquatic activities, ecological simulations, historical presentations, and writing or reciting poetry.…

  14. Night blindness and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Lima, Breno; Pichi, Francesco; Lowder, Careen Y

    2014-10-01

    Signs of malnutrition are common clinical features in Crohn's disease; and bowel resection, commonly needed in these cases, can aggravate malnutrition. These patients are at risk of developing vitamin A deficiency, which can lead to night blindness. We present a 60-year-old male, with history of Crohn's disease and multiple resections for strictures and fistulas leading to short bowel syndrome, with progressive bilateral loss of night vision (nyctalopia). Serum vitamin A level was markedly depleted (11 µg/dL, reference 20-120 µg/dL), and full-field electroretinogram testing demonstrated extinguished scotopic (rod function) responses and decreased amplitudes of photopic responses on 30 Hz flicker (cone function). He was started on vitamin A supplementation (initially intramuscular). His vitamin A level was back to normal (78 µg/dL), and night vision problems subjectively improved. Patients with Crohn's disease should be inquired about night vision problems. The presence of nyctalopia should prompt vitamin A level measurement and ophthalmology referral for further evaluation.

  15. Developing consensus: mercury science and policy in the NAFTA countries (Canada, the United States and Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, W; Schroeder, W; Porcella, D B; Santos-Burgoa, C; Montgomery, S; Hamilton, A; Trip, L

    2000-10-16

    The international science community has recognized methylmercury in the aquatic food chain, as a potential environmental and human health risk. As a result, countries around the world have implemented a number of mercury management initiatives. The United States, Mexico and Canada in consultation with stakeholders are developing a trilateral North American Regional Action Plan (NARAP) on mercury. Through public involvement in the decision making process, the NARAP has offered opportunities for more transparency in transactions between governments, industry and stakeholders. In spite of the available scientific information, there are still important uncertainties associated with the mercury issue. These knowledge gaps include: the most appropriate methylmercury reference dose for sensitive groups; the percentage of the North American population that is at risk from methylmercury exposure; spatial and temporal mercury deposition patterns in each country; the link between mercury emissions, atmospheric deposition and methylmercury concentrations in fish; and the relative magnitude of contributions from natural and anthropogenic sources.

  16. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative: 2011 Status Report on the International Space Weather Initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Gadimova, S; Danov, D; Georgieva, K; Maeda, G; Yumoto, K; Davila, J M; Gopalswami, N

    2011-01-01

    The UNBSSI is a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis. A series of workshops on BSS was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004; http://www.seas.columbia.edu/~ah297/un-esa/) and addressed the status of astronomy in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Western Asia. One major recommendation that emanated from these workshops was the establishment of astronomical facilities in developing nations for research and education programmes at the university level. Such workshops on BSS emphasized the particular importance of astrophysical data systems and the virtual observatory concept for the development of astronomy on a worldwide basis. Pursuant to resolutions of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful ...

  17. EUROPEAN VOLCANOES' NIGHT: building a link between general public and volcanologists in a relaxed and welcoming setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, David; González-Cárdenas, María E.; Baldrich, Laura; Solana, Carmen; Nave, Rosella; Calvari, Sonia; Harangi, Szabolcs; Chouraqui, Floriane; Dionis, Samara; Silva, Sonia V.; Forjaz, Victor H.; D'Auria, Luca; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    European Volcanoes' Night (www.volcanoesnight.com) is a "volcanic eruption" of art, culture, music, gastronomy, school activities, geotourism, exhibitions and scientific debates. The event aims to bring together members of the general public with scientists who work on the study of volcanoes, in order to meet and ask questions in a relaxed and welcoming setting. It is open to both locals and tourists who appreciate the beauty and power of this natural phenomena. This celebration gives attendees, and in particular young people, the opportunity to meet researchers in a relaxed and festive setting, which will feature many activities and which will be used to highlight the attractiveness of a career research on one of the most attractive natural phenomena; volcanoes. The 2016 European Volcanoes' Night was held at 16 different municipalities of Spain, France, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, United Kingdom and Cape Verde on September 30, 2016, coinciding with the celebration of "European Researchers' Night" held annually throughout Europe and neighbouring countries the last Friday of September. The spirit of the European VolcanoeśNight fits perfectly in the aim of the ERN, trying to close the gap between the scientific community and the rest of the society. In this case, volcanoes are the driving force of this event, celebrating the singularity of living on volcanoes, and how these affect our daily lives, our culture and our heritage. European VolcanoeśNight also celebrates volcano science, with avantgarde talks and presentations on different volcanic topics and becomes a meeting point for children discovering volcanoes as a pastime or a leisure topic, making this event a must for tourists and locals wherever has been held. At the end of 2016 European VolcanoeśNight, almost 150 activities were performed for thousands of spectators, a big success that confirms something as crucial as science as a communication issue, and as a tool to strengthen the ties between researchers

  18. `We put on the glasses and Moon comes closer!' Urban Second Graders Exploring the Earth, the Sun and Moon Through 3D Technologies in a Science and Literacy Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik-Ercan, Zeynep; Zeynep Inan, Hatice; Nowak, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Beomjin

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes (a) the ways 3D visualization, coupled with other science and literacy experiences, supported young children's first exploration of the Earth-Sun-Moon system and (b) the perspectives of classroom teachers and children on using 3D visualization. We created three interactive 3D software modules that simulate day and night, Moon phases and seasons. These modules were used in a science and literacy unit for 35 second graders at an urban elementary school in Midwestern USA. Data included pre- and post-interviews, audio-taped lessons and classroom observations. Post-interviews demonstrated that children's knowledge of the shapes and the movements of the Earth and Moon, alternation of day and night, the occurrence of the seasons, and Moon's changing appearance increased. Second graders reported that they enjoyed expanding their knowledge through hands-on experiences; through its reality effect, 3D visualization enabled them to observe the space objects that move in the virtual space. The teachers noted that 3D visualization stimulated children's interest in space and that using 3D visualization in combination with other teaching methods-literacy experiences, videos and photos, simulations, discussions, and presentations-supported student learning. The teachers and the students still experienced challenges using 3D visualization due to technical problems with 3D vision and time constraints. We conclude that 3D visualization offers hands-on experiences for challenging science concepts and may support young children's ability to view phenomena that would typically be observed through direct, long-term observations in outer space. Results imply a reconsideration of assumed capabilities of young children to understand astronomical phenomena.

  19. United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Randall G.; Ellis, Eugene G.; Page, William R.; Parker, Melanie J.; Hestbeck, Jay B.; Horak, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Along the nearly 3,200 kilometers (almost 2,000 miles) of the United States–Mexican border, in an area known as the Borderlands, we are witnessing the expression of the challenges of the 21st century. This circular identifies several challenge themes and issues associated with life and the environment in the Borderlands, listed below. The challenges are not one-sided; they do not originate in one country only to become problems for the other. The issues and concerns of each challenge theme flow in both directions across the border, and both nations feel their effects throughout the Borderlands and beyond. The clear message is that our two nations, the United States and Mexico, face the issues in these challenge themes together, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) understands it must work with its counterparts, partners, and customers in both countries.Though the mission of the USGS is not to serve as land manager, law enforcer, or code regulator, its innovation and creativity and the scientific and technical depth of its capabilities can be directly applied to monitoring the conditions of the landscape. The ability of USGS scientists to critically analyze the monitored data in search of signals and trends, whether they lead to negative or positive results, allows us to reach significant conclusions—from providing factual conclusions to decisionmakers, to estimating how much of a natural resource exists in a particular locale, to predicting how a natural hazard phenomenon will unfold, to forecasting on a scale from hours to millennia how ecosystems will behave.None of these challenge themes can be addressed strictly by one or two science disciplines; all require well-integrated, cross-discipline thinking, data collection, and analyses. The multidisciplinary science themes that have become the focus of the USGS mission parallel the major challenges in the border region between Mexico and the United States. Because of this multidisciplinary approach, the USGS

  20. United States-Mexican Borderlands: facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Randall G.; Ellis, Eugene G.; Page, William R.; Parker, Melanie J.; Hestbeck, Jay B.; Horak, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Along the nearly 3,200 kilometers (almost 2,000 miles) of the United States–Mexican border, in an area known as the Borderlands, we are witnessing the expression of the challenges of the 21st century. This circular identifies several challenge themes and issues associated with life and the environment in the Borderlands, listed below. The challenges are not one-sided; they do not originate in one country only to become problems for the other. The issues and concerns of each challenge theme flow in both directions across the border, and both nations feel their effects throughout the Borderlands and beyond. The clear message is that our two nations, the United States and Mexico, face the issues in these challenge themes together, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) understands it must work with its counterparts, partners, and customers in both countries. Though the mission of the USGS is not to serve as land manager, law enforcer, or code regulator, its innovation and creativity and the scientific and technical depth of its capabilities can be directly applied to monitoring the conditions of the landscape. The ability of USGS scientists to critically analyze the monitored data in search of signals and trends, whether they lead to negative or positive results, allows us to reach significant conclusions—from providing factual conclusions to decisionmakers, to estimating how much of a natural resource exists in a particular locale, to predicting how a natural hazard phenomenon will unfold, to forecasting on a scale from hours to millennia how ecosystems will behave. None of these challenge themes can be addressed strictly by one or two science disciplines; all require well-integrated, cross-discipline thinking, data collection, and analyses. The multidisciplinary science themes that have become the focus of the USGS mission parallel the major challenges in the border region between Mexico and the United States. Because of this multidisciplinary approach, the USGS

  1. The development of a virtual science museum for the public understanding of science in eastern China and in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delello, Julie Anne

    2009-12-01

    In 1999, the Chinese Academy of Sciences realized that there was a need for a better public understanding of science. For the public to have better accessibility and comprehension of China's significance to the world, the Computer Network Information Center (CNIC), under the direction of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, combined resources from thousands of experts across the world to develop online science exhibits housed within the Virtual Science Museum of China. Through an analysis of historical documents, this descriptive dissertation presents a research project that explores a dimension of the development of the Giant Panda Exhibit. This study takes the reader on a journey, first to China and then to a classroom within the United States, in order to answer the following questions: (1) What is the process of the development of a virtual science exhibit; and, (2) What role do public audiences play in the design and implementation of virtual science museums? The creation of a virtual science museum exhibition is a process that is not completed with just the building and design, but must incorporate feedback from public audiences who utilize the exhibit. To meet the needs of the museum visitors, the designers at CNIC took a user-centered approach and solicited feedback from six survey groups. To design a museum that would facilitate a cultural exchange of scientific information, the CNIC looked at the following categories: visitor insights, the usability of the technology, the educational effectiveness of the museum exhibit, and the cultural nuances that existed between students in China and in the United States. The findings of this study illustrate that the objectives of museum designers may not necessarily reflect the needs of the visitors and confirm previous research studies which indicate that museum exhibits need a more constructivist approach that fully engages the visitor in an interactive, media-rich environment. Even though the world has moved forwards

  2. Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

  3. Professor Tony F. Chan Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences National Science Foundation United States of America on 23rd May 2007. Here visiting ATLAS experiment with P. Jenni and M. Tuts.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Professor Tony F. Chan Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences National Science Foundation United States of America on 23rd May 2007. Here visiting ATLAS experiment with P. Jenni and M. Tuts.

  4. Deconstructing alcohol use on a night out in England: promotions, preloading and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchley, Kirstie; Shorter, Gillian W; Chalmers, Jenny

    2014-07-01

    To examine alcohol consumed during a drinking event (a single drinking occasion) by those attending public house/on-trade establishments on nights with standard pricing and nights with promotional prices. Data (n = 425) were collected in an ecological momentary assessment over eight nights in two locations (Midlands and London) on both promotional and standard (Saturday) nights. Multiple regression was used to predict event alcohol consumption by sex, age, type of night, alcohol preloading behaviour, marital and employment status, education, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test alcohol consumption questions separately or total AUDIT-C and social group size. Mean (UK) units consumed were 11.8 (London) and 14.4 (Midlands). In London, consumption was similar on promotional and standard nights, but in the Midlands, standard night consumption was three units higher. Preloading was reported by 30%; more common on standard nights. Regression analyses revealed being male, preloading and past-year total AUDIT-C were associated with higher event consumption. However, when AUDIT-C questions were added separately, being a standard night was associated with increased event consumption and different AUDIT-C questions were significantly associated with event consumption in each location. Event consumption reflected heavy episodic drinking and was influenced by price. Promotional night consumption either matched standard Saturday night consumption or was slightly lower. In London, there was a significant preference for drinking at least one promotional beverage on promotional nights. On standard nights, consumption was over a wider range of venues, and preloading with off-trade alcohol was more likely. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  5. The impact of changing night vision goggle spectral response on night vision imaging system lighting compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Task, Harry L.; Marasco, Peter L.

    2004-09-01

    The defining document outlining night-vision imaging system (NVIS) compatible lighting, MIL-L-85762A, was written in the mid 1980's, based on what was then the state of the art in night vision and image intensification. Since that time there have been changes in the photocathode sensitivity and the minus-blue coatings applied to the objective lenses. Specifically, many aviation night-vision goggles (NVGs) in the Air Force are equipped with so-called "leaky green" or Class C type objective lens coatings that provide a small amount of transmission around 545 nanometers so that the displays that use a P-43 phosphor can be seen through the NVGs. However, current NVIS compatibility requirements documents have not been updated to include these changes. Documents that followed and replaced MIL-L-85762A (ASC/ENFC-96-01 and MIL-STD-3009) addressed aspects of then current NVIS technology, but did little to change the actual content or NVIS radiance requirements set forth in the original MIL-L-85762A. This paper examines the impact of spectral response changes, introduced by changes in image tube parameters and objective lens minus-blue filters, on NVIS compatibility and NVIS radiance calculations. Possible impact on NVIS lighting requirements is also discussed. In addition, arguments are presented for revisiting NVIS radiometric unit conventions.

  6. Night Vision Device and Cockpit Displays

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Night Vision Device and Cockpit Display labevaluates night vision devices and certifies them for use in the fleet. Lab functions supported include: Analysis of...

  7. Life Science's Average Publishable Unit (APU Has Increased over the Past Two Decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radames J B Cordero

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of the scientific literature is important for evaluating the evolution and state of science. To study how the density of biological literature has changed over the past two decades we visually inspected 1464 research articles related only to the biological sciences from ten scholarly journals (with average Impact Factors, IF, ranging from 3.8 to 32.1. By scoring the number of data items (tables and figures, density of composite figures (labeled panels per figure or PPF, as well as the number of authors, pages and references per research publication we calculated an Average Publishable Unit or APU for 1993, 2003, and 2013. The data show an overall increase in the average ± SD number of data items from 1993 to 2013 of approximately 7±3 to 14±11 and PPF ratio of 2±1 to 4±2 per article, suggesting that the APU has doubled in size over the past two decades. As expected, the increase in data items per article is mainly in the form of supplemental material, constituting 0 to 80% of the data items per publication in 2013, depending on the journal. The changes in the average number of pages (approx. 8±3 to 10±3, references (approx. 44±18 to 56±24 and authors (approx. 5±3 to 8±9 per article are also presented and discussed. The average number of data items, figure density and authors per publication are correlated with the journal's average IF. The increasing APU size over time is important when considering the value of research articles for life scientists and publishers, as well as, the implications of these increasing trends in the mechanisms and economics of scientific communication.

  8. Life Science's Average Publishable Unit (APU) Has Increased over the Past Two Decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Radames J B; de León-Rodriguez, Carlos M; Alvarado-Torres, John K; Rodriguez, Ana R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the scientific literature is important for evaluating the evolution and state of science. To study how the density of biological literature has changed over the past two decades we visually inspected 1464 research articles related only to the biological sciences from ten scholarly journals (with average Impact Factors, IF, ranging from 3.8 to 32.1). By scoring the number of data items (tables and figures), density of composite figures (labeled panels per figure or PPF), as well as the number of authors, pages and references per research publication we calculated an Average Publishable Unit or APU for 1993, 2003, and 2013. The data show an overall increase in the average ± SD number of data items from 1993 to 2013 of approximately 7±3 to 14±11 and PPF ratio of 2±1 to 4±2 per article, suggesting that the APU has doubled in size over the past two decades. As expected, the increase in data items per article is mainly in the form of supplemental material, constituting 0 to 80% of the data items per publication in 2013, depending on the journal. The changes in the average number of pages (approx. 8±3 to 10±3), references (approx. 44±18 to 56±24) and authors (approx. 5±3 to 8±9) per article are also presented and discussed. The average number of data items, figure density and authors per publication are correlated with the journal's average IF. The increasing APU size over time is important when considering the value of research articles for life scientists and publishers, as well as, the implications of these increasing trends in the mechanisms and economics of scientific communication.

  9. A Comprehensive Survey on the Status of Social and Professional Issues in United States Undergraduate Computer Science Programs and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradling, Carol; Soh, Leen-Kiat; Ansorge, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    A national web-based survey was administered to 700 undergraduate computer science (CS) programs in the United States as part of a stratified random sample of 797 undergraduate CS programs. The 251 program responses (36% response rate) regarding social and professional issues are presented. This article describes the demographics of the…

  10. Authentic science in education: Studies in course-based research at the United States Military Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Anthony M.

    This dissertation consists of two studies at the United States Military Academy. Both studies involve the use of Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs). These experiences give students the ability to engage in undergraduate research at an early point in their academic career by replacing traditional laboratory activities with semester-long research projects. Both studies show an implementation of this type of instruction from the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE). Study 1 shows the specific method of implementation at the military academy and explores learning-based outcomes. Primarily the outcome of critical thinking is demonstrated. Critical thinking is a construct that many curriculum developers and instructors want to foster within their students but often lack clear definitions or evaluation plans. This study gives a definition of critical thinking and an outcome of a critical thinking test. Significant gains in critical thinking are observed by students participating in the CURE as well as significant gains in three affective factors (Interest in Science/Chemistry, Authenticity, Perceived Learning). The gains in critical thinking are then further statistically linked to students’ perceptions of how authentically they saw the research in the course. If they felt that the course was demonstrating more authentic science practices, they gained significantly more in their critical thinking scores. The second study in this dissertation adds an additional transfer focus to the instructional materials that the CURE was meant to support. The treatment group in this study received instruction that was framed expansively. The expansively framed instruction showed students ways that the material was applicable outside of the course. The assessments and instructional materials of this study were transfer assessments with contrasting cases. Instances of negative or “overzealous transfer” were also reported. Findings suggest

  11. Seven Years of World-Wide Participation in International Observe the Moon Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Jones, Andrea J.; Bleacher, Lora; Wenger, Matthew; Shaner, Andrew; Joseph, Emily C. S.; Day, Brian; Canipe, Marti; InOMN Coordinating Committee

    2016-10-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual worldwide public event that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of our Moon and its connection to NASA planetary science and exploration. Everyone on Earth is invited to join the celebration by hosting or attending an InOMN event - and uniting on one day each year to look at and learn about the Moon together. This year marks the seventh year of InOMN, which will be held on October 8, 2016. Between 2010 and 2015, a total of 3,275 events were registered worldwide, 49% of which were held in the United States. In 2015, a total of 545 events were registered on the InOMN website from around the world. These events were scheduled to be held in 54 different countries, 43% of which were registered in the United States from 40 states and the District of Columbia. InOMN events are hosted by a variety of institutions including astronomy clubs, observatories, schools, and universities and hosted at a variety of public and private institutions all over the world including museums, planetaria, schools, universities, observatories, parks, and private businesses and private homes. Evaluation of InOMN is led by the Planetary Science Institute who assesses the success of InOMN through analysis of event registrations, facilitator surveys, and visitor survey. Current InOMN efforts demonstrate success in meeting the overall goals of the LRO E/PO goals including raising visitors' awareness of lunar science and exploration, providing audiences with information about lunar science and exploration along with access to LRO data and science results, and inspiring visitors to want to learn more about the Moon and providing connections to opportunities to do so. InOMN is sponsored by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI), and the Lunar and Planetary Institute. Learn more at http://observethemoonnight.org/.

  12. Impacts of animal science research on United States sheep production and predictions for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, C J

    2008-11-01

    One hundred years ago, there were more than 48 million sheep in the United States. In 1910, they were valued at $4/head, with 43% of income coming from the sale of sheep, lambs, and meat and 57% coming from wool. Over the years, fluctuations in this ratio have challenged the breeder and researcher alike. By 2007, sheep numbers had declined to 6.2 million, with the average sheep shearing 3.4 kg of wool (representing animal science research has made little impact on sheep production in the United States. On the contrary, lamb crops in the new millennium (range = 109 to 115%) are greater than those recorded in the 1920s (85 to 89%) and dressed lamb weights increased from 18 to 32 kg from 1940 to the present. In the past century, researchers conducted thousands of investigations, with progress reported in new, existing, and crossbreed evaluations, quantitative and molecular genetics, selection, nutrition, fiber, meat, hides, milk, growth, physiology, reproduction, endocrinology, management, behavior, the environment, disease, pharmacology, toxicology, and range, pasture, and forage utilization such that a vast amount of new information was accrued. Our understanding of sheep has benefited also from research conducted on other species, and vice versa. Many factors that have contributed to the decline in the sheep industry are not influenced easily by academic research (e.g., low per capita consumption of lamb meat, predation, reluctance to adopt new technologies, cost and availability of laborers with sheep-related skills, and fewer young people pursuing careers in agriculture). The size of the US sheep industry is expected to remain stable, with possible slow growth in the foreseeable future. To remain profitable, producers will take advantage of new (or previously unused) technologies, the desire of the public for things natural, domestic niche and international fiber markets, and the ability of the sheep to control noxious weeds and thrive in suboptimal ecosystems.

  13. Bioinformatics and the Politics of Innovation in the Life Sciences: Science and the State in the United Kingdom, China, and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Brian; Zhou, Yinhua; Datta, Saheli; Salter, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    The governments of China, India, and the United Kingdom are unanimous in their belief that bioinformatics should supply the link between basic life sciences research and its translation into health benefits for the population and the economy. Yet at the same time, as ambitious states vying for position in the future global bioeconomy they differ considerably in the strategies adopted in pursuit of this goal. At the heart of these differences lies the interaction between epistemic change within the scientific community itself and the apparatus of the state. Drawing on desk-based research and thirty-two interviews with scientists and policy makers in the three countries, this article analyzes the politics that shape this interaction. From this analysis emerges an understanding of the variable capacities of different kinds of states and political systems to work with science in harnessing the potential of new epistemic territories in global life sciences innovation.

  14. Sleep, ageing and night work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.N. Pires

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the frequency or worsening of sleep disorders tends to increase with age and that the ability to perform circadian adjustments tends to decrease in individuals who work the night shift. This condition can cause consequences such as excessive sleepiness, which are often a factor in accidents that occur at work. The present study investigated the effects of age on the daytime and nighttime sleep patterns using polysomnography (PSG of long-haul bus drivers working fixed night or day shifts. A total of 124 drivers, free of sleep disorders and grouped according to age (<45 years, N = 85, and ≥45 years, N = 39 and PSG timing (daytime (D PSG, N = 60; nighttime (N PSG, N = 64 participated in the study. We observed a significant effect of bedtime (D vs N and found that the length of daytime sleep was shorter [D: <45 years (336.10 ± 73.75 min vs N: <45 years (398 ± 78.79 min and D: ≥45 years (346.57 ± 43.17 min vs N: ≥45 years (386.44 ± 52.92 min; P ≤ 0.05]. Daytime sleep was less efficient compared to nighttime sleep [D: <45 years (78.86 ± 13.30% vs N: <45 years (86.45 ± 9.77% and D: ≥45 years (79.89 ± 9.45% and N: ≥45 years (83.13 ± 9.13%; P ≤ 0.05]. An effect of age was observed for rapid eye movement sleep [D: <45 years (18.05 ± 6.12% vs D: ≥45 years (15.48 ± 7.11% and N: <45 years (23.88 ± 6.75% vs N: ≥45 years (20.77 ± 5.64%; P ≤ 0.05], which was greater in younger drivers. These findings are inconsistent with the notion that older night workers are more adversely affected than younger night workers by the challenge of attempting to rest during the day.

  15. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative: 2010 Status Report on the International Space Weather Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadimova, S.; Haubold, H. J.; Danov, D.; Georgieva, K.; Maeda, G.; Yumoto, K.; Davila, J. M.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2011-11-01

    The UNBSSI is a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis. A series of workshops on BSS was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004) Pursuant to resolutions of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee, since 2005, these workshops focused on the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (UAE 2005, India 2006, Japan 2007, Bulgaria 2008, Ro Korea 2009) Starting in 2010, the workshops focus on the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) as recommended in a three-year-work plan as part of the deliberations of UNCOPUOS (www.iswi-secretariat.org/). Workshops on the ISWI have been scheduled to be hosted by Egypt in 2010 for Western Asia, Nigeria in 2011 for Africa, and Ecuador in 2012 for Latin America and the Caribbean. Currently, fourteen IHY/ISWI instrument arrays with more than five hundred instruments are operational in ninety countries.

  16. The United States Polar Rock Repository: A geological resource for the Earth science community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, Annie M.; Elliot, David H.; Codispoti, Julie E.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) is a U. S. national facility designed for the permanent curatorial preservation of rock samples, along with associated materials such as field notes, annotated air photos and maps, raw analytic data, paleomagnetic cores, ground rock and mineral residues, thin sections, and microfossil mounts, microslides and residues from Polar areas. This facility was established by the Office of Polar Programs at the U. S. National Science Foundation (NSF) to minimize redundant sample collecting, and also because the extreme cold and hazardous field conditions make fieldwork costly and difficult. The repository provides, along with an on-line database of sample information, an essential resource for proposal preparation, pilot studies and other sample based research that should make fieldwork more efficient and effective. This latter aspect should reduce the environmental impact of conducting research in sensitive Polar Regions. The USPRR also provides samples for educational outreach. Rock samples may be borrowed for research or educational purposes as well as for museum exhibits.

  17. A science confidence gap: Education, trust in scientific methods, and trust in scientific institutions in the United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Peter; de Koster, Willem; van der Waal, Jeroen

    2017-08-01

    Following up on suggestions that attitudes toward science are multi-dimensional, we analyze nationally representative survey data collected in the United States in 2014 ( N = 2006), and demonstrate the existence of a science confidence gap: some people place great trust in scientific methods and principles, but simultaneously distrust scientific institutions. This science confidence gap is strongly associated with level of education: it is larger among the less educated than among the more educated. We investigate explanations for these educational differences. Whereas hypotheses deduced from reflexive-modernization theory do not pass the test, those derived from theorizing on the role of anomie are corroborated. The less educated are more anomic (they have more modernity-induced cultural discontents), which not only underlies their distrust in scientific institutions, but also fuels their trust in scientific methods and principles. This explains why this science confidence gap is most pronounced among the less educated.

  18. Widespread distribution and unexpected variation among science faculty with education specialties (SFES) across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Seth D; Pelaez, Nancy J; Rudd, James A; Stevens, Michael T; Tanner, Kimberly D; Williams, Kathy S

    2013-04-30

    College and university science departments are increasingly taking an active role in improving science education. Perhaps as a result, a new type of specialized science faculty position within science departments is emerging--referred to here as science faculty with education specialties (SFES)--where individual scientists focus their professional efforts on strengthening undergraduate science education, improving kindergarten-through-12th grade science education, and conducting discipline-based education research. Numerous assertions, assumptions, and questions about SFES exist, yet no national studies have been published. Here, we present findings from a large-scale study of US SFES, who are widespread and increasing in numbers. Contrary to many assumptions, SFES were indeed found across the nation, across science disciplines, and, most notably, across primarily undergraduate, master of science-granting, and PhD-granting institutions. Data also reveal unexpected variations among SFES by institution type. Among respondents, SFES at master of science-granting institutions were almost twice as likely to have formal training in science education compared with other SFES. In addition, SFES at PhD-granting institutions were much more likely to have obtained science education funding. Surprisingly, formal training in science education provided no advantage in obtaining science education funding. Our findings show that the SFES phenomenon is likely more complex and diverse than anticipated, with differences being more evident across institution types than across science disciplines. These findings raise questions about the origins of differences among SFES and are useful to science departments interested in hiring SFES, scientific trainees preparing for SFES careers, and agencies awarding science education funding.

  19. Measuring relative efficiency of applied science and technology universities in province of Semnan, Iran and providing suggestions for merging units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Danaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available University of applied science and technology has been designed to create a platform for multilateral activities such as industrial, military and academic in developing countries to promote science and scientific research applications. These universities are responsible to promote practical training in quantitative and qualitative indicators and they provide appropriate infrastructure to implement theoretical graduates to solve practical problems to build necessary infrastructure to transfer modern technology into developing countries. During the past few years, there have been tremendous development on these units but some of them have not been efficient. In this paper, we present an empirical study to measure the relative efficiencies of various units of applied science and technology universities using data envelopment analysis. The proposed model of this paper uses two inputs including human resources as well as total assets and two outputs including the number of graduate students as well as operating profit. The results of the study have indicated that some of the units are inefficient and need to be merged with other units to increase the relative efficiency of these universities.

  20. Night shift work and modifiable lifestyle factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pepłońska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Night shift work has been linked to some chronic diseases. Modification of lifestyle by night work may partially contribute to the development of these diseases, nevertheless, so far epidemiological evidence is limited. The aim of the study was to explore association between night shift work and lifestyle factors using data from a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers employed in industrial plants in Łódź, Poland. Material and Methods: The anonymous questionnaire was self-administered among 605 employees (236 women and 369 men, aged 35 or more - 434 individuals currently wor­king night shifts. Distribution of the selected lifestyle related factors such as smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity, body mass index (BMI, number of main meals and the hour of the last meal was compared between current, former, and never night shift workers. Adjusted ORs or predicted means were calculated, as a measure of the associations between night shift work and lifestyle factors, with age, marital status and education included in the models as covariates. Results: Recreational inactivity (defined here as less than one hour per week of recreational physical activity was associated with current night shift work when compared to never night shift workers (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.13-5.22 among men. Alcohol abstinence and later time of the last meal was associated with night shift work among women. Statistically significant positive relationship between night shift work duration and BMI was observed among men (p = 0.029. Conclusions: This study confirms previous studies reporting lower exercising among night shift workers and tendency to increase body weight. This finding provides important public health implication for the prevention of chronic diseases among night shift workers. Initiatives promoting physical activity addressed in particular to the night shift workers are recommended.

  1. Wide-field-of-view (WFOV) night vision goggle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Wayne; Estrera, Joseph P.

    2003-09-01

    The United States' armed forces continue to be presented with increased challenges in adverse operational environments with increasing risk and complexity - especially at night. To ensure continued operational success and battlefield superiority during darkness, our armed forces must be equipped with night vision (NV) systems providing increased situational awareness. Doing so will significantly enhance threat detection and engagement, as well as survivability, thus ensuring greater mission success. Northrop Grumman Electro-Optical Systems (EOS) continues to develop its Wide Field of View (WFOV) image intensification (I2) night vision system for ground forces. This system will provide a significant increase in visual coverage enabling US forces to continue "to own the night". Until now, NV systems have typically been limited to a 40-degree field of view (FOV), vertically and horizontally. This limited FOV reduces off-axis detection, restricts an individual soldier's recognition and engagement capabilities and hinders added peripheral vision. To counter this operational deficiency, EOS proposes the Wide Field of View (WFOV) night vision binocular. The WFOV system will have a 70-degree horizontal FOV, with a 55-degree vertical FOV. The increased FOV will result in increased situational awareness of soldiers' surrounding environment (including terrain, hazards, threat, etc) during normal night operations. It will also allow for rapid and safer movement, especially in MOUT operations. Additionally, the increased visual coverage of large areas will enable soldiers to detect and engage targets faster and with greater reliability. The WFOV binocular will significantly enhance survivability, threat detection and engagement, and hence, greater mission success rate.

  2. Critical review of the United Kingdom's "gold standard" survey of public attitudes to science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin K; Jensen, Eric A

    2016-02-01

    Since 2000, the UK government has funded surveys aimed at understanding the UK public's attitudes toward science, scientists, and science policy. Known as the Public Attitudes to Science series, these surveys and their predecessors have long been used in UK science communication policy, practice, and scholarship as a source of authoritative knowledge about science-related attitudes and behaviors. Given their importance and the significant public funding investment they represent, detailed academic scrutiny of the studies is needed. In this essay, we critically review the most recently published Public Attitudes to Science survey (2014), assessing the robustness of its methods and claims. The review casts doubt on the quality of key elements of the Public Attitudes to Science 2014 survey data and analysis while highlighting the importance of robust quantitative social research methodology. Our analysis comparing the main sample and booster sample for young people demonstrates that quota sampling cannot be assumed equivalent to probability-based sampling techniques.

  3. Transforming a Traditional Inquiry-Based Science Unit into a STEM Unit for Elementary Pre-service Teachers: A View from the Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthew; Fulton, Lori

    2016-04-01

    The need to prepare students with twenty-first-century skills through STEM-related teaching is strong, especially at the elementary level. However, most teacher education preparation programs do not focus on STEM education. In an attempt to provide an exemplary model of a STEM unit, we used a rapid prototyping approach to transform an inquiry-based unit on moon phases into one that integrated technology in a meaningful manner to develop technological literacy and scientific concepts for pre-service teachers (PSTs). Using qualitative case study methodology, we describe lessons learned related to the development and implementation of a STEM unit in an undergraduate elementary methods course, focusing on the impact the inquiry model had on PSTs' perceptions of inquiry-based science instruction and how the integration of technology impacted their learning experience. Using field notes and survey data, we uncovered three overarching themes. First, we found that PSTs held absolutist beliefs and had a need for instruction on inquiry-based learning and teaching. Second, we determined that explicit examples of effective and ineffective technology use are needed to help PSTs develop an understanding of meaningful technology integration. Finally, the rapid prototyping approach resulted in a successful modification of the unit, but caused the usability of our digital instructional materials to suffer. Our findings suggest that while inquiry-based STEM units can be implemented in existing programs, creating and testing these prototypes requires significant effort to meet PSTs' learning needs, and that iterating designs is essential to successful implementation.

  4. Passive cooling by night-time ventilation using climate responsive elements - Annual report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, N.

    2007-07-01

    This illustrated annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on the work done at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA in 2007 on the subject of passive cooling systems. The paper reports on the evaluation of the possibilities and limitations of passive cooling using night-time ventilation. The climatic potential for the passive cooling of buildings using such night-time ventilation was evaluated. The author reports that the results show a very high potential for night-time cooling over the whole of Northern Europe and a still significant potential in Central, Eastern and even some regions of Southern Europe. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the potential for night cooling was found due to climate change. Although its potential might not always be sufficient to assure thermal comfort, night-time ventilation can still be used to reduce the cooling energy demand in buildings using hybrid systems.

  5. Availability, Uniqueness and Perceived Value of Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (BSPS Programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabaa M. Al-Rousan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the uniqueness of the Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (BSPS degree and the factors that contribute to this uniqueness. A total of 18 colleges and schools that offer a BSPS were identified in the literature and compared. A review of the current literature and university websites was conducted in order to compare and contrast the different BSPS programs. BSPS program directors’ perceptions were evaluated through a 14-item online survey instrument. Of the 16 programs surveyed, seven (43.8% responded to the survey. The respondents agreed that most of the BSPS graduates are placed (from the highest to the lowest at pharmacy school, postgraduate education and in the pharmaceutical industry. This is a timely review of coursework, program lengths and job opportunities for graduates of the BSPS. Currently, the BSPS programs have yet to receive a large amount of attention, but the importance in pharmaceutical education cannot be denied.

  6. CERN Researchers' Night @ CMS + TOTEM

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Young researchers' shifter training at CMS; • Introduction talk with discussion, • CMS control room shadowing the shifters • TOTEM control room introduction and discusson • Scientific poster work shop and presentation • Science Art installations ‘Faces of CMS’ & ‘Science Cloud’ • CMS Shift diploma presentation

  7. Simplified Night Sky Display System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    A document describes a simple night sky display system that is portable, lightweight, and includes, at most, four components in its simplest configuration. The total volume of this system is no more than 10(sup 6) cm(sup 3) in a disassembled state, and weighs no more than 20 kilograms. The four basic components are a computer, a projector, a spherical light-reflecting first surface and mount, and a spherical second surface for display. The computer has temporary or permanent memory that contains at least one signal representing one or more images of a portion of the sky when viewed from an arbitrary position, and at a selected time. The first surface reflector is spherical and receives and reflects the image from the projector onto the second surface, which is shaped like a hemisphere. This system may be used to simulate selected portions of the night sky, preserving the appearance and kinesthetic sense of the celestial sphere surrounding the Earth or any other point in space. These points will then show motions of planets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, and comets that are visible from that position. The images may be motionless, or move with the passage of time. The array of images presented, and vantage points in space, are limited only by the computer software that is available, or can be developed. An optional approach is to have the screen (second surface) self-inflate by means of gas within the enclosed volume, and then self-regulate that gas in order to support itself without any other mechanical support.

  8. Night vision: changing the way we drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapper, Stuart H.; Kyle, Robert J. S.; Nicklin, Robert L.; Kormos, Alexander L.

    2001-03-01

    A revolutionary new Night Vision System has been designed to help drivers see well beyond their headlights. From luxury automobiles to heavy trucks, Night Vision is helping drivers see better, see further, and react sooner. This paper describes how Night Vision Systems are being used in transportation and their viability for the future. It describes recent improvements to the system currently in the second year of production. It also addresses consumer education and awareness, cost reduction, product reliability, market expansion and future improvements.

  9. A review of forensic science higher education programs in the United States: bachelor's and master's degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregar, Kristen L; Proni, Gloria

    2010-11-01

    As the number of forensic science programs offered at higher education institutions rises, and more students express an interest in them, it is important to gain information regarding the offerings in terms of courses, equipment available to students, degree requirements, and other important aspects of the programs. A survey was conducted examining the existing bachelor's and master's forensic science programs in the U.S. Of the responding institutions, relatively few were, at the time of the survey, accredited by the forensic science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC). In general, the standards of the responding programs vary considerably primarily in terms of their size and subjects coverage. While it is clear that the standards for the forensic science programs investigated are not homogeneous, the majority of the programs provide a strong science curriculum, faculties with advanced degrees, and interesting forensic-oriented courses. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Night ventilation control strategies in office buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Yi, Lingli; Gao, Fusheng [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2009-10-15

    In moderate climates night ventilation is an effective and energy-efficient approach to improve the indoor thermal environment for office buildings during the summer months, especially for heavyweight construction. However, is night ventilation a suitable strategy for office buildings with lightweight construction located in cold climates? In order to answer this question, the whole energy-consumption analysis software EnergyPlus was used to simulate the indoor thermal environment and energy consumption in typical office buildings with night mechanical ventilation in three cities in northern China. The summer outdoor climate data was analyzed, and three typical design days were chosen. The most important factors influencing night ventilation performance such as ventilation rates, ventilation duration, building mass and climatic conditions were evaluated. When night ventilation operation time is closer to active cooling time, the efficiency of night ventilation is higher. With night ventilation rate of 10 ach, the mean radiant temperature of the indoor surface decreased by up to 3.9 C. The longer the duration of operation, the more efficient the night ventilation strategy becomes. The control strategies for three locations are given in the paper. Based on the optimized strategies, the operation consumption and fees are calculated. The results show that more energy is saved in office buildings cooled by a night ventilation system in northern China than ones that do not employ this strategy. (author)

  11. Important Developments in STEM Education in the United States: Next Generation Science Standards and Classroom Representations of Localized Scientific Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Campbell

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines important recent developments in STEM education, especially related to science education in the United States (U.S.. This examination begins with an abbreviated introduction of the newest science standards documents in the U.S., with a specific focus on the structure and main priorities of these documents. This is followed by an explanation of why priority in the standards is given to teachers engaging students in science and engineering practices to use disciplinary scientific ideas in explaining phenomena and solving problems. Finally, attention is briefly given to how these standards documents hold promise for acting as leverage points within the complex U.S. educational system for positively influencing the disconcerting issues consistently reported in national studies of U.S. classrooms.

  12. A collaborative integrated stem teaching: Examination of a science and math teacher collaboration on an integrated stem unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Drew C.

    The integration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum in middle school science and math classrooms is a reform effort currently taking place. The teachers are being encouraged to teach integrated content through national and state standards. The teachers have not been trained to do this form of teaching, which has led to feelings of discomfort or incompetence to fulfill those standards. This has led to a need for professional developments to train these teachers. Those developing the professional developments are seeking to identify ways to encourage teachers to continue to implement integrated units. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a collaborative teaching relationship between a math and science teacher following a professional development. The teachers used a common integrated STEM unit to teach math and science standards by using engineering design as the integrator. The teachers provided lesson plans, were video recorded during implementation, interviewed pre and post-implementation, and made daily journal entries. These data were analyzed to document the collaboration and identify impacts of the collaboration.

  13. Cultural differences: Polish fandom of Welcome to Night Vale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Włodarczyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to Night Vale (2012– is an intertextual podcast in the tradition of popular horror and weird tales. Listeners are meant to be part of a (fictional community, listening to the radio in the small desert town of Night Vale in the Southwestern United States, although neither the state nor the exact time are specified. We follow the host of the program, Cecil Palmer, as he describes the town's community life, although the events presented in the show are far from normal. The first episode was published online June 15, 2012, with no marketing to accompany the event. Many had first heard about Welcome to Night Vale through fan art available via social media, including Tumblr, Soup.io, blog communities, Facebook groups, and deviantArt. Although the production is available in English only, it has a Polish fandom. We describe the difference in perception of this popular text based on differences in the cultural background and literary knowledge of the listeners. We also attend to fan practices such as fan art surrounding Welcome to Night Vale because their content correlates with the creator's culture of origin, as well as the issue of funding the free podcast among fans from different countries and different economies.

  14. General Education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science College Courses Serve as a Vehicle for Improving Science Literacy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, E.

    2011-10-01

    Every year approximately 500,000 undergraduate college students take a general education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science (EASS) course in the Unites States. For the majority of these students this will be their last physical science course in life. This population of students is incredibly important to the science literacy of the United States citizenry and to the success of the STEM career pipeline. These students represent future scientists, technologists, business leaders, politicians, journalists, historians, artists, and most importantly, policy makers, parents, voters, and teachers. A significant portion of these students are taught at minority serving institutions and community colleges and often are from underserved and underrepresented groups, such as women and minorities. Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona have been developing and conducting research on the effectiveness of instructional strategies and materials that are explicitly designed to challenge students' naïve ideas and intellectually engage their thinking at a deep level in the traditional lecture classroom. The results of this work show that dramatic improvement in student understanding can be made from increased use of interactive learning strategies. These improvements are shown to be independent of institution type or class size, but appear to be strongly influenced by the quality of the instructor's implementation. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies.

  15. Starry Nights: The Great World Wide Star Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dennis; Meymaris, K.; Henderson, S.; Johnson, R.

    2008-05-01

    The Great World Wide Star Count is an international field campaign encouraging participants to go outside, look skyward after dark, count the stars they see in certain constellations, and report what they see online. This Windows to the Universe citizen science event is designed to raise awareness about light pollution and the night sky as well as promote learning in astronomy. Star Count benefits from the current excitement in citizen science. The 2007 pilot effort included 15 nights for observations in October & November. Utilizing the international networking capabilities of Windows to the Universe, Star Count is able to engage people from all countries. Data collection and online reporting is designed to be simple and user-friendly for citizen scientists of all ages. The collected data is available online in a variety of formats for use by students, teachers and scientists worldwide to assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world. This session will share our results and demonstrate how students and scientists worldwide can explore and analyze the data from the of the 2007 campaign. We will discuss how the Star Count team planned and executed the project in such a way that non-astronomers were able to make valid and useful contributions. We will also discuss lessons learned and best practices based on this inaugural campaign, as well as our plans for the future, including IYA 2009.

  16. A Directory of Information Resources in the United States: Biological Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Referral Center for Science and Technology.

    Contained in this volume is an update and extension of the coverage of the biological sciences directory published in 1965 by the National Referral Center of the Library of Congress. The 2230 entries, organizations with specialized knowledge in the field of biological sciences, are arranged alphabetically. The name, address, telephone number,…

  17. How do different definitions of night shift affect the exposure assessment of night work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Johnni; Kolstad, Henrik A

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to show how different definitions affect the proportion of shifts classified as night shifts. The Danish Working Hour Database was used to calculate number of night shifts according to eight definitions. More than 98% of the total night shifts were night shifts by use of both...... the reference definition (at least 3 h of work between 24:00 and 05:00) and definitions using a period during the night. The overlap with definitions based on starting and ending time was less pronounced (64-71 %). The proportion of classified night shifts differs little when night shifts are based...... on definitions including a period during the night. Studies based on other definitions may be less comparable....

  18. Metabolic syndrome in permanent night workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggi, Nicoletta; Consonni, Dario; Galluzzo, Valeria; Sogliani, Marco; Costa, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    Night and shift work might be risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders due to interference with diet, circadian metabolic rhythms, and lifestyle. The relationship between permanent night work and metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors was explored in a retrospective longitudinal study of workers employed in a large municipal enterprise in charge of street cleaning and domestic waste collection. All subjects who had worked night shifts between 1976 and 2007 as hand sweepers, motor sweepers, and delivery tricar drivers were compared with subjects who always worked the same jobs but on day shifts. From the periodical medical surveillance files, we identified 488 male workers who had been examined on average five times (minimum 2, maximum 14) during the study period, for a total of 2,328 medical examinations; 157 always had worked day shifts, 12 always the night shift, and 319 both (initially day and subsequently night shifts). Their age ranged from 22 to 62 yrs, and work experience varied from 1 to 28 yrs. Lifestyle habits (smoking, alcohol consumption), body mass index, serum glucose, total cholesterol, tryglicerides, hepatic enzymes, blood pressure, resting electrocardiogram, diabetes, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and related drugs were taken into consideration for the analysis. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) models (exchangeable correlation matrix) to analyze the relationship between night work and health effects while accounting for within-subject correlations and adjusting for study period, job, age, and lifestyle variables. As a whole, night workers smoked more and had significantly higher BMI, serum total cholesterol, and triglycerides than day workers. Both the inter-individual comparison between day and night workers and the intra-individual comparison among the workers, who were day workers at the beginning of their employment and later became night workers, showed a significant increase in BMI, total cholesterol

  19. Visualization on the Day Night Year Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božić, Mirjana; Vušković, Leposava; Popović, Svetozar; Popović, Jelena; Marković-Topalović, Tatjana

    2016-11-01

    The story about a properly oriented outdoor globe in the hands and minds of Eratosthenes, Jefferson, Milanković and science educators is presented. Having the same orientation in space as the Earth, the Day Night Year Globe (DING) shows in real time the pattern of illumination of the Earth’s surface and its diurnal and seasonal variations. It is an ideal object for the visualization of knowledge and increase in knowledge about: the form of the Earth, Earth’s rotation, Earth’s revolution around the Sun, the length of seasons, solstices, equinoxes, the longitude problem, the distribution of the Sun’s radiation over the Earth, the impact of this radiation on Earth’s climate, and how to use it efficiently. By attaching a movable vane to the poles, or adding pins around the equator to read time, DING becomes a spherical/globe-shaped sundial. So, the DING is simultaneously useful for teaching physics, geophysics, astronomy, use of solar energy and promoting an inquiry-based learning environment for students and the public.

  20. United States Naval Academy Polar Science Program; Undergraduate Research and Outreach in Polar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    The United States Naval Academy (USNA) Polar Science Program (PSP), has been very active completing its own field campaign out of Barrow, AK, sent students to the South Pole, participated in STEM activities and educated over 100 future Naval Officers about the Polar Regions. Each activity is uniquely different, but has the similar undertone of sharing the recent rapid changes in the Cryosphere to a wide range of audiences. There is further room for development and growth through future field campaigns and new collaborations. The Naval Academy Ice Experiment (NAICEX) 2013 was based out of the old Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) in Barrow, AK. In joint collaboration with the University of Delaware, University of Washington, and Naval Research Laboratory we successfully took multiple measurements for over a week on the fast ice just offshore. Five undergraduate students from USNA, as well as 3 graduate students from University of Delaware participated, as well as multiple professors and instructors from each institution. Data collected during the experiment will be used in capstone courses and thesis research. There was also an outreach component to the experiment, where local students from Barrow H.S. have been assigned to the USNA ice observations project for their own high school course work. Local students will be analyzing data that will contribute into the larger research effort at USNA through coordinated remote efforts and participation in future field experiments. The USNA STEM office is one of the most robust in the entire country. The USNA PSP is active within this program by developing polar specific modules that are integrated varying length outreach opportunities from a few hours to week long camps. USNA PSP also engages in educator training that is held at the Naval Academy each summer. Through this program of educating the educators, the far reaching levels of awareness are multiplied exponentially. Also, the USNA Oceanography Department has

  1. Handling qualities comparison of panoramic night vision goggles and 46-deg. night vision goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion; Thorndycraft, David

    2003-09-01

    Night Vision Goggles allow the user to see in extremely low illumination levels but the visual information provided by Night Vision Goggles has a limited field-of-view that diminishes handling-qualities in the night flying environment. Panoramic Night Vision Goggles were designed to correct this problem by providing a 100° horizontal field-of-view which is larger than currently used Night Vision Goggles. However, in the first generation Panoramic Night Vision Goggle, the improved field of view came at the cost of diminished resolution, contrast and central overlap area when compared to conventional Night Vision Goggles. This paper describes an evaluation that was conducted in the variable stability NRC Bell-205 helicopter to examine the influence on system handling qualities of the Panoramic Night Vision Goggles and a 46° field-of-view UK Night Vision Goggle. Five pilots flew the ADS-33D hover, sidestep and pirouette manoeuvres in simulated night conditions with the UK Night Vision Goggle and the Panoramic Night Vision Goggle. Both subjective and objective measures of task performance were obtained. Handling-qualities ratings showed the pirouette was performed better with the Panoramic Night Vision Goggles. This was the only manoeuvre where there was a clear-cut handling qualities improvement when using the Panoramic Night Vision Goggles. Other manoeuvres such as the sidestep and hover did not show definitive handling qualities rating differences between the two Night Vision Goggle types. The flight test results were interpreted in terms of the design trade-offs of the two night vision systems, with regard to the different acuity, binocular overlaps and fields-of-view.

  2. Night Sky Quality Measurements at the ATA50 Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Hüseyin; Nasiroglu, Ilham; Guney, Yavuz

    2016-07-01

    One of the most important factor affecting the quality of the sky in astronomy is the light pollution (luminance of the night sky). Light pollution, also affects humans and wildlife in many ways. This effect occurs by using the light source of outdoor lighting in the wrong way. Light pollution can be reduced by lighting only what is actually needed, when and where it is needed. In generally, SQM (Sky Quality Meter- Clear Sky Detector) is used to measure this light effect. In this work we present night sky brightness measurements performed at the Atatürk University Astrophysics Research Telescope (ATA50) and the surrounding area, Erzurum, TURKEY. We also discussed the physical impacts of light pollution on science, humans and wildlife.

  3. Night-vision goggles for night-blind subjects : subjective evaluation after 2 years of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartong, D. T.; Kooijman, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of night-vision goggles (NVG) for night-blind subjects after 1 and 2 years of use. Methods: Eleven night-blind subjects with retinitis pigmentosa used NVG for a 2-year period. At the end of each year, they were requested to fill-in two questionnaires regarding the

  4. Why Does Asthma Attack Severely at Night?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The rhythmic changes of human physiological activities by day and at night may cause regular change of the patient's condition within one day. The following is the explanation with the theory of Chinese medicine for the reason why asthma attacks severely at night.

  5. Definitions of night eating in adolescent girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Striegel-Moore, RH; Thompson, D; Franko, DL; Barton, B; Affenito, S; Schreiber, GB; Daniels, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of night eating in a community cohort of black and white girls, using different definitions of night eating as described in the literature. Research Methods and Procedures: Three-day food diaries collected as part of the National Growth and Health Study were exa

  6. Field testing driver night vision devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, F.L.; Kolletzki, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the available methodologies to field test driver night vision devices ranging from vehicle mounted camera’s to head-mounted NVG’s. As in flight trials, a formidable challenge is to collect meaningful performance measures. Night vision systems for land and air systems show many

  7. Definitions of night eating in adolescent girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Striegel-Moore, RH; Thompson, D; Franko, DL; Barton, B; Affenito, S; Schreiber, GB; Daniels, [No Value

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of night eating in a community cohort of black and white girls, using different definitions of night eating as described in the literature. Research Methods and Procedures: Three-day food diaries collected as part of the National Growth and Health Study were

  8. Determining Light Pollution of the Global Sky: GLOBE at Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Meymaris, K.; Ward, D.; Walker, C.; Russell, R.; Pompea, S.; Salisbury, D.

    2006-05-01

    GLOBE at Night is an international science event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Increased and robust understanding of our environment requires learning opportunities that take place outside of the conventional K-12 classroom and beyond the confines of the school day. This hands-on learning activity extended the traditional classroom and school day last March with a week of nighttime sky observations involving teachers, students and their families. The quality of the night sky for stellar observations is impacted by several factors including human activities. By observing cloud cover and locating specific constellations in the sky, students from around the world learned how the lights in their community contribute to light pollution, exploring the relationship between science, technology and their society. Students learned that light pollution impacts more than just the visibility of stars at night. Lights at night impact both the biology and ecology of many species in our environment. Students were able to participate in this global scientific campaign by submitting their observations through an online database, allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis by participating scientists. Students and their families learned how latitude and longitude coordinates provide a location system to map and analyze the observation data submitted from around the globe. The collected data is available online for use by students, teachers and scientists worldwide to assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world. This session will share how students and scientists across the globe can explore and analyze the results of this exciting campaign. GLOBE at Night is a collaborative effort sponsored by The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS), Windows to the Universe, and ESRI. The GLOBE Program is

  9. Night time blood pressure dip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis; Bloomfield; Alex; Park

    2015-01-01

    The advent of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring permitted examination of blood pressures during sleep and recognition of the associated circadian fall in pressure during this period. The fall in pressure,called the "dip",is defined as the difference between daytime mean systolic pressure and nighttime mean systolic pressure expressed as a percentage of the day value. Ten percent to 20% is considered normal. Dips less than 10%,referred to as blunted or absent,have been considered as predicting an adverse cardiovascular event. This view and the broader concept that white coat hypertension itself is a forerunner of essential hypertension is disputable. This editorial questions whether mean arterial pressures over many hours accurately represent the systolic load,whether nighttime dipping varies from measure to measure or is a fixed phenomenon,whether the abrupt morning pressure rise is a risk factor or whether none of these issues are as important as the actual night time systolic blood pressure itself. The paper discusses the difference between medicated and nonmedicated white coat hypertensives in regard to the cardiovascular risk and suggests that further work is necessary to consider whether the quality and duration of sleep are important factors.

  10. Transfer color to night vision images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoyuan Sun; Zhongliang Jing; Gang Liu; Zhenhua Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ Natural color appearance is the key problem of color night vision field. In this paper, the color mood of daytime color image is transferred to the monochromic night vision image. This method gives the night image a natural color appearance. For each pixel in the night vision image, the best matching pixel in the color image is found based on texture similarity measure. Entropy, energy, contrast, homogeneity, and correlation features based on co-occurrence matrix are combined as texture similarity measure to find the corresponding pixels between the two images. We use a genetic algorithm (GA) to find the optimistic weighting factors assigned to the five different features. GA is also employed in searching the matching pixels to make the color transfer algorithm faster. When the best matching pixel in the color image is found, the chromaticity values are transferred to the corresponding pixel of the night vision image. The experiment results demonstrate the efficiency of this natural color transfer technique.

  11. [NIGHT SHIFT WORK AND HEALTH DISORDER RISK IN FEMALE WORKERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhtina, E G; Solionova, L G; Fedichkina, T P; Zykova, I E

    2015-01-01

    There was evaluated the risk to health in females employed in shift work, including night shifts. According to the data of periodical medical examinations health indices of 403 females employed in shift work, including night shifts, were compared with indices of 205 females--workers of administrative units of the same enterprise. Overall relative risk (RR) for the health disorder associated with the night shift was 1.2 (95%; confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.28). A statistically significant increase in risk was observed in relation to uterine fibroids (OR 1.3; 95% CI: 1.06-1.54), mastopathy (OR 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.6), inorganic sleep disorders (OR 8.8; 95% CI 2.6-29.8). At the boundary of the statistical significance there was the increase in the risk for obesity (OR 1.2; 95% C: 0.97-1.39), hypertension (OR 1.2; 95% CI, 0.9-1.5) and endometriosis (OR 1.5; 95% CI: 0.98-2.16). There was revealed an adverse effect of night shifts on the gestation course: ectopic pregnancy in the experimental group occurred 6.6 times more frequently than in the control group (95% CI: 0.87-50.2), and spontaneous abortion--1.7 times (95% CI: 0.95-3.22). The performed study has once again confirmed the negative impact of smoking on women's reproductive health: smoking women in the experimental group compared with the control group smokers had 2.7 times increased risk of uterine fibroids (within 1.06-7.0), the risk in non-smokers was significantly lower--1.2 (0.98-1.4). The findings suggest about a wide range of health problems related to employment on shift work, including night shifts, which indicates to the need for adoption of regulatory and preventive measures aimed to this professional group.

  12. Visual anomalies and display night vision goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Donald N.; Ineson, Judith; Cheetham, Mark

    2003-09-01

    A brief study has been conducted to investigate several visual anomalies reported by test pilots using a Display Night Vision Goggle (DNVG) that superimposed symbols onto the intensified image seen by the right eye. A survey of relevant research suggests that one oddity, an apparent focus mis-match between the scene image and the injected symbols, is an irremovable facet of the perception of bright, contrasting, overlaid symbols. A second oddity, an uncomfortable and distracting blurring of the under-stimulated left eye during periods of flight in cloud, was eventually experienced by several people in a laboratory simulation, the effect being more noticeable if the under-stimulated eye was the dominant eye. A subsequent apparent enlargement of the HUD symbols and a post-flight focussing delay by the left eye seemed to be after-effects of whatever caused the ocular discomfort. As about 30% of the population are left eye dominant, the disturbing discomfort and aftermath could affect this proportion of pilots using a right-eye DNVG. Although further work is needed to understand the phenomena, it would be wise to warn aircrew and enable the symbol injection unit to be fitted to either channel of the DNVG.

  13. ASAS centennial paper: Farm animal welfare science in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A K

    2009-06-01

    Compared with the more traditional sciences of nutrition, physiology, and reproduction, the acceptance of animal welfare science in its own right is still relatively new. Seven colleagues, who had an average of 10 yr experience with beef (n = 5), swine (n = 5), dairy (n = 2), poultry (n = 1), and sheep (n = 1) were asked several questions on the opportunities and challenges facing the field. The information collected was pooled for anonymity. General challenges identified by the group were (1) are we making progress and how can this be defined, (2) demand for information has outpaced the science, and (3) pressures from stakeholders. Solutions were (1) to continue providing sound science that has been validated, measured objectively, and is reliable; and (2) to continue to have animal science and veterinary medicine departments employ faculty trained in farm animal welfare. Highlights for the future were willingness for animal welfare scientists to work across disciplines and across departments, within the same institution, and enthusiastically across state lines, and expansion of new teaching models. In conclusion, new and innovative tools, personalities, and dedication to the field of animal welfare will continue to provide scientific information and direction for farm animal welfare science.

  14. The use of animals in national high school student science fair projects in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Spiegel, Crystal

    2004-06-01

    Science fair projects can provide a sound opportunity to teach students the value of scientific methodology without relying on the routine and unnecessary use of animals. Unfortunately, students are often encouraged to use animals in an expendable manner that both duplicates previous experiments and neglects the opportunity to "think outside the box" in order to generate new hypotheses/theories about human health, physiological processes or basic biological concepts. Although at least one national science fair sponsor has changed its policy regarding students' utilisation of vertebrate animals, others continue to encourage the more traditional in vivo experimental projects. This paper will review the guidelines of two major national science fairs in the USA; types of projects conducted that involve animals; numbers of animals involved; interview responses by some student finalists who used vertebrates in their projects; successful initiatives by animal advocates in the USA to eliminate the use of animals in science fairs; and potential areas of outreach to science educators, science fair sponsors, high schools and students.

  15. Who pre-drinks before a night out and why?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jeanette; Andrade, Stefan Bastholm

    2014-01-01

    models were used on a survey of 628 people (aged 18–35) conducted on-site in 26 bars, clubs and pubs in four cities and towns. Results: Young males drink on average 9.8 and females 7.4 standard units of alcohol before a night out. Saving money is the most prevalent motive for pre-drinking. Although lower...... income levels cannot explain whether a young person will pre-drink on an event-specific night out, young people’s income level and their motives explain the quantities they consume. Lower-earning males who pre-drank to save money consumed larger quantities of alcohol at home and lower-earning females......Aim: To examine young people’s main motive for pre-drinking in the United Kingdom, how much they drink on an event-specific night out, and whether motives or socioeconomic status (particularly their income level) explain the alcohol quantities they drink. Methods: Multilevel logit and Poisson...

  16. Between the Local and the Global: Organized Research Units and International Collaborations in the Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Creso M.; Oleksiyenko, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    Organized research units--also known as centers, institutes, and laboratories--are increasingly prominent in the university. This paper examines how ORUs emerge to promote global agendas and international collaborations in an academic health center in North America. The roles these units play in helping researchers work across institutional and…

  17. The effect of chronotype on sleepiness, fatigue, and psychomotor vigilance of ICU nurses during the night shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinke, Laurens; Ozbay, Yusuf; Dieperink, Willem; Tulleken, Jaap E.

    In general, sleeping and activity patterns vary between individuals. This attribute, known as chronotype, may affect night shift performance. In the intensive care unit (ICR), night shift performance may impact patient safety. We have investigated the effect of chronotype and social demographics on

  18. Organization and management of ATLAS nightly builds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehring, F.; Obreshkov, E.; Quarrie, D.; Rybkine, G.; Undrus, A.

    2010-04-01

    The automated multi-platform software nightly build system is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation and code approval schemes. Code developers from ATLAS participating Institutes spread all around the world use about 30 branches of nightly releases for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers. The nightly releases lead up to, and are the basis of, stable software releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS nightly builds are managed by the fully automated NICOS framework on the computing farm with 44 powerful multiprocessor nodes. The ATN test tool is embedded within the nightly system and provides results shortly after full compilations complete. Other test frameworks are synchronized with NICOS jobs and run larger scale validation jobs using the nightly releases. NICOS web pages dynamically provide information about the progress and results of the builds. For faster feedback, e-mail notifications about nightly releases problems are automatically distributed to the developers responsible.

  19. Short communication: On recognizing the proper experimental unit in animal studies in the dairy sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Nora M; Kramer, Matthew; Tempelman, Robert J; Stroup, Walter W; St-Pierre, Normand R; Craig, Bruce A; Young, Linda J; Gbur, Edward E

    2016-11-01

    Sound design of experiments combined with proper implementation of appropriate statistical methods for data analysis are critical for producing meaningful scientific results that are both replicable and reproducible. This communication addresses specific aspects of design and analysis of experiments relevant to the dairy sciences and, in so doing, responds to recent concerns raised in a letter to the editor of the Journal of Dairy Science regarding journal policy for research publications on pen-based animal studies. We further elaborate on points raised, rectify interpretation of important concepts, and show how aspects of statistical inference and elicitation of research conclusions are affected. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Night sky a falcon field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Nigro, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Night Sky: A Falcon Field Guide covers both summer and winter constellations, planets, and stars found in the northern hemisphere. Conveniently sized to fit in a pocket and featuring detailed photographs, this informative guide makes it easy to identify objects in the night sky even from one's own backyard. From information on optimal weather conditions, preferred viewing locations, and how to use key tools of the trade, this handbook will help you adeptly navigate to and fro the vast and dynamic nighttime skies, and you'll fast recognize that the night sky's the limit.

  1. Developmental/remedial sciences at community colleges in five states in the central part of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramore, Tricia L.

    Phipps (1998) emphasized interinstitutional collaboration among colleges to share and replicate best practices and ideas as a strategy to improve the effectiveness of developmental/remedial education, but Johnson (2001) noted a lack of communication between science educators and developmental educators. The purposes of this mixed methods study were (a) to identify and examine the characteristics of developmental/remedial sciences as it existed in the 2006-2007 academic year in terms of organization, structure, instructional practices, and curriculum as offered at community colleges in five states in the central part of the United States; and (b) to develop a set of guidelines for community college faculty and administrators to use in making decisions about whether or not to offer developmental/remedial sciences and identify the general steps to follow in implementation. The study was conducted in four phases which involved two surveys, subsequent interviews with leaders at three institutions selected for case study, and guideline development. Developmental/remedial sciences were offered at few institutions. At those institutions where they were offered, however, nearly half offered courses and multiple support services, but did not define their offerings as a program. Some developmental education best practices were adopted (such as integrating study skills with science content in courses and using a variety of instructional strategies), but many, including goals and assessment, were omitted. Interviewees indicated the need for developmental/remedial sciences would continue in the future. Guidelines to use in determining whether to offer developmental/remedial sciences included the following: (1) adopt an attitude of quality improvement; (2) look to faculty as a #1 resource; (3) assess what is currently offered in the sciences and ask if it works; (4) know what you are remediating; (5) start a conversation between the academic department and support services staff

  2. Basic Principles of Genetics. [Aids to Individualize the Teaching of Science, Mini-Course Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Sharon

    This booklet, one of a series developed by the Frederick County Board of Education, Frederick, Maryland, provides an instruction module for an individualized or flexible approach to secondary science teaching. Subjects and activities in this series of booklets are designed to supplement a basic curriculum or to form a total curriculum, and relate…

  3. The Impact of Changing Scientific Knowledge on Science Education in the United States Since 1850

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giorno, Bette J.

    1969-01-01

    Presents the findings and conclusions of research study into the impact of changing scientific knowledge on the content and methodology of science education during the period 1850-1954. The results showed that changing scientific knowledge had a greater and more direct influence on educational psychology and philosophy than on the science…

  4. Analyzing Science Education in the United Kingdom: Taking a System-Wide Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, John H.; Dierking, Lynn D.; Osborne, Jonathan; Wenger, Matthew; Dawson, Emily; Wong, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that individuals develop their understanding of science concepts in and out of school, using varied community resources and networks. Thus in contrast to historic research approaches that focus exclusively on single organizations and/or educational events, the current paper presents exploratory research in which we…

  5. LEECH: A 100 Night Exoplanet Imaging Survey at the LBT

    CERN Document Server

    Skemer, Andrew; Bailey, Vanessa; Biller, Beth; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Brandner, Wolfgang; Buenzli, Esther; Close, Laird; Crepp, Justin; Defrere, Denis; Desidera, Silvano; Eisner, Josh; Esposito, Simone; Fortney, Jonathan; Henning, Thomas; Hinz, Phil; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Leisenring, Jarron; Males, Jared; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Morzinski, Katie; Oza, Apurva; Pascucci, Ilaria; Patience, Jenny; Rieke, George; Schertl, Dieter; Schlieder, Joshua; Skrutskie, Mike; Su, Kate; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E; Zimmerman, Neil

    2014-01-01

    In February 2013, the LEECH (LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt) survey began its 100-night campaign from the Large Binocular Telescope atop Mount Graham in Arizona. LEECH nearly complements other high-contrast planet imaging efforts by observing stars in L' band (3.8 microns) as opposed to the shorter wavelength near-infrared bands (1-2.3 microns). This part of the spectrum offers deeper mass sensitivity for intermediate age (several hundred Myr-old) systems, since their Jovian-mass planets radiate predominantly in the mid-infrared. In this proceedings, we present the science goals for LEECH and a preliminary contrast curve from some early data.

  6. Work at night and breast cancer - report on evidence-based options for preventive actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Hansen, Johnni; Kolstad, Henrik A.

    2012-01-01

    actions, 16 researchers in basic, epidemiological and applied sciences convened at a workshop in Copenhagen 26-27 October 2011. This paper summarizes the evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies and presents possible recommendations for prevention of the effects of night work on breast...... cancer. Among those studies that quantified duration of shift work, there were statistically significant elevations in risk only after about 20 years working night shift. It is unclear from these studies whether or not there is a modest but real elevated risk for shorter durations. Hence, restriction...... by suppression of melatonin secretion. Work during the night is widespread worldwide. To provide additional evidence-based recommendations on prevention of diseases related to night shift work, large studies on the impact of various shift schedules and type of light on circadian rhythms need to be conducted...

  7. Smartphones May Hinder a Good Night's Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161924.html Smartphones May Hinder a Good Night's Sleep Study suggests ... sleep, it might be wise to give your smartphone a rest from time to time. New research ...

  8. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    CERN Document Server

    Undrus, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Builds and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, test...

  9. TBT recommends : Courtney Pine. Hansa disco night

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Inglise jazzsaksofonisti Courtney Pine heliplaadi "Resistance" esitluskontserdist 15. dets. Rock Cafés Tallinnas. Inglise laulja Chris Norman läti ansamblitega üritusel "Hansa disco night Nr.4" 9. dets. Kipsala Hallis Riias

  10. TBT recommends : Courtney Pine. Hansa disco night

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Inglise jazzsaksofonisti Courtney Pine heliplaadi "Resistance" esitluskontserdist 15. dets. Rock Cafés Tallinnas. Inglise laulja Chris Norman läti ansamblitega üritusel "Hansa disco night Nr.4" 9. dets. Kipsala Hallis Riias

  11. Science Outreach for the Thousands: Coe College's Playground of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D. E.; Franke, M.; Affatigato, M.; Feller, S.

    2011-12-01

    Coe College is a private liberal arts college nestled in the northeast quadrant of Cedar Rapids, IA. Coe takes pride in the outreach it does in the local community. The sciences at Coe find enjoyment in educating the children and families of this community through a diverse set of venues; from performing science demonstrations for children at Cedar Rapids' Fourth of July Freedom Festival to hosting summer forums and talks to invigorate the minds of its more mature audiences. Among these events, the signature event of the year is the Coe Playground of Science. On the last Thursday of October, before Halloween, the science departments at Coe invite nearly two thousand children from pre elementary to high school ages, along with their parents to participate in a night filled with science demos, haunted halls, and trick-or-treating for more than just candy. The demonstrations are performed by professors and students alike from a raft of cooperative departments including physics, chemistry, biology, math, computer science, nursing, ROTC, and psychology. This event greatly strengthens the relationships between institution members and community members. The sciences at Coe understand the importance of imparting the thrill and hunger for exploration and discovery into the future generations. More importantly they recognize that this cannot start and end at the collegiate level, but the American public must be reached at younger ages and continue to be encouraged beyond the college experience. The Playground of Science unites these two groups under the common goal of elevating scientific interest in the American people.

  12. Nature's Late-Night Light Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carolyn Collins

    2002-09-01

    In addition to stars and planets, there are other interesting lights to be seen in the night sky. The northern and southern lights, called the aurora borealis and aurora australis, are created by charged particles from the Sun reacting in Earth's magnetic field. Night-shining clouds or noctilucent clouds appear at evening twilight as a result of water vapor in the polar mesosphere. Zodiacal light can be seen stretching up from the horizon after sunset or before sunrise.

  13. Night cough and general practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toop, L J; Howie, J G; Paxton, F M

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-four children, aged between three and nine years, presenting with nocturnal cough, were studied on successive nights using an automatic voice activated tape recorder system. Children with a family history of atopy coughed significantly more than children without such a family history. A wide variation in cough frequency was found both between and within subjects. No effects of treatment on cough frequency were demonstrated. Some of the physiological and pathological mechanisms underlying night cough are discussed.

  14. Globe at Night: From IYA2009 to the International Year of Light 2015 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance Elaine; Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.

    2015-08-01

    Citizen-science is a rewardingly inclusive way to bring awareness to the public on important issues like the disappearing starry night sky, its cause and solutions. Citizen-science can also provide meaningful, hands-on “science process” experiences for students. One program that does both is Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org), an international campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by having people measure night-sky brightness and submit observations via a “web app” on any smart device or computer. Additionally, 2 native mobile apps - Loss of the Night for iPhone & Android, and Dark Sky Meter for iPhone - support Globe at Night.Since 2006, more than 125,000 vetted measurements from 115 countries have been reported. For 2015 the campaign is offered as a 10-day observation window each month when the Moon is not up. To facilitate Globe at Night as an international project, the web app and other materials are in many languages. (See www.globeatnight.org/downloads.)Students and the general public can use the data to monitor levels of light pollution around the world, as well as understand light pollution’s effects on energy consumption, plants, wildlife, human health and our ability to enjoy a starry night sky. Projects have compared Globe at Night data with ground-truthing using meters for energy audits as well as with data on birds and bats, population density, satellite data and trends over time. Globe at Night tackles grand challenges and everyday problems. It provides resources for formal and informal educators to engage learners of all ages. It has 9 years of experience in best practices for data management, design, collection, visualization, interpretation, etc. It has externally evaluated its program, workshops, lesson plans and accompanying kit to explore reasons for participation, skills developed, impact of experiences and perceived outcomes. Three recent papers (Birriel et al. 2014; Kyba et al. 2013; 2015) verify the

  15. Flying Blind: The Rise, Fall, and Possible Resurrection of Science Policy Advice in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Barry Sharpless George A. Silver * Richard E. Smalley * Robert M. Solow * Jack Steinberger * Joseph Stiglitz * Henry Taube * Daniel Tsui * Charles H...officio: Carl Kaysen Robert Solow Frank von Hippel Henry Kelly, Ivan Oelrich, Steven Aftergood, Benn H.Tannenbaum Occasional Paper No. 2 December 2004...about.htm. 116 http://www.tech-forum.org/. 117 Daniel S. Greenberg, Science, Money, and Politics (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2001), p. 473

  16. Narratives, memorable cases and metaphors of night nursing: findings from an interpretative phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannini, Lucia; Ghitti, Maria Grazia; Martin, Sonia; Palese, Alvisa; Saiani, Luisa

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of night nurses. An interpretative phenomenological study was undertaken, and 35 nurses working in Italian medical, surgical and intensive care units were purposely recruited. Data were gathered in 2010 by semi-structured interviews, collecting nurses' narratives, memorable cases and metaphors, aimed at summarising the essence of work as a nurse during the night. The experience of night nursing is based on four interconnected themes: (i) working in a state of alert, (ii) growing by expanding autonomy and responsibility, (iii) assuring sensitive surveillance and (iv) experiencing deep intimacy. Memorable episodes were polarised along (i) expected/unexpected events; (ii) positive/negative epilogues; and (iii) life/death issues. Many of the emergent metaphors described working during the night as being in the middle of a space where an apparent calm scene takes place, but unpredictable factors may suddenly change the order of events and the outcomes, creating chaos. Working during the night alerts nurses, who increase autonomy, expanding their role and assuming more responsibility with respect to that assumed during daily shifts. The nurses' clinical reasoning is based on data they carefully listen to, and on the meaning that nurses give time by time to different noises and silence. While in the past a sense of companionships was reported, a loneliness or a 'neutral' experience concerning the relationships with colleagues seems to prevail during night nursing. Working night shifts is a complex task, and specific training must be assured to students/novices.

  17. Teaching Basic Science Environmentally, The Concept: The cell is basic unit of structure of most organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests simple ways to introduce students to the concept that the cell is the basic unit of structure of most organisms. Mentions materials for microscope study that are readily available and easy to handle, e.g., membranes from between the scales of the onion bulb, thin-leaved plants, pond water, and pollen. (JHZ)

  18. Early Legal Education in the United States: Natural Law Theory and Law as a Moral Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mark Warren

    1998-01-01

    An examination of the history of legal education covers the long period of law-office apprenticeship as the principal method of legal education in the United States and reviews trends in the period of formal education, the relationship between formal education and professional practice, the philosophical context for legal education, instruction in…

  19. Science, Technology and Innovation for Achieving United Nations Millennium Development Goals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In September 2000, 147 heads of State and Government, and 189 nations intotal,committed themselves by year 2015 to roduce significantly global poverty and the related problems of illiteracy,hunger,discrimination against women, unsafe drinking water,and degraded environments and ecosystems,through the United Nations Millennium Declaration[A/RES/55/2].

  20. Negotiating White Science in a Racially and Ethnically Diverse United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunac, Patricia S.; Demir, Kadir

    2017-01-01

    The racial and ethnic makeup of the United States is in constant flux and is expected to experience substantial increases in racial and ethnic diversity over the next four decades. The problem the American educational system faces is attempting to problematize race/racism in its educational system and creating a system to counteract educational…

  1. Man's Effect on the Environment, Teacher's Guide. Environmental Education Unit, Sixth Grade Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little Rock School District, AR.

    Part of a sequential series of curriculum units in environmental education for grades 4 through 12, this sixth grade curriculum guide focuses on man's effect upon the environment. Extensive classroom activities and field trips introduce the student to population, technology, pollution, natural resources, responsibility, career opportunities, and…

  2. Connecting Girls and Science: A Feminist Teacher Research Study of a High School Prenatal Testing Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Elaine Virginia

    1998-01-01

    Explores how a dozen high school girls express their relationship to and understanding of prenatal testing and its possible place in their lives and the lives of others in the context of a short unit on prenatal testing in a semester-long genetics course. Contains 57 references. (DDR)

  3. Person Response Functions and the Definition of Units in the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, George, Jr.; Perkins, Aminah F.

    2011-01-01

    Humphry (this issue) has written a thought-provoking piece on the interpretation of item discrimination parameters as scale units in item response theory. One of the key features of his work is the description of an item response theory (IRT) model that he calls the logistic measurement function that combines aspects of two traditions in IRT that…

  4. Water Availability for the Western United States: The Role for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. T.; Woosley, L. H.

    2003-12-01

    In the American West, the availability of water has become a serious concern for many communities and rural homeowners. Water of acceptable quality is harder to find because local sources are allocated to prior uses, depleted by overuse, or diminished by drought stress. Some of the inherent characteristics of the West add complexity to the task. The most rapidly growing States in population are in the Southwest-the most arid region on the continent. There is evidence that the climate is warming, which will have consequences for the Western water supplies, such as increasing minimum streamflow and earlier snowmelt events in snow-dominated basins. Endangered species are disproportionately represented in the Western States, and water availability now means sustaining riparian ecosystems and individual endangered species. Periodic inventory and assessment of the amounts and trends of water available in surface water and ground water are needed to support water management. The widespread perception that the amount of water available is diminishing with time needs to be replaced with fact. For the major Western rivers, there is either no long-term streamflow trend or the trend is increasing. In contrast, systematic information is lacking to make broad assessments of ground-water availability, but for specific aquifers where data are available, the aquifers are being depleted. The complexity added to the issue of Western water availability by these and other factors gives rise to a significant role for science. Science has played a role in support of Western water development from the beginning, and the role has evolved and changed over time along with society's values. The role for science is discussed in three phases-development and construction, consequences and environmental awareness, and sustainability. The development and construction includes some historical accounting of water development for the West and how some precedents set then, still exist today. Science

  5. The Study of Life Change Unit as Stressor Agents among Tehran University of Medical Sciences Hospitals' Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dargahi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Life crises as stressor agents can disrupt the best stress management regime. Different life crises have different impacts. A standard scale to rate change and its related stress impact has been developed commonly referred to as LCU (Life Change Unit Rating. This allocates a number of Life Crisis Units or Life Change Units (LCUs to different event and then evaluates them and takes action accordingly. This idea behind this approach of is to rundown the LCU table, totaling the LCUs for life crisis that have occurred in the previous one year. A Cross - sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 900 Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS Employees by a Holms and Rahe LCU questionnaire at 15 hospitals. The respondents were asked to determine their demographic information, list of stress symptoms which suffered from these diseases in the previous one year and finally, responded to 45 Life Change Unit as stressful life events and the value of each in "stress units" which occurred in the previous one year. The results showed that there is significant correlation between the employees LCU rating by sex, educational degree and size of hospital. Also we found that there are significant correlations between the employees stress symptoms with their LCU rating. Totally, 40% of the employees have less than 150 LCU rating (normal range and 60% of them have 150-300 or more than 300 LCU rating (abnormal range. In conclusion most of TUMS hospitals' employees who had stress symptoms have more LCU rating. One third of these employees are not in danger of suffering the illness effect, while two third of them are in danger.

  6. The study of life change unit as stressor agents among Tehran University of Medical Sciences Hospitals' employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein; Sharifiy Yazdi, Mohammad Kazem

    2010-01-01

    Life crises as stressor agents can disrupt the best stress management regime. Different life crises have different impacts. A standard scale to rate change and its related stress impact has been developed commonly referred to as LCU (life change unit) rating. This allocates a number of life crisis units or life change units (LCUs) to different event and then evaluates them and takes action accordingly. This idea behind this approach of is to rundown the LCU table, totaling the LCUs for life crisis that have occurred in the previous one year. A cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 900 Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) employees by a Holms and Rahe LCU questionnaire at 15 hospitals. The respondents were asked to determine their demographic information, list of stress symptoms which suffered from these diseases in the previous one year and finally, responded to 45 Life Change Unit as stressful life events and the value of each in "stress units" which occurred in the previous one year. The results showed that there is significant correlation between the employees LCU rating by sex, educational degree and size of hospital. Also we found that there are significant correlations between the employees stress symptoms with their LCU rating. Totally, 40% of the employees have less than 150 LCU rating (normal range) and 60% of them have 150-300 or more than 300 LCU rating (abnormal range). In conclusion most of TUMS hospitals' employees who had stress symptoms have more LCU rating. One third of these employees are not in danger of suffering the illness effect, while two third of them are in danger.

  7. The Study of Life Change Unit as Stressor Agents among Tehran University of Medical Sciences Hospitals' Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dargahi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nLife crises as stressor agents can disrupt the best stress management regime. Different life crises have different impacts. A standard scale to rate change and its related stress impact has been developed commonly referred to as LCU (Life Change Unit Rating. This allocates a number of Life Crisis Units or Life Change Units (LCUs to different event and then evaluates them and takes action accordingly. This idea behind this approach of is to rundown the LCU table, totaling the LCUs for life crisis that have occurred in the previous one year. A Cross - sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 900 Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS Employees by a Holms and Rahe LCU questionnaire at 15 hospitals. The respondents were asked to determine their demographic information, list of stress symptoms which suffered from these diseases in the previous one year and finally, responded to 45 Life Change Unit as stressful life events and the value of each in "stress units" which occurred in the previous one year. The results showed that there is significant correlation between the employees LCU rating by sex, educational degree and size of hospital. Also we found that there are significant correlations between the employees stress symptoms with their LCU rating. Totally, 40% of the employees have less than 150 LCU rating (normal range and 60% of them have 150-300 or more than 300 LCU rating (abnormal range. In conclusion most of TUMS hospitals' employees who had stress symptoms have more LCU rating. One third of these employees are not in danger of suffering the illness effect, while two third of them are in danger.

  8. Radiotelemetry locates wintering grounds of DDE-contaminated black-crowned night-herons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, C.J.; Blus, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if night-herons nesting at Ruby Lake, Nevada, shared a common wintering area with lesser contaminated night-herons nesting farther north in Oregon and Idaho. Radiotelemetry (29 transmitters) and banding studies indicated that the lesser-contaminated Oregon-Idaho night-herons wintered primarily in coastal Mexico (mean 22-23'N latitude), while the Ruby Lake night-herons wintered in the southwestern United States with some in the interior of northern Mexico (mean 29-30?N latitude). We believe the nearly disjunct wintering areas for the populations, and the apparent differing pollutant loads on the wintering areas accounted for the 3-fold higher DDE egg residues at Ruby Lake. Findings from this study emphasize the influence migration patterns can have on pollutants accumulated by populations of migratory birds nesting in relatively unpolluted areas and at relatively short distances apart (400 km).

  9. The significance of soils and soil science towards realization of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia D.; Bouma, Johan; Wallinga, Jakob; Tittonell, Pablo; Smith, Pete; Cerdà, Artemi; Montanarella, Luca; Quinton, John N.; Pachepsky, Yakov; van der Putten, Wim H.; Bardgett, Richard D.; Moolenaar, Simon; Mol, Gerben; Jansen, Boris; Fresco, Louise O.

    2016-04-01

    In this forum paper we discuss how soil scientists can help to reach the recently adopted UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the most effective manner. Soil science, as a land-related discipline, has important links to several of the SDGs, which are demonstrated through the functions of soils and the ecosystem services that are linked to those functions (see graphical abstract in the Supplement). We explore and discuss how soil scientists can rise to the challenge both internally, in terms of our procedures and practices, and externally, in terms of our relations with colleague scientists in other disciplines, diverse groups of stakeholders and the policy arena. To meet these goals we recommend the following steps to be taken by the soil science community as a whole: (i) embrace the UN SDGs, as they provide a platform that allows soil science to demonstrate its relevance for realizing a sustainable society by 2030; (ii) show the specific value of soil science: research should explicitly show how using modern soil information can improve the results of inter- and transdisciplinary studies on SDGs related to food security, water scarcity, climate change, biodiversity loss and health threats; (iii) take leadership in overarching system analysis of ecosystems, as soils and soil scientists have an integrated nature and this places soil scientists in a unique position; (iii) raise awareness of soil organic matter as a key attribute of soils to illustrate its importance for soil functions and ecosystem services; (iv) improve the transfer of knowledge through knowledge brokers with a soil background; (v) start at the basis: educational programmes are needed at all levels, starting in primary schools, and emphasizing practical, down-to-earth examples; (vi) facilitate communication with the policy arena by framing research in terms that resonate with politicians in terms of the policy cycle or by considering drivers, pressures and responses affecting impacts of land

  10. United States Air Force College Science and Engineering Program. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Department and Chemistry Department 5 University: University of Ca. at Santa Barbara Research Location: AF Astronautics Laboratory/VSSC Comonent Structures...University of I Ca. at Santa Barbara with a B.S. degree in Chemistry, which 3 I intend to apply to the field of material science. This is the second...an average diameter of 2 in. and length 1.5 ft. The mandrels used for this were constructed out of steel and had slight capers to them of approx. .17

  11. The significance of soils and soil science towards realization of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Bouma, Johan; Wallinga, Jakob; Tittonell, Pablo; SMith, Pete; Cerda, Artermi; Montanarella, Luca; Quinton, John; Pachepsky, Yakov; van der Putten, Wim; BArdgett, Richard; Moolenaar, Simon; Mol, Gerben; Janssen, Boris; Fresco, Louise

    2017-04-01

    In this research we discuss how soil scientists can help to reach the recently adopted UN Sustainable Development Goals in the most effective manner. Soil science, as a land-related discipline has important links to several of the SDGs which are demonstrated through the functions of soils and the ecosystem services that are linked to those functions. We explore and discuss how soil scientists can rise to the challenge both internally, in terms of our procedures and practices, and externally in terms of our relations with colleague scientists in other disciplines, diverse groups of stakeholders and the policy arena. To meet these goals we recommend the following steps to be taken by the soil science community as a whole: (i) Embrace the UN Sustainable Development Goals, as they provide a platform that allows soil science to demonstrate its relevance for realizing a sustainable society by 2030; (ii) Show the specific value of soil science: Research should explicitly show how using modern soil information can improve the results of inter- and trans-disciplinary studies on SDGs related to food security, water scarcity, climate change, biodiversity loss and health threats; (iii) Given the integrative nature of soils, soil scientists are in a unique position to take leadership in overarching systems-analyses of ecosystems; (iii) Raise awareness of soil organic matter as a key attribute of soils to illustrate its importance for soil functions and ecosystem services; (iv) Improve the transfer of knowledge through knowledge brokers with a soil background; (v) Start at the basis: educational programs are needed at all levels, starting in primary schools, and emphasizing practical, down-to-earth examples; (vi) Facilitate communication with the policy arena by framing research in terms that resonate with politicians in terms of the policy cycle or by considering drivers, pressures and responses affecting impacts of land use change; and finally (vii) All this is only possible

  12. Interaction of science and diplomacy: Latin American, the United States and nuclear energy, 1945-1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, R.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear programs in Argentina and Brazil can be traced to August 1945 when their scientific communities articulated responses to the atomic bombings of Japan. They culminated in attempts to develop independent nuclear programs, sharply opposed by the United States, during the nationalist governments of Juan Peron and Getulio Vargas. This dissertation, based on primary sources from the three nations, analyzes these programs and the American responses. Latin America entered the nuclear age attempting to control natural resources, to improve scientific establishments, and to appraise Latin American-United States relations. Despite some clear warnings about nuclear dangers, the new form of energy was seen as the solution to industrial problems, poverty, and outside political interference. International opposition, which may have included nuclear threats from the United States, blocked Argentina's first attempt in 1947. After 1948, Peron wanted a nuclear program for cheap energy and prestige. The qualifications of the Brazilian scientists gave more substance to their program. The program originated in August, 1945, but assumed national proportion with the government of Vargas in 1951. Lack of American cooperation forced Vargas to establish a secret program with Germany. American troops intervened taking over the German equipment already completed. The final collapse came about with Vargas' suicide in August, 1954.

  13. But science is international! Finding time and space to encourage intercultural learning in a content-driven physiology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Sarah J

    2014-06-01

    Internationalization of the curriculum is central to the strategic direction of many modern universities and has widespread benefits for student learning. However, these clear aspirations for internationalization of the curriculum have not been widely translated into more internationalized course content and teaching methods in the classroom, particularly in scientific disciplines. This study addressed one major challenge to promoting intercultural competence among undergraduate science students: finding time to scaffold such learning within the context of content-heavy, time-poor units. Small changes to enhance global and intercultural awareness were incorporated into existing assessments and teaching activities within a second-year biomedical physiology unit. Interventions were designed to start a conversation about global and intercultural perspectives on physiology, to embed the development of global awareness into the assessment and to promote cultural exchanges through peer interactions. In student surveys, 40% of domestic and 60% of international student respondents articulated specific learning about interactions in cross-cultural groups resulting from unit activities. Many students also identified specific examples of how cultural beliefs would impact on the place of biomedical physiology within the global community. In addition, staff observed more widespread benefits for student engagement and learning. It is concluded that a significant development of intercultural awareness and a more global perspective on scientific understanding can be supported among undergraduates with relatively modest, easy to implement adaptations to course content.

  14. The Astronomical Society of the Pacific and Globe at Night Dark Sky Collaborations for IYA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurton, S.; Hurst, A.; White, V.; Berendsen, M.; Walker, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Astronomical Society of the Pacific increases the understanding and appreciation of astronomy by engaging scientists, educators, enthusiasts and the public to advance science and science literacy. In the last ten years three networks of educators have grown to serve hundreds of educators and hundreds of thousands of participants each year. These networks are partnering with Globe at Night, a program of NOAO, to promote dark skies as a universal resource, one of seven primary US themes being developed for the International Year of Astronomy in 2009. In this presentation we will introduce the networks (Project ASTRO, Astronomy from the Ground Up, and Night Sky Network), the professional development opportunities through Globe at Night for the network participants, and highlight some of the results as they implement what they have learned with their public audiences.

  15. The Citizen-Scientist as Data Collector: GLOBE at Night, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Ward, D.; Henderson, S.; Meymaris, K.; Gallagher, S.; Salisbury, D.

    2006-12-01

    An innovative program to realize light pollution education on two continents via Internet 2-based videoconferencing was begun 4 years ago by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Bilingual science teachers and their students in Arizona and Chile recorded the brightness of the night sky by matching its appearance toward the constellation Orion with one of 6 stellar maps of limiting magnitude. Students from both hemispheres would report their findings via videoconferences. In the last year the program has evolved in collaboration with UCAR and other partners into an international, user-friendly, web-based science event open to anyone in the world, known as GLOBE at Night. GLOBE at Night uses the same design to observe and record the visible stars toward Orion, as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. The inaugural event occurred over 11 nights last March, when 18,000 citizen- scientists made over 4,500 observations from 96 countries. Analysis of the GLOBE at Night data set found that the brighter skies corresponded to areas with higher population density, and that most observations were taken in a location with some light pollution. The data also tended to confirm that satellite data is reliable in assessing light pollution. This session will describe our program to incorporate more technology into the GLOBE at Night program. Citizen-scientists will use sky quality meters (visible light photometers), calibrated digital photography, and GPS as a means to measure and map more accurately the brightness of the sky at selected urban and rural sites. This extension of the program is designed to aid further in teaching about the impact of artificial lighting on local environments and the ongoing loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource. We will also describe how detailed maps of selected urban areas can be used to assess lighting design, safety considerations and energy usage. Given the widespread interest in the inaugural GLOBE at Night

  16. Supportive leadership in Swedish community night nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Christine; Fagerberg, Ingegerd; Asp, Margareta

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the support night nurses' give to staff in community night nursing. Studies have shown that support given to staff is one of night registered nurses' (RNs') experiences of the meaning of caring. This support, that community RNs display for staff in night-time care, is sparsely described. All community night-duty nurses in a medium-sized municipal in Sweden participated in the present study. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse data from observations. The support given by RNs to staff is described using three themes: (1) a conditional supporting stance, (2) preparing propitious conditions for caring and (3) confidence in the abilities of individual staff members and adaptation to their individual needs. The results reveal that RNs consider support to staff in terms of nursing leadership. Out of 'concern for the staff' the RNs try to be there for them, which corresponds to nursing leadership. Such concern also arises from the RNs' awareness that by giving support to staff this affects the staffs' caring for older people. The current municipal social care organization of community nursing of older people in which RNs have extensive responsibilities with insufficient control, is a working condition with a risk for decreased quality of care and a high risk for work-related stress syndrome. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Science-practice nexus for landslide surveying: technical training for local government units in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, A. L.; Hespiantoro, S.; Dyar, D.; Balzer, D.; Kuhn, D.; Torizin, J.; Fuchs, M.; Kastl, S.; Anhorn, J.

    2017-02-01

    The Indonesian archipelago is prone to various geological hazards on an almost day to day basis. In order to mitigate disaster risk and reduce losses, the government uses its unique setup of ministerial training institutions. The Centre for Development of Human Resources in Geology, Mineral and Coal offers different level of technical training to local governments in order to provide them with the necessary means to understand geological hazards, mitigate risks, and hence close the gap between local and national governments. One key factor has been the continuous incorporation of new scientific knowledge into their training curricula. The paper presents benefits and challenges of this science-practice nexus using the standardised landslide survey as one example where mobile technology has been introduced to the training just recently.

  18. Summary of the Science Performed Onboard the International Space Station within the United States Orbital Segment during Increments 16 and 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Kenol; Istasse, Eric; Stenuit, Hilde; Murakami, Jeiji; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Johnson-Green, Perry

    2008-01-01

    With the launch of the STS-122 on February 7, 2008, which delivered the European Columbus science module and the upcoming STS-124 flight, which will deliver the Japanese Kibo science module in May 2008, the International Space Station will become truly International with Europe and Japan joining the United States of America and Russia to perform science on a continuous basis in a wide spectrum of science disciplines. The last science module, Kibo, of the United States Orbital Segment (USOS) will be mated to the station on time to celebrate its first decade in low Earth orbit in October 2008 (end of Increment 17), thus ushering in the second decade of the station with all the USOS science modules mated and performing science. The arrival of the Kibo science module will also mark continuous human presence on the station for eighty eight (88) months, and, with the addition of the ESA science module during the STS-122 flight, the USOS will be made up of four space agencies: CSA, ESA, JAXA and NASA, spanning three continents. With the additional partners coming onboard with different research needs, every effort is being made to coordinate science across the USOS segment in an integrated manner for the benefit of all parties. One of the objectives of this paper is to discuss the integrated manner in which science planning/replanning and prioritization during the execution phase of an increment is being done. The main focus, though, of this paper is to summarize and to discuss the science performed during Increments 16 and 17 (October 2007 to October 2008). The discussion will focus mainly on the primary objectives of each investigation and their associated hypotheses that were investigated during these two Increments. Also, preliminary science results will be discussed for each of the investigation as science results availability permit. Additionally, the paper will briefly touch on what the science complement for these two increments was and what was actually

  19. Frequency of College Students' Night-Sky Watching Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William E.; Kelly, Kathryn E.; Batey, Jason

    2006-01-01

    College students (N = 112) completed the Noctcaelador Inventory, a measure of psychological attachment to the night-sky, and estimated various night-sky watching related activities: frequency and duration of night-sky watching, astro-tourism, ownership of night-sky viewing equipment, and attendance of observatories or planetariums. The results…

  20. 5 CFR 550.122 - Computation of night pay differential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of night pay differential... REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Night Pay § 550.122 Computation of night pay differential. (a) Absence on holidays or in travel status. An employee is entitled to a night pay differential...

  1. The effect of the number of consecutive night shifts on diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Aarrebo; Garde, Anne Helene; Kristiansen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge from field studies on how many consecutive night shifts are required for adaptation of diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV) to night work. METHODS: A systematic search of the databases Pub......Med and Web of Science resulted in 18 studies selected for review. RESULTS: Cortisol was measured in five studies, melatonin in 11 studies and HRV in four studies. Diurnal rhythms were assessed by use of several different measures based on three to eight samples per day for cortisol and melatonin and 24-h...... to night work had not occurred after two consecutive night shifts, whereas a small number found evidence for full adaptation after seven consecutive night shifts based on diurnal rhythms in cortisol and melatonin. CONCLUSION: There are methodological differences in the field studies analyzing diurnal...

  2. Ideas of Kindergarten Students on the Day-Night Cycles, the Seasons and the Moon Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçüközer, Hüseyin; Bostan, Ayberk

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine ideas of the kindergarten students on day-night, seasons, and the phases of the Moon. Although there are lots of studies on kindergarten students about science education, few of them are present on astronomy. Fifty-two students (age 6) from four different kindergartens were chosen as a sample of the study. The…

  3. Review of Virginia Woolf's Night and Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M Bani-Khair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this Review article, we have looked at different aspects that make Virginia Woolf's Night and Day one of the most interesting to read and analyze. We particularly focus on the familial and social patterns that distinguish this novel from other ones written by the same author. We also placed a good emphasis on the strength points the novel shows by looking at various elements such as themes of love relationships, modern treatment of plot and content, and more importantly on characterizations. The article revealed that Woolf's Night and Day is rich in terms of its modern and unconventional approach towards characters, plot, style, and thematic content which all make it a successful novel. Keywords: social stability, Virginia Woolf, Night and Day, techniques, styles, modernism, relationships, success, Marriage

  4. Effect of culturally relevant pedagogy on Latino students' engagement and content mastery on states of matter unit in physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jennifer

    This research, in response to the lack of empirical evidence of the impact of culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) on Latino students in science education, examined the effect CRP on Latino students' engagement and content mastery. Quantitative research was conducted with a treatment group that received an intervention unit on states of matter with CRP approaches and a comparison group that did not receive the intervention. The sample comprised approximately 189 eighth-grade students from a Southern Californian middle school. The research findings reveal that CRP approaches had a statistically significant positive effect on student engagement of all ethnic groups in this study, particularly Latino students, while CRP approaches had a statistically significant negative effect on Latino students' content mastery. Three recommendations result from this study, including professional development of CRP for educators, professional development of CRP for educational leaders, and using CRP to address multiculturalism.

  5. What is marine biology?: Defining a science in the United States in the mid 20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Marine biology and biological oceanography are two disciplinary subfields that have long struggled with their definitions. Should marine biology simply be considered a part of biology that takes place in the marine environment or is it a distinct entity, with conceptual problems and methodological approaches all its own? Similarly, biological oceanography could be seen as a necessary adjunct to physical and chemical oceanography or it could be defined more as an extension of biology into the marine realm. In the United States, these issues were directly addressed from the mid 1950s through the mid 1960s in a series of events that shed light on how marine biologists came to a working definition of their field that provided a broad methodological tent for practitioners and, at the same time, allied the field to oceanography during a period in which exploration of uncharted areas drew considerable funding from the post-WWII federal agencies charged with keeping American science at the forefront.

  6. Lessons learnt from Volcanoes' Night I-II-III - a Marie Curie Researchers' Night project series dedicated to geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseko, Adrienn; Bodo, Balazs; Ortega Rodriguez, Ariadna

    2017-04-01

    European Researchers' Nights (ERNs) are a pan-European series of events funded by the European Commission, organised on the last Friday of every September since 2005. ERNs mobilise scientific, academic and research organisations with the aim of giving the public the opportunity to meet researchers in an informal setting. The overall objective of ERNs is to achieve better awareness among the general public concerning the importance of science in everyday life and to combat stereotypes about researchers. The longer-term strategic objective of ERNs is to encourage young people to embark on a scientific career. Volcanoes' Night I-II-III has been an ERN project series funded by the EC FP7 and H2020 programmes between 2012-2015 (EC contract No. 316558, 610050, 633310, www.nochedevolcanes.es). The concept of Volcanoes' Night was created by researchers from the Canary Islands, Spain, where both the researchers and the public live in the close vicinity of volcanoes. The objective of the project was to use volcanoes as a background against which the role of geoscientists could be explained to the public. The scope of Volcanoes' Night was exclusively dedicated to geoscience, and in this respect it stands out among all other ERN projects, which are always more general in scope. During its four years of EC funding, the geographical coverage of Volcanoes' Night expanded substantially from a single location in 2012 (Fuencaliente de La Palma, Spain) to a dozen locations in 2015, mobilising multiple scientific organisations, researchers, and public authorities for engagement with the public. The last EC-funded project, Volcanoes' Night III, which was organised in 2014 and 2015, engaged approximately 21,000 visitors through its outreach activities, which included experiments, science cafés, volcano movies, My Day presentations, excursions, science workshops and more. The impact of the project was carefully assessed via surveys and social studies during its lifetime, and an Impact

  7. Understanding Variations of Soil Mapping Units and Associated Data for Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Melissa D; Southard, Randal J; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2015-07-01

    Soil samples have potential to be useful in forensic investigations, but their utility may be limited due to the inherent variability of soil properties, the wide array of analytical methods, and complexity of data analysis. This study examined the differentiation of similar soils based on both gross (texture, color, mineralogy) and explicit soil properties (elemental composition, cation exchange, Fe-oxyhydroxides). Soils were collected from Fallbrook and adjacent map units from Riverside and San Diego Counties in California. Samples were characterized using multiple techniques, including chemical extracts, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results were analyzed using multiple analytical approaches to compare counties and land uses. Some analyses (XRD, extractions) were better at distinguishing among samples than others (color, texture). Ratios of rare earth elements were particularly useful for distinguishing samples between counties. This potential to "fingerprint" soils illustrates the usefulness of a comprehensive soil database for criminal investigators.

  8. Top 40 priorities for science to inform conservation and management policy in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Erica; Blockstein, David E.; Hall, John A.; Mascia, Michael B.; Rudd, Murray A.; Scott, J. Michael; Sutherland, William J.; Bartuska, Ann M.; Brown, A. Gordon; Christen, Catherine A.; Clement, Joel P.; DellaSala, Dominick; Duke, Clifford D.; Fiske, Shirley J.; Gosnell, Hannah; Haney, J. Chris; Hutchins, Michael; Klein, Mary L.; Marqusee, Jeffrey; Noon, Barry R.; Nordgren, John R.; Orbuch, Paul M.; Powell, Jimmie; Quarles, Steven P.; Saterson, Kathryn A.; Stein, Bruce A.; Webster, Michael S.; Vedder, Amy

    2011-01-01

    To maximize the utility of research to decisionmaking, especially given limited financial resources, scientists must set priorities for their efforts. We present a list of the top 40 high-priority, multidisciplinary research questions directed toward informing some of the most important current and future decisions about management of species, communities, and ecological processes in the United States. The questions were generated by an open, inclusive process that included personal interviews with decisionmakers, broad solicitation of research needs from scientists and policymakers, and an intensive workshop that included scientifically oriented individuals responsible for managing and developing policy related to natural resources. The process differed from previous efforts to set priorities for conservation research in its focus on the engagement of decisionmakers in addition to researchers. The research priorities emphasized the importance of addressing societal context and exploration of trade-offs among alternative policies and actions, as well as more traditional questions related to ecological processes and functions.

  9. Cockpit Readiness For Night Vision Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Marija S.; Scholl, James W.

    1987-09-01

    The introduction of night vision goggles into the cockpit environment may produce incompatibility with existing cockpit optoelectronic instrumentation. The methodology used to identify the origin of the spurious signal is demonstrated with the example of an electronic display. The amount of radiation emitted by a gray body in the wavelength region of goggle sensitivity is calculated. A simple procedure for preflight testing of cockpit instrumentation using a commercially available infrared camera is recommended. Other recommendations include the specification of cockpit instrumentation for compatibility with night vision devices.

  10. The GLOBE at Night Campaign: Promoting Dark Skies Awareness Beyond IYA2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most productive programs in the IYA2009 Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project has been GLOBE at Night. The GLOBE at Night program has endeavored to promote social awareness of the dark sky by getting the general public to measure light pollution and submit results on-line. During IYA2009 alone, over 15,700 measurements from 70 countries were contributed during the 2-week campaign period. That amount is twice the number of measurements on average from previous years. The GLOBE at Night website explains clearly the simple-to-participate-in 5 step program and offers background information and interactive games on key concepts. The program has been expanded to include trainings of the general public, but especially educators in schools, museums and science centers, in unique ways. Education kits for Dark Skies Awareness have been distributed at these training workshops. The kit includes material for a light shielding demonstration, a digital Sky Quality Meter and Dark Skies Ranger Activities. The activities are on how unshielded light wastes energy, how light pollution affects wildlife and how you can participate in a citizen-science star-hunt like GLOBE at Night. In addition, projects are being developed for what to do with the data once it is taken. There were particularly spirited and creative GLOBE at Night campaigns around the world in 2009. One such "poster child” was carried out by 6500 students in northern Indiana. The students produced 3,391 GLOBE at Night measurements. To visualize the magnitudes of dark sky lost to light pollution, these students removed over 12,000 of the 35,000 stacked LEGO blocks that represented an ideal night sky across the school district. The presentation will provide an update with lessons learned, describe how people can become involved and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For further information, visit www.globe.gov/globeatnight.

  11. Funding for Adaptive Optics in the United States by the National Science Foundation 2006-2009: An Update

    CERN Document Server

    Frogel, Jay A

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 I published an article in GeminiFocus that examined funding for astronomical adaptive optics related technology and instrumentation in the United States from 1995 through mid-2006. That article concluded that based on projections then current, AO implementation on public and private telescopes in the U.S. will soon seriously lag that on the ESO VLT as measured by funds available. It called for a significant infusion of public funds for AO development and implementation so that when combined with private funds, the U.S. astronomical community as a whole would be able to take full advantage of AO systems on both public and private telescopes. In 2006 I estimated that the total amount of public (NSF) funds that would be available in 2009 for AO related non-science activities would be about $6M. This article updates the analysis done in my previous article. I show that for 2009 the funds for AO related non-science activities are about $7M in spite of the termination of the AODP program. Federal stimulus f...

  12. Identifying, highlighting and reducing polypharmacy in a UK hospice inpatient unit using improvement Science methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippen, Alison; Pickard, Jennie; Steinke, Douglas; Cope, Matt; Roberts, Dai

    2017-01-01

    Polypharmacy, the concurrent use of multiple medications by one individual is a growing global issue driven by an ageing population and increasing prevalence of multi-morbidity[1]. Polypharmacy can be problematic: interactions between medications, reduced adherence to medication, burden of medication to patients, administration time, increased risk of errors and increased cost. Quality improvement methods were applied to identify and highlight polypharmacy patients with the aim of reducing their average number of regular tablets/capsules per day by 25%. The project was delivered within a UK based 27 bedded hospice inpatient unit. A series of PDSA cycles studied interventions focusing on the identification of patients with polypharmacy, the highlighting of these patients to prescribers for review and the views of patients about their medication. For the purposes of the study, polypharmacy was defined as greater than ten regular medicines and/or greater than twenty regular tablets/capsules each day. The interventions tested included patients on regular paracetamol and strong opioids being offered a trial without regular paracetamol, a constipation guide promoting the use of combination laxatives, education of prescribers around dose strengths, checklist of recommendations was placed in case notes and a sticker was used on the medicine chart to highlight patients in need of polypharmacy review. The introduction of a trial without paracetamol and a laxative guide led to reductions in polypharmacy. The sticker and checklist were successful interventions for highlighting patients with polypharmacy. Quality improvement methods were used to plan, try, test and implement simple interventions for patients on the hospice inpatient unit. This has led to a 25% reduction in the average regular tablet/capsules burden , a 16% reduction in the average number of regular medications and a 30% reduction in the average volume of liquid medication per patient without an increase in the

  13. Design for learning - a case study of blended learning in a science unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleadow, Roslyn; Macfarlan, Barbara; Honeydew, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Making material available through learning management systems is standard practice in most universities, but this is generally seen as an adjunct to the 'real' teaching, that takes place in face-to-face classes. Lecture attendance is poor, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to engage students, both in the material being taught and campus life. This paper describes the redevelopment of a large course in scientific practice and communication that is compulsory for all science students studying at our Melbourne and Malaysian campuses, or by distance education. Working with an educational designer, a blended learning methodology was developed, converting the environment provided by the learning management system into a teaching space, rather than a filing system. To ensure focus, topics are clustered into themes with a 'question of the week', a pre-class stimulus and follow up activities. The content of the course did not change, but by restructuring the delivery using educationally relevant design techniques, the content was contextualised resulting in an integrated learning experience. Students are more engaged intellectually, and lecture attendance has improved. The approach we describe here is a simple and effective approach to bringing this university's teaching and learning into the 21 (st) century.

  14. Design for learning – a case study of blended learning in a science unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleadow, Roslyn; Macfarlan, Barbara; Honeydew, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Making material available through learning management systems is standard practice in most universities, but this is generally seen as an adjunct to the ‘real’ teaching, that takes place in face-to-face classes. Lecture attendance is poor, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to engage students, both in the material being taught and campus life. This paper describes the redevelopment of a large course in scientific practice and communication that is compulsory for all science students studying at our Melbourne and Malaysian campuses, or by distance education. Working with an educational designer, a blended learning methodology was developed, converting the environment provided by the learning management system into a teaching space, rather than a filing system. To ensure focus, topics are clustered into themes with a ‘question of the week’, a pre-class stimulus and follow up activities. The content of the course did not change, but by restructuring the delivery using educationally relevant design techniques, the content was contextualised resulting in an integrated learning experience. Students are more engaged intellectually, and lecture attendance has improved. The approach we describe here is a simple and effective approach to bringing this university’s teaching and learning into the 21 st century. PMID:26594348

  15. Science, Technology and Innovation through Entrepreneurship Education in the United Arab Emirates (UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Hameed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the ways of achieving Science, Technology and Innovation (STI in UAE. Previously, sustainability within an entrepreneurship context has been related to economic viability as opposed to sustainability in its broadest sense. Through a survey research method, we have highlighted the effects of three independent variables and two intervening variables on three important outcomes, innovation, need for achievement and motivation, which ultimately contributes towards STI. These data have been collected from the students of a well-known university in Al-Ain, UAE. The responses of 251 students have been utilized for analysis. For hypotheses testing, we used AMOS 18 (Structural Equation Modeling and SPSS 20. The study revealed that all of the predictors have a strong effect on the outcome variables, which leads to STI in UAE. There is a strong need to revise the curriculum of higher education institutions of UAE to develop self-confidence, locus of control and risk taking propensity among students. The study provides novel insight into entrepreneurship education and serves as an initial benchmark in the field.

  16. The effect of lab sequence in science instruction: The consequences of shifting labs to the beginning of learning units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Thomas R.

    This study examined the relationship between activity sequence and student outcomes in science instruction. Traditionally sequenced teacher learning units with lab activities late in activity sequence were compared to learning units with labs first in their activity sequence. A mixed-methods, quasi-experimental approach was used to test the effectiveness of a lab-first lesson approach suggested by the literature. Quantitative methods were used to assess content achievement; and qualitative methods were used to assess perception. No statistically significant difference was found between the approaches, although the researcher interpreted the results as suggesting some learning advantage for a lab-first approach. Although the teacher thought lab-first appeared to enhance learning, and students seemed to notice no difference during instruction, students preferred and thought they learned best with a lab-last approach. The teacher's view of the lab-first approach was positive; and he is inclined to continue to use it in his practice following the study.

  17. Night-Time Noise Index Based on the Integration of Awakening Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junta Tagusari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance induced by night-time noise is a serious environmental problem that can cause adverse health effects, such as hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Night-time noise indices are used to facilitate the enforcement of permitted noise levels during night-time. However, existing night-time noise indices, such as sound exposure level (SEL, maximum sound level (LAmax and night equivalent level (Lnight are selected mainly because of practical reasons. Therefore, this study proposes a noise index based on neurophysiological determinants of the awakening process. These determinants have revealed that the potential on awakening is likely integrated into the brainstem that dominates wakefulness and sleep. From this evidence, a night-time noise index, N awake,year, was redefined based on the integration of the awakening potential unit (punit estimated from the existing dose-response relationships of awakening. The newly-defined index considers the total number of awakenings and covers a wide-range and number of noise events. We also presented examples of its applicability to traffic noise. Although further studies are needed, it may reveal a reasonable dose-response relationship between sleep disturbance and adverse health effects and provide a consistent explanation for the risks of different sound sources where the characteristics of noise exposure are quite different.

  18. Is the American Approach to Science Education the Best in the World?: Market Forces--Driving Science Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Compares the European style of teaching with the U.S. approach to science education in terms of the level of science instruction, educational systems, school curriculums, and scientific and economic status. (KHR)

  19. Analysis of Thursday Night NFL Winning Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a dataset and associated analysis of the scores of National Football League (NFL) games over the 2012, 2013, and first five weeks of the 2014 season. In the face of current media attention to "lopsided" scores in Thursday night games in the early part of the 2014 season, t-test results indicate no statistically…

  20. Early Birds by Light at Night

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, De Maaike; Caro, Samuel P.; Gienapp, Phillip; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Visser, Marcel E.

    2017-01-01

    Artificial light at night disturbs the daily rhythms of many organisms. To what extent this disturbance depends on the intensity and spectral composition of light remain obscure. Here, we measured daily activity patterns of captive blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) exposed to similar intensities of

  1. What's crucial in night vision goggle simulation ?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, F.L.; Toet, A.

    2005-01-01

    Training is required to correctly interpret NVG imagery. Training night operations with simulated intensified imagery has great potential. Compared to direct viewing with the naked eye, intensified imagery is relatively easy to simulate and the cost of real NVG training is high (logistics, risk,

  2. Behavioral management of night eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berner LA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Laura A Berner,1 Kelly C Allison2 1Department of Psychology, Drexel University, 2Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Night eating syndrome (NES is a form of disordered eating associated with evening hyperphagia (overeating at night and nocturnal ingestions (waking at night to eat. As with other forms of disordered eating, cognitive and behavioral treatment modalities may be effective in reducing NES symptoms. This review presents evidence for a variety of behavioral treatment approaches, including behavioral therapy, phototherapy, behavioral weight loss treatment, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. A more detailed overview of cognitive-behavioral therapy for NES is provided. All of these studies have been case studies or included small samples, and all but one have been uncontrolled, but the outcomes of many of these approaches are promising. Larger randomized controlled trials are warranted to advance NES treatment literature. With the inclusion of NES in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 as a “Feeding or Eating Disorder Not Elsewhere Classified,” more sophisticated, empirically-supported, behaviorally-based treatment approaches are much needed. Keywords: night eating syndrome, cognitive-behavioral treatment, phototherapy, behavioral weight loss, behavior therapy

  3. Family Literacy Night: A Celebration of Reading!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Becky; Morton, Shirley; Rumschlag, Hella

    2011-01-01

    Family Literacy Night is an exciting way to engage students and their parents in meaningful literacy activities while building community spirit and strengthening the partnership between school and home. It is an opportunity for students to show their parents what they do in school; how they create in the computer lab, how they work in the art…

  4. Invite an Alien to Astronomy Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor, Donna; Richwine, Pebble

    2007-01-01

    Dozens of inflatable aliens recently "descended" upon the authors' middle school to kick-off their first school-wide Astronomy night. With an estimated attendance of over 500, their eighth-grade students hosted over a dozen activity-rich sessions designed to entertain and educate students and their families about the wonders of the solar system…

  5. Helicopter Night Vision System Simulation Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    mision safety. The enroute evaluation indicates a con- sistent preference for the 4HMD-PMD configuration. The copilot felt that the virtual HUD...pilot but never allowed Cho copilot to slow in a hover. In edsencer the night cranpore mision appears wo be a two pilot task with a t consant verbal

  6. Sirius brightest diamond in the night sky

    CERN Document Server

    Holberg, Jay B

    2007-01-01

    This book describes why Sirius has been regarded as an important fixture of the night sky since the beginnings of history. It also examines the part that Sirius has played in how we came to achieve our current scientific understanding of stars.

  7. Portable real-time color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a simple and fast lookup-table based method to derive and apply natural daylight colors to multi-band night-time images. The method deploys an optimal color transformation derived from a set of samples taken from a daytime color reference image. The colors in the resulting colorized mul

  8. What's crucial in night vision goggle simulation ?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, F.L.; Toet, A.

    2005-01-01

    Training is required to correctly interpret NVG imagery. Training night operations with simulated intensified imagery has great potential. Compared to direct viewing with the naked eye, intensified imagery is relatively easy to simulate and the cost of real NVG training is high (logistics, risk, civ

  9. Portable real-time color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a simple and fast lookup-table based method to derive and apply natural daylight colors to multi-band night-time images. The method deploys an optimal color transformation derived from a set of samples taken from a daytime color reference image. The colors in the resulting colorized mul

  10. Urban planning and traffic safety at night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispas, N.; Trusca, D.

    2016-08-01

    Urban planning including traffic signs serve vital functions, providing road users with regulatory, warning and guidance information about the roadway and surrounding environment. There are a large number of signs and even more guidelines on how these signs should be designed, installed, and maintained in concordance with on road surface traffic signs. More requirements for signs are made for night urban traffic, including appearance (size, shape, colour), placement (height, lateral, and longitudinal), maintenance (visibility, position, damage) and signs light and retroreflective. In the night, traffic signs visibility can interact by on pedestrian visibility and diminish urban traffic safety. The main aim of this paper are the scientific determination of an urban specific zone visibility for evaluate at night real conditions in case of a traffic accident in the Braşov city area. The night visibility study was made using PC-Rect version 4.2. Other goal of the paper was to modify some urban planning solution in order to increase the urban safety in Brașov.

  11. Artificial night lighting inhibits feeding in moths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, Van Frank; Grunsven, Van Roy H.A.; Veenendaal, Elmar M.; Fijen, Thijs P.M.

    2017-01-01

    One major, yet poorly studied, change in the environment is nocturnal light pollution, which strongly alters habitats of nocturnally active species. Artificial night lighting is often considered as driving force behind rapid moth population declines in severely illuminated countries. To understand

  12. Portable real-time color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a simple and fast lookup-table based method to derive and apply natural daylight colors to multi-band night-time images. The method deploys an optimal color transformation derived from a set of samples taken from a daytime color reference image. The colors in the resulting colorized

  13. The Night Of Hennessy Paradis Extra Cognac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>The world-known Hennessy Paradis Extra Cognaclaunched its"dazzling night"on the evening of May 22 tolet guests enjoy to their hearts’content the fine wine andthe charming glamour of the diamond evening dress. A liquid,dating back to the 18th century,was called

  14. Why Is the Sky Dark at Night?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinner, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The puzzle as to just why the sky is dark at night, given that there are so many stars, has been around at least since Newton. This article summarizes six cosmological models that have been used to attempt to give an account of this puzzle including the Copernican universe, the Newton-Halley universe, the nineteenth century "one galaxy"…

  15. Observations of the role of science in the United States medical cannabis state policies: Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Jelica; Goddard, Perilou; Ryder, David

    2017-04-01

    Clinical trials have shown cannabis to be effective in the treatment of some medical conditions and there is mounting public and political pressure to enact laws enabling the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes. To date, 28 United States (U.S.) states and the District of Columbia have enacted medical cannabis laws. This study sought to identify the main issues pertaining to the development of medical cannabis laws in the U.S, including the role of scientific evidence. Data were collected from three groups of participants: government officials, lobbyists and medical professionals involved in the medical cannabis debate in five selected states in the U.S.; researchers from the same five states conducting funded research in the alcohol and other drugs field; and members of the International Society for the Study of Drug Policy. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Six major themes emerged in relation to the factors influencing policy: scientific evidence plays a limited role in the development of policy; the available research is limited and mixed; there is a need for clearer communication and active dissemination of evidence to policy makers; researchers need to consider what research is likely to impact on policy; scientific evidence is not a major factor in policy development; and there is a need to consider evidence within a political context. Researchers need to be aware of the political context in which medical cannabis laws are or are not enacted and consider ways in which research findings can achieve a higher profile within this context. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. PAVE LOW III: interior lighting reconfiguration for night lighting and night vision goggle compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Task, H L; Griffin, L L

    1982-12-01

    The PAVE LOW III aircraft is a modified HH-53H helicopter that has a low altitude--below 30.48 m (100 ft)--night/day rescue mission. The desired night flying configuration is for the pilot to wear night vision goggles (NVGs) to fly the aircraft while the copilot, without NVGs, observes the video display and monitors the aircraft instruments. The problems of NVG incompatibility in the cockpit were successfully countered using several light control techniques. The light control modifications were evaluated on the ground in the PAVE LOW III helicopter at Kirtland AFB in April, 1980, by PAVE LOW instructor pilots. The evaluation results were extremely positive.

  17. Biomedical Science, Unit II: Nutrition in Health and Medicine. Digestion of Foods; Organic Chemistry of Nutrients; Energy and Cell Respiration; The Optimal Diet; Foodborne Diseases; Food Technology; Dental Science and Nutrition. Student Text. Revised Version, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    This student text presents instructional materials for a unit of science within the Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project (BICP), a two-year interdisciplinary precollege curriculum aimed at preparing high school students for entry into college and vocational programs leading to a career in the health field. Lessons concentrate on…

  18. Into the Curriculum. Music/Art/Reading/Language Arts: Can You Guess the Animal? [and] Science: The Ocean [and] Science: Biome and Animal Unit [and] Social Studies: How Many Forms of Transportation Can You Find?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz-Salminen, Dianne; Ely, Patricia; Asire, Marty

    2000-01-01

    Presents four fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in music and art, reading and language arts, science, and social studies. Each activity identifies library media skills objectives, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, librarian and teacher instructional roles, procedures,…

  19. Effect of Computer Animation Technique on Students' Comprehension of the "Solar System and Beyond" Unit in the Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of computer animation technique on academic achievement of students in the "Solar System and Beyond" unit lecture as part of the Science and Technology course of the seventh grade in primary education. The sample of the study consists of 60 students attending to the 7th grade of primary school…

  20. The Significance of Language Study in Library and Information Science: A Comparison of Two Programs in the United States and Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Charlotte; Faires, Debbie; Hirsh, Sandra; Carranza, Nítida

    2017-01-01

    This comparative case study evaluated the role of foreign language study within the Library and Information Science (LIS) curriculum of two programs in the United States and Honduras. The purpose of this research was to understand the significance and usefulness of language courses from the perspective of the students enrolled. Students who had…

  1. A Framework for Understanding Cross-National and Cross-Ethnic Gaps in Math and Science Achievement: The Case of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, R. Sergio; Brekke, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Comparative international assessments of academic achievement consistently indicate that US students trail behind many peers, particularly those from east Asia, in math and science. Traditional efforts to explain this finding have focused on identifying characteristics that might differentiate the United States from top-performing countries.…

  2. An Analysis of the LISP(P) Unit--Floating and Sinking. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 118.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symington, David

    The Learning in Science Project (Primary)--LISP(P)--developed a handbook for a unit on "floating and sinking". The handbook contains information about ideas children and scientists have about the topic and several investigations and projects designed to help teachers move children gradually from intuitive explanations toward those which…

  3. Nurses\\' perception of caring behaviors in intensive care units in hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Caring is the core of nursing however, different individules have different perceptions of it. Continuous assessment and measurement of caring behaviors results in the identification of their problems. The careful planning of interventions and problem solving will improve care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' perception of caring behaviors in the intensive care units. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic study, 140 nurses were selected from intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, using the census method in 2012. The data collection tool was the Caring Behaviors Inventory for Elders (CBI-E. This questionnaire consisted of two parts including demographic information and 28 items related to care. Face and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire were provided by professionals, and after deletion of 4 items a 24-item questionnaire was provided. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to assess reliability (&alpha = 0.71. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18 and descriptive-analytic statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Based on the findings, nurses paid more attention to the physical–technical aspects (95.71 ± 12.76 of care in comparison to its psychosocial aspects (75.41 ± 27.91. Nurses had the highest score in care behavior of "timely performance of medical procedures and medication administration". Conclusion: Since nurses paid more attention to the technical aspects of care than its psychosocial aspects, by providing nurses with a correct perception of care, patients can be provided with needs-based care. This will increase patient satisfaction with nursing care, and indirectly result in the positive attitude of patients and society toward the nursing profession and its services. Moreover, nursing education officials can use these results to assist nurses in meeting

  4. The Effect of Reform-Based Science Teaching on SES-Associated Achievement Gap on PISA 2006: A Comparative Study of the United States and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nai-En

    The goal of this study is to examine how reform-based science teaching has been implemented and whether reform-based science teaching has promoted education equity through being available and beneficial for students from different socioeconomic status (SES) family backgrounds in the U.S. and Taiwan. No existing study used large-scale assessment to investigate the implementation and outcomes of the science reform movement in the U.S. and Taiwan. This study was developed to fill this gap using the Program of International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data including 5,611 students in the United States and 5995 students in Taiwan. A Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) was used to classify students into different science learning subgroups to understand how broadly reform-based science learning has been implemented in classrooms. The results showed that students in the U.S. had more opportunity to learn science through the reform-based learning activities than students in Taiwan. Latent Class Regression (LCR) and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) were used for examining the availability of reform-based science teaching in both countries. The results showed that in the U.S., higher SES students had more opportunity to learn science reform-based learning activities. On the other hand, students' SES had no association with reform-based science learning in Taiwan. Regression Mixture Modeling and SEM were used to examine whether there was an association between reform-based science teaching and SES-associated achievement gaps. The results found no evidence to support the claim that reform-based science teaching helps to minimize SES-associated achievement gaps in both countries.

  5. Healthy Diet And Reduction Of Chronic Disease Risks Of Night Shift Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Giovanni M; Cavone, Domenica; Intranuovo, Graziana; Macinagrossa, Linda

    2017-07-20

    The large increase in epidemiological studies on night shift work is due to the important effects of night shift work on workers' health and psychophysical wellbeing. The short-term effects-insomnia, difficulties in managing work and private life, lower work performance, and more work and extra-work accidents-are easily studied. However, there are several long-term effects that are difficult to study because of the need for detailed exposure assessment and the long latency periods of these diseases. The aim was to collect epidemiologic evidence of diseases in night shift workers, describing their biological pathways and a set of dietary guidelines. This is a review on diet and health effects in night shift workers. Significant increases in the rate ratios and hazard ratios of different diseases were associated with modified eating behaviours and poor eating habits among night shift workers. Night shift work is a risk factor for disruption of the circadian rhythms and for some genetic deregulation because it produces the inversion of the sleep/wake cycle and modifies the alternation between activity and rest. A healthy diet and improved dietary practices, together with other factors, can reduce shift workers' chronic disease risk. The literature showed the importance of eating behaviour in order to prevent diseases in these workers; therefore, educational programmes are necessary to encourage several important lifestyle changes. The target of our future research will be the role of food components in some dietetic habits for the prevention of disease in night shift workers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Falchi, Fabio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C M; Elvidge, Christopher D; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A; Rybnikova, Nataliya A; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution-artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world's land surfaces between 75{\\deg}N and 60{\\deg}S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.

  7. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C M; Elvidge, Christopher D; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A; Rybnikova, Nataliya A; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-06-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution-artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world's land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.

  8. Geneva motorway bypass closed for two nights

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The carriageways heading towards France on the airport section of the motorway will be closed from 8.30 p.m. to 5.00 a.m. in the night of 1 to 2 October and those heading towards Lausanne during the same hours in the night of 2 to 3 October. This is to allow dry-surface road-marking and signage work to be performed. The work will be postponed in the event of bad weather, in which case the new date will be announced on Radio RSR and Radio Lac as well as on the telephone traffic news service 163. Diversions will be in operation. Thank you in advance for your understanding. For further information, tel. 163 or www.autoroute-aeroport.ch Civil Engineering Department, DCTI, State of Geneva

  9. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitored...... prospectively for 4 days: pre call, on call, post call day 1 (PC1), and post call day 2 (PC2). The urinary metabolite of melatonin and cortisol in saliva were measured to assess the circadian rhythm. Sleep and activity were measured by actigraphy. Subjective measures were assessed by the Karolinska Sleepiness...... Scale and Visual Analog Scale of fatigue, general well-being, and sleep quality. RESULTS: For both metabolite of melatonin and cortisol, a significant difference (P sleep time during the day on call...

  10. Statistical assessment of night vision goggle noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Jesse G.; Marasco, Peter L.

    2006-05-01

    New advancements in charged-coupled device (CCD) technology allow for further investigation into the spatial nature of night vision goggle (NVG) noise distributions. This is significant because it is common practice in new NVG technology to combine image intensifiers with CCDs for night vision imaging. In this study, images of NVG noise are recorded by a CCD camera while varying input radiance and using multiple goggle types. Noise distributions characterized using histograms of these images are analyzed and fitted with curves. Using the changes in the distribution and relating distribution changes (coefficient changes) to input radiance and goggle performance provides a very accurate noise characterization. This study finds that a Weibull distribution seems more appropriate than a Poisson distribution, producing higher correlation coefficient fits. In addition, the paper suggests possible ways the noise models developed here can impact advancements in NVG image enhancement using this new technology.

  11. Illuminating the Nights in Rural Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Achara N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Electric power supply in many cities in developing countries is erratic and can only be described as non-existent in the rural areas. Kerosene lantern, the main source of illuminating the night is associated with obnoxious fumes production and more especially the kerosene fuel is scarce to find. Rural dwellers who cannot afford the globed kerosene lanterns either use the locally fabricated globeless kerosene lanterns, ―atunja‖ or log fire. Log fire is associated with deforestation and desert encroachment. A solar lantern has been designed and built for illuminating the nights in rural communities. Battery and LED are part of the components used and it is recommended that appropriate safety measures are put in place not only in use but also in their disposal.

  12. Bacterial populations on 30-night extended wear silicone hydrogel lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, L; Willcox, M D; Sweeney, D F; Morris, C A; Harmis, N; Corrigan, K; Holden, B A

    2001-01-01

    Ocular infection and inflammation during hydrogel lens extended wear is often associated with colonization of the lenses with bacteria. This study compares colonization of a high Dk silicone hydrogel contact lens (lotrafilcon A) worn on a 30-night extended wear basis to a low Dk HEMA-based lens (etafilcon A) worn on a 6-night extended wear schedule. The group wearing the low Dk/t soft contact lens (n = 63) replaced their lenses weekly and the group wearing high Dk/t soft contact lenses replaced their lenses monthly (n = 64). Lens allocation was assigned randomly at enrollment. Worn lenses, from one eye only, were collected aseptically and placed in sterile vials. Microbial growth on various media was enumerated and the number of colony forming units (cfu) per lens was calculated in categories of normal ocular microbiota (such as coagulase-negative staphylococci and Propionibacterium spp.) and known ocular pathogens (such as Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative bacteria). The proportion of samples colonized with these bacteria and the extent of colonization were compared between the two groups. The proportion of sterile lenses was calculated, and the types of bacteria on each lens group were compared. No differences between the low and high Dk/t Soft contact lens groups were observed in the proportion of lenses colonized by Propionibacterium spp. (48% vs 43%, P = 0.4) or coagulase-negative staphylococci (47% vs 54%, P = 0.2). Similarly, no differences were found for lenses colonized by S. aureus (0% vs 2%, P = 0.1) or gram-negative bacteria (3% vs 2%, P = 0.8). The types of bacteria isolated from the high and low Dk/t lenses were similar. There were no differences in the number of sterile samples (28% vs 27%, P = 0.8) from each group. These findings suggest that high Dk/t silicone hydrogel materials are colonized by similar numbers and types of microorganisms during extended wear compared to HEMA-based material. Most lenses were colonized by commensal bacteria

  13. RESEARCH OF NIGHT LIGHT EFFECTS ON COLORIMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF IMAGE PERCEIVED BY THE PILOT IN AN AIRCRAFT COCKPIT

    OpenAIRE

    I. O. Zharinov; O. O. Zharinov

    2015-01-01

    Subject of Research. The influence of radiation spectra from the source of artificial night light on colorimetric characteristics of image perceived by the pilot in the aircraft cockpit has been studied. The image is displayed on the LCD screen of multifunctional color indication equipment unit. Night illumination of the cockpit is performed with the use of artificial lamps of red, green, blue and, rarely, white light. Method. Any given color to be displayed on the screen is perceived by an o...

  14. The Mythology of the Night Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, David E.

    The word "planet" comes from the Latin word planeta and the Greek word planes, which means "wanderer." When the ancient Greeks studied the night sky they noticed that most of the stars remained in the same position relative to all the other stars, but a few stars seem to move in the sky from day to day, week to week, and month to month. The Greeks called these rogue stars "wanderers" because they wandered through the starry background.

  15. What's crucial in night vision goggle simulation ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kooi, F.L.; Toet, A

    2005-01-01

    Training is required to correctly interpret NVG imagery. Training night operations with simulated intensified imagery has great potential. Compared to direct viewing with the naked eye, intensified imagery is relatively easy to simulate and the cost of real NVG training is high (logistics, risk, civilian sleep deprivation, pollution). On the surface NVG imagery appears to have a structure similar to daylight imagery. However, in actuality its characteristics differ significantly from those of...

  16. The conformal transformation of the night sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2016-12-01

    We give a simple differential geometric proof of the conformal transformation of the night sky under change of observer. The proof does not use the four dimensionality of spacetime or spinor methods. Furthermore, it really shows that the result does not depend on Lorentz transformations. This approach, by giving a transparent covariant expression to the conformal factor, shows that in most situations it is possible to define a thermal sky metric independent of the observer.

  17. Agomelatine Efficacy in the Night Eating Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Milano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Night eating syndrome (NES is a nosographic entity included among the forms not otherwise specified (EDNOS in eating disorders (ED of the DSM IV. It is characterized by a reduced food intake during the day, evening hyperphagia, and nocturnal awakenings associated with conscious episodes of compulsive ingestion of food. Frequently, NES patients show significant psychopathology comorbidity with affective disorders. This paper describes a case report of an NES patient treated with agomelatine, an antidepressant analogue of melatonin, which acts by improving not only the mood but also by regulating sleep cycles and appetite. After three months of observation, the use of Agomelatine not only improved the mood of our NES patient (assessed in the HAM-D scores but it was also able to reduce the night eating questionnaire, by both reducing the number of nocturnal awakenings with food intake, the time of snoring, the minutes of movement during night sleep (assessed at polysomnography, and the weight (−5.5 kg and optimizing blood glucose and lipid profile. In our clinical case report, agomelatine was able both to reduce the NES symptoms and to significantly improve the mood of our NES patient without adverse side effects during the duration of treatment. Therefore, our case report supports the rationale for further studies on the use of Agomelatine in the NES treatment.

  18. The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Østergaard; Bendix Kleif, Helle; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’ (NR) was founded in Sweden in 1987 and has, over the years, developed into a Scandinavian concept covering large areas of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The NR programme is a crime prevention initiative with adults walking the stre......The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’ (NR) was founded in Sweden in 1987 and has, over the years, developed into a Scandinavian concept covering large areas of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The NR programme is a crime prevention initiative with adults walking...... the streets at night in identifiable ‘uniforms’ in areas with high activity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the NR programme in Denmark based on a volunteer set-up with a less intrusive approach to situational crime prevention than, for instance, hot spot policing. The analyses...... with NR organizations to districts without NR organizations. The results show no difference in the crime rates between Danish postcode districts with and without the NR programme. Hence, we cannot identify positive effects of situational crime prevention when evaluating this Scandinavian volunteer...

  19. Persepsi Wisatawan Terhadap Night Life Attraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hary Hermawan

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT Cabaret is a term performances of music, comedy, dance, drama, and other special mix of art perfomed by men who dressed in women (ladyboy on stage. Cabaret performances in Oyot Godhong Restaurant intended as new tourist attraction that is expected to increase the interest of tourists to visit Malioboro in Yogyakarta, especially to Oyot Godhong Restaurants. Based descriptive study shows that the characteristics travelers who viewed Kabaret show is very diverse, each of which has perceptions and motivations are different. Cabaret performances have qualified to become the cultural attractions are staged at night (night atraction in the city of Yogyakarta. Based on traveler perception indicates that the cabaret performances have beauty or aesthetics, uniqueness, and values that match the criteria criteria of the standard as a tourist attraction. Performances Cabaret in Oyot Godhong Restaurants able to increase the sale value. Oyot Godhong Restaurants previously only form of tourism facilities (amenities, but is now a restaurant that has a tourist attraction (atraction.   Keywords: Cabaret show, night life attractions, tourism attraction, tourists perception, tourism marketing

  20. Mothers' night work and children's behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunifon, Rachel; Kalil, Ariel; Crosby, Danielle A; Su, Jessica Houston

    2013-10-01

    Many mothers work in jobs with nonstandard schedules (i.e., schedules that involve work outside of the traditional 9-5, Monday through Friday schedule); this is particularly true for economically disadvantaged mothers. In the present article, we used longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey (n = 2,367 mothers of children ages 3-5 years) to examine the associations between maternal nonstandard work and children's behavior problems, with a particular focus on mothers' night shift work. We employed 3 analytic strategies with various approaches to adjusting for observed and unobserved selection factors; these approaches provided an upper and lower bound on the true relationship between night shift work and children's behavior. Taken together, the results provide suggestive evidence for modest associations between exposure to maternal night shift work and higher levels of aggressive and anxious or depressed behavior in children compared with children whose mothers who are not working, those whose mothers work other types of nonstandard shifts, and, for aggressive behavior, those whose mothers work standard shifts.

  1. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000826.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats To ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot ...

  2. Artificial light at night inhibits mating in a geometrid moth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Koert G.; van Eck, Emiel; de Boer, Rens A.; van Grunsven, Roy H. A.; Salis, Lucia; Berendse, Frank; Veenendaal, Elmar M.

    Levels of artificial night lighting are increasing rapidly worldwide, subjecting nocturnal organisms to a major change in their environment. Many moth species are strongly attracted to sources of artificial night lighting, with potentially severe, yet poorly studied, consequences for development,

  3. Noise at night in hospital general wards: a mapping of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillary, Julie; Chaplin, Hema; Jones, Gill; Thompson, Angela; Holme, Anita; Wilson, Patricia

    English NHS inpatient surveys consistently identify that noise at night in hospitals and its impact on patients' sleep is a persisting problem that needs addressing. To identify how noise at night in hospital affects patients on general wards and the range of interventions aimed at reducing the problem, a systematic mapping of the literature was undertaken. All primary studies and relevant literature published January 2003-July 2013 were included. Key issues identified in the literature included noise levels and causes, impact on patient experience, and lack of staff awareness. Interventions to reduce noise were targeted at staff education, behaviour modification, care organisation and environmental solutions. The scoping suggested that when compared with specialist units, there is little evidence on effective interventions reducing disturbance from night-time noise on general wards. The available evidence suggests a whole systems approach should be adopted to aid quality sleep and promote recovery.

  4. The Feminist Interpretation of ’Night, Mother

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张璐

    2014-01-01

    The famous contemporary drama wrights in America, Marsha Norman, had won Pulitzer Prize, Tony Prize, Drama Desk Awards and so on. ’Night, Mother was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1983.Feminist is the theoretical basis of this paper, analyze ’Night, Mother with the theory of feminist.’Night, Mother is a feminist play.

  5. Do wild great tits avoid exposure to light at night?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, M.; Ouyang, Jenny; van Grunsven, Roy H. A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their night

  6. Do Wild Great Tits Avoid Exposure to Light at Night?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Maaike; Ouyang, Jenny Q; van Grunsven, Roy H A; Visser, Marcel E; Spoelstra, Kamiel

    2016-01-01

    Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their night

  7. The impact of science methods courses on preservice elementary teachers' science teaching self-efficacy beliefs: Case studies from Turkey and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursal, Murat

    Four case studies in two American and two Turkish science methods classrooms were conducted to investigate the changes in preservice elementary teachers' personal science teaching efficacy (PSTE) beliefs during their course periods. The findings indicated that while Turkish preservice elementary teachers (TR sample) started the science methods course semester with higher PSTE than their American peers (US sample), due to a significant increase in the US sample's and an insignificant decline in the TR sample's PSTE scores, both groups completed the science methods course with similar PSTE levels. Consistent with Bandura's social cognitive theory, describing four major sources of self-efficacy, the inclusion of mastery experiences (inquiry activities and elementary school micro-teaching experiences) and vicarious experiences (observation of course instructor and supervisor elementary teacher) into the science methods course, providing positive social persuasion (positive appraisal from the instructor and classmates), and improving physiological states (reduced science anxiety and positive attitudes toward becoming elementary school teachers), were found to contribute to the significant enhancement of the US sample's PSTE beliefs. For the TR sample, although some of the above sources were present, the lack of student teaching experiences and inservice teacher observations, as well as the TR samples' negative attitudes toward becoming elementary school teachers and a lack of positive classroom support were found to make Turkish preservice teachers rely mostly on their mastery in science concepts, and therefore resulted in not benefiting from their science methods course, in terms of enhancing their PSTE beliefs. Calls for reforms in the Turkish education system that will include more mastery experiences in the science methods courses and provide more flexibility for students to choose their high school majors and college programs, and switch between them are made. In

  8. Integrated Water-Less Management of Night Soil for Depollution of Water Resources and Water Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod R. Chaudhari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Use of water for flushing night soil and enormous sewage disposal are responsible for pollution and depletion of fresh water resources in India and other countries. The review of traditional methods in the world provides idea of zero-waste discharge residential units. Experiences and research in India, China, Japan, America and Sweden has indicated feasibility of waterless management of night soil, composting and use of biofertilizer product in agriculture. A novel idea of ecological management of night soil and urine is presented in which night soil may be conditioned for transportation and treatment by adding suitable waste product(s from industry and other sources. Different night soil treatment methods are reviewed and emphasized the need for further research on whole cycle of ecological management or sustainable sanitation depending on local conditions. The benefits of this system are zero sewage discharge, reuse of waste as resource, recovery of nutrients in waste as fertilizer, production of fuel gas and reduction of pathogens in biofertilizer. This will help in water conservation and regenerating the quality and quantity of river flow for use as water ways and irrigation and to improve the public health. Potential technical intervention and research needs are discussed in this article

  9. Approaches for Improving Earth System Science Education in Middle Schools and High Schools in the United States (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. E.

    2009-12-01

    Earth system science is an often neglected subject in the US science curriculum. The state of Kansas State Department of Education, for example, has provided teachers with a curriculum guide for incorporating earth system science as an ancillary topic within the subjects of physics, chemistry, and the biological sciences. While this does provide a means to have earth system science within the curriculum, it relegates earth system science topics to a secondary status. In practice, earth system science topics are considered optional or only taught if there is time within an already an overly crowded curriculum. Given the importance of developing an educated citizenry that is capable of understanding, coping, and deciding how to live in a world where climate change is a reality requires a deeper understanding of earth system science. The de-emphasis of earth system science in favor of other science disciplines makes it imperative to seek opportunities to provide teachers, whose primary subject is not earth system science, with professional development opportunities to develop content knowledge understanding of earth system science, and pedagogical content knowledge (i.e. effective strategies for teaching earth system science). This is a noble goal, but there is no single method. At Fort Hays State University we have developed multiple strategies from face-to-face workshops, on-line coursework, and academic year virtual and face-to-face consultations with in-service and pre-service teachers. A review of the techniques and measures of effectiveness (based on teacher and student performance), and strengths and limitations of each method will be presented as an aid to other institutions and programs seeking to improve the teaching and learning of earth system science in their region.

  10. Rethinking the relationship between science and society: Has there been a shift in attitudes to Patient and Public Involvement and Public Engagement in Science in the United Kingdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Annette; Biri, Despina; McKevitt, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    The policy imperative to engage the public and patients in research can be seen as part of a wider shift in the research environment. This study addresses the question: Has there been a shift in attitudes to Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) and Public Engagement in Science (PES) amongst researchers? Attitudes to PPI and PES within a cluster of three NIHR supported Biomedical Research Centres were explored through in-depth interviews with 19 researchers. Participants distinguished PPI (as an activity involving patients and carers in research projects and programmes) from PES (as an activity that aims to communicate research findings to the public, engage the public with broader issues of science policy or promote a greater understanding of the role of science in society). While participants demonstrated a range of attitudes to these practices, they shared a resistance to sharing power and control of the research process with the public and patients. While researchers were prepared to engage with the public and patients and listed the advantages of engagement, the study revealed few differences in their underlying attitudes towards the role of society in science (and science in society) to those reported in previous studies. To the participants science remains the preserve of scientists, with patients and the public invited to 'tinker at the edges'. © 2014 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Night-time ozone uptake by Mediterranean species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mereu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the evident tropospheric ozone impact on plant productivity, an accurate ozone risk assessment for the vegetation has become an issue. There is a growing evidence that ozone stomatal uptake may also take place at night and that the night-time uptake may be more damaging than diurnal uptake. Estimation of night-time uptake in the field is complicated because of instrumental difficulties. Eddy covariance technology is not always reliable because of the low turbulence at night. Leaf level porometry is defective at relative humidity above 70% which often takes place at night. Improved sap flow technology allows to estimate also slow flows that usually take place at night and hence may be, at present, the most trustworthy technology to measure night-time transpiration and hence to derive canopy stomatal conductance and ozone uptake at night. Based on micrometeorological data and the sap flow of three Mediterranean woody species, the night-time ozone uptake of these species was evaluated during a summer season as drought increased. Night-time ozone uptake was 10% of the total when plants were exposed to a weak drought, but increased up to 24% as the drought became more pronounced. The percentage increase is due to a stronger reduction of diurnal stomatal conductance than night-time stomatal conductance.

  12. 《The Night Life of Trees》

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琛; 韩多妮; 孔未冉; 林琪香; 陈铭恒

    2010-01-01

    <正>出版:Tarabooks(印度)作者:Gita Wolf、Sirish Rao插画:Bhajju Shyam、Durga Bai、Ram Singh Urveti查询:The Bookshop(mccmbookshop.wo rdpress.com)印度Tarabooks出版的《The Night Life of Trees》于2006年推出,至去年末出版的已是第五版了。这一栏原本是为介绍新书而设的,但当在香港湾仔的The Bookshop遇到这本印度手造书时,我不得不违反这常规。

  13. The stargazer's guide to the night sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lisle, Jason, Dr

    2012-01-01

    Explore the night sky, identify stars, constellations, and even planets. Stargaze with a telescope, binoculars, or even your naked eye. Allow Dr. Jason Lisle, a research scientist with a masters and PhD in astrophysics, to guide you in examining the beauty of God's Creation with 150 full color star-charts. Learn the best ways and optimal times to observe planets and stars with easy to use illustrations. Create or expand the hobby of stargazing; an outdoor, educational hobby to enjoy with friends or family.

  14. Design Considerations For Night Vision Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasheen, W. M.; Reiss, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Baird Corporation of Bedford, Massachusetts, has designed and developed two similar night vision goggles. These goggles are binocular viewing to the wearer's eyes, but use a single objective lens and a single image intensifier tube. Binocular viewing is achieved by dividing a single image and sharing it between the'viewer's eyes. The goggles are self-sufficient, independent instruments which can be simply and easily interfaced with a face mask that the viewer wears. This paper covers the main design considerations that are associated with achieving the goals of these goggle configurations and their performance. Baird's first goggle design is designated the GP/NVG; the second is designated the AN/PVS-7. The GP/NVG night vision goggle is a high-performance, single intensifier tube, passive night vision device that provides the user with a 40-degree field of view at unity magnification. The fixed aperture, f/1.0 objective lens collects the available light and images it on the fiber optic faceplate of the second generation image intensifier tube. The image intensifier tube converts the real image at the fiber optic faceplate into electrons across the image, amplifies them, and then reconverts the electrons into a real, visible image at the fiber optic output of the tube. This image is then collimated to appear as if it is coming from infinity, split in two, and reimaged by the relay lenses. The eyelenses provide a magnified image to the user. The user can adjust each eyelens to clearly view the output faceplate of the image intensifier tube. This adjustment is made only once for each user. The objective focus can be manually set for distances from 25 centimeters to infinity. The general configuration of this night vision goggle is similar to that of a pair of single objective binocular field glasses. It is extremely lightweight (with most of the main construction molded from plastic) and compact for easy handling. All adjustments and on/off switching have been "human

  15. NASA Science Served Family Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Mitchell, S.; Drobnes, E.

    2010-01-01

    Family oriented innovative programs extend the reach of many traditional out-of-school venues to involve the entire family in learning in comfortable and fun environments. Research shows that parental involvement is key to increasing student achievement outcomes, and family-oriented programs have a direct impact on student performance. Because families have the greatest influence on children's attitudes towards education and career choices, we have developed a Family Science program that provides families a venue where they can explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by engaging in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science. NASA Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond. After three years of pilot implementation and assessment, our evaluation data shows that Family Science Night participants have positive change in their attitudes and involvement in science.  Even after a single session, families are more likely to engage in external science-related activities and are increasingly excited about science in their everyday lives.  As we enter our dissemination phase, NASA Family Science Night will be compiling and releasing initial evaluation results, and providing facilitator training and online support resources. Support for NASA Family Science Nights is provided in part through NASA ROSES grant NNH06ZDA001N.

  16. Excessive sleepiness, sleep hygiene, and coping strategies among night bus drivers: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Uma Maheswari; Chhabria, Mamta S.; Rao, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sleep disruption and excessive sleepiness are the known consequences of shift work. The recent spate of night-time road and air accidents, with some being directly attributed to driver sleepiness prompted us to undertake this study. Aims: To screen for excessive sleepiness, coping practices, and post-shift sleep hygiene in night bus drivers. Settings and Design: This prospective study was carried out on night bus drivers of a public transport organization in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: Bus drivers driving for ≥8 h at night were screened with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and a prevalidated shift work questionnaire. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the compiled data using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: One hundred and eighty bus drivers aged 22–63 years were screened. Excessive Sleepiness: Although only 2 (1.1%) drivers scored above the cutoff on ESS, 10 (5.6%) and 103 (57.2%) drivers admitted to feeling sleepy during daytime and night driving respectively. None of the drivers admitted to causing accidents related to sleepiness. The coping strategies for nocturnal sleepiness included consuming coffee/tea (16.7%), chewing tobacco (12.8%), smoking (6.1%), and walking (3.9%). Post-Shift Sleep Practices: Post-shift sleep duration ranged between 1 h and 10 h. Twenty-six (14.4%) and 16 (8.9%) drivers had difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep, respectively, while 9 (5%) reported frequent awakening during daytime sleep. Conclusion and Implications: This study has demonstrated a high incidence of nocturnal sleepiness and daytime sleep disruption among night bus drivers, thus necessitating the need for education about shift work and alertness testing among shift workers in critical professions. PMID:28194081

  17. A Formative Evaluation of Me Now, Unit I, Digestion and Circulation, Life Sciences for the Educable Mentally Handicapped Intermediate Grades (11-13 years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James T.; Tolman, Richard R.

    In order to evaluate Unit I (Digestion and Circulation) of the Me Now series of Life Sciences for the Educable Mentally Handicapped, 139 students in an experimental group (mean IQ 72.04; mean CA 144.9 months) and 154 control subjects (mean IQ 70.2; mean CA 148.3 months) were pre- and post-tested following instruction in the Me Now series…

  18. VIIRS Nightfire: Satellite Pyrometry at Night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly E. Baugh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nightfire algorithm detects and characterizes sub-pixel hot sources using multispectral data collected globally, each night, by the Suomi National Polar Partnership (NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS. The spectral bands utilized span visible, near-infrared (NIR, short-wave infrared (SWIR, and mid-wave infrared (MWIR. The primary detection band is in the SWIR, centered at 1.6 μm. Without solar input, the SWIR spectral band records sensor noise, punctuated by high radiant emissions associated with gas flares, biomass burning, volcanoes, and industrial sites such as steel mills. Planck curve fitting of the hot source radiances yields temperature (K and emission scaling factor (ESF. Additional calculations are done to estimate source size (m2, radiant heat intensity (W/m2, and radiant heat (MW. Use of the sensor noise limited M7, M8, and M10 spectral bands at night reduce scene background effects, which are widely reported for fire algorithms based on MWIR and long-wave infrared. High atmospheric transmissivity in the M10 spectral band reduces atmospheric effects on temperature and radiant heat retrievals. Nightfire retrieved temperature estimates for sub-pixel hot sources ranging from 600 to 6,000 K. An intercomparison study of biomass burning in Sumatra from June 2013 found Nightfire radiant heat (MW to be highly correlated to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS Fire Radiative Power (MW.

  19. Being a researcher for one night

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    On 24 September from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., European Researchers Night will give some 100 young students from local schools the opportunity to sit side by side with scientists and operators in the LHC control rooms. At the same time, a live webcast will connect CERN with various institutes around Europe participating in the Being a European Scientist Today (BEST) project. You are all invited to take part!   Copyright Frascati Scienza The European Researchers Night is an EU initiated and funded initiative, which aims at highlighting the appeal of being a researcher. Meeting scientists in a ‘fun’ and festive context gives the public, especially the young, the opportunity to get to know the job better and be inspired to pursue a career in research. “CERN scientists already took part in last year’s event, but only through a web connection with Frascati in Italy”, explains Paola Catapano, a member of the Communication group and organiser of the activities t...

  20. Lacanian Reading of Marsha Norman's Night, Mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Taherifard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a Lacanian/feminist reading of Night, Mother by the American playwright Marsha Norman. The play Night, Mother will be read according to Lacan’s point of view and the concepts of identity and identity formation are studied in this paper. The play will be analyzed based on the Lacanian concepts of the contrast between the Imaginary Order and the Symbolic Order, and the notion of Death Drive, suggesting that in the play Jessie represents the Symbolic Order and her mother, Thelma, represents the Imaginary Order. The notion of Death Drive and its omnipresence in Jessie’s psyche is discussed and emphasized. Thelma functions as the Other for Jessie, while her father functions as the Mother, a reversal of gender roles in the Lacanian reading. Moreover, the relationship between some of the concepts are explained. It will be explicated how the play can be brought in line with a feminist reading of Lacan by reversing the stereotypical gender roles and subsequently getting close to post-feminist authors.

  1. Panoramic night vision goggle flight test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Douglas L.; Geiselman, Eric E.; Craig, Jeffrey L.

    2000-06-01

    The Panoramic Night Vision Goggle (PNVG) has begun operational test and evaluation with its 100-degree horizontal by 40-degree vertical field of view (FOV) on different aircraft and at different locations. Two configurations of the PNVG are being evaluated. The first configuration design (PNVG I) is very low in profile and fits underneath a visor. PNVG I can be retained by the pilot during ejection. This configuration is interchangeable with a day helmet mounted tracker and display through a standard universal connector. The second configuration (PNVG II) resembles the currently fielded 40-degree circular FOV Aviator Night Vision Imaging Systems (ANVIS) and is designed for non-ejection seat aircraft and ground applications. Pilots completed subjective questionnaires after each flight to compare the capability of the 100-degree horizontal by 40-degree vertical PNVG to the 40-degree circular ANVIS across different operational tasks. This paper discusses current findings and pilot feedback from the flight trials objectives of the next phase of the PNVG program are also discussed.

  2. Insect photoreceptor adaptations to night vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, Anna; Immonen, Esa-Ville; Salmela, Iikka; Heimonen, Kyösti; Weckström, Matti

    2017-04-05

    Night vision is ultimately about extracting information from a noisy visual input. Several species of nocturnal insects exhibit complex visually guided behaviour in conditions where most animals are practically blind. The compound eyes of nocturnal insects produce strong responses to single photons and process them into meaningful neural signals, which are amplified by specialized neuroanatomical structures. While a lot is known about the light responses and the anatomical structures that promote pooling of responses to increase sensitivity, there is still a dearth of knowledge on the physiology of night vision. Retinal photoreceptors form the first bottleneck for the transfer of visual information. In this review, we cover the basics of what is known about physiological adaptations of insect photoreceptors for low-light vision. We will also discuss major enigmas of some of the functional properties of nocturnal photoreceptors, and describe recent advances in methodologies that may help to solve them and broaden the field of insect vision research to new model animals.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'.

  3. Similar or Different?: A Comparative Analysis of Higher Education Research in Political Science and International Relations between the United States of America and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the nature of the writing in 73 articles published in six U.S. and U.K. political science and international relations journals that focus on teaching and learning. A comparative analysis is made of the articles through a review of the characteristics of the authors, the themes researched, the analytical focus, the research…

  4. Similar or Different?: A Comparative Analysis of Higher Education Research in Political Science and International Relations between the United States of America and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the nature of the writing in 73 articles published in six U.S. and U.K. political science and international relations journals that focus on teaching and learning. A comparative analysis is made of the articles through a review of the characteristics of the authors, the themes researched, the analytical focus, the research…

  5. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room during Researchers Night by Natural History Museum, London

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This event is part of EU Researchers Night, when institutions in more than 200 cities across Europe reveal the exciting science research taking place behind their doors and how science research is exciting, fun and vital to our daily lives. Following the success of Science Uncovered in 2010 and 2011, the Natural History Museum, London throws open its doors once again this September. There will be hundreds of inspiring scientific activities happening throughout the Museum's iconic galleries and behind the scenes. One big part of the night is a series of Nature Live events, where visitors get the chance to meet our scientists, see the specimens they study and join in the discussion. Throughout the night these events will feature live links to other scientific institutions across the world, including to the LHC control room at CERN. This will give visitors the amazing opportunity to ask questions to the physicists involved about the Large Hadron Collider experiments, Higgs particles and antimatter. As well as to...

  6. “Wild Nights-Wild Nights!”:Passion for Love

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁飞

    2015-01-01

    One favorite subject of Emily Dickinson is love,which approximately 300 of her poems concern.This essay intends to analyze one of her love poems“Wild Nights—Wild Nights!”.In this short poem,the poet expresses her passion for love and shows the greatness of love through the employment of symbols and metaphors.

  7. “Wild Nights-Wild Nights!”:Passion for Love

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁飞

    2015-01-01

    One favorite subject of Emily Dickinson i love,which approximately 300 of her poems concern.This essay intends to analyze one of her love poems "Wild Nights—Wild Nights!".In this short poem,the poet expresses her passion fo love and shows the greatness of love through the employment o symbols and metaphors.

  8. Own the night with flying colors: towards ergonomic full color multiband night vision systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently we introduced a method for applying natural daytime colors to multi-band night-time images. In this method statistical properties of a reference daytime color image are transferred to the multi-band image. Although the method yields nice results, its practical value is limited since it is c

  9. Assessment of night vision problems in patients with congenital stationary night blindness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke M C Bijveld

    Full Text Available Congenital Stationary Night Blindness (CSNB is a retinal disorder caused by a signal transmission defect between photoreceptors and bipolar cells. CSNB can be subdivided in CSNB2 (rod signal transmission reduced and CSNB1 (rod signal transmission absent. The present study is the first in which night vision problems are assessed in CSNB patients in a systematic way, with the purpose of improving rehabilitation for these patients. We assessed the night vision problems of 13 CSNB2 patients and 9 CSNB1 patients by means of a questionnaire on low luminance situations. We furthermore investigated their dark adapted visual functions by the Goldmann Weekers dark adaptation curve, a dark adapted static visual field, and a two-dimensional version of the "Light Lab". In the latter test, a digital image of a living room with objects was projected on a screen. While increasing the luminance of the image, we asked the patients to report on detection and recognition of objects. The questionnaire showed that the CSNB2 patients hardly experienced any night vision problems, while all CSNB1 patients experienced some problems although they generally did not describe them as severe. The three scotopic tests showed minimally to moderately decreased dark adapted visual functions in the CSNB2 patients, with differences between patients. In contrast, the dark adapted visual functions of the CSNB1 patients were more severely affected, but showed almost no differences between patients. The results from the "2D Light Lab" showed that all CSNB1 patients were blind at low intensities (equal to starlight, but quickly regained vision at higher intensities (full moonlight. Just above their dark adapted thresholds both CSNB1 and CSNB2 patients had normal visual fields. From the results we conclude that night vision problems in CSNB, in contrast to what the name suggests, are not conspicuous and generally not disabling.

  10. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change.

  11. Monitoring and Assessment Science to Support Decision-Making by the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, M.; Akhtar-Schuster, M.; Cherlet, M.; Martius, C.; Sommer, S.; Thomas, R.; Vogt, J.

    2009-12-01

    The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) is a global treaty that emerged from the Rio Earth Summit and formally took force in 1996. It has now been ratified by 193 countries (known as Parties to the Convention). Yet the UNCCD has gained only modest support from donors, largely due to questions about the science base underlying its target issue (desertification) resulting in ambiguous definitions and quantification of the problem. The UNCCD recognizes the need to reform itself and commissioned a scientific conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina in September 2009 to discuss ways to improve the scientific underpinning of monitoring and assessment (M&A) of desertification, land degradation and drought (DLDD). Previous attempts by the UNCCD on M&A focused largely on a search for a common, simple, universal set of indicators that could be reported by country Parties to the Convention Secretariat, which would collate them into a global report. However experience found that no single set of indicators is satisfactory to all countries, because DLDD depends strongly on the local environmental and human/social context. Three preparatory Working Groups analyzed the issue of DLDD M&A and recommended the following. Parties should recognize that M&A methods must integrate human-environment parameters to capture the complexity of DLDD phenomena as defined in the Convention’s text. Traditional tendencies had been to isolate biophysical from social and economic parameters, leading to unrealistic conclusions. Parties should take advantage of a much wider range of analytical techniques than just the coarse-scale indicators that had been their main focus to date. Powerful but underutilized techniques include integrated assessment models, remote sensing, geographic information systems and mapping, participatory stakeholder assessment, hierarchical aggregation of related data, knowledge management and many others. Multiple methods could provide validation checks

  12. Looking inward, looking outward: Developing knowledge through teacher research in a middle school science classroom during a unit on magnetism and electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melissa D.

    In this study I aimed to understand effective teaching and learning in the context of my middle school science classroom. The study was a multiple case analysis of two classes of students, one gifted and one academic, during a unit on magnetism and electricity. From a teacher researcher perspective, I conducted the study to investigate the development of my knowledge---scientific, pedagogical content, and reflective---as a teacher. From an analysis of questionnaires, field notes, transcribed audio tapes of small and large group discussions, and student artifacts, I constructed an understanding of my students' learning and my own growth in several realms. My scientific knowledge grew both substantively and syntactically; I elaborated my understanding of magnetism, rethought my delivery of electricity, realized a need for training in electronics, and refined my definition of the nature of science in research. I built on my pedagogical content knowledge with regard to students ideas about magnetism and electricity, learning characteristics of gifted students, tools of inquiry that facilitate learning, and methods to operationalize the situated learning model. Most importantly I gained an understanding of teacher research and its three components: ownership, purpose, and methodology. The findings contribute to the understanding of teacher research as well as various bodies of science education literature: (a) students' ideas about magnetism, (b) the science learning characteristics of gifted students, (c) tools of inquiry in the science classroom, and (d) operationalization of the situated learning model.

  13. Results from the Prototype GLOBE at Night Worldwide Light Pollution Observation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Pompea, S. M.; Isbell, D.; Orellana, D.; Blurton, C.; Henderson, S.

    2006-06-01

    Students, families, and educators worldwide participated in GLOBE at Night - an international event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Participation was open to anyone - anywhere in the world - who could get outside and look skyward during the week of March 22-29, 2006. Our goal was 5000 observations from around the world in this prototype program.The hands-on learning activities associated with the program were designed to extend the traditional classroom and school day with a week of nighttime observations involving teachers, students and their families. By locating specific constellations in the sky, students from around the world learned how the lights in their community contribute to light pollution. Students explored the different light sources in their community learning the relationship between science, technology and society, and they reported their observations online through a central database allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis. The observations made during GLOBE at Night helped students and scientists together assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world as well as the level of energy wastage associated with poorly-shielded lights.For more information, visit http://www.globe.gov/globeatnight.GLOBE at Night is a collaboration between The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS) in Chile , Windows to the Universe, and Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI).

  14. Keeping Residents in the Dark: Do Night-Float Rotations Provide a Valuable Educational Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmann, Alessandra; Mahnken, Heidi; Antonoff, Mara B; White, SuAnn; Patel, Arpit; Scifres, Aaron M; Lees, Jason S

    2017-08-18

    To qualify and characterize resident overnight activity. A prospective 3-phase study was conducted of surgical residents with attention to activities performed on the overnight rotation: needs assessment, direct observation of activities, and feedback. This study was conducted at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. This is both a tertiary referral center and the only American College of Surgeons (ACS) verified level 1 trauma center in the state. This study included current surgical residents within the residency program. During the study period, 270 pages were individually recorded, with 60% of these pages defined as time-sensitive activities. In addition, most of the pages involved pressing patient-care issues irrespective of postgraduate year level. Analyses revealed that residents spend most of their time performing educational activities (62%). On feedback, residents reported overall satisfaction with the learning opportunities during night-shift (6.4/7.0) and indicated their perceptions of an adequate balance of service and education on night float (6.6/7.0). This correlates with our annual rotation assessment where residents identify night-float as an overall positive experience which provides educational benefit. Work-hour restrictions induce residency programs to adapt to new training models. Our results report a breakdown of resident activities while on night-float and demonstrate that overnight shifts continue to provide important educational opportunities during training. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. A prospective cohort study of the morbidity associated with operative vaginal deliveries performed by day and at night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Katherine; Ramphul, Meenakshi; Dunney, Clare; Farren, Maria; McSweeney, Aoife; McNamara, Karen; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate maternal and neonatal outcomes associated with operative vaginal deliveries (OVDs) performed by day and at night. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Urban maternity unit in Ireland with off-site consultant staff at night. Population All nulliparous women requiring an OVD with a term singleton fetus in a cephalic presentation from February to November 2013. Methods Delivery outcomes were compared for women who delivered by day (08:00–19:59) or at night (20:00–07:59). Main outcome measures The main outcomes included postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), anal sphincter tear and neonatal unit admission. Procedural factors included operator grade, sequential use of instruments and caesarean section. Results Of the 597 women who required an OVD, 296 (50%) delivered at night. Choice of instrument, place of delivery, sequential use of instruments and caesarean section did not differ significantly in relation to time of birth. Mid-grade operators performed less OVDs by day than at night, OR 0.60 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.83), and a consultant supervisor was more frequently present by day, OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.05 to 4.83). Shoulder dystocia occurred more commonly by day, OR 2.57 (95% CI 1.05 to 6.28). The incidence of PPH, anal sphincter tears, neonatal unit admission, fetal acidosis and neonatal trauma was similar by day and at night. The mean decision to delivery intervals were 12.0 and 12.6 min, respectively. Conclusions There was no evidence of an association between time of OVD and adverse perinatal outcomes despite off-site consultant obstetric support at night. PMID:25354825

  16. Acute sciatic neuropathy: "Saturday night palsy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manigoda Miodrag

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of 25-year old, unemployed male, admitted to hospital due to acute onset of the left foot drop, subsequent walking difficulty and numbness of the left calf and foot. Symptoms began after prolonged sleep with previous heroin abuse by sniffing. During neurological examination, mild weakness of knee flexors, moderate weakness of plantar flexors and paralysis of foot dorsiflexors, together with hypesthesia of the left calf, foot and fingers, predominantly in the innervation area of common peroneal nerve on the same side, were observed. The electrophysiologic examination revealed predominant involvement of peroneal division within the sciatic nerve, together with recorded conduction block indicating the compression as possible mechanism of nerve injury. The patient was administered corticosteroid therapy during two months, what resulted in almost complete recovery. The peculiarity of this case report is in the presence of the sciatic nerve "Saturday night palsy" with possible effect of former heroin abuse.

  17. Coloring night vision imagery for depth perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Gu; Shaoyuan Sun; Jian'an Fang

    2009-01-01

    Depth perception for night vision(NV)imagery could largely improve scene comprehension.We present a novel scheme to give fused multi-band NV imagery smoothly natural color appearance as well as depth sense from color.Our approach is based on simulating color cues by varying saturation values of each object in the color NV image,in correspondence with the ratio between the infrared and low-light-level sensor outputs which in practice is the depth feature for same materials.We render the NV image segment-by-segment by taking advantage of image segmentation,dominant color transfer,saturation variation,and image fusion.Experiments have shown that the proposed scheme can achieve satisfying results.

  18. Managing for climate change on federal lands of the western United States: perceived usefulness of climate science, effectiveness of adaptation strategies, and barriers to implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry B. Kemp

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent mandates in the United States require federal agencies to incorporate climate change science into land management planning efforts. These mandates target possible adaptation and mitigation strategies. However, the degree to which climate change is actively being considered in agency planning and management decisions is largely unknown. We explored the usefulness of climate change science for federal resource managers, focusing on the efficacy of potential adaptation strategies and barriers limiting the use of climate change science in adaptation efforts. Our study was conducted in the northern Rocky Mountains region of the western United States, where we interacted with 77 U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management personnel through surveys, semistructured interviews, and four collaborative workshops at locations across Idaho and Montana. We used a mixed-methods approach to evaluate managers' perceptions about adapting to and mitigating for climate change. Although resource managers incorporate general language about climate change in regional and landscape-level planning documents, they are currently not planning on-the-ground adaptation or mitigation projects. However, managers felt that their organizations were most likely to adapt to climate change through use of existing management strategies that are already widely implemented for other non climate-related management goals. These existing strategies, (e.g., thinning and prescribed burning are perceived as more feasible than new climate-specific methods (e.g., assisted migration because they already have public and agency support, accomplish multiple goals, and require less anticipation of the future timing and probability of climate change impacts. Participants reported that the most common barriers to using climate change information included a lack of management-relevant climate change science, inconsistent agency guidance, and insufficient time and resources to access

  19. The observer's year 366 nights in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This is a night by night account of the stars. For every night of the year Sir Patrick Moore gives the reader details of interesting objects that can be seen from earth. It is a book for people with a wide interest in astronomy, those who may not have specialised in a specific area of astronomy and wish to expand their knowledge in all areas. This second edition is updated for astronomical events through until 2010.

  20. SSMILes: School Science and Mathematics Integrated Lessons: Chocolate Chip Cookies: A Consumer Unit, Part III: Investigating Snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Susan; Pericak-Spector, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Gives lesson plans for activities integrating mathematics and science in which students collect data on the nutritional makeup of a number of snack foods and relate this information to the recommendations of the food guide pyramid. (MKR)

  1. SSMILes: School Science and Mathematics Integrated Lessons: Chocolate Chip Cookies: A Consumer Unit, Part III: Investigating Snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Susan; Pericak-Spector, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Gives lesson plans for activities integrating mathematics and science in which students collect data on the nutritional makeup of a number of snack foods and relate this information to the recommendations of the food guide pyramid. (MKR)

  2. The Alvey Conference in Edinburgh: A Review of the United Kingdom’s Research Program in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    A conference to review the UK’s Alvey Program of research in computer science was held in Edinburgh from 24 through 27 June 1985. This report summarizes the speakers’ comments about the progress of the Alvey Program.

  3. Night lights and regional income inequality in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mveyange, Anthony Francis

    Estimating regional income inequality in Africa has been challenging due to the lack of reliable and consistent sub-national income data. I employ night lights data to circumvent this limitation. I find significant and positive associations between regional inequality visible through night lights...... and income in Africa. Thus, in the absence of income data, we can construct regional inequality proxies using night lights data. Further investigation on the night lights-based regional inequality trends reveals two main findings: first, increasing regional inequality trends between 1992 and 2003; and second......, declining regional inequality trends between 2004 and 2012....

  4. An innovative night service program in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, J; Narayan, M C

    1997-05-01

    Comprehensive night service by a home care agency has resulted in increased customer satisfaction and referrals to the agency. The description of this innovative night nurse program includes the job requirements and duties of a visiting night nurse and the tools the nurse uses to accomplish the task of nighttime care delivery. The use of self-directed work groups and mentorship to manage the demands of night service are discussed. Continuity of care, nurse safety, professional development, and program cost also are addressed.

  5. What is the preferred number of consecutive night shifts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jensen, Marie Aarrebo; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-01-01

    Among police officers in Denmark, we studied (i) how many consecutive night shifts participants preferred at baseline; (ii) preferences regarding three intervention conditions (two, four, and seven consecutive night shifts followed by the same number of days off/day shifts: '2 + 2', '4 + 4', '7 + 7...... work. The participants' preferences are likely to be influenced by their previous shift work experience. Practitioner Summary: We investigated police officers' preferences regarding the number of consecutive night shifts. The majority preferred four consecutive night shifts. Those who preferred...

  6. The Night Sky, The Forgotten Nature: Uncovering the Impact of One Television Programme on Astronomy Communication in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, P.

    2017-09-01

    In 2001, two brothers known as the Saffarianpour brothers started a television programme on Iranian state television called Aseman-e-shab (The Night Sky). The programme, which explores astronomy and space science, became one of the longest-running television shows in the history of Iranian television and played a major role in the public communication of science and astronomy. It inspired many of the next generation of Iranian scientists and astronomers and played a key role in the advancement of science journalism and science communication in Iranian media. This article outlines a brief history of the show and its producer and describes the role they played in Iranian society.

  7. The United States-Mexican Border - A land of conflict and opportunity: Chapter 1 in United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Randall G.

    2013-01-01

    The boundary between the United States and Mexico was created for convenient expediency through political debate and agreements (fig. 1–1). With the exception of the eastern segment of the border, which follows the course of the Rio Grande (known as the Rio Bravo in Mexico), the defining of this border was based on political decisions that had little concern for ecosystems, geologic features, or water—all of which span that imaginary line. However, the location of the border has had a remarkable effect on the biologic and physical systems in the border region and, in turn, has had a growing influence on what we now see as 21st century socioeconomic and environmental priorities. Because of the complex interactions of the human, ecological, political, and economic exigencies associated with this area, the status of the United States–Mexican border region, known as the Borderlands, has become an ever-present concern for most American citizens and for Mexican and United States Federal, State, and local governments.

  8. Social Studies: Economics, International Relations, and Political Science. Latin American Curriculum Units for Junior and Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, William P.; Baldwin, Emily

    These three self-contained units of study will help community college students learn about the economics, international relations, and politics of Latin America. Each unit can be used independently and contains introductory notes for instructors, student materials, and a bibliography. Students are expected to read and discuss the reading…

  9. Detection of Special Operations Forces Using Night Vision Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.M.

    2001-10-22

    Night vision devices, such image intensifiers and infrared imagers, are readily available to a host of nations, organizations, and individuals through international commerce. Once the trademark of special operations units, these devices are widely advertised to ''turn night into day''. In truth, they cannot accomplish this formidable task, but they do offer impressive enhancement of vision in limited light scenarios through electronically generated images. Image intensifiers and infrared imagers are both electronic devices for enhancing vision in the dark. However, each is based upon a totally different physical phenomenon. Image intensifiers amplify the available light energy whereas infrared imagers detect the thermal energy radiated from all objects. Because of this, each device operates from energy which is present in a different portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. This leads to differences in the ability of each device to detect and/or identify objects. This report is a compilation of the available information on both state-of-the-art image intensifiers and infrared imagers. Image intensifiers developed in the United States, as well as some foreign made image intensifiers, are discussed. Image intensifiers are categorized according to their spectral response and sensitivity using the nomenclature of GEN I, GEN II, and GEN III. As the first generation of image intensifiers, GEN I, were large and of limited performance, this report will deal with only GEN II and GEN III equipment. Infrared imagers are generally categorized according to their spectral response, sensor materials, and related sensor operating temperature using the nomenclature Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) Cooled and Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) Uncooled. MWIR Cooled refers to infrared imagers which operate in the 3 to 5 {micro}m wavelength electromagnetic spectral region and require either mechanical or thermoelectric coolers to keep the sensors operating at 77 K

  10. 科学慈善事业--美国科技发展的助推器%An Overview of Science Philanthropy in the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付克飞

    2015-01-01

    Science philanthropy has played and continues to play a signiifcant role in promoting the United States’ science and technology development, which was largely ignored and underestimated. Science philanthropy funds are mainly from private philanthropists and professional foundations which are inclined to support the controversial projects with high risk, including the basic and translational researches in the ifelds of public health, medical treatment, environment protection, physics and marine sciences. After deploying the reform and opening up policy for more than 30 years, China has consolidated a basis for science philanthropy from both material and spiritual aspects. This article reviews the history of science philanthropy in US, examines the ongoing development of the science philanthropy, analyzes the related policies and objectives, and evaluates the science philanthropy from an all-round perspective. Finally, this article is concluded by analyzing the deep-rooted reasons for the success of American science philanthropy and leaves room for readers to think and learn from USA.%科学慈善事业在美国科技发展的历史上发挥了并继续发挥着独特的、无可替代的重要作用,虽然目前尚未被正确认识和评价。美国科学慈善基金主要来源于专业的基金会和慈善家个人,资助那些对政府来说风险过高、争议过大的科研项目,包括基础研究和转化研究,其主要捐助领域有生命健康和卫生医药以及环保、物理、海洋等。美国科学慈善资金的最大特点之一在于比联邦资助更自由。经过 30 年改革开放,我国已初步具备了发展科学慈善事业的物质基础和思想基础。通过回顾美国科学慈善事业的历史,整理和分析其发展现状及美国对此的相关政策及其社会影响和评价,期望对我国发展科学慈善事业有所借鉴。

  11. Professor Sir Mark Walport Government Chief Scientific Adviser Head of Government Science and Engineering Profession Chief Executive Designate of UK Research and Innovation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Professor Sir Mark Walport Government Chief Scientific Adviser Head of Government Science and Engineering Profession Chief Executive Designate of UK Research and Innovation United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

  12. Conceptualizing nurses' night work: an inductive content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Sandra; Rudge, Trudy; Mapedzahama, Virginia

    2016-08-01

    To develop a conceptual model of nurse-identified effects of night work. Studies designed to predict shift work tolerance are frequently unsuccessful in incorporating the intersections between physiological, psychological and social issues involved in such work. Where nurses have been the participants of such studies they have rarely been involved in ways that would allow their points of view to be heard directly. Consequently, the issues of personal importance to nurses as shift and night workers in 24/7 organizations are rarely identified in discussions about that work. Inductive qualitative content analysis. Survey responses were provided by 1355 night working RNs employed in a state/public health system in 2012. Data derived from open-ended questions about nurses' own perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of night work are analysed here. Four main categories providing a descriptive summary of the major elements of nurses' night work were identified: 'Lives' and 'Bodies' of night working nurses, the 'Work' of nurses at night and the nurses' 'Workplace' at night. The work nurses undertake at night, and the demanding organizational and clinical environments where they do this are uniquely related to the time of day that this work occurs. The Nurses' Night Work model deconstructs the established binary considerations of the lives and bodies of workers to permit a 24/7-based consideration of nurses' night work and its frequently unacknowledged relationship with the day work required of the same nurses when working a rapidly but randomly rotating shift work schedule. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A magic night in the footsteps of scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    CERN will be welcoming young people into the control rooms of the LHC and its experiments during the European Researchers' Night, which runs from 6 p.m. to midnight on 28 September.   To give young people a taste for science, nothing beats a chance to speak with actual scientists. That is one of the objectives of the “European Researchers’ Night”, when scientists across Europe will open the doors of their laboratories to the general public. This year's event, planned for 28 September, will see CERN once again opening the control rooms of the LHC and its experiments to young people aged 13 to 18 years. From 6 p.m. to midnight, they will be able to spend two to three hours in a control room of the LHC or one of its experiments (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM, and LHCb). In addition to the visit, specific activities have been organised to give the young visitors an insight into how the accelerator and detectors function and what kind of research is bei...

  14. The pre-history of health psychology in the United Kingdom: From natural science and psychoanalysis to social science, social cognition and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Health psychology formally came of age in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, but it was prefigured by much discussion about challenges to the dominance of biomedicine in healthcare and debates about the role of individual behaviour change in promoting population health. Despite current progress and accomplishments, it is important to reflect upon earlier attempts to explore the psychological dimensions of health and illness. It is through such exploration that we can begin to reveal the connection between ideas and the social context. This article focuses on what could be termed the pre-history of health psychology in the United Kingdom. This was the period in the earlier 20th century when psychological approaches were dominated by psychoanalysis which was in tension with more positivist approaches. In the post-World War II period, the classical form of psychoanalysis turned to a concern with relationships. This was the period which also saw the rise of behaviourism and then cognitivism each of which had a strong influence on the new profession of clinical psychology and then health psychology. Review of this pre-history provides the backdrop for the rise of health psychology in the United Kingdom and also reveals the tensions between the different theoretical perspectives.

  15. The Structure of Matter in the Unit of 4E Model and Its Impact on Science Process Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay KARAMUSTAFAOĞLU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research with four-stage model is enriched with activities supported by the scientific process skills of teachers to develop guidance material and this material is carried out to determine the effectiveness of the process of teaching science process skills. For this purpose, scientific process skills test developed by Enger and Yager and applied on 48 students. Iteman program and 5 item with low reliability are removed. The final status is 31 items. The test result of the analysis of the collected data indicated that the test scores of students’ science process skills are significantly different and they were in favour of the experimental group. Primary education is the first stage of the education and this sort of research is extremely good for teacher candidates. By the help of this research, teacher candidates can receive a very good science education.

  16. Morning and Night People in the Family: A Preliminary Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bert N.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This paper is a preliminary statement about morning and night people. The authors collected and analyzed married student responses to open-ended questions concerning "morningness" and "nightness" as factors influencing individual, marital, and family adjustment. This issue has both theoretical and practical significance for marriage and the…

  17. Evening media exposure reduces night-time sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijakkhana, Nakul; Wilaisakditipakorn, Tanaporn; Ruedeekhajorn, Kitja; Pruksananonda, Chandhita; Chonchaiya, Weerasak

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether evening media exposure, bedroom media use and night-time sleep duration at age 6 months are associated with night-time sleep duration in 12-month-old Thai infants. We enrolled 208 infants in this study at 6 months of age. They were followed-up at 12 months of age. A sleep diary was used to document the infant's sleep onset and wake time at each visit. Night-time sleep duration was then calculated at both ages. Screen media exposure in the household was assessed in depth at both visits. Infants who were exposed to screen media in the evening at 12 months of age had a 28-min decrease in 12-month night-time sleep duration on weekdays. Moreover, infants who were exposed to screen media in the evening at age 6 months and 12 months had shorter 12-month night-time sleep duration compared with those who were not exposed to screen media after 7 pm at both ages. Night-time sleep duration at 12 months of age was also directly related to 6-month night-time sleep duration. Infants exposed to screen media in the evening at 12 months of age had decreased 12-month night-time sleep duration. To promote good sleep hygiene and optimal sleep for infants at this age, screen media exposure after 7 pm should be avoided. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. INVIS : Integrated night vision surveillance and observation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Dijk, J.; Son, R. van

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and first field trial results of the all-day all-weather INVIS Integrated Night Vision surveillance and observation System. The INVIS augments a dynamic three-band false-color nightvision image with synthetic 3D imagery in a real-time display. The night vision sensor suite

  19. Gender Roles and Night-Sky Watching among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William E.; McGee, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between gender roles and night-sky watching in a sample of college students (N=161). The Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Noctcaelador Inventory (NI) were used to investigate the differences between gender role groups for night-sky watching. The results supported the hypothesis that androgynous…

  20. 78 FR 19742 - Centennial Challenges: 2014 Night Rover Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Centennial Challenges: 2014 Night Rover Challenge AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Centennial Challenges 2014 Night Rover Challenge. SUMMARY... scheduled and teams that wish to compete may register. Centennial Challenges is a program of prize...

  1. Range-Gated Laser Stroboscopic Imaging for Night Remote Surveillance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Wei; ZHOU Yan; FAN Song-Tao; HE Jun; LIU Yu-Liang

    2010-01-01

    @@ For night remote surveillance,we present a method,the range-gated laser stroboscopic imaging(RGLSI),which uses a new kind of time delay integration mode to integrate target signals so that night remote surveillance can be realized by a low-energy illuminated laser.The time delay integration in this method has no influence on the video frame rate.

  2. Gender Roles and Night-Sky Watching among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William E.; McGee, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between gender roles and night-sky watching in a sample of college students (N=161). The Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Noctcaelador Inventory (NI) were used to investigate the differences between gender role groups for night-sky watching. The results supported the hypothesis that androgynous…

  3. Do wild great tits avoid exposure to light at night?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, M.; Ouyang, Jenny; van Grunsven, Roy H. A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their

  4. INVIS : Integrated night vision surveillance and observation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Dijk, J.; Son, R. van

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and first field trial results of the all-day all-weather INVIS Integrated Night Vision surveillance and observation System. The INVIS augments a dynamic three-band false-color nightvision image with synthetic 3D imagery in a real-time display. The night vision sensor suite cons

  5. Preservice Teachers' Observations of Children's Learning during Family Math Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Terri L.; Kokic, Ivana Batarelo

    2011-01-01

    Family math night can easily be implemented into mathematics methodology courses providing an opportunity for field-based learning. Preservice teachers were asked to develop and implement an inquiry-based activity at a family math night event held at a local school with personnel, elementary children and their parents in attendance. This action…

  6. Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dylan; Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Do not go gentle into that good night,Old age should burn and rave at close of day;Rage, rage against the dying of the light.Though wise men at their end know dark is right,Because their words had forked no lightning theyDo not go gentle into that good night.

  7. Nonelective surgery at night and in-hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Bas; van Klei, Wilton A.; Buhre, Wolfgang F.; Bauer, Peter; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Hoeft, Andreas; Metnitz, Philipp; Moreno, Rui P.; Pearse, Rupert; Pelosi, Paolo; Sander, Michael; Vallet, Benoit; Pettilä, Ville; Vincent, Jean Louis; Rhodes, Andrew; van Klei, Wilton A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Evidence suggests that sleep deprivation associated with night-time working may adversely affect performance resulting in a reduction in the safety of surgery and anaesthesia. OBJECTIVE Our primary objective was to evaluate an association between nonelective night-time surgery and in-hosp

  8. Experimental Assessment of Mechanical Night Ventilation on Inner Wall Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenhui, Ji; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Wang, Houhua

    2016-01-01

    The cooling potential of night ventilation largely depends on the heat exchange at the internal room surfaces. During night time, increased heat transfer on a vertical wall is expected due to cool supply air that flows along the internal wall surface from the top of the wall. This paper presents ...

  9. Do wild great tits avoid exposure to light at night?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, De Maaike; Ouyang, Jenny Q.; Grunsven, van Roy H.A.; Visser, Marcel E.; Spoelstra, Kamiel

    2016-01-01

    Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their ni

  10. 5 CFR 550.121 - Authorization of night pay differential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorization of night pay differential... differential. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, nightwork is regularly scheduled work... his or her rate of basic pay plus a night pay differential amounting to 10 percent of his or her...

  11. Psyche and Society in Sendak's "In the Night Kitchen"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rebecca V. L.; Rabkin, Eric S.

    2007-01-01

    While "Where the Wild Things Are" may be Maurice Sendak's most popular book, "In the Night Kitchen" is arguably the greater work. Though his journey in "Wild Things" shares many of the elements of Mickey's adventure in "Night Kitchen"--swinging between the protagonist's initiatory verbal assertions and silent, completely pictorial spreads that…

  12. Drax's Reading in Neverwinter Nights: With a Tutor as Henchman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commeyras, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    This is an account of what a teacher educator learned from using the video game Neverwinter Nights with Drax, a high school student whose reading is like that of an elementary school student. Neverwinter Nights is a role-playing adventure game that requires reading print along with other meaningful signs such as sounds, artefacts, color, maps,…

  13. Fidelity of implementation to instructional strategies as a moderator of curriculum unit effectiveness in a large-scale middle school science quasi-experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Carol Lynn

    This study examined whether fidelity of implementation to reform-based instructional strategies embedded in a middle school physical science curriculum unit developed by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics moderated the causal relationship between curriculum condition and classroom mean achievement in a quasi-experiment testing the effectiveness of the unit. The study sample included 48 6th grade science classrooms selected randomly from 8 Montgomery County Public Schools middle schools, assigned randomly to either the treatment or comparison condition in the Scaling up Curriculum for Achievement, Learning, and Equity Project (SCALE-0) quasi-experiment of The George Washington University. This dissertation was a secondary analysis of SCALE-uP's 2005-2006 fidelity of implementation data collected with the Instructional Strategies Classroom Observation Protocol (ISCOP), which captured whether the Project 2061 instructional strategies rated Satisfactory or Excellent in the ARIES: Exploring Motion and Forces (M&F) treatment unit were present during implementation in treatment and comparison classrooms. ISCOP Likert-like scores for each classroom were subjected to Rasch analysis; rating scale diagnostics, category collapsing, and fit statistics were used to develop a reliable continuous fidelity of implementation measure for each classroom. Results from hierarchical multiple regression analysis performed on the fidelity of implementation measures indicated that when controlling for prior knowledge, fidelity of implementation to the Project 2061 instructional strategies rated Satisfactory or Excellent in M&F moderated the causal relationship between science curriculum condition and classroom mean achievement. Follow-up post hoc analyses at two select fidelity measures indicated that treatment classrooms with High Fidelity were predicted to have higher classroom mean achievement than comparison classrooms with High Fidelity to the same set of instructional

  14. Forecasting Urban Expansion Based on Night Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathakis, D.

    2016-06-01

    Forecasting urban expansion models are a very powerful tool in the hands of urban planners in order to anticipate and mitigate future urbanization pressures. In this paper, a linear regression forecasting urban expansion model is implemented based on the annual composite night lights time series available from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The product known as 'stable lights' is used in particular, after it has been corrected with a standard intercalibration process to reduce artificial year-to-year fluctuations as much as possible. Forecasting is done for ten years after the end of the time series. Because the method is spatially explicit the predicted expansion trends are relatively accurately mapped. Two metrics are used to validate the process. The first one is the year-to-year Sum of Lights (SoL) variation. The second is the year-to-year image correlation coefficient. Overall it is evident that the method is able to provide an insight on future urbanization pressures in order to be taken into account in planning. The trends are quantified in a clear spatial manner.

  15. PARTICLE-larly Enriching Night at CERN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Yves-Marie Ducimetière

    2010-01-01

    After the 2010 European Researchers' Night, a contest was organised for its participants, asking them to write about their experience. We are now pleased to announce the winner: Yves-Marie Ducimetière, a 14-year-old student at the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire.    Yves-Marie Ducimetière. The visit began for me around 20.30, as we all joined our respective groups to board a CERN shuttle to our final destination, which was LHCb in my case. I was heading into the unknown! On leaving, I knew nothing about this place, and the discovery made it all the more interesting. Upon arriving, a woman explained that their research looked at antimatter, or rather, the reason why it disappeared from our Universe – she then accompanied us inside. Amazingly, I found the place to be both friendly and serious. One physicist spoke passionately about the purpose of LHCb, in short: colliding particles in order to understand the Big Bang, the origin of t...

  16. Fifty years ago: the Vaiont night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Spagna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A geologist at the beginning of his career in the early 1960’s was a teacher of mineralogy and geology at the Agordo “Follador” Mining Institute in the Dolomites area. It was 50 years ago now when he observed the building of the Vaiont dam, and here he tells us of the night of October 9, 1963, when he rushed to the Piave Valley together with the first-aid teams, to confront the remains of Longarone. Did the dam collapse? Everybody thinks so, but the moon was not shining enough to allow an understanding of what had happened. It was only the first faint light of dawn that revealed that the dam was still standing: it was only edged by the water, from the shaping of the tremendous wave that was raised by the Mount Toc landslide when it entered the basin at 100 km/h. The dam edge contributed to the projection of the wave onto the opposite slopes, where once the water mass was released from the narrow Vaiont canyon, it raised solidly into the air, grazing the Casso village and precipitated as a massive block on the Longarone area. Everybody looked upwards with hate and despair, at the residual water streamlets that were overflowing along the concrete wall of the dam. Over the white bare esplanade people appeared extremely small. Pitiful people, gathered around the bodies wrenched from the devastated houses, denuded and buried in the mud.

  17. Night eating syndrome: How to treat it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thisciane Ferreira Pinto

    Full Text Available Summary Night eating syndrome (NES is characterized by caloric intake ≥ 25% of total daily after dinner and/or by two or more weekly nocturnal awakenings accompanied by food ingestion. Causes of NES are not entirely clear and seem to involve a desynchronization between the circadian rhythms of food ingestion and sleep, resulting in a delayed pattern of food intake. Estimates of the prevalence of NES in the general population are around 1.5%, and although much higher frequencies have been described in obese individuals, a causal relationship between NES and obesity is not clearly established. Since the first NES reports, several treatment modalities have been proposed, although, in many cases, the evidence is still insufficient and there is no consensus on the ideal approach. In order to conduct a critical review of proposed treatments for NES since its original description, a systematic search of articles published in journals indexed in Medline/Pubmed database in the period 1955-2015 was performed. Seventeen articles addressing non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies met the selection criteria. Based on the articles analyzed, we conclude that serotonergic agents and psychological interventions, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of NES. A combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies must be considered in future studies on the treatment of these patients.

  18. Residents' perceptions of a night float system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granieri Rosanne

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Night Float (NF system has been implemented by many institutions to address increasing concerns about residents' work hours. The purpose of our study was to examine the perceptions of residents towards a NF system. Methods A 115-item questionnaire was developed to assess residents' perceptions of the NF rotation as compared with a regular call month. The categories included patient care, education, medical errors, and overall satisfaction. Internal Medicine housestaff (post-graduate years 1–3 from three hospital settings at the University of Pittsburgh completed the questionnaire. Results The response rate was 90% (n = 149. Of these, 74 had completed the NF rotation. The housestaff felt that the quality of patient care was improved because of NF (41% agreed and 18% disagreed. A majority also felt that better care was provided by a rested physician in spite of being less familiar with the patient (46% agreed and 21% disagreed. Most felt that there was less emphasis on education (65% and more emphasis on service (52% during NF. Overall, the residents felt more rested during their call months (83% and strongly supported the 80-hour workweek requirement (77%. Conclusion Housestaff felt that the overall quality of patient care was improved by a NF system. The perceived improved quality of care by a rested physician coupled with a perceived decrease in the emphasis on education may have significant implications in housestaff training.

  19. Krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica) swim faster at night

    KAUST Repository

    Klevjer, Thor A.

    2011-05-01

    Krill are key members in marine food webs, and measurement of swimming speed is vital to assess their bioenergetic budgets, feeding, and encounters with predators. We document a consistent and marked diel signal in swimming speed of krill in their natural habitat that is not related to diel vertical migration. The results were obtained using a bottom-mounted, upward-looking echo sounder at 150-m depth in the Oslofjord, Norway, spanning 5 months from late autumn to spring at a temporal resolution of ~1–2 records s−1. Swimming speed was assessed using acoustic target tracking of individual krill. At the start of the registration period, both daytime and nocturnal average swimming speeds of Meganyctiphanes norvegica were ~ 3.5 cm s−1 (~ 1 body lengths ([bl] s−1) in waters with oxygen concentrations of ~ 15–20% O2 saturation. Following intrusion of more oxygenated water, nocturnal average swimming speeds increased to ~ 10 cm s−1 (~ 3 bl s−1), i.e., more than double that of daytime swimming speeds in the same period. We hypothesize that krill activity during the first period was limited by oxygen, and the enhanced swimming at night subsequent to the water renewal is due to increased feeding activity under lessened danger of predation in darkness.

  20. What's crucial in night vision goggle simulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Frank L.; Toet, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    Training is required to correctly interpret NVG imagery. Training night operations with simulated intensified imagery has great potential. Compared to direct viewing with the naked eye, intensified imagery is relatively easy to simulate and the cost of real NVG training is high (logistics, risk, civilian sleep deprivation, pollution). On the surface NVG imagery appears to have a structure similar to daylight imagery. However, in actuality its characteristics differ significantly from those of daylight imagery. As a result, NVG imagery frequently induces visual illusions. To achieve realistic training, simulated NVG imagery should at least reproduce the essential visual limitations of real NVG imagery caused by reduced resolution, reduced contrast, limited field-of-view, the absence of color, and the systems sensitivity to nearby infrared radiation. It is particularly important that simulated NVG imagery represents essential NVG visual characteristics, such as the high reflection of chlorophyll and halos. Current real-time simulation software falls short for training purposes because of an incorrect representation of shadow effects. We argue that the development of shading and shadowing merits priority to close the gap between real and simulated NVG flight conditions. Visual conspicuity can be deployed as an efficient metric to measure the 'perceptual distance' between the real NVG and the simulated NVG image.

  1. Psychophysical measurement of night vision goggle noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Rachael L.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Martinsen, Gary L.; Reis, George A.; Heft, Eric L.

    2003-09-01

    Pilots, developers, and other users of night-vision goggles (NVGs) have pointed out that different NVG image intensifier tubes have different subjective noise characteristics. Currently, no good model of the visual impact of NVG noise exists. Because it is very difficult to objectively measure the noise of a NVG, a method for assessing noise subjectively using simple psychophysical procedures was developed. This paper discusses the use of a computer program to generate noise images similar to what an observer sees through an NVG, based on filtered white noise. The images generated were based on 1/f (where f is frequency) filtered white noise with several adjustable parameters. Adjusting each of these parameters varied different characteristics of the noise. This paper discusses a study where observers compared the computer-generated noise images to true NVG noise and were asked to determine which computer-generated image was the best representation of the true noise. This method was repeated with different types of NVGs and at different luminance levels to study what NVG parameters cause variations in NVG noise.

  2. Challenge theme 6: Natural hazard risks in the Borderlands: Chapter 8 in United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William R.; Parcher, Jean W.; Stefanov, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides and debris flows, wildfires, hurricanes, and intense storm-induced flash floods threaten communities to varying degrees all along the United States–Mexican border. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collaborates with Federal, State, and local agencies to minimize the effects of natural hazards by providing timely, unbiased science information to emergency response officials, resource managers, and the public to help reduce property damage, injury, and loss of life. The USGS often mobilizes response efforts during and after a natural hazard event to provide technical and scientific counsel on recovery and response, and it has a long history of deploying emergency response teams to major disasters in both domestic and international locations. This chapter describes the challenges of natural hazards in the United States–Mexican border region and the capabilities of the USGS in the fields of hazard research, monitoring, and assessment, as well as preventative mitigation and post-disaster response.

  3. The Ecological Implications of Light at Night (LAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Colin

    2015-08-01

    Summary: Light at night (LAN) is now an established environmental problem, not only for astronomers but for the population at large. It has serious ecological effects that are wide ranging, and its environmental effects may be more serious than ever imagined. The ecological and environmental consequences are examined and emphasis is stressed on resolving the problem before it is too late.Introduction: A casual glance at NASA images of the Earth at night1 reveals the lights of thousands of cities. The larger cities will contain millions of street lights, along with commercial, sports and decorative lighting. Most of these lights are on all night, every night, three hundred and sixty-five nights a year, (fig 1), so they must be having a measurable ecological and environmental effect. The most obvious effect of all this excessive lighting is the light pollution suffered by astronomers.

  4. Experimental Assessment of Mechanical Night Ventilation on Inner Wall Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenhui, Ji; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Wang, Houhua;

    2016-01-01

    The cooling potential of night ventilation largely depends on the heat exchange at the internal room surfaces. During night time, increased heat transfer on a vertical wall is expected due to cool supply air that flows along the internal wall surface from the top of the wall. This paper presents ...... an experimental study of the cooling of wall surfaces in a test room by mechanical night-time ventilation. Significant improvement of indoor thermal environment is presented resulting from the enhanced internal convection heat transfer.......The cooling potential of night ventilation largely depends on the heat exchange at the internal room surfaces. During night time, increased heat transfer on a vertical wall is expected due to cool supply air that flows along the internal wall surface from the top of the wall. This paper presents...

  5. Creepy Critters (Snakes). [Aids to Individualize the Teaching of Science, Mini-Course Units for Grades 7, 8, and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Terrence

    This booklet, one of a series developed by the Frederick County Board of Education, Frederick, Maryland, provides an instruction module for an individualized or flexible approach to 7th, 8th, and 9th grade science teaching. Subjects and activities in this series of booklets are designed to supplement a basic curriculum or to form a total…

  6. A Tale of Two Countries: Successes and Challenges in K-12 Computer Science Education in Israel and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Ezer, Judith; Stephenson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article tells a story of K-12 computer science in two different countries. These two countries differ profoundly in culture, language, government and state structure, and in their education systems. Despite these differences, however, they share the pursuit of excellence and high standards in K-12 education. In Israel, curriculum is…

  7. But science is international! Finding time and space to encourage intercultural learning in a content-driven physiology unit

    OpenAIRE

    Etherington, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Internationalization of the curriculum is central to the strategic direction of many modern universities and has widespread benefits for student learning. However, these clear aspirations for internationalization of the curriculum have not been widely translated into more internationalized course content and teaching methods in the classroom, particularly in scientific disciplines. This study addressed one major challenge to promoting intercultural competence among undergraduate science stude...

  8. Coastline Development. [Aids to Individualize the Teaching of Science, Mini-Course Units for Grades 7, 8, and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Nelson S.

    This booklet, one of a series developed by the Frederick County Board of Education, Frederick, Maryland, provides an instruction module for an individualized or flexible approach to 7th, 8th, and 9th grade science teaching. Subjects and activities in this series of booklets are designed to supplement a basic curriculum or to form a total…

  9. Implementing a Context-Based Environmental Science Unit in the Middle Years: Teaching and Learning at the Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Ginns, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Engaging middle school students in science continues to be a challenge in Australian schools. One initiative that has been tried in the senior years but is a more recent development in the middle years is the context-based approach. In this ethnographic study, we researched the teaching and learning transactions that occurred in one ninth grade…

  10. A Tale of Two Countries: Successes and Challenges in K-12 Computer Science Education in Israel and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Ezer, Judith; Stephenson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article tells a story of K-12 computer science in two different countries. These two countries differ profoundly in culture, language, government and state structure, and in their education systems. Despite these differences, however, they share the pursuit of excellence and high standards in K-12 education. In Israel, curriculum is…

  11. Representation and Analysis of Chemistry Core Ideas in Science Education Standards between China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yanlan; Bi, Hualin

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry core ideas play an important role in students' chemistry learning. On the basis of the representations of chemistry core ideas about "substances" and "processes" in the Chinese Chemistry Curriculum Standards (CCCS) and the U.S. Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), we conduct a critical comparison of chemistry…

  12. Exploring the Anxiety State of the Science Majoring International Graduate Students with Conditional Acceptance in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan

    2017-01-01

    As the conditionally accepted students enroll in the graduate courses, not having met the English proficiency requirement in their program yet creates a vulnerable state of mind for them. This phenomenological study explores the anxiety state of the conditionally admitted international students at a US higher institution. Six science and…

  13. Implementing a Context-Based Environmental Science Unit in the Middle Years: Teaching and Learning at the Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Ginns, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Engaging middle school students in science continues to be a challenge in Australian schools. One initiative that has been tried in the senior years but is a more recent development in the middle years is the context-based approach. In this ethnographic study, we researched the teaching and learning transactions that occurred in one ninth grade…

  14. Human Genetics - Mendel's Laws Applied to You! [Aids to Individualize the Teaching of Science, Mini-Course Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Sharon

    This booklet, one of a series developed by the Frederick County Board of Education, Frederick, Maryland, provides an instruction module for an individualized or flexible approach to secondary science teaching. Subjects and activities in this series of booklets are designed to supplement a basic curriculum or to form a total curriculum, and relate…

  15. LWIR passive perception system for stealthy unmanned ground vehicle night operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daren; Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Nash, Jeremy; Ahuja, Gaurav; Matthies, Larry

    2016-05-01

    Resupplying forward-deployed units in rugged terrain in the presence of hostile forces creates a high threat to manned air and ground vehicles. An autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) capable of navigating stealthily at night in off-road and on-road terrain could significantly increase the safety and success rate of such resupply missions for warfighters. Passive night-time perception of terrain and obstacle features is a vital requirement for such missions. As part of the ONR 30 Autonomy Team, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a passive, low-cost night-time perception system under the ONR Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Applied Research program. Using a stereo pair of forward looking LWIR uncooled microbolometer cameras, the perception system generates disparity maps using a local window-based stereo correlator to achieve real-time performance while maintaining low power consumption. To overcome the lower signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution of LWIR thermal imaging technologies, a series of pre-filters were applied to the input images to increase the image contrast and stereo correlator enhancements were applied to increase the disparity density. To overcome false positives generated by mixed pixels, noisy disparities from repeated textures, and uncertainty in far range measurements, a series of consistency, multi-resolution, and temporal based post-filters were employed to improve the fidelity of the output range measurements. The stereo processing leverages multi-core processors and runs under the Robot Operating System (ROS). The night-time passive perception system was tested and evaluated on fully autonomous testbed ground vehicles at SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) and Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California. This paper describes the challenges, techniques, and experimental results of developing a passive, low-cost perception system for night-time autonomous navigation.

  16. Microbial evaluation of dental units waterlines at the department of operative dentistry, Tehran university of medical sciences in the year 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memarian M.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: According to infection possibility in high risk patients, assessment of microbial contamination in water sources utilized at medico-dental units has become a recent concern. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microbial contamination in dental units waterlines at the department of operative dentistry, Tehran university of medical sciences in the year 2006. "nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, six dental units in the department of operative dentistry were selected to assess microbial contamination in water sources. Samples were taken on Saturdays (the first working day in a week and in the midweek, 64 and 16 hours respectively after turning the units off. Moreover, for investigating the effect of flushing, sampling was done at 30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds after flushing and were taken from three parts of each unit including air/water syringe, turbine handpiece and also cup filler water. Samples were transported in closed sterile containers to microbiology laboratory of the school pharmacy. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. "nResults: E.coli was isolated from contaminated samples. Contamination decreased by flushing. In midweek after 90 seconds flushing, water contamination disappeared. On Saturdays 2 minutes flushing decreased contamination to lower that 200 cfu/ml (the rate recommended by ADA. Samples taken from turbine handpieces showed significantly higher contamination rate compared to air/water syringe and cup filler water (p<0.001. "nConclusion: According to the results of this study, dental units waterlines showed bacterial contamination which was eliminated after 120 seconds of flushing.

  17. Night-time atmospheric chemistry of methacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, M Sagrario; Gallego-Iniesta, M Paz; Martín, M Pilar; Tapia, Araceli; Cabañas, Beatriz

    2011-07-01

    Methacrylates are α, β-unsaturated esters that are widely used in the polymer plastics and resins production. Kinetic information of NO(3) radical reactions is especially scarce and a good understanding of all the atmospheric oxidation processes of these compounds is necessary in order to determine lifetimes in the atmosphere and to evaluate the impact of these reactions on the formation of ozone and other photooxidants. The experiments have been carried out using the relative technique in a static Teflon reactor at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (N(2) as bath gas) using gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detection (FID) as detection system. Products were analyzed using solid phase microextraction (SPME)-GC-mass spectrometry (MS) technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) using air as bath gas. The following rate coefficients were obtained (in cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): methyl methacrylate + NO(3) = (3.55 ± 0.62) × 10(-15), ethyl methacrylate + NO(3) = (5.42 ± 1.90) × 10(-15), butyl methacrylate + NO(3) = (7.87 ± 3.86) × 10(-15). Methylpyruvate, ethylpyruvate, and butylpyruvate/butanol were identified as main degradation products respectively in the GC-MS analysis. Nitrates compounds were also identified in the FTIR study. The reactivity increases with the substitution and with the chain of the alkyl group in -C(O)OR. An electrophilic addition mechanism is proposed as dominant degradation process. Estimations of the atmospheric lifetimes clearly indicate that the dominant atmospheric loss process for methacrylate esters is their daytime reaction with the hydroxyl radical. NO(3) and ozone are the main oxidants at night time. A detailed products analysis including quantification could elucidate the mechanism for butanol generation for butyl methacrylate reaction.

  18. Xerostomia: a day and night difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkema, Tim; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P J; Braam, Pètra M; Roesink, Judith M; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Terhaard, Chris H J

    2012-08-01

    To compare patient-reported xerostomia during daytime and during nighttime with objectively measured parotid and submandibular gland function in a cohort of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with RT. A cohort of 138 HNC patients underwent objective measurements of parotid (PF) and submandibular (SMF) gland function and completed a xerostomia questionnaire (XQ) before RT, at 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after RT. No attempt was made to spare the submandibular gland(s). The XQ contained specific questions concerning the sensation of dry mouth during day- (XD) and nighttime (XN), scored on a 5-point Likert scale. Patients with no or mild (grade 1-3) xerostomia and patients with more severe (grade 4-5) complaints were grouped together. Before RT, no association existed between dry mouth complaints and PF or SMF. At 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after RT; 37%, 51% and 36% had grade 4-5 XD and 65%, 64% and 56% had grade 4-5 XN, respectively. Patients with grade 4-5 XD and XN had significantly worse SMF at all time points after RT compared to patients with grade 1-3 XD and XN, while PF was significantly worse only at 6 weeks after RT. In multivariate analyses, SMF was consistently the most important factor related to XN after treatment. PF significantly influenced XD at 6 weeks and 1 year after RT. Differentiating between complaints during day- and nighttime in xerostomia research is necessary. Dry mouth at night is a frequent problem after (parotid-sparing) RT for HNC and is explained by submandibular gland dysfunction. Sparing of the contralateral submandibular gland, in addition to parotid gland sparing, may result in improved patient-reported xerostomia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Design and Environmental Verification of Chang'E-3 Moon-night Survival Device for APXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. Y.; Wu, J.; Hu, Y. M.; Chang, J.; Gong, Y. Z.; Cai, M. S.; Wang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Y.; Cui, X. Z.; Wang, J. Y.

    2015-09-01

    The Active Particle X-ray Spectrum (APXS) is one of the 4 scientific payloads of Chang'E-3 (CE-3) Lunar Rover, of which the scientific object is to identify the elements of lunar soil and rock samples. In this paper, the moon-night temperature of the moon surface will be described, and due to the cold environment the APXS will undergo after its landing. Thus, a specialized instrument which is named the moon-night survival device using the Radioisotope Heat Unit (RHU) as its heater source is designed to ensure APXS storage temperature requirements with limited sources on the satellite. In the end, a series of environmental tests are performed, and the installation of RHU on the launch tower as well as the status of the APXS working on orbit is presented since its launching in 2013.

  20. Design and Experimental Verification of Chang'E-3 Moon-night Survival Device for APXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng-yi, Chen; Jian, Wu; Yi-ming, Hu; Jin, Chang; Yi-zhong, Gong; Ming-sheng, Cai; Huan-yu, Wang; Jia-yu, Zhang; Xing-zhu, Cui; Jin-zhou, Wang

    2016-07-01

    The Active Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the 4 scientific payloads of Chang'E-3 (CE-3) Lunar Rover, of which the scientific object is to identify the elements of lunar soil and rock samples by a carried radioactive source to trigger and detect the characteristic X-ray from them. According to the extreme temperature environment of the APXS and under the restriction of limited resources, this paper presents the design and analysis of the moon-night survival device RHU (radioisotope heating unit) for the APXS, and describes the corresponding environmental tests on its structure dynamics and moon-night survival. Finally, its reinstallation on the launch tower and the preliminary result of its on-orbit operation are introduced.

  1. National states and international science: A comparative history of international science congresses in Hitler's Germany, Stalin's Russia, and cold war United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doel, Ronald E; Hoffmann, Dieter; Krementsov, Nikolai

    2005-01-01

    Prior studies of modern scientific internationalism have been written primarily from the point of view of scientists, with little regard to the influence of the state. This study examines the state's role in international scientific relations. States sometimes encouraged scientific internationalism; in the mid-twentieth century, they often sought to restrict it. The present study examines state involvement in international scientific congresses, the primary intersection between the national and international dimensions of scientists' activities. Here we examine three comparative instances in which such restrictions affected scientific internationalism: an attempt to bring an international aerodynamics congress to Nazi Germany in the late 1930s, unsuccessful efforts by Soviet geneticists to host the Seventh International Genetics Congress in Moscow in 1937, and efforts by U.S. scientists to host international meetings in 1950s cold war America. These case studies challenge the classical ideology of scientific internationalism, wherein participation by a nation in a scientist's fame spares the scientist conflict between advancing his science and advancing the interests of his nation. In the cases we consider, scientists found it difficult to simultaneously support scientific universalism and elitist practices. Interest in these congresses reached the top levels of the state, and access to patronage beyond state control helped determine their outcomes.

  2. East Meets West: Rome. Grade 6 Model Lesson for Unit V. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    This unit for sixth-grade students provides a fuller understanding of Julius Caesar's significance. Before students delve into the sample topic, they need an understanding of Roman values, lore, republican ideals, and structure of early Roman history. The first few activities in this lesson are to be taught prior to beginning the actual study of…

  3. East Meets West: Rome. Grade 6 Model Lesson for Unit V. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    This unit for sixth-grade students provides a fuller understanding of Julius Caesar's significance. Before students delve into the sample topic, they need an understanding of Roman values, lore, republican ideals, and structure of early Roman history. The first few activities in this lesson are to be taught prior to beginning the actual study of…

  4. Idea-Centered Laboratory Science (I-CLS), [Unit] C, How a Scientist Expects His World To Behave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deventer, William C.; Duyser, Lucille

    The major ideas of this unit are: consistency and uniformity, cause and effect, and parsimony. Laboratory experiences consist of investigations into: projecting expectations, moon and stars, the relationships among different kinds of change (daily, monthly, annual temperature changes), force and motion, chemical reactions, superstitions, origin of…

  5. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: DEVELOPMENT OF A PHOTOTHERMAL DETOXIFICATION UNIT - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING GROUP - UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The University of Dayton Research Institute has developed a novel photochemical process embodied in a device called a Photothermal Detoxification Unit (PDU) which offers an efficient means of destroying hazardous organic wastes. The PDU, which overcomes the problems of slow react...

  6. Romantic Agrarianism and Movement Education in the United States: Examining the Discursive Politics of Learning Disability Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, Scot

    2011-01-01

    The learning disability construct gained scientific and political legitimacy in the United States in the 1960s as an explanation for some forms of childhood learning difficulties. In 1975, federal law incorporated learning disability into the categorical system of special education. The historical and scientific roots of the disorder involved a…

  7. How Can Biodiversity Be Preserved? A Curriculum Unit for Science and Social Studies, Grades 6-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, Jane; Commins, Stephen

    This unit examines questions about biodiversity and its preservation through six activities. Each activity allows students to explore a particular approach to preservation and to identify some of the challenges facing policymakers. Through the introductory activities and the six focused activities, students develop an understanding of the dynamics…

  8. The Need for Social Ethics in Interdisciplinary Environmental Science Graduate Programs: Results from a Nation-Wide Survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Troy E; Engebretson, Jesse; O'Rourke, Michael; Piso, Zach; Whyte, Kyle; Valles, Sean

    2017-04-01

    Professionals in environmental fields engage with complex problems that involve stakeholders with different values, different forms of knowledge, and contentious decisions. There is increasing recognition of the need to train graduate students in interdisciplinary environmental science programs (IESPs) in these issues, which we refer to as "social ethics." A literature review revealed topics and skills that should be included in such training, as well as potential challenges and barriers. From this review, we developed an online survey, which we administered to faculty from 81 United States colleges and universities offering IESPs (480 surveys were completed). Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that IESPs should address values in applying science to policy and management decisions. They also agreed that programs should engage students with issues related to norms of scientific practice. Agreement was slightly less strong that IESPs should train students in skills related to managing value conflicts among different stakeholders. The primary challenges to incorporating social ethics into the curriculum were related to the lack of materials and expertise for delivery, though challenges such as ethics being marginalized in relation to environmental science content were also prominent. Challenges related to students' interest in ethics were considered less problematic. Respondents believed that social ethics are most effectively delivered when incorporated into existing courses, and they preferred case studies or problem-based learning for delivery. Student competence is generally not assessed, and respondents recognized a need for both curricular materials and assessment tools.

  9. Rotating night shift work and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Devin L; Feskanich, Diane; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Schernhammer, Eva S; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2009-06-01

    Rotating night shift work disrupts circadian rhythms and is associated with coronary heart disease. The relation between rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke is unclear. The Nurses' Health Study, an ongoing cohort study of registered female nurses, assessed in 1988 the total number of years the nurses had worked rotating night shifts. The majority (69%) of stroke outcomes from 1988 to 2004 were confirmed by physician chart review. The authors used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the relation between years of rotating night shift work and ischemic stroke, adjusting for multiple vascular risk factors. Of 80,108 subjects available for analysis, 60% reported at least 1 year of rotating night shift work. There were 1,660 ischemic strokes. Rotating night shift work was associated with a 4% increased risk of ischemic stroke for every 5 years (hazard ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.01). This increase in risk was similar when limited to the 1,152 confirmed ischemic strokes (hazard ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.07; P(trend) = 0.10) and may be confined to women with a history of 15 or more years of rotating shift work. Women appear to have a modestly increased risk of stroke after extended periods of rotating night shift work.

  10. Night or darkness, which intensifies the feeling of fear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadan; Ma, Wenjuan; Kang, Qin; Qiao, Lei; Tang, Dandan; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Nighttime fear is a phenomenon in which people feel more afraid of threats at night. Despite the vast amount of psychological research on nighttime fear, previous researchers have not accurately distinguished between "night" and "darkness", both of which play important roles in nighttime fear. We collected physiological (skin conductance response and heart rate) and psychological (self-report) data simultaneously to investigate the effects of "night" and "darkness" on fearful feelings and whether these effects were moderated by the mode of stimulus delivery (i.e., visual or auditory). Specifically, two tasks were employed in which time (day vs. night), illumination (light vs. darkness) and stimulus type (fearful vs. neutral) were manipulated. Participants (n=128) were exposed to visual and auditory oddball tasks consisting of fearful and neutral stimuli. The results indicated that there were significant increases in fear responses at night, and the difference between day and night was significant for fear stimuli but not for neutral events. Furthermore, these effects were consistent over different sensory modalities (visual and auditory). The results of this study underscore the importance of the day-night cycle in fear-related information processing and suggest that further attention needs to be paid to the influence of the biological circadian rhythm on these processes. The current findings could inform a deeper understanding of anxiety and fear-related disorders, and thus, we invite future studies to illuminate the underlying neurobiological mechanisms therein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. All Sky Camera instrument for night sky monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mandat, Dusan; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Schovanek, Petr; Palatka, Miroslav; Travnicek, Petr; Prouza, Michael; Ebr, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The All Sky Camera (ASC) was developed as an universal device for a monitoring of the night sky quality and night sky background measurement. ASC system consists of an astronomical CCD camera, a fish eye lens, a control computer and associated electronics. The measurement is carried out during astronomical twilight. The analysis results are the cloud fraction (the percentage of the sky covered by clouds), night sky brightness (in mag/arcsec2) and light background in the field of view of the camera. The analysis of the cloud fraction is based on the astrometry (comparison to catalogue positions) of the observed stars.

  12. Light Pollution Awareness through Globe at Night & IYL2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2015-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) will be coordinating extensive activities to raise awareness of light pollution through running the Cosmic Light theme of the International Year of Light (IYL2015) and by partnering in particular with the popular Globe at Night program.Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) is an international campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by having people measure night-sky brightness and submit observations in real-time with smart phone or later with a computer. In 2015, Globe at Night will run for 10-nights each month, an hour after sunset til before the Moon rises. Students can use the data to monitor levels of light pollution around the world, as well as understand light pollution's effects on energy consumption, plants, wildlife, human health and our ability to enjoy a starry night sky.Since its inception in 2006, more than 115,000 measurements from 115 countries have been reported. The last 9 years of data can be explored with Globe at Night's interactive world map or with the 'map app' to view a particular area. A spreadsheet of the data is downloadable from any year. One can compare Globe at Night data with a variety of other databases to see, for example, how light pollution affects the foraging habits of bats.To encourage public participation in Globe at Night during IYL2015, each month will target an area of the world that habitually contributes during that time. Special concerns for how light pollution affects that area and solutions will be featured on the Globe at Night website (www.globeatnight.org), through its Facebook page, in its newsletter or in the 365DaysofAstronomy.org podcasts.Twice during IYL there will be a global Flash Mob event, one on Super Pi Day (March 14, 2015) and a second in mid-September, where the public will be invited to take night-sky brightness measurements en masse. In April, the International Dark-Sky Week hosted by the International Dark-Sky Association will be

  13. The Voices of Women in the Night: Veronica and Judith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Walker

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available quite often leave the radio playing all night on the bedside table; my only company in an all too empty house. It shuts out the noises of the night: the cry of the great owl in the rain-forest trees, the scurrying of possums on the roof, or the rustle of the neighbourhood carpet snake, a beautiful multi-coloured python, slithering into or out of the roof-space. I’m used to him (or her. She’s harmless —just another presence in the night.

  14. Vision with the AN/PVS-5 Night Vision Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-08

    btock ntanb~v) AN/PV’S-5 Night Vision Goggle Relative Depth Perception Stereopsis Visual Modulation Transfer Function 20. ITRACT (Cent Iaus an roer**e...U.S. Army Night Vision Laboratory, is considered an effective interim solution to allow U.S. Army aviators to conduct rotary wing operations at night...background maps using either the goggle or with the naked eye and aviation red 3illumination The NVG is powered by a 2.7 volts wafer battery. Since

  15. Evaluation of International Observe the Moon Night: Outcomes, Challenges, and Lessons Learned from Six Years of Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Wenger, M.; Joseph, E.; Jones, A. P.; Bleacher, L.; Shaner, A. J.; Day, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of large public STEM events poses many challenges including data collection of moving crowds, representative sampling, and collecting sufficient data with available resources. International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is a yearly event held around the world on a single day coordinated by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter with support from partners around the globe. Each year hundreds of events are held across the United States and in over 50 countries across the world. This distributed event poses even more challenges in its evaluation due to the fact that events vary widely in their implementation and that it is impossible for evaluators to collect data at any more than a small fraction of the events. We present findings of six years of evaluation at InOMN events that implemented varying data collection techniques, incentives, and target outcomes as the event has evolved. Through analysis of these years of data, we have found that InOMN events are hosted by a variety of public and private institutions all over the world including museums, planetaria, schools, universities, observatories, parks, and private businesses and families, over half of which have hosted events for more than one year. Telescopes are present at a majority of the events and lunar science and exploration is often highlighted. Visitors who have been surveyed or interviewed often report being regular attendees at science related events but many were new to InOMN. Many of those surveyed report that they attended with friends and family making their participation a social event. Visitors also reported an increase in knowledge and excitement to learn more about the Moon as a result of their participation in an event. Overall, InOMN events have met both organizers and facilitators' goals. We will discuss the different data collection techniques, challenges encountered and overcome, and lessons learned through this ongoing evaluation effort.

  16. ASAS Centennial paper: a century of pioneers and progress in meat science in the United States leads to new frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, D H

    2009-03-01

    Discoveries, understanding, and innovations in meat science during the last century have led to revolutionary changes in meat and poultry production, processing, marketing, and consumption. American Society of Animal Science members have made key contributions in most, if not all, categories of advancement. The first US university meat science program was begun in Minnesota in 1905. Use of mechanical refrigeration in the meatpacking industry, improved transportation and packaging, and home refrigeration provided more flexibility, variety, and consistency in meat and meat products in the early 1900s. Cooperative meat research was begun by 27 universities in 1925, with a focus on the observational characterization of carcass traits and composition, meat quality attributes, and causes of the wide variation in these variables. Scientific study of genetic, nutritional, and environmental influences on the growth, physiology, and postmortem biochemistry of muscle often used muscle-comparative investigations. Rigor mortis, cold shortening and thaw rigor, postmortem muscle metabolism, postmortem tenderization and tenderness variation, and postmortem myoglobin and lipid oxidation were studied vigorously in the 1960s and beyond, defining the biochemical bases for associated outcomes in fresh and processed products. Value-added benefits resulted from implementation of electrical stimulation, boxed beef and modified-atmosphere packaging, restructuring technologies, collagen recovery, and muscle profiling work. Isolation, purification, and definition of the primary structure and biophysical properties of the myofribillar and cytoskeletal proteins in muscle aided the understanding of contraction and postmortem changes. The role of Ca-dependent proteases in meat tenderness and muscle growth is being clarified. The chemistry of meat curing, meat emulsion formation, fermentation, and other processing methods led to new technologies, new meat products, and new benchmarks in product

  17. Informing climate change adaptation in the Northeast and Midwest United States: The role of Climate Science Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, A. M.; Morelli, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) is part of a federal network of eight Climate Science Centers created to provide scientific information and tools that managers and other parties interested in land, water, wildlife, and cultural resources can use to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. The NE CSC partners with other federal agencies, universities, and NGOs to facilitate stakeholder interaction and delivery of scientific products. For example, NE CSC researchers have partnered with the National Park Service to help managers at Acadia National Park adapt their infrastructure, operations, and ecosystems to rising seas and more extreme events. In collaboration with the tribal College of Menominee Nation and Michigan State University, the NE CSC is working with indigenous communities in Michigan and Wisconsin to co-develop knowledge of how to preserve their natural and cultural values in the face of climate change. Recently, in its largest collaborative initiative to date, the NE CSC led a cross-institutional effort to produce a comprehensive synthesis of climate change, its impacts on wildlife and their habitats, and available adaptation strategies across the entire Northeast and Midwest region; the resulting document was used by wildlife managers in 22 states to revise their Wildlife Action Plans (WAPs). Additionally, the NE CSC is working with the Wildlife Conservation Society to help inform moose conservation management. Other research efforts include hydrological modeling to inform culvert sizing under greater rainfall intensity, forest and landscape modeling to inform tree planting that mitigates the spread of invasive species, species and habitat modeling to help identify suitable locations for wildlife refugia. In addition, experimental research is being conducted to improve our understanding of how species such as brook trout are responding to climate change. Interacting with stakeholders during all phases of

  18. Barossa Night: cohesion in the British Army officer corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Contrasting the classical explanation of military group cohesion as sustained by interpersonal bonds, recent scholars have highlighted the importance of ritualized communication, training and drills in explaining effective military performance in professional armies. While this has offered a welcome addition to the cohesion literature and a novel micro-sociological method of examining cohesion, its primary evidential base has been combat groups. Indeed, despite their prominent role in directing operations over the past decade, the British Army's officer corps has received relatively little attention from sociologists during this period. No attempt has been made to explain cohesion in the officer corps. Using a similar method to recent cohesion scholars, this paper seeks to address this imbalance by undertaking a micro-sociology of one ritual in particular: 'Barossa Night' in the Royal Irish Regiment. Firstly, it draws on the work of Durkheim to examine how cohesion amongst the officer corps is created and sustained through a dense array of practises during formal social rituals. It provides evidence that the use of rituals highlights that social solidarity is central to understanding officer cohesion. Secondly, following Hockey's work on how private soldiers negotiate order, the paper shows how this solidarity in the officer corps is based on a degree of negotiated order and the need to release organizational tensions inherent in a strictly hierarchical rank structure. It highlights how the awarding of gallantry medals can threaten this negotiated order and fuel deviancy. In examining this behaviour, the paper shows that even amongst an officer class traditionally viewed as the elite upholders of organizational discipline, the negotiation of rank and hierarchy can be fluid. How deviant behaviour is later accepted and normalized by senior officers indicates that negotiated order is as important to understanding cohesion in the British Army's officer corps as it is

  19. The Citizen-Scientist as Data Collector: GLOBE at Night, Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D. L.; Henderson, S.; Meymaris, K.; Walker, C.; Pompea, S. M.; Gallagher, S.; Salisbury, D.

    2006-12-01

    GLOBE at Night is an international science event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Increased and robust understanding of our environment requires learning opportunities that take place outside of the conventional K-12 classroom and beyond the confines of the school day. This hands-on learning activity extended the traditional classroom and school day through 11 nights last March, when 18,000 citizen-scientists made over 4,500 observations from 96 countries. Utilizing the international networking capabilities of The GLOBE Program, GLOBE at Night was designed to make data collection and input user-friendly. Citizen-scientists were able to participate in this global scientific campaign by submitting their observations through an online database, allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis by participating scientists. The data collected is available online in a variety of formats for use by students, teachers and scientists worldwide to assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world. Using the online analysis tools provided by ESRI, participants were able to compare the observed data with population density and nighttime lighting datasets (DMSP Earth at Night). This comparison allowed correlations between observed data patterns and commonly used indices of population density and energy usage. This session will share our results and demonstrate how students and scientists across the globe can explore and analyze the results of this exciting campaign. We will discuss how the project team planned and executed the project in such a way that non-astronomers were able to make valid and useful contributions. We will also discuss lessons learned and best practices based on the 2006 campaign. GLOBE at Night is a collaborative effort sponsored by The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS

  20. Demographics of undergraduates studying games in the United States: a comparison of computer science students and the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Monica M.; Settle, Amber; Decker, Adrienne

    2013-06-01

    Our study gathered data to serve as a benchmark of demographics of undergraduate students in game degree programs. Due to the high number of programs that are cross-disciplinary with computer science programs or that are housed in computer science departments, the data is presented in comparison to data from computing students (where available) and the US population. Participants included students studying games at four nationally recognized postsecondary institutions. The results of the study indicate that there is no significant difference between the ratio of men to women studying in computing programs or in game degree programs, with women being severely underrepresented in both. Women, blacks, Hispanics/Latinos, and heterosexuals are underrepresented compared to the US population. Those with moderate and conservative political views and with religious affiliations are underrepresented in the game student population. Participants agree that workforce diversity is important and that their programs are adequately diverse, but only one-half of the participants indicated that diversity has been discussed in any of their courses.

  1. Efficacy of split night CPAP titration in moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Farghaly

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Split night sleep study is more commonly associated with unsuccessful CPAP titration than full night titration but successful titration could be obtained during split night titration in patients with severe AHI >36.5 event/h.

  2. Correspondence Concerning Night Fishing in Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document includes correspondence discussing fishing at night time in Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge. Letters communciate concerns from local people and the...

  3. Study on Optimization of Night Illumination in Expressway Long Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Night illumination of expressway long tunnels in China was far from drivers’ demand and caused lots of traffic accidents and electricity wasting. In order to solve this problem, reasonable night luminosity in expressway long tunnels in China was studied. Based on a visual disturbance generation mechanism, the mistakes in night illumination of Chinese expressway long tunnels were analyzed. Real road experiments were conducted and fuzzy assessments were used to establish models. The results showed that night luminosity was too high and should be controlled below 9 Lx. In the entrance segment, the luminosity should be gradually increased from 0 Lx to 9 Lx. In the middle segment, the luminosity should be remained at 9 Lx. In the exit segment, the luminosity should be gradually decreased to 0 Lx. The optimized luminosity is highly consistent with the actual demand of drivers. Traffic safety was improved and electricity consumption was reduced.

  4. European Researchers Night, Students on Shift at ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Fons Rademakers

    2010-01-01

    During European Researchers' Night, on Friday 24 September 2010, from 17:00 to 24:00, pupils from French and Swiss schools visited ALICE and took shifts in the control room, helping the ALICE physicists run the experiment.

  5. Night vision goggles resolution performance at low contrast levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjernstrom, Lars

    1993-01-01

    NVG (Night Vision Goggle) resolution performance data is usually given as measured against high contrast, black and white, targets. When NVGs are used as night vision aids for visual night flight, the scene viewed by the pilot is in most cases dominated by low contrast. Therefore, NVG performance at low contrast levels is more relevant to the piloting task than NVG resolution at high contrast levels. A set of resolution targets with different contrast levels was designed and ground tests performed at various light levels outdoors at night. The results showed a marked loss of resolution at lower contrast levels. The presentation will describe the test method, give the results and discuss how the results may be explained. A method for using the test results as the basis for correlating piloting performance to light levels will be presented.

  6. Night Area Search for Cheat Mountain Salamanders, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — On July 8, 2009 a night area search was conducted for presence of Cheat Mountain salamanders (Plethodon nettingi) on the Kelly Elkins Tract of the Refuge. A total of...

  7. Passive Cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, Heinrich; Heiselberg, Per

    Due to an overall trend towards an increasing cooling energy demand in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising concept. However, because of uncertainties in thermal comfort predictions, architects and engineers...... are still hesitant to apply passive cooling techniques. As night-time ventilation is highly dependent on climatic conditions, a method for quantifying the climatic cooling potential was developed and the impact of climate warming was investigated. Although a clear decrease was found, significant potential...... will remain, especially if night-time ventilation is applied in combination with other cooling methods. Building energy simulations showed that the performance of night-time ventilation is also affected by the heat transfer at internal room surfaces, as the cooling effect is very limited for heat transfer...

  8. The Play as Novel: Reappropriating Brecht's "Drums in the Night."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Della

    1988-01-01

    Applies Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of the novel to Bertolt Brecht's "Drums in the Night" to illuminate the play's dialogic structure and alienation value, and reappropriate its prerevolutionary dimensions for contemporary use. (MM)

  9. Ad libitum and restricted day and night sleep architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korompeli, Anna St; Muurlink, Olav; Gavala, Alexandra; Myrianthefs, Pavlos; Fildissis, Georgios; Baltopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    This study represents a first controlled comparison of restricted versus unrestricted sleep in both day and night sleep categories. A repeated measures study of a homogenous group of young women without sleep disorders (n=14) found that stage 1, 2, 3 and REM sleep, as well as sleep latency were not statistically different between day ad libitum sleep (DAL) and day interrupted (DI) sleep categories, while night interrupted (NI) and ad libitum (NAL) sleep showed strikingly different architecture.

  10. Use of weather forecasts to control night cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B. [Danish Building Research Inst., Horsholm (Denmark); Logberg, E.; Pedersen, S.; Djurtoft, R. [Birch and Krogboe Consultants and Planners, Virum (Denmark); Thiesen, J. [Vejr2 Private Weather Service of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    Night cooling can reduce the energy consumption for conditioning spaces in a building by allowing cool night air to flow as free cooling through a mechanical ventilation system or as ventilation driven by natural buoyancy. This study examined the feasibility of saving energy by having a better control strategy for night cooling in an office building. The work was based on the premise that having accurate knowledge of the weather would allow for greater control of night cooling. The enhanced control should result in both energy savings and thermal comfort. Traditional night cooling strategies create challenges in cold or moderate climates during the first hours of work because if the buildings are cooled to eliminate the cooling load of the following day, the indoor operative temperature will likely be too low to be acceptable. The solution is to provide a boost of hot air in the morning to compensate for the cool construction. The energy savings are attributed to the minimization of the boost of heated air in the morning to overcome thermal discomfort due to cold construction, and to the storage of the appropriate amount of cooling in the construction when the external loads of the following day are known. It was concluded that the use of local weather forecasts is a promising approach to control passive night cooling. Night ventilation driven by mechanical ventilation system will increase the energy use of the fans and this increase may be in the same order of magnitude as the energy savings obtained by reducing the cooling load due to efficient night cooling. It was noted that further development of the method is needed before implementation in real buildings. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  11. Researchers Night in Portugal, featuring CMS Virtual Visit

    CERN Multimedia

    Lisbon, Portugal

    2016-01-01

    Highlights from European Researchers Night in the Planetarium Calouste Gulbenkian - Ciência Viva Centre. Organised by researchers from LIP (Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas) and including CMS Virtual Visit. During that night, André David Tinoco Mendez and José Rasteiro da Silva, based at Cessy (France) - home of the CMS detector, discussed scientific challenges with audience in Lisbon.

  12. Do Wild Great Tits Avoid Exposure to Light at Night?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maaike; Ouyang, Jenny Q; van Grunsven, Roy H A; Visser, Marcel E; Spoelstra, Kamiel

    2016-01-01

    Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their nighttime light exposure by seeking dark spots within illuminated areas. This uncertainty makes it difficult to attribute effects to a direct effect of light at night, or to indirect effects, e.g., via an effect of light at night on food availability. In this study, we aim to quantify the nocturnal light exposure of wild birds in a previously dark forest-edge habitat, experimentally illuminated with three different colors of street lighting, in comparison to a dark control. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we deployed male great tits (Parus major) with a light logger measuring light intensity every five minutes over a 24h period. We found that three males from pairs breeding in brightly illuminated nest boxes close to green and red lamp posts, were not exposed to more artificial light at night than males from pairs breeding further away. This suggests, based on our limited sample size, that these males could have been avoiding light at night by choosing a roosting place with a reduced light intensity. Therefore, effects of light at night previously reported for this species in our experimental set-up might be indirect. In contrast to urban areas where light is omnipresent, bird species in non-urban areas may evade exposure to nocturnal artificial light, thereby avoiding direct consequences of light at night.

  13. Do Wild Great Tits Avoid Exposure to Light at Night?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike de Jong

    Full Text Available Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their nighttime light exposure by seeking dark spots within illuminated areas. This uncertainty makes it difficult to attribute effects to a direct effect of light at night, or to indirect effects, e.g., via an effect of light at night on food availability. In this study, we aim to quantify the nocturnal light exposure of wild birds in a previously dark forest-edge habitat, experimentally illuminated with three different colors of street lighting, in comparison to a dark control. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we deployed male great tits (Parus major with a light logger measuring light intensity every five minutes over a 24h period. We found that three males from pairs breeding in brightly illuminated nest boxes close to green and red lamp posts, were not exposed to more artificial light at night than males from pairs breeding further away. This suggests, based on our limited sample size, that these males could have been avoiding light at night by choosing a roosting place with a reduced light intensity. Therefore, effects of light at night previously reported for this species in our experimental set-up might be indirect. In contrast to urban areas where light is omnipresent, bird species in non-urban areas may evade exposure to nocturnal artificial light, thereby avoiding direct consequences of light at night.

  14. Night-time symptoms: a forgotten dimension of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agusti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep quality is often poor in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, but these night-time symptoms are frequently unnoticed by physicians and/or not reported by patients themselves. Therefore, the prevalence and clinical impact of sleep disturbances and night-time symptoms in COPD is not well understood and has not been a clinical focus to date. To address this gap, an expert panel meeting was convened in Barcelona, Spain, in March 2011 to discuss the aetiology, evolution, burden, long-term clinical consequences and optimal management of night-time symptoms in COPD. The term “night-time symptoms” in COPD has not been distinctly defined in an objective sense but epidemiological data suggests that the prevalence of nocturnal symptoms and symptomatic sleep disturbance may exceed 75% in patients with COPD. The panel concluded that night-time symptoms in COPD are prevalent and bothersome; that their cause(s are multiple and include demographic factors, such as age and obesity, pharmacotherapy, disease-specific symptoms and the presence of comorbid sleep disorders, and other medical conditions; and that potential long-term consequences can include lung function changes, increased exacerbation frequency, emergence or worsening of cardiovascular disease, cognitive effects, depression, impaired quality of life and increased mortality. To date, few interventional studies have investigated them, but emerging data suggest that bronchodilator therapy can improve them if deployed appropriately. In summary, night-time symptoms in COPD warrant further clinical investigation with validated tools.

  15. Night Sky Brightness at San Pedro Martir Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Richer, M. G.; Colorado, E.; Herrera, J.; Córdova, A.; Ceseña, U.; Ávila, F.

    2017-03-01

    We present optical UBVRI zenith night sky brightness measurements collected on 18 nights during 2013 to 2016 and SQM measurements obtained daily over 20 months during 2014 to 2016 at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional on the Sierra San Pedro Mártir (OAN-SPM) in México. The UBVRI data is based upon CCD images obtained with the 0.84 m and 2.12 m telescopes, while the SQM data is obtained with a high-sensitivity, low-cost photometer. The typical moonless night sky brightness at zenith averaged over the whole period is U = 22.68, B = 23.10, V = 21.84, R = 21.04, I = 19.36, and SQM = 21.88 {mag} {{arcsec}}-2, once corrected for zodiacal light. We find no seasonal variation of the night sky brightness measured with the SQM. The typical night sky brightness values found at OAN-SPM are similar to those reported for other astronomical dark sites at a similar phase of the solar cycle. We find a trend of decreasing night sky brightness with decreasing solar activity during period of the observations. This trend implies that the sky has become darker by Δ U = 0.7, Δ B = 0.5, Δ V = 0.3, Δ R=0.5 mag arcsec‑2 since early 2014 due to the present solar cycle.

  16. Coupling of Thermal Mass with Night Ventilation in Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endurthy, Akhilesh Reddy

    Passive cooling designs & technologies offer great promise to lower energy use in buildings. Though the working principles of these designs and technologies are well understood, simplified tools to quantitatively evaluate their performance are lacking. Cooling by night ventilation, which is the topic of this research, is one of the well known passive cooling technologies. The building's thermal mass can be cooled at night by ventilating the inside of the space with the relatively lower outdoor air temperatures, thereby maintaining lower indoor temperatures during the warmer daytime period. Numerous studies, both experimental and theoretical, have been performed and have shown the effectiveness of the method to significantly reduce air conditioning loads or improve comfort levels in those climates where the night time ambient air temperature drops below that of the indoor air. The impact of widespread adoption of night ventilation cooling can be substantial, given the large fraction of energy consumed by air conditioning of buildings (about 12-13% of the total electricity use in U.S. buildings). Night ventilation is relatively easy to implement with minimal design changes to existing buildings. Contemporary mathematical models to evaluate the performance of night ventilation are embedded in detailed whole building simulation tools which require a certain amount of expertise and is a time consuming approach.

  17. Night sky brightness at San Pedro Martir Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Plauchu-Frayn, I; Colorado, E; Herrera, J; Cordova, A; Cesena, U; Avila, F

    2016-01-01

    We present optical UBVRI zenith night sky brightness measurements collected on eighteen nights during 2013--2016 and SQM measurements obtained daily over twenty months during 2014--2016 at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional on the Sierra San Pedro Martir (OAN-SPM) in Mexico. The UBVRI data is based upon CCD images obtained with the 0.84m and 2.12m telescopes, while the SQM data is obtained with a high-sensitivity, low-cost photometer. The typical moonless night sky brightness at zenith averaged over the whole period is U = 22.68, B = 23.10, V = 21.84, R = 21.04, I = 19.36, and SQM = 21.88 mag/square arcsec, once corrected for zodiacal light. We find no seasonal variation of the night sky brightness measured with the SQM. The typical night sky brightness values found at OAN-SPM are similar to those reported for other astronomical dark sites at a similar phase of the solar cycle. We find a trend of decreasing night sky brightness with decreasing solar activity during period of the observations. This trend im...

  18. An opportunity and an imperative: Chapter 11 in United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Randall G.; Page, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Along the nearly 3,200 kilometers (almost 2,000 miles) of the United States–Mexican border, we are witnessing the expression of the challenges of the 21st century. The Borderlands have become a microcosm for the entire United States and Mexico; the issues faced in that region are felt throughout both nations—water availability and quality, ecosystem health, natural resource needs, safety from natural hazards, and human socioeconomic well-being. If these issues were not challenging enough, we now recognize that the difficulties of addressing them are exacerbated by the onset of climate change, and as we come to better understand the complexities of the components of these challenge themes, we discover that each part is inextricably intertwined with other overarching issues. Further, because we are a creative and progressive society, we all seek to understand and appreciate the natural environments associated with the Borderlands while at the same time benefitting from the region’s many social and economic values. It is little wonder that we as a society find it increasingly difficult to ask the right questions, much less find suitable answers to the questions we do ask. For the many scientists who have worked in the Borderlands and contributed to the preceding chapters, this circular is a way to describe to the two nations of the region the capabilities the U.S. Geological Survey can provide to assist in that quest for knowledge and understanding in preparation for the future.

  19. Effect of carbohydrates and night temperature on night respiration in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraudeau, Sébastien; Lafarge, Tanguy; Roques, Sandrine; Quiñones, Cherryl O; Clement-Vidal, Anne; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Van Rie, Jeroen; Fabre, Denis; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Global warming causes night temperature (NT) to increase faster than day temperature in the tropics. According to crop growth models, respiration incurs a loss of 40-60% of photosynthate. The thermal sensitivity of night respiration (R(n)) will thus reduce biomass. Instantaneous and acclimated effects of NT on R(n) of leaves and seedlings of two rice cultivars having a variable level of carbohydrates, induced by exposure to different light intensity on the previous day, were investigated. Experiments were conducted in a greenhouse and growth chambers, with R(n) measured on the youngest fully expanded leaves or whole seedlings. Dry weight-based R(n) was 2.6-fold greater for seedlings than for leaves. Leaf R(n) was linearly related to starch (positive intercept) and soluble sugar concentration (zero intercept). Increased NT caused higher R(n) at a given carbohydrate concentration. The change of R(n) at NT increasing from 21 °C to 31 °C was 2.4-fold for the instantaneous response but 1.2- to 1.7-fold after acclimation. The maintenance component of R(n) (R(m)'), estimated by assimilate starvation, averaged 28% in seedlings and 34% in leaves, with no significant thermal effect on this ratio. The acclimated effect of increased NT on R(m)' across experiments was 1.5-fold for a 10 °C increase in NT. No cultivar differences were observed in R(n) or R(m)' responses. The results suggest that the commonly used Q10=2 rule overestimates thermal response of respiration, and R(n) largely depends on assimilate resources.

  20. ESO unveils an amazing, interactive, 360-degree panoramic view of the entire night sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The first of three images of ESO's GigaGalaxy Zoom project - a new magnificent 800-million-pixel panorama of the entire sky as seen from ESO's observing sites in Chile - has just been released online. The project allows stargazers to explore and experience the Universe as it is seen with the unaided eye from the darkest and best viewing locations in the world. This 360-degree panoramic image, covering the entire celestial sphere, reveals the cosmic landscape that surrounds our tiny blue planet. This gorgeous starscape serves as the first of three extremely high-resolution images featured in the GigaGalaxy Zoom project, launched by ESO within the framework of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009). GigaGalaxy Zoom features a web tool that allows users to take a breathtaking dive into our Milky Way. With this tool users can learn more about many different and exciting objects in the image, such as multicoloured nebulae and exploding stars, just by clicking on them. In this way, the project seeks to link the sky we can all see with the deep, "hidden" cosmos that astronomers study on a daily basis. The wonderful quality of the images is a testament to the splendour of the night sky at ESO's sites in Chile, which are the most productive astronomical observatories in the world. The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, which we see edge-on from our perspective on Earth, cuts a luminous swath across the image. The projection used in GigaGalaxy Zoom place the viewer in front of our Galaxy with the Galactic Plane running horizontally through the image - almost as if we were looking at the Milky Way from the outside. From this vantage point, the general components of our spiral galaxy come clearly into view, including its disc, marbled with both dark and glowing nebulae, which harbours bright, young stars, as well as the Galaxy's central bulge and its satellite galaxies. The painstaking production of this image came about as a collaboration between ESO, the renowned

  1. Day/night ANVIS/HUD-24 (day HUD) flight test and pilot evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yona, Zvi; Weiser, Ben; Hamburger, Oded

    2004-09-01

    The Day/Night ANVIS/HUD-24 gives pilots the ultimate head-out flight solution: 24-hour operational capability from a single integrated system. The basic integrated system combines the standard Night Vision Goggle (NVG) image with vital aircraft flight and navigation information, currently operational on over 4500 helicopters worldwide. Introducing the new Day HUD add-on module the same flight information is displayed for day use. The Day Head Up Display (HUD) is an add-on, complimentary to the basic night ANVIS/HUD system (AN/AVS-7). A lightweight optical module enhancing the day flight operation is designed to allow utility and reconnaissance helicopter day-mission operation by providing complete daytime head-out flight information. This add-on unit enhances flight safety, maximizes tactical survivability, and increases situational awareness during critical landing and takeoff phases. The Day HUD offers a unique 25° field-of-view, monocular, see-through flight information display. It mounts directly to the standard NVG mounting, incorporating a state of the art AMLCD flat panel display, high brightness solid-state backlight and compact optics resulting in a high contrast, high visibility display. The Day HUD test and evaluation program included extensive man-machine interface tests and numerous flight test aircraft in more than six separate countries. This paper will also address flight training, customer acceptance and expand on these findings and observations.

  2. Mathematics beliefs and achievement of a national sample of Native American students: results from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 United States assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, J Daniel

    2009-04-01

    Recent mathematics assessment findings indicate that Native American students tend to score below students of the ethnic majority. Findings suggest that students' beliefs about mathematics are significantly related to achievement outcomes. This study examined relations between self-beliefs and mathematics achievement for a national sample of 130 Grade 8 Native American students from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 United States sample of (M age = 14.2 yr., SD = 0.5). Multiple regression indicated several significant relations of mathematics beliefs with achievement and accounted for 26.7% of the variance in test scores. Students who earned high test scores tended to hold more positive beliefs about their ability to learn mathematics quickly, while students who earned low scores expressed negative beliefs about their ability to learn new mathematics topics.

  3. Interfacing of science, medicine and law: The stem cell patent controversy in the United States and the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya eDavey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The patent eligibility of stem cells – particularly those derived from human embryos – has long been under debate in both the scientific and legal communities. On the basis of moral grounds, the European Patent Office (EPO has refrained from granting patents for stem cells obtained through the destruction of human embryos. On the contrary, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO has historically granted patents regarding the isolation and use of human embryonic and other stem cells. To date, these US patents remain valid despite an increasing onslaught of challenges in court. However, recent precedents established in US courts significantly narrow the scope of patent eligibility within biotechnology. This article compares the implications of recent legal changes on stem cell patent eligibility between the EU and US.

  4. Effect of auditory stimulation on traumatic coma duration in intensive care unit of Medical Sciences University of Mazandarn, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Heidari Gorji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sensory deprivation is one of the common complications of coma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a familiar voice to consciousness level in coma patients. Methods: A total of 13 patients with traumatic coma (8 ≥ Glasgow′s coma scale [GCS] admitted in ICU ward were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. The experimental group was treated twice a daily each time 15 min with a familiar recorded MP3 sound for 2 weeks. The control group received only natural voices of environment. GCS applied to evaluate patients′ level of consciousness. Finding: Findings showed that duration to reach GCS = 15 was significantly shorter in the experimental group (χ 2 = 12/96, P < 0/001. Conclusion: These findings imply that providing familiar auditory stimulation programs for coma patients in the ICU could be effective.

  5. Linking Environmental Research and Practice: Lessons From The Integration of Climate Science and Water Management in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, D. B.; Rice, J.; Woodhouse, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts to better connect scientific research with people and organizations involved in environmental decision making are receiving increased interest and attention. Some of the challenges we currently face, however—including complex questions associated with climate change—present unique challenges because of their scale and scope. Focused research on the intersections between environment and society has provided substantial insight into dynamics of large-scale environmental change and the related impacts on people, natural resources, and ecosystems, yet our ability to connect this research to real-world decision making remains limited. Addressing these complex environmental problems requires broad cooperation between scientists and those who may apply research results in decision making, but there are few templates for guiding the growing number of scientists and practitioners now engaging in this kind of cooperative work. This presentation will offer a set of heuristics for carrying out collaborative work between scientists and practitioners. These heuristics were derived from research that examined the direct experiences of water resources professionals and climate researchers who have been working to integrate science and practice.

  6. Design for learning – a case study of blended learning in a science unit [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn Gleadow

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Making material available through learning management systems is standard practice in most universities, but this is generally seen as an adjunct to the ‘real’ teaching, that takes place in face-to-face classes. Lecture attendance is poor, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to engage students, both in the material being taught and campus life. This paper describes the redevelopment of a large course in scientific practice and communication that is compulsory for all science students studying at our Melbourne and Malaysian campuses, or by distance education. Working with an educational designer, a blended learning methodology was developed, converting the environment provided by the learning management system into a teaching space, rather than a filing system. To ensure focus, topics are clustered into themes with a ‘question of the week’, a pre-class stimulus and follow up activities. The content of the course did not change, but by restructuring the delivery using educationally relevant design techniques, the content was contextualised resulting in an integrated learning experience. Students are more engaged intellectually, and lecture attendance has improved. The approach we describe here is a simple and effective approach to bringing this university’s teaching and learning into the 21st century.

  7. Design for learning – a case study of blended learning in a science unit [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn Gleadow

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Making material available through learning management systems is standard practice in most universities, but this is generally seen as an adjunct to the ‘real’ teaching, that takes place in face-to-face classes. Lecture attendance is poor, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to engage students, both in the material being taught and campus life. This paper describes the redevelopment of a large course in scientific practice and communication that is compulsory for all science students studying at our Melbourne and Malaysian campuses, or by distance education. Working with an educational designer, a blended learning methodology was developed, converting the environment provided by the learning management system into a teaching space, rather than a filing system. To ensure focus, topics are clustered into themes with a ‘question of the week’, a pre-class stimulus and follow up activities. The content of the course did not change, but by restructuring the delivery using educationally relevant design techniques, the content was contextualised resulting in an integrated learning experience. Students are more engaged intellectually, and lecture attendance has improved. The approach we describe here is a simple and effective approach to bringing this university’s teaching and learning into the 21st century.

  8. Development of an aviator's helmet-mounted night-vision goggle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gerry H.; McFarlane, Robert J.

    1990-10-01

    Helmet Mounted Systems (HMS) must be lightweight, balanced and compatible with life support and head protection assemblies. This paper discusses the design of one particular HMS, the GEC Ferranti NITE-OP/NIGHTBIRD aviator's Night Vision Goggle (NVG) developed under contracts to the Ministry of Defence for all three services in the United Kingdom (UK) for Rotary Wing and fast jet aircraft. The existing equipment constraints, safety, human factor and optical performance requirements are discussed before the design solution is presented after consideration of these material and manufacturing options.

  9. A methodological proposal to contribute to the development of research skills in science education to start the design of a didactic unit built on foundations of scientific and technological literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Velásquez Mosquera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to promote a discussion of the need to promote the training of investigative skills in students of natural sciences from a methodology structured from the design of the plan of course, including a didactic unit, based on scientific and technological literacy to. It is the result of several years of experience in teaching and research of the author in the field of the didactics of the sciences

  10. A methodological proposal to contribute to the development of research skills in science education to start the design of a didactic unit built on foundations of scientific and technological literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Felipe Velásquez Mosquera; Eduardo Augusto López

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to promote a discussion of the need to promote the training of investigative skills in students of natural sciences from a methodology structured from the design of the plan of course, including a didactic unit, based on scientific and technological literacy to. It is the result of several years of experience in teaching and research of the author in the field of the didactics of the sciences

  11. Helicopter flights with night-vision goggles: Human factors aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Night-vision goggles (NVGs) and, in particular, the advanced, helmet-mounted Aviators Night-Vision-Imaging System (ANVIS) allows helicopter pilots to perform low-level flight at night. It consists of light intensifier tubes which amplify low-intensity ambient illumination (star and moon light) and an optical system which together produce a bright image of the scene. However, these NVGs do not turn night into day, and, while they may often provide significant advantages over unaided night flight, they may also result in visual fatigue, high workload, and safety hazards. These problems reflect both system limitations and human-factors issues. A brief description of the technical characteristics of NVGs and of human night-vision capabilities is followed by a description and analysis of specific perceptual problems which occur with the use of NVGs in flight. Some of the issues addressed include: limitations imposed by a restricted field of view; problems related to binocular rivalry; the consequences of inappropriate focusing of the eye; the effects of ambient illumination levels and of various types of terrain on image quality; difficulties in distance and slope estimation; effects of dazzling; and visual fatigue and superimposed symbology. These issues are described and analyzed in terms of their possible consequences on helicopter pilot performance. The additional influence of individual differences among pilots is emphasized. Thermal imaging systems (forward looking infrared (FLIR)) are described briefly and compared to light intensifier systems (NVGs). Many of the phenomena which are described are not readily understood. More research is required to better understand the human-factors problems created by the use of NVGs and other night-vision aids, to enhance system design, and to improve training methods and simulation techniques.

  12. Investigating Visitors' and Facilitators' Experiences at International Observe the Moon Night Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Matthew; Buxner, Sanlyn; Jones, Andrea; Hsu, Brooke; Shaner, Andy; Bleacher, Lora; Day, Brian

    2014-11-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual event where people around the world are encouraged to look up at the Moon and share in the excitement of lunar science and exploration. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) leads the coordination of InOMN, with support from partner NASA mission and institution teams, including the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) and the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). In 2013, InOMN was held on October 12th and a total of 521 unique events were registered on the InOMN website from around the world. These 521 events were held in 56 different countries, 46% of which were events in the United States. The InOMN evaluation was designed to characterize the overall participation of sites and visitors, characterize the types of visitors who attended, understand visitors’ intentions for attending an InOMN event, and understand how can facilitators be better supported for future events. Data was collected from event facilitators before and after the event and from visitors at the event. The follow-up facilitator survey was designed to understand to what extent the InOMN hosts were aware of the LRO mission and more generally understand how to support InOMN events in the future. Thirty-eight visitor surveys were collected and 186 facilitators completed follow-up surveys to give us an insight into both visitors’ and facilitators’ experiences.Most of the visitors (67%) who responded to the surveys were new to InOMN and reported that they had not attended a previous InOMN event. As with the 2012 events, the findings from 2013 continue to support the findings that InOMN events are social experiences and that most visitors attend with other people. The majority of visitors attended in family groups (72%), and another 20% attended with groups of other individuals (friends or other groups) with only 7% attending by themselves. A majority of survey respondents were aware of the LRO

  13. Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) and Russian Olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) in the Western United States-A Report on the State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafroth, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Salt Cedar and Russian Olive Control Demonstration Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-320) directs the Department of the Interior to submit a report to Congress that includes an assessment of several issues surrounding these two nonnative trees, now dominant components of the vegetation along many rivers in the Western United States. This report was published in 2010 as a U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report (available online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5247). The report was produced through a collaborative effort led by the Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Geological Survey, with critical contributions from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and from university researchers. The document synthesizes the state of the science and key research needs on the following topics related to management of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) in the Western United States: their distribution and abundance (extent); the potential for water savings associated with controlling these species; considerations related to wildlife use of saltcedar and Russian olive habitat and restored habitats; methods of control and removal; possible utilization of dead biomass following control and removal; and approaches and challenges associated with site revegetation or restoration. A concluding chapter discusses possible long-term management strategies, potentially useful field-demonstration projects, and a planning process for on-the-ground projects involving removal of saltcedar and Russian olive.

  14. An exploration of the impact of family background factors on the science achievement of Afro-Caribbean and African American students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Patrice J.

    Ogbu and Simons (1998) defined voluntary immigrants as individuals who chose to migrate to the United States (U.S.). Involuntary immigrants are defined as individuals whose ancestors were brought to the U.S. by force (Obgu & Simons, 1998). There have been recent reports indicating that voluntary immigrants are outperforming involuntary immigrants (Fisher, 2005; Williams, Fleming, Jones, & Griffin, 2007). There seems to be a trend in voluntary immigrants exhibiting a higher academic achievement pattern than involuntary immigrants (Fisher, 2005; Rong & Preissle, 1998; Williams et al., 2007). However, the reason for the groups' differences in achievement has not been extensively explored. The primary objective of this research study was to explore the impact of family background on the academic achievement patterns of Afro-Caribbean and African American students in the United States. The study utilized two research designs; a causal-comparative and a correlational design. A questionnaire was distributed to a sample of eighty-seven high school students. Eighteen of the participants were Afro-Caribbean students, and sixty-seven were African American students. Chemistry test scores for the students were also provided. The results of the study indicated that Afro-Caribbean students outperformed African American students on the test of science achievement. The difference was statistically significant (t= 2.43, pparents and teachers of immigrant minority students. Additionally, the current researcher has offered several implications for future research on ethnicity, immigration pattern, parenting, and achievement.

  15. Survey of Nurses\\' Viewpoints on Causes of Medicinal Errors and Barriers to Reporting in Pediatric Units in Hospitals of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Seidi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patient safety is the principal concern of current health care delivery systems, and several recent studies initiated by the Institute of Medicine have reported a high incidence of medicinal errors. Of the approximately 44000-98000 patient deaths reported each year because of medical errors, 7000 are attributed to medicinal errors. The purpose of this study was to determine nurses' perceptions of causes of medicinal errors and barriers to reporting them in the pediatric wards of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study recruited156 nurses working in general pediatric units via the convenience sample method. A questionnaire containing four sections was used: the first section on demographic information; the second on the reasons for medicinal errors; the third on the estimation of the percentage of medicinal errors occurring in the units; and the final section on the reasons for failing to report the medicinal errors. Results: The most important medicinal errors from the nurses' viewpoint were failure to check medicinal orders (73.9% and errors in the medication administration (64%. The nurses estimated that only 45% of all the medicinal errors were reported, and they cited a lack of knowledge about unit policies and routines (59.8% and negligence to report (59.8% as the most important reasons for the failure to report the errors. Conclusion: We need to improve the accuracy of medicinal error reporting by nurses and to provide a hospital environment conducive to preventing errors from occurring.

  16. The Borderlands and climate change: Chapter 10 in United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joan; Gray, Floyd; Dubiel, Russell; Langman, Jeff; Moring, J. Bruce; Norman, Laura M.; Page, William R.; Parcher, Jean W.

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of global climate change in response to both natural forces and human activity is one of the defining issues of our times. The unprecedented observational capacity of modern earth-orbiting satellites coupled with the development of robust computational representations (models) of the Earth’s weather and climate systems afford us the opportunity to observe and investigate how these systems work now, how they have worked in the past, and how they will work in the future when forced in specific ways. In the most recent report on global climate change by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC; Solomon and others, 2007), analyses using multiple climate models support recent observations that the Earth’s climate is changing in response to a combination of natural and human-induced causes. These changes will be significant in the United States–Mexican border region, where the process of climate change affects all of the Borderlands challenge themes discussed in the preceding chapters. The dual possibilities of both significantly-changed climate and increasing variability in climate make it challenging to take full measure of the potential effects because the Borderlands already experience a high degree of interannual variability and climatological extremes.

  17. Relation Between Night Urinary Free Cortisol and Hypertension in Youth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶涛; 刘治全; 傅毅; 牟建军; 傅西汉; 高保林; 张晓红

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To study the relation between night urinary free cortisol (UFC) ex-cretion and hypertension in youth. Methods Nighturinary free cortisol excretion and blood pressure & itsrelated factor were measured in 188 young people.Results In young men with hypertension the 8 h'snight UFC excretion was significantly higher than thatin the group with normal blood pressure 21.57 ± 6.28μg/8hvs 10. 54 ± 5. 46μg/8 h (P <0.05). Inagroup of young people with positive family history ofhypertension, the night UFC excretion was much higherthan that in the group with negative family history ofhypertension. Men excrete much more night UFC thanwomen (12.73±5.85 μg/8hvs7.80±4.15 μg/8h, P < 0. 05). Conclusions There is an associationbetween hypertension and high 8h's night UFC excre-tion; furthermore, there is gender difference in nightUFC excretion.

  18. How much wrapping do babies need at night?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigfield, R E; Fleming, P J; Azaz, Y E; Howell, T E; Jacobs, D E; Nadin, P S; McCabe, R; Stewart, A J

    1993-08-01

    In a longitudinal, population based study, overnight temperature recordings were made in the bedrooms of 152 babies aged 3-18 weeks and the insulation provided by their bedclothing was assessed. Outdoor temperatures for the study nights were also available. Parents applied more insulation on colder nights with lower bedroom temperatures than on warmer nights (mean 8.5 tog at 15 degrees C minimum bedroom temperature falling to 4.0 tog at 25 degrees C). For a particular temperature they also applied 2 tog more insulation in winter than in summer. The amounts of bedclothing used in the home were compared with insulation levels predicted to achieve thermo-neutrality over a similar range of environmental temperature from heat balance studies in young infants. They corresponded closely. The average amount of bedclothing chosen for babies in Avon allows them to remain in thermoneutral conditions throughout the night. These values are proposed as broad guidelines for the thermal care of young babies at night.

  19. Promoting alertness with a short nap during a night shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallinen, M; Härmä, M; Akerstedt, T; Rosa, R; Lillqvist, O

    1998-12-01

    The use of a short (nap in improving alertness during the early morning hours in the first night shift was examined under laboratory conditions. The study contained four experimental, non-consecutive night shifts with a nap of either 50 or 30 min at 01.00 or 04.00 hours. An experimental night shift without a nap served as a control condition. Each experimental shift was followed by daytime sleep. Fourteen experienced male shift workers went through all of the experimental conditions. The results showed that the naps improved the ability to respond to visual signals during the second half of the night shift. Physiological sleepiness was alleviated by the early naps, as measured 50 min after awakening, but not at the end of the shift. Subjective sleepiness was somewhat decreased by the naps. The naps produced sleep inertia which lasted for about 10-15 min. Daytime sleep was somewhat impaired by the 50 min naps. The study shows that a nap shorter than 1 h is able to improve alertness to a certain extent during the first night shift.

  20. New device for monitoring the colors of the night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Henk

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of LED lighting in the outdoor environment may increase the amount of blue light in the night sky color spectrum. This can cause more light pollution due to Rayleigh scattering of the shorter wavelengths. Blue light may also have an impact on circadian rhythm of humans due to the suppression of melatonin. At present no long-term data sets of the color spectrum of the night sky are available. In order to facilitate the monitoring of levels and variations in the night sky spectrum, a low cost multi-filter instrument has been developed. Design considerations are described as well as the choice of suitable filters, which are critical - especially in the green wavelength band from 500 to 600 nm. Filters from the optical industry were chosen for this band because available astronomical filters exclude some or all of the low and high-pressure sodium lines from lamps, which are important in light pollution research. Correction factors are calculated to correct for the detector response and filter transmissions. Results at a suburban monitoring station showed that the light levels between 500 and 600 nm are dominant during clear and cloudy skies. The relative contribution of blue light increases with a clear moonless night sky. The change in color spectrum of the night sky under moonlit skies is more complex and is still under study.

  1. ASAS Centennial Paper: Impact of animal science research on United States goat production and predictions for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlu, T; Dawson, L J; Gipson, T A; Hart, S P; Merkel, R C; Puchala, R; Wang, Z; Zeng, S; Goetsch, A L

    2009-01-01

    Goat research in the United States has increased but at a rate less than that in production. Research on goat meat includes nutritional quality, packaging, color, sensory characteristics, and preslaughter management. Goat skins have value for leather, but quality of goat leather has not been extensively studied. Research in the production, quality, antibiotic residues, and sensory characteristics of goat milk and its products has aided development of the US dairy goat industry. Limited progress has been made in genetic improvement of milk or meat production. There is need to explore applications of genomics and proteomics and improve consistency in texture and functionality of goat cheeses. New goat meat and milk products are needed to increase demand and meet the diverse tastes of the American public. Despite research progress in control of mohair and cashmere growth, erratic prices and sale of raw materials have contributed to further declines in US production. Innovative and cooperative ventures are needed for profit sharing up to the consumer level. Internal parasites pose the greatest challenge to goat production in humid areas largely because of anthelmintic resistance. Study of alternative controls is required, including immunity enhancement via nutrition, vaccination, pasture management such as co-grazing with cattle, and genetic resistance. Similarly, the importance of health management is increasing related in part to a lack of effective vaccines for many diseases. Nutrition research should address requirements for vitamins and minerals, efficiencies of protein utilization, adjusting energy requirements for nutritional plane, acclimatization, and grazing conditions, feed intake prediction, and management practices for rapid-growth production systems. Moreover, efficient technology transfer methods are needed to disseminate current knowledge and that gained in future research.

  2. An Exploratory Study of the Relationship between Night Eating Syndrome and Depression among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; DeBate, Rita DiGioacchino

    2010-01-01

    Night eating syndrome criteria include skipping breakfast, night eating, and sleep difficulties. It is associated with mood disturbances, particularly depression, and may contribute to later obesity development. Most research on night eating syndrome has focused on obese persons seeking weight loss treatment, and little is known about night eating…

  3. At the heart of CERN for one night

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Some 200 young people, mostly from neighbouring Switzerland or France – but also from Italy, Great Britain and Poland – took part in Researchers Night on Friday, 23 September. Interviewed by the Bulletin after they had returned from the control rooms of the LHC and its experiments, the pupils were full of enthusiasm following, by all accounts, an unforgettable evening.   Participants of the 2011 Researchers Night enjoy their visit to CMS. The second edition of CERN Researchers Night was a great success, with international participants as well as a substantial local contingent. Some 200 young people aged 13 to 18 registered on the event’s website and spent two hours in one of the control rooms of the LHC machine and its experiments. Laëtitia Pedroso, a member of the Communication Group who participated in the organisation of this event, noted with satisfaction: “Most of the pupils came from neighbouring France and Switzerland, but we also welcom...

  4. Does dental biofilm accumulation differ between night and day?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Nyvad, Bente

    Objective: The initial microbial colonization of dental surfaces has been studied thoroughly by classical ultrastructural and microbiological studies and further analysed by fluorescent methods. Most of these studies, however, do not differentiate between biofilms formed during night and day....... The purpose of the study was to perform a quantitative and qualitative analysis of in situ dental biofilms collected during night and day, respectively. We hypothesised that there is a circadian rhythm in the accumulation of bacteria during initial biofilm formation. Methods: Biofilms were collected....... The qualitative analysis confirmed this difference within all individuals but with large inter-individual variation in the degree of microbial coverage and bacterial composition. Conclusions: The study provides firm evidence that initial biofilm formation decreases during night. Low biofilm accumulation during...

  5. Cooling of the Building Structure by Night-time Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai

    , architects and engineers are still hesitant to apply passive cooling techniques. The basic concept of night-time ventilation involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink during the occupancy period. As this requires a sufficiently high temperature difference between...... a building energy simulation program (HELIOS), and the effect of different parameters such as building construction, heat gains, air change rates, heat transfer coefficients and climatic conditions on the number of overheating degree hours (operative room temperature >26 °C) was evaluated. Besides climatic...... air flow rates and the possibility of a cold air jet flowing along the ceiling, but the magnitude of these effects is hard to predict. Heat transfer during night-time ventilation in case of mixing and displacement ventilation has been investigated in a full scale test room. The performance of night...

  6. Evaluation of visual acuity with Gen 3 night vision goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Arthur; Kaiser, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Using laboratory simulations, visual performance was measured at luminance and night vision imaging system (NVIS) radiance levels typically encountered in the natural nocturnal environment. Comparisons were made between visual performance with unaided vision and that observed with subjects using image intensification. An Amplified Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS6) binocular image intensifier was used. Light levels available in the experiments (using video display technology and filters) were matched to those of reflecting objects illuminated by representative night-sky conditions (e.g., full moon, starlight). Results show that as expected, the precipitous decline in foveal acuity experienced with decreasing mesopic luminance levels is effectively shifted to much lower light levels by use of an image intensification system. The benefits of intensification are most pronounced foveally, but still observable at 20 deg eccentricity. Binocularity provides a small improvement in visual acuity under both intensified and unintensified conditions.

  7. Low Cost Night Vision System for Intruder Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Liang S.; Yusoff, Wan Azhar Wan; R, Dhinesh; Sak, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    The growth in production of Android devices has resulted in greater functionalities as well as lower costs. This has made previously more expensive systems such as night vision affordable for more businesses and end users. We designed and implemented robust and low cost night vision systems based on red-green-blue (RGB) colour histogram for a static camera as well as a camera on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), using OpenCV library on Intel compatible notebook computers, running Ubuntu Linux operating system, with less than 8GB of RAM. They were tested against human intruders under low light conditions (indoor, outdoor, night time) and were shown to have successfully detected the intruders.

  8. Arabian sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) prefer the hottest nights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D M

    1994-04-01

    A vehicle-mounted net was used to collect hourly samples of sandflies on 15 nights during June in northern Oman. Every half hour, the temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity and light intensity were measured (there was no cloud or rainfall during this period). The sandflies caught were mainly Phlebotomus alexandri and Sergentomyia clydei. Their circadian activity increased rapidly after sunset (18.50 hours). The high level of activity was fairly constant during 9h of darkness until dawn, when it decreased rapidly. A few flies were still active at 07.00 hours, 1.5h after sunrise. A multiple regression showed that the main factor affecting sandfly activity was light intensity. When this factor was removed, by considering only the 135 catches collected during the 9h of darkness, the second most important factor was low relative humidity, followed by low wind velocity. Temperature was not a significant factor in the analysis, because of its strong negative correlation with humidity. However, when the effect of humidity was removed from the regression, high temperature became significant, but less important than wind. The regressions showed that, for flight activity, the optimum humidity was around 10%; the probable maximum wind velocity was 3.5 m s-1 and 11 degrees C was the probable minimum temperature. Thus, when the 4 nights with highest catches (200-260 flies/night) were compared with the 4 nights with lowest catches (50-120 flies/night), the best nights had a low humidity (10-25%) and low wind speed (temperatures (31-43 degrees C).

  9. [Substance use among night high school students in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimane, Takuya; Wada, Kiyoshi

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of tobacco use, alcohol drinking, and illicit drug use among night high school students in Japan. 247 students (180 boys and 67 girls) from 3 night high schools were asked to complete self-administered anonymous questionnaires in classrooms. The average age of the participants was 18.7 years. Overall, 76.0% of the participants reported lifetime alcohol use, and 44.0% reported drinking alcohol during the past 30 days. Of the former, 24.6% reported experiencing alcohol-induced blackouts and 18.9% reported drinking alcohol without adult supervision at the age of 13 years or younger. 58.3% of the participants reported experimenting with smoking cigarettes, 42.3% reported having smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days, and 34.8% reported smoking cigarettes daily. 43.0% of the participants who had experienced smoking cigarettes had started smoking at the age of 13 years or younger. The lifetime prevalence of any illicit drugs was 9.8% for boys and 5.2% for girls; overall, it was 8.6%. The most commonly used illicit drugs were marijuana (6.4%), inhalants (6.4%), butane gas (4.5%), and nitrites (3.2%). Although the results showed that there were no significant differences in alcohol drinking experience between night high school and general high school students, problematic drinking behavior was observed. In the case of cigarette smoking, night high school students outnumber general high school students. In previous studies in Japan, the former population showed the highest prevalence of illicit drug use. These findings provide evidence that substance use represents a problem among night high school students. Based on this evidence, health education in night high schools should include not only zero tolerance for or abstinence from substance use but also secondary and tertiary prevention approaches.

  10. Integrating Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  11. Integrating Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  12. LHCb: A New Nightly Build System for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Clemencic, M

    2013-01-01

    The nightly build system used so far by LHCb has been implemented as an extension on the system developed by CERN PH/SFT group (as presented at CHEP2010). Although this version has been working for many years, it has several limitations in terms of extensibility, management and ease of use, so that it was decided to develop a new version based on a continuous integration system. In this paper we describe a new implementation of the LHCb Nightly Build System based on the open source continuous integration system Jenkins and report on the experience on the configuration of a complex build workflow in Jenkins.

  13. Night vision of the post-LASIK myope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hansraj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Poor night vision has been reported as one of the side-effects of LASIK,  however, this area has not been widely studied.  This study therefore set out to assess and quantify the visual status of the post-LASIK patient in dim illumination as an indication of visual performance at night.  This was achieved by assessing the night vision threshold, glare vision threshold and glare recovery time.Setting: The study was carried out in Durban, Kwazulu-Natal in South Africa.Method: This study used the Night Sight Meter for assessment of the night vision thresholds, glare vision thresholds and glare  recovery times of individuals who had had LASIK at least one year before commencement of the study.  The inclusion criteria were post-surgical interval following LASIK of at least one year and willingness to participate in the study.  The exclusion criteria included previous ocular surgery other than LASIK, current ocular disease and any systemic illnesses.   One hundred subjects were selected from participating ophthalmologists’ records, using convenience sampling, at different post-operative periods that ranged from 12 to 57 months.  Other refractive findings taken included post-LASIK visual acuity measured using the Snellen Visual Acuity chart and post-LASIK refractive error, measured with the standard subjective refraction tests which included duochrome, Jackson crossed-cylinder and Humphrey’s Immediate Contrast test, which are used for comparison in this study.Results: Post-operatively, the majority of the eyes (89.2% were classified as having ‘poor’ night vision thresholds.  A similar trend was observed in the case of the glare vision thresholds as 84.7% of the eyes fell into the classification of below average.  The degree of pre-operative myopia appears to have an effect on the post-LASIK night vision and glare  thresholds.  Only glare recovery  time was not affected as 51.2% of the subjects displayed good recovery

  14. Improving night sky star image processing algorithm for star sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabmir, Mohammad Vali; Mohammadi, Seyyed Mohammad; Salahshour, Sadegh; Somayehee, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the night sky star image processing algorithm, consisting of image preprocessing, star pattern recognition, and centroiding steps, is improved. It is shown that the proposed noise reduction approach can preserve more necessary information than other frequently used approaches. It is also shown that the proposed thresholding method unlike commonly used techniques can properly perform image binarization, especially in images with uneven illumination. Moreover, the higher performance rate and lower average centroiding estimation error of near 0.045 for 400 simulated images compared to other algorithms show the high capability of the proposed night sky star image processing algorithm.

  15. Soulless Bodies in Elie Wiesel’s Night

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑莹

    2014-01-01

    Night is Elie Wiesel’s classic memoir of the Holocaust. One of its central themes is that once involved in war, a person is doomed to undergo a transformation from a human being to a soulless body. To understand this theme, we shall have to travel with Eliezer, the protagonist as well as the first person narrator, through the long nights of living in fear of hunger, terror, and violence. Hopefully, the leg of this journey would reveal how the consistent exposure to traumatic experiences can compel a person to abandon the soul as his or her emotional and spiritual homebase.

  16. Low light comparison of target visibility with night vision goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Gregory; Brulotte, Michel; Carignan, Stephan; Macuda, Todd; Jennings, Sion

    2008-04-01

    Different night vision goggle image intensification technologies were tested to compare goggle performance in low light conditions. A total of four different night vision goggles were tested in a laboratory dark room. The laboratory tests consisted of viewing Landolt acuity stimuli of different contrast levels with each set of goggles and without the goggles in full light conditions (baseline performance). The results from the laboratory testing indicated that there were significant differences in acuity between the NVGs, particularly for low contrast targets. These data suggest that NVG standards developed using high contrast targets, even in low light conditions may not provide the full story of how the NVG will perform in flight.

  17. The dual threat of urbanisation and climate change in urbanising catchments - integrated science to meet future challenges - a case study of the Thames catchment, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Hutchins, M.; McGrane, S. J.; Kjeldsen, T. R.; Rowland, C.; Hagen-Zanker, A.; Rickards, N. J.; Fidal, J.; Vesuviano, G.; Hitt, O.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid urbanisation coupled with climate change poses a significant threat of increased flooding in urban locations around the world. In the UK there is a lack of joined up science and monitoring data to support model development and management decisions required for a rapidly growing population. Here, we present the findings from a multi-disciplinary research project entitled POLLCURB involving a combination of both monitoring and modelling approaches, including participatory citizen science, to evaluate impacts of urbanisation and climate change on flooding and water quality in the Thames basin, United Kingdom. Empirical analysis of five years of monitoring data in intensely monitored sub-catchments reveals the degree to which urban land-use impacts upon hydrological and water quality response. Analysis reveals hydrological impacts do not always follow the expected urban gradient due to intra-catchment differences in hydraulic functions. Statistical detection and attribution techniques are used to assess long-term river data, highlighting strong signals of urban growth after climate variability is accounted for. Historical land-use change mapping of the Thames basin using remote sensing shows growth in urban coverage from around 13% (1980's) to 15% (2015) and was used to develop and train a cellular automata model. Projections of a business-as-usual scenario indicates future growth of 12% by 2035. Future potential changes to flooding and water quality are assessed under urbanisation and climate scenarios for the Thames region to provide comparative and cumulative analysis of how these drivers will affect existing and new urban areas within the Thames basin. Results show the relative and cumulative impacts that both urbanisation and climate change have on basin hydrology and water quality, and highlight the improvements in modelling accuracy when utilising high-resolution data. Discussion is made of results in relation to modelling, policy, mitigation options, and

  18. Patterns of paging medical interns during night calls at two teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R; Jarrett, P G; Peltekian, K M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the patterns of paging medical interns during night calls. DESIGN: Descriptive study; diaries were used to log calls between 7 pm and 7 am for 1 week in February 1991. SETTING: Two teaching hospitals in Halifax. PARTICIPANTS: All 10 interns assigned to the 15 medical units and nurses from 3 representative medical units. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number and nature of calls. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 90%. A total of 309 calls were logged by the interns and 107 by the nurses. Each intern had 17 calls on average (range 6 to 33) per 12-hour period. Of the calls 27% occurred after midnight, 25% disrupted sleeping, and 19% interrupted direct patient contact. Overall, the most common reasons for paging interns were related to prescribing of medications (42% of the calls), direct patient assessment (25%) and reporting of laboratory results (18%). According to the nurses, there were no delays in the interns' responding to the pages, and 61% of the calls led to a new physician order. CONCLUSIONS: Paging frequently interrupts interns during work and rest on night calls. Assessment of paging patterns may be useful in identifying specific interventions to reduce the number of calls so that interns will have fewer interruptions during patient encounters and more rest. The collection of data from nurses in a routine nursing audit may be useful for evaluating the communication between interns and nurses and, indirectly, for assessing interns' workload. PMID:8039084

  19. The Effectiveness of the Conceptual Change Approach, Explicit Reflective Approach, and Course Book by the Ministry of Education on the Views of the Nature of Science and Conceptual Change in Light Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cil, Emine; Cepni, Salih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of the conceptual change approach, explicit reflective approach, and the course book by the Ministry of Education on the views toward the nature of science and conceptual change in the Light unit. Three study groups were selected from several seventh grade classes. Two of the three classes,…

  20. The science case of WISH-Spec, an Integral-field unit for the WISH telescope to study the first populations of galaxies in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgarella, Denis

    2015-08-01

    WISH is a new space science mission concept whose primary goal is to study the first galaxies in the early universe. WISH will be a 1.5m telescope equipped with a 1000 arcmin2 wide-field Near-IR camera that would fly in ~2020 in order to conduct unique ultra-deep and wide-area sky surveys in the wavelength range 1-5 micron. A spectroscopic mode (Integral-Field Unit) in the same Near-IR range is also planned. The primary science goal of WISH mission is to push the high-redshift frontier beyond the epoch of reionization by utilizing its unique imaging capability and the dedicated survey strategy. Which spectral range should we select to optimize the detection of very high-redshift (i.e., z > 5) galaxies ? In the rest-frame Far-UV or in the rest-frame Far-IR? In a recent paper, Burgarella et al. (2013) showed that the Far-UV dust attenuation (AFUV) reaches the same level at z ~ 3 than at z = 0 . This suggest that the early universe would be better studied in the rest-frame Far-UV. At z > 5, this Far-UV range moves into the Near-IR (1 - 5um) which is WISH’s preferred spectral range. The baseline of WISH-Spec is a 1x1 arcmin2 Integral-Field Unit (IFU) using slicers. WISH-Spec could observe in a parallel mode which translates into spectroscopic exposure times as long as the telescope lifetime. WISH features two 100-deg2 and 1000-deg2 surveys. However, WISHSpec will allow to acquire very large samples of high-redshift and primordial galaxies by combining spectroscopic detections within total (non contiguous) 1-deg2 and 10-deg2 fields of views. Therefore, the first strong advantage of WISHSpec wrt JWST is that 10^4 - 10^5 faint emission-line galaxies in 1 deg2 and 10^3 - 10^6 bright emission-line galaxies in 10 deg2 in the redshift range 3 < z < 8 will be detected.