WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit gpu computing

  1. The Performance Improvement of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) Using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    used for its GPU computing capability during the experiment. It has Nvidia Tesla K40 GPU accelerators containing 32 GPU nodes consisting of 1024...cores. CUDA is a parallel computing platform and application programming interface (API) model that was created and designed by Nvidia to give direct...Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 1995:76:277–291, ISSN 0168-1923. 3. GPU vs. CPU? What is GPU computing? Santa Clara (CA): Nvidia Corporation; 2017

  2. GPU Computing For Particle Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Song, Kai; Muriki, Krishna; Sun, Changchun; James, Susan; Qin, Yong

    2011-01-01

    This is a feasibility study of using a modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to parallelize the accelerator particle tracking code. To demonstrate the massive parallelization features provided by GPU computing, a simplified TracyGPU program is developed for dynamic aperture calculation. Performances, issues, and challenges from introducing GPU are also discussed. General purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) bring massive parallel computing capabilities to numerical calculation. However, the unique architecture of GPU requires a comprehensive understanding of the hardware and programming model to be able to well optimize existing applications. In the field of accelerator physics, the dynamic aperture calculation of a storage ring, which is often the most time consuming part of the accelerator modeling and simulation, can benefit from GPU due to its embarrassingly parallel feature, which fits well with the GPU programming model. In this paper, we use the Tesla C2050 GPU which consists of 14 multi-processois (MP) with 32 cores on each MP, therefore a total of 448 cores, to host thousands ot threads dynamically. Thread is a logical execution unit of the program on GPU. In the GPU programming model, threads are grouped into a collection of blocks Within each block, multiple threads share the same code, and up to 48 KB of shared memory. Multiple thread blocks form a grid, which is executed as a GPU kernel. A simplified code that is a subset of Tracy++ (2) is developed to demonstrate the possibility of using GPU to speed up the dynamic aperture calculation by having each thread track a particle.

  3. GPU computing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    See, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a collection of state of the art research on GPU Computing and Application. The major part of this book is selected from the work presented at the 2013 Symposium on GPU Computing and Applications held in Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Oct 9, 2013). Three major domains of GPU application are covered in the book including (1) Engineering design and simulation; (2) Biomedical Sciences; and (3) Interactive & Digital Media. The book also addresses the fundamental issues in GPU computing with a focus on big data processing. Researchers and developers in GPU Computing and Applications will benefit from this book. Training professionals and educators can also benefit from this book to learn the possible application of GPU technology in various areas.

  4. GPU Computing Gems Emerald Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Wen-mei W

    2011-01-01

    ".the perfect companion to Programming Massively Parallel Processors by Hwu & Kirk." -Nicolas Pinto, Research Scientist at Harvard & MIT, NVIDIA Fellow 2009-2010 Graphics processing units (GPUs) can do much more than render graphics. Scientists and researchers increasingly look to GPUs to improve the efficiency and performance of computationally-intensive experiments across a range of disciplines. GPU Computing Gems: Emerald Edition brings their techniques to you, showcasing GPU-based solutions including: Black hole simulations with CUDA GPU-accelerated computation and interactive display of

  5. Distributed GPU Computing in GIScience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Yang, C.; Huang, Q.; Li, J.; Sun, M.

    2013-12-01

    Transactions on, 9(3), 378-394. 2. Li, J., Jiang, Y., Yang, C., Huang, Q., & Rice, M. (2013). Visualizing 3D/4D Environmental Data Using Many-core Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and Multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs). Computers & Geosciences, 59(9), 78-89. 3. Owens, J. D., Houston, M., Luebke, D., Green, S., Stone, J. E., & Phillips, J. C. (2008). GPU computing. Proceedings of the IEEE, 96(5), 879-899.

  6. Transportable GPU (General Processor Units) chip set technology for standard computer architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, R. E.; Denison, H. C.

    1982-11-01

    The USAFR-developed GPU Chip Set has been utilized by Tracor to implement both USAF and Navy Standard 16-Bit Airborne Computer Architectures. Both configurations are currently being delivered into DOD full-scale development programs. Leadless Hermetic Chip Carrier packaging has facilitated implementation of both architectures on single 41/2 x 5 substrates. The CMOS and CMOS/SOS implementations of the GPU Chip Set have allowed both CPU implementations to use less than 3 watts of power each. Recent efforts by Tracor for USAF have included the definition of a next-generation GPU Chip Set that will retain the application-proven architecture of the current chip set while offering the added cost advantages of transportability across ISO-CMOS and CMOS/SOS processes and across numerous semiconductor manufacturers using a newly-defined set of common design rules. The Enhanced GPU Chip Set will increase speed by an approximate factor of 3 while significantly reducing chip counts and costs of standard CPU implementations.

  7. Performance evaluation for volumetric segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions using MATLAB and computing engine in the graphical processing unit (GPU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anh H.; Park, Young W.; Ma, Kevin; Jacobs, Colin; Liu, Brent J.

    2010-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disease affecting myelin pathways in the brain. Multiple lesions in the white matter can cause paralysis and severe motor disabilities of the affected patient. To solve the issue of inconsistency and user-dependency in manual lesion measurement of MRI, we have proposed a 3-D automated lesion quantification algorithm to enable objective and efficient lesion volume tracking. The computer-aided detection (CAD) of MS, written in MATLAB, utilizes K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) method to compute the probability of lesions on a per-voxel basis. Despite the highly optimized algorithm of imaging processing that is used in CAD development, MS CAD integration and evaluation in clinical workflow is technically challenging due to the requirement of high computation rates and memory bandwidth in the recursive nature of the algorithm. In this paper, we present the development and evaluation of using a computing engine in the graphical processing unit (GPU) with MATLAB for segmentation of MS lesions. The paper investigates the utilization of a high-end GPU for parallel computing of KNN in the MATLAB environment to improve algorithm performance. The integration is accomplished using NVIDIA's CUDA developmental toolkit for MATLAB. The results of this study will validate the practicality and effectiveness of the prototype MS CAD in a clinical setting. The GPU method may allow MS CAD to rapidly integrate in an electronic patient record or any disease-centric health care system.

  8. GPU-accelerated computation of electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Acocella, Angela; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Beu, Titus; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-11-05

    Electron transfer is a fundamental process that can be studied with the help of computer simulation. The underlying quantum mechanical description renders the problem a computationally intensive application. In this study, we probe the graphics processing unit (GPU) for suitability to this type of problem. Time-critical components are identified via profiling of an existing implementation and several different variants are tested involving the GPU at increasing levels of abstraction. A publicly available library supporting basic linear algebra operations on the GPU turns out to accelerate the computation approximately 50-fold with minor dependence on actual problem size. The performance gain does not compromise numerical accuracy and is of significant value for practical purposes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Computing treewidth on the GPU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Zanden, Tom C.; Bodlaender, Hans L.

    2018-01-01

    We present a parallel algorithm for computing the treewidth of a graph on a GPU. We implement this algorithm in OpenCL, and experimentally evaluate its performance. Our algorithm is based on an O∗(2n)-time algorithm that explores the elimination orderings of the graph using a Held-Karp like dynamic

  10. Computing treewidth on the GPU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, T.C.; Bodlaender, Hans L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a parallel algorithm for computing the treewidth of a graph on a GPU. We implement this algorithm in OpenCL, and experimentally evaluate its performance. Our algorithm is based on an $O^*(2^{n})$-time algorithm that explores the elimination orderings of the graph using a Held-Karp like

  11. Application of GPU to computational multiphase fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatake, T; Kunugi, T

    2010-01-01

    The MARS (Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver) [1] is one of the surface volume tracking methods for multi-phase flows. Nowadays, the performance of GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is much higher than the CPU (Central Processing Unit). In this study, the GPU was applied to the MARS in order to accelerate the computation of multi-phase flows (GPU-MARS), and the performance of the GPU-MARS was discussed. From the performance of the interface tracking method for the analyses of one-directional advection problem, it is found that the computing time of GPU(single GTX280) was around 4 times faster than that of the CPU (Xeon 5040, 4 threads parallelized). From the performance of Poisson Solver by using the algorithm developed in this study, it is found that the performance of the GPU showed around 30 times faster than that of the CPU. Finally, it is confirmed that the GPU showed the large acceleration of the fluid flow computation (GPU-MARS) compared to the CPU. However, it is also found that the double-precision computation of the GPU must perform with very high precision.

  12. GPU-based high-performance computing for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Ziegenhein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in radiotherapy therapy demand high computation powers to solve challenging problems in a timely fashion in a clinical environment. The graphics processing unit (GPU), as an emerging high-performance computing platform, has been introduced to radiotherapy. It is particularly attractive due to its high computational power, small size, and low cost for facility deployment and maintenance. Over the past few years, GPU-based high-performance computing in radiotherapy has experienced rapid developments. A tremendous amount of study has been conducted, in which large acceleration factors compared with the conventional CPU platform have been observed. In this paper, we will first give a brief introduction to the GPU hardware structure and programming model. We will then review the current applications of GPU in major imaging-related and therapy-related problems encountered in radiotherapy. A comparison of GPU with other platforms will also be presented. (topical review)

  13. GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulations using cloud computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermain, C.L.; Rowlands, G.E.; Buhrman, R.A.; Ralph, D.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highly parallel graphics processing units (GPUs) can improve the speed of micromagnetic simulations significantly as compared to conventional computing using central processing units (CPUs). We present a strategy for performing GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulations by utilizing cost-effective GPU access offered by cloud computing services with an open-source Python-based program for running the MuMax3 micromagnetics code remotely. We analyze the scaling and cost benefits of using cloud computing for micromagnetics. - Highlights: • The benefits of cloud computing for GPU-accelerated micromagnetics are examined. • We present the MuCloud software for running simulations on cloud computing. • Simulation run times are measured to benchmark cloud computing performance. • Comparison benchmarks are analyzed between CPU and GPU based solvers.

  14. GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulations using cloud computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermain, C.L., E-mail: clj72@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Rowlands, G.E.; Buhrman, R.A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ralph, D.C. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Highly parallel graphics processing units (GPUs) can improve the speed of micromagnetic simulations significantly as compared to conventional computing using central processing units (CPUs). We present a strategy for performing GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulations by utilizing cost-effective GPU access offered by cloud computing services with an open-source Python-based program for running the MuMax3 micromagnetics code remotely. We analyze the scaling and cost benefits of using cloud computing for micromagnetics. - Highlights: • The benefits of cloud computing for GPU-accelerated micromagnetics are examined. • We present the MuCloud software for running simulations on cloud computing. • Simulation run times are measured to benchmark cloud computing performance. • Comparison benchmarks are analyzed between CPU and GPU based solvers.

  15. GPU in Physics Computation: Case Geant4 Navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Seiskari, Otto; Niemi, Tapio

    2012-01-01

    General purpose computing on graphic processing units (GPU) is a potential method of speeding up scientific computation with low cost and high energy efficiency. We experimented with the particle physics simulation toolkit Geant4 used at CERN to benchmark its geometry navigation functionality on a GPU. The goal was to find out whether Geant4 physics simulations could benefit from GPU acceleration and how difficult it is to modify Geant4 code to run in a GPU. We ported selected parts of Geant4 code to C99 & CUDA and implemented a simple gamma physics simulation utilizing this code to measure efficiency. The performance of the program was tested by running it on two different platforms: NVIDIA GeForce 470 GTX GPU and a 12-core AMD CPU system. Our conclusion was that GPUs can be a competitive alternate for multi-core computers but porting existing software in an efficient way is challenging.

  16. GPU-based cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Peter B; Walczak, Alan M; Xu, Jinhui; Corso, Jason J; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Schafer, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is growing in the clinical arena due to its ability to provide 3D information during interventions, its high diagnostic quality (sub-millimeter resolution), and its short scanning times (60 s). In many situations, the short scanning time of CBCT is followed by a time-consuming 3D reconstruction. The standard reconstruction algorithm for CBCT data is the filtered backprojection, which for a volume of size 256(3) takes up to 25 min on a standard system. Recent developments in the area of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) make it possible to have access to high-performance computing solutions at a low cost, allowing their use in many scientific problems. We have implemented an algorithm for 3D reconstruction of CBCT data using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) provided by NVIDIA (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, California), which was executed on a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280. Our implementation results in improved reconstruction times from minutes, and perhaps hours, to a matter of seconds, while also giving the clinician the ability to view 3D volumetric data at higher resolutions. We evaluated our implementation on ten clinical data sets and one phantom data set to observe if differences occur between CPU and GPU-based reconstructions. By using our approach, the computation time for 256(3) is reduced from 25 min on the CPU to 3.2 s on the GPU. The GPU reconstruction time for 512(3) volumes is 8.5 s. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Parallel Computer System for 3D Visualization Stereo on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oraiqat, Anas M.; Zori, Sergii A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes the organization of a parallel computer system based on Graphic Processors Unit (GPU) for 3D stereo image synthesis. The development is based on the modified ray tracing method developed by the authors for fast search of tracing rays intersections with scene objects. The system allows significant increase in the productivity for the 3D stereo synthesis of photorealistic quality. The generalized procedure of 3D stereo image synthesis on the Graphics Processing Unit/Graphics Processing Clusters (GPU/GPC) is proposed. The efficiency of the proposed solutions by GPU implementation is compared with single-threaded and multithreaded implementations on the CPU. The achieved average acceleration in multi-thread implementation on the test GPU and CPU is about 7.5 and 1.6 times, respectively. Studying the influence of choosing the size and configuration of the computational Compute Unified Device Archi-tecture (CUDA) network on the computational speed shows the importance of their correct selection. The obtained experimental estimations can be significantly improved by new GPUs with a large number of processing cores and multiprocessors, as well as optimized configuration of the computing CUDA network.

  18. CUDA/GPU Technology : Parallel Programming For High Performance Scientific Computing

    OpenAIRE

    YUHENDRA; KUZE, Hiroaki; JOSAPHAT, Tetuko Sri Sumantyo

    2009-01-01

    [ABSTRACT]Graphics processing units (GP Us) originally designed for computer video cards have emerged as the most powerful chip in a high-performance workstation. In the high performance computation capabilities, graphic processing units (GPU) lead to much more powerful performance than conventional CPUs by means of parallel processing. In 2007, the birth of Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) and CUDA-enabled GPUs by NVIDIA Corporation brought a revolution in the general purpose GPU a...

  19. SU-D-BRD-03: A Gateway for GPU Computing in Cancer Radiotherapy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, X; Folkerts, M [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States); Shi, F; Yan, H; Yan, Y; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Sivagnanam, S; Majumdar, A [University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has become increasingly important in radiotherapy. However, it is still difficult for general clinical researchers to access GPU codes developed by other researchers, and for developers to objectively benchmark their codes. Moreover, it is quite often to see repeated efforts spent on developing low-quality GPU codes. The goal of this project is to establish an infrastructure for testing GPU codes, cross comparing them, and facilitating code distributions in radiotherapy community. Methods: We developed a system called Gateway for GPU Computing in Cancer Radiotherapy Research (GCR2). A number of GPU codes developed by our group and other developers can be accessed via a web interface. To use the services, researchers first upload their test data or use the standard data provided by our system. Then they can select the GPU device on which the code will be executed. Our system offers all mainstream GPU hardware for code benchmarking purpose. After the code running is complete, the system automatically summarizes and displays the computing results. We also released a SDK to allow the developers to build their own algorithm implementation and submit their binary codes to the system. The submitted code is then systematically benchmarked using a variety of GPU hardware and representative data provided by our system. The developers can also compare their codes with others and generate benchmarking reports. Results: It is found that the developed system is fully functioning. Through a user-friendly web interface, researchers are able to test various GPU codes. Developers also benefit from this platform by comprehensively benchmarking their codes on various GPU platforms and representative clinical data sets. Conclusion: We have developed an open platform allowing the clinical researchers and developers to access the GPUs and GPU codes. This development will facilitate the utilization of GPU in radiation therapy field.

  20. The gputools package enables GPU computing in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Joshua; Wilson, Justin; Seligman, Mark; Athey, Brian; Watson, Stanley; Meng, Fan

    2010-01-01

    By default, the R statistical environment does not make use of parallelism. Researchers may resort to expensive solutions such as cluster hardware for large analysis tasks. Graphics processing units (GPUs) provide an inexpensive and computationally powerful alternative. Using R and the CUDA toolkit from Nvidia, we have implemented several functions commonly used in microarray gene expression analysis for GPU-equipped computers. R users can take advantage of the better performance provided by an Nvidia GPU. The package is available from CRAN, the R project's repository of packages, at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/gputools More information about our gputools R package is available at http://brainarray.mbni.med.umich.edu/brainarray/Rgpgpu

  1. Accelerating the XGBoost algorithm using GPU computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory Mitchell

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a CUDA-based implementation of a decision tree construction algorithm within the gradient boosting library XGBoost. The tree construction algorithm is executed entirely on the graphics processing unit (GPU and shows high performance with a variety of datasets and settings, including sparse input matrices. Individual boosting iterations are parallelised, combining two approaches. An interleaved approach is used for shallow trees, switching to a more conventional radix sort-based approach for larger depths. We show speedups of between 3× and 6× using a Titan X compared to a 4 core i7 CPU, and 1.2× using a Titan X compared to 2× Xeon CPUs (24 cores. We show that it is possible to process the Higgs dataset (10 million instances, 28 features entirely within GPU memory. The algorithm is made available as a plug-in within the XGBoost library and fully supports all XGBoost features including classification, regression and ranking tasks.

  2. GPU-computing in econophysics and statistical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, T.

    2011-03-01

    A recent trend in computer science and related fields is general purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPUs), which can yield impressive performance. With multiple cores connected by high memory bandwidth, today's GPUs offer resources for non-graphics parallel processing. This article provides a brief introduction into the field of GPU computing and includes examples. In particular computationally expensive analyses employed in financial market context are coded on a graphics card architecture which leads to a significant reduction of computing time. In order to demonstrate the wide range of possible applications, a standard model in statistical physics - the Ising model - is ported to a graphics card architecture as well, resulting in large speedup values.

  3. Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations Accelerated on a Hybrid Multicore CPU-GPU Computing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Koslowski, Axel; Thiel, Walter

    2012-07-10

    In this work, we demonstrate that semiempirical quantum chemical calculations can be accelerated significantly by leveraging the graphics processing unit (GPU) as a coprocessor on a hybrid multicore CPU-GPU computing platform. Semiempirical calculations using the MNDO, AM1, PM3, OM1, OM2, and OM3 model Hamiltonians were systematically profiled for three types of test systems (fullerenes, water clusters, and solvated crambin) to identify the most time-consuming sections of the code. The corresponding routines were ported to the GPU and optimized employing both existing library functions and a GPU kernel that carries out a sequence of noniterative Jacobi transformations during pseudodiagonalization. The overall computation times for single-point energy calculations and geometry optimizations of large molecules were reduced by one order of magnitude for all methods, as compared to runs on a single CPU core.

  4. Development of High-speed Visualization System of Hypocenter Data Using CUDA-based GPU computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, T.; Okubo, K.; Uchida, N.; Matsuzawa, T.; Kawada, N.; Takeuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, intelligent visualization of seismic information is becoming important to understand the earthquake phenomena. On the other hand, to date, the quantity of seismic data becomes enormous as a progress of high accuracy observation network; we need to treat many parameters (e.g., positional information, origin time, magnitude, etc.) to efficiently display the seismic information. Therefore, high-speed processing of data and image information is necessary to handle enormous amounts of seismic data. Recently, GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) is used as an acceleration tool for data processing and calculation in various study fields. This movement is called GPGPU (General Purpose computing on GPUs). In the last few years the performance of GPU keeps on improving rapidly. GPU computing gives us the high-performance computing environment at a lower cost than before. Moreover, use of GPU has an advantage of visualization of processed data, because GPU is originally architecture for graphics processing. In the GPU computing, the processed data is always stored in the video memory. Therefore, we can directly write drawing information to the VRAM on the video card by combining CUDA and the graphics API. In this study, we employ CUDA and OpenGL and/or DirectX to realize full-GPU implementation. This method makes it possible to write drawing information to the VRAM on the video card without PCIe bus data transfer: It enables the high-speed processing of seismic data. The present study examines the GPU computing-based high-speed visualization and the feasibility for high-speed visualization system of hypocenter data.

  5. Work-Efficient Parallel Skyline Computation for the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden; Chester, Sean; Assent, Ira

    2015-01-01

    offers the potential for parallelizing skyline computation across thousands of cores. However, attempts to port skyline algorithms to the GPU have prioritized throughput and failed to outperform sequential algorithms. In this paper, we introduce a new skyline algorithm, designed for the GPU, that uses...... a global, static partitioning scheme. With the partitioning, we can permit controlled branching to exploit transitive relationships and avoid most point-to-point comparisons. The result is a non-traditional GPU algorithm, SkyAlign, that prioritizes work-effciency and respectable throughput, rather than...

  6. GPU Computing in Bayesian Inference of Realized Stochastic Volatility Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The realized stochastic volatility (RSV) model that utilizes the realized volatility as additional information has been proposed to infer volatility of financial time series. We consider the Bayesian inference of the RSV model by the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm. The HMC algorithm can be parallelized and thus performed on the GPU for speedup. The GPU code is developed with CUDA Fortran. We compare the computational time in performing the HMC algorithm on GPU (GTX 760) and CPU (Intel i7-4770 3.4GHz) and find that the GPU can be up to 17 times faster than the CPU. We also code the program with OpenACC and find that appropriate coding can achieve the similar speedup with CUDA Fortran

  7. R-GPU : A reconfigurable GPU architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Braak, G.J.; Corporaal, H.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architectures have evolved from a fixed-function graphics pipeline to a programmable, energy-efficient compute accelerator for massively parallel applications. The compute power arises from the GPU's Single Instruction/Multiple Threads

  8. Fast magnetic field computation in fusion technology using GPU technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiariello, Andrea Gaetano [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, Aversa (CE) (Italy); Formisano, Alessandro, E-mail: Alessandro.Formisano@unina2.it [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, Aversa (CE) (Italy); Martone, Raffaele [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, Aversa (CE) (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The paper deals with high accuracy numerical simulations of high field magnets. ► The porting of existing codes of High Performance Computing architectures allowed to obtain a relevant speedup while not reducing computational accuracy. ► Some examples of applications, referred to ITER-like magnets, are reported. -- Abstract: One of the main issues in the simulation of Tokamaks functioning is the reliable and accurate computation of actual field maps in the plasma chamber. In this paper a tool able to accurately compute magnetic field maps produced by active coils of any 3D shape, wound with high number of conductors, is presented. Under linearity assumption, the coil winding is modeled by means of “sticks”, following each conductor's shape, and the contribution of each stick is computed using high speed Graphic Computing Units (GPU's). Relevant speed enhancements with respect to standard parallel computing environment are achieved in this way.

  9. Fast Simulation of Large-Scale Floods Based on GPU Parallel Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Computing speed is a significant issue of large-scale flood simulations for real-time response to disaster prevention and mitigation. Even today, most of the large-scale flood simulations are generally run on supercomputers due to the massive amounts of data and computations necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional shallow water model based on an unstructured Godunov-type finite volume scheme was proposed for flood simulation. To realize a fast simulation of large-scale floods on a personal computer, a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU-based, high-performance computing method using the OpenACC application was adopted to parallelize the shallow water model. An unstructured data management method was presented to control the data transportation between the GPU and CPU (Central Processing Unit with minimum overhead, and then both computation and data were offloaded from the CPU to the GPU, which exploited the computational capability of the GPU as much as possible. The parallel model was validated using various benchmarks and real-world case studies. The results demonstrate that speed-ups of up to one order of magnitude can be achieved in comparison with the serial model. The proposed parallel model provides a fast and reliable tool with which to quickly assess flood hazards in large-scale areas and, thus, has a bright application prospect for dynamic inundation risk identification and disaster assessment.

  10. Reliability Lessons Learned From GPU Experience With The Titan Supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallarno, George [Christian Brothers University; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Maxwell, Don E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The high computational capability of graphics processing units (GPUs) is enabling and driving the scientific discovery process at large-scale. The world s second fastest supercomputer for open science, Titan, has more than 18,000 GPUs that computational scientists use to perform scientific simu- lations and data analysis. Understanding of GPU reliability characteristics, however, is still in its nascent stage since GPUs have only recently been deployed at large-scale. This paper presents a detailed study of GPU errors and their impact on system operations and applications, describing experiences with the 18,688 GPUs on the Titan supercom- puter as well as lessons learned in the process of efficient operation of GPUs at scale. These experiences are helpful to HPC sites which already have large-scale GPU clusters or plan to deploy GPUs in the future.

  11. A Study on GPU-based Iterative ML-EM Reconstruction Algorithm for Emission Computed Tomographic Imaging Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Woo Seok; Kim, Soo Mee; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) is the statistical reconstruction algorithm derived from probabilistic model of the emission and detection processes. Although the ML-EM has many advantages in accuracy and utility, the use of the ML-EM is limited due to the computational burden of iterating processing on a CPU (central processing unit). In this study, we developed a parallel computing technique on GPU (graphic processing unit) for ML-EM algorithm. Using Geforce 9800 GTX+ graphic card and CUDA (compute unified device architecture) the projection and backprojection in ML-EM algorithm were parallelized by NVIDIA's technology. The time delay on computations for projection, errors between measured and estimated data and backprojection in an iteration were measured. Total time included the latency in data transmission between RAM and GPU memory. The total computation time of the CPU- and GPU-based ML-EM with 32 iterations were 3.83 and 0.26 sec, respectively. In this case, the computing speed was improved about 15 times on GPU. When the number of iterations increased into 1024, the CPU- and GPU-based computing took totally 18 min and 8 sec, respectively. The improvement was about 135 times and was caused by delay on CPU-based computing after certain iterations. On the other hand, the GPU-based computation provided very small variation on time delay per iteration due to use of shared memory. The GPU-based parallel computation for ML-EM improved significantly the computing speed and stability. The developed GPU-based ML-EM algorithm could be easily modified for some other imaging geometries

  12. A Study on GPU-based Iterative ML-EM Reconstruction Algorithm for Emission Computed Tomographic Imaging Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Woo Seok; Kim, Soo Mee; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2009-01-01

    The maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) is the statistical reconstruction algorithm derived from probabilistic model of the emission and detection processes. Although the ML-EM has many advantages in accuracy and utility, the use of the ML-EM is limited due to the computational burden of iterating processing on a CPU (central processing unit). In this study, we developed a parallel computing technique on GPU (graphic processing unit) for ML-EM algorithm. Using Geforce 9800 GTX+ graphic card and CUDA (compute unified device architecture) the projection and backprojection in ML-EM algorithm were parallelized by NVIDIA's technology. The time delay on computations for projection, errors between measured and estimated data and backprojection in an iteration were measured. Total time included the latency in data transmission between RAM and GPU memory. The total computation time of the CPU- and GPU-based ML-EM with 32 iterations were 3.83 and 0.26 sec, respectively. In this case, the computing speed was improved about 15 times on GPU. When the number of iterations increased into 1024, the CPU- and GPU-based computing took totally 18 min and 8 sec, respectively. The improvement was about 135 times and was caused by delay on CPU-based computing after certain iterations. On the other hand, the GPU-based computation provided very small variation on time delay per iteration due to use of shared memory. The GPU-based parallel computation for ML-EM improved significantly the computing speed and stability. The developed GPU-based ML-EM algorithm could be easily modified for some other imaging geometries

  13. GPU-accelerated Lattice Boltzmann method for anatomical extraction in patient-specific computational hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, C.; Chen, N.; Zhao, Y.; Sawchuk, A. P.; Dalsing, M. C.; Teague, S. D.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Existing research of patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) heavily relies on software for anatomical extraction of blood arteries. Data reconstruction and mesh generation have to be done using existing commercial software due to the gap between medical image processing and CFD, which increases computation burden and introduces inaccuracy during data transformation thus limits the medical applications of PSCH. We use lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to solve the level-set equation over an Eulerian distance field and implicitly and dynamically segment the artery surfaces from radiological CT/MRI imaging data. The segments seamlessly feed to the LBM based CFD computation of PSCH thus explicit mesh construction and extra data management are avoided. The LBM is ideally suited for GPU (graphic processing unit)-based parallel computing. The parallel acceleration over GPU achieves excellent performance in PSCH computation. An application study will be presented which segments an aortic artery from a chest CT dataset and models PSCH of the segmented artery.

  14. Parallel computing in cluster of GPU applied to a problem of nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Sergio Ricardo S.; Heimlich, Adino; Resende, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Cluster computing has been widely used as a low cost alternative for parallel processing in scientific applications. With the use of Message-Passing Interface (MPI) protocol development became even more accessible and widespread in the scientific community. A more recent trend is the use of Graphic Processing Unit (GPU), which is a powerful co-processor able to perform hundreds of instructions in parallel, reaching a capacity of hundreds of times the processing of a CPU. However, a standard PC does not allow, in general, more than two GPUs. Hence, it is proposed in this work development and evaluation of a hybrid low cost parallel approach to the solution to a nuclear engineering typical problem. The idea is to use clusters parallelism technology (MPI) together with GPU programming techniques (CUDA - Compute Unified Device Architecture) to simulate neutron transport through a slab using Monte Carlo method. By using a cluster comprised by four quad-core computers with 2 GPU each, it has been developed programs using MPI and CUDA technologies. Experiments, applying different configurations, from 1 to 8 GPUs has been performed and results were compared with the sequential (non-parallel) version. A speed up of about 2.000 times has been observed when comparing the 8-GPU with the sequential version. Results here presented are discussed and analyzed with the objective of outlining gains and possible limitations of the proposed approach. (author)

  15. permGPU: Using graphics processing units in RNA microarray association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Stephen L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many analyses of microarray association studies involve permutation, bootstrap resampling and cross-validation, that are ideally formulated as embarrassingly parallel computing problems. Given that these analyses are computationally intensive, scalable approaches that can take advantage of multi-core processor systems need to be developed. Results We have developed a CUDA based implementation, permGPU, that employs graphics processing units in microarray association studies. We illustrate the performance and applicability of permGPU within the context of permutation resampling for a number of test statistics. An extensive simulation study demonstrates a dramatic increase in performance when using permGPU on an NVIDIA GTX 280 card compared to an optimized C/C++ solution running on a conventional Linux server. Conclusions permGPU is available as an open-source stand-alone application and as an extension package for the R statistical environment. It provides a dramatic increase in performance for permutation resampling analysis in the context of microarray association studies. The current version offers six test statistics for carrying out permutation resampling analyses for binary, quantitative and censored time-to-event traits.

  16. Study on GPU Computing for SCOPE2 with CUDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Yasuhiro; Tatsumi, Masahiro; Ohoka, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    For improving safety and cost effectiveness of nuclear power plants, a core calculation code SCOPE2 has been developed, which adopts detailed calculation models such as the multi-group nodal SP3 transport calculation method in three-dimensional pin-by-pin geometry to achieve high predictability. However, it is difficult to apply the code to loading pattern optimizations since it requires much longer computation time than that of codes based on the nodal diffusion method which is widely used in core design calculations. In this study, we studied possibility of acceleration of SCOPE2 with GPU computing capability which has been recognized as one of the most promising direction of high performance computing. In the previous study with an experimental programming framework, it required much effort to convert the algorithms to ones which fit to GPU computation. It was found, however, that this conversion was tremendously difficult because of the complexity of algorithms and restrictions in implementation. In this study, to overcome this complexity, we utilized the CUDA programming environment provided by NVIDIA which is a versatile and flexible language as an extension to the C/C++ languages. It was confirmed that we could enjoy high performance without degradation of maintainability through test implementation of GPU kernels for neutron diffusion/simplified P3 equation solvers. (author)

  17. GPU acceleration of Dock6's Amber scoring computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hailong; Zhou, Qiongqiong; Li, Bo; Wang, Yongjian; Luan, Zhongzhi; Qian, Depei; Li, Hanlu

    2010-01-01

    Dressing the problem of virtual screening is a long-term goal in the drug discovery field, which if properly solved, can significantly shorten new drugs' R&D cycle. The scoring functionality that evaluates the fitness of the docking result is one of the major challenges in virtual screening. In general, scoring functionality in docking requires a large amount of floating-point calculations, which usually takes several weeks or even months to be finished. This time-consuming procedure is unacceptable, especially when highly fatal and infectious virus arises such as SARS and H1N1, which forces the scoring task to be done in a limited time. This paper presents how to leverage the computational power of GPU to accelerate Dock6's (http://dock.compbio.ucsf.edu/DOCK_6/) Amber (J. Comput. Chem. 25: 1157-1174, 2004) scoring with NVIDIA CUDA (NVIDIA Corporation Technical Staff, Compute Unified Device Architecture - Programming Guide, NVIDIA Corporation, 2008) (Compute Unified Device Architecture) platform. We also discuss many factors that will greatly influence the performance after porting the Amber scoring to GPU, including thread management, data transfer, and divergence hidden. Our experiments show that the GPU-accelerated Amber scoring achieves a 6.5× speedup with respect to the original version running on AMD dual-core CPU for the same problem size. This acceleration makes the Amber scoring more competitive and efficient for large-scale virtual screening problems.

  18. Heterogeneous Gpu&Cpu Cluster For High Performance Computing In Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Marks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses issues associated with distributed computing systems andthe application of mixed GPU&CPU technology to data encryption and decryptionalgorithms. We describe a heterogenous cluster HGCC formed by twotypes of nodes: Intel processor with NVIDIA graphics processing unit and AMDprocessor with AMD graphics processing unit (formerly ATI, and a novel softwareframework that hides the heterogeneity of our cluster and provides toolsfor solving complex scientific and engineering problems. Finally, we present theresults of numerical experiments. The considered case study is concerned withparallel implementations of selected cryptanalysis algorithms. The main goal ofthe paper is to show the wide applicability of the GPU&CPU technology tolarge scale computation and data processing.

  19. Hypergraph partitioning implementation for parallelizing matrix-vector multiplication using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murni, Bustamam, A.; Ernastuti, Handhika, T.; Kerami, D.

    2017-07-01

    Calculation of the matrix-vector multiplication in the real-world problems often involves large matrix with arbitrary size. Therefore, parallelization is needed to speed up the calculation process that usually takes a long time. Graph partitioning techniques that have been discussed in the previous studies cannot be used to complete the parallelized calculation of matrix-vector multiplication with arbitrary size. This is due to the assumption of graph partitioning techniques that can only solve the square and symmetric matrix. Hypergraph partitioning techniques will overcome the shortcomings of the graph partitioning technique. This paper addresses the efficient parallelization of matrix-vector multiplication through hypergraph partitioning techniques using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing. CUDA (compute unified device architecture) is a parallel computing platform and programming model that was created by NVIDIA and implemented by the GPU (graphics processing unit).

  20. GPU-Based FFT Computation for Multi-Gigabit WirelessHD Baseband Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Hinitt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The next generation Graphics Processing Units (GPUs are being considered for non-graphics applications. Millimeter wave (60 Ghz wireless networks that are capable of multi-gigabit per second (Gbps transfer rates require a significant baseband throughput. In this work, we consider the baseband of WirelessHD, a 60 GHz communications system, which can provide a data rate of up to 3.8 Gbps over a short range wireless link. Thus, we explore the feasibility of achieving gigabit baseband throughput using the GPUs. One of the most computationally intensive functions commonly used in baseband communications, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT algorithm, is implemented on an NVIDIA GPU using their general-purpose computing platform called the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA. The paper, first, investigates the implementation of an FFT algorithm using the GPU hardware and exploiting the computational capability available. It then outlines the limitations discovered and the methods used to overcome these challenges. Finally a new algorithm to compute FFT is proposed, which reduces interprocessor communication. It is further optimized by improving memory access, enabling the processing rate to exceed 4 Gbps, achieving a processing time of a 512-point FFT in less than 200 ns using a two-GPU solution.

  1. A Performance/Cost Evaluation for a GPU-Based Drug Discovery Application on Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Ginés D.; Imbernón, Baldomero; García, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary research field that develops tools for the analysis of large biological databases, and, thus, the use of high performance computing (HPC) platforms is mandatory for the generation of useful biological knowledge. The latest generation of graphics processing units (GPUs) has democratized the use of HPC as they push desktop computers to cluster-level performance. Many applications within this field have been developed to leverage these powerful and low-cost architectures. However, these applications still need to scale to larger GPU-based systems to enable remarkable advances in the fields of healthcare, drug discovery, genome research, etc. The inclusion of GPUs in HPC systems exacerbates power and temperature issues, increasing the total cost of ownership (TCO). This paper explores the benefits of volunteer computing to scale bioinformatics applications as an alternative to own large GPU-based local infrastructures. We use as a benchmark a GPU-based drug discovery application called BINDSURF that their computational requirements go beyond a single desktop machine. Volunteer computing is presented as a cheap and valid HPC system for those bioinformatics applications that need to process huge amounts of data and where the response time is not a critical factor. PMID:25025055

  2. A Performance/Cost Evaluation for a GPU-Based Drug Discovery Application on Volunteer Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginés D. Guerrero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary research field that develops tools for the analysis of large biological databases, and, thus, the use of high performance computing (HPC platforms is mandatory for the generation of useful biological knowledge. The latest generation of graphics processing units (GPUs has democratized the use of HPC as they push desktop computers to cluster-level performance. Many applications within this field have been developed to leverage these powerful and low-cost architectures. However, these applications still need to scale to larger GPU-based systems to enable remarkable advances in the fields of healthcare, drug discovery, genome research, etc. The inclusion of GPUs in HPC systems exacerbates power and temperature issues, increasing the total cost of ownership (TCO. This paper explores the benefits of volunteer computing to scale bioinformatics applications as an alternative to own large GPU-based local infrastructures. We use as a benchmark a GPU-based drug discovery application called BINDSURF that their computational requirements go beyond a single desktop machine. Volunteer computing is presented as a cheap and valid HPC system for those bioinformatics applications that need to process huge amounts of data and where the response time is not a critical factor.

  3. Fast-GPU-PCC: A GPU-Based Technique to Compute Pairwise Pearson's Correlation Coefficients for Time Series Data-fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Taban; Saeed, Fahad

    2018-04-20

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive brain imaging technique, which has been regularly used for studying brain’s functional activities in the past few years. A very well-used measure for capturing functional associations in brain is Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Pearson’s correlation is widely used for constructing functional network and studying dynamic functional connectivity of the brain. These are useful measures for understanding the effects of brain disorders on connectivities among brain regions. The fMRI scanners produce huge number of voxels and using traditional central processing unit (CPU)-based techniques for computing pairwise correlations is very time consuming especially when large number of subjects are being studied. In this paper, we propose a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based algorithm called Fast-GPU-PCC for computing pairwise Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Based on the symmetric property of Pearson’s correlation, this approach returns N ( N − 1 ) / 2 correlation coefficients located at strictly upper triangle part of the correlation matrix. Storing correlations in a one-dimensional array with the order as proposed in this paper is useful for further usage. Our experiments on real and synthetic fMRI data for different number of voxels and varying length of time series show that the proposed approach outperformed state of the art GPU-based techniques as well as the sequential CPU-based versions. We show that Fast-GPU-PCC runs 62 times faster than CPU-based version and about 2 to 3 times faster than two other state of the art GPU-based methods.

  4. Efficient GPU-based skyline computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden; Assent, Ira; Magnani, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The skyline operator for multi-criteria search returns the most interesting points of a data set with respect to any monotone preference function. Existing work has almost exclusively focused on efficiently computing skylines on one or more CPUs, ignoring the high parallelism possible in GPUs. In...

  5. Accelerating Computation of DCM for ERP in MATLAB by External Function Calls to the GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Jen; Hsieh, I-Fan; Chen, Chun-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to improve the performance of Dynamic Causal Modelling for Event Related Potentials (DCM for ERP) in MATLAB by using external function calls to a graphics processing unit (GPU). DCM for ERP is an advanced method for studying neuronal effective connectivity. DCM utilizes an iterative procedure, the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm, to find the optimal parameters given a set of observations and the underlying probability model. As the EM algorithm is computationally demanding and the analysis faces possible combinatorial explosion of models to be tested, we propose a parallel computing scheme using the GPU to achieve a fast estimation of DCM for ERP. The computation of DCM for ERP is dynamically partitioned and distributed to threads for parallel processing, according to the DCM model complexity and the hardware constraints. The performance efficiency of this hardware-dependent thread arrangement strategy was evaluated using the synthetic data. The experimental data were used to validate the accuracy of the proposed computing scheme and quantify the time saving in practice. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme can accelerate the computation by a factor of 155 for the parallel part. For experimental data, the speedup factor is about 7 per model on average, depending on the model complexity and the data. This GPU-based implementation of DCM for ERP gives qualitatively the same results as the original MATLAB implementation does at the group level analysis. In conclusion, we believe that the proposed GPU-based implementation is very useful for users as a fast screen tool to select the most likely model and may provide implementation guidance for possible future clinical applications such as online diagnosis. PMID:23840507

  6. Parallelized computation for computer simulation of electrocardiograms using personal computers with multi-core CPU and general-purpose GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenfeng; Wei, Daming; Xu, Weimin; Zhu, Xin; Yuan, Shizhong

    2010-10-01

    Biological computations like electrocardiological modelling and simulation usually require high-performance computing environments. This paper introduces an implementation of parallel computation for computer simulation of electrocardiograms (ECGs) in a personal computer environment with an Intel CPU of Core (TM) 2 Quad Q6600 and a GPU of Geforce 8800GT, with software support by OpenMP and CUDA. It was tested in three parallelization device setups: (a) a four-core CPU without a general-purpose GPU, (b) a general-purpose GPU plus 1 core of CPU, and (c) a four-core CPU plus a general-purpose GPU. To effectively take advantage of a multi-core CPU and a general-purpose GPU, an algorithm based on load-prediction dynamic scheduling was developed and applied to setting (c). In the simulation with 1600 time steps, the speedup of the parallel computation as compared to the serial computation was 3.9 in setting (a), 16.8 in setting (b), and 20.0 in setting (c). This study demonstrates that a current PC with a multi-core CPU and a general-purpose GPU provides a good environment for parallel computations in biological modelling and simulation studies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU) for Deep Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Mary; Salazar, George; Steele, Glen

    2015-01-01

    A graphics processing capability will be required for deep space missions and must include a range of applications, from safety-critical vehicle health status to telemedicine for crew health. However, preliminary radiation testing of commercial graphics processing cards suggest they cannot operate in the deep space radiation environment. Investigation into an Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU)comprised of commercial-equivalent radiation hardened/tolerant single board computers, field programmable gate arrays, and safety-critical display software shows promising results. Preliminary performance of approximately 30 frames per second (FPS) has been achieved. Use of multi-core processors may provide a significant increase in performance.

  8. Using the CPU and GPU for real-time video enhancement on a mobile computer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bachoo, AK

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper, the current advances in mobile CPU and GPU hardware are used to implement video enhancement algorithms in a new way on a mobile computer. Both the CPU and GPU are used effectively to achieve realtime performance for complex image enhancement...

  9. Parallel, distributed and GPU computing technologies in single-particle electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Martin; Heisen, Burkhard C; Luettich, Mario; Busche, Boris; Hauer, Florian; Koske, Tobias; Knauber, Karl-Heinz; Stark, Holger

    2009-07-01

    Most known methods for the determination of the structure of macromolecular complexes are limited or at least restricted at some point by their computational demands. Recent developments in information technology such as multicore, parallel and GPU processing can be used to overcome these limitations. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs), which were originally developed for rendering real-time effects in computer games, are now ubiquitous and provide unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Each parallel-processing paradigm alone can improve overall performance; the increased computational performance obtained by combining all paradigms, unleashing the full power of today's technology, makes certain applications feasible that were previously virtually impossible. In this article, state-of-the-art paradigms are introduced, the tools and infrastructure needed to apply these paradigms are presented and a state-of-the-art infrastructure and solution strategy for moving scientific applications to the next generation of computer hardware is outlined.

  10. GPU-FS-kNN: a software tool for fast and scalable kNN computation using GPUs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shamsul Arefin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of biological networks has become a major challenge due to the recent development of high-throughput techniques that are rapidly producing very large data sets. The exploding volumes of biological data are craving for extreme computational power and special computing facilities (i.e. super-computers. An inexpensive solution, such as General Purpose computation based on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU, can be adapted to tackle this challenge, but the limitation of the device internal memory can pose a new problem of scalability. An efficient data and computational parallelism with partitioning is required to provide a fast and scalable solution to this problem. RESULTS: We propose an efficient parallel formulation of the k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN search problem, which is a popular method for classifying objects in several fields of research, such as pattern recognition, machine learning and bioinformatics. Being very simple and straightforward, the performance of the kNN search degrades dramatically for large data sets, since the task is computationally intensive. The proposed approach is not only fast but also scalable to large-scale instances. Based on our approach, we implemented a software tool GPU-FS-kNN (GPU-based Fast and Scalable k-Nearest Neighbour for CUDA enabled GPUs. The basic approach is simple and adaptable to other available GPU architectures. We observed speed-ups of 50-60 times compared with CPU implementation on a well-known breast microarray study and its associated data sets. CONCLUSION: Our GPU-based Fast and Scalable k-Nearest Neighbour search technique (GPU-FS-kNN provides a significant performance improvement for nearest neighbour computation in large-scale networks. Source code and the software tool is available under GNU Public License (GPL at https://sourceforge.net/p/gpufsknn/.

  11. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO. However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate.

  12. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-04-07

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate.

  13. Graphics processing unit (GPU) real-time infrared scene generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Chad L.; Gouthas, Efthimios (Themie); Williams, Owen M.

    2007-04-01

    VIRSuite, the GPU-based suite of software tools developed at DSTO for real-time infrared scene generation, is described. The tools include the painting of scene objects with radiometrically-associated colours, translucent object generation, polar plot validation and versatile scene generation. Special features include radiometric scaling within the GPU and the presence of zoom anti-aliasing at the core of VIRSuite. Extension of the zoom anti-aliasing construct to cover target embedding and the treatment of translucent objects is described.

  14. System matrix computation vs storage on GPU: A comparative study in cone beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matenine, Dmitri; Côté, Geoffroi; Mascolo-Fortin, Julia; Goussard, Yves; Després, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Iterative reconstruction algorithms in computed tomography (CT) require a fast method for computing the intersection distances between the trajectories of photons and the object, also called ray tracing or system matrix computation. This work focused on the thin-ray model is aimed at comparing different system matrix handling strategies using graphical processing units (GPUs). In this work, the system matrix is modeled by thin rays intersecting a regular grid of box-shaped voxels, known to be an accurate representation of the forward projection operator in CT. However, an uncompressed system matrix exceeds the random access memory (RAM) capacities of typical computers by one order of magnitude or more. Considering the RAM limitations of GPU hardware, several system matrix handling methods were compared: full storage of a compressed system matrix, on-the-fly computation of its coefficients, and partial storage of the system matrix with partial on-the-fly computation. These methods were tested on geometries mimicking a cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisition of a human head. Execution times of three routines of interest were compared: forward projection, backprojection, and ordered-subsets convex (OSC) iteration. A fully stored system matrix yielded the shortest backprojection and OSC iteration times, with a 1.52× acceleration for OSC when compared to the on-the-fly approach. Nevertheless, the maximum problem size was bound by the available GPU RAM and geometrical symmetries. On-the-fly coefficient computation did not require symmetries and was shown to be the fastest for forward projection. It also offered reasonable execution times of about 176.4 ms per view per OSC iteration for a detector of 512 × 448 pixels and a volume of 384 3 voxels, using commodity GPU hardware. Partial system matrix storage has shown a performance similar to the on-the-fly approach, while still relying on symmetries. Partial system matrix storage was shown to yield the lowest relative

  15. Hybrid GPU-CPU adaptive precision ray-triangle intersection tests for robust high-performance GPU dosimetry computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotte, Lancelot; Bodin, Bruno; Chodorge, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Before an intervention on a nuclear site, it is essential to study different scenarios to identify the less dangerous one for the operator. Therefore, it is mandatory to dispose of an efficient dosimetry simulation code with accurate results. One classical method in radiation protection is the straight-line attenuation method with build-up factors. In the case of 3D industrial scenes composed of meshes, the computation cost resides in the fast computation of all of the intersections between the rays and the triangles of the scene. Efficient GPU algorithms have already been proposed, that enable dosimetry calculation for a huge scene (800000 rays, 800000 triangles) in a fraction of second. But these algorithms are not robust: because of the rounding caused by floating-point arithmetic, the numerical results of the ray-triangle intersection tests can differ from the expected mathematical results. In worst case scenario, this can lead to a computed dose rate dramatically inferior to the real dose rate to which the operator is exposed. In this paper, we present a hybrid GPU-CPU algorithm to manage adaptive precision floating-point arithmetic. This algorithm allows robust ray-triangle intersection tests, with very small loss of performance (less than 5 % overhead), and without any need for scene-dependent tuning. (author)

  16. 3D fast adaptive correlation imaging for large-scale gravity data based on GPU computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Meng, X.; Guo, L.; Liu, G.

    2011-12-01

    comtinue to perform 3D correlation imaging for the redisual gravity data. After several iterations, we can obtain a satisfactoy results. Newly developed general purpose computing technology from Nvidia GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) has been put into practice and received widespread attention in many areas. Based on the GPU programming mode and two parallel levels, five CPU loops for the main computation of 3D correlation imaging are converted into three loops in GPU kernel functions, thus achieving GPU/CPU collaborative computing. The two inner loops are defined as the dimensions of blocks and the three outer loops are defined as the dimensions of threads, thus realizing the double loop block calculation. Theoretical and real gravity data tests show that results are reliable and the computing time is greatly reduced. Acknowledgments We acknowledge the financial support of Sinoprobe project (201011039 and 201011049-03), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (2010ZY26 and 2011PY0183), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41074095) and the Open Project of State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources (GPMR0945).

  17. Parallel, distributed and GPU computing technologies in single-particle electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmeisser, Martin; Heisen, Burkhard C.; Luettich, Mario; Busche, Boris; Hauer, Florian; Koske, Tobias; Knauber, Karl-Heinz; Stark, Holger

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to the current paradigm shift towards concurrency in software. Most known methods for the determination of the structure of macromolecular complexes are limited or at least restricted at some point by their computational demands. Recent developments in information technology such as multicore, parallel and GPU processing can be used to overcome these limitations. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs), which were originally developed for rendering real-time effects in computer games, are now ubiquitous and provide unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Each parallel-processing paradigm alone can improve overall performance; the increased computational performance obtained by combining all paradigms, unleashing the full power of today’s technology, makes certain applications feasible that were previously virtually impossible. In this article, state-of-the-art paradigms are introduced, the tools and infrastructure needed to apply these paradigms are presented and a state-of-the-art infrastructure and solution strategy for moving scientific applications to the next generation of computer hardware is outlined

  18. Computing OpenSURF on OpenCL and General Purpose GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanglong Yan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Speeded-Up Robust Feature (SURF algorithm is widely used for image feature detecting and matching in computer vision area. Open Computing Language (OpenCL is a framework for writing programs that execute across heterogeneous platforms consisting of CPUs, GPUs, and other processors. This paper introduces how to implement an open-sourced SURF program, namely OpenSURF, on general purpose GPU by OpenCL, and discusses the optimizations in terms of the thread architectures and memory models in detail. Our final OpenCL implementation of OpenSURF is on average 37% and 64% faster than the OpenCV SURF v2.4.5 CUDA implementation on NVidia's GTX660 and GTX460SE GPUs, repectively. Our OpenCL program achieved real-time performance (>25 Frames Per Second for almost all the input images with different sizes from 320*240 to 1024*768 on NVidia's GTX660 GPU, NVidia's GTX460SE GPU and AMD's Radeon HD 6850 GPU. Our OpenCL approach on NVidia's GTX660 GPU is more than 22.8 times faster than its original CPU version on Intel's Dual-Core E5400 2.7G on average.

  19. GPU applications for data processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladymyrov, Mykhailo, E-mail: mykhailo.vladymyrov@cern.ch [LPI - Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, RUS-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, Andrey [LPI - Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, RUS-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); INFN sezione di Napoli, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Tioukov, Valeri [INFN sezione di Napoli, I-80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2015-12-31

    Modern experiments that use nuclear photoemulsion imply fast and efficient data acquisition from the emulsion can be performed. The new approaches in developing scanning systems require real-time processing of large amount of data. Methods that use Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) computing power for emulsion data processing are presented here. It is shown how the GPU-accelerated emulsion processing helped us to rise the scanning speed by factor of nine.

  20. Near real-time digital holographic microscope based on GPU parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gang; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wang, Huarui; Yang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    A transmission near real-time digital holographic microscope with in-line and off-axis light path is presented, in which the parallel computing technology based on compute unified device architecture (CUDA) and digital holographic microscopy are combined. Compared to other holographic microscopes, which have to implement reconstruction in multiple focal planes and are time-consuming the reconstruction speed of the near real-time digital holographic microscope can be greatly improved with the parallel computing technology based on CUDA, so it is especially suitable for measurements of particle field in micrometer and nanometer scale. Simulations and experiments show that the proposed transmission digital holographic microscope can accurately measure and display the velocity of particle field in micrometer scale, and the average velocity error is lower than 10%.With the graphic processing units(GPU), the computing time of the 100 reconstruction planes(512×512 grids) is lower than 120ms, while it is 4.9s using traditional reconstruction method by CPU. The reconstruction speed has been raised by 40 times. In other words, it can handle holograms at 8.3 frames per second and the near real-time measurement and display of particle velocity field are realized. The real-time three-dimensional reconstruction of particle velocity field is expected to achieve by further optimization of software and hardware. Keywords: digital holographic microscope,

  1. Design Patterns for Sparse-Matrix Computations on Hybrid CPU/GPU Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Cardellini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply object-oriented software design patterns to develop code for scientific software involving sparse matrices. Design patterns arise when multiple independent developments produce similar designs which converge onto a generic solution. We demonstrate how to use design patterns to implement an interface for sparse matrix computations on NVIDIA GPUs starting from PSBLAS, an existing sparse matrix library, and from existing sets of GPU kernels for sparse matrices. We also compare the throughput of the PSBLAS sparse matrix–vector multiplication on two platforms exploiting the GPU with that obtained by a CPU-only PSBLAS implementation. Our experiments exhibit encouraging results regarding the comparison between CPU and GPU executions in double precision, obtaining a speedup of up to 35.35 on NVIDIA GTX 285 with respect to AMD Athlon 7750, and up to 10.15 on NVIDIA Tesla C2050 with respect to Intel Xeon X5650.

  2. Exploiting graphics processing units for computational biology and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Joshua L; Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A; Moore, Jason H

    2010-09-01

    Advances in the video gaming industry have led to the production of low-cost, high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) that possess more memory bandwidth and computational capability than central processing units (CPUs), the standard workhorses of scientific computing. With the recent release of generalpurpose GPUs and NVIDIA's GPU programming language, CUDA, graphics engines are being adopted widely in scientific computing applications, particularly in the fields of computational biology and bioinformatics. The goal of this article is to concisely present an introduction to GPU hardware and programming, aimed at the computational biologist or bioinformaticist. To this end, we discuss the primary differences between GPU and CPU architecture, introduce the basics of the CUDA programming language, and discuss important CUDA programming practices, such as the proper use of coalesced reads, data types, and memory hierarchies. We highlight each of these topics in the context of computing the all-pairs distance between instances in a dataset, a common procedure in numerous disciplines of scientific computing. We conclude with a runtime analysis of the GPU and CPU implementations of the all-pairs distance calculation. We show our final GPU implementation to outperform the CPU implementation by a factor of 1700.

  3. Acceleration of PIC simulation with GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Junya; Shimazu, Hironori; Fukazawa, Keiichiro; Den, Mitsue

    2011-01-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) is a simulation technique for plasma physics. The large number of particles in high-resolution plasma simulation increases the volume computation required, making it vital to increase computation speed. In this study, we attempt to accelerate computation speed on graphics processing units (GPUs) using KEMPO, a PIC simulation code package. We perform two tests for benchmarking, with small and large grid sizes. In these tests, we run KEMPO1 code using a CPU only, both a CPU and a GPU, and a GPU only. The results showed that performance using only a GPU was twice that of using a CPU alone. While, execution time for using both a CPU and GPU is comparable to the tests with a CPU alone, because of the significant bottleneck in communication between the CPU and GPU. (author)

  4. Accelerating MATLAB with GPU computing a primer with examples

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Jung W

    2013-01-01

    Beyond simulation and algorithm development, many developers increasingly use MATLAB even for product deployment in computationally heavy fields. This often demands that MATLAB codes run faster by leveraging the distributed parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). While MATLAB successfully provides high-level functions as a simulation tool for rapid prototyping, the underlying details and knowledge needed for utilizing GPUs make MATLAB users hesitate to step into it. Accelerating MATLAB with GPUs offers a primer on bridging this gap. Starting with the basics, setting up MATLAB for

  5. A Comparison of Sequential and GPU Implementations of Iterative Methods to Compute Reachability Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Cormie-Bowins

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of computing reachability probabilities: given a Markov chain, an initial state of the Markov chain, and a set of goal states of the Markov chain, what is the probability of reaching any of the goal states from the initial state? This problem can be reduced to solving a linear equation Ax = b for x, where A is a matrix and b is a vector. We consider two iterative methods to solve the linear equation: the Jacobi method and the biconjugate gradient stabilized (BiCGStab method. For both methods, a sequential and a parallel version have been implemented. The parallel versions have been implemented on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA so that they can be run on a NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU. From our experiments we conclude that as the size of the matrix increases, the CUDA implementations outperform the sequential implementations. Furthermore, the BiCGStab method performs better than the Jacobi method for dense matrices, whereas the Jacobi method does better for sparse ones. Since the reachability probabilities problem plays a key role in probabilistic model checking, we also compared the implementations for matrices obtained from a probabilistic model checker. Our experiments support the conjecture by Bosnacki et al. that the Jacobi method is superior to Krylov subspace methods, a class to which the BiCGStab method belongs, for probabilistic model checking.

  6. Graphics processing unit based computation for NDE applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahas, C. A.; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2012-05-01

    Advances in parallel processing in recent years are helping to improve the cost of numerical simulation. Breakthroughs in Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) based computation now offer the prospect of further drastic improvements. The introduction of 'compute unified device architecture' (CUDA) by NVIDIA (the global technology company based in Santa Clara, California, USA) has made programming GPUs for general purpose computing accessible to the average programmer. Here we use CUDA to develop parallel finite difference schemes as applicable to two problems of interest to NDE community, namely heat diffusion and elastic wave propagation. The implementations are for two-dimensions. Performance improvement of the GPU implementation against serial CPU implementation is then discussed.

  7. Development of GPU Based Parallel Computing Module for Solving Pressure Equation in the CUPID Component Thermo-Fluid Analysis Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Pyo; Joo, Han Gyu

    2010-01-01

    In the thermo-fluid analysis code named CUPID, the linear system of pressure equations must be solved in each iteration step. The time for repeatedly solving the linear system can be quite significant because large sparse matrices of Rank more than 50,000 are involved and the diagonal dominance of the system is hardly hold. Therefore parallelization of the linear system solver is essential to reduce the computing time. Meanwhile, Graphics Processing Units (GPU) have been developed as highly parallel, multi-core processors for the global demand of high quality 3D graphics. If a suitable interface is provided, parallelization using GPU can be available to engineering computing. NVIDIA provides a Software Development Kit(SDK) named CUDA(Compute Unified Device Architecture) to code developers so that they can manage GPUs for parallelization using the C language. In this research, we implement parallel routines for the linear system solver using CUDA, and examine the performance of the parallelization. In the next section, we will describe the method of CUDA parallelization for the CUPID code, and then the performance of the CUDA parallelization will be discussed

  8. An efficient implementation of 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data with GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jin; Liu, Linong; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2018-02-01

    De-absorption pre-stack time migration (QPSTM) compensates for the absorption and dispersion of seismic waves by introducing an effective Q parameter, thereby making it an effective tool for 3D, high-resolution imaging of seismic data. Although the optimal aperture obtained via stationary-phase migration reduces the computational cost of 3D QPSTM and yields 3D stationary-phase QPSTM, the associated computational efficiency is still the main problem in the processing of 3D, high-resolution images for real large-scale seismic data. In the current paper, we proposed a division method for large-scale, 3D seismic data to optimize the performance of stationary-phase QPSTM on clusters of graphics processing units (GPU). Then, we designed an imaging point parallel strategy to achieve an optimal parallel computing performance. Afterward, we adopted an asynchronous double buffering scheme for multi-stream to perform the GPU/CPU parallel computing. Moreover, several key optimization strategies of computation and storage based on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) were adopted to accelerate the 3D stationary-phase QPSTM algorithm. Compared with the initial GPU code, the implementation of the key optimization steps, including thread optimization, shared memory optimization, register optimization and special function units (SFU), greatly improved the efficiency. A numerical example employing real large-scale, 3D seismic data showed that our scheme is nearly 80 times faster than the CPU-QPSTM algorithm. Our GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing framework significant reduces the computational cost and facilitates 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data.

  9. Shredder: GPU-Accelerated Incremental Storage and Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatotia, Pramod; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Verma, Akshat

    2012-01-01

    Redundancy elimination using data deduplication and incremental data processing has emerged as an important technique to minimize storage and computation requirements in data center computing. In this paper, we present the design, implementation and evaluation of Shredder, a high performance content-based chunking framework for supporting incremental storage and computation systems. Shredder exploits the massively parallel processing power of GPUs to overcome the CPU bottlenecks of content-ba...

  10. The Dynamo package for tomography and subtomogram averaging: components for MATLAB, GPU computing and EC2 Amazon Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño-Díez, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Dynamo is a package for the processing of tomographic data. As a tool for subtomogram averaging, it includes different alignment and classification strategies. Furthermore, its data-management module allows experiments to be organized in groups of tomograms, while offering specialized three-dimensional tomographic browsers that facilitate visualization, location of regions of interest, modelling and particle extraction in complex geometries. Here, a technical description of the package is presented, focusing on its diverse strategies for optimizing computing performance. Dynamo is built upon mbtools (middle layer toolbox), a general-purpose MATLAB library for object-oriented scientific programming specifically developed to underpin Dynamo but usable as an independent tool. Its structure intertwines a flexible MATLAB codebase with precompiled C++ functions that carry the burden of numerically intensive operations. The package can be delivered as a precompiled standalone ready for execution without a MATLAB license. Multicore parallelization on a single node is directly inherited from the high-level parallelization engine provided for MATLAB, automatically imparting a balanced workload among the threads in computationally intense tasks such as alignment and classification, but also in logistic-oriented tasks such as tomogram binning and particle extraction. Dynamo supports the use of graphical processing units (GPUs), yielding considerable speedup factors both for native Dynamo procedures (such as the numerically intensive subtomogram alignment) and procedures defined by the user through its MATLAB-based GPU library for three-dimensional operations. Cloud-based virtual computing environments supplied with a pre-installed version of Dynamo can be publicly accessed through the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), enabling users to rent GPU computing time on a pay-as-you-go basis, thus avoiding upfront investments in hardware and longterm software maintenance.

  11. Fast and maliciously secure two-party computation using the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Tore Kasper; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2013-01-01

    We describe, and implement, a maliciously secure protocol for two-party computation in a parallel computational model. Our protocol is based on Yao’s garbled circuit and an efficient OT extension. The implementation is done using CUDA and yields fast results for maliciously secure two-party compu......-party computation in a financially feasible and practical setting by using a consumer grade CPU and GPU. Our protocol further uses some novel constructions in order to combine garbled circuits and an OT extension in a parallel and maliciously secure setting.......We describe, and implement, a maliciously secure protocol for two-party computation in a parallel computational model. Our protocol is based on Yao’s garbled circuit and an efficient OT extension. The implementation is done using CUDA and yields fast results for maliciously secure two...

  12. Efficient computation of k-Nearest Neighbour Graphs for large high-dimensional data sets on GPU clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dashti

    Full Text Available This paper presents an implementation of the brute-force exact k-Nearest Neighbor Graph (k-NNG construction for ultra-large high-dimensional data cloud. The proposed method uses Graphics Processing Units (GPUs and is scalable with multi-levels of parallelism (between nodes of a cluster, between different GPUs on a single node, and within a GPU. The method is applicable to homogeneous computing clusters with a varying number of nodes and GPUs per node. We achieve a 6-fold speedup in data processing as compared with an optimized method running on a cluster of CPUs and bring a hitherto impossible [Formula: see text]-NNG generation for a dataset of twenty million images with 15 k dimensionality into the realm of practical possibility.

  13. Electromagnetic Computation and Visualization of Transmission Particle Model and Its Simulation Based on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingnian Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic calculation plays an important role in both military and civic fields. Some methods and models proposed for calculation of electromagnetic wave propagation in a large range bring heavy burden in CPU computation and also require huge amount of memory. Using the GPU to accelerate computation and visualization can reduce the computational burden on the CPU. Based on forward ray-tracing method, a transmission particle model (TPM for calculating electromagnetic field is presented to combine the particle method. The movement of a particle obeys the principle of the propagation of electromagnetic wave, and then the particle distribution density in space reflects the electromagnetic distribution status. The algorithm with particle transmission, movement, reflection, and diffraction is described in detail. Since the particles in TPM are completely independent, it is very suitable for the parallel computing based on GPU. Deduction verification of TPM with the electric dipole antenna as the transmission source is conducted to prove that the particle movement itself represents the variation of electromagnetic field intensity caused by diffusion. Finally, the simulation comparisons are made against the forward and backward ray-tracing methods. The simulation results verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Cpu/gpu Computing for AN Implicit Multi-Block Compressible Navier-Stokes Solver on Heterogeneous Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liang; Bai, Hanli; Wang, Fang; Xu, Qingxin

    2016-06-01

    CPU/GPU computing allows scientists to tremendously accelerate their numerical codes. In this paper, we port and optimize a double precision alternating direction implicit (ADI) solver for three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations from our in-house Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software on heterogeneous platform. First, we implement a full GPU version of the ADI solver to remove a lot of redundant data transfers between CPU and GPU, and then design two fine-grain schemes, namely “one-thread-one-point” and “one-thread-one-line”, to maximize the performance. Second, we present a dual-level parallelization scheme using the CPU/GPU collaborative model to exploit the computational resources of both multi-core CPUs and many-core GPUs within the heterogeneous platform. Finally, considering the fact that memory on a single node becomes inadequate when the simulation size grows, we present a tri-level hybrid programming pattern MPI-OpenMP-CUDA that merges fine-grain parallelism using OpenMP and CUDA threads with coarse-grain parallelism using MPI for inter-node communication. We also propose a strategy to overlap the computation with communication using the advanced features of CUDA and MPI programming. We obtain speedups of 6.0 for the ADI solver on one Tesla M2050 GPU in contrast to two Xeon X5670 CPUs. Scalability tests show that our implementation can offer significant performance improvement on heterogeneous platform.

  15. A Fast GPU-accelerated Mixed-precision Strategy for Fully NonlinearWater Wave Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Madsen, Morten G.

    2011-01-01

    We present performance results of a mixed-precision strategy developed to improve a recently developed massively parallel GPU-accelerated tool for fast and scalable simulation of unsteady fully nonlinear free surface water waves over uneven depths (Engsig-Karup et.al. 2011). The underlying wave......-preconditioned defect correction method. The improved strategy improves the performance by exploiting architectural features of modern GPUs for mixed precision computations and is tested in a recently developed generic library for fast prototyping of PDE solvers. The new wave tool is applicable to solve and analyze...

  16. Seismic Shot Processing on GPU

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Owe

    2009-01-01

    Today s petroleum industry demand an ever increasing amount of compu- tational resources. Seismic processing applications in use by these types of companies have generally been using large clusters of compute nodes, whose only computing resource has been the CPU. However, using Graphics Pro- cessing Units (GPU) for general purpose programming is these days becoming increasingly more popular in the high performance computing area. In 2007, NVIDIA corporation launched their framework for develo...

  17. Modeling of Tsunami Equations and Atmospheric Swirling Flows with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Radial Basis Functions (RBF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.; Piret, C.; Zhang, N.; Kadlec, B. J.; Liu, Y.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Sevre, E. O.

    2008-12-01

    The faster growth curves in the speed of GPUs relative to CPUs in recent years and its rapidly gained popularity has spawned a new area of development in computational technology. There is much potential in utilizing GPUs for solving evolutionary partial differential equations and producing the attendant visualization. We are concerned with modeling tsunami waves, where computational time is of extreme essence, for broadcasting warnings. In order to test the efficacy of the GPU on the set of shallow-water equations, we employed the NVIDIA board 8600M GT on a MacBook Pro. We have compared the relative speeds between the CPU and the GPU on a single processor for two types of spatial discretization based on second-order finite-differences and radial basis functions. RBFs are a more novel method based on a gridless and a multi- scale, adaptive framework. Using the NVIDIA 8600M GT, we received a speed up factor of 8 in favor of GPU for the finite-difference method and a factor of 7 for the RBF scheme. We have also studied the atmospheric dynamics problem of swirling flows over a spherical surface and found a speed-up of 5.3 using the GPU. The time steps employed for the RBF method are larger than those used in finite-differences, because of the much fewer number of nodal points needed by RBF. Thus, in modeling the same physical time, RBF acting in concert with GPU would be the fastest way to go.

  18. Survey of using GPU CUDA programming model in medical image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kalaiselvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the technology development of medical industry, processing data is expanding rapidly and computation time also increases due to many factors like 3D, 4D treatment planning, the increasing sophistication of MRI pulse sequences and the growing complexity of algorithms. Graphics processing unit (GPU addresses these problems and gives the solutions for using their features such as, high computation throughput, high memory bandwidth, support for floating-point arithmetic and low cost. Compute unified device architecture (CUDA is a popular GPU programming model introduced by NVIDIA for parallel computing. This review paper briefly discusses the need of GPU CUDA computing in the medical image analysis. The GPU performances of existing algorithms are analyzed and the computational gain is discussed. A few open issues, hardware configurations and optimization principles of existing methods are discussed. This survey concludes the few optimization techniques with the medical imaging algorithms on GPU. Finally, limitation and future scope of GPU programming are discussed.

  19. Graphics Processing Units (GPU) and the Goddard Earth Observing System atmospheric model (GEOS-5): Implementation and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Earth system models like the Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5) have been pushing the limits of large clusters of multi-core microprocessors, producing breath-taking fidelity in resolving cloud systems at a global scale. GPU computing presents an opportunity for improving the efficiency of these leading edge models. A GPU implementation of GEOS-5 will facilitate the use of cloud-system resolving resolutions in data assimilation and weather prediction, at resolutions near 3.5 km, improving our ability to extract detailed information from high-resolution satellite observations and ultimately produce better weather and climate predictions

  20. 78 FR 22347 - GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-320; NRC-2013-0065] GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain Security Requirements AGENCY: Nuclear... and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  1. A FPGA-based Network Interface Card with GPUDirect enabling realtime GPU computing in HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lonardo, Alessandro; Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frezza, Ottorino; Lamanna, Gianluca; Lo Cicero, Francesca; Martinelli, Michele; Neri, Ilaria; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Pastorelli, Elena; Pontisso, Luca; Rossetti, Davide; Simeone, Francesco; Simula, Francesco; Sozzi, Marco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The capability of processing high bandwidth data streams in real-time is a computational requirement common to many High Energy Physics experiments. Keeping the latency of the data transport tasks under control is essential in order to meet this requirement. We present NaNet, a FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card design featuring Remote Direct Memory Access towards CPU and GPU memories plus a transport protocol offload module characterized by cycle-accurate upper-bound handling. The combination of these two features allows to relieve almost entirely the OS and the application from data tranfer management, minimizing the unavoidable jitter effects associated to OS process scheduling. The design currently supports one GbE (1000Base-T) and three custom 34 Gbps APElink I/O channels, but four-channels 10GbE (10Base-R) and 2.5 Gbps deterministic latency KM3link versions are being implemented. Two use cases of NaNet will be discussed: the GPU-based low level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 experiment an...

  2. SU-E-T-806: Very Fast GPU-Based IMPT Dose Computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A; Brand, M [Mitsubishi Electric Research Lab, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Designing particle therapy treatment plans is a dosimetrist-in-the-loop optimization wherein the conflicting constraints of achieving a desired tumor dose distribution must be balanced against the need to minimize the dose to nearby OARs. IMPT introduces an additional, inner, numerical optimization step in which the dosimetrist’s current set of constraints are used to determine the weighting of beam spots. Very fast dose calculations are needed to enable the dosimetrist to perform many iterations of the outer optimization in a commercially reasonable time. Methods: We have developed a GPU-based convolution-type dose computation algorithm that more accurately handles heterogeneities than earlier algorithms by redistributing energy from dose computed in a water volume. The depth dependence of the beam size is handled by pre-processing Bragg curves using a weighted superposition of Gaussian bases. Additionally, scattering, the orientation of treatment ports, and the non-parallel propagation of beams are handled by large, but sparse, energy-redistribution matrices that implement affine transforms. Results: We tested our algorithm using a brain tumor dataset with 1 mm voxels and a single treatment port from the patient’s anterior through the sinuses. The resulting dose volume is 100 × 100 × 230 mm with 66,200 beam spots on a 3 × 3 × 2 mm grid. The dose computation takes <1 msec on a GeForce GTX Titan GPU with the Gamma passing rate for 2mm/2% criterion of 99.1% compared to dose calculated by an alternative dose algorithm based on pencil beams. We will present comparisons to Monte Carlo dose calculations. Conclusion: Our high-speed dose computation method enables the IMPT spot weights to be optimized in <1 second, resulting in a nearly instantaneous response to user changes to dose constraints. This permits the creation of higher quality plans by allowing the dosimetrist to evaluate more alternatives in a short period of time.

  3. NMF-mGPU: non-negative matrix factorization on multi-GPU systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Roa, Edgardo; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Setoain, Javier; García, Carlos; Tirado, Francisco; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2015-02-13

    In the last few years, the Non-negative Matrix Factorization ( NMF ) technique has gained a great interest among the Bioinformatics community, since it is able to extract interpretable parts from high-dimensional datasets. However, the computing time required to process large data matrices may become impractical, even for a parallel application running on a multiprocessors cluster. In this paper, we present NMF-mGPU, an efficient and easy-to-use implementation of the NMF algorithm that takes advantage of the high computing performance delivered by Graphics-Processing Units ( GPUs ). Driven by the ever-growing demands from the video-games industry, graphics cards usually provided in PCs and laptops have evolved from simple graphics-drawing platforms into high-performance programmable systems that can be used as coprocessors for linear-algebra operations. However, these devices may have a limited amount of on-board memory, which is not considered by other NMF implementations on GPU. NMF-mGPU is based on CUDA ( Compute Unified Device Architecture ), the NVIDIA's framework for GPU computing. On devices with low memory available, large input matrices are blockwise transferred from the system's main memory to the GPU's memory, and processed accordingly. In addition, NMF-mGPU has been explicitly optimized for the different CUDA architectures. Finally, platforms with multiple GPUs can be synchronized through MPI ( Message Passing Interface ). In a four-GPU system, this implementation is about 120 times faster than a single conventional processor, and more than four times faster than a single GPU device (i.e., a super-linear speedup). Applications of GPUs in Bioinformatics are getting more and more attention due to their outstanding performance when compared to traditional processors. In addition, their relatively low price represents a highly cost-effective alternative to conventional clusters. In life sciences, this results in an excellent opportunity to facilitate the

  4. RGCA: A Reliable GPU Cluster Architecture for Large-Scale Internet of Things Computing Based on Effective Performance-Energy Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuling; Chen, Qingkui; Xiong, Neal N; Zhao, Deyu; Wang, Jingjuan

    2017-08-04

    This paper aims to develop a low-cost, high-performance and high-reliability computing system to process large-scale data using common data mining algorithms in the Internet of Things (IoT) computing environment. Considering the characteristics of IoT data processing, similar to mainstream high performance computing, we use a GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) cluster to achieve better IoT services. Firstly, we present an energy consumption calculation method (ECCM) based on WSNs. Then, using the CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) Programming model, we propose a Two-level Parallel Optimization Model (TLPOM) which exploits reasonable resource planning and common compiler optimization techniques to obtain the best blocks and threads configuration considering the resource constraints of each node. The key to this part is dynamic coupling Thread-Level Parallelism (TLP) and Instruction-Level Parallelism (ILP) to improve the performance of the algorithms without additional energy consumption. Finally, combining the ECCM and the TLPOM, we use the Reliable GPU Cluster Architecture (RGCA) to obtain a high-reliability computing system considering the nodes' diversity, algorithm characteristics, etc. The results show that the performance of the algorithms significantly increased by 34.1%, 33.96% and 24.07% for Fermi, Kepler and Maxwell on average with TLPOM and the RGCA ensures that our IoT computing system provides low-cost and high-reliability services.

  5. Proceedings of the GPU computing in high-energy physics conference 2014 GPUHEP2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonati, Claudio; D'Elia, Massimo; Lamanna, Gianluca; Sozzi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The International Conference on GPUs in High-Energy Physics was held from September 10 to 12, 2014 at the University of Pisa, Italy. It represented a larger scale follow-up to a set of workshops which indicated the rising interest of the HEP community, experimentalists and theorists alike, towards the use of inexpensive and massively parallel computing devices, for very diverse purposes. The conference was organized in plenary sessions of invited and contributed talks, and poster presentations on the following topics: - GPUs in triggering applications - Low-level trigger systems based on GPUs - Use of GPUs in high-level trigger systems - GPUs in tracking and vertexing - Challenges for triggers in future HEP experiments - Reconstruction and Monte Carlo software on GPUs - Software frameworks and tools for GPU code integration - Hard real-time use of GPUs - Lattice QCD simulation - GPUs in phenomenology - GPUs for medical imaging purposes - GPUs in neutron and photon science - Massively parallel computations in HEP - Code parallelization. ''GPU computing in High-Energy Physics'' attracted 78 registrants to Pisa. The 38 oral presentations included talks on specific topics in experimental and theoretical applications of GPUs, as well as review talks on applications and technology. 5 posters were also presented, and were introduced by a short plenary oral illustration. A company exhibition was hosted on site. The conference consisted of 12 plenary sessions, together with a social program which included a banquet and guided excursions around Pisa. It was overall an enjoyable experience, offering an opportunity to share ideas and opinions, and getting updated on other participants' work in this emerging field, as well as being a valuable introduction for newcomers interested to learn more about the use of GPUs as accelerators for scientific progress on the elementary constituents of matter and energy.

  6. Proceedings of the GPU computing in high-energy physics conference 2014 GPUHEP2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonati, Claudio; D' Elia, Massimo; Lamanna, Gianluca; Sozzi, Marco (eds.)

    2015-06-15

    The International Conference on GPUs in High-Energy Physics was held from September 10 to 12, 2014 at the University of Pisa, Italy. It represented a larger scale follow-up to a set of workshops which indicated the rising interest of the HEP community, experimentalists and theorists alike, towards the use of inexpensive and massively parallel computing devices, for very diverse purposes. The conference was organized in plenary sessions of invited and contributed talks, and poster presentations on the following topics: - GPUs in triggering applications - Low-level trigger systems based on GPUs - Use of GPUs in high-level trigger systems - GPUs in tracking and vertexing - Challenges for triggers in future HEP experiments - Reconstruction and Monte Carlo software on GPUs - Software frameworks and tools for GPU code integration - Hard real-time use of GPUs - Lattice QCD simulation - GPUs in phenomenology - GPUs for medical imaging purposes - GPUs in neutron and photon science - Massively parallel computations in HEP - Code parallelization. ''GPU computing in High-Energy Physics'' attracted 78 registrants to Pisa. The 38 oral presentations included talks on specific topics in experimental and theoretical applications of GPUs, as well as review talks on applications and technology. 5 posters were also presented, and were introduced by a short plenary oral illustration. A company exhibition was hosted on site. The conference consisted of 12 plenary sessions, together with a social program which included a banquet and guided excursions around Pisa. It was overall an enjoyable experience, offering an opportunity to share ideas and opinions, and getting updated on other participants' work in this emerging field, as well as being a valuable introduction for newcomers interested to learn more about the use of GPUs as accelerators for scientific progress on the elementary constituents of matter and energy.

  7. Physical modeling and high-performance GPU computing for characterization, interception, and disruption of hazardous near-Earth objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinger, Brian Douglas

    For the past few decades, both the scientific community and the general public have been becoming more aware that the Earth lives in a shooting gallery of small objects. We classify all of these asteroids and comets, known or unknown, that cross Earth's orbit as near-Earth objects (NEOs). A look at our geologic history tells us that NEOs have collided with Earth in the past, and we expect that they will continue to do so. With thousands of known NEOs crossing the orbit of Earth, there has been significant scientific interest in developing the capability to deflect an NEO from an impacting trajectory. This thesis applies the ideas of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) theory to the NEO disruption problem. A simulation package was designed that allows efficacy simulation to be integrated into the mission planning and design process. This is done by applying ideas in high-performance computing (HPC) on the computer graphics processing unit (GPU). Rather than prove a concept through large standalone simulations on a supercomputer, a highly parallel structure allows for flexible, target dependent questions to be resolved. Built around nonclassified data and analysis, this computer package will allow academic institutions to better tackle the issue of NEO mitigation effectiveness.

  8. Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to-Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    implementation of the direct interaction called particle-to-particle kernel for a shared-memory single GPU device using the Compute Unified Device Architecture ...GPU-defined P2P kernel we developed using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA).9 A brief outline of the rest of this work follows. The...Employed The computing environment used for this work is a 64-node heterogeneous cluster consisting of 48 IBM dx360M4 nodes, each with one Intel Phi

  9. Spins Dynamics in a Dissipative Environment: Hierarchal Equations of Motion Approach Using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Masashi; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-08-11

    A system with many energy states coupled to a harmonic oscillator bath is considered. To study quantum non-Markovian system-bath dynamics numerically rigorously and nonperturbatively, we developed a computer code for the reduced hierarchy equations of motion (HEOM) for a graphics processor unit (GPU) that can treat the system as large as 4096 energy states. The code employs a Padé spectrum decomposition (PSD) for a construction of HEOM and the exponential integrators. Dynamics of a quantum spin glass system are studied by calculating the free induction decay signal for the cases of 3 × 2 to 3 × 4 triangular lattices with antiferromagnetic interactions. We found that spins relax faster at lower temperature due to transitions through a quantum coherent state, as represented by the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix, while it has been known that the spins relax slower due to suppression of thermal activation in a classical case. The decay of the spins are qualitatively similar regardless of the lattice sizes. The pathway of spin relaxation is analyzed under a sudden temperature drop condition. The Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) based source code used in the present calculations is provided as Supporting Information .

  10. Performance analysis and acceleration of explicit integration for large kinetic networks using batched GPU computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shyles, Daniel [University of Tennessee (UT); Dongarra, Jack J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guidry, Mike W. [ORNL; Tomov, Stanimire Z. [ORNL; Billings, Jay Jay [ORNL; Brock, Benjamin A. [ORNL; Haidar Ahmad, Azzam A. [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    Abstract—We demonstrate the systematic implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms that solve efficiently N coupled ordinary differential equations (subject to initial conditions) on modern GPUs. We take representative test cases (Type Ia supernova explosions) and demonstrate two or more orders of magnitude increase in efficiency for solving such systems (of realistic thermonuclear networks coupled to fluid dynamics). This implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical disciplines that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible. As examples of such applications we present the computational techniques developed for our ongoing deployment of these new methods on modern GPU accelerators. We show that similarly to many other scientific applications, ranging from national security to medical advances, the computation can be split into many independent computational tasks, each of relatively small-size. As the size of each individual task does not provide sufficient parallelism for the underlying hardware, especially for accelerators, these tasks must be computed concurrently as a single routine, that we call batched routine, in order to saturate the hardware with enough work.

  11. A comparison of native GPU computing versus OpenACC for implementing flow-routing algorithms in hydrological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Antonio J.; Noguera, José M.; Luque, Adrián

    2016-02-01

    In recent years GPU computing has gained wide acceptance as a simple low-cost solution for speeding up computationally expensive processing in many scientific and engineering applications. However, in most cases accelerating a traditional CPU implementation for a GPU is a non-trivial task that requires a thorough refactorization of the code and specific optimizations that depend on the architecture of the device. OpenACC is a promising technology that aims at reducing the effort required to accelerate C/C++/Fortran code on an attached multicore device. Virtually with this technology the CPU code only has to be augmented with a few compiler directives to identify the areas to be accelerated and the way in which data has to be moved between the CPU and GPU. Its potential benefits are multiple: better code readability, less development time, lower risk of errors and less dependency on the underlying architecture and future evolution of the GPU technology. Our aim with this work is to evaluate the pros and cons of using OpenACC against native GPU implementations in computationally expensive hydrological applications, using the classic D8 algorithm of O'Callaghan and Mark for river network extraction as case-study. We implemented the flow accumulation step of this algorithm in CPU, using OpenACC and two different CUDA versions, comparing the length and complexity of the code and its performance with different datasets. We advance that although OpenACC can not match the performance of a CUDA optimized implementation (×3.5 slower in average), it provides a significant performance improvement against a CPU implementation (×2-6) with by far a simpler code and less implementation effort.

  12. Simulating spin models on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Over the last couple of years it has been realized that the vast computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs) could be harvested for purposes other than the video game industry. This power, which at least nominally exceeds that of current CPUs by large factors, results from the relative simplicity of the GPU architectures as compared to CPUs, combined with a large number of parallel processing units on a single chip. To benefit from this setup for general computing purposes, the problems at hand need to be prepared in a way to profit from the inherent parallelism and hierarchical structure of memory accesses. In this contribution I discuss the performance potential for simulating spin models, such as the Ising model, on GPU as compared to conventional simulations on CPU.

  13. GPU-Based Computation of Formation Pressure for Multistage Hydraulically Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Oil and Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongwang Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for multistage hydraulically fractured horizontal wells (MFHWs in tight oil and gas reservoirs was derived by considering the variations in the permeability and porosity of tight oil and gas reservoirs that depend on formation pressure and mixed fluid properties and introducing the pseudo-pressure; analytical solutions were presented using the Newman superposition principle. The CPU-GPU asynchronous computing model was designed based on the CUDA platform, and the analytic solution was decomposed into infinite summation and integral forms for parallel computation. Implementation of this algorithm on an Intel i5 4590 CPU and NVIDIA GT 730 GPU demonstrates that computation speed increased by almost 80 times, which meets the requirement for real-time calculation of the formation pressure of MFHWs.

  14. GPU: the biggest key processor for AI and parallel processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baji, Toru

    2017-07-01

    Two types of processors exist in the market. One is the conventional CPU and the other is Graphic Processor Unit (GPU). Typical CPU is composed of 1 to 8 cores while GPU has thousands of cores. CPU is good for sequential processing, while GPU is good to accelerate software with heavy parallel executions. GPU was initially dedicated for 3D graphics. However from 2006, when GPU started to apply general-purpose cores, it was noticed that this architecture can be used as a general purpose massive-parallel processor. NVIDIA developed a software framework Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) that make it possible to easily program the GPU for these application. With CUDA, GPU started to be used in workstations and supercomputers widely. Recently two key technologies are highlighted in the industry. The Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Autonomous Driving Cars. AI requires a massive parallel operation to train many-layers of neural networks. With CPU alone, it was impossible to finish the training in a practical time. The latest multi-GPU system with P100 makes it possible to finish the training in a few hours. For the autonomous driving cars, TOPS class of performance is required to implement perception, localization, path planning processing and again SoC with integrated GPU will play a key role there. In this paper, the evolution of the GPU which is one of the biggest commercial devices requiring state-of-the-art fabrication technology will be introduced. Also overview of the GPU demanding key application like the ones described above will be introduced.

  15. GPU based acceleration of first principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, H; Tsumuraya, K; Aoki, M; Iitaka, T

    2010-01-01

    We present a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated simulations of first principles electronic structure calculations. The FFT, which is the most time-consuming part, is about 10 times accelerated. As the result, the total computation time of a first principles calculation is reduced to 15 percent of that of the CPU.

  16. GPU Accelerated Surgical Simulators for Complex Morhpology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2005-01-01

    a springmass system in order to simulate a complex organ such as the heart. Computations are accelerated by taking advantage of modern graphics processing units (GPUs). Two GPU implementations are presented. They vary in their generality of spring connections and in the speedup factor they achieve...

  17. Efficient Support for Matrix Computations on Heterogeneous Multi-core and Multi-GPU Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Fengguang [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tomov, Stanimire [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-06-01

    We present a new methodology for utilizing all CPU cores and all GPUs on a heterogeneous multicore and multi-GPU system to support matrix computations e ciently. Our approach is able to achieve the objectives of a high degree of parallelism, minimized synchronization, minimized communication, and load balancing. Our main idea is to treat the heterogeneous system as a distributed-memory machine, and to use a heterogeneous 1-D block cyclic distribution to allocate data to the host system and GPUs to minimize communication. We have designed heterogeneous algorithms with two di erent tile sizes (one for CPU cores and the other for GPUs) to cope with processor heterogeneity. We propose an auto-tuning method to determine the best tile sizes to attain both high performance and load balancing. We have also implemented a new runtime system and applied it to the Cholesky and QR factorizations. Our experiments on a compute node with two Intel Westmere hexa-core CPUs and three Nvidia Fermi GPUs demonstrate good weak scalability, strong scalability, load balance, and e ciency of our approach.

  18. Development of parallel GPU based algorithms for problems in nuclear area; Desenvolvimento de algoritmos paralelos baseados em GPU para solucao de problemas na area nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Adino Americo Heimlich

    2009-07-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPU) are high performance co-processors intended, originally, to improve the use and quality of computer graphics applications. Since researchers and practitioners realized the potential of using GPU for general purpose, their application has been extended to other fields out of computer graphics scope. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of using GPU in two typical problems of Nuclear area. The neutron transport simulation using Monte Carlo method and solve heat equation in a bi-dimensional domain by finite differences method. To achieve this, we develop parallel algorithms for GPU and CPU in the two problems described above. The comparison showed that the GPU-based approach is faster than the CPU in a computer with two quad core processors, without precision loss. (author)

  19. Application of GPU to Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver (MARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatake, Taku; Takase, Kazuyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    In the nuclear engineering fields, a high performance computer system is necessary to perform the large scale computations. Recently, a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been developed as a rendering computational system in order to reduce a Central Processing Unit (CPU) load. In the graphics processing, the high performance computing is needed to render the high-quality 3D objects in some video games. Thus the GPU consists of many processing units and a wide memory bandwidth. In this study, the Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver (MARS) which is one of the interface volume tracking methods for multi-phase flows has been performed. The multi-phase flow computation is very important for the nuclear reactors and other engineering fields. The MARS consists of two computing parts: the interface tracking part and the fluid motion computing part. As for the interface tracking part, the performance of GPU (GTX280) was 6 times faster than that of the CPU (Dual-Xeon 5040), and in the fluid motion computing part the Poisson Solver by the GPU (GTX285) was 22 times faster than that by the CPU(Core i7). As for the Dam Breaking Problem, the result of GPU-MARS showed slightly different from the experimental result. Because the GPU-MARS was developed using the single-precision GPU, it can be considered that the round-off error might be accumulated. (author)

  20. GPU-based implementation of an accelerated SR-NLUT based on N-point one-dimensional sub-principal fringe patterns in computer-generated holograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Min Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated spatial redundancy-based novel-look-up-table (A-SR-NLUT method based on a new concept of the N-point one-dimensional sub-principal fringe pattern (N-point1-D sub-PFP is implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU for fast calculation of computer-generated holograms (CGHs of three-dimensional (3-Dobjects. Since the proposed method can generate the N-point two-dimensional (2-D PFPs for CGH calculation from the pre-stored N-point 1-D PFPs, the loading time of the N-point PFPs on the GPU can be dramatically reduced, which results in a great increase of the computational speed of the proposed method. Experimental results confirm that the average calculation time for one-object point has been reduced by 49.6% and 55.4% compared to those of the conventional 2-D SR-NLUT methods for each case of the 2-point and 3-point SR maps, respectively.

  1. Compute-unified device architecture implementation of a block-matching algorithm for multiple graphical processing unit cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanes, Francesc; Cadennes, Marie; Brankov, Jovan G

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a fast implementation of a classical block matching motion estimation algorithm for multiple Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) computing engine. The implemented block matching algorithm (BMA) uses summed absolute difference (SAD) error criterion and full grid search (FS) for finding optimal block displacement. In this evaluation we compared the execution time of a GPU and CPU implementation for images of various sizes, using integer and non-integer search grids.The results show that use of a GPU card can shorten computation time by a factor of 200 times for integer and 1000 times for a non-integer search grid. The additional speedup for non-integer search grid comes from the fact that GPU has built-in hardware for image interpolation. Further, when using multiple GPU cards, the presented evaluation shows the importance of the data splitting method across multiple cards, but an almost linear speedup with a number of cards is achievable.In addition we compared execution time of the proposed FS GPU implementation with two existing, highly optimized non-full grid search CPU based motion estimations methods, namely implementation of the Pyramidal Lucas Kanade Optical flow algorithm in OpenCV and Simplified Unsymmetrical multi-Hexagon search in H.264/AVC standard. In these comparisons, FS GPU implementation still showed modest improvement even though the computational complexity of FS GPU implementation is substantially higher than non-FS CPU implementation.We also demonstrated that for an image sequence of 720×480 pixels in resolution, commonly used in video surveillance, the proposed GPU implementation is sufficiently fast for real-time motion estimation at 30 frames-per-second using two NVIDIA C1060 Tesla GPU cards.

  2. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  3. Multi-GPU Jacobian accelerated computing for soft-field tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsic, A; Attardo, E A; Halter, R J

    2012-01-01

    on a single NVIDIA S1070 GPU, and of 50 times on four GPUs, bringing the Jacobian computing time for a fine 3D mesh from 12 min to 14 s. We regard this as an important step toward gaining interactive reconstruction times in 3D imaging, particularly when coupled in the future with acceleration of the forward problem. While we demonstrate results for EIT, these results apply to any soft-field imaging modality where the Jacobian matrix is computed with the adjoint method. (paper)

  4. Multi-GPU Jacobian accelerated computing for soft-field tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsic, A; Attardo, E A; Halter, R J

    2012-10-01

    times on a single NVIDIA S1070 GPU, and of 50 times on four GPUs, bringing the Jacobian computing time for a fine 3D mesh from 12 min to 14 s. We regard this as an important step toward gaining interactive reconstruction times in 3D imaging, particularly when coupled in the future with acceleration of the forward problem. While we demonstrate results for EIT, these results apply to any soft-field imaging modality where the Jacobian matrix is computed with the adjoint method.

  5. Computing the Density Matrix in Electronic Structure Theory on Graphics Processing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, M J; Sanville, E J; Mniszewski, S M; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-11-13

    The self-consistent solution of a Schrödinger-like equation for the density matrix is a critical and computationally demanding step in quantum-based models of interatomic bonding. This step was tackled historically via the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. We have investigated the performance and accuracy of the second-order spectral projection (SP2) algorithm for the computation of the density matrix via a recursive expansion of the Fermi operator in a series of generalized matrix-matrix multiplications. We demonstrate that owing to its simplicity, the SP2 algorithm [Niklasson, A. M. N. Phys. Rev. B2002, 66, 155115] is exceptionally well suited to implementation on graphics processing units (GPUs). The performance in double and single precision arithmetic of a hybrid GPU/central processing unit (CPU) and full GPU implementation of the SP2 algorithm exceed those of a CPU-only implementation of the SP2 algorithm and traditional matrix diagonalization when the dimensions of the matrices exceed about 2000 × 2000. Padding schemes for arrays allocated in the GPU memory that optimize the performance of the CUBLAS implementations of the level 3 BLAS DGEMM and SGEMM subroutines for generalized matrix-matrix multiplications are described in detail. The analysis of the relative performance of the hybrid CPU/GPU and full GPU implementations indicate that the transfer of arrays between the GPU and CPU constitutes only a small fraction of the total computation time. The errors measured in the self-consistent density matrices computed using the SP2 algorithm are generally smaller than those measured in matrices computed via diagonalization. Furthermore, the errors in the density matrices computed using the SP2 algorithm do not exhibit any dependence of system size, whereas the errors increase linearly with the number of orbitals when diagonalization is employed.

  6. Quick plasma equilibrium reconstruction based on GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Bingjia; Huang, Y.; Luo, Z.P.; Yuan, Q.P.; Lao, L.

    2014-01-01

    A parallel code named P-EFIT which could complete an equilibrium reconstruction iteration in 250 μs is described. It is built with the CUDA TM architecture by using Graphical Processing Unit (GPU). It is described for the optimization of middle-scale matrix multiplication on GPU and an algorithm which could solve block tri-diagonal linear system efficiently in parallel. Benchmark test is conducted. Static test proves the accuracy of the P-EFIT and simulation-test proves the feasibility of using P-EFIT for real-time reconstruction on 65x65 computation grids. (author)

  7. GPU Pro 5 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In GPU Pro5: Advanced Rendering Techniques, section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Marius Bjorge have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book covers rendering, lighting, effects in image space, mobile devices, 3D engine design, and compute. It explores rasterization of liquids, ray tracing of art assets that would otherwise be used in a rasterized engine, physically based area lights, volumetric light

  8. Performance analysis of the FDTD method applied to holographic volume gratings: Multi-core CPU versus GPU computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, J.; Bleda, S.; Neipp, C.; Márquez, A.; Pascual, I.; Beléndez, A.

    2013-03-01

    The finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) allows electromagnetic field distribution analysis as a function of time and space. The method is applied to analyze holographic volume gratings (HVGs) for the near-field distribution at optical wavelengths. Usually, this application requires the simulation of wide areas, which implies more memory and time processing. In this work, we propose a specific implementation of the FDTD method including several add-ons for a precise simulation of optical diffractive elements. Values in the near-field region are computed considering the illumination of the grating by means of a plane wave for different angles of incidence and including absorbing boundaries as well. We compare the results obtained by FDTD with those obtained using a matrix method (MM) applied to diffraction gratings. In addition, we have developed two optimized versions of the algorithm, for both CPU and GPU, in order to analyze the improvement of using the new NVIDIA Fermi GPU architecture versus highly tuned multi-core CPU as a function of the size simulation. In particular, the optimized CPU implementation takes advantage of the arithmetic and data transfer streaming SIMD (single instruction multiple data) extensions (SSE) included explicitly in the code and also of multi-threading by means of OpenMP directives. A good agreement between the results obtained using both FDTD and MM methods is obtained, thus validating our methodology. Moreover, the performance of the GPU is compared to the SSE+OpenMP CPU implementation, and it is quantitatively determined that a highly optimized CPU program can be competitive for a wider range of simulation sizes, whereas GPU computing becomes more powerful for large-scale simulations.

  9. Accelerating population balance-Monte Carlo simulation for coagulation dynamics from the Markov jump model, stochastic algorithm and GPU parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zuwei; Zhao, Haibo; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a comprehensive framework for accelerating population balance-Monte Carlo (PBMC) simulation of particle coagulation dynamics. By combining Markov jump model, weighted majorant kernel and GPU (graphics processing unit) parallel computing, a significant gain in computational efficiency is achieved. The Markov jump model constructs a coagulation-rule matrix of differentially-weighted simulation particles, so as to capture the time evolution of particle size distribution with low statistical noise over the full size range and as far as possible to reduce the number of time loopings. Here three coagulation rules are highlighted and it is found that constructing appropriate coagulation rule provides a route to attain the compromise between accuracy and cost of PBMC methods. Further, in order to avoid double looping over all simulation particles when considering the two-particle events (typically, particle coagulation), the weighted majorant kernel is introduced to estimate the maximum coagulation rates being used for acceptance–rejection processes by single-looping over all particles, and meanwhile the mean time-step of coagulation event is estimated by summing the coagulation kernels of rejected and accepted particle pairs. The computational load of these fast differentially-weighted PBMC simulations (based on the Markov jump model) is reduced greatly to be proportional to the number of simulation particles in a zero-dimensional system (single cell). Finally, for a spatially inhomogeneous multi-dimensional (multi-cell) simulation, the proposed fast PBMC is performed in each cell, and multiple cells are parallel processed by multi-cores on a GPU that can implement the massively threaded data-parallel tasks to obtain remarkable speedup ratio (comparing with CPU computation, the speedup ratio of GPU parallel computing is as high as 200 in a case of 100 cells with 10 000 simulation particles per cell). These accelerating approaches of PBMC are

  10. Implementation and Optimization of GPU-Based Static State Security Analysis in Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Static state security analysis (SSSA is one of the most important computations to check whether a power system is in normal and secure operating state. It is a challenge to satisfy real-time requirements with CPU-based concurrent methods due to the intensive computations. A sensitivity analysis-based method with Graphics processing unit (GPU is proposed for power systems, which can reduce calculation time by 40% compared to the execution on a 4-core CPU. The proposed method involves load flow analysis and sensitivity analysis. In load flow analysis, a multifrontal method for sparse LU factorization is explored on GPU through dynamic frontal task scheduling between CPU and GPU. The varying matrix operations during sensitivity analysis on GPU are highly optimized in this study. The results of performance evaluations show that the proposed GPU-based SSSA with optimized matrix operations can achieve a significant reduction in computation time.

  11. Development of parallel GPU based algorithms for problems in nuclear area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Adino Americo Heimlich

    2009-01-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPU) are high performance co-processors intended, originally, to improve the use and quality of computer graphics applications. Since researchers and practitioners realized the potential of using GPU for general purpose, their application has been extended to other fields out of computer graphics scope. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of using GPU in two typical problems of Nuclear area. The neutron transport simulation using Monte Carlo method and solve heat equation in a bi-dimensional domain by finite differences method. To achieve this, we develop parallel algorithms for GPU and CPU in the two problems described above. The comparison showed that the GPU-based approach is faster than the CPU in a computer with two quad core processors, without precision loss. (author)

  12. Probing the Statistical Validity of the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition in Metallic Nanowires Using GPU Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, William R; Pervaje, Amulya K; Santos, Andrew P; Iacovella, Christopher R; Cummings, Peter T

    2013-12-10

    We perform a large-scale statistical analysis (>2000 independent simulations) of the elongation and rupture of gold nanowires, probing the validity and scope of the recently proposed ductile-to-brittle transition that occurs with increasing nanowire length [Wu et al. Nano Lett. 2012, 12, 910-914]. To facilitate a high-throughput simulation approach, we implement the second-moment approximation to the tight-binding (TB-SMA) potential within HOOMD-Blue, a molecular dynamics package which runs on massively parallel graphics processing units (GPUs). In a statistical sense, we find that the nanowires obey the ductile-to-brittle model quite well; however, we observe several unexpected features from the simulations that build on our understanding of the ductile-to-brittle transition. First, occasional failure behavior is observed that qualitatively differs from that predicted by the model prediction; this is attributed to stochastic thermal motion of the Au atoms and occurs at temperatures as low as 10 K. In addition, we also find that the ductile-to-brittle model, which was developed using classical dislocation theory, holds for nanowires as small as 3 nm in diameter. Finally, we demonstrate that the nanowire critical length is higher at 298 K relative to 10 K, a result that is not predicted by the ductile-to-brittle model. These results offer practical design strategies for adjusting nanowire failure and structure and also demonstrate that GPU computing is an excellent tool for studies requiring a large number of independent trajectories in order to fully characterize a system's behavior.

  13. Numerical simulation of lava flow using a GPU SPH model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Rustico

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH method for lava-flow modeling was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA developed by NVIDIA. This resulted in speed-ups of up to two orders of magnitude. The three-dimensional model can simulate lava flow on a real topography with free-surface, non-Newtonian fluids, and with phase change. The entire SPH code has three main components, neighbor list construction, force computation, and integration of the equation of motion, and it is computed on the GPU, fully exploiting the computational power. The simulation speed achieved is one to two orders of magnitude faster than the equivalent central processing unit (CPU code. This GPU implementation of SPH allows high resolution SPH modeling in hours and days, rather than in weeks and months, on inexpensive and readily available hardware.

  14. Graphics processing units in bioinformatics, computational biology and systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Marco S; Cazzaniga, Paolo; Tangherloni, Andrea; Besozzi, Daniela

    2017-09-01

    Several studies in Bioinformatics, Computational Biology and Systems Biology rely on the definition of physico-chemical or mathematical models of biological systems at different scales and levels of complexity, ranging from the interaction of atoms in single molecules up to genome-wide interaction networks. Traditional computational methods and software tools developed in these research fields share a common trait: they can be computationally demanding on Central Processing Units (CPUs), therefore limiting their applicability in many circumstances. To overcome this issue, general-purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are gaining an increasing attention by the scientific community, as they can considerably reduce the running time required by standard CPU-based software, and allow more intensive investigations of biological systems. In this review, we present a collection of GPU tools recently developed to perform computational analyses in life science disciplines, emphasizing the advantages and the drawbacks in the use of these parallel architectures. The complete list of GPU-powered tools here reviewed is available at http://bit.ly/gputools. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. GPU-based high performance Monte Carlo simulation in neutron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimlich, Adino; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Inteligencia Artificial Aplicada], e-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPU) are high performance co-processors intended, originally, to improve the use and quality of computer graphics applications. Since researchers and practitioners realized the potential of using GPU for general purpose, their application has been extended to other fields out of computer graphics scope. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of using GPU in neutron transport simulation by Monte Carlo method. To accomplish that, GPU- and CPU-based (single and multicore) approaches were developed and applied to a simple, but time-consuming problem. Comparisons demonstrated that the GPU-based approach is about 15 times faster than a parallel 8-core CPU-based approach also developed in this work. (author)

  16. GPU-based high performance Monte Carlo simulation in neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimlich, Adino; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPU) are high performance co-processors intended, originally, to improve the use and quality of computer graphics applications. Since researchers and practitioners realized the potential of using GPU for general purpose, their application has been extended to other fields out of computer graphics scope. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of using GPU in neutron transport simulation by Monte Carlo method. To accomplish that, GPU- and CPU-based (single and multicore) approaches were developed and applied to a simple, but time-consuming problem. Comparisons demonstrated that the GPU-based approach is about 15 times faster than a parallel 8-core CPU-based approach also developed in this work. (author)

  17. A Study on GPU Computing of Bi-conjugate Gradient Method for Finite Element Analysis of the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Seon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon; Jeon, Byoung Jin; Jung, Hye Dong

    2016-01-01

    A parallel algorithm of bi-conjugate gradient method was developed based on CUDA for parallel computation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The governing equations were discretized using splitting P2P1 finite element method. Asymmetric stenotic flow problem was solved to validate the proposed algorithm, and then the parallel performance of the GPU was examined by measuring the elapsed times. Further, the GPU performance for sparse matrix-vector multiplication was also investigated with a matrix of fluid-structure interaction problem. A kernel was generated to simultaneously compute the inner product of each row of sparse matrix and a vector. In addition, the kernel was optimized to improve the performance by using both parallel reduction and memory coalescing. In the kernel construction, the effect of warp on the parallel performance of the present CUDA was also examined. The present GPU computation was more than 7 times faster than the single CPU by double precision.

  18. A Study on GPU Computing of Bi-conjugate Gradient Method for Finite Element Analysis of the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jong Seon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon [Seoul Nat’l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byoung Jin [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hye Dong [Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    A parallel algorithm of bi-conjugate gradient method was developed based on CUDA for parallel computation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The governing equations were discretized using splitting P2P1 finite element method. Asymmetric stenotic flow problem was solved to validate the proposed algorithm, and then the parallel performance of the GPU was examined by measuring the elapsed times. Further, the GPU performance for sparse matrix-vector multiplication was also investigated with a matrix of fluid-structure interaction problem. A kernel was generated to simultaneously compute the inner product of each row of sparse matrix and a vector. In addition, the kernel was optimized to improve the performance by using both parallel reduction and memory coalescing. In the kernel construction, the effect of warp on the parallel performance of the present CUDA was also examined. The present GPU computation was more than 7 times faster than the single CPU by double precision.

  19. Advantages of GPU technology in DFT calculations of intercalated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešić, J.; Gajić, R.

    2014-09-01

    Over the past few years, the expansion of general-purpose graphic-processing unit (GPGPU) technology has had a great impact on computational science. GPGPU is the utilization of a graphics-processing unit (GPU) to perform calculations in applications usually handled by the central processing unit (CPU). Use of GPGPUs as a way to increase computational power in the material sciences has significantly decreased computational costs in already highly demanding calculations. A level of the acceleration and parallelization depends on the problem itself. Some problems can benefit from GPU acceleration and parallelization, such as the finite-difference time-domain algorithm (FTDT) and density-functional theory (DFT), while others cannot take advantage of these modern technologies. A number of GPU-supported applications had emerged in the past several years (www.nvidia.com/object/gpu-applications.html). Quantum Espresso (QE) is reported as an integrated suite of open source computer codes for electronic-structure calculations and materials modeling at the nano-scale. It is based on DFT, the use of a plane-waves basis and a pseudopotential approach. Since the QE 5.0 version, it has been implemented as a plug-in component for standard QE packages that allows exploiting the capabilities of Nvidia GPU graphic cards (www.qe-forge.org/gf/proj). In this study, we have examined the impact of the usage of GPU acceleration and parallelization on the numerical performance of DFT calculations. Graphene has been attracting attention worldwide and has already shown some remarkable properties. We have studied an intercalated graphene, using the QE package PHonon, which employs GPU. The term ‘intercalation’ refers to a process whereby foreign adatoms are inserted onto a graphene lattice. In addition, by intercalating different atoms between graphene layers, it is possible to tune their physical properties. Our experiments have shown there are benefits from using GPUs, and we reached an

  20. Advantages of GPU technology in DFT calculations of intercalated graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pešić, J; Gajić, R

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, the expansion of general-purpose graphic-processing unit (GPGPU) technology has had a great impact on computational science. GPGPU is the utilization of a graphics-processing unit (GPU) to perform calculations in applications usually handled by the central processing unit (CPU). Use of GPGPUs as a way to increase computational power in the material sciences has significantly decreased computational costs in already highly demanding calculations. A level of the acceleration and parallelization depends on the problem itself. Some problems can benefit from GPU acceleration and parallelization, such as the finite-difference time-domain algorithm (FTDT) and density-functional theory (DFT), while others cannot take advantage of these modern technologies. A number of GPU-supported applications had emerged in the past several years (www.nvidia.com/object/gpu-applications.html). Quantum Espresso (QE) is reported as an integrated suite of open source computer codes for electronic-structure calculations and materials modeling at the nano-scale. It is based on DFT, the use of a plane-waves basis and a pseudopotential approach. Since the QE 5.0 version, it has been implemented as a plug-in component for standard QE packages that allows exploiting the capabilities of Nvidia GPU graphic cards (www.qe-forge.org/gf/proj). In this study, we have examined the impact of the usage of GPU acceleration and parallelization on the numerical performance of DFT calculations. Graphene has been attracting attention worldwide and has already shown some remarkable properties. We have studied an intercalated graphene, using the QE package PHonon, which employs GPU. The term ‘intercalation’ refers to a process whereby foreign adatoms are inserted onto a graphene lattice. In addition, by intercalating different atoms between graphene layers, it is possible to tune their physical properties. Our experiments have shown there are benefits from using GPUs, and we reached an

  1. A GPU-based calculation using the three-dimensional FDTD method for electromagnetic field analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations with the numerical human model using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method have recently been performed frequently in a number of fields in biomedical engineering. However, the FDTD calculation runs too slowly. We focus, therefore, on general purpose programming on the graphics processing unit (GPGPU). The three-dimensional FDTD method was implemented on the GPU using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In this study, we used the NVIDIA Tesla C1060 as a GPGPU board. The performance of the GPU is evaluated in comparison with the performance of a conventional CPU and a vector supercomputer. The results indicate that three-dimensional FDTD calculations using a GPU can significantly reduce run time in comparison with that using a conventional CPU, even a native GPU implementation of the three-dimensional FDTD method, while the GPU/CPU speed ratio varies with the calculation domain and thread block size.

  2. Computing Low-Rank Approximation of a Dense Matrix on Multicore CPUs with a GPU and Its Application to Solving a Hierarchically Semiseparable Linear System of Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichitaro Yamazaki

    2015-01-01

    of their low-rank properties. To compute a low-rank approximation of a dense matrix, in this paper, we study the performance of QR factorization with column pivoting or with restricted pivoting on multicore CPUs with a GPU. We first propose several techniques to reduce the postprocessing time, which is required for restricted pivoting, on a modern CPU. We then examine the potential of using a GPU to accelerate the factorization process with both column and restricted pivoting. Our performance results on two eight-core Intel Sandy Bridge CPUs with one NVIDIA Kepler GPU demonstrate that using the GPU, the factorization time can be reduced by a factor of more than two. In addition, to study the performance of our implementations in practice, we integrate them into a recently developed software StruMF which algebraically exploits such low-rank structures for solving a general sparse linear system of equations. Our performance results for solving Poisson's equations demonstrate that the proposed techniques can significantly reduce the preconditioner construction time of StruMF on the CPUs, and the construction time can be further reduced by 10%–50% using the GPU.

  3. gPGA: GPU Accelerated Population Genetics Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbao Zhou

    Full Text Available The isolation with migration (IM model is important for studies in population genetics and phylogeography. IM program applies the IM model to genetic data drawn from a pair of closely related populations or species based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulations of gene genealogies. But computational burden of IM program has placed limits on its application.With strong computational power, Graphics Processing Unit (GPU has been widely used in many fields. In this article, we present an effective implementation of IM program on one GPU based on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA, which we call gPGA.Compared with IM program, gPGA can achieve up to 52.30X speedup on one GPU. The evaluation results demonstrate that it allows datasets to be analyzed effectively and rapidly for research on divergence population genetics. The software is freely available with source code at https://github.com/chunbaozhou/gPGA.

  4. Personal Supercomputing for Monte Carlo Simulation Using a GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Since the usability, accessibility, and maintenance of a personal computer (PC) are very good, a PC is a useful computer simulation tool for researchers. It has enough calculation power to simulate a small scale system with the improved performance of a PC's CPU. However, if a system is large or long time scale, we need a cluster computer or supercomputer. Recently great changes have occurred in the PC calculation environment. A graphic process unit (GPU) on a graphic card, only used to calculate display data, has a superior calculation capability to a PC's CPU. This GPU calculation performance is a match for the supercomputer in 2000. Although it has such a great calculation potential, it is not easy to program a simulation code for GPU due to difficult programming techniques for converting a calculation matrix to a 3D rendering image using graphic APIs. In 2006, NVIDIA provided the Software Development Kit (SDK) for the programming environment for NVIDIA's graphic cards, which is called the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). It makes the programming on the GPU easy without knowledge of the graphic APIs. This paper describes the basic architectures of NVIDIA's GPU and CUDA, and carries out a performance benchmark for the Monte Carlo simulation.

  5. Personal Supercomputing for Monte Carlo Simulation Using a GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Since the usability, accessibility, and maintenance of a personal computer (PC) are very good, a PC is a useful computer simulation tool for researchers. It has enough calculation power to simulate a small scale system with the improved performance of a PC's CPU. However, if a system is large or long time scale, we need a cluster computer or supercomputer. Recently great changes have occurred in the PC calculation environment. A graphic process unit (GPU) on a graphic card, only used to calculate display data, has a superior calculation capability to a PC's CPU. This GPU calculation performance is a match for the supercomputer in 2000. Although it has such a great calculation potential, it is not easy to program a simulation code for GPU due to difficult programming techniques for converting a calculation matrix to a 3D rendering image using graphic APIs. In 2006, NVIDIA provided the Software Development Kit (SDK) for the programming environment for NVIDIA's graphic cards, which is called the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). It makes the programming on the GPU easy without knowledge of the graphic APIs. This paper describes the basic architectures of NVIDIA's GPU and CUDA, and carries out a performance benchmark for the Monte Carlo simulation

  6. GPU-Boosted Camera-Only Indoor Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Fan, Zhun; Kristensen, Jens Klæstrup

    relies on local image features detection, description and matching; by parallelizing these computationally intensive tasks on the graphical processing unit (GPU), it is possible to do online localization using a Topometric Appearance Map. The method is developed as an integral part of a mobile service...

  7. GPU accelerated manifold correction method for spinning compact binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Chong-xi; Liu, Song; Zhong, Shuang-ying

    2018-04-01

    The graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration of the manifold correction algorithm based on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) technology is designed to simulate the dynamic evolution of the Post-Newtonian (PN) Hamiltonian formulation of spinning compact binaries. The feasibility and the efficiency of parallel computation on GPU have been confirmed by various numerical experiments. The numerical comparisons show that the accuracy on GPU execution of manifold corrections method has a good agreement with the execution of codes on merely central processing unit (CPU-based) method. The acceleration ability when the codes are implemented on GPU can increase enormously through the use of shared memory and register optimization techniques without additional hardware costs, implying that the speedup is nearly 13 times as compared with the codes executed on CPU for phase space scan (including 314 × 314 orbits). In addition, GPU-accelerated manifold correction method is used to numerically study how dynamics are affected by the spin-induced quadrupole-monopole interaction for black hole binary system.

  8. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L., E-mail: joaquin@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cal-Gonzalez, J. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  9. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S.; Cal-Gonzalez, J.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M.; Udias, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  10. Parallel generation of architecture on the GPU

    KAUST Repository

    Steinberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for the parallel evaluation of procedural shape grammars on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Unlike previous approaches that are either limited in the kind of shapes they allow, the amount of parallelism they can take advantage of, or both, our method supports state of the art procedural modeling including stochasticity and context-sensitivity. To increase parallelism, we explicitly express independence in the grammar, reduce inter-rule dependencies required for context-sensitive evaluation, and introduce intra-rule parallelism. Our rule scheduling scheme avoids unnecessary back and forth between CPU and GPU and reduces round trips to slow global memory by dynamically grouping rules in on-chip shared memory. Our GPU shape grammar implementation is multiple orders of magnitude faster than the standard in CPU-based rule evaluation, while offering equal expressive power. In comparison to the state of the art in GPU shape grammar derivation, our approach is nearly 50 times faster, while adding support for geometric context-sensitivity. © 2014 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2014 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. GPU-based acceleration of computations in nonlinear finite element deformation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafi, Ramin; Sirouspour, Shahin

    2014-03-01

    The physics of deformation for biological soft-tissue is best described by nonlinear continuum mechanics-based models, which then can be discretized by the FEM for a numerical solution. However, computational complexity of such models have limited their use in applications requiring real-time or fast response. In this work, we propose a graphic processing unit-based implementation of the FEM using implicit time integration for dynamic nonlinear deformation analysis. This is the most general formulation of the deformation analysis. It is valid for large deformations and strains and can account for material nonlinearities. The data-parallel nature and the intense arithmetic computations of nonlinear FEM equations make it particularly suitable for implementation on a parallel computing platform such as graphic processing unit. In this work, we present and compare two different designs based on the matrix-free and conventional preconditioned conjugate gradients algorithms for solving the FEM equations arising in deformation analysis. The speedup achieved with the proposed parallel implementations of the algorithms will be instrumental in the development of advanced surgical simulators and medical image registration methods involving soft-tissue deformation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key; Sil Lee, Keum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations

  13. Acceleration for 2D time-domain elastic full waveform inversion using a single GPU card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinpeng; Zhu, Peimin

    2018-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a challenging procedure due to the high computational cost related to the modeling, especially for the elastic case. The graphics processing unit (GPU) has become a popular device for the high-performance computing (HPC). To reduce the long computation time, we design and implement the GPU-based 2D elastic FWI (EFWI) in time domain using a single GPU card. We parallelize the forward modeling and gradient calculations using the CUDA programming language. To overcome the limitation of relatively small global memory on GPU, the boundary saving strategy is exploited to reconstruct the forward wavefield. Moreover, the L-BFGS optimization method used in the inversion increases the convergence of the misfit function. A multiscale inversion strategy is performed in the workflow to obtain the accurate inversion results. In our tests, the GPU-based implementations using a single GPU device achieve >15 times speedup in forward modeling, and about 12 times speedup in gradient calculation, compared with the eight-core CPU implementations optimized by OpenMP. The test results from the GPU implementations are verified to have enough accuracy by comparing the results obtained from the CPU implementations.

  14. Ultrafast convolution/superposition using tabulated and exponential kernels on GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Quan; Chen Mingli; Lu Weiguo [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) dose calculation is the workhorse for IMRT dose calculation. The authors present a novel algorithm for computing CCCS dose on the modern graphic processing unit (GPU). Methods: The GPU algorithm includes a novel TERMA calculation that has no write-conflicts and has linear computation complexity. The CCCS algorithm uses either tabulated or exponential cumulative-cumulative kernels (CCKs) as reported in literature. The authors have demonstrated that the use of exponential kernels can reduce the computation complexity by order of a dimension and achieve excellent accuracy. Special attentions are paid to the unique architecture of GPU, especially the memory accessing pattern, which increases performance by more than tenfold. Results: As a result, the tabulated kernel implementation in GPU is two to three times faster than other GPU implementations reported in literature. The implementation of CCCS showed significant speedup on GPU over single core CPU. On tabulated CCK, speedups as high as 70 are observed; on exponential CCK, speedups as high as 90 are observed. Conclusions: Overall, the GPU algorithm using exponential CCK is 1000-3000 times faster over a highly optimized single-threaded CPU implementation using tabulated CCK, while the dose differences are within 0.5% and 0.5 mm. This ultrafast CCCS algorithm will allow many time-sensitive applications to use accurate dose calculation.

  15. Medical image processing on the GPU - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Dufort, Paul; Forsberg, Daniel; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-12-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) are used today in a wide range of applications, mainly because they can dramatically accelerate parallel computing, are affordable and energy efficient. In the field of medical imaging, GPUs are in some cases crucial for enabling practical use of computationally demanding algorithms. This review presents the past and present work on GPU accelerated medical image processing, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to existing GPU implementations. The review covers GPU acceleration of basic image processing operations (filtering, interpolation, histogram estimation and distance transforms), the most commonly used algorithms in medical imaging (image registration, image segmentation and image denoising) and algorithms that are specific to individual modalities (CT, PET, SPECT, MRI, fMRI, DTI, ultrasound, optical imaging and microscopy). The review ends by highlighting some future possibilities and challenges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Study on efficiency of time computation in x-ray imaging simulation base on Monte Carlo algorithm using graphics processing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiani, Tia Dwi; Suprijadi; Haryanto, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) is one of the powerful techniques for simulation in x-ray imaging. MC method can simulate the radiation transport within matter with high accuracy and provides a natural way to simulate radiation transport in complex systems. One of the codes based on MC algorithm that are widely used for radiographic images simulation is MC-GPU, a codes developed by Andrea Basal. This study was aimed to investigate the time computation of x-ray imaging simulation in GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) compared to a standard CPU (Central Processing Unit). Furthermore, the effect of physical parameters to the quality of radiographic images and the comparison of image quality resulted from simulation in the GPU and CPU are evaluated in this paper. The simulations were run in CPU which was simulated in serial condition, and in two GPU with 384 cores and 2304 cores. In simulation using GPU, each cores calculates one photon, so, a large number of photon were calculated simultaneously. Results show that the time simulations on GPU were significantly accelerated compared to CPU. The simulations on the 2304 core of GPU were performed about 64 -114 times faster than on CPU, while the simulation on the 384 core of GPU were performed about 20 – 31 times faster than in a single core of CPU. Another result shows that optimum quality of images from the simulation was gained at the history start from 10"8 and the energy from 60 Kev to 90 Kev. Analyzed by statistical approach, the quality of GPU and CPU images are relatively the same.

  17. Study on efficiency of time computation in x-ray imaging simulation base on Monte Carlo algorithm using graphics processing unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setiani, Tia Dwi, E-mail: tiadwisetiani@gmail.com [Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Suprijadi [Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Reaserch Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Reaserch Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Monte Carlo (MC) is one of the powerful techniques for simulation in x-ray imaging. MC method can simulate the radiation transport within matter with high accuracy and provides a natural way to simulate radiation transport in complex systems. One of the codes based on MC algorithm that are widely used for radiographic images simulation is MC-GPU, a codes developed by Andrea Basal. This study was aimed to investigate the time computation of x-ray imaging simulation in GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) compared to a standard CPU (Central Processing Unit). Furthermore, the effect of physical parameters to the quality of radiographic images and the comparison of image quality resulted from simulation in the GPU and CPU are evaluated in this paper. The simulations were run in CPU which was simulated in serial condition, and in two GPU with 384 cores and 2304 cores. In simulation using GPU, each cores calculates one photon, so, a large number of photon were calculated simultaneously. Results show that the time simulations on GPU were significantly accelerated compared to CPU. The simulations on the 2304 core of GPU were performed about 64 -114 times faster than on CPU, while the simulation on the 384 core of GPU were performed about 20 – 31 times faster than in a single core of CPU. Another result shows that optimum quality of images from the simulation was gained at the history start from 10{sup 8} and the energy from 60 Kev to 90 Kev. Analyzed by statistical approach, the quality of GPU and CPU images are relatively the same.

  18. Real-time computation of parameter fitting and image reconstruction using graphical processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locans, Uldis; Adelmann, Andreas; Suter, Andreas; Fischer, Jannis; Lustermann, Werner; Dissertori, Günther; Wang, Qiulin

    2017-06-01

    In recent years graphical processing units (GPUs) have become a powerful tool in scientific computing. Their potential to speed up highly parallel applications brings the power of high performance computing to a wider range of users. However, programming these devices and integrating their use in existing applications is still a challenging task. In this paper we examined the potential of GPUs for two different applications. The first application, created at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), is used for parameter fitting during data analysis of μSR (muon spin rotation, relaxation and resonance) experiments. The second application, developed at ETH, is used for PET (Positron Emission Tomography) image reconstruction and analysis. Applications currently in use were examined to identify parts of the algorithms in need of optimization. Efficient GPU kernels were created in order to allow applications to use a GPU, to speed up the previously identified parts. Benchmarking tests were performed in order to measure the achieved speedup. During this work, we focused on single GPU systems to show that real time data analysis of these problems can be achieved without the need for large computing clusters. The results show that the currently used application for parameter fitting, which uses OpenMP to parallelize calculations over multiple CPU cores, can be accelerated around 40 times through the use of a GPU. The speedup may vary depending on the size and complexity of the problem. For PET image analysis, the obtained speedups of the GPU version were more than × 40 larger compared to a single core CPU implementation. The achieved results show that it is possible to improve the execution time by orders of magnitude.

  19. Implementation of the Lucas-Kanade image registration algorithm on a GPU for 3D computational platform stabilisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available rate of 15 fps at an image and ROI size of 640 480 pixels. This result was measured on an NVidia Tesla C870 GPU with about half as many processor cores as the GeForce GTX285 GPU. Marzat, et al. however estimate that their execu- tion times would...

  20. Accelerating Pseudo-Random Number Generator for MCNP on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunye; Liu, Jie; Chi, Lihua; Hu, Qingfeng; Deng, Li; Gong, Zhenghu

    2010-09-01

    Pseudo-random number generators (PRNG) are intensively used in many stochastic algorithms in particle simulations, artificial neural networks and other scientific computation. The PRNG in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) requires long period, high quality, flexible jump and fast enough. In this paper, we implement such a PRNG for MCNP on NVIDIA's GTX200 Graphics Processor Units (GPU) using CUDA programming model. Results shows that 3.80 to 8.10 times speedup are achieved compared with 4 to 6 cores CPUs and more than 679.18 million double precision random numbers can be generated per second on GPU.

  1. How General-Purpose can a GPU be?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Machanick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of graphics processing units (GPUs in general-purpose computation (GPGPU is a growing field. GPU instruction sets, while implementing a graphics pipeline, draw from a range of single instruction multiple datastream (SIMD architectures characteristic of the heyday of supercomputers. Yet only one of these SIMD instruction sets has been of application on a wide enough range of problems to survive the era when the full range of supercomputer design variants was being explored: vector instructions. This paper proposes a reconceptualization of the GPU as a multicore design with minimal exotic modes of parallelism so as to make GPGPU truly general.

  2. FULL GPU Implementation of Lattice-Boltzmann Methods with Immersed Boundary Conditions for Fast Fluid Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Boroni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM has shown great potential in fluid simulations, but performance issues and difficulties to manage complex boundary conditions have hindered a wider application. The upcoming of Graphic Processing Units (GPU Computing offered a possible solution for the performance issue, and methods like the Immersed Boundary (IB algorithm proved to be a flexible solution to boundaries. Unfortunately, the implicit IB algorithm makes the LBM implementation in GPU a non-trivial task. This work presents a fully parallel GPU implementation of LBM in combination with IB. The fluid-boundary interaction is implemented via GPU kernels, using execution configurations and data structures specifically designed to accelerate each code execution. Simulations were validated against experimental and analytical data showing good agreement and improving the computational time. Substantial reductions of calculation rates were achieved, lowering down the required time to execute the same model in a CPU to about two magnitude orders.

  3. Parallel GPU implementation of iterative PCA algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, M

    2009-11-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a key statistical technique for multivariate data analysis. For large data sets, the common approach to PCA computation is based on the standard NIPALS-PCA algorithm, which unfortunately suffers from loss of orthogonality, and therefore its applicability is usually limited to the estimation of the first few components. Here we present an algorithm based on Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization (called GS-PCA), which eliminates this shortcoming of NIPALS-PCA. Also, we discuss the GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) parallel implementation of both NIPALS-PCA and GS-PCA algorithms. The numerical results show that the GPU parallel optimized versions, based on CUBLAS (NVIDIA), are substantially faster (up to 12 times) than the CPU optimized versions based on CBLAS (GNU Scientific Library).

  4. GPU's for event reconstruction in the FairRoot framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Turany, M; Uhlig, F; Karabowicz, R

    2010-01-01

    FairRoot is the simulation and analysis framework used by CBM and PANDA experiments at FAIR/GSI. The use of graphics processor units (GPUs) for event reconstruction in FairRoot will be presented. The fact that CUDA (Nvidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture) development tools work alongside the conventional C/C++ compiler, makes it possible to mix GPU code with general-purpose code for the host CPU, based on this some of the reconstruction tasks can be send to the graphic cards. Moreover, tasks that run on the GPU's can also run in emulation mode on the host CPU, which has the advantage that the same code is used on both CPU and GPU.

  5. Toward real-time diffuse optical tomography: accelerating light propagation modeling employing parallel computing on GPU and CPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulgerakis, Matthaios; Eggebrecht, Adam; Wojtkiewicz, Stanislaw; Culver, Joseph; Dehghani, Hamid

    2017-12-01

    Parameter recovery in diffuse optical tomography is a computationally expensive algorithm, especially when used for large and complex volumes, as in the case of human brain functional imaging. The modeling of light propagation, also known as the forward problem, is the computational bottleneck of the recovery algorithm, whereby the lack of a real-time solution is impeding practical and clinical applications. The objective of this work is the acceleration of the forward model, within a diffusion approximation-based finite-element modeling framework, employing parallelization to expedite the calculation of light propagation in realistic adult head models. The proposed methodology is applicable for modeling both continuous wave and frequency-domain systems with the results demonstrating a 10-fold speed increase when GPU architectures are available, while maintaining high accuracy. It is shown that, for a very high-resolution finite-element model of the adult human head with ∼600,000 nodes, consisting of heterogeneous layers, light propagation can be calculated at ∼0.25  s/excitation source. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  6. Toward real-time diffuse optical tomography: accelerating light propagation modeling employing parallel computing on GPU and CPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulgerakis, Matthaios; Eggebrecht, Adam; Wojtkiewicz, Stanislaw; Culver, Joseph; Dehghani, Hamid

    2017-12-01

    Parameter recovery in diffuse optical tomography is a computationally expensive algorithm, especially when used for large and complex volumes, as in the case of human brain functional imaging. The modeling of light propagation, also known as the forward problem, is the computational bottleneck of the recovery algorithm, whereby the lack of a real-time solution is impeding practical and clinical applications. The objective of this work is the acceleration of the forward model, within a diffusion approximation-based finite-element modeling framework, employing parallelization to expedite the calculation of light propagation in realistic adult head models. The proposed methodology is applicable for modeling both continuous wave and frequency-domain systems with the results demonstrating a 10-fold speed increase when GPU architectures are available, while maintaining high accuracy. It is shown that, for a very high-resolution finite-element model of the adult human head with ˜600,000 nodes, consisting of heterogeneous layers, light propagation can be calculated at ˜0.25 s/excitation source.

  7. CudaPre3D: An Alternative Preprocessing Algorithm for Accelerating 3D Convex Hull Computation on the GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEI, G.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the calculating of convex hulls for point sets, a preprocessing procedure that is to filter the input points by discarding non-extreme points is commonly used to improve the computational efficiency. We previously proposed a quite straightforward preprocessing approach for accelerating 2D convex hull computation on the GPU. In this paper, we extend that algorithm to being used in 3D cases. The basic ideas behind these two preprocessing algorithms are similar: first, several groups of extreme points are found according to the original set of input points and several rotated versions of the input set; then, a convex polyhedron is created using the found extreme points; and finally those interior points locating inside the formed convex polyhedron are discarded. Experimental results show that: when employing the proposed preprocessing algorithm, it achieves the speedups of about 4x on average and 5x to 6x in the best cases over the cases where the proposed approach is not used. In addition, more than 95 percent of the input points can be discarded in most experimental tests.

  8. Vulnerable GPU Memory Management: Towards Recovering Raw Data from GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available According to previous reports, information could be leaked from GPU memory; however, the security implications of such a threat were mostly over-looked, because only limited information could be indirectly extracted through side-channel attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for recovering raw data directly from the GPU memory residues of many popular applications such as Google Chrome and Adobe PDF reader. Our algorithm enables harvesting highly sensitive information including credit card numbers and email contents from GPU memory residues. Evaluation results also indicate that nearly all GPU-accelerated applications are vulnerable to such attacks, and adversaries can launch attacks without requiring any special privileges both on traditional multi-user operating systems, and emerging cloud computing scenarios.

  9. Fast GPU-based computation of the sensitivity matrix for a PET list-mode OSEM algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassiri, Moulay Ali; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Montreal Univ., QC (Canada). Dept. de Radio-Oncologie; Hissoiny, Sami [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. de Genie Informatique et Genie Logiciel; Despres, Philippe [Quebec Univ. (Canada). Dept. de Radio-Oncologie

    2011-07-01

    One of the obstacle in introducing a list-mode PET reconstruction algorithm for routine clinical use is the long computation time required for the sensitivity matrix calculation. This matrix must be computed for each study because it depends on the object attenuation map. During the last decade, studies have shown that 3D list-mode OSEM reconstruction algorithms could be effectively performed and considerably accelerated by GPU devices. However, most of that preliminary work (1) was done for pre-clinical PET systems in which the number of LORs is small compared to modern human PET systems and (2) supposed that the sensitivity matrix is pre-calculated. The time required to compute this matrix can however be longer than the reconstruction time itself. The objective of this work is to investigate the performance of sensitivity matrix calculations in terms of computation time with modern GPUs, for clinical fully 3D LM-OSEM for modern PET scanners. For this purpose, sensitivity matrix calculations and full list-mode OSEM reconstruction for human PET systems were implemented on GPUs using the CUDA framework. The system matrices were built on-the-fly by using the multi-ray Siddon algorithm. The time to compute the sensitivity matrix for 288 x 288 x 57 arrays using 3 tangential LORs was 29 seconds. The 3D LM-OSEM algorithm, including the sensitivity matrix calculation, was performed for the same LORs in 71 seconds for 62 millions events, 6 frames and 1 iterations. This work let envision fast reconstructions for advanced PET application such as dynamic studies and parametric image reconstruction. (orig.)

  10. A real-time spike sorting method based on the embedded GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelan Yang; Kedi Xu; Xiang Tian; Shaomin Zhang; Xiaoxiang Zheng

    2017-07-01

    Microelectrode arrays with hundreds of channels have been widely used to acquire neuron population signals in neuroscience studies. Online spike sorting is becoming one of the most important challenges for high-throughput neural signal acquisition systems. Graphic processing unit (GPU) with high parallel computing capability might provide an alternative solution for increasing real-time computational demands on spike sorting. This study reported a method of real-time spike sorting through computing unified device architecture (CUDA) which was implemented on an embedded GPU (NVIDIA JETSON Tegra K1, TK1). The sorting approach is based on the principal component analysis (PCA) and K-means. By analyzing the parallelism of each process, the method was further optimized in the thread memory model of GPU. Our results showed that the GPU-based classifier on TK1 is 37.92 times faster than the MATLAB-based classifier on PC while their accuracies were the same with each other. The high-performance computing features of embedded GPU demonstrated in our studies suggested that the embedded GPU provide a promising platform for the real-time neural signal processing.

  11. GPU-accelerated Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of Lennard-Jonesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Jason; Hailat, Eyad; Russo, Vincent; Rushaidat, Kamel; Schwiebert, Loren; Potoff, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    This work describes an implementation of canonical and Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). The pair-wise energy calculations, which consume the majority of the computational effort, are parallelized using the energetic decomposition algorithm. While energetic decomposition is relatively inefficient for traditional CPU-bound codes, the algorithm is ideally suited to the architecture of the GPU. The performance of the CPU and GPU codes are assessed for a variety of CPU and GPU combinations for systems containing between 512 and 131,072 particles. For a system of 131,072 particles, the GPU-enabled canonical and Gibbs ensemble codes were 10.3 and 29.1 times faster (GTX 480 GPU vs. i5-2500K CPU), respectively, than an optimized serial CPU-bound code. Due to overhead from memory transfers from system RAM to the GPU, the CPU code was slightly faster than the GPU code for simulations containing less than 600 particles. The critical temperature Tc∗=1.312(2) and density ρc∗=0.316(3) were determined for the tail corrected Lennard-Jones potential from simulations of 10,000 particle systems, and found to be in exact agreement with prior mixed field finite-size scaling calculations [J.J. Potoff, A.Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 109 (1998) 10914].

  12. Massively Parallel Signal Processing using the Graphics Processing Unit for Real-Time Brain-Computer Interface Feature Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Adam; Williams, Justin C

    2009-01-01

    The clock speeds of modern computer processors have nearly plateaued in the past 5 years. Consequently, neural prosthetic systems that rely on processing large quantities of data in a short period of time face a bottleneck, in that it may not be possible to process all of the data recorded from an electrode array with high channel counts and bandwidth, such as electrocorticographic grids or other implantable systems. Therefore, in this study a method of using the processing capabilities of a graphics card [graphics processing unit (GPU)] was developed for real-time neural signal processing of a brain-computer interface (BCI). The NVIDIA CUDA system was used to offload processing to the GPU, which is capable of running many operations in parallel, potentially greatly increasing the speed of existing algorithms. The BCI system records many channels of data, which are processed and translated into a control signal, such as the movement of a computer cursor. This signal processing chain involves computing a matrix-matrix multiplication (i.e., a spatial filter), followed by calculating the power spectral density on every channel using an auto-regressive method, and finally classifying appropriate features for control. In this study, the first two computationally intensive steps were implemented on the GPU, and the speed was compared to both the current implementation and a central processing unit-based implementation that uses multi-threading. Significant performance gains were obtained with GPU processing: the current implementation processed 1000 channels of 250 ms in 933 ms, while the new GPU method took only 27 ms, an improvement of nearly 35 times.

  13. Integrative multicellular biological modeling: a case study of 3D epidermal development using GPU algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christley Scott

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulation of sophisticated biological models requires considerable computational power. These models typically integrate together numerous biological phenomena such as spatially-explicit heterogeneous cells, cell-cell interactions, cell-environment interactions and intracellular gene networks. The recent advent of programming for graphical processing units (GPU opens up the possibility of developing more integrative, detailed and predictive biological models while at the same time decreasing the computational cost to simulate those models. Results We construct a 3D model of epidermal development and provide a set of GPU algorithms that executes significantly faster than sequential central processing unit (CPU code. We provide a parallel implementation of the subcellular element method for individual cells residing in a lattice-free spatial environment. Each cell in our epidermal model includes an internal gene network, which integrates cellular interaction of Notch signaling together with environmental interaction of basement membrane adhesion, to specify cellular state and behaviors such as growth and division. We take a pedagogical approach to describing how modeling methods are efficiently implemented on the GPU including memory layout of data structures and functional decomposition. We discuss various programmatic issues and provide a set of design guidelines for GPU programming that are instructive to avoid common pitfalls as well as to extract performance from the GPU architecture. Conclusions We demonstrate that GPU algorithms represent a significant technological advance for the simulation of complex biological models. We further demonstrate with our epidermal model that the integration of multiple complex modeling methods for heterogeneous multicellular biological processes is both feasible and computationally tractable using this new technology. We hope that the provided algorithms and source code will be a

  14. High performance computing and quantum trajectory method in CPU and GPU systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiśniewska, Joanna; Sawerwain, Marek; Leoński, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, a dynamic progress in computational techniques allows for development of various methods, which offer significant speed-up of computations, especially those related to the problems of quantum optics and quantum computing. In this work, we propose computational solutions which re-implement the quantum trajectory method (QTM) algorithm in modern parallel computation environments in which multi-core CPUs and modern many-core GPUs can be used. In consequence, new computational routines are developed in more effective way than those applied in other commonly used packages, such as Quantum Optics Toolbox (QOT) for Matlab or QuTIP for Python

  15. GPU-based parallel computing in real-time modeling of atmospheric transport and diffusion of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcelo C. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Pinheiro, André; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric radionuclide dispersion systems (ARDS) are essential mechanisms to predict the consequences of unexpected radioactive releases from nuclear power plants. Considering, that during an eventuality of an accident with a radioactive material release, an accurate forecast is vital to guide the evacuation plan of the possible affected areas. However, in order to predict the dispersion of the radioactive material and its impact on the environment, the model must process information about source term (radioactive materials released, activities and location), weather condition (wind, humidity and precipitation) and geographical characteristics (topography). Furthermore, ARDS is basically composed of 4 main modules: Source Term, Wind Field, Plume Dispersion and Doses Calculations. The Wind Field and Plume Dispersion modules are the ones that require a high computational performance to achieve accurate results within an acceptable time. Taking this into account, this work focuses on the development of a GPU-based parallel Plume Dispersion module, focusing on the radionuclide transport and diffusion calculations, which use a given wind field and a released source term as parameters. The program is being developed using the C ++ programming language, allied with CUDA libraries. In comparative case study between a parallel and sequential version of the slower function of the Plume Dispersion module, a speedup of 11.63 times could be observed. (author)

  16. GPU-based parallel computing in real-time modeling of atmospheric transport and diffusion of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo C. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Pinheiro, André, E-mail: jovitamarcelo@gmail.com, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: apinheiro99@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric radionuclide dispersion systems (ARDS) are essential mechanisms to predict the consequences of unexpected radioactive releases from nuclear power plants. Considering, that during an eventuality of an accident with a radioactive material release, an accurate forecast is vital to guide the evacuation plan of the possible affected areas. However, in order to predict the dispersion of the radioactive material and its impact on the environment, the model must process information about source term (radioactive materials released, activities and location), weather condition (wind, humidity and precipitation) and geographical characteristics (topography). Furthermore, ARDS is basically composed of 4 main modules: Source Term, Wind Field, Plume Dispersion and Doses Calculations. The Wind Field and Plume Dispersion modules are the ones that require a high computational performance to achieve accurate results within an acceptable time. Taking this into account, this work focuses on the development of a GPU-based parallel Plume Dispersion module, focusing on the radionuclide transport and diffusion calculations, which use a given wind field and a released source term as parameters. The program is being developed using the C ++ programming language, allied with CUDA libraries. In comparative case study between a parallel and sequential version of the slower function of the Plume Dispersion module, a speedup of 11.63 times could be observed. (author)

  17. Energy- and cost-efficient lattice-QCD computations using graphics processing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Quarks and gluons are the building blocks of all hadronic matter, like protons and neutrons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a theory under test by large scale experiments like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and in the future at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. However, perturbative methods can only be applied to QCD for high energies. Studies from first principles are possible via a discretization onto an Euclidean space-time grid. This discretization of QCD is called Lattice QCD (LQCD) and is the only ab-initio option outside of the high-energy regime. LQCD is extremely compute and memory intensive. In particular, it is by definition always bandwidth limited. Thus - despite the complexity of LQCD applications - it led to the development of several specialized compute platforms and influenced the development of others. However, in recent years General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) came up as a new means for parallel computing. Contrary to machines traditionally used for LQCD, graphics processing units (GPUs) are a massmarket product. This promises advantages in both the pace at which higher-performing hardware becomes available and its price. CL2QCD is an OpenCL based implementation of LQCD using Wilson fermions that was developed within this thesis. It operates on GPUs by all major vendors as well as on central processing units (CPUs). On the AMD Radeon HD 7970 it provides the fastest double-precision D kernel for a single GPU, achieving 120GFLOPS. D - the most compute intensive kernel in LQCD simulations - is commonly used to compare LQCD platforms. This performance is enabled by an in-depth analysis of optimization techniques for bandwidth-limited codes on GPUs. Further, analysis of the communication between GPU and CPU, as well as between multiple GPUs, enables high-performance Krylov space solvers and linear scaling to multiple GPUs within a single system. LQCD

  18. Energy- and cost-efficient lattice-QCD computations using graphics processing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Quarks and gluons are the building blocks of all hadronic matter, like protons and neutrons. Their interaction is described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a theory under test by large scale experiments like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and in the future at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. However, perturbative methods can only be applied to QCD for high energies. Studies from first principles are possible via a discretization onto an Euclidean space-time grid. This discretization of QCD is called Lattice QCD (LQCD) and is the only ab-initio option outside of the high-energy regime. LQCD is extremely compute and memory intensive. In particular, it is by definition always bandwidth limited. Thus - despite the complexity of LQCD applications - it led to the development of several specialized compute platforms and influenced the development of others. However, in recent years General-Purpose computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) came up as a new means for parallel computing. Contrary to machines traditionally used for LQCD, graphics processing units (GPUs) are a massmarket product. This promises advantages in both the pace at which higher-performing hardware becomes available and its price. CL2QCD is an OpenCL based implementation of LQCD using Wilson fermions that was developed within this thesis. It operates on GPUs by all major vendors as well as on central processing units (CPUs). On the AMD Radeon HD 7970 it provides the fastest double-precision D kernel for a single GPU, achieving 120GFLOPS. D - the most compute intensive kernel in LQCD simulations - is commonly used to compare LQCD platforms. This performance is enabled by an in-depth analysis of optimization techniques for bandwidth-limited codes on GPUs. Further, analysis of the communication between GPU and CPU, as well as between multiple GPUs, enables high-performance Krylov space solvers and linear scaling to multiple GPUs within a single system. LQCD

  19. TU-FG-BRB-07: GPU-Based Prompt Gamma Ray Imaging From Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S; Suh, T; Yoon, D; Jung, J; Shin, H; Kim, M [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusion: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  20. Clinical implementation of a GPU-based simplified Monte Carlo method for a treatment planning system of proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, R; Hotta, K; Nishioka, S; Matsubara, K; Tansho, R; Suzuki, T

    2011-01-01

    We implemented the simplified Monte Carlo (SMC) method on graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture under the computer-unified device architecture platform developed by NVIDIA. The GPU-based SMC was clinically applied for four patients with head and neck, lung, or prostate cancer. The results were compared to those obtained by a traditional CPU-based SMC with respect to the computation time and discrepancy. In the CPU- and GPU-based SMC calculations, the estimated mean statistical errors of the calculated doses in the planning target volume region were within 0.5% rms. The dose distributions calculated by the GPU- and CPU-based SMCs were similar, within statistical errors. The GPU-based SMC showed 12.30–16.00 times faster performance than the CPU-based SMC. The computation time per beam arrangement using the GPU-based SMC for the clinical cases ranged 9–67 s. The results demonstrate the successful application of the GPU-based SMC to a clinical proton treatment planning. (note)

  1. GPU-BSM: a GPU-based tool to map bisulfite-treated reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Manconi

    Full Text Available Cytosine DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark implicated in several biological processes. Bisulfite treatment of DNA is acknowledged as the gold standard technique to study methylation. This technique introduces changes in the genomic DNA by converting cytosines to uracils while 5-methylcytosines remain nonreactive. During PCR amplification 5-methylcytosines are amplified as cytosine, whereas uracils and thymines as thymine. To detect the methylation levels, reads treated with the bisulfite must be aligned against a reference genome. Mapping these reads to a reference genome represents a significant computational challenge mainly due to the increased search space and the loss of information introduced by the treatment. To deal with this computational challenge we devised GPU-BSM, a tool based on modern Graphics Processing Units. Graphics Processing Units are hardware accelerators that are increasingly being used successfully to accelerate general-purpose scientific applications. GPU-BSM is a tool able to map bisulfite-treated reads from whole genome bisulfite sequencing and reduced representation bisulfite sequencing, and to estimate methylation levels, with the goal of detecting methylation. Due to the massive parallelization obtained by exploiting graphics cards, GPU-BSM aligns bisulfite-treated reads faster than other cutting-edge solutions, while outperforming most of them in terms of unique mapped reads.

  2. A CFD Heterogeneous Parallel Solver Based on Collaborating CPU and GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jianqi; Tian, Zhengyu; Li, Hua; Pan, Sha

    2018-03-01

    Since Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) has a strong ability of floating-point computation and memory bandwidth for data parallelism, it has been widely used in the areas of common computing such as molecular dynamics (MD), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and so on. The emergence of compute unified device architecture (CUDA), which reduces the complexity of compiling program, brings the great opportunities to CFD. There are three different modes for parallel solution of NS equations: parallel solver based on CPU, parallel solver based on GPU and heterogeneous parallel solver based on collaborating CPU and GPU. As we can see, GPUs are relatively rich in compute capacity but poor in memory capacity and the CPUs do the opposite. We need to make full use of the GPUs and CPUs, so a CFD heterogeneous parallel solver based on collaborating CPU and GPU has been established. Three cases are presented to analyse the solver’s computational accuracy and heterogeneous parallel efficiency. The numerical results agree well with experiment results, which demonstrate that the heterogeneous parallel solver has high computational precision. The speedup on a single GPU is more than 40 for laminar flow, it decreases for turbulent flow, but it still can reach more than 20. What’s more, the speedup increases as the grid size becomes larger.

  3. Optimizing a mobile robot control system using GPU acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Nat; McGuinness, Michael; Martin, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our attempt to optimize a robot control program for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) by running computationally intensive portions of the system on a commodity graphics processing unit (GPU). The IGVC Autonomous Challenge requires a control program that performs a number of different computationally intensive tasks ranging from computer vision to path planning. For the 2011 competition our Robot Operating System (ROS) based control system would not run comfortably on the multicore CPU on our custom robot platform. The process of profiling the ROS control program and selecting appropriate modules for porting to run on a GPU is described. A GPU-targeting compiler, Bacon, is used to speed up development and help optimize the ported modules. The impact of the ported modules on overall performance is discussed. We conclude that GPU optimization can free a significant amount of CPU resources with minimal effort for expensive user-written code, but that replacing heavily-optimized library functions is more difficult, and a much less efficient use of time.

  4. Development of a prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system with fast image reconstruction using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sunghoon, E-mail: choi.sh@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwan [Department of Radiological Science, College of Medical Science, Konyang University, 158 Gwanjeodong-ro, Daejeon, 308-812 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Haenghwa [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Donghoon; Choi, Seungyeon [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jungwook [LISTEM Corporation, 94 Donghwagongdan-ro, Munmak-eup, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung, E-mail: hjk1@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-11

    Digital tomosynthesis offers the advantage of low radiation doses compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) by utilizing small numbers of projections (~80) acquired over a limited angular range. It produces 3D volumetric data, although there are artifacts due to incomplete sampling. Based upon these characteristics, we developed a prototype digital tomosynthesis R/F system for applications in chest imaging. Our prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system contains an X-ray tube with high power R/F pulse generator, flat-panel detector, R/F table, electromechanical radiographic subsystems including a precise motor controller, and a reconstruction server. For image reconstruction, users select between analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. Our reconstructed images of Catphan700 and LUNGMAN phantoms clearly and rapidly described the internal structures of phantoms using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values of the CTP682 module of Catphan700 were higher in images using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) than in those using filtered back-projection (FBP) for all materials by factors of 2.60, 3.78, 5.50, 2.30, 3.70, and 2.52 for air, lung foam, low density polyethylene (LDPE), Delrin{sup ®} (acetal homopolymer resin), bone 50% (hydroxyapatite), and Teflon, respectively. Total elapsed times for producing 3D volume were 2.92 s and 86.29 s on average for FBP and SART (20 iterations), respectively. The times required for reconstruction were clinically feasible. Moreover, the total radiation dose from our system (5.68 mGy) was lower than that of conventional chest CT scan. Consequently, our prototype tomosynthesis R/F system represents an important advance in digital tomosynthesis applications.

  5. ALICE HLT high speed tracking on GPU

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbunov, Sergey; Aamodt, Kenneth; Alt, Torsten; Appelshauser, Harald; Arend, Andreas; Bach, Matthias; Becker, Bruce; Bottger, Stefan; Breitner, Timo; Busching, Henner; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Cleymans, Jean; Cicalo, Corrado; Das, Indranil; Djuvsland, Oystein; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Fearick, Roger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hille, Per Thomas; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Kisel, Ivan; Kretz, Matthias; Lara, Camillo; Lindal, Sven; Lindenstruth, Volker; Masoodi, Arshad Ahmad; Ovrebekk, Gaute; Panse, Ralf; Peschek, Jorg; Ploskon, Mateusz; Pocheptsov, Timur; Ram, Dinesh; Rascanu, Theodor; Richter, Matthias; Rohrich, Dieter; Ronchetti, Federico; Skaali, Bernhard; Smorholm, Olav; Stokkevag, Camilla; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Szostak, Artur; Thader, Jochen; Tveter, Trine; Ullaland, Kjetil; Vilakazi, Zeblon; Weis, Robert; Yin, Zhong-Bao; Zelnicek, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The on-line event reconstruction in ALICE is performed by the High Level Trigger, which should process up to 2000 events per second in proton-proton collisions and up to 300 central events per second in heavy-ion collisions, corresponding to an inp ut data stream of 30 GB/s. In order to fulfill the time requirements, a fast on-line tracker has been developed. The algorithm combines a Cellular Automaton method being used for a fast pattern recognition and the Kalman Filter method for fitting of found trajectories and for the final track selection. The tracker was adapted to run on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) framework. The implementation of the algorithm had to be adjusted at many points to allow for an efficient usage of the graphics cards. In particular, achieving a good overall workload for many processor cores, efficient transfer to and from the GPU, as well as optimized utilization of the different memories the GPU offers turned out to be cri...

  6. Computational Approach for Securing Radiology-Diagnostic Data in Connected Health Network using High-Performance GPU-Accelerated AES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeshina, A M; Hashim, R

    2017-03-01

    Diagnostic radiology is a core and integral part of modern medicine, paving ways for the primary care physicians in the disease diagnoses, treatments and therapy managements. Obviously, all recent standard healthcare procedures have immensely benefitted from the contemporary information technology revolutions, apparently revolutionizing those approaches to acquiring, storing and sharing of diagnostic data for efficient and timely diagnosis of diseases. Connected health network was introduced as an alternative to the ageing traditional concept in healthcare system, improving hospital-physician connectivity and clinical collaborations. Undoubtedly, the modern medicinal approach has drastically improved healthcare but at the expense of high computational cost and possible breach of diagnosis privacy. Consequently, a number of cryptographical techniques are recently being applied to clinical applications, but the challenges of not being able to successfully encrypt both the image and the textual data persist. Furthermore, processing time of encryption-decryption of medical datasets, within a considerable lower computational cost without jeopardizing the required security strength of the encryption algorithm, still remains as an outstanding issue. This study proposes a secured radiology-diagnostic data framework for connected health network using high-performance GPU-accelerated Advanced Encryption Standard. The study was evaluated with radiology image datasets consisting of brain MR and CT datasets obtained from the department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, USA, and the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing. Sample patients' notes from the University of North Carolina, School of medicine at Chapel Hill were also used to evaluate the framework for its strength in encrypting-decrypting textual data in the form of medical report. Significantly, the framework is not only able to accurately encrypt and decrypt medical image datasets, but it also

  7. Breast Cancer Image Segmentation Using K-Means Clustering Based on GPU Cuda Parallel Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andika Elok Amalia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Image processing technology is now widely used in the health area, one example is to help the radiologist to analyze the result of MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, CT Scan and Mammography. Image segmentation is a process which is intended to obtain the objects contained in the image by dividing the image into several areas that have similarity attributes on an object with the aim of facilitating the analysis process. The increasing amount  of patient data and larger image size are new challenges in segmentation process to use time efficiently while still keeping the process quality. Research on the segmentation of medical images have been done but still few that combine with parallel computing. In this research, K-Means clustering on the image of mammography result is implemented using two-way computation which are serial and parallel. The result shows that parallel computing  gives faster average performance execution up to twofold.

  8. Fast Simulation of Large-Scale Floods Based on GPU Parallel Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Liu; Yi Qin; Guodong Li

    2018-01-01

    Computing speed is a significant issue of large-scale flood simulations for real-time response to disaster prevention and mitigation. Even today, most of the large-scale flood simulations are generally run on supercomputers due to the massive amounts of data and computations necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional shallow water model based on an unstructured Godunov-type finite volume scheme was proposed for flood simulation. To realize a fast simulation of large-scale floods on a personal...

  9. GPU based numerical simulation of core shooting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-zhong Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Core shooting process is the most widely used technique to make sand cores and it plays an important role in the quality of sand cores. Although numerical simulation can hopefully optimize the core shooting process, research on numerical simulation of the core shooting process is very limited. Based on a two-fluid model (TFM and a kinetic-friction constitutive correlation, a program for 3D numerical simulation of the core shooting process has been developed and achieved good agreements with in-situ experiments. To match the needs of engineering applications, a graphics processing unit (GPU has also been used to improve the calculation efficiency. The parallel algorithm based on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA platform can significantly decrease computing time by multi-threaded GPU. In this work, the program accelerated by CUDA parallelization method was developed and the accuracy of the calculations was ensured by comparing with in-situ experimental results photographed by a high-speed camera. The design and optimization of the parallel algorithm were discussed. The simulation result of a sand core test-piece indicated the improvement of the calculation efficiency by GPU. The developed program has also been validated by in-situ experiments with a transparent core-box, a high-speed camera, and a pressure measuring system. The computing time of the parallel program was reduced by nearly 95% while the simulation result was still quite consistent with experimental data. The GPU parallelization method can successfully solve the problem of low computational efficiency of the 3D sand shooting simulation program, and thus the developed GPU program is appropriate for engineering applications.

  10. Democratic population decisions result in robust policy-gradient learning: a parametric study with GPU simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Richmond

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available High performance computing on the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU is an emerging field driven by the promise of high computational power at a low cost. However, GPU programming is a non-trivial task and moreover architectural limitations raise the question of whether investing effort in this direction may be worthwhile. In this work, we use GPU programming to simulate a two-layer network of Integrate-and-Fire neurons with varying degrees of recurrent connectivity and investigate its ability to learn a simplified navigation task using a policy-gradient learning rule stemming from Reinforcement Learning. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we want to support the use of GPUs in the field of Computational Neuroscience. Second, using GPU computing power, we investigate the conditions under which the said architecture and learning rule demonstrate best performance. Our work indicates that networks featuring strong Mexican-Hat-shaped recurrent connections in the top layer, where decision making is governed by the formation of a stable activity bump in the neural population (a "non-democratic" mechanism, achieve mediocre learning results at best. In absence of recurrent connections, where all neurons "vote" independently ("democratic" for a decision via population vector readout, the task is generally learned better and more robustly. Our study would have been extremely difficult on a desktop computer without the use of GPU programming. We present the routines developed for this purpose and show that a speed improvement of 5x up to 42x is provided versus optimised Python code. The higher speed is achieved when we exploit the parallelism of the GPU in the search of learning parameters. This suggests that efficient GPU programming can significantly reduce the time needed for simulating networks of spiking neurons, particularly when multiple parameter configurations are investigated.

  11. ARCHERRT - a GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: software development and application to helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X George

    2014-07-01

    Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHERRT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head & neck. To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHERRT. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHERRT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHERRT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHERRT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head & neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU, modified Woodcock tracking algorithm

  12. ARCHERRT – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHERRT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head & neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHERRT. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHERRT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHERRT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHERRT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head & neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU, modified

  13. Basket Option Pricing Using GP-GPU Hardware Acceleration

    KAUST Repository

    Douglas, Craig C.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a basket option pricing problem arisen in financial mathematics. We discretized the problem based on the alternating direction implicit (ADI) method and parallel cyclic reduction is applied to solve the set of tridiagonal matrices generated by the ADI method. To reduce the computational time of the problem, a general purpose graphics processing units (GP-GPU) environment is considered. Numerical results confirm the convergence and efficiency of the proposed method. © 2010 IEEE.

  14. A GPU Accelerated Spring Mass System for Surgical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing demand for surgical simulators to dofast and precise calculations of tissue deformation to simulateincreasingly complex morphology in real-time. Unfortunately, evenfast spring-mass based systems have slow convergence rates for largemodels. This paper presents a method to accele...... to accelerate computation of aspring-mass system in order to simulate a complex organ such as theheart. This acceleration is achieved by taking advantage of moderngraphics processing units (GPU)....

  15. GPU accelerated FDTD solver and its application in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, J; Liu, F; Jin, J; Mason, D G; Crozier, S

    2010-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is a popular technique for computational electromagnetics (CEM). The large computational power often required, however, has been a limiting factor for its applications. In this paper, we will present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel FDTD solver and its successful application to the investigation of a novel B1 shimming scheme for high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optimized shimming scheme exhibits considerably improved transmit B(1) profiles. The GPU implementation dramatically shortened the runtime of FDTD simulation of electromagnetic field compared with its CPU counterpart. The acceleration in runtime has made such investigation possible, and will pave the way for other studies of large-scale computational electromagnetic problems in modern MRI which were previously impractical.

  16. Multi-GPU implementation of a VMAT treatment plan optimization algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Folkerts, Michael; Tan, Jun; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.; Peng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization is a computationally challenging problem due to its large data size, high degrees of freedom, and many hardware constraints. High-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) have been used to speed up the computations. However, GPU’s relatively small memory size cannot handle cases with a large dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix in cases of, e.g., those with a large target size, multiple targets, multiple arcs, and/or small beamlet size. The main purpose of this paper is to report an implementation of a column-generation-based VMAT algorithm, previously developed in the authors’ group, on a multi-GPU platform to solve the memory limitation problem. While the column-generation-based VMAT algorithm has been previously developed, the GPU implementation details have not been reported. Hence, another purpose is to present detailed techniques employed for GPU implementation. The authors also would like to utilize this particular problem as an example problem to study the feasibility of using a multi-GPU platform to solve large-scale problems in medical physics. Methods: The column-generation approach generates VMAT apertures sequentially by solving a pricing problem (PP) and a master problem (MP) iteratively. In the authors’ method, the sparse DDC matrix is first stored on a CPU in coordinate list format (COO). On the GPU side, this matrix is split into four submatrices according to beam angles, which are stored on four GPUs in compressed sparse row format. Computation of beamlet price, the first step in PP, is accomplished using multi-GPUs. A fast inter-GPU data transfer scheme is accomplished using peer-to-peer access. The remaining steps of PP and MP problems are implemented on CPU or a single GPU due to their modest problem scale and computational loads. Barzilai and Borwein algorithm with a subspace step scheme is adopted here to solve the MP problem. A head and neck (H and N) cancer case is

  17. Multi-GPU implementation of a VMAT treatment plan optimization algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Zhen, E-mail: Zhen.Tian@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Xun.Jia@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Steve.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Folkerts, Michael; Tan, Jun; Jia, Xun, E-mail: Zhen.Tian@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Xun.Jia@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Steve.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Jiang, Steve B., E-mail: Zhen.Tian@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Xun.Jia@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Steve.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Peng, Fei [Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization is a computationally challenging problem due to its large data size, high degrees of freedom, and many hardware constraints. High-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) have been used to speed up the computations. However, GPU’s relatively small memory size cannot handle cases with a large dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix in cases of, e.g., those with a large target size, multiple targets, multiple arcs, and/or small beamlet size. The main purpose of this paper is to report an implementation of a column-generation-based VMAT algorithm, previously developed in the authors’ group, on a multi-GPU platform to solve the memory limitation problem. While the column-generation-based VMAT algorithm has been previously developed, the GPU implementation details have not been reported. Hence, another purpose is to present detailed techniques employed for GPU implementation. The authors also would like to utilize this particular problem as an example problem to study the feasibility of using a multi-GPU platform to solve large-scale problems in medical physics. Methods: The column-generation approach generates VMAT apertures sequentially by solving a pricing problem (PP) and a master problem (MP) iteratively. In the authors’ method, the sparse DDC matrix is first stored on a CPU in coordinate list format (COO). On the GPU side, this matrix is split into four submatrices according to beam angles, which are stored on four GPUs in compressed sparse row format. Computation of beamlet price, the first step in PP, is accomplished using multi-GPUs. A fast inter-GPU data transfer scheme is accomplished using peer-to-peer access. The remaining steps of PP and MP problems are implemented on CPU or a single GPU due to their modest problem scale and computational loads. Barzilai and Borwein algorithm with a subspace step scheme is adopted here to solve the MP problem. A head and neck (H and N) cancer case is

  18. Parallel hyperbolic PDE simulation on clusters: Cell versus GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostrup, Scott; De Sterck, Hans

    2010-12-01

    Increasingly, high-performance computing is looking towards data-parallel computational devices to enhance computational performance. Two technologies that have received significant attention are IBM's Cell Processor and NVIDIA's CUDA programming model for graphics processing unit (GPU) computing. In this paper we investigate the acceleration of parallel hyperbolic partial differential equation simulation on structured grids with explicit time integration on clusters with Cell and GPU backends. The message passing interface (MPI) is used for communication between nodes at the coarsest level of parallelism. Optimizations of the simulation code at the several finer levels of parallelism that the data-parallel devices provide are described in terms of data layout, data flow and data-parallel instructions. Optimized Cell and GPU performance are compared with reference code performance on a single x86 central processing unit (CPU) core in single and double precision. We further compare the CPU, Cell and GPU platforms on a chip-to-chip basis, and compare performance on single cluster nodes with two CPUs, two Cell processors or two GPUs in a shared memory configuration (without MPI). We finally compare performance on clusters with 32 CPUs, 32 Cell processors, and 32 GPUs using MPI. Our GPU cluster results use NVIDIA Tesla GPUs with GT200 architecture, but some preliminary results on recently introduced NVIDIA GPUs with the next-generation Fermi architecture are also included. This paper provides computational scientists and engineers who are considering porting their codes to accelerator environments with insight into how structured grid based explicit algorithms can be optimized for clusters with Cell and GPU accelerators. It also provides insight into the speed-up that may be gained on current and future accelerator architectures for this class of applications. Program summaryProgram title: SWsolver Catalogue identifier: AEGY_v1_0 Program summary URL

  19. GPU implementation of Bayesian neural network construction for data-intensive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, Michelle; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Prosper, Harrison B

    2014-01-01

    We describe a graphical processing unit (GPU) implementation of the Hybrid Markov Chain Monte Carlo (HMC) method for training Bayesian Neural Networks (BNN). Our implementation uses NVIDIA's parallel computing architecture, CUDA. We briefly review BNNs and the HMC method and we describe our implementations and give preliminary results.

  20. Efficient GPU-based texture interpolation using uniform B-splines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijters, D.; Haar Romenij, ter B.M.; Suetens, P.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents uniform B-spline interpolation, completely contained on the graphics processing unit (GPU). This implies that the CPU does not need to compute any lookup tables or B-spline basis functions. The cubic interpolation can be decomposed into several linear interpolations [Sigg and

  1. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the ;tape;. Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  2. Vortex particle method in parallel computations on graphical processing units used in study of the evolution of vortex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudela, Henryk; Kosior, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and the mutual interaction among various types of vortical motions is a key ingredient in clarifying and controlling fluid motion. In the paper several different cases related to vortex tube interactions are presented. Due to problems with very long computation times on the single processor, the vortex-in-cell (VIC) method is implemented on the multicore architecture of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Numerical results of leapfrogging of two vortex rings for inviscid and viscous fluid are presented as test cases for the new multi-GPU implementation of the VIC method. Influence of the Reynolds number on the reconnection process is shown for two examples: antiparallel vortex tubes and orthogonally offset vortex tubes. Our aim is to show the great potential of the VIC method for solutions of three-dimensional flow problems and that the VIC method is very well suited for parallel computation. (paper)

  3. Fully 3-D list-mode positron emission tomography image reconstruction on a multi-GPU cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jingyu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Prevrhal, Sven; Shao, Lingxiong [Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Pratx, Guillem [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Levin, Craig S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology, Electrical Engineering, and Physics; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS); Stanford Univ., CA (United States). School of Medicine

    2011-07-01

    List-mode processing is an efficient way of dealing with the sparse nature of PET data sets, and is the processing method of choice for time-of-flight (ToF) PET. We present a novel method of computing line projection operations required for list-mode ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) for fully 3-D PET image reconstruction on a graphics processing unit (GPU) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) framework. Our method overcomes challenges such as compute thread divergence, and exploits GPU capabilities such as shared memory and atomic operations. When applied to line projection operations for list-mode time-of-flight PET, this new GPU-CUDA reformulation is 188X faster than a single-threaded reference CPU implementation. When embedded in a multi-process environment on a GPU-equipped small cluster, a speedup of 4X was observed over the same configuration but without GPU support. Image quality is preserved with root mean squared (RMS) deviation of 0.05% between CPU and GPU-generated images, which has negligible effect in typical clinical applications. (orig.)

  4. GPU accelerated generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs for 2-D/3-D image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgham, Osama M; Laycock, Stephen D; Fisher, Mark H

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in programming languages for graphics processing units (GPUs) provide developers with a convenient way of implementing applications which can be executed on the CPU and GPU interchangeably. GPUs are becoming relatively cheap, powerful, and widely available hardware components, which can be used to perform intensive calculations. The last decade of hardware performance developments shows that GPU-based computation is progressing significantly faster than CPU-based computation, particularly if one considers the execution of highly parallelisable algorithms. Future predictions illustrate that this trend is likely to continue. In this paper, we introduce a way of accelerating 2-D/3-D image registration by developing a hybrid system which executes on the CPU and utilizes the GPU for parallelizing the generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Based on the advancements of the GPU over the CPU, it is timely to exploit the benefits of many-core GPU technology by developing algorithms for DRR generation. Although some previous work has investigated the rendering of DRRs using the GPU, this paper investigates approximations which reduce the computational overhead while still maintaining a quality consistent with that needed for 2-D/3-D registration with sufficient accuracy to be clinically acceptable in certain applications of radiation oncology. Furthermore, by comparing implementations of 2-D/3-D registration on the CPU and GPU, we investigate current performance and propose an optimal framework for PC implementations addressing the rigid registration problem. Using this framework, we are able to render DRR images from a 256×256×133 CT volume in ~24 ms using an NVidia GeForce 8800 GTX and in ~2 ms using NVidia GeForce GTX 580. In addition to applications requiring fast automatic patient setup, these levels of performance suggest image-guided radiation therapy at video frame rates is technically feasible using relatively low cost PC

  5. Compact multimode fiber beam-shaping system based on GPU accelerated digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöschner, Martin; Čižmár, Tomáš

    2015-01-15

    Real-time, on-demand, beam shaping at the end of the multimode fiber has recently been made possible by exploiting the computational power of rapidly evolving graphics processing unit (GPU) technology [Opt. Express 22, 2933 (2014)]. However, the current state-of-the-art system requires the presence of an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) to produce images at the end of the fiber without interference effects between neighboring output points. Here, we present a system free from the AOD complexity where we achieve the removal of the undesired interference effects computationally using GPU implemented Gerchberg-Saxton and Yang-Gu algorithms. The GPU implementation is two orders of magnitude faster than the CPU implementation which allows video-rate image control at the distal end of the fiber virtually free of interference effects.

  6. How Do We Really Compute with Units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, B. H.

    2010-01-01

    The methods that we teach students for computing with units of measurement are often not consistent with the practice of professionals. For professionals, the vast majority of computations with quantities of measure are performed within programs on electronic computers, for which an accounting for the units occurs only once, in the design of the…

  7. SU-E-T-423: Fast Photon Convolution Calculation with a 3D-Ideal Kernel On the GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, S; Sato, M [Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo (Japan); Tachibana, H [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The calculation time is a trade-off for improving the accuracy of convolution dose calculation with fine calculation spacing of the KERMA kernel. We investigated to accelerate the convolution calculation using an ideal kernel on the Graphic Processing Units (GPU). Methods: The calculation was performed on the AMD graphics hardware of Dual FirePro D700 and our algorithm was implemented using the Aparapi that convert Java bytecode to OpenCL. The process of dose calculation was separated with the TERMA and KERMA steps. The dose deposited at the coordinate (x, y, z) was determined in the process. In the dose calculation running on the central processing unit (CPU) of Intel Xeon E5, the calculation loops were performed for all calculation points. On the GPU computation, all of the calculation processes for the points were sent to the GPU and the multi-thread computation was done. In this study, the dose calculation was performed in a water equivalent homogeneous phantom with 150{sup 3} voxels (2 mm calculation grid) and the calculation speed on the GPU to that on the CPU and the accuracy of PDD were compared. Results: The calculation time for the GPU and the CPU were 3.3 sec and 4.4 hour, respectively. The calculation speed for the GPU was 4800 times faster than that for the CPU. The PDD curve for the GPU was perfectly matched to that for the CPU. Conclusion: The convolution calculation with the ideal kernel on the GPU was clinically acceptable for time and may be more accurate in an inhomogeneous region. Intensity modulated arc therapy needs dose calculations for different gantry angles at many control points. Thus, it would be more practical that the kernel uses a coarse spacing technique if the calculation is faster while keeping the similar accuracy to a current treatment planning system.

  8. TU-AB-BRC-10: Modeling of Radiotherapy Linac Source Terms Using ARCHER Monte Carlo Code: Performance Comparison of GPU and MIC Computing Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T; Lin, H; Xu, X; Su, L; Shi, C; Tang, X; Bednarz, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To perform phase space (PS) based source modeling for Tomotherapy and Varian TrueBeam 6 MV Linacs, (2) to examine the accuracy and performance of the ARCHER Monte Carlo code on a heterogeneous computing platform with Many Integrated Core coprocessors (MIC, aka Xeon Phi) and GPUs, and (3) to explore the software micro-optimization methods. Methods: The patient-specific source of Tomotherapy and Varian TrueBeam Linacs was modeled using the PS approach. For the helical Tomotherapy case, the PS data were calculated in our previous study (Su et al. 2014 41(7) Medical Physics). For the single-view Varian TrueBeam case, we analytically derived them from the raw patient-independent PS data in IAEA’s database, partial geometry information of the jaw and MLC as well as the fluence map. The phantom was generated from DICOM images. The Monte Carlo simulation was performed by ARCHER-MIC and GPU codes, which were benchmarked against a modified parallel DPM code. Software micro-optimization was systematically conducted, and was focused on SIMD vectorization of tight for-loops and data prefetch, with the ultimate goal of increasing 512-bit register utilization and reducing memory access latency. Results: Dose calculation was performed for two clinical cases, a Tomotherapy-based prostate cancer treatment and a TrueBeam-based left breast treatment. ARCHER was verified against the DPM code. The statistical uncertainty of the dose to the PTV was less than 1%. Using double-precision, the total wall time of the multithreaded CPU code on a X5650 CPU was 339 seconds for the Tomotherapy case and 131 seconds for the TrueBeam, while on 3 5110P MICs it was reduced to 79 and 59 seconds, respectively. The single-precision GPU code on a K40 GPU took 45 seconds for the Tomotherapy dose calculation. Conclusion: We have extended ARCHER, the MIC and GPU-based Monte Carlo dose engine to Tomotherapy and Truebeam dose calculations.

  9. TU-AB-BRC-10: Modeling of Radiotherapy Linac Source Terms Using ARCHER Monte Carlo Code: Performance Comparison of GPU and MIC Computing Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Lin, H; Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Su, L [John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shi, C [Saint Vincent Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Tang, X [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, NY (United States); Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: (1) To perform phase space (PS) based source modeling for Tomotherapy and Varian TrueBeam 6 MV Linacs, (2) to examine the accuracy and performance of the ARCHER Monte Carlo code on a heterogeneous computing platform with Many Integrated Core coprocessors (MIC, aka Xeon Phi) and GPUs, and (3) to explore the software micro-optimization methods. Methods: The patient-specific source of Tomotherapy and Varian TrueBeam Linacs was modeled using the PS approach. For the helical Tomotherapy case, the PS data were calculated in our previous study (Su et al. 2014 41(7) Medical Physics). For the single-view Varian TrueBeam case, we analytically derived them from the raw patient-independent PS data in IAEA’s database, partial geometry information of the jaw and MLC as well as the fluence map. The phantom was generated from DICOM images. The Monte Carlo simulation was performed by ARCHER-MIC and GPU codes, which were benchmarked against a modified parallel DPM code. Software micro-optimization was systematically conducted, and was focused on SIMD vectorization of tight for-loops and data prefetch, with the ultimate goal of increasing 512-bit register utilization and reducing memory access latency. Results: Dose calculation was performed for two clinical cases, a Tomotherapy-based prostate cancer treatment and a TrueBeam-based left breast treatment. ARCHER was verified against the DPM code. The statistical uncertainty of the dose to the PTV was less than 1%. Using double-precision, the total wall time of the multithreaded CPU code on a X5650 CPU was 339 seconds for the Tomotherapy case and 131 seconds for the TrueBeam, while on 3 5110P MICs it was reduced to 79 and 59 seconds, respectively. The single-precision GPU code on a K40 GPU took 45 seconds for the Tomotherapy dose calculation. Conclusion: We have extended ARCHER, the MIC and GPU-based Monte Carlo dose engine to Tomotherapy and Truebeam dose calculations.

  10. GPU acceleration of 3D forward and backward projection using separable footprints for X-ray CT image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meng; Fessler, Jeffrey A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    2011-07-01

    Iterative 3D image reconstruction methods can improve image quality over conventional filtered back projection (FBP) in X-ray computed tomography. However, high computational costs deter the routine use of iterative reconstruction clinically. The separable footprint method for forward and back-projection simplifies the integrals over a detector cell in a way that is quite accurate and also has a relatively efficient CPU implementation. In this project, we implemented the separable footprints method for both forward and backward projection on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with NVDIA's parallel computing architecture (CUDA). This paper describes our GPU kernels for the separable footprint method and simulation results. (orig.)

  11. Travel Software using GPU Hardware

    CERN Document Server

    Szalwinski, Chris M; Dimov, Veliko Atanasov; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    Travel is the main multi-particle tracking code being used at CERN for the beam dynamics calculations through hadron and ion linear accelerators. It uses two routines for the calculation of space charge forces, namely, rings of charges and point-to-point. This report presents the studies to improve the performance of Travel using GPU hardware. The studies showed that the performance of Travel with the point-to-point simulations of space-charge effects can be speeded up at least 72 times using current GPU hardware. Simple recompilation of the source code using an Intel compiler can improve performance at least 4 times without GPU support. The limited memory of the GPU is the bottleneck. Two algorithms were investigated on this point: repeated computation and tiling. The repeating computation algorithm is simpler and is the currently recommended solution. The tiling algorithm was more complicated and degraded performance. Both build and test instructions for the parallelized version of the software are inclu...

  12. High Performance Processing and Analysis of Geospatial Data Using CUDA on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STOJANOVIC, N.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the high-performance processing of massive geospatial data on many-core GPU (Graphic Processing Unit is presented. We use CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture programming framework to implement parallel processing of common Geographic Information Systems (GIS algorithms, such as viewshed analysis and map-matching. Experimental evaluation indicates the improvement in performance with respect to CPU-based solutions and shows feasibility of using GPU and CUDA for parallel implementation of GIS algorithms over large-scale geospatial datasets.

  13. GASPRNG: GPU accelerated scalable parallel random number generator library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuang; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2013-04-01

    Graphics processors represent a promising technology for accelerating computational science applications. Many computational science applications require fast and scalable random number generation with good statistical properties, so they use the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators library (SPRNG). We present the GPU Accelerated SPRNG library (GASPRNG) to accelerate SPRNG in GPU-based high performance computing systems. GASPRNG includes code for a host CPU and CUDA code for execution on NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) along with a programming interface to support various usage models for pseudorandom numbers and computational science applications executing on the CPU, GPU, or both. This paper describes the implementation approach used to produce high performance and also describes how to use the programming interface. The programming interface allows a user to be able to use GASPRNG the same way as SPRNG on traditional serial or parallel computers as well as to develop tightly coupled programs executing primarily on the GPU. We also describe how to install GASPRNG and use it. To help illustrate linking with GASPRNG, various demonstration codes are included for the different usage models. GASPRNG on a single GPU shows up to 280x speedup over SPRNG on a single CPU core and is able to scale for larger systems in the same manner as SPRNG. Because GASPRNG generates identical streams of pseudorandom numbers as SPRNG, users can be confident about the quality of GASPRNG for scalable computational science applications. Catalogue identifier: AEOI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: UTK license. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167900 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1422058 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C and CUDA. Computer: Any PC or

  14. High-speed optical coherence tomography signal processing on GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiqi; Shi Guohua; Zhang Yudong

    2011-01-01

    The signal processing speed of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) has become a bottleneck in many medical applications. Recently, a time-domain interpolation method was proposed. This method not only gets a better signal-to noise ratio (SNR) but also gets a faster signal processing time for the SD-OCT than the widely used zero-padding interpolation method. Furthermore, the re-sampled data is obtained by convoluting the acquired data and the coefficients in time domain. Thus, a lot of interpolations can be performed concurrently. So, this interpolation method is suitable for parallel computing. An ultra-high optical coherence tomography signal processing can be realized by using graphics processing unit (GPU) with computer unified device architecture (CUDA). This paper will introduce the signal processing steps of SD-OCT on GPU. An experiment is performed to acquire a frame SD-OCT data (400A-linesx2048 pixel per A-line) and real-time processed the data on GPU. The results show that it can be finished in 6.208 milliseconds, which is 37 times faster than that on Central Processing Unit (CPU).

  15. High performance direct gravitational N-body simulations on graphics processing units II: An implementation in CUDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belleman, R.G.; Bédorf, J.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of gravitational direct N-body simulations using the graphics processing unit (GPU) on a commercial NVIDIA GeForce 8800GTX designed for gaming computers. The force evaluation of the N-body problem is implemented in "Compute Unified Device Architecture" (CUDA) using the GPU to

  16. GPU Parallel Bundle Block Adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Maoteng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To deal with massive data in photogrammetry, we introduce the GPU parallel computing technology. The preconditioned conjugate gradient and inexact Newton method are also applied to decrease the iteration times while solving the normal equation. A brand new workflow of bundle adjustment is developed to utilize GPU parallel computing technology. Our method can avoid the storage and inversion of the big normal matrix, and compute the normal matrix in real time. The proposed method can not only largely decrease the memory requirement of normal matrix, but also largely improve the efficiency of bundle adjustment. It also achieves the same accuracy as the conventional method. Preliminary experiment results show that the bundle adjustment of a dataset with about 4500 images and 9 million image points can be done in only 1.5 minutes while achieving sub-pixel accuracy.

  17. NaNet: a configurable NIC bridging the gap between HPC and real-time HEP GPU computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonardo, A.; Ameli, F.; Biagioni, A.; Frezza, O.; Cicero, F. Lo; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E.; Simeone, F.; Simula, F.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.; Ammendola, R.; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Fiorini, M.; Neri, I.; Lamanna, G.; Pontisso, L.; Sozzi, M.; Rossetti, D.

    2015-01-01

    NaNet is a FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) design with GPUDirect and Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) capabilities featuring a configurable and extensible set of network channels. The design currently supports both standard—Gbe (1000BASE-T) and 10GbE (10Base-R)—and custom—34 Gbps APElink and 2.5 Gbps deterministic latency KM3link—channels, but its modularity allows for straightforward inclusion of other link technologies. The GPUDirect feature combined with a transport layer offload module and a data stream processing stage makes NaNet a low-latency NIC suitable for real-time GPU processing. In this paper we describe the NaNet architecture and its performances, exhibiting two of its use cases: the GPU-based low-level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 experiment at CERN and the on-/off-shore data transport system for the KM3NeT-IT underwater neutrino telescope

  18. ARCHERRT – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHER RT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head and neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHER RT . Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHER RT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHER RT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHER RT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head and neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU

  19. A computer controlled tele-cobalt unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brace, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A computer controlled cobalt treatment unit was commissioned for treating patients in January 1980. Initially the controlling computer was a minicomputer, but now the control of the therapy unit is by a microcomputer. The treatment files, which specify the movement and configurations necessary to deliver the prescribed dose, are produced on the minicomputer and then transferred to the microcomputer using minitape cartridges. The actual treatment unit is based on a standard cobalt unit with a few additional features e.g. the drive motors can be controlled either by the computer or manually. Since the treatment unit is used for both manual and automatic treatments, the operational procedure under computer control is made to closely follow the manual procedure for a single field treatment. The necessary safety features which protect against human, hardware and software errors as well as the advantages and disadvantages of computer controlled radiotherapy are discussed

  20. GPU-based Scalable Volumetric Reconstruction for Multi-view Stereo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H; Duchaineau, M; Max, N

    2011-09-21

    We present a new scalable volumetric reconstruction algorithm for multi-view stereo using a graphics processing unit (GPU). It is an effectively parallelized GPU algorithm that simultaneously uses a large number of GPU threads, each of which performs voxel carving, in order to integrate depth maps with images from multiple views. Each depth map, triangulated from pair-wise semi-dense correspondences, represents a view-dependent surface of the scene. This algorithm also provides scalability for large-scale scene reconstruction in a high resolution voxel grid by utilizing streaming and parallel computation. The output is a photo-realistic 3D scene model in a volumetric or point-based representation. We demonstrate the effectiveness and the speed of our algorithm with a synthetic scene and real urban/outdoor scenes. Our method can also be integrated with existing multi-view stereo algorithms such as PMVS2 to fill holes or gaps in textureless regions.

  1. Using GPU to calculate electron dose for hybrid pencil beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chengjun; Li Xia; Hou Qing; Wu Zhangwen

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid pencil beam model (HPBM) offers an efficient approach to calculate the three-dimension dose distribution from a clinical electron beam. Still, clinical radiation treatment activity desires faster treatment plan process. Our work presented the fast implementation of HPBM-based electron dose calculation using graphics processing unit (GPU). The HPBM algorithm was implemented in compute unified device architecture running on the GPU, and C running on the CPU, respectively. Several tests with various sizes of the field, beamlet and voxel were used to evaluate our implementation. On an NVIDIA GeForce GTX470 GPU card, we achieved speedup factors of 2.18- 98.23 with acceptable accuracy, compared with the results from a Pentium E5500 2.80 GHz Dual-core CPU. (authors)

  2. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammazzalorso, F; Jelen, U; Bednarz, T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  3. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  4. Utilizing General Purpose Graphics Processing Units to Improve Performance of Computer Modelling and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, J.; Zhu, Y.; Koons, P. O.; Segee, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    With the introduction of the G8X series of cards by nVidia an architecture called CUDA was released, virtually all subsequent video cards have had CUDA support. With this new architecture nVidia provided extensions for C/C++ that create an Application Programming Interface (API) allowing code to be executed on the GPU. Since then the concept of GPGPU (general purpose graphics processing unit) has been growing, this is the concept that the GPU is very good a algebra and running things in parallel so we should take use of that power for other applications. This is highly appealing in the area of geodynamic modeling, as multiple parallel solutions of the same differential equations at different points in space leads to a large speedup in simulation speed. Another benefit of CUDA is a programmatic method of transferring large amounts of data between the computer's main memory and the dedicated GPU memory located on the video card. In addition to being able to compute and render on the video card, the CUDA framework allows for a large speedup in the situation, such as with a tiled display wall, where the rendered pixels are to be displayed in a different location than where they are rendered. A CUDA extension for VirtualGL was developed allowing for faster read back at high resolutions. This paper examines several aspects of rendering OpenGL graphics on large displays using VirtualGL and VNC. It demonstrates how performance can be significantly improved in rendering on a tiled monitor wall. We present a CUDA enhanced version of VirtualGL as well as the advantages to having multiple VNC servers. It will discuss restrictions caused by read back and blitting rates and how they are affected by different sizes of virtual displays being rendered.

  5. Haptic Feedback for the GPU-based Surgical Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The GPU has proven to be a powerful processor to compute spring-mass based surgical simulations. It has not previously been shown however, how to effectively implement haptic interaction with a simulation running entirely on the GPU. This paper describes a method to calculate haptic feedback...... with limited performance cost. It allows easy balancing of the GPU workload between calculations of simulation, visualisation, and the haptic feedback....

  6. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-01-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S n ) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  7. Improving GPU-accelerated adaptive IDW interpolation algorithm using fast kNN search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gang; Xu, Nengxiong; Xu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel Adaptive Inverse Distance Weighting (AIDW) interpolation algorithm on modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The presented algorithm is an improvement of our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm by adopting fast k-nearest neighbors (kNN) search. In AIDW, it needs to find several nearest neighboring data points for each interpolated point to adaptively determine the power parameter; and then the desired prediction value of the interpolated point is obtained by weighted interpolating using the power parameter. In this work, we develop a fast kNN search approach based on the space-partitioning data structure, even grid, to improve the previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm. The improved algorithm is composed of the stages of kNN search and weighted interpolating. To evaluate the performance of the improved algorithm, we perform five groups of experimental tests. The experimental results indicate: (1) the improved algorithm can achieve a speedup of up to 1017 over the corresponding serial algorithm; (2) the improved algorithm is at least two times faster than our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm; and (3) the utilization of fast kNN search can significantly improve the computational efficiency of the entire GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm.

  8. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunye; Liu, Jie; Chi, Lihua; Huang, Haowei; Fang, Jingyue; Gong, Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates ( Sn) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  9. Modeling of Radiotherapy Linac Source Terms Using ARCHER Monte Carlo Code: Performance Comparison for GPU and MIC Parallel Computing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Liu, Tianyu; Su, Lin; Bednarz, Bryan; Caracappa, Peter; Xu, X. George

    2017-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is well recognized as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. For radiotherapy applications, accurate modelling of the source term, i.e. the clinical linear accelerator is critical to the simulation. The purpose of this paper is to perform source modelling and examine the accuracy and performance of the models on Intel Many Integrated Core coprocessors (aka Xeon Phi) and Nvidia GPU using ARCHER and explore the potential optimization methods. Phase Space-based source modelling for has been implemented. Good agreements were found in a tomotherapy prostate patient case and a TrueBeam breast case. From the aspect of performance, the whole simulation for prostate plan and breast plan cost about 173s and 73s with 1% statistical error.

  10. Modeling of Radiotherapy Linac Source Terms Using ARCHER Monte Carlo Code: Performance Comparison for GPU and MIC Parallel Computing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo (MC simulation is well recognized as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. For radiotherapy applications, accurate modelling of the source term, i.e. the clinical linear accelerator is critical to the simulation. The purpose of this paper is to perform source modelling and examine the accuracy and performance of the models on Intel Many Integrated Core coprocessors (aka Xeon Phi and Nvidia GPU using ARCHER and explore the potential optimization methods. Phase Space-based source modelling for has been implemented. Good agreements were found in a tomotherapy prostate patient case and a TrueBeam breast case. From the aspect of performance, the whole simulation for prostate plan and breast plan cost about 173s and 73s with 1% statistical error.

  11. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Orrin S; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    Recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for such 'crowdsourcing' efforts in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding opportunities, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real - it is time to jump in! Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acoustic reverse-time migration using GPU card and POSIX thread based on the adaptive optimal finite-difference scheme and the hybrid absorbing boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaohui; Liu, Yang; Ren, Zhiming

    2018-06-01

    Reverse-time migration (RTM) is a powerful tool for imaging geologically complex structures such as steep-dip and subsalt. However, its implementation is quite computationally expensive. Recently, as a low-cost solution, the graphic processing unit (GPU) was introduced to improve the efficiency of RTM. In the paper, we develop three ameliorative strategies to implement RTM on GPU card. First, given the high accuracy and efficiency of the adaptive optimal finite-difference (FD) method based on least squares (LS) on central processing unit (CPU), we study the optimal LS-based FD method on GPU. Second, we develop the CPU-based hybrid absorbing boundary condition (ABC) to the GPU-based one by addressing two issues of the former when introduced to GPU card: time-consuming and chaotic threads. Third, for large-scale data, the combinatorial strategy for optimal checkpointing and efficient boundary storage is introduced for the trade-off between memory and recomputation. To save the time of communication between host and disk, the portable operating system interface (POSIX) thread is utilized to create the other CPU core at the checkpoints. Applications of the three strategies on GPU with the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming language in RTM demonstrate their efficiency and validity.

  13. Performance Analysis of Memory Transfers and GEMM Subroutines on NVIDIA Tesla GPU Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allada, Veerendra, Benjegerdes, Troy; Bode, Brett

    2009-08-31

    Commodity clusters augmented with application accelerators are evolving as competitive high performance computing systems. The Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) with a very high arithmetic density and performance per price ratio is a good platform for the scientific application acceleration. In addition to the interconnect bottlenecks among the cluster compute nodes, the cost of memory copies between the host and the GPU device have to be carefully amortized to improve the overall efficiency of the application. Scientific applications also rely on efficient implementation of the BAsic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS), among which the General Matrix Multiply (GEMM) is considered as the workhorse subroutine. In this paper, they study the performance of the memory copies and GEMM subroutines that are critical to port the computational chemistry algorithms to the GPU clusters. To that end, a benchmark based on the NetPIPE framework is developed to evaluate the latency and bandwidth of the memory copies between the host and the GPU device. The performance of the single and double precision GEMM subroutines from the NVIDIA CUBLAS 2.0 library are studied. The results have been compared with that of the BLAS routines from the Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) to understand the computational trade-offs. The test bed is a Intel Xeon cluster equipped with NVIDIA Tesla GPUs.

  14. Performance Analysis of Memory Transfers and GEMM Subroutines on NVIDIA Tesla GPU Cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allada, Veerendra; Benjegerdes, Troy; Bode, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Commodity clusters augmented with application accelerators are evolving as competitive high performance computing systems. The Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) with a very high arithmetic density and performance per price ratio is a good platform for the scientific application acceleration. In addition to the interconnect bottlenecks among the cluster compute nodes, the cost of memory copies between the host and the GPU device have to be carefully amortized to improve the overall efficiency of the application. Scientific applications also rely on efficient implementation of the BAsic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS), among which the General Matrix Multiply (GEMM) is considered as the workhorse subroutine. In this paper, they study the performance of the memory copies and GEMM subroutines that are critical to port the computational chemistry algorithms to the GPU clusters. To that end, a benchmark based on the NetPIPE framework is developed to evaluate the latency and bandwidth of the memory copies between the host and the GPU device. The performance of the single and double precision GEMM subroutines from the NVIDIA CUBLAS 2.0 library are studied. The results have been compared with that of the BLAS routines from the Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) to understand the computational trade-offs. The test bed is a Intel Xeon cluster equipped with NVIDIA Tesla GPUs.

  15. Large Scale Simulations of the Euler Equations on GPU Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Liebmann, Manfred

    2010-08-01

    The paper investigates the scalability of a parallel Euler solver, using the Vijayasundaram method, on a GPU cluster with 32 Nvidia Geforce GTX 295 boards. The aim of this research is to enable large scale fluid dynamics simulations with up to one billion elements. We investigate communication protocols for the GPU cluster to compensate for the slow Gigabit Ethernet network between the GPU compute nodes and to maintain overall efficiency. A diesel engine intake-port and a nozzle, meshed in different resolutions, give good real world examples for the scalability tests on the GPU cluster. © 2010 IEEE.

  16. A survey and measurement study of GPU DVFS on energy conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Mei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency has become one of the top design criteria for current computing systems. The dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS has been widely adopted by laptop computers, servers, and mobile devices to conserve energy, while the GPU DVFS is still at a certain early age. This paper aims at exploring the impact of GPU DVFS on the application performance and power consumption, and furthermore, on energy conservation. We survey the state-of-the-art GPU DVFS characterizations, and then summarize recent research works on GPU power and performance models. We also conduct real GPU DVFS experiments on NVIDIA Fermi and Maxwell GPUs. According to our experimental results, GPU DVFS has significant potential for energy saving. The effect of scaling core voltage/frequency and memory voltage/frequency depends on not only the GPU architectures, but also the characteristic of GPU applications.

  17. GPU-accelerated Kernel Regression Reconstruction for Freehand 3D Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tiexiang; Li, Ling; Zhu, Qingsong; Qin, Wenjian; Gu, Jia; Yang, Feng; Xie, Yaoqin

    2017-07-01

    Volume reconstruction method plays an important role in improving reconstructed volumetric image quality for freehand three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging. By utilizing the capability of programmable graphics processing unit (GPU), we can achieve a real-time incremental volume reconstruction at a speed of 25-50 frames per second (fps). After incremental reconstruction and visualization, hole-filling is performed on GPU to fill remaining empty voxels. However, traditional pixel nearest neighbor-based hole-filling fails to reconstruct volume with high image quality. On the contrary, the kernel regression provides an accurate volume reconstruction method for 3D ultrasound imaging but with the cost of heavy computational complexity. In this paper, a GPU-based fast kernel regression method is proposed for high-quality volume after the incremental reconstruction of freehand ultrasound. The experimental results show that improved image quality for speckle reduction and details preservation can be obtained with the parameter setting of kernel window size of [Formula: see text] and kernel bandwidth of 1.0. The computational performance of the proposed GPU-based method can be over 200 times faster than that on central processing unit (CPU), and the volume with size of 50 million voxels in our experiment can be reconstructed within 10 seconds.

  18. GAMER: A GRAPHIC PROCESSING UNIT ACCELERATED ADAPTIVE-MESH-REFINEMENT CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schive, H.-Y.; Tsai, Y.-C.; Chiueh Tzihong

    2010-01-01

    We present the newly developed code, GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement code (GAMER), which adopts a novel approach in improving the performance of adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) astrophysical simulations by a large factor with the use of the graphic processing unit (GPU). The AMR implementation is based on a hierarchy of grid patches with an oct-tree data structure. We adopt a three-dimensional relaxing total variation diminishing scheme for the hydrodynamic solver and a multi-level relaxation scheme for the Poisson solver. Both solvers have been implemented in GPU, by which hundreds of patches can be advanced in parallel. The computational overhead associated with the data transfer between the CPU and GPU is carefully reduced by utilizing the capability of asynchronous memory copies in GPU, and the computing time of the ghost-zone values for each patch is diminished by overlapping it with the GPU computations. We demonstrate the accuracy of the code by performing several standard test problems in astrophysics. GAMER is a parallel code that can be run in a multi-GPU cluster system. We measure the performance of the code by performing purely baryonic cosmological simulations in different hardware implementations, in which detailed timing analyses provide comparison between the computations with and without GPU(s) acceleration. Maximum speed-up factors of 12.19 and 10.47 are demonstrated using one GPU with 4096 3 effective resolution and 16 GPUs with 8192 3 effective resolution, respectively.

  19. Thermal/Heat Transfer Analysis Using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) Enabled Computing Environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulation technology plays an important role in propulsion test facility design and development by assessing risks, identifying failure modes, and predicting...

  20. Accelerating image reconstruction in dual-head PET system by GPU and symmetry properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ying Chou

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an important imaging modality in both clinical usage and research studies. We have developed a compact high-sensitivity PET system that consisted of two large-area panel PET detector heads, which produce more than 224 million lines of response and thus request dramatic computational demands. In this work, we employed a state-of-the-art graphics processing unit (GPU, NVIDIA Tesla C2070, to yield an efficient reconstruction process. Our approaches ingeniously integrate the distinguished features of the symmetry properties of the imaging system and GPU architectures, including block/warp/thread assignments and effective memory usage, to accelerate the computations for ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM image reconstruction. The OSEM reconstruction algorithms were implemented employing both CPU-based and GPU-based codes, and their computational performance was quantitatively analyzed and compared. The results showed that the GPU-accelerated scheme can drastically reduce the reconstruction time and thus can largely expand the applicability of the dual-head PET system.

  1. Semi-automatic tool to ease the creation and optimization of GPU programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    We present a tool that reduces the development time of GPU-executable code. We implement a catalogue of common optimizations specific to the GPU architecture. Through the tool, the programmer can semi-automatically transform a computationally-intensive code section into GPU-executable form...... of the transformations can be performed automatically, which makes the tool usable for both novices and experts in GPU programming....

  2. MAGI: a Node.js web service for fast microRNA-Seq analysis in a GPU infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jihoon; Levy, Eric; Ferbrache, Alex; Stepanowsky, Petra; Farcas, Claudiu; Wang, Shuang; Brunner, Stefan; Bath, Tyler; Wu, Yuan; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    Summary: MAGI is a web service for fast MicroRNA-Seq data analysis in a graphics processing unit (GPU) infrastructure. Using just a browser, users have access to results as web reports in just a few hours—>600% end-to-end performance improvement over state of the art. MAGI’s salient features are (i) transfer of large input files in native FASTA with Qualities (FASTQ) format through drag-and-drop operations, (ii) rapid prediction of microRNA target genes leveraging parallel computing with GPU ...

  3. Development of a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Bormin; Mielikainen, Jarno; Oh, Hyunjong; Allen Huang, Hung-Lung

    2011-01-01

    Satellite-observed radiance is a nonlinear functional of surface properties and atmospheric temperature and absorbing gas profiles as described by the radiative transfer equation (RTE). In the era of hyperspectral sounders with thousands of high-resolution channels, the computation of the radiative transfer model becomes more time-consuming. The radiative transfer model performance in operational numerical weather prediction systems still limits the number of channels we can use in hyperspectral sounders to only a few hundreds. To take the full advantage of such high-resolution infrared observations, a computationally efficient radiative transfer model is needed to facilitate satellite data assimilation. In recent years the programmable commodity graphics processing unit (GPU) has evolved into a highly parallel, multi-threaded, many-core processor with tremendous computational speed and very high memory bandwidth. The radiative transfer model is very suitable for the GPU implementation to take advantage of the hardware's efficiency and parallelism where radiances of many channels can be calculated in parallel in GPUs. In this paper, we develop a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched in 2006 onboard the first European meteorological polar-orbiting satellites, METOP-A. Each IASI spectrum has 8461 spectral channels. The IASI radiative transfer model consists of three modules. The first module for computing the regression predictors takes less than 0.004% of CPU time, while the second module for transmittance computation and the third module for radiance computation take approximately 92.5% and 7.5%, respectively. Our GPU-based IASI radiative transfer model is developed to run on a low-cost personal supercomputer with four GPUs with total 960 compute cores, delivering near 4 TFlops theoretical peak performance. By massively parallelizing the second and third modules, we reached 364x

  4. Validation of GPU based TomoTherapy dose calculation engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Yu; Chen, Mingli; Henderson, Douglas; Sterpin, Edmond

    2012-04-01

    The graphic processing unit (GPU) based TomoTherapy convolution/superposition(C/S) dose engine (GPU dose engine) achieves a dramatic performance improvement over the traditional CPU-cluster based TomoTherapy dose engine (CPU dose engine). Besides the architecture difference between the GPU and CPU, there are several algorithm changes from the CPU dose engine to the GPU dose engine. These changes made the GPU dose slightly different from the CPU-cluster dose. In order for the commercial release of the GPU dose engine, its accuracy has to be validated. Thirty eight TomoTherapy phantom plans and 19 patient plans were calculated with both dose engines to evaluate the equivalency between the two dose engines. Gamma indices (Γ) were used for the equivalency evaluation. The GPU dose was further verified with the absolute point dose measurement with ion chamber and film measurements for phantom plans. Monte Carlo calculation was used as a reference for both dose engines in the accuracy evaluation in heterogeneous phantom and actual patients. The GPU dose engine showed excellent agreement with the current CPU dose engine. The majority of cases had over 99.99% of voxels with Γ(1%, 1 mm) engine also showed similar degree of accuracy in heterogeneous media as the current TomoTherapy dose engine. It is verified and validated that the ultrafast TomoTherapy GPU dose engine can safely replace the existing TomoTherapy cluster based dose engine without degradation in dose accuracy.

  5. A GPU code for analytic continuation through a sampling method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Nordström

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We here present a code for performing analytic continuation of fermionic Green’s functions and self-energies as well as bosonic susceptibilities on a graphics processing unit (GPU. The code is based on the sampling method introduced by Mishchenko et al. (2000, and is written for the widely used CUDA platform from NVidia. Detailed scaling tests are presented, for two different GPUs, in order to highlight the advantages of this code with respect to standard CPU computations. Finally, as an example of possible applications, we provide the analytic continuation of model Gaussian functions, as well as more realistic test cases from many-body physics.

  6. GPU-Based Techniques for Global Illumination Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Szirmay-Kalos, László; Sbert, Mateu

    2008-01-01

    This book presents techniques to render photo-realistic images by programming the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). We discuss effects such as mirror reflections, refractions, caustics, diffuse or glossy indirect illumination, radiosity, single or multiple scattering in participating media, tone reproduction, glow, and depth of field. This book targets game developers, graphics programmers, and also students with some basic understanding of computer graphics algorithms, rendering APIs like Direct3D or OpenGL, and shader programming. In order to make this book self-contained, the most important c

  7. Computation of large covariance matrices by SAMMY on graphical processing units and multicore CPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbanas, G.; Dunn, M.E.; Wiarda, D., E-mail: arbanasg@ornl.gov, E-mail: dunnme@ornl.gov, E-mail: wiardada@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Computational power of Graphical Processing Units and multicore CPUs was harnessed by the nuclear data evaluation code SAMMY to speed up computations of large Resonance Parameter Covariance Matrices (RPCMs). This was accomplished by linking SAMMY to vendor-optimized implementations of the matrix-matrix multiplication subroutine of the Basic Linear Algebra Library to compute the most time-consuming step. The {sup 235}U RPCM computed previously using a triple-nested loop was re-computed using the NVIDIA implementation of the subroutine on a single Tesla Fermi Graphical Processing Unit, and also using the Intel's Math Kernel Library implementation on two different multicore CPU systems. A multiplication of two matrices of dimensions 16,000×20,000 that had previously taken days, took approximately one minute on the GPU. Comparable performance was achieved on a dual six-core CPU system. The magnitude of the speed-up suggests that these, or similar, combinations of hardware and libraries may be useful for large matrix operations in SAMMY. Uniform interfaces of standard linear algebra libraries make them a promising candidate for a programming framework of a new generation of SAMMY for the emerging heterogeneous computing platforms. (author)

  8. Computation of large covariance matrices by SAMMY on graphical processing units and multicore CPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbanas, G.; Dunn, M.E.; Wiarda, D.

    2011-01-01

    Computational power of Graphical Processing Units and multicore CPUs was harnessed by the nuclear data evaluation code SAMMY to speed up computations of large Resonance Parameter Covariance Matrices (RPCMs). This was accomplished by linking SAMMY to vendor-optimized implementations of the matrix-matrix multiplication subroutine of the Basic Linear Algebra Library to compute the most time-consuming step. The 235 U RPCM computed previously using a triple-nested loop was re-computed using the NVIDIA implementation of the subroutine on a single Tesla Fermi Graphical Processing Unit, and also using the Intel's Math Kernel Library implementation on two different multicore CPU systems. A multiplication of two matrices of dimensions 16,000×20,000 that had previously taken days, took approximately one minute on the GPU. Comparable performance was achieved on a dual six-core CPU system. The magnitude of the speed-up suggests that these, or similar, combinations of hardware and libraries may be useful for large matrix operations in SAMMY. Uniform interfaces of standard linear algebra libraries make them a promising candidate for a programming framework of a new generation of SAMMY for the emerging heterogeneous computing platforms. (author)

  9. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Xuejun; Jia Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Jelen, Urszula; Li Jinsheng

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on graphics processing unit (GPU). This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework (Gu et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97). Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on ten IMRT treatment plans (five head-and-neck cases and five lung cases). For all cases, there is improvement with the 3D-density correction over the conventional FSPB algorithm and for most cases the improvement is significant. Regarding the efficiency, because of the appropriate arrangement of memory access and the usage of GPU intrinsic functions, the dose calculation for an IMRT plan can be accomplished well within 1 s (except for one case) with this new GPU-based FSPB algorithm. Compared to the previous GPU-based FSPB algorithm without 3D-density correction, this new algorithm, though slightly sacrificing the computational efficiency (∼5-15% lower), has significantly improved the dose calculation accuracy, making it more suitable for online IMRT replanning.

  10. Cucheb: A GPU implementation of the filtered Lanczos procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurentz, Jared L.; Kalantzis, Vassilis; Saad, Yousef

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the software package Cucheb, a GPU implementation of the filtered Lanczos procedure for the solution of large sparse symmetric eigenvalue problems. The filtered Lanczos procedure uses a carefully chosen polynomial spectral transformation to accelerate convergence of the Lanczos method when computing eigenvalues within a desired interval. This method has proven particularly effective for eigenvalue problems that arise in electronic structure calculations and density functional theory. We compare our implementation against an equivalent CPU implementation and show that using the GPU can reduce the computation time by more than a factor of 10. Program Summary Program title: Cucheb Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/rjr9tzchmh.1 Licensing provisions: MIT Programming language: CUDA C/C++ Nature of problem: Electronic structure calculations require the computation of all eigenvalue-eigenvector pairs of a symmetric matrix that lie inside a user-defined real interval. Solution method: To compute all the eigenvalues within a given interval a polynomial spectral transformation is constructed that maps the desired eigenvalues of the original matrix to the exterior of the spectrum of the transformed matrix. The Lanczos method is then used to compute the desired eigenvectors of the transformed matrix, which are then used to recover the desired eigenvalues of the original matrix. The bulk of the operations are executed in parallel using a graphics processing unit (GPU). Runtime: Variable, depending on the number of eigenvalues sought and the size and sparsity of the matrix. Additional comments: Cucheb is compatible with CUDA Toolkit v7.0 or greater.

  11. GPU-accelerated FDTD modeling of radio-frequency field-tissue interactions in high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jieru; Liu, Feng; Weber, Ewald; Li, Yu; Crozier, Stuart

    2011-06-01

    The analysis of high-field RF field-tissue interactions requires high-performance finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computing. Conventional CPU-based FDTD calculations offer limited computing performance in a PC environment. This study presents a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel-computing framework, producing substantially boosted computing efficiency (with a two-order speedup factor) at a PC-level cost. Specific details of implementing the FDTD method on a GPU architecture have been presented and the new computational strategy has been successfully applied to the design of a novel 8-element transceive RF coil system at 9.4 T. Facilitated by the powerful GPU-FDTD computing, the new RF coil array offers optimized fields (averaging 25% improvement in sensitivity, and 20% reduction in loop coupling compared with conventional array structures of the same size) for small animal imaging with a robust RF configuration. The GPU-enabled acceleration paves the way for FDTD to be applied for both detailed forward modeling and inverse design of MRI coils, which were previously impractical.

  12. PIConGPU - A highly-scalable particle-in-cell implementation for GPU clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussmann, Michael; Burau, Heiko; Debus, Alexander; Huebl, Axel; Kluge, Thomas; Pausch, Richard; Schmeisser, Nils; Steiniger, Klaus; Widera, Rene; Wyderka, Nikolai; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Thomas [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Benjamin [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany); Schmitt, Felix [NVIDIA, Austin, TX (United States); Grottel, Sebastian; Gumhold, Stefan [TU Dresden (Germany); Juckeland, Guido; Angel, Wolfgang [TU Dresden (Germany); ZIH, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    PIConGPU can handle large-scale simulations of laser plasma and astrophysical plasma dynamics on GPU clusters with thousands of GPUs. High data throughput allows to conduct large parameter surveys but makes it necessary to rethink data analysis and look for new ways of analyzing large simulation data sets. The speedup seen on GPUs enables scientists to add physical effects to their code that up until recently have been too computationally demanding. We present recent results obtained with PIConGPU, discuss scaling behaviour, the most important building blocks of the code and new physics modules recently added. In addition we give an outlook on data analysis, resiliance and load balancing with PIConGPU.

  13. Implementation and optimization of ultrasound signal processing algorithms on mobile GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Woo Kyu; Lee, Wooyoul; Kim, Kyu Cheol; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong

    2014-03-01

    A general-purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) has been used for improving computing power in medical ultrasound imaging systems. Recently, a mobile GPU becomes powerful to deal with 3D games and videos at high frame rates on Full HD or HD resolution displays. This paper proposes the method to implement ultrasound signal processing on a mobile GPU available in the high-end smartphone (Galaxy S4, Samsung Electronics, Seoul, Korea) with programmable shaders on the OpenGL ES 2.0 platform. To maximize the performance of the mobile GPU, the optimization of shader design and load sharing between vertex and fragment shader was performed. The beamformed data were captured from a tissue mimicking phantom (Model 539 Multipurpose Phantom, ATS Laboratories, Inc., Bridgeport, CT, USA) by using a commercial ultrasound imaging system equipped with a research package (Ultrasonix Touch, Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). The real-time performance is evaluated by frame rates while varying the range of signal processing blocks. The implementation method of ultrasound signal processing on OpenGL ES 2.0 was verified by analyzing PSNR with MATLAB gold standard that has the same signal path. CNR was also analyzed to verify the method. From the evaluations, the proposed mobile GPU-based processing method has no significant difference with the processing using MATLAB (i.e., PSNRe., 11.31). From the mobile GPU implementation, the frame rates of 57.6 Hz were achieved. The total execution time was 17.4 ms that was faster than the acquisition time (i.e., 34.4 ms). These results indicate that the mobile GPU-based processing method can support real-time ultrasound B-mode processing on the smartphone.

  14. Development of efficient GPU parallelization of WRF Yonsei University planetary boundary layer scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer (PBL is the lowest part of the atmosphere and where its character is directly affected by its contact with the underlying planetary surface. The PBL is responsible for vertical sub-grid-scale fluxes due to eddy transport in the whole atmospheric column. It determines the flux profiles within the well-mixed boundary layer and the more stable layer above. It thus provides an evolutionary model of atmospheric temperature, moisture (including clouds, and horizontal momentum in the entire atmospheric column. For such purposes, several PBL models have been proposed and employed in the weather research and forecasting (WRF model of which the Yonsei University (YSU scheme is one. To expedite weather research and prediction, we have put tremendous effort into developing an accelerated implementation of the entire WRF model using graphics processing unit (GPU massive parallel computing architecture whilst maintaining its accuracy as compared to its central processing unit (CPU-based implementation. This paper presents our efficient GPU-based design on a WRF YSU PBL scheme. Using one NVIDIA Tesla K40 GPU, the GPU-based YSU PBL scheme achieves a speedup of 193× with respect to its CPU counterpart running on one CPU core, whereas the speedup for one CPU socket (4 cores with respect to 1 CPU core is only 3.5×. We can even boost the speedup to 360× with respect to 1 CPU core as two K40 GPUs are applied.

  15. A Monte Carlo neutron transport code for eigenvalue calculations on a dual-GPU system and CUDA environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.; Ding, A.; Ji, W.; Xu, X. G. [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Carothers, C. D. [Dept. of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. RPI (United States); Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is able to accurately calculate eigenvalues in reactor analysis. Its lengthy computation time can be reduced by general-purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU), one of the latest parallel computing techniques under development. The method of porting a regular transport code to GPU is usually very straightforward due to the 'embarrassingly parallel' nature of MC code. However, the situation becomes different for eigenvalue calculation in that it will be performed on a generation-by-generation basis and the thread coordination should be explicitly taken care of. This paper presents our effort to develop such a GPU-based MC code in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) environment. The code is able to perform eigenvalue calculation under simple geometries on a multi-GPU system. The specifics of algorithm design, including thread organization and memory management were described in detail. The original CPU version of the code was tested on an Intel Xeon X5660 2.8 GHz CPU, and the adapted GPU version was tested on NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Double-precision floating point format was used throughout the calculation. The result showed that a speedup of 7.0 and 33.3 were obtained for a bare spherical core and a binary slab system respectively. The speedup factor was further increased by a factor of {approx}2 on a dual GPU system. The upper limit of device-level parallelism was analyzed, and a possible method to enhance the thread-level parallelism was proposed. (authors)

  16. A Monte Carlo neutron transport code for eigenvalue calculations on a dual-GPU system and CUDA environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.; Ding, A.; Ji, W.; Xu, X. G.; Carothers, C. D.; Brown, F. B.

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is able to accurately calculate eigenvalues in reactor analysis. Its lengthy computation time can be reduced by general-purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU), one of the latest parallel computing techniques under development. The method of porting a regular transport code to GPU is usually very straightforward due to the 'embarrassingly parallel' nature of MC code. However, the situation becomes different for eigenvalue calculation in that it will be performed on a generation-by-generation basis and the thread coordination should be explicitly taken care of. This paper presents our effort to develop such a GPU-based MC code in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) environment. The code is able to perform eigenvalue calculation under simple geometries on a multi-GPU system. The specifics of algorithm design, including thread organization and memory management were described in detail. The original CPU version of the code was tested on an Intel Xeon X5660 2.8 GHz CPU, and the adapted GPU version was tested on NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Double-precision floating point format was used throughout the calculation. The result showed that a speedup of 7.0 and 33.3 were obtained for a bare spherical core and a binary slab system respectively. The speedup factor was further increased by a factor of ∼2 on a dual GPU system. The upper limit of device-level parallelism was analyzed, and a possible method to enhance the thread-level parallelism was proposed. (authors)

  17. GPU-Accelerated Parallel FDTD on Distributed Heterogeneous Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronglin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a (finite difference time domain FDTD code written in Fortran and CUDA for realistic electromagnetic calculations with parallelization methods of Message Passing Interface (MPI and Open Multiprocessing (OpenMP. Since both Central Processing Unit (CPU and Graphics Processing Unit (GPU resources are utilized, a faster execution speed can be reached compared to a traditional pure GPU code. In our experiments, 64 NVIDIA TESLA K20m GPUs and 64 INTEL XEON E5-2670 CPUs are used to carry out the pure CPU, pure GPU, and CPU + GPU tests. Relative to the pure CPU calculations for the same problems, the speedup ratio achieved by CPU + GPU calculations is around 14. Compared to the pure GPU calculations for the same problems, the CPU + GPU calculations have 7.6%–13.2% performance improvement. Because of the small memory size of GPUs, the FDTD problem size is usually very small. However, this code can enlarge the maximum problem size by 25% without reducing the performance of traditional pure GPU code. Finally, using this code, a microstrip antenna array with 16×18 elements is calculated and the radiation patterns are compared with the ones of MoM. Results show that there is a well agreement between them.

  18. Accelerating Smith-Waterman Alignment for Protein Database Search Using Frequency Distance Filtration Scheme Based on CPU-GPU Collaborative System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Hong, Yang; Lin, Chun-Yuan; Hung, Che-Lun

    2015-01-01

    The Smith-Waterman (SW) algorithm has been widely utilized for searching biological sequence databases in bioinformatics. Recently, several works have adopted the graphic card with Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) and their associated CUDA model to enhance the performance of SW computations. However, these works mainly focused on the protein database search by using the intertask parallelization technique, and only using the GPU capability to do the SW computations one by one. Hence, in this paper, we will propose an efficient SW alignment method, called CUDA-SWfr, for the protein database search by using the intratask parallelization technique based on a CPU-GPU collaborative system. Before doing the SW computations on GPU, a procedure is applied on CPU by using the frequency distance filtration scheme (FDFS) to eliminate the unnecessary alignments. The experimental results indicate that CUDA-SWfr runs 9.6 times and 96 times faster than the CPU-based SW method without and with FDFS, respectively.

  19. Moving-Target Position Estimation Using GPU-Based Particle Filter for IoT Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongseop Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A particle filter (PF has been introduced for effective position estimation of moving targets for non-Gaussian and nonlinear systems. The time difference of arrival (TDOA method using acoustic sensor array has normally been used to for estimation by concealing the location of a moving target, especially underwater. In this paper, we propose a GPU -based acceleration of target position estimation using a PF and propose an efficient system and software architecture. The proposed graphic processing unit (GPU-based algorithm has more advantages in applying PF signal processing to a target system, which consists of large-scale Internet of Things (IoT-driven sensors because of the parallelization which is scalable. For the TDOA measurement from the acoustic sensor array, we use the generalized cross correlation phase transform (GCC-PHAT method to obtain the correlation coefficient of the signal using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, and we try to accelerate the calculations of GCC-PHAT based TDOA measurements using FFT with GPU compute unified device architecture (CUDA. The proposed approach utilizes a parallelization method in the target position estimation algorithm using GPU-based PF processing. In addition, it could efficiently estimate sudden movement change of the target using GPU-based parallel computing which also can be used for multiple target tracking. It also provides scalability in extending the detection algorithm according to the increase of the number of sensors. Therefore, the proposed architecture can be applied in IoT sensing applications with a large number of sensors. The target estimation algorithm was verified using MATLAB and implemented using GPU CUDA. We implemented the proposed signal processing acceleration system using target GPU to analyze in terms of execution time. The execution time of the algorithm is reduced by 55% from to the CPU standalone operation in target embedded board, NVIDIA Jetson TX1. Also, to apply large

  20. Control of peripheral units by satellite computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, K.T.

    1974-01-01

    A computer system was developed allowing the control of nuclear physics experiments, and use of the results by means of graphical and conversational assemblies. This system which is made of two computers, one IBM-370/135 and one Telemecanique Electrique T1600, controls the conventional IBM peripherals and also the special ones made in the laboratory, such as data acquisition display and graphics units. The visual display is implemented by a scanning-type television, equipped with a light-pen. These units in themselves are universal, but their specifications were established to meet the requirements of nuclear physics experiments. The input-output channels of the two computers have been connected together by an interface, designed and implemented in the Laboratory. This interface allows the exchange of control signals and data (the data are changed from bytes into word and vice-versa). The T1600 controls the peripherals mentionned above according to the commands of the IBM370. Hence the T1600 has here the part of a satellite computer which allows conversation with the main computer and also insures the control of its special peripheral units [fr

  1. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvadore, Francesco [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy); Bernardini, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bernardini@uniroma1.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ – via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Botti, Michela [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier–Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  2. High-speed, multi-input, multi-output control using GPU processing in the HBT-EP tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, N., E-mail: Nikolaus@rath.org [Columbia University, Rm 200 Mudd, 500 W 120th St, New York, NY - 10027 (United States); Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.J.; DeBono, B.; Levesque, J.P.; Li, B.; Mauel, M.E.; Maurer, D.A.; Navratil, G.A.; Shiraki, D. [Columbia University, Rm 200 Mudd, 500 W 120th St, New York, NY - 10027 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a GPU based system for magnetic control of perturbed equilibria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cycle times are below 5 {mu}s and I/O latencies below 10 {mu}s for 96 inputs and 64 outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new architecture removes host RAM and CPU from the control cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GPU and DA/AD modules operate independently and communicate via PCIe peer-to-peer connections. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Linux host system does not require real-time extensions. - Abstract: We report on the design of a new plasma control system for the HBT-EP tokamak that utilizes a graphical processing unit (GPU) to magnetically control the 3D perturbed equilibrium state [1] of the plasma. The control system achieves cycle times of 5 {mu}s and I/O latencies below 10 {mu}s for up to 96 inputs and 64 outputs. The number of state variables is in the same order. To handle the resulting computational complexity under the given time constraints, the control algorithms are designed for massively parallel processing. The necessary hardware resources are provided by an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU, offering a total of 448 computing cores running at 1.3 GHz each. A new control architecture allows control input from magnetic diagnostics to be pushed directly into GPU memory by a D-TACQ ACQ196 digitizer, and control output to be pulled directly from GPU memory by two D-TACQ AO32 analog output modules. By using peer-to-peer PCI express connections, this technique completely eliminates the use of host RAM and central processing unit (CPU) from the control cycle, permitting single-digit microsecond latencies on a standard Linux host system without any real-time extensions.

  3. High performance MRI simulations of motion on multi-GPU systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthis, Christos G; Venetis, Ioannis E; Aletras, Anthony H

    2014-07-04

    MRI physics simulators have been developed in the past for optimizing imaging protocols and for training purposes. However, these simulators have only addressed motion within a limited scope. The purpose of this study was the incorporation of realistic motion, such as cardiac motion, respiratory motion and flow, within MRI simulations in a high performance multi-GPU environment. Three different motion models were introduced in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging SIMULator (MRISIMUL) of this study: cardiac motion, respiratory motion and flow. Simulation of a simple Gradient Echo pulse sequence and a CINE pulse sequence on the corresponding anatomical model was performed. Myocardial tagging was also investigated. In pulse sequence design, software crushers were introduced to accommodate the long execution times in order to avoid spurious echoes formation. The displacement of the anatomical model isochromats was calculated within the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) kernel for every timestep of the pulse sequence. Experiments that would allow simulation of custom anatomical and motion models were also performed. Last, simulations of motion with MRISIMUL on single-node and multi-node multi-GPU systems were examined. Gradient Echo and CINE images of the three motion models were produced and motion-related artifacts were demonstrated. The temporal evolution of the contractility of the heart was presented through the application of myocardial tagging. Better simulation performance and image quality were presented through the introduction of software crushers without the need to further increase the computational load and GPU resources. Last, MRISIMUL demonstrated an almost linear scalable performance with the increasing number of available GPU cards, in both single-node and multi-node multi-GPU computer systems. MRISIMUL is the first MR physics simulator to have implemented motion with a 3D large computational load on a single computer multi-GPU configuration. The incorporation

  4. GPU Acceleration of DSP for Communication Receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Jake; Gunther, Hyrum; Moon, Todd

    2017-09-01

    Graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of signal processing algorithms can outperform CPU-based implementations. This paper describes the GPU implementation of several algorithms encountered in a wide range of high-data rate communication receivers including filters, multirate filters, numerically controlled oscillators, and multi-stage digital down converters. These structures are tested by processing the 20 MHz wide FM radio band (88-108 MHz). Two receiver structures are explored: a single channel receiver and a filter bank channelizer. Both run in real time on NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card.

  5. GPU Pro 4 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    GPU Pro4: Advanced Rendering Techniques presents ready-to-use ideas and procedures that can help solve many of your day-to-day graphics programming challenges. Focusing on interactive media and games, the book covers up-to-date methods producing real-time graphics. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book begins with discussions on the abi

  6. NAVIER-STOKES EM GPU

    OpenAIRE

    ALEX LAIER BORDIGNON

    2006-01-01

    Nesse trabalho, mostramos como simular um fluido em duas dimensões em um domínio com fronteiras arbitrárias. Nosso trabalho é baseado no esquema stable fluids desenvolvido por Joe Stam. A implementação é feita na GPU (Graphics Processing Unit), permitindo velocidade de interação com o fluido. Fazemos uso da linguagem Cg (C for Graphics), desenvolvida pela companhia NVidia. Nossas principais contribuições são o tratamento das múltiplas fronteiras, o...

  7. Graphics processor efficiency for realization of rapid tabular computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, V.A.; Kudryavtsev, V.I.; Us, S.A.; Shestakov, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Capabilities of graphics processing units (GPU) and central processing units (CPU) have been investigated for realization of fast-calculation algorithms with the use of tabulated functions. The realization of tabulated functions is exemplified by the GPU/CPU architecture-based processors. Comparison is made between the operating efficiencies of GPU and CPU, employed for tabular calculations at different conditions of use. Recommendations are formulated for the use of graphical and central processors to speed up scientific and engineering computations through the use of tabulated functions

  8. Parallel GPU implementation of PWR reactor burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimlich, A.; Silva, F.C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three GPU algorithms used to evaluate the burn-up in a PWR reactor. • Exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential. • The C++ container is expansible to accept new nuclides chains. - Abstract: This paper surveys three methods, implemented for multi-core CPU and graphic processor unit (GPU), to evaluate the fuel burn-up in a pressurized light water nuclear reactor (PWR) using the solutions of a large system of coupled ordinary differential equations. The reactor physics simulation of a PWR reactor spends a long execution time with burnup calculations, so performance improvement using GPU can imply in better core design and thus extended fuel life cycle. The results of this study exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential solver, within 1% accuracy.

  9. Modelling multi-phase liquid-sediment scour and resuspension induced by rapid flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) accelerated with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourtakas, G.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A two-phase numerical model using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is applied to two-phase liquid-sediments flows. The absence of a mesh in SPH is ideal for interfacial and highly non-linear flows with changing fragmentation of the interface, mixing and resuspension. The rheology of sediment induced under rapid flows undergoes several states which are only partially described by previous research in SPH. This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the geotechnics, non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows by proposing a model that combines the yielding, shear and suspension layer which are needed to predict accurately the global erosion phenomena, from a hydrodynamics prospective. The numerical SPH scheme is based on the explicit treatment of both phases using Newtonian and the non-Newtonian Bingham-type Herschel-Bulkley-Papanastasiou constitutive model. This is supplemented by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion to predict the onset of yielding of the sediment surface and a concentration suspension model. The multi-phase model has been compared with experimental and 2-D reference numerical models for scour following a dry-bed dam break yielding satisfactory results and improvements over well-known SPH multi-phase models. With 3-D simulations requiring a large number of particles, the code is accelerated with a graphics processing unit (GPU) in the open-source DualSPHysics code. The implementation and optimisation of the code achieved a speed up of x58 over an optimised single thread serial code. A 3-D dam break over a non-cohesive erodible bed simulation with over 4 million particles yields close agreement with experimental scour and water surface profiles.

  10. The performances of R GPU implementations of the GMRES method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Oancea

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the performance of commodity computers has improved drastically with the introduction of multicore processors and GPU computing, the standard R distribution is still based on single-threaded model of computation, using only a small fraction of the computational power available now for most desktops and laptops. Modern statistical software packages rely on high performance implementations of the linear algebra routines there are at the core of several important leading edge statistical methods. In this paper we present a GPU implementation of the GMRES iterative method for solving linear systems. We compare the performance of this implementation with a pure single threaded version of the CPU. We also investigate the performance of our implementation using different GPU packages available now for R such as gmatrix, gputools or gpuR which are based on CUDA or OpenCL frameworks.

  11. Pipelining Computational Stages of the Tomographic Reconstructor for Multi-Object Adaptive Optics on a Multi-GPU System

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali; Ltaief, Hatem; Gratadour, Damien; Keyes, David E.; Sevin, Arnaud; Abdelfattah, Ahmad; Gendron, Eric; Morel, Carine; Vidal, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    called MOSAIC has been proposed to perform multi-object spectroscopy using the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) technique. The core implementation of the simulation lies in the intensive computation of a tomographic reconstruct or (TR), which is used

  12. Data assimilation using a GPU accelerated path integral Monte Carlo approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, John C.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2011-09-01

    The answers to data assimilation questions can be expressed as path integrals over all possible state and parameter histories. We show how these path integrals can be evaluated numerically using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method designed to run in parallel on a graphics processing unit (GPU). We demonstrate the application of the method to an example with a transmembrane voltage time series of a simulated neuron as an input, and using a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. By taking advantage of GPU computing, we gain a parallel speedup factor of up to about 300, compared to an equivalent serial computation on a CPU, with performance increasing as the length of the observation time used for data assimilation increases.

  13. GPU - Accelerated Monte Carlo electron transport methods: development and application for radiation dose calculations using 6 GPU cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G.

    2013-01-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test-bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. As for photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were simulated. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU (Central Processing Unit)code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6*10 6 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy. (authors)

  14. CUDAICA: GPU Optimization of Infomax-ICA EEG Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Raimondo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Independent Component Analysis (ICA has become a standard to identify relevant dimensions of the data in neuroscience. ICA is a very reliable method to analyze data but it is, computationally, very costly. The use of ICA for online analysis of the data, used in brain computing interfaces, results are almost completely prohibitive. We show an increase with almost no cost (a rapid video card of speed of ICA by about 25 fold. The EEG data, which is a repetition of many independent signals in multiple channels, is very suitable for processing using the vector processors included in the graphical units. We profiled the implementation of this algorithm and detected two main types of operations responsible of the processing bottleneck and taking almost 80% of computing time: vector-matrix and matrix-matrix multiplications. By replacing function calls to basic linear algebra functions to the standard CUBLAS routines provided by GPU manufacturers, it does not increase performance due to CUDA kernel launch overhead. Instead, we developed a GPU-based solution that, comparing with the original BLAS and CUBLAS versions, obtains a 25x increase of performance for the ICA calculation.

  15. CMFD and GPU acceleration on method of characteristics for hexagonal cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yu; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dezhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A merged hex-mesh CMFD method solved via tri-diagonal matrix inversion. • Alternative hardware acceleration of using inexpensive GPU. • A hex-core benchmark with solution to confirm two acceleration methods. - Abstract: Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) has been widely adopted as an effective way to accelerate the source iteration of transport calculation. However in a core with hexagonal assemblies there are non-hexagonal meshes around the edges of assemblies, causing a problem for CMFD if the CMFD equations are still to be solved via tri-diagonal matrix inversion by simply scanning the whole core meshes in different directions. To solve this problem, we propose an unequal mesh CMFD formulation that combines the non-hexagonal cells on the boundary of neighboring assemblies into non-regular hexagonal cells. We also investigated the alternative hardware acceleration of using graphics processing units (GPU) with graphics card in a personal computer. The tool CUDA is employed, which is a parallel computing platform and programming model invented by the company NVIDIA for harnessing the power of GPU. To investigate and implement these two acceleration methods, a 2-D hexagonal core transport code using the method of characteristics (MOC) is developed. A hexagonal mini-core benchmark problem is established to confirm the accuracy of the MOC code and to assess the effectiveness of CMFD and GPU parallel acceleration. For this benchmark problem, the CMFD acceleration increases the speed 16 times while the GPU acceleration speeds it up 25 times. When used simultaneously, they provide a speed gain of 292 times

  16. CMFD and GPU acceleration on method of characteristics for hexagonal cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yu, E-mail: hanyu1203@gmail.com [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jiang, Xiaofeng [Shanghai NuStar Nuclear Power Technology Co., Ltd., No. 81 South Qinzhou Road, XuJiaHui District, Shanghai 200000 (China); Wang, Dezhong [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A merged hex-mesh CMFD method solved via tri-diagonal matrix inversion. • Alternative hardware acceleration of using inexpensive GPU. • A hex-core benchmark with solution to confirm two acceleration methods. - Abstract: Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) has been widely adopted as an effective way to accelerate the source iteration of transport calculation. However in a core with hexagonal assemblies there are non-hexagonal meshes around the edges of assemblies, causing a problem for CMFD if the CMFD equations are still to be solved via tri-diagonal matrix inversion by simply scanning the whole core meshes in different directions. To solve this problem, we propose an unequal mesh CMFD formulation that combines the non-hexagonal cells on the boundary of neighboring assemblies into non-regular hexagonal cells. We also investigated the alternative hardware acceleration of using graphics processing units (GPU) with graphics card in a personal computer. The tool CUDA is employed, which is a parallel computing platform and programming model invented by the company NVIDIA for harnessing the power of GPU. To investigate and implement these two acceleration methods, a 2-D hexagonal core transport code using the method of characteristics (MOC) is developed. A hexagonal mini-core benchmark problem is established to confirm the accuracy of the MOC code and to assess the effectiveness of CMFD and GPU parallel acceleration. For this benchmark problem, the CMFD acceleration increases the speed 16 times while the GPU acceleration speeds it up 25 times. When used simultaneously, they provide a speed gain of 292 times.

  17. CPU and GPU (Cuda Template Matching Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldas Borcovas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Image processing, computer vision or other complicated opticalinformation processing algorithms require large resources. It isoften desired to execute algorithms in real time. It is hard tofulfill such requirements with single CPU processor. NVidiaproposed CUDA technology enables programmer to use theGPU resources in the computer. Current research was madewith Intel Pentium Dual-Core T4500 2.3 GHz processor with4 GB RAM DDR3 (CPU I, NVidia GeForce GT320M CUDAcompliable graphics card (GPU I and Intel Core I5-2500K3.3 GHz processor with 4 GB RAM DDR3 (CPU II, NVidiaGeForce GTX 560 CUDA compatible graphic card (GPU II.Additional libraries as OpenCV 2.1 and OpenCV 2.4.0 CUDAcompliable were used for the testing. Main test were made withstandard function MatchTemplate from the OpenCV libraries.The algorithm uses a main image and a template. An influenceof these factors was tested. Main image and template have beenresized and the algorithm computing time and performancein Gtpix/s have been measured. According to the informationobtained from the research GPU computing using the hardwarementioned earlier is till 24 times faster when it is processing abig amount of information. When the images are small the performanceof CPU and GPU are not significantly different. Thechoice of the template size makes influence on calculating withCPU. Difference in the computing time between the GPUs canbe explained by the number of cores which they have.

  18. GPU-based RFA simulation for minimally invasive cancer treatment of liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Panchatcharam; Weir, Phil; Flanagan, Ronan; Voglreiter, Philip; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald; Futterer, Jurgen; Portugaller, Horst Rupert; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Kolesnik, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is one of the most popular and well-standardized minimally invasive cancer treatments (MICT) for liver tumours, employed where surgical resection has been contraindicated. Less-experienced interventional radiologists (IRs) require an appropriate planning tool for the treatment to help avoid incomplete treatment and so reduce the tumour recurrence risk. Although a few tools are available to predict the ablation lesion geometry, the process is computationally expensive. Also, in our implementation, a few patient-specific parameters are used to improve the accuracy of the lesion prediction. Advanced heterogeneous computing using personal computers, incorporating the graphics processing unit (GPU) and the central processing unit (CPU), is proposed to predict the ablation lesion geometry. The most recent GPU technology is used to accelerate the finite element approximation of Penne's bioheat equation and a three state cell model. Patient-specific input parameters are used in the bioheat model to improve accuracy of the predicted lesion. A fast GPU-based RFA solver is developed to predict the lesion by doing most of the computational tasks in the GPU, while reserving the CPU for concurrent tasks such as lesion extraction based on the heat deposition at each finite element node. The solver takes less than 3 min for a treatment duration of 26 min. When the model receives patient-specific input parameters, the deviation between real and predicted lesion is below 3 mm. A multi-centre retrospective study indicates that the fast RFA solver is capable of providing the IR with the predicted lesion in the short time period before the intervention begins when the patient has been clinically prepared for the treatment.

  19. AMITIS: A 3D GPU-Based Hybrid-PIC Model for Space and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Shahab; Poppe, Andrew R.; Delory, Gregory T.; Farrell, William M.

    2017-05-01

    We have developed, for the first time, an advanced modeling infrastructure in space simulations (AMITIS) with an embedded three-dimensional self-consistent grid-based hybrid model of plasma (kinetic ions and fluid electrons) that runs entirely on graphics processing units (GPUs). The model uses NVIDIA GPUs and their associated parallel computing platform, CUDA, developed for general purpose processing on GPUs. The model uses a single CPU-GPU pair, where the CPU transfers data between the system and GPU memory, executes CUDA kernels, and writes simulation outputs on the disk. All computations, including moving particles, calculating macroscopic properties of particles on a grid, and solving hybrid model equations are processed on a single GPU. We explain various computing kernels within AMITIS and compare their performance with an already existing well-tested hybrid model of plasma that runs in parallel using multi-CPU platforms. We show that AMITIS runs ∼10 times faster than the parallel CPU-based hybrid model. We also introduce an implicit solver for computation of Faraday’s Equation, resulting in an explicit-implicit scheme for the hybrid model equation. We show that the proposed scheme is stable and accurate. We examine the AMITIS energy conservation and show that the energy is conserved with an error < 0.2% after 500,000 timesteps, even when a very low number of particles per cell is used.

  20. Pipelining Computational Stages of the Tomographic Reconstructor for Multi-Object Adaptive Optics on a Multi-GPU System

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali

    2014-11-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope project (E-ELT) is one of Europe\\'s highest priorities in ground-based astronomy. ELTs are built on top of a variety of highly sensitive and critical astronomical instruments. In particular, a new instrument called MOSAIC has been proposed to perform multi-object spectroscopy using the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) technique. The core implementation of the simulation lies in the intensive computation of a tomographic reconstruct or (TR), which is used to drive the deformable mirror in real time from the measurements. A new numerical algorithm is proposed (1) to capture the actual experimental noise and (2) to substantially speed up previous implementations by exposing more concurrency, while reducing the number of floating-point operations. Based on the Matrices Over Runtime System at Exascale numerical library (MORSE), a dynamic scheduler drives all computational stages of the tomographic reconstruct or simulation and allows to pipeline and to run tasks out-of order across different stages on heterogeneous systems, while ensuring data coherency and dependencies. The proposed TR simulation outperforms asymptotically previous state-of-the-art implementations up to 13-fold speedup. At more than 50000 unknowns, this appears to be the largest-scale AO problem submitted to computation, to date, and opens new research directions for extreme scale AO simulations. © 2014 IEEE.

  1. GPU Linear algebra extensions for GNU/Octave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosi, L B; Mariotti, M; Santocchia, A

    2012-01-01

    Octave is one of the most widely used open source tools for numerical analysis and liner algebra. Our project aims to improve Octave by introducing support for GPU computing in order to speed up some linear algebra operations. The core of our work is a C library that executes some BLAS operations concerning vector- vector, vector matrix and matrix-matrix functions on the GPU. OpenCL functions are used to program GPU kernels, which are bound within the GNU/octave framework. We report the project implementation design and some preliminary results about performance.

  2. Algorithms of GPU-enabled reactive force field (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mo; Li, Xiaoxia; Guo, Li

    2013-04-01

    Reactive force field (ReaxFF), a recent and novel bond order potential, allows for reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF MD) simulations for modeling larger and more complex molecular systems involving chemical reactions when compared with computation intensive quantum mechanical methods. However, ReaxFF MD can be approximately 10-50 times slower than classical MD due to its explicit modeling of bond forming and breaking, the dynamic charge equilibration at each time-step, and its one order smaller time-step than the classical MD, all of which pose significant computational challenges in simulation capability to reach spatio-temporal scales of nanometers and nanoseconds. The very recent advances of graphics processing unit (GPU) provide not only highly favorable performance for GPU enabled MD programs compared with CPU implementations but also an opportunity to manage with the computing power and memory demanding nature imposed on computer hardware by ReaxFF MD. In this paper, we present the algorithms of GMD-Reax, the first GPU enabled ReaxFF MD program with significantly improved performance surpassing CPU implementations on desktop workstations. The performance of GMD-Reax has been benchmarked on a PC equipped with a NVIDIA C2050 GPU for coal pyrolysis simulation systems with atoms ranging from 1378 to 27,283. GMD-Reax achieved speedups as high as 12 times faster than Duin et al.'s FORTRAN codes in Lammps on 8 CPU cores and 6 times faster than the Lammps' C codes based on PuReMD in terms of the simulation time per time-step averaged over 100 steps. GMD-Reax could be used as a new and efficient computational tool for exploiting very complex molecular reactions via ReaxFF MD simulation on desktop workstations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A multithreaded and GPU-optimized compact finite difference algorithm for turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number using petascale computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, M. P.; Yeung, P. K.; Buaria, D.; Gotoh, T.

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number is a multiscale problem which places demanding requirements on direct numerical simulations to resolve fluctuations down the to Batchelor scale. We use a dual-grid, dual-scheme and dual-communicator approach where velocity and scalar fields are computed by separate groups of parallel processes, the latter using a combined compact finite difference (CCD) scheme on finer grid with a static 3-D domain decomposition free of the communication overhead of memory transposes. A high degree of scalability is achieved for a 81923 scalar field at Schmidt number 512 in turbulence with a modest inertial range, by overlapping communication with computation whenever possible. On the Cray XE6 partition of Blue Waters, use of a dedicated thread for communication combined with OpenMP locks and nested parallelism reduces CCD timings by 34% compared to an MPI baseline. The code has been further optimized for the 27-petaflops Cray XK7 machine Titan using GPUs as accelerators with the latest OpenMP 4.5 directives, giving 2.7X speedup compared to CPU-only execution at the largest problem size. Supported by NSF Grant ACI-1036170, the NCSA Blue Waters Project with subaward via UIUC, and a DOE INCITE allocation at ORNL.

  4. Sop-GPU: accelerating biomolecular simulations in the centisecond timescale using graphics processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmurov, A; Dima, R I; Kholodov, Y; Barsegov, V

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical exploration of fundamental biological processes involving the forced unraveling of multimeric proteins, the sliding motion in protein fibers and the mechanical deformation of biomolecular assemblies under physiological force loads is challenging even for distributed computing systems. Using a C(α)-based coarse-grained self organized polymer (SOP) model, we implemented the Langevin simulations of proteins on graphics processing units (SOP-GPU program). We assessed the computational performance of an end-to-end application of the program, where all the steps of the algorithm are running on a GPU, by profiling the simulation time and memory usage for a number of test systems. The ∼90-fold computational speedup on a GPU, compared with an optimized central processing unit program, enabled us to follow the dynamics in the centisecond timescale, and to obtain the force-extension profiles using experimental pulling speeds (v(f) = 1-10 μm/s) employed in atomic force microscopy and in optical tweezers-based dynamic force spectroscopy. We found that the mechanical molecular response critically depends on the conditions of force application and that the kinetics and pathways for unfolding change drastically even upon a modest 10-fold increase in v(f). This implies that, to resolve accurately the free energy landscape and to relate the results of single-molecule experiments in vitro and in silico, molecular simulations should be carried out under the experimentally relevant force loads. This can be accomplished in reasonable wall-clock time for biomolecules of size as large as 10(5) residues using the SOP-GPU package. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Parallelization and checkpointing of GPU applications through program transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano-Quinde, Lizandro Damian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    GPUs have emerged as a powerful tool for accelerating general-purpose applications. The availability of programming languages that makes writing general-purpose applications for running on GPUs tractable have consolidated GPUs as an alternative for accelerating general purpose applications. Among the areas that have benefited from GPU acceleration are: signal and image processing, computational fluid dynamics, quantum chemistry, and, in general, the High Performance Computing (HPC) Industry. In order to continue to exploit higher levels of parallelism with GPUs, multi-GPU systems are gaining popularity. In this context, single-GPU applications are parallelized for running in multi-GPU systems. Furthermore, multi-GPU systems help to solve the GPU memory limitation for applications with large application memory footprint. Parallelizing single-GPU applications has been approached by libraries that distribute the workload at runtime, however, they impose execution overhead and are not portable. On the other hand, on traditional CPU systems, parallelization has been approached through application transformation at pre-compile time, which enhances the application to distribute the workload at application level and does not have the issues of library-based approaches. Hence, a parallelization scheme for GPU systems based on application transformation is needed. Like any computing engine of today, reliability is also a concern in GPUs. GPUs are vulnerable to transient and permanent failures. Current checkpoint/restart techniques are not suitable for systems with GPUs. Checkpointing for GPU systems present new and interesting challenges, primarily due to the natural differences imposed by the hardware design, the memory subsystem architecture, the massive number of threads, and the limited amount of synchronization among threads. Therefore, a checkpoint/restart technique suitable for GPU systems is needed. The goal of this work is to exploit higher levels of parallelism and

  6. Multi-GPU hybrid programming accelerated three-dimensional phase-field model in binary alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsheng Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the process of dendritic growth simulation, the computational efficiency and the problem scales have extremely important influence on simulation efficiency of three-dimensional phase-field model. Thus, seeking for high performance calculation method to improve the computational efficiency and to expand the problem scales has a great significance to the research of microstructure of the material. A high performance calculation method based on MPI+CUDA hybrid programming model is introduced. Multi-GPU is used to implement quantitative numerical simulations of three-dimensional phase-field model in binary alloy under the condition of multi-physical processes coupling. The acceleration effect of different GPU nodes on different calculation scales is explored. On the foundation of multi-GPU calculation model that has been introduced, two optimization schemes, Non-blocking communication optimization and overlap of MPI and GPU computing optimization, are proposed. The results of two optimization schemes and basic multi-GPU model are compared. The calculation results show that the use of multi-GPU calculation model can improve the computational efficiency of three-dimensional phase-field obviously, which is 13 times to single GPU, and the problem scales have been expanded to 8193. The feasibility of two optimization schemes is shown, and the overlap of MPI and GPU computing optimization has better performance, which is 1.7 times to basic multi-GPU model, when 21 GPUs are used.

  7. GPU acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations for polarized photon scattering in anisotropic turbid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Celong; Li, Xianpeng; He, Honghui; Ma, Hui

    2016-09-20

    In earlier studies, we developed scattering models and the corresponding CPU-based Monte Carlo simulation programs to study the behavior of polarized photons as they propagate through complex biological tissues. Studying the simulation results in high degrees of freedom that created a demand for massive simulation tasks. In this paper, we report a parallel implementation of the simulation program based on the compute unified device architecture running on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Different schemes for sphere-only simulations and sphere-cylinder mixture simulations were developed. Diverse optimizing methods were employed to achieve the best acceleration. The final-version GPU program is hundreds of times faster than the CPU version. Dependence of the performance on input parameters and precision were also studied. It is shown that using single precision in the GPU simulations results in very limited losses in accuracy. Consumer-level graphics cards, even those in laptop computers, are more cost-effective than scientific graphics cards for single-precision computation.

  8. Efficient parallel implementation of active appearance model fitting algorithm on GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinwei; Ma, Xirong; Zhu, Yuanping; Sun, Jizhou

    2014-01-01

    The active appearance model (AAM) is one of the most powerful model-based object detecting and tracking methods which has been widely used in various situations. However, the high-dimensional texture representation causes very time-consuming computations, which makes the AAM difficult to apply to real-time systems. The emergence of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) that feature a many-core, fine-grained parallel architecture provides new and promising solutions to overcome the computational challenge. In this paper, we propose an efficient parallel implementation of the AAM fitting algorithm on GPUs. Our design idea is fine grain parallelism in which we distribute the texture data of the AAM, in pixels, to thousands of parallel GPU threads for processing, which makes the algorithm fit better into the GPU architecture. We implement our algorithm using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) on the Nvidia's GTX 650 GPU, which has the latest Kepler architecture. To compare the performance of our algorithm with different data sizes, we built sixteen face AAM models of different dimensional textures. The experiment results show that our parallel AAM fitting algorithm can achieve real-time performance for videos even on very high-dimensional textures.

  9. Efficient Parallel Implementation of Active Appearance Model Fitting Algorithm on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The active appearance model (AAM is one of the most powerful model-based object detecting and tracking methods which has been widely used in various situations. However, the high-dimensional texture representation causes very time-consuming computations, which makes the AAM difficult to apply to real-time systems. The emergence of modern graphics processing units (GPUs that feature a many-core, fine-grained parallel architecture provides new and promising solutions to overcome the computational challenge. In this paper, we propose an efficient parallel implementation of the AAM fitting algorithm on GPUs. Our design idea is fine grain parallelism in which we distribute the texture data of the AAM, in pixels, to thousands of parallel GPU threads for processing, which makes the algorithm fit better into the GPU architecture. We implement our algorithm using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA on the Nvidia’s GTX 650 GPU, which has the latest Kepler architecture. To compare the performance of our algorithm with different data sizes, we built sixteen face AAM models of different dimensional textures. The experiment results show that our parallel AAM fitting algorithm can achieve real-time performance for videos even on very high-dimensional textures.

  10. Quantum Chemical Calculations Using Accelerators: Migrating Matrix Operations to the NVIDIA Kepler GPU and the Intel Xeon Phi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leang, Sarom S; Rendell, Alistair P; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-03-11

    Increasingly, modern computer systems comprise a multicore general-purpose processor augmented with a number of special purpose devices or accelerators connected via an external interface such as a PCI bus. The NVIDIA Kepler Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and the Intel Phi are two examples of such accelerators. Accelerators offer peak performances that can be well above those of the host processor. How to exploit this heterogeneous environment for legacy application codes is not, however, straightforward. This paper considers how matrix operations in typical quantum chemical calculations can be migrated to the GPU and Phi systems. Double precision general matrix multiply operations are endemic in electronic structure calculations, especially methods that include electron correlation, such as density functional theory, second order perturbation theory, and coupled cluster theory. The use of approaches that automatically determine whether to use the host or an accelerator, based on problem size, is explored, with computations that are occurring on the accelerator and/or the host. For data-transfers over PCI-e, the GPU provides the best overall performance for data sizes up to 4096 MB with consistent upload and download rates between 5-5.6 GB/s and 5.4-6.3 GB/s, respectively. The GPU outperforms the Phi for both square and nonsquare matrix multiplications.

  11. GPU-based Parallel Application Design for Emerging Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kshitij

    A revolution is underway in the computing world that is causing a fundamental paradigm shift in device capabilities and form-factor, with a move from well-established legacy desktop/laptop computers to mobile devices in varying sizes and shapes. Amongst all the tasks these devices must support, graphics has emerged as the 'killer app' for providing a fluid user interface and high-fidelity game rendering, effectively making the graphics processor (GPU) one of the key components in (present and future) mobile systems. By utilizing the GPU as a general-purpose parallel processor, this dissertation explores the GPU computing design space from an applications standpoint, in the mobile context, by focusing on key challenges presented by these devices---limited compute, memory bandwidth, and stringent power consumption requirements---while improving the overall application efficiency of the increasingly important speech recognition workload for mobile user interaction. We broadly partition trends in GPU computing into four major categories. We analyze hardware and programming model limitations in current-generation GPUs and detail an alternate programming style called Persistent Threads, identify four use case patterns, and propose minimal modifications that would be required for extending native support. We show how by manually extracting data locality and altering the speech recognition pipeline, we are able to achieve significant savings in memory bandwidth while simultaneously reducing the compute burden on GPU-like parallel processors. As we foresee GPU computing to evolve from its current 'co-processor' model into an independent 'applications processor' that is capable of executing complex work independently, we create an alternate application framework that enables the GPU to handle all control-flow dependencies autonomously at run-time while minimizing host involvement to just issuing commands, that facilitates an efficient application implementation. Finally, as

  12. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. This orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  13. GPU-based fast pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Rintaro; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Kurihara, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    Performance of a treatment planning system is an essential factor in making sophisticated plans. The dose calculation is a major time-consuming process in planning operations. The standard algorithm for proton dose calculations is the pencil beam algorithm which produces relatively accurate results, but is time consuming. In order to shorten the computational time, we have developed a GPU (graphics processing unit)-based pencil beam algorithm. We have implemented this algorithm and calculated dose distributions in the case of a water phantom. The results were compared to those obtained by a traditional method with respect to the computational time and discrepancy between the two methods. The new algorithm shows 5-20 times faster performance using the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 card in comparison with the Intel Core-i7 920 processor. The maximum discrepancy of the dose distribution is within 0.2%. Our results show that GPUs are effective for proton dose calculations.

  14. A Simple GPU-Accelerated Two-Dimensional MUSCL-Hancock Solver for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Christopher; Dorelli, John C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe our experience using NVIDIA's CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) C programming environment to implement a two-dimensional second-order MUSCL-Hancock ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver on a GTX 480 Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Taking a simple approach in which the MHD variables are stored exclusively in the global memory of the GTX 480 and accessed in a cache-friendly manner (without further optimizing memory access by, for example, staging data in the GPU's faster shared memory), we achieved a maximum speed-up of approx. = 126 for a sq 1024 grid relative to the sequential C code running on a single Intel Nehalem (2.8 GHz) core. This speedup is consistent with simple estimates based on the known floating point performance, memory throughput and parallel processing capacity of the GTX 480.

  15. Accelerating three-dimensional FDTD calculations on GPU clusters for electromagnetic field simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic simulation with anatomically realistic computational human model using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method has recently been performed in a number of fields in biomedical engineering. To improve the method's calculation speed and realize large-scale computing with the computational human model, we adapt three-dimensional FDTD code to a multi-GPU cluster environment with Compute Unified Device Architecture and Message Passing Interface. Our multi-GPU cluster system consists of three nodes. The seven GPU boards (NVIDIA Tesla C2070) are mounted on each node. We examined the performance of the FDTD calculation on multi-GPU cluster environment. We confirmed that the FDTD calculation on the multi-GPU clusters is faster than that on a multi-GPU (a single workstation), and we also found that the GPU cluster system calculate faster than a vector supercomputer. In addition, our GPU cluster system allowed us to perform the large-scale FDTD calculation because were able to use GPU memory of over 100 GB.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Stony-Brook University 5-class Microphysics Scheme in WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielikainen, J.; Huang, B.; Huang, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system. Microphysics plays an important role in weather and climate prediction. Several bulk water microphysics schemes are available within the WRF, with different numbers of simulated hydrometeor classes and methods for estimating their size fall speeds, distributions and densities. Stony-Brook University scheme (SBU-YLIN) is a 5-class scheme with riming intensity predicted to account for mixed-phase processes. In the past few years, co-processing on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) has been a disruptive technology in High Performance Computing (HPC). GPUs use the ever increasing transistor count for adding more processor cores. Therefore, GPUs are well suited for massively data parallel processing with high floating point arithmetic intensity. Thus, it is imperative to update legacy scientific applications to take advantage of this unprecedented increase in computing power. CUDA is an extension to the C programming language offering programming GPU's directly. It is designed so that its constructs allow for natural expression of data-level parallelism. A CUDA program is organized into two parts: a serial program running on the CPU and a CUDA kernel running on the GPU. The CUDA code consists of three computational phases: transmission of data into the global memory of the GPU, execution of the CUDA kernel, and transmission of results from the GPU into the memory of CPU. CUDA takes a bottom-up point of view of parallelism is which thread is an atomic unit of parallelism. Individual threads are part of groups called warps, within which every thread executes exactly the same sequence of instructions. To test SBU-YLIN, we used a CONtinental United States (CONUS) benchmark data set for 12 km resolution domain for October 24, 2001. A WRF domain is a geographic region of interest discretized into a 2-dimensional grid parallel to the ground. Each grid point has

  17. GRAVIDY, a GPU modular, parallel direct-summation N-body integrator: dynamics with softening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Amaro-Seoane, Pau

    2018-01-01

    A wide variety of outstanding problems in astrophysics involve the motion of a large number of particles under the force of gravity. These include the global evolution of globular clusters, tidal disruptions of stars by a massive black hole, the formation of protoplanets and sources of gravitational radiation. The direct-summation of N gravitational forces is a complex problem with no analytical solution and can only be tackled with approximations and numerical methods. To this end, the Hermite scheme is a widely used integration method. With different numerical techniques and special-purpose hardware, it can be used to speed up the calculations. But these methods tend to be computationally slow and cumbersome to work with. We present a new graphics processing unit (GPU), direct-summation N-body integrator written from scratch and based on this scheme, which includes relativistic corrections for sources of gravitational radiation. GRAVIDY has high modularity, allowing users to readily introduce new physics, it exploits available computational resources and will be maintained by regular updates. GRAVIDY can be used in parallel on multiple CPUs and GPUs, with a considerable speed-up benefit. The single-GPU version is between one and two orders of magnitude faster than the single-CPU version. A test run using four GPUs in parallel shows a speed-up factor of about 3 as compared to the single-GPU version. The conception and design of this first release is aimed at users with access to traditional parallel CPU clusters or computational nodes with one or a few GPU cards.

  18. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Conte, Riccardo [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Ceotto, Michele, E-mail: michele.ceotto@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  19. An efficient spectral crystal plasticity solver for GPU architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malahe, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We present a spectral crystal plasticity (CP) solver for graphics processing unit (GPU) architectures that achieves a tenfold increase in efficiency over prior GPU solvers. The approach makes use of a database containing a spectral decomposition of CP simulations performed using a conventional iterative solver over a parameter space of crystal orientations and applied velocity gradients. The key improvements in efficiency come from reducing global memory transactions, exposing more instruction-level parallelism, reducing integer instructions and performing fast range reductions on trigonometric arguments. The scheme also makes more efficient use of memory than prior work, allowing for larger problems to be solved on a single GPU. We illustrate these improvements with a simulation of 390 million crystal grains on a consumer-grade GPU, which executes at a rate of 2.72 s per strain step.

  20. Synergia CUDA: GPU-accelerated accelerator modeling package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Q; Amundson, J

    2014-01-01

    Synergia is a parallel, 3-dimensional space-charge particle-in-cell accelerator modeling code. We present our work porting the purely MPI-based version of the code to a hybrid of CPU and GPU computing kernels. The hybrid code uses the CUDA platform in the same framework as the pure MPI solution. We have implemented a lock-free collaborative charge-deposition algorithm for the GPU, as well as other optimizations, including local communication avoidance for GPUs, a customized FFT, and fine-tuned memory access patterns. On a small GPU cluster (up to 4 Tesla C1070 GPUs), our benchmarks exhibit both superior peak performance and better scaling than a CPU cluster with 16 nodes and 128 cores. We also compare the code performance on different GPU architectures, including C1070 Tesla and K20 Kepler.

  1. High-throughput GPU-based LDPC decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yang-Lang; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Huang, Min-Yu; Huang, Bormin

    2010-08-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) code is a linear block code known to approach the Shannon limit via the iterative sum-product algorithm. LDPC codes have been adopted in most current communication systems such as DVB-S2, WiMAX, WI-FI and 10GBASE-T. LDPC for the needs of reliable and flexible communication links for a wide variety of communication standards and configurations have inspired the demand for high-performance and flexibility computing. Accordingly, finding a fast and reconfigurable developing platform for designing the high-throughput LDPC decoder has become important especially for rapidly changing communication standards and configurations. In this paper, a new graphic-processing-unit (GPU) LDPC decoding platform with the asynchronous data transfer is proposed to realize this practical implementation. Experimental results showed that the proposed GPU-based decoder achieved 271x speedup compared to its CPU-based counterpart. It can serve as a high-throughput LDPC decoder.

  2. DEM GPU studies of industrial scale particle simulations for granular flow civil engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizette, Patrick; Govender, Nicolin; Wilke, Daniel N.; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2017-06-01

    The use of the Discrete Element Method (DEM) for industrial civil engineering industrial applications is currently limited due to the computational demands when large numbers of particles are considered. The graphics processing unit (GPU) with its highly parallelized hardware architecture shows potential to enable solution of civil engineering problems using discrete granular approaches. We demonstrate in this study the pratical utility of a validated GPU-enabled DEM modeling environment to simulate industrial scale granular problems. As illustration, the flow discharge of storage silos using 8 and 17 million particles is considered. DEM simulations have been performed to investigate the influence of particle size (equivalent size for the 20/40-mesh gravel) and induced shear stress for two hopper shapes. The preliminary results indicate that the shape of the hopper significantly influences the discharge rates for the same material. Specifically, this work shows that GPU-enabled DEM modeling environments can model industrial scale problems on a single portable computer within a day for 30 seconds of process time.

  3. GPU-accelerated ray-tracing for real-time treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, H; Ziegenhein, P; Kamerling, C P; Oelfke, U; Froening, H

    2014-01-01

    Dose calculation methods in radiotherapy treatment planning require the radiological depth information of the voxels that represent the patient volume to correct for tissue inhomogeneities. This information is acquired by time consuming ray-tracing-based calculations. For treatment planning scenarios with changing geometries and real-time constraints this is a severe bottleneck. We implemented an algorithm for the graphics processing unit (GPU) which implements a ray-matrix approach to reduce the number of rays to trace. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of different strategies of accessing memory in kernel implementations as well as strategies for rapid data transfers between main memory and memory of the graphics device. Our study included the overlapping of computations and memory transfers to reduce the overall runtime using Hyper-Q. We tested our approach on a prostate case (9 beams, coplanar). The measured execution times for a complete ray-tracing range from 28 msec for the computations on the GPU to 99 msec when considering data transfers to and from the graphics device. Our GPU-based algorithm performed the ray-tracing in real-time. The strategies efficiently reduce the time consumption of memory accesses and data transfer overhead. The achieved runtimes demonstrate the viability of this approach and allow improved real-time performance for dose calculation methods in clinical routine.

  4. An implementation of the direct-forcing immersed boundary method using GPU power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Tutkun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A graphics processing unit (GPU is utilized to apply the direct-forcing immersed boundary method. The code running on the GPU is generated with the help of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA. The first and second spatial derivatives of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized by the sixth-order central compact finite-difference schemes. Two flow fields are simulated. The first test case is the simulated flow around a square cylinder, with the results providing good estimations of the wake region mechanics and vortex shedding. The second test case is the simulated flow around a circular cylinder. This case was selected to better understand the effects of sharp corners on the force coefficients. It was observed that the estimation of the force coefficients did not result in any troubles in the case of a circular cylinder. Additionally, the performance values obtained for the calculation time for the solution of the Poisson equation are compared with the values for other CPUs and GPUs from the literature. Consequently, approximately 3× and 20× speedups are achieved in comparison with GPU (using CUSP library and CPU, respectively. CUSP is an open-source library for sparse linear algebra and graph computations on CUDA.

  5. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation.

  6. Real-Time Incompressible Fluid Simulation on the GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Nie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a parallel framework for simulating incompressible fluids with predictive-corrective incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (PCISPH on the GPU in real time. To this end, we propose an efficient GPU streaming pipeline to map the entire computational task onto the GPU, fully exploiting the massive computational power of state-of-the-art GPUs. In PCISPH-based simulations, neighbor search is the major performance obstacle because this process is performed several times at each time step. To eliminate this bottleneck, an efficient parallel sorting method for this time-consuming step is introduced. Moreover, we discuss several optimization techniques including using fast on-chip shared memory to avoid global memory bandwidth limitations and thus further improve performance on modern GPU hardware. With our framework, the realism of real-time fluid simulation is significantly improved since our method enforces incompressibility constraint which is typically ignored due to efficiency reason in previous GPU-based SPH methods. The performance results illustrate that our approach can efficiently simulate realistic incompressible fluid in real time and results in a speed-up factor of up to 23 on a high-end NVIDIA GPU in comparison to single-threaded CPU-based implementation.

  7. A GPU-based incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on moving overset grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Dominic D. J.; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2013-07-01

    In pursuit of obtaining high fidelity solutions to the fluid flow equations in a short span of time, graphics processing units (GPUs) which were originally intended for gaming applications are currently being used to accelerate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. With a high peak throughput of about 1 TFLOPS on a PC, GPUs seem to be favourable for many high-resolution computations. One such computation that involves a lot of number crunching is computing time accurate flow solutions past moving bodies. The aim of the present paper is thus to discuss the development of a flow solver on unstructured and overset grids and its implementation on GPUs. In its present form, the flow solver solves the incompressible fluid flow equations on unstructured/hybrid/overset grids using a fully implicit projection method. The resulting discretised equations are solved using a matrix-free Krylov solver using several GPU kernels such as gradient, Laplacian and reduction. Some of the simple arithmetic vector calculations are implemented using the CU++: An Object Oriented Framework for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications using Graphics Processing Units, Journal of Supercomputing, 2013, doi:10.1007/s11227-013-0985-9 approach where GPU kernels are automatically generated at compile time. Results are presented for two- and three-dimensional computations on static and moving grids.

  8. Solving global optimization problems on GPU cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkalov, Konstantin; Gergel, Victor; Lebedev, Ilya [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, Gagarin Avenue 23, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-08

    The paper contains the results of investigation of a parallel global optimization algorithm combined with a dimension reduction scheme. This allows solving multidimensional problems by means of reducing to data-independent subproblems with smaller dimension solved in parallel. The new element implemented in the research consists in using several graphic accelerators at different computing nodes. The paper also includes results of solving problems of well-known multiextremal test class GKLS on Lobachevsky supercomputer using tens of thousands of GPU cores.

  9. Multi-GPU parallel algorithm design and analysis for improved inversion of probability tomography with gravity gradiometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhenlong; Huang, Danian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we make a study on the inversion of probability tomography (IPT) with gravity gradiometry data at first. The space resolution of the results is improved by multi-tensor joint inversion, depth weighting matrix and the other methods. Aiming at solving the problems brought by the big data in the exploration, we present the parallel algorithm and the performance analysis combining Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) with Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) based on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerating. In the test of the synthetic model and real data from Vinton Dome, we get the improved results. It is also proved that the improved inversion algorithm is effective and feasible. The performance of parallel algorithm we designed is better than the other ones with CUDA. The maximum speedup could be more than 200. In the performance analysis, multi-GPU speedup and multi-GPU efficiency are applied to analyze the scalability of the multi-GPU programs. The designed parallel algorithm is demonstrated to be able to process larger scale of data and the new analysis method is practical.

  10. Parallel Optimization of 3D Cardiac Electrophysiological Model Using GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale 3D virtual heart model simulations are highly demanding in computational resources. This imposes a big challenge to the traditional computation resources based on CPU environment, which already cannot meet the requirement of the whole computation demands or are not easily available due to expensive costs. GPU as a parallel computing environment therefore provides an alternative to solve the large-scale computational problems of whole heart modeling. In this study, using a 3D sheep atrial model as a test bed, we developed a GPU-based simulation algorithm to simulate the conduction of electrical excitation waves in the 3D atria. In the GPU algorithm, a multicellular tissue model was split into two components: one is the single cell model (ordinary differential equation and the other is the diffusion term of the monodomain model (partial differential equation. Such a decoupling enabled realization of the GPU parallel algorithm. Furthermore, several optimization strategies were proposed based on the features of the virtual heart model, which enabled a 200-fold speedup as compared to a CPU implementation. In conclusion, an optimized GPU algorithm has been developed that provides an economic and powerful platform for 3D whole heart simulations.

  11. Blaze-DEMGPU: Modular high performance DEM framework for the GPU architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolin Govender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blaze-DEMGPU is a modular GPU based discrete element method (DEM framework that supports polyhedral shaped particles. The high level performance is attributed to the light weight and Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD that the GPU architecture offers. Blaze-DEMGPU offers suitable algorithms to conduct DEM simulations on the GPU and these algorithms can be extended and modified. Since a large number of scientific simulations are particle based, many of the algorithms and strategies for GPU implementation present in Blaze-DEMGPU can be applied to other fields. Blaze-DEMGPU will make it easier for new researchers to use high performance GPU computing as well as stimulate wider GPU research efforts by the DEM community.

  12. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon-electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783-97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE’s random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ~4-16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was validated by

  13. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia's CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon-electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783-97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE's random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ~4-16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was validated by

  14. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon–electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783–97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE’s random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48–0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15–0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ∼4–16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was

  15. Computing with impure numbers - Automatic consistency checking and units conversion using computer algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoutemyer, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    The computer algebra language MACSYMA enables the programmer to include symbolic physical units in computer calculations, and features automatic detection of dimensionally-inhomogeneous formulas and conversion of inconsistent units in a dimensionally homogeneous formula. Some examples illustrate these features.

  16. Fast GPU-based spot extraction for energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alghabi, F.; Schipper, U.; Kolb, A.; Send, S.; Abboud, A.; Pashniak, N.; Pietsch, U.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method for fast online analysis of X-ray Laue spots taken by means of an energy-dispersive X-ray 2D detector. Current pnCCD detectors typically operate at some 100 Hz (up to a maximum of 400 Hz) and have a resolution of 384 × 384 pixels, future devices head for even higher pixel counts and frame rates. The proposed online data analysis is based on a computer utilizing multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which allow for fast and parallel data processing. Our multi-GPU based algorithm is compliant with the rules of stream-based data processing, for which GPUs are optimized. The paper's main contribution is therefore an alternative algorithm for the determination of spot positions and energies over the full sequence of pnCCD data frames. Furthermore, an improved background suppression algorithm is presented.The resulting system is able to process data at the maximum acquisition rate of 400 Hz. We present a detailed analysis of the spot positions and energies deduced from a prior (single-core) CPU-based and the novel GPU-based data processing, showing that the parallel computed results using the GPU implementation are at least of the same quality as prior CPU-based results. Furthermore, the GPU-based algorithm is able to speed up the data processing by a factor of 7 (in comparison to single-core CPU-based algorithm) which effectively makes the detector system more suitable for online data processing

  17. GPU-accelerated depth map generation for X-ray simulations of complex CAD geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Robert J.; Young, Gavin; Holland, Stephen D.; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2018-04-01

    Interactive x-ray simulations of complex computer-aided design (CAD) models can provide valuable insights for better interpretation of the defect signatures such as porosity from x-ray CT images. Generating the depth map along a particular direction for the given CAD geometry is the most compute-intensive step in x-ray simulations. We have developed a GPU-accelerated method for real-time generation of depth maps of complex CAD geometries. We preprocess complex components designed using commercial CAD systems using a custom CAD module and convert them into a fine user-defined surface tessellation. Our CAD module can be used by different simulators as well as handle complex geometries, including those that arise from complex castings and composite structures. We then make use of a parallel algorithm that runs on a graphics processing unit (GPU) to convert the finely-tessellated CAD model to a voxelized representation. The voxelized representation can enable heterogeneous modeling of the volume enclosed by the CAD model by assigning heterogeneous material properties in specific regions. The depth maps are generated from this voxelized representation with the help of a GPU-accelerated ray-casting algorithm. The GPU-accelerated ray-casting method enables interactive (> 60 frames-per-second) generation of the depth maps of complex CAD geometries. This enables arbitrarily rotation and slicing of the CAD model, leading to better interpretation of the x-ray images by the user. In addition, the depth maps can be used to aid directly in CT reconstruction algorithms.

  18. GPU-based simulation of optical propagation through turbulence for active and passive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Goulven; Duval, François-Régis; Amram, Solène

    2014-10-01

    IMOTEP is a GPU-based (Graphical Processing Units) software relying on a fast parallel implementation of Fresnel diffraction through successive phase screens. Its applications include active imaging, laser telemetry and passive imaging through turbulence with anisoplanatic spatial and temporal fluctuations. Thanks to parallel implementation on GPU, speedups ranging from 40X to 70X are achieved. The present paper gives a brief overview of IMOTEP models, algorithms, implementation and user interface. It then focuses on major improvements recently brought to the anisoplanatic imaging simulation method. Previously, we took advantage of the computational power offered by the GPU to develop a simulation method based on large series of deterministic realisations of the PSF distorted by turbulence. The phase screen propagation algorithm, by reproducing higher moments of the incident wavefront distortion, provides realistic PSFs. However, we first used a coarse gaussian model to fit the numerical PSFs and characterise there spatial statistics through only 3 parameters (two-dimensional displacements of centroid and width). Meanwhile, this approach was unable to reproduce the effects related to the details of the PSF structure, especially the "speckles" leading to prominent high-frequency content in short-exposure images. To overcome this limitation, we recently implemented a new empirical model of the PSF, based on Principal Components Analysis (PCA), ought to catch most of the PSF complexity. The GPU implementation allows estimating and handling efficiently the numerous (up to several hundreds) principal components typically required under the strong turbulence regime. A first demanding computational step involves PCA, phase screen propagation and covariance estimates. In a second step, realistic instantaneous images, fully accounting for anisoplanatic effects, are quickly generated. Preliminary results are presented.

  19. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefan, D; Talebpour, A; Ahmadinejhad, N; Kamali Asl, A

    2015-06-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D) images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU) card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU).

  20. Web-based Tsunami Early Warning System with instant Tsunami Propagation Calculations in the GPU Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammitzsch, M.; Spazier, J.; Reißland, S.

    2014-12-01

    Usually, tsunami early warning and mitigation systems (TWS or TEWS) are based on several software components deployed in a client-server based infrastructure. The vast majority of systems importantly include desktop-based clients with a graphical user interface (GUI) for the operators in early warning centers. However, in times of cloud computing and ubiquitous computing the use of concepts and paradigms, introduced by continuously evolving approaches in information and communications technology (ICT), have to be considered even for early warning systems (EWS). Based on the experiences and the knowledge gained in three research projects - 'German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System' (GITEWS), 'Distant Early Warning System' (DEWS), and 'Collaborative, Complex, and Critical Decision-Support in Evolving Crises' (TRIDEC) - new technologies are exploited to implement a cloud-based and web-based prototype to open up new prospects for EWS. This prototype, named 'TRIDEC Cloud', merges several complementary external and in-house cloud-based services into one platform for automated background computation with graphics processing units (GPU), for web-mapping of hazard specific geospatial data, and for serving relevant functionality to handle, share, and communicate threat specific information in a collaborative and distributed environment. The prototype in its current version addresses tsunami early warning and mitigation. The integration of GPU accelerated tsunami simulation computations have been an integral part of this prototype to foster early warning with on-demand tsunami predictions based on actual source parameters. However, the platform is meant for researchers around the world to make use of the cloud-based GPU computation to analyze other types of geohazards and natural hazards and react upon the computed situation picture with a web-based GUI in a web browser at remote sites. The current website is an early alpha version for demonstration purposes to give the

  1. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canal, P. [Fermilab; Elvira, D. [Fermilab; Jun, S. Y. [Fermilab; Kowalkowski, J. [Fermilab; Paterno, M. [Fermilab; Apostolakis, J. [CERN

    2014-01-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  2. Graphics Processing Units for HEP trigger systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R.; Bauce, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Giagu, S.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lonardo, A.; Messina, A.

    2016-01-01

    General-purpose computing on GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to the specific strengths of such devices as accelerator in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughput, the use of such devices for real-time applications in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming ripe. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPU for synchronous low level trigger, focusing on CERN NA62 experiment trigger system. The use of GPU in higher level trigger system is also briefly considered.

  3. Graphics Processing Units for HEP trigger systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammendola, R. [INFN Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Bauce, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); University of Rome “La Sapienza”, P.lee A.Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Biagioni, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Fantechi, R. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Fiorini, M. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Giagu, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); University of Rome “La Sapienza”, P.lee A.Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Gianoli, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Lamanna, G., E-mail: gianluca.lamanna@cern.ch [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Lonardo, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Messina, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); University of Rome “La Sapienza”, P.lee A.Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    General-purpose computing on GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to the specific strengths of such devices as accelerator in offline computation. With the steady reduction of GPU latencies, and the increase in link and memory throughput, the use of such devices for real-time applications in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems is becoming ripe. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPU for synchronous low level trigger, focusing on CERN NA62 experiment trigger system. The use of GPU in higher level trigger system is also briefly considered.

  4. A cache-friendly sampling strategy for texture-based volume rendering on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The texture-based volume rendering is a memory-intensive algorithm. Its performance relies heavily on the performance of the texture cache. However, most existing texture-based volume rendering methods blindly map computational resources to texture memory and result in incoherent memory access patterns, causing low cache hit rates in certain cases. The distance between samples taken by threads of an atomic scheduling unit (e.g. a warp of 32 threads in CUDA of the GPU is a crucial factor that affects the texture cache performance. Based on this fact, we present a new sampling strategy, called Warp Marching, for the ray-casting algorithm of texture-based volume rendering. The effects of different sample organizations and different thread-pixel mappings in the ray-casting algorithm are thoroughly analyzed. Also, a pipeline manner color blending approach is introduced and the power of warp-level GPU operations is leveraged to improve the efficiency of parallel executions on the GPU. In addition, the rendering performance of the Warp Marching is view-independent, and it outperforms existing empty space skipping techniques in scenarios that need to render large dynamic volumes in a low resolution image. Through a series of micro-benchmarking and real-life data experiments, we rigorously analyze our sampling strategies and demonstrate significant performance enhancements over existing sampling methods.

  5. Multi-GPU Accelerated Admittance Method for High-Resolution Human Exposure Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zubiao; Feng, Shi; Kautz, Richard; Chandra, Sandeep; Altunyurt, Nevin; Chen, Ji

    2015-12-01

    A multi-graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated admittance method solver is presented for solving the induced electric field in high-resolution anatomical models of human body when exposed to external low-frequency magnetic fields. In the solver, the anatomical model is discretized as a three-dimensional network of admittances. The conjugate orthogonal conjugate gradient (COCG) iterative algorithm is employed to take advantage of the symmetric property of the complex-valued linear system of equations. Compared against the widely used biconjugate gradient stabilized method, the COCG algorithm can reduce the solving time by 3.5 times and reduce the storage requirement by about 40%. The iterative algorithm is then accelerated further by using multiple NVIDIA GPUs. The computations and data transfers between GPUs are overlapped in time by using asynchronous concurrent execution design. The communication overhead is well hidden so that the acceleration is nearly linear with the number of GPU cards. Numerical examples show that our GPU implementation running on four NVIDIA Tesla K20c cards can reach 90 times faster than the CPU implementation running on eight CPU cores (two Intel Xeon E5-2603 processors). The implemented solver is able to solve large dimensional problems efficiently. A whole adult body discretized in 1-mm resolution can be solved in just several minutes. The high efficiency achieved makes it practical to investigate human exposure involving a large number of cases with a high resolution that meets the requirements of international dosimetry guidelines.

  6. On-the-fly generation and rendering of infinite cities on the GPU

    KAUST Repository

    Steinberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for shape-grammar-based generation and rendering of huge cities in real-time on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Traditional approaches rely on evaluating a shape grammar and storing the geometry produced as a preprocessing step. During rendering, the pregenerated data is then streamed to the GPU. By interweaving generation and rendering, we overcome the problems and limitations of streaming pregenerated data. Using our methods of visibility pruning and adaptive level of detail, we are able to dynamically generate only the geometry needed to render the current view in real-time directly on the GPU. We also present a robust and efficient way to dynamically update a scene\\'s derivation tree and geometry, enabling us to exploit frame-to-frame coherence. Our combined generation and rendering is significantly faster than all previous work. For detailed scenes, we are capable of generating geometry more rapidly than even just copying pregenerated data from main memory, enabling us to render cities with thousands of buildings at up to 100 frames per second, even with the camera moving at supersonic speed. © 2014 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2014 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A GPU Implementation of Local Search Operators for Symmetric Travelling Salesman Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Fosin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP is one of the most studied combinatorial optimization problem which is significant in many practical applications in transportation problems. The TSP problem is NP-hard problem and requires large computation power to be solved by the exact algorithms. In the past few years, fast development of general-purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPUs has brought huge improvement in decreasing the applications’ execution time. In this paper, we implement 2-opt and 3-opt local search operators for solving the TSP on the GPU using CUDA. The novelty presented in this paper is a new parallel iterated local search approach with 2-opt and 3-opt operators for symmetric TSP, optimized for the execution on GPUs. With our implementation large TSP problems (up to 85,900 cities can be solved using the GPU. We will show that our GPU implementation can be up to 20x faster without losing quality for all TSPlib problems as well as for our CRO TSP problem.

  8. On-the-fly generation and rendering of infinite cities on the GPU

    KAUST Repository

    Steinberger, Markus; Kenzel, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard K.; Wonka, Peter; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for shape-grammar-based generation and rendering of huge cities in real-time on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Traditional approaches rely on evaluating a shape grammar and storing the geometry produced as a preprocessing step. During rendering, the pregenerated data is then streamed to the GPU. By interweaving generation and rendering, we overcome the problems and limitations of streaming pregenerated data. Using our methods of visibility pruning and adaptive level of detail, we are able to dynamically generate only the geometry needed to render the current view in real-time directly on the GPU. We also present a robust and efficient way to dynamically update a scene's derivation tree and geometry, enabling us to exploit frame-to-frame coherence. Our combined generation and rendering is significantly faster than all previous work. For detailed scenes, we are capable of generating geometry more rapidly than even just copying pregenerated data from main memory, enabling us to render cities with thousands of buildings at up to 100 frames per second, even with the camera moving at supersonic speed. © 2014 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2014 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. ARCHER{sub RT} – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George, E-mail: xug2@rpi.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan [Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Sterpin, Edmond [Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium 1348 (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHER{sub RT} is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head and neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHER{sub RT}. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHER{sub RT} and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHER{sub RT} agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHER{sub RT} are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head and neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to

  10. GPU Implementation of High Rayleigh Number Three-Dimensional Mantle Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, D. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Although we have entered the age of petascale computing, many factors are still prohibiting high-performance computing (HPC) from infiltrating all suitable scientific disciplines. For this reason and others, application of GPU to HPC is gaining traction in the scientific world. With its low price point, high performance potential, and competitive scalability, GPU has been an option well worth considering for the last few years. Moreover with the advent of NVIDIA's Fermi architecture, which brings ECC memory, better double-precision performance, and more RAM to GPU, there is a strong message of corporate support for GPU in HPC. However many doubts linger concerning the practicality of using GPU for scientific computing. In particular, GPU has a reputation for being difficult to program and suitable for only a small subset of problems. Although inroads have been made in addressing these concerns, for many scientists GPU still has hurdles to clear before becoming an acceptable choice. We explore the applicability of GPU to geophysics by implementing a three-dimensional, second-order finite-difference model of Rayleigh-Benard thermal convection on an NVIDIA GPU using C for CUDA. Our code reaches sufficient resolution, on the order of 500x500x250 evenly-spaced finite-difference gridpoints, on a single GPU. We make extensive use of highly optimized CUBLAS routines, allowing us to achieve performance on the order of O( 0.1 ) µs per timestep*gridpoint at this resolution. This performance has allowed us to study high Rayleigh number simulations, on the order of 2x10^7, on a single GPU.

  11. Gfargo: Fargo for Gpu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masset, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    GFARGO is a GPU version of FARGO. It is written in C and C for CUDA and runs only on NVIDIA’s graphics cards. Though it corresponds to the standard, isothermal version of FARGO, not all functionnalities of the CPU version have been translated to CUDA. The code is available in single and double precision versions, the latter compatible with FERMI architectures. GFARGO can run on a graphics card connected to the display, allowing the user to see in real time how the fields evolve.

  12. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Shawn Q.; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W.; Agard, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096 2 x512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096 2 pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024 2 x256 voxels from 122 1024 2 pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. -- Highlights: → A distributed multi-GPU system has been developed for electron microscopic tomography (EMT). → This system allows for rapid constrained, iterative reconstruction of very large volumes. → This system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for large-scale iterative EMT realignment.

  13. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Shawn Q.; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W. [The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the W.M. Keck Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, 600, 16th Street, Room S412D, CA 94158-2517 (United States); Agard, David A., E-mail: agard@msg.ucsf.edu [The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the W.M. Keck Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, 600, 16th Street, Room S412D, CA 94158-2517 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096{sup 2}x512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096{sup 2} pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024{sup 2}x256 voxels from 122 1024{sup 2} pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. -- Highlights: {yields} A distributed multi-GPU system has been developed for electron microscopic tomography (EMT). {yields} This system allows for rapid constrained, iterative reconstruction of very large volumes. {yields} This system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for large-scale iterative EMT realignment.

  14. Bayer image parallel decoding based on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rihui; Xu, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuxing; Sun, Shaohua

    2012-11-01

    In the photoelectrical tracking system, Bayer image is decompressed in traditional method, which is CPU-based. However, it is too slow when the images become large, for example, 2K×2K×16bit. In order to accelerate the Bayer image decoding, this paper introduces a parallel speedup method for NVIDA's Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) which supports CUDA architecture. The decoding procedure can be divided into three parts: the first is serial part, the second is task-parallelism part, and the last is data-parallelism part including inverse quantization, inverse discrete wavelet transform (IDWT) as well as image post-processing part. For reducing the execution time, the task-parallelism part is optimized by OpenMP techniques. The data-parallelism part could advance its efficiency through executing on the GPU as CUDA parallel program. The optimization techniques include instruction optimization, shared memory access optimization, the access memory coalesced optimization and texture memory optimization. In particular, it can significantly speed up the IDWT by rewriting the 2D (Tow-dimensional) serial IDWT into 1D parallel IDWT. Through experimenting with 1K×1K×16bit Bayer image, data-parallelism part is 10 more times faster than CPU-based implementation. Finally, a CPU+GPU heterogeneous decompression system was designed. The experimental result shows that it could achieve 3 to 5 times speed increase compared to the CPU serial method.

  15. a method of gravity and seismic sequential inversion and its GPU implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G.; Meng, X.

    2011-12-01

    In this abstract, we introduce a gravity and seismic sequential inversion method to invert for density and velocity together. For the gravity inversion, we use an iterative method based on correlation imaging algorithm; for the seismic inversion, we use the full waveform inversion. The link between the density and velocity is an empirical formula called Gardner equation, for large volumes of data, we use the GPU to accelerate the computation. For the gravity inversion method , we introduce a method based on correlation imaging algorithm,it is also a interative method, first we calculate the correlation imaging of the observed gravity anomaly, it is some value between -1 and +1, then we multiply this value with a little density ,this value become the initial density model. We get a forward reuslt with this initial model and also calculate the correaltion imaging of the misfit of observed data and the forward data, also multiply the correaltion imaging result a little density and add it to the initial model, then do the same procedure above , at last ,we can get a inversion density model. For the seismic inveron method ,we use a mothod base on the linearity of acoustic wave equation written in the frequency domain,with a intial velociy model, we can get a good velocity result. In the sequential inversion of gravity and seismic , we need a link formula to convert between density and velocity ,in our method , we use the Gardner equation. Driven by the insatiable market demand for real time, high-definition 3D images, the programmable NVIDIA Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) as co-processor of CPU has been developed for high performance computing. Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) is a parallel programming model and software environment provided by NVIDIA designed to overcome the challenge of using traditional general purpose GPU while maintaining a low learn curve for programmers familiar with standard programming languages such as C. In our inversion processing

  16. A parallel finite element procedure for contact-impact problems using edge-based smooth triangular element and GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yong; Cui, Xiangyang; Li, Guangyao; Liu, Wenyang

    2018-04-01

    The edge-smooth finite element method (ES-FEM) can improve the computational accuracy of triangular shell elements and the mesh partition efficiency of complex models. In this paper, an approach is developed to perform explicit finite element simulations of contact-impact problems with a graphical processing unit (GPU) using a special edge-smooth triangular shell element based on ES-FEM. Of critical importance for this problem is achieving finer-grained parallelism to enable efficient data loading and to minimize communication between the device and host. Four kinds of parallel strategies are then developed to efficiently solve these ES-FEM based shell element formulas, and various optimization methods are adopted to ensure aligned memory access. Special focus is dedicated to developing an approach for the parallel construction of edge systems. A parallel hierarchy-territory contact-searching algorithm (HITA) and a parallel penalty function calculation method are embedded in this parallel explicit algorithm. Finally, the program flow is well designed, and a GPU-based simulation system is developed, using Nvidia's CUDA. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the high quality of the results obtained with the proposed methods. In addition, the GPU-based parallel computation is shown to significantly reduce the computing time.

  17. GPU-based real-time triggering in the NA62 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ammendola, R.; Cretaro, P.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years the GPGPU (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) paradigm represented a remarkable development in the world of computing. Computing for High-Energy Physics is no exception: several works have demonstrated the effectiveness of the integration of GPU-based systems in high level trigger of different experiments. On the other hand the use of GPUs in the low level trigger systems, characterized by stringent real-time constraints, such as tight time budget and high throughput, poses several challenges. In this paper we focus on the low level trigger in the CERN NA62 experiment, investigating the use of real-time computing on GPUs in this synchronous system. Our approach aimed at harvesting the GPU computing power to build in real-time refined physics-related trigger primitives for the RICH detector, as the the knowledge of Cerenkov rings parameters allows to build stringent conditions for data selection at trigger level. Latencies of all components of the trigger chain have...

  18. Fast parallel tandem mass spectral library searching using GPU hardware acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Lydia Ashleigh; Shanmugam, Avinash Kumar; Lam, Henry; Eng, Jimmy K; Martin, Daniel B

    2011-06-03

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a maturing discipline of biologic research that is experiencing substantial growth. Instrumentation has steadily improved over time with the advent of faster and more sensitive instruments collecting ever larger data files. Consequently, the computational process of matching a peptide fragmentation pattern to its sequence, traditionally accomplished by sequence database searching and more recently also by spectral library searching, has become a bottleneck in many mass spectrometry experiments. In both of these methods, the main rate-limiting step is the comparison of an acquired spectrum with all potential matches from a spectral library or sequence database. This is a highly parallelizable process because the core computational element can be represented as a simple but arithmetically intense multiplication of two vectors. In this paper, we present a proof of concept project taking advantage of the massively parallel computing available on graphics processing units (GPUs) to distribute and accelerate the process of spectral assignment using spectral library searching. This program, which we have named FastPaSS (for Fast Parallelized Spectral Searching), is implemented in CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) from NVIDIA, which allows direct access to the processors in an NVIDIA GPU. Our efforts demonstrate the feasibility of GPU computing for spectral assignment, through implementation of the validated spectral searching algorithm SpectraST in the CUDA environment.

  19. Bridging FPGA and GPU technologies for AO real-time control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Denis; Lainé, Maxime; Bernard, Julien; Gratadour, Damien; Sevin, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    Our team has developed a common environment for high performance simulations and real-time control of AO systems based on the use of Graphics Processors Units in the context of the COMPASS project. Such a solution, based on the ability of the real time core in the simulation to provide adequate computing performance, limits the cost of developing AO RTC systems and makes them more scalable. A code developed and validated in the context of the simulation may be injected directly into the system and tested on sky. Furthermore, the use of relatively low cost components also offers significant advantages for the system hardware platform. However, the use of GPUs in an AO loop comes with drawbacks: the traditional way of offloading computation from CPU to GPUs - involving multiple copies and unacceptable overhead in kernel launching - is not well suited in a real time context. This last application requires the implementation of a solution enabling direct memory access (DMA) to the GPU memory from a third party device, bypassing the operating system. This allows this device to communicate directly with the real-time core of the simulation feeding it with the WFS camera pixel stream. We show that DMA between a custom FPGA-based frame-grabber and a computation unit (GPU, FPGA, or Coprocessor such as Xeon-phi) across PCIe allows us to get latencies compatible with what will be needed on ELTs. As a fine-grained synchronization mechanism is not yet made available by GPU vendors, we propose the use of memory polling to avoid interrupts handling and involvement of a CPU. Network and Vision protocols are handled by the FPGA-based Network Interface Card (NIC). We present the results we obtained on a complete AO loop using camera and deformable mirror simulators.

  20. New Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact IBM unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    New Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact IBM unit replaces a two-unit earlier generation computer. The new IBM unit is documented in table top views alone (S91-26867, S91-26868), with the onboard equipment it supports including the flight deck CRT screen and keypad (S91-26866), and next to the two earlier versions it replaces (S91-26869).

  1. GPU accelerated study of heat transfer and fluid flow by lattice Boltzmann method on CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qinlong

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been developed as a powerful numerical approach to simulate the complex fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena during the past two decades. As a mesoscale method based on the kinetic theory, LBM has several advantages compared with traditional numerical methods such as physical representation of microscopic interactions, dealing with complex geometries and highly parallel nature. Lattice Boltzmann method has been applied to solve various fluid behaviors and heat transfer process like conjugate heat transfer, magnetic and electric field, diffusion and mixing process, chemical reactions, multiphase flow, phase change process, non-isothermal flow in porous medium, microfluidics, fluid-structure interactions in biological system and so on. In addition, as a non-body-conformal grid method, the immersed boundary method (IBM) could be applied to handle the complex or moving geometries in the domain. The immersed boundary method could be coupled with lattice Boltzmann method to study the heat transfer and fluid flow problems. Heat transfer and fluid flow are solved on Euler nodes by LBM while the complex solid geometries are captured by Lagrangian nodes using immersed boundary method. Parallel computing has been a popular topic for many decades to accelerate the computational speed in engineering and scientific fields. Today, almost all the laptop and desktop have central processing units (CPUs) with multiple cores which could be used for parallel computing. However, the cost of CPUs with hundreds of cores is still high which limits its capability of high performance computing on personal computer. Graphic processing units (GPU) is originally used for the computer video cards have been emerged as the most powerful high-performance workstation in recent years. Unlike the CPUs, the cost of GPU with thousands of cores is cheap. For example, the GPU (GeForce GTX TITAN) which is used in the current work has 2688 cores and the price is only 1

  2. A GPU-based large-scale Monte Carlo simulation method for systems with long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yihao; Xing, Xiangjun; Li, Yaohang

    2017-06-01

    In this work we present an efficient implementation of Canonical Monte Carlo simulation for Coulomb many body systems on graphics processing units (GPU). Our method takes advantage of the GPU Single Instruction, Multiple Data (SIMD) architectures, and adopts the sequential updating scheme of Metropolis algorithm. It makes no approximation in the computation of energy, and reaches a remarkable 440-fold speedup, compared with the serial implementation on CPU. We further use this method to simulate primitive model electrolytes, and measure very precisely all ion-ion pair correlation functions at high concentrations. From these data, we extract the renormalized Debye length, renormalized valences of constituent ions, and renormalized dielectric constants. These results demonstrate unequivocally physics beyond the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory.

  3. A Novel CPU/GPU Simulation Environment for Large-Scale Biologically-Realistic Neural Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger V Hoang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational Neuroscience is an emerging field that provides unique opportunities to studycomplex brain structures through realistic neural simulations. However, as biological details are added tomodels, the execution time for the simulation becomes longer. Graphics Processing Units (GPUs are now being utilized to accelerate simulations due to their ability to perform computations in parallel. As such, they haveshown significant improvement in execution time compared to Central Processing Units (CPUs. Most neural simulators utilize either multiple CPUs or a single GPU for better performance, but still show limitations in execution time when biological details are not sacrificed. Therefore, we present a novel CPU/GPU simulation environment for large-scale biological networks,the NeoCortical Simulator version 6 (NCS6. NCS6 is a free, open-source, parallelizable, and scalable simula-tor, designed to run on clusters of multiple machines, potentially with high performance computing devicesin each of them. It has built-in leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF and Izhikevich (IZH neuron models, but usersalso have the capability to design their own plug-in interface for different neuron types as desired. NCS6is currently able to simulate one million cells and 100 million synapses in quasi real time by distributing dataacross these heterogeneous clusters of CPUs and GPUs.

  4. A nonvoxel-based dose convolution/superposition algorithm optimized for scalable GPU architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neylon, J., E-mail: jneylon@mednet.ucla.edu; Sheng, K.; Yu, V.; Low, D. A.; Kupelian, P.; Santhanam, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, 200 Medical Plaza, #B265, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Q. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, 1300 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, California 22908 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Real-time adaptive planning and treatment has been infeasible due in part to its high computational complexity. There have been many recent efforts to utilize graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate the computational performance and dose accuracy in radiation therapy. Data structure and memory access patterns are the key GPU factors that determine the computational performance and accuracy. In this paper, the authors present a nonvoxel-based (NVB) approach to maximize computational and memory access efficiency and throughput on the GPU. Methods: The proposed algorithm employs a ray-tracing mechanism to restructure the 3D data sets computed from the CT anatomy into a nonvoxel-based framework. In a process that takes only a few milliseconds of computing time, the algorithm restructured the data sets by ray-tracing through precalculated CT volumes to realign the coordinate system along the convolution direction, as defined by zenithal and azimuthal angles. During the ray-tracing step, the data were resampled according to radial sampling and parallel ray-spacing parameters making the algorithm independent of the original CT resolution. The nonvoxel-based algorithm presented in this paper also demonstrated a trade-off in computational performance and dose accuracy for different coordinate system configurations. In order to find the best balance between the computed speedup and the accuracy, the authors employed an exhaustive parameter search on all sampling parameters that defined the coordinate system configuration: zenithal, azimuthal, and radial sampling of the convolution algorithm, as well as the parallel ray spacing during ray tracing. The angular sampling parameters were varied between 4 and 48 discrete angles, while both radial sampling and parallel ray spacing were varied from 0.5 to 10 mm. The gamma distribution analysis method (γ) was used to compare the dose distributions using 2% and 2 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria

  5. A nonvoxel-based dose convolution/superposition algorithm optimized for scalable GPU architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylon, J.; Sheng, K.; Yu, V.; Low, D. A.; Kupelian, P.; Santhanam, A.; Chen, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time adaptive planning and treatment has been infeasible due in part to its high computational complexity. There have been many recent efforts to utilize graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate the computational performance and dose accuracy in radiation therapy. Data structure and memory access patterns are the key GPU factors that determine the computational performance and accuracy. In this paper, the authors present a nonvoxel-based (NVB) approach to maximize computational and memory access efficiency and throughput on the GPU. Methods: The proposed algorithm employs a ray-tracing mechanism to restructure the 3D data sets computed from the CT anatomy into a nonvoxel-based framework. In a process that takes only a few milliseconds of computing time, the algorithm restructured the data sets by ray-tracing through precalculated CT volumes to realign the coordinate system along the convolution direction, as defined by zenithal and azimuthal angles. During the ray-tracing step, the data were resampled according to radial sampling and parallel ray-spacing parameters making the algorithm independent of the original CT resolution. The nonvoxel-based algorithm presented in this paper also demonstrated a trade-off in computational performance and dose accuracy for different coordinate system configurations. In order to find the best balance between the computed speedup and the accuracy, the authors employed an exhaustive parameter search on all sampling parameters that defined the coordinate system configuration: zenithal, azimuthal, and radial sampling of the convolution algorithm, as well as the parallel ray spacing during ray tracing. The angular sampling parameters were varied between 4 and 48 discrete angles, while both radial sampling and parallel ray spacing were varied from 0.5 to 10 mm. The gamma distribution analysis method (γ) was used to compare the dose distributions using 2% and 2 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria

  6. Incompressible SPH (ISPH) with fast Poisson solver on a GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Alex D.; Rogers, Benedict D.; Lind, Steven J.; Stansby, Peter K.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a fast incompressible SPH (ISPH) solver implemented to run entirely on a graphics processing unit (GPU) capable of simulating several millions of particles in three dimensions on a single GPU. The ISPH algorithm is implemented by converting the highly optimised open-source weakly-compressible SPH (WCSPH) code DualSPHysics to run ISPH on the GPU, combining it with the open-source linear algebra library ViennaCL for fast solutions of the pressure Poisson equation (PPE). Several challenges are addressed with this research: constructing a PPE matrix every timestep on the GPU for moving particles, optimising the limited GPU memory, and exploiting fast matrix solvers. The ISPH pressure projection algorithm is implemented as 4 separate stages, each with a particle sweep, including an algorithm for the population of the PPE matrix suitable for the GPU, and mixed precision storage methods. An accurate and robust ISPH boundary condition ideal for parallel processing is also established by adapting an existing WCSPH boundary condition for ISPH. A variety of validation cases are presented: an impulsively started plate, incompressible flow around a moving square in a box, and dambreaks (2-D and 3-D) which demonstrate the accuracy, flexibility, and speed of the methodology. Fragmentation of the free surface is shown to influence the performance of matrix preconditioners and therefore the PPE matrix solution time. The Jacobi preconditioner demonstrates robustness and reliability in the presence of fragmented flows. For a dambreak simulation, GPU speed ups demonstrate up to 10-18 times and 1.1-4.5 times compared to single-threaded and 16-threaded CPU run times respectively.

  7. Avaliação de desempenho e consumo energético para configurações de Wavefront pools de uma GPU AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Gustavo Zuquello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available O uso de sistemas heterogêneos CPU-GPU para atender à crescente demanda por aplicações com grande paralelismo de dados resulta na necessidade de estudar e avaliar tais arquiteturas para melhorá-las continuamente. Neste artigo foram feitas simulações da execução de uma suíte de benchmark em uma GPU AMD ATI RadeonTM HD 7970, de modo a avaliar o impacto sobre o desempenho e o consumo energético quando alterado o número de Wavefront Pools presentes em cada compute unit da GPU, que é 4 por padrão. O resultado mais significante evidencia um aumento de velocidade de cerca de 5,7% para a configuração com duas Wavefront Pools em conjunto com um aumento no consumo de energia de cerca de 5,1%. Todavia, as outras configurações avaliadas também representam opções para diferentes tipos de necessidades, conforme a categoria de demanda computacional.Palavras-chave: Sistemas heterogêneos. Simulações. Desempenho.Performance evaluation and energy consumption for settings of Wavefront pools of a GPU AMDAbstractThe use of CPU-GPU heterogeneous systems to meet the growing demand for applications with large data parallelism results in the need to study and evaluate these architectures in order to improve them continuously. In this paper we made simulations of running a benchmark suite on an AMD GPU ATI RadeonTM HD 7970 in order to assess the impact on performance and power consumption when tuning the number of Wavefront Pools present in each GPU compute unit, which is 4 by default. The most significant result shows a speedup of about 5.7% for configuration with two Wavefront Pools in conjunction with an increase of about 5.1% in the energy consumption. However, the other evaluated configuration also represent options for different kinds of needs, according to   the  computational demand.Keyworks: Heterogeneous systems. Simulation. Performance.

  8. MASSIVELY PARALLEL LATENT SEMANTIC ANALYSES USING A GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.; Cui, S.

    2009-01-01

    Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) aims to reduce the dimensions of large term-document datasets using Singular Value Decomposition. However, with the ever-expanding size of datasets, current implementations are not fast enough to quickly and easily compute the results on a standard PC. A graphics processing unit (GPU) can solve some highly parallel problems much faster than a traditional sequential processor or central processing unit (CPU). Thus, a deployable system using a GPU to speed up large-scale LSA processes would be a much more effective choice (in terms of cost/performance ratio) than using a PC cluster. Due to the GPU’s application-specifi c architecture, harnessing the GPU’s computational prowess for LSA is a great challenge. We presented a parallel LSA implementation on the GPU, using NVIDIA® Compute Unifi ed Device Architecture and Compute Unifi ed Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms software. The performance of this implementation is compared to traditional LSA implementation on a CPU using an optimized Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms library. After implementation, we discovered that the GPU version of the algorithm was twice as fast for large matrices (1 000x1 000 and above) that had dimensions not divisible by 16. For large matrices that did have dimensions divisible by 16, the GPU algorithm ran fi ve to six times faster than the CPU version. The large variation is due to architectural benefi ts of the GPU for matrices divisible by 16. It should be noted that the overall speeds for the CPU version did not vary from relative normal when the matrix dimensions were divisible by 16. Further research is needed in order to produce a fully implementable version of LSA. With that in mind, the research we presented shows that the GPU is a viable option for increasing the speed of LSA, in terms of cost/performance ratio.

  9. SU-D-206-02: Evaluation of Partial Storage of the System Matrix for Cone Beam Computed Tomography Using a GPU Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenine, D; Cote, G; Mascolo-Fortin, J [Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Goussard, Y [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, P [Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHU de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction algorithms in computed tomography (CT) require a fast method for computing the intersections between the photons’ trajectories and the object, also called ray-tracing or system matrix computation. This work evaluates different ways to store the system matrix, aiming to reconstruct dense image grids in reasonable time. Methods: We propose an optimized implementation of the Siddon’s algorithm using graphics processing units (GPUs) with a novel data storage scheme. The algorithm computes a part of the system matrix on demand, typically, for one projection angle. The proposed method was enhanced with accelerating options: storage of larger subsets of the system matrix, systematic reuse of data via geometric symmetries, an arithmetic-rich parallel code and code configuration via machine learning. It was tested on geometries mimicking a cone beam CT acquisition of a human head. To realistically assess the execution time, the ray-tracing routines were integrated into a regularized Poisson-based reconstruction algorithm. The proposed scheme was also compared to a different approach, where the system matrix is fully pre-computed and loaded at reconstruction time. Results: Fast ray-tracing of realistic acquisition geometries, which often lack spatial symmetry properties, was enabled via the proposed method. Ray-tracing interleaved with projection and backprojection operations required significant additional time. In most cases, ray-tracing was shown to use about 66 % of the total reconstruction time. In absolute terms, tracing times varied from 3.6 s to 7.5 min, depending on the problem size. The presence of geometrical symmetries allowed for non-negligible ray-tracing and reconstruction time reduction. Arithmetic-rich parallel code and machine learning permitted a modest reconstruction time reduction, in the order of 1 %. Conclusion: Partial system matrix storage permitted the reconstruction of higher 3D image grid sizes and larger

  10. SU-D-206-02: Evaluation of Partial Storage of the System Matrix for Cone Beam Computed Tomography Using a GPU Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matenine, D; Cote, G; Mascolo-Fortin, J; Goussard, Y; Despres, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction algorithms in computed tomography (CT) require a fast method for computing the intersections between the photons’ trajectories and the object, also called ray-tracing or system matrix computation. This work evaluates different ways to store the system matrix, aiming to reconstruct dense image grids in reasonable time. Methods: We propose an optimized implementation of the Siddon’s algorithm using graphics processing units (GPUs) with a novel data storage scheme. The algorithm computes a part of the system matrix on demand, typically, for one projection angle. The proposed method was enhanced with accelerating options: storage of larger subsets of the system matrix, systematic reuse of data via geometric symmetries, an arithmetic-rich parallel code and code configuration via machine learning. It was tested on geometries mimicking a cone beam CT acquisition of a human head. To realistically assess the execution time, the ray-tracing routines were integrated into a regularized Poisson-based reconstruction algorithm. The proposed scheme was also compared to a different approach, where the system matrix is fully pre-computed and loaded at reconstruction time. Results: Fast ray-tracing of realistic acquisition geometries, which often lack spatial symmetry properties, was enabled via the proposed method. Ray-tracing interleaved with projection and backprojection operations required significant additional time. In most cases, ray-tracing was shown to use about 66 % of the total reconstruction time. In absolute terms, tracing times varied from 3.6 s to 7.5 min, depending on the problem size. The presence of geometrical symmetries allowed for non-negligible ray-tracing and reconstruction time reduction. Arithmetic-rich parallel code and machine learning permitted a modest reconstruction time reduction, in the order of 1 %. Conclusion: Partial system matrix storage permitted the reconstruction of higher 3D image grid sizes and larger

  11. Reconstruction of the neutron spectrum using an artificial neural network in CPU and GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez D, V. M.; Moreno M, A.; Ortiz L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R.; Alonso M, O. E.

    2016-10-01

    The increase in computing power in personal computers has been increasing, computers now have several processors in the CPU and in addition multiple CUDA cores in the graphics processing unit (GPU); both systems can be used individually or combined to perform scientific computation without resorting to processor or supercomputing arrangements. The Bonner sphere spectrometer is the most commonly used multi-element system for neutron detection purposes and its associated spectrum. Each sphere-detector combination gives a particular response that depends on the energy of the neutrons, and the total set of these responses is known like the responses matrix Rφ(E). Thus, the counting rates obtained with each sphere and the neutron spectrum is related to the Fredholm equation in its discrete version. For the reconstruction of the spectrum has a system of poorly conditioned equations with an infinite number of solutions and to find the appropriate solution, it has been proposed the use of artificial intelligence through neural networks with different platforms CPU and GPU. (Author)

  12. A GPU-accelerated semi-implicit fractional-step method for numerical solutions of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sanghyun; Park, Junshin; You, Donghyun

    2018-01-01

    Utility of the computational power of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) is elaborated for solutions of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations which are integrated using a semi-implicit fractional-step method. The Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) and the Fourier-transform-based direct solution methods used in the semi-implicit fractional-step method take advantage of multiple tridiagonal matrices whose inversion is known as the major bottleneck for acceleration on a typical multi-core machine. A novel implementation of the semi-implicit fractional-step method designed for GPU acceleration of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Aspects of the programing model of Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which are critical to the bandwidth-bound nature of the present method are discussed in detail. A data layout for efficient use of CUDA libraries is proposed for acceleration of tridiagonal matrix inversion and fast Fourier transform. OpenMP is employed for concurrent collection of turbulence statistics on a CPU while the Navier-Stokes equations are computed on a GPU. Performance of the present method using CUDA is assessed by comparing the speed of solving three tridiagonal matrices using ADI with the speed of solving one heptadiagonal matrix using a conjugate gradient method. An overall speedup of 20 times is achieved using a Tesla K40 GPU in comparison with a single-core Xeon E5-2660 v3 CPU in simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate conducted on over 134 million grids. Enhanced performance of 48 times speedup is reached for the same problem using a Tesla P100 GPU.

  13. Energy efficiency of computer power supply units - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aebischer, B. [cepe - Centre for Energy Policy and Economics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Huser, H. [Encontrol GmbH, Niederrohrdorf (Switzerland)

    2002-11-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the efficiency of computer power supply units, which decreases rapidly during average computer use. The background and the purpose of the project are examined. The power supplies for personal computers are discussed and the testing arrangement used is described. Efficiency, power-factor and operating points of the units are examined. Potentials for improvement and measures to be taken are discussed. Also, action to be taken by those involved in the design and operation of such power units is proposed. Finally, recommendations for further work are made.

  14. GPU accelerated population annealing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, Lev Yu.; Weigel, Martin; Borovský, Michal; Janke, Wolfhard; Shchur, Lev N.

    2017-11-01

    Population annealing is a promising recent approach for Monte Carlo simulations in statistical physics, in particular for the simulation of systems with complex free-energy landscapes. It is a hybrid method, combining importance sampling through Markov chains with elements of sequential Monte Carlo in the form of population control. While it appears to provide algorithmic capabilities for the simulation of such systems that are roughly comparable to those of more established approaches such as parallel tempering, it is intrinsically much more suitable for massively parallel computing. Here, we tap into this structural advantage and present a highly optimized implementation of the population annealing algorithm on GPUs that promises speed-ups of several orders of magnitude as compared to a serial implementation on CPUs. While the sample code is for simulations of the 2D ferromagnetic Ising model, it should be easily adapted for simulations of other spin models, including disordered systems. Our code includes implementations of some advanced algorithmic features that have only recently been suggested, namely the automatic adaptation of temperature steps and a multi-histogram analysis of the data at different temperatures. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/sgzt4b7b3m.1 Licensing provisions: Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY 4.0) Programming language: C, CUDA External routines/libraries: NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit 6.5 or newer Nature of problem: The program calculates the internal energy, specific heat, several magnetization moments, entropy and free energy of the 2D Ising model on square lattices of edge length L with periodic boundary conditions as a function of inverse temperature β. Solution method: The code uses population annealing, a hybrid method combining Markov chain updates with population control. The code is implemented for NVIDIA GPUs using the CUDA language and employs advanced techniques such as multi-spin coding, adaptive temperature

  15. Accelerating large-scale phase-field simulations with GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new package for accelerating large-scale phase-field simulations was developed by using GPU based on the semi-implicit Fourier method. The package can solve a variety of equilibrium equations with different inhomogeneity including long-range elastic, magnetostatic, and electrostatic interactions. Through using specific algorithm in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA, Fourier spectral iterative perturbation method was integrated in GPU package. The Allen-Cahn equation, Cahn-Hilliard equation, and phase-field model with long-range interaction were solved based on the algorithm running on GPU respectively to test the performance of the package. From the comparison of the calculation results between the solver executed in single CPU and the one on GPU, it was found that the speed on GPU is enormously elevated to 50 times faster. The present study therefore contributes to the acceleration of large-scale phase-field simulations and provides guidance for experiments to design large-scale functional devices.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Text Mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, X.; Mueller, F.; Zhang, Y.; Potok, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerating hardware devices represent a novel promise for improving the performance for many problem domains but it is not clear for which domains what accelerators are suitable. While there is no room in general-purpose processor design to significantly increase the processor frequency, developers are instead resorting to multi-core chips duplicating conventional computing capabilities on a single die. Yet, accelerators offer more radical designs with a much higher level of parallelism and novel programming environments. This present work assesses the viability of text mining on CUDA. Text mining is one of the key concepts that has become prominent as an effective means to index the Internet, but its applications range beyond this scope and extend to providing document similarity metrics, the subject of this work. We have developed and optimized text search algorithms for GPUs to exploit their potential for massive data processing. We discuss the algorithmic challenges of parallelization for text search problems on GPUs and demonstrate the potential of these devices in experiments by reporting significant speedups. Our study may be one of the first to assess more complex text search problems for suitability for GPU devices, and it may also be one of the first to exploit and report on atomic instruction usage that have recently become available in NVIDIA devices

  17. GPU-accelerated low-latency real-time searches for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuan; Du Zhihui; Chung, Shin Kee; Hooper, Shaun; Blair, David; Wen Linqing

    2012-01-01

    We present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated time-domain low-latency algorithm to search for gravitational waves (GWs) from coalescing binaries of compact objects based on the summed parallel infinite impulse response (SPIIR) filtering technique. The aim is to facilitate fast detection of GWs with a minimum delay to allow prompt electromagnetic follow-up observations. To maximize the GPU acceleration, we apply an efficient batched parallel computing model that significantly reduces the number of synchronizations in SPIIR and optimizes the usage of the memory and hardware resource. Our code is tested on the CUDA ‘Fermi’ architecture in a GTX 480 graphics card and its performance is compared with a single core of Intel Core i7 920 (2.67 GHz). A 58-fold speedup is achieved while giving results in close agreement with the CPU implementation. Our result indicates that it is possible to conduct a full search for GWs from compact binary coalescence in real time with only one desktop computer equipped with a Fermi GPU card for the initial LIGO detectors which in the past required more than 100 CPUs. (paper)

  18. Simulation of isothermal multi-phase fuel-coolant interaction using MPS method with GPU acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, W.; Zhang, S.; Zheng, Y. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Center for Engineering and Scientific Computation

    2016-07-15

    The energetic fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) has been one of the primary safety concerns in nuclear power plants. Graphical processing unit (GPU) implementation of the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method is presented and used to simulate the fuel coolant interaction problem. The governing equations are discretized with the particle interaction model of MPS. Detailed implementation on single-GPU is introduced. The three-dimensional broken dam is simulated to verify the developed GPU acceleration MPS method. The proposed GPU acceleration algorithm and developed code are then used to simulate the FCI problem. As a summary of results, the developed GPU-MPS method showed a good agreement with the experimental observation and theoretical prediction.

  19. Overview of implementation of DARPA GPU program in SAIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunreiter, Dennis; Furtek, Jeremy; Chen, Hai-Wen; Healy, Dennis

    2008-04-01

    This paper reviews the implementation of DARPA MTO STAP-BOY program for both Phase I and II conducted at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The STAP-BOY program conducts fast covariance factorization and tuning techniques for space-time adaptive process (STAP) Algorithm Implementation on Graphics Processor unit (GPU) Architectures for Embedded Systems. The first part of our presentation on the DARPA STAP-BOY program will focus on GPU implementation and algorithm innovations for a prototype radar STAP algorithm. The STAP algorithm will be implemented on the GPU, using stream programming (from companies such as PeakStream, ATI Technologies' CTM, and NVIDIA) and traditional graphics APIs. This algorithm will include fast range adaptive STAP weight updates and beamforming applications, each of which has been modified to exploit the parallel nature of graphics architectures.

  20. Research on GPU acceleration for Monte Carlo criticality calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport method can be naturally parallelized by multi-core architectures due to the dependency between particles during the simulation. The GPU+CPU heterogeneous parallel mode has become an increasingly popular way of parallelism in the field of scientific supercomputing. Thus, this work focuses on the GPU acceleration method for the Monte Carlo criticality simulation, as well as the computational efficiency that GPUs can bring. The 'neutron transport step' is introduced to increase the GPU thread occupancy. In order to test the sensitivity of the MC code's complexity, a 1D one-group code and a 3D multi-group general purpose code are respectively transplanted to GPUs, and the acceleration effects are compared. The result of numerical experiments shows considerable acceleration effect of the 'neutron transport step' strategy. However, the performance comparison between the 1D code and the 3D code indicates the poor scalability of MC codes on GPUs. (authors)

  1. High-Performance Matrix-Vector Multiplication on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a high-performance GPU kernel for one of the most popular dense linear algebra operations, the matrix-vector multiplication. The target hardware is the most recent Nvidia Tesla 20-series (Fermi architecture), which is designed from the ground up for scientific computing...

  2. STEM image simulation with hybrid CPU/GPU programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.; Ge, B.H.; Shen, X.; Wang, Y.G.; Yu, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    STEM image simulation is achieved via hybrid CPU/GPU programming under parallel algorithm architecture to speed up calculation on a personal computer (PC). To utilize the calculation power of a PC fully, the simulation is performed using the GPU core and multi-CPU cores at the same time to significantly improve efficiency. GaSb and an artificial GaSb/InAs interface with atom diffusion have been used to verify the computation. - Highlights: • STEM image simulation is achieved by hybrid CPU/GPU programming under parallel algorithm architecture to speed up the calculation in the personal computer (PC). • In order to fully utilize the calculation power of the PC, the simulation is performed by GPU core and multi-CPU cores at the same time so efficiency is improved significantly. • GaSb and artificial GaSb/InAs interface with atom diffusion have been used to verify the computation. The results reveal some unintuitive phenomena about the contrast variation with the atom numbers.

  3. GPU accelerated likelihoods for stereo-based articulated tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg, Rune Møllegaard; Hauberg, Søren; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    than a traditional CPU implementation. We explain the non-intuitive steps required to attain an optimized GPU implementation, where the dominant part is to hide the memory latency effectively. Benchmarks show that computations which previously required several minutes, are now performed in few seconds....

  4. STEM image simulation with hybrid CPU/GPU programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Y., E-mail: yaoyuan@iphy.ac.cn; Ge, B.H.; Shen, X.; Wang, Y.G.; Yu, R.C.

    2016-07-15

    STEM image simulation is achieved via hybrid CPU/GPU programming under parallel algorithm architecture to speed up calculation on a personal computer (PC). To utilize the calculation power of a PC fully, the simulation is performed using the GPU core and multi-CPU cores at the same time to significantly improve efficiency. GaSb and an artificial GaSb/InAs interface with atom diffusion have been used to verify the computation. - Highlights: • STEM image simulation is achieved by hybrid CPU/GPU programming under parallel algorithm architecture to speed up the calculation in the personal computer (PC). • In order to fully utilize the calculation power of the PC, the simulation is performed by GPU core and multi-CPU cores at the same time so efficiency is improved significantly. • GaSb and artificial GaSb/InAs interface with atom diffusion have been used to verify the computation. The results reveal some unintuitive phenomena about the contrast variation with the atom numbers.

  5. Massively parallel signal processing using the graphics processing unit for real-time brain-computer interface feature extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam Wilson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The clock speeds of modern computer processors have nearly plateaued in the past five years. Consequently, neural prosthetic systems that rely on processing large quantities of data in a short period of time face a bottleneck, in that it may not be possible to process all of the data recorded from an electrode array with high channel counts and bandwidth, such as electrocorticographic grids or other implantable systems. Therefore, in this study a method of using the processing capabilities of a graphics card (GPU was developed for real-time neural signal processing of a brain-computer interface (BCI. The NVIDIA CUDA system was used to offload processing to the GPU, which is capable of running many operations in parallel, potentially greatly increasing the speed of existing algorithms. The BCI system records many channels of data, which are processed and translated into a control signal, such as the movement of a computer cursor. This signal processing chain involves computing a matrix-matrix multiplication (i.e., a spatial filter, followed by calculating the power spectral density on every channel using an auto-regressive method, and finally classifying appropriate features for control. In this study, the first two computationally-intensive steps were implemented on the GPU, and the speed was compared to both the current implementation and a CPU-based implementation that uses multi-threading. Significant performance gains were obtained with GPU processing: the current implementation processed 1000 channels in 933 ms, while the new GPU method took only 27 ms, an improvement of nearly 35 times.

  6. High-performance computing on GPUs for resistivity logging of oil and gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinskikh, V.; Dudaev, A.; Nechaev, O.; Surodina, I.

    2017-10-01

    We developed and implemented into software an algorithm for high-performance simulation of electrical logs from oil and gas wells using high-performance heterogeneous computing. The numerical solution of the 2D forward problem is based on the finite-element method and the Cholesky decomposition for solving a system of linear algebraic equations (SLAE). Software implementations of the algorithm used the NVIDIA CUDA technology and computing libraries are made, allowing us to perform decomposition of SLAE and find its solution on central processor unit (CPU) and graphics processor unit (GPU). The calculation time is analyzed depending on the matrix size and number of its non-zero elements. We estimated the computing speed on CPU and GPU, including high-performance heterogeneous CPU-GPU computing. Using the developed algorithm, we simulated resistivity data in realistic models.

  7. Numerical computations with GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Kindratenko, Volodymyr

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together research on numerical methods adapted for Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). It explains recent efforts to adapt classic numerical methods, including solution of linear equations and FFT, for massively parallel GPU architectures. This volume consolidates recent research and adaptations, covering widely used methods that are at the core of many scientific and engineering computations. Each chapter is written by authors working on a specific group of methods; these leading experts provide mathematical background, parallel algorithms and implementation details leading to

  8. Software Accelerates Computing Time for Complex Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded Newark, Delaware-based EM Photonics Inc. SBIR funding to utilize graphic processing unit (GPU) technology- traditionally used for computer video games-to develop high-computing software called CULA. The software gives users the ability to run complex algorithms on personal computers with greater speed. As a result of the NASA collaboration, the number of employees at the company has increased 10 percent.

  9. Installation of new Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) high bay 2, Spacecraft Electronics technician Ed Carter (right), wearing clean suit, prepares for (26864) and installs (26865) the new Generation General Purpose Computer (GPC) compact IBM unit in Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, middeck avionics bay as Orbiter Systems Quality Control technician Doug Snider looks on. Both men work for NASA contractor Lockheed Space Operations Company. All three orbiters are being outfitted with the compact IBM unit, which replaces a two-unit earlier generation computer.

  10. NLSEmagic: Nonlinear Schrödinger equation multi-dimensional Matlab-based GPU-accelerated integrators using compact high-order schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, R. M.

    2013-04-01

    We present a simple to use, yet powerful code package called NLSEmagic to numerically integrate the nonlinear Schrödinger equation in one, two, and three dimensions. NLSEmagic is a high-order finite-difference code package which utilizes graphic processing unit (GPU) parallel architectures. The codes running on the GPU are many times faster than their serial counterparts, and are much cheaper to run than on standard parallel clusters. The codes are developed with usability and portability in mind, and therefore are written to interface with MATLAB utilizing custom GPU-enabled C codes with the MEX-compiler interface. The packages are freely distributed, including user manuals and set-up files. Catalogue identifier: AEOJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 124453 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4728604 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, CUDA, MATLAB. Computer: PC, MAC. Operating system: Windows, MacOS, Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Number of processors used: Single CPU, number of GPU processors dependent on chosen GPU card (max is currently 3072 cores on GeForce GTX 690). Supplementary material: Setup guide, Installation guide. RAM: Highly dependent on dimensionality and grid size. For typical medium-large problem size in three dimensions, 4GB is sufficient. Keywords: Nonlinear Schröodinger Equation, GPU, high-order finite difference, Bose-Einstien condensates. Classification: 4.3, 7.7. Nature of problem: Integrate solutions of the time-dependent one-, two-, and three-dimensional cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Solution method: The integrators utilize a fully-explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme in time

  11. A Generic High-performance GPU-based Library for PDE solvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    , the privilege of high-performance parallel computing is now in principle accessible for many scientific users, no matter their economic resources. Though being highly effective units, GPUs and parallel architectures in general, pose challenges for software developers to utilize their efficiency. Sequential...... legacy codes are not always easily parallelized and the time spent on conversion might not pay o in the end. We present a highly generic C++ library for fast assembling of partial differential equation (PDE) solvers, aiming at utilizing the computational resources of GPUs. The library requires a minimum...... of GPU computing knowledge, while still oering the possibility to customize user-specic solvers at kernel level if desired. Spatial dierential operators are based on matrix free exible order nite dierence approximations. These matrix free operators minimize both memory consumption and main memory access...

  12. An Investigation of the Performance of the Colored Gauss-Seidel Solver on CPU and GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Seon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon; Jeon, Byoung Jin

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the colored Gauss–Seidel solver on CPU and GPU was investigated for the two- and three-dimensional heat conduction problems by using different mesh sizes. The heat conduction equation was discretized by the finite difference method and finite element method. The CPU yielded good performance for small problems but deteriorated when the total memory required for computing was larger than the cache memory for large problems. In contrast, the GPU performed better as the mesh size increased because of the latency hiding technique. Further, GPU computation by the colored Gauss–Siedel solver was approximately 7 times that by the single CPU. Furthermore, the colored Gauss–Seidel solver was found to be approximately twice that of the Jacobi solver when parallel computing was conducted on the GPU.

  13. An Investigation of the Performance of the Colored Gauss-Seidel Solver on CPU and GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jong Seon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon [Seoul Nat’l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byoung Jin [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The performance of the colored Gauss–Seidel solver on CPU and GPU was investigated for the two- and three-dimensional heat conduction problems by using different mesh sizes. The heat conduction equation was discretized by the finite difference method and finite element method. The CPU yielded good performance for small problems but deteriorated when the total memory required for computing was larger than the cache memory for large problems. In contrast, the GPU performed better as the mesh size increased because of the latency hiding technique. Further, GPU computation by the colored Gauss–Siedel solver was approximately 7 times that by the single CPU. Furthermore, the colored Gauss–Seidel solver was found to be approximately twice that of the Jacobi solver when parallel computing was conducted on the GPU.

  14. Mapping the Information Trace in Local Field Potentials by a Computational Method of Two-Dimensional Time-Shifting Synchronization Likelihood Based on Graphic Processing Unit Acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zi-Fang; Li, Xue-Zhu; Wan, You

    2017-12-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is a signal reflecting the electrical activity of neurons surrounding the electrode tip. Synchronization between LFP signals provides important details about how neural networks are organized. Synchronization between two distant brain regions is hard to detect using linear synchronization algorithms like correlation and coherence. Synchronization likelihood (SL) is a non-linear synchronization-detecting algorithm widely used in studies of neural signals from two distant brain areas. One drawback of non-linear algorithms is the heavy computational burden. In the present study, we proposed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-accelerated implementation of an SL algorithm with optional 2-dimensional time-shifting. We tested the algorithm with both artificial data and raw LFP data. The results showed that this method revealed detailed information from original data with the synchronization values of two temporal axes, delay time and onset time, and thus can be used to reconstruct the temporal structure of a neural network. Our results suggest that this GPU-accelerated method can be extended to other algorithms for processing time-series signals (like EEG and fMRI) using similar recording techniques.

  15. Fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM for HRRT PET using a GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Sang; Ye, Jong Chul, E-mail: kssigari@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: jong.ye@kaist.ac.kr [Bio-Imaging and Signal Processing Lab., Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 335 Gwahak-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-07

    Accurate scatter correction is especially important for high-resolution 3D positron emission tomographies (PETs) such as high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) due to large scatter fraction in the data. To address this problem, a fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) in which a 3D single scatter simulation (SSS) is alternatively performed with a 3D OSEM reconstruction was recently proposed. However, due to the computational complexity of both SSS and OSEM algorithms for a high-resolution 3D PET, it has not been widely used in practice. The main objective of this paper is, therefore, to accelerate the fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM using a graphics processing unit (GPU) and verify its performance for an HRRT. We show that to exploit the massive thread structures of the GPU, several algorithmic modifications are necessary. For SSS implementation, a sinogram-driven approach is found to be more appropriate compared to a detector-driven approach, as fast linear interpolation can be performed in the sinogram domain through the use of texture memory. Furthermore, a pixel-driven backprojector and a ray-driven projector can be significantly accelerated by assigning threads to voxels and sinograms, respectively. Using Nvidia's GPU and compute unified device architecture (CUDA), the execution time of a SSS is less than 6 s, a single iteration of OSEM with 16 subsets takes 16 s, and a single iteration of the fully 3D scatter-corrected OSEM composed of a SSS and six iterations of OSEM takes under 105 s for the HRRT geometry, which corresponds to acceleration factors of 125x and 141x for OSEM and SSS, respectively. The fully 3D iterative scatter-corrected OSEM algorithm is validated in simulations using Geant4 application for tomographic emission and in actual experiments using an HRRT.

  16. Evolution of GPU nuclear's training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Coe, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    GPU Nuclear Corporation (GPUN) manages the operators of Three Mile Island Unit 1 and Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Stations and the recovery activities at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 plant. From the time it was formed in January 1980 GPUN emphasized the use of behavioral learning objectives as the basis for all its training programs. This paper describes the evolution to a formalized performance based Training System Development (TSD) Process. The Training and Education Department staff increased from 10 in 1979 to the current 120 dedicated professionals, with a corresponding increase in facilities and acquisition of sophisticated Basic Principles Training Simulators and a Three Mile Island Unit 1 control Room Replica Simulator. The impact of these developments and achievement of full INPO accreditation are discussed and related to plant performance improvements

  17. An Application of Graphics Processing Units to Geosimulation of Collective Crowd Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cjoskāns Jānis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to assess the ways for computational performance and efficiency improvement of collective crowd behaviour simulation by using parallel computing methods implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU. To perform an experimental evaluation of benefits of parallel computing, a new GPU-based simulator prototype is proposed and the runtime performance is analysed. Based on practical examples of pedestrian dynamics geosimulation, the obtained performance measurements are compared to several other available multiagent simulation tools to determine the efficiency of the proposed simulator, as well as to provide generic guidelines for the efficiency improvements of the parallel simulation of collective crowd behaviour.

  18. Accelerating solidification process simulation for large-sized system of liquid metal atoms using GPU with CUDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie, Liang [School of Information Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changshang, 410082 (China); Li, KenLi, E-mail: lkl@hnu.edu.cn [School of Information Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changshang, 410082 (China); National Supercomputing Center in Changsha, 410082 (China); Shi, Lin [School of Information Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changshang, 410082 (China); Liu, RangSu [School of Physics and Micro Electronic, Hunan University, Changshang, 410082 (China); Mei, Jing [School of Information Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changshang, 410082 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation is a powerful tool to simulate and analyze complex physical processes and phenomena at atomic characteristic for predicting the natural time-evolution of a system of atoms. Precise simulation of physical processes has strong requirements both in the simulation size and computing timescale. Therefore, finding available computing resources is crucial to accelerate computation. However, a tremendous computational resource (GPGPU) are recently being utilized for general purpose computing due to its high performance of floating-point arithmetic operation, wide memory bandwidth and enhanced programmability. As for the most time-consuming component in MD simulation calculation during the case of studying liquid metal solidification processes, this paper presents a fine-grained spatial decomposition method to accelerate the computation of update of neighbor lists and interaction force calculation by take advantage of modern graphics processors units (GPU), enlarging the scale of the simulation system to a simulation system involving 10 000 000 atoms. In addition, a number of evaluations and tests, ranging from executions on different precision enabled-CUDA versions, over various types of GPU (NVIDIA 480GTX, 580GTX and M2050) to CPU clusters with different number of CPU cores are discussed. The experimental results demonstrate that GPU-based calculations are typically 9∼11 times faster than the corresponding sequential execution and approximately 1.5∼2 times faster than 16 CPU cores clusters implementations. On the basis of the simulated results, the comparisons between the theoretical results and the experimental ones are executed, and the good agreement between the two and more complete and larger cluster structures in the actual macroscopic materials are observed. Moreover, different nucleation and evolution mechanism of nano-clusters and nano-crystals formed in the processes of metal solidification is observed with large

  19. GPU-based parallel algorithm for blind image restoration using midfrequency-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lang; Luo, Yi-han; Bao, Qi-liang

    2013-08-01

    GPU-based general-purpose computing is a new branch of modern parallel computing, so the study of parallel algorithms specially designed for GPU hardware architecture is of great significance. In order to solve the problem of high computational complexity and poor real-time performance in blind image restoration, the midfrequency-based algorithm for blind image restoration was analyzed and improved in this paper. Furthermore, a midfrequency-based filtering method is also used to restore the image hardly with any recursion or iteration. Combining the algorithm with data intensiveness, data parallel computing and GPU execution model of single instruction and multiple threads, a new parallel midfrequency-based algorithm for blind image restoration is proposed in this paper, which is suitable for stream computing of GPU. In this algorithm, the GPU is utilized to accelerate the estimation of class-G point spread functions and midfrequency-based filtering. Aiming at better management of the GPU threads, the threads in a grid are scheduled according to the decomposition of the filtering data in frequency domain after the optimization of data access and the communication between the host and the device. The kernel parallelism structure is determined by the decomposition of the filtering data to ensure the transmission rate to get around the memory bandwidth limitation. The results show that, with the new algorithm, the operational speed is significantly increased and the real-time performance of image restoration is effectively improved, especially for high-resolution images.

  20. Parallel implementation of DNA sequences matching algorithms using PWM on GPU architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Nitin; Narang, Vipin; Mittal, Ankush

    2011-01-01

    Positional Weight Matrices (PWMs) are widely used in representation and detection of Transcription Factor Of Binding Sites (TFBSs) on DNA. We implement online PWM search algorithm over parallel architecture. A large PWM data can be processed on Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) systems in parallel which can help in matching sequences at a faster rate. Our method employs extensive usage of highly multithreaded architecture and shared memory of multi-cored GPU. An efficient use of shared memory is required to optimise parallel reduction in CUDA. Our optimised method has a speedup of 230-280x over linear implementation on GPU named GeForce GTX 280.

  1. Resolution of the Vlasov-Maxwell system by PIC discontinuous Galerkin method on GPU with OpenCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crestetto Anaïs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation of a Vlasov-Maxwell solver for multicore processors. The Vlasov equation describes the evolution of charged particles in an electromagnetic field, solution of the Maxwell equations. The Vlasov equation is solved by a Particle-In-Cell method (PIC, while the Maxwell system is computed by a Discontinuous Galerkin method. We use the OpenCL framework, which allows our code to run on multicore processors or recent Graphic Processing Units (GPU. We present several numerical applications to two-dimensional test cases.

  2. Real-time Deformation of Detailed Geometry Based on Mappings to a Less Detailed Physical Simulation on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Jesper; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2005-01-01

    Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) can be effectively used to solve physical systems. To use the GPUoptimally, the discretization of the physical system is often restricted to a regular grid. When grid values representspatial positions, a direct visualization can result in a jagged appearance....... In this paper we propose todecouple computation and visualization of such systems. We define mappings that enable the deformation of ahigh-resolution surface based on a physical simulation on a lower resolution uniform grid. More specifically weinvestigate new approaches for the visualization of a GPU based...

  3. GPU-Based Block-Wise Nonlocal Means Denoising for 3D Ultrasound Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Speckle suppression plays an important role in improving ultrasound (US image quality. While lots of algorithms have been proposed for 2D US image denoising with remarkable filtering quality, there is relatively less work done on 3D ultrasound speckle suppression, where the whole volume data rather than just one frame needs to be considered. Then, the most crucial problem with 3D US denoising is that the computational complexity increases tremendously. The nonlocal means (NLM provides an effective method for speckle suppression in US images. In this paper, a programmable graphic-processor-unit- (GPU- based fast NLM filter is proposed for 3D ultrasound speckle reduction. A Gamma distribution noise model, which is able to reliably capture image statistics for Log-compressed ultrasound images, was used for the 3D block-wise NLM filter on basis of Bayesian framework. The most significant aspect of our method was the adopting of powerful data-parallel computing capability of GPU to improve the overall efficiency. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can enormously accelerate the algorithm.

  4. Papaya Tree Detection with UAV Images Using a GPU-Accelerated Scale-Space Filtering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV can allow individual tree detection for forest inventories in a cost-effective way. The scale-space filtering (SSF algorithm is commonly used and has the capability of detecting trees of different crown sizes. In this study, we made two improvements with regard to the existing method and implementations. First, we incorporated SSF with a Lab color transformation to reduce over-detection problems associated with the original luminance image. Second, we ported four of the most time-consuming processes to the graphics processing unit (GPU to improve computational efficiency. The proposed method was implemented using PyCUDA, which enabled access to NVIDIA’s compute unified device architecture (CUDA through high-level scripting of the Python language. Our experiments were conducted using two images captured by the DJI Phantom 3 Professional and a most recent NVIDIA GPU GTX1080. The resulting accuracy was high, with an F-measure larger than 0.94. The speedup achieved by our parallel implementation was 44.77 and 28.54 for the first and second test image, respectively. For each 4000 × 3000 image, the total runtime was less than 1 s, which was sufficient for real-time performance and interactive application.

  5. Multi–GPU Implementation of Machine Learning Algorithm using CUDA and OpenCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Masek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using modern Graphic Processing Units (GPUs becomes very useful for computing complex and time consuming processes. GPUs provide high–performance computation capabilities with a good price. This paper deals with a multi–GPU OpenCL and CUDA implementations of k–Nearest Neighbor (k–NN algorithm. This work compares performances of OpenCLand CUDA implementations where each of them is suitable for different number of used attributes. The proposed CUDA algorithm achieves acceleration up to 880x in comparison witha single thread CPU version. The common k-NN was modified to be faster when the lower number of k neighbors is set. The performance of algorithm was verified with two GPUs dual-core NVIDIA GeForce GTX 690 and CPU Intel Core i7 3770 with 4.1 GHz frequency. The results of speed up were measured for one GPU, two GPUs, three and four GPUs. We performed several tests with data sets containing up to 4 million elements with various number of attributes.

  6. GPU-Accelerated Foreground Segmentation and Labeling for Real-Time Video Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Real-time and accurate background modeling is an important researching topic in the fields of remote monitoring and video surveillance. Meanwhile, effective foreground detection is a preliminary requirement and decision-making basis for sustainable energy management, especially in smart meters. The environment monitoring results provide a decision-making basis for energy-saving strategies. For real-time moving object detection in video, this paper applies a parallel computing technology to develop a feedback foreground–background segmentation method and a parallel connected component labeling (PCCL algorithm. In the background modeling method, pixel-wise color histograms in graphics processing unit (GPU memory is generated from sequential images. If a pixel color in the current image does not locate around the peaks of its histogram, it is segmented as a foreground pixel. From the foreground segmentation results, a PCCL algorithm is proposed to cluster the foreground pixels into several groups in order to distinguish separate blobs. Because the noisy spot and sparkle in the foreground segmentation results always contain a small quantity of pixels, the small blobs are removed as noise in order to refine the segmentation results. The proposed GPU-based image processing algorithms are implemented using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA toolkit. The testing results show a significant enhancement in both speed and accuracy.

  7. GPU-based Branchless Distance-Driven Projection and Backprojection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Fu, Lin; De Man, Bruno; Yu, Hengyong

    2017-12-01

    Projection and backprojection operations are essential in a variety of image reconstruction and physical correction algorithms in CT. The distance-driven (DD) projection and backprojection are widely used for their highly sequential memory access pattern and low arithmetic cost. However, a typical DD implementation has an inner loop that adjusts the calculation depending on the relative position between voxel and detector cell boundaries. The irregularity of the branch behavior makes it inefficient to be implemented on massively parallel computing devices such as graphics processing units (GPUs). Such irregular branch behaviors can be eliminated by factorizing the DD operation as three branchless steps: integration, linear interpolation, and differentiation, all of which are highly amenable to massive vectorization. In this paper, we implement and evaluate a highly parallel branchless DD algorithm for 3D cone beam CT. The algorithm utilizes the texture memory and hardware interpolation on GPUs to achieve fast computational speed. The developed branchless DD algorithm achieved 137-fold speedup for forward projection and 188-fold speedup for backprojection relative to a single-thread CPU implementation. Compared with a state-of-the-art 32-thread CPU implementation, the proposed branchless DD achieved 8-fold acceleration for forward projection and 10-fold acceleration for backprojection. GPU based branchless DD method was evaluated by iterative reconstruction algorithms with both simulation and real datasets. It obtained visually identical images as the CPU reference algorithm.

  8. GALARIO: a GPU accelerated library for analysing radio interferometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzari, Marco; Beaujean, Frederik; Testi, Leonardo

    2018-06-01

    We present GALARIO, a computational library that exploits the power of modern graphical processing units (GPUs) to accelerate the analysis of observations from radio interferometers like Atacama Large Millimeter and sub-millimeter Array or the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. GALARIO speeds up the computation of synthetic visibilities from a generic 2D model image or a radial brightness profile (for axisymmetric sources). On a GPU, GALARIO is 150 faster than standard PYTHON and 10 times faster than serial C++ code on a CPU. Highly modular, easy to use, and to adopt in existing code, GALARIO comes as two compiled libraries, one for Nvidia GPUs and one for multicore CPUs, where both have the same functions with identical interfaces. GALARIO comes with PYTHON bindings but can also be directly used in C or C++. The versatility and the speed of GALARIO open new analysis pathways that otherwise would be prohibitively time consuming, e.g. fitting high-resolution observations of large number of objects, or entire spectral cubes of molecular gas emission. It is a general tool that can be applied to any field that uses radio interferometer observations. The source code is available online at http://github.com/mtazzari/galario under the open source GNU Lesser General Public License v3.

  9. cudaMap: a GPU accelerated program for gene expression connectivity mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Darragh G; Bankhead, Peter; Dunne, Philip D; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Hamilton, Peter; Zhang, Shu-Dong

    2013-10-11

    Modern cancer research often involves large datasets and the use of sophisticated statistical techniques. Together these add a heavy computational load to the analysis, which is often coupled with issues surrounding data accessibility. Connectivity mapping is an advanced bioinformatic and computational technique dedicated to therapeutics discovery and drug re-purposing around differential gene expression analysis. On a normal desktop PC, it is common for the connectivity mapping task with a single gene signature to take > 2h to complete using sscMap, a popular Java application that runs on standard CPUs (Central Processing Units). Here, we describe new software, cudaMap, which has been implemented using CUDA C/C++ to harness the computational power of NVIDIA GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) to greatly reduce processing times for connectivity mapping. cudaMap can identify candidate therapeutics from the same signature in just over thirty seconds when using an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU. Results from the analysis of multiple gene signatures, which would previously have taken several days, can now be obtained in as little as 10 minutes, greatly facilitating candidate therapeutics discovery with high throughput. We are able to demonstrate dramatic speed differentials between GPU assisted performance and CPU executions as the computational load increases for high accuracy evaluation of statistical significance. Emerging 'omics' technologies are constantly increasing the volume of data and information to be processed in all areas of biomedical research. Embracing the multicore functionality of GPUs represents a major avenue of local accelerated computing. cudaMap will make a strong contribution in the discovery of candidate therapeutics by enabling speedy execution of heavy duty connectivity mapping tasks, which are increasingly required in modern cancer research. cudaMap is open source and can be freely downloaded from http://purl.oclc.org/NET/cudaMap.

  10. ACL2 Meets the GPU: Formalizing a CUDA-based Parallelizable All-Pairs Shortest Path Algorithm in ACL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Hardin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As Graphics Processing Units (GPUs have gained in capability and GPU development environments have matured, developers are increasingly turning to the GPU to off-load the main host CPU of numerically-intensive, parallelizable computations. Modern GPUs feature hundreds of cores, and offer programming niceties such as double-precision floating point, and even limited recursion. This shift from CPU to GPU, however, raises the question: how do we know that these new GPU-based algorithms are correct? In order to explore this new verification frontier, we formalized a parallelizable all-pairs shortest path (APSP algorithm for weighted graphs, originally coded in NVIDIA's CUDA language, in ACL2. The ACL2 specification is written using a single-threaded object (stobj and tail recursion, as the stobj/tail recursion combination yields the most straightforward translation from imperative programming languages, as well as efficient, scalable executable specifications within ACL2 itself. The ACL2 version of the APSP algorithm can process millions of vertices and edges with little to no garbage generation, and executes at one-sixth the speed of a host-based version of APSP coded in C – a very respectable result for a theorem prover. In addition to formalizing the APSP algorithm (which uses Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm at its core, we have also provided capability that the original APSP code lacked, namely shortest path recovery. Path recovery is accomplished using a secondary ACL2 stobj implementing a LIFO stack, which is proven correct. To conclude the experiment, we ported the ACL2 version of the APSP kernels back to C, resulting in a less than 5% slowdown, and also performed a partial back-port to CUDA, which, surprisingly, yielded a slight performance increase.

  11. Multi-GPU accelerated three-dimensional FDTD method for electromagnetic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation with a numerical human model using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method has recently been performed in a number of fields in biomedical engineering. To improve the method's calculation speed and realize large-scale computing with the numerical human model, we adapt three-dimensional FDTD code to a multi-GPU environment using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In this study, we used NVIDIA Tesla C2070 as GPGPU boards. The performance of multi-GPU is evaluated in comparison with that of a single GPU and vector supercomputer. The calculation speed with four GPUs was approximately 3.5 times faster than with a single GPU, and was slightly (approx. 1.3 times) slower than with the supercomputer. Calculation speed of the three-dimensional FDTD method using GPUs can significantly improve with an expanding number of GPUs.

  12. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Weile; Fu, Jiyun; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP

  13. GPU TECHNOLOGIES EMBODIED IN PARALLEL SOLVERS OF LINEAR ALGEBRAIC EQUATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Alexander Vladimirovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The author reviews existing shareware solvers that are operated by graphical computer devices. The purpose of this review is to explore the opportunities and limitations of the above parallel solvers applicable for resolution of linear algebraic problems that arise at Research and Educational Centre of Computer Modeling at MSUCE, and Research and Engineering Centre STADYO. The author has explored new applications of the GPU in the PETSc suite and compared them with the results generated absent of the GPU. The research is performed within the CUSP library developed to resolve the problems of linear algebra through the application of GPU. The author has also reviewed the new MAGMA project which is analogous to LAPACK for the GPU.

  14. Computer systems for the control of teletherapy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brace, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a computer-controlled tracking cobalt unit installed at the Royal Free Hospital. It is based on a standard TEM MS90 unit and operates at 90-cm source-axis distance with a geometric field size of 45 x 45 cm at that distance. It has been modified so that it can be used either manually or under computer control. There are nine parameters that can be controlled positionally and two that can be controlled in rate mode; these are presented in a table

  15. Complexity estimates based on integral transforms induced by computational units

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůrková, Věra

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 33, September (2012), s. 160-167 ISSN 0893-6080 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/11/1368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : neural networks * estimates of model complexity * approximation from a dictionary * integral transforms * norms induced by computational units Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.927, year: 2012

  16. Accelerating Smith-Waterman Alignment for Protein Database Search Using Frequency Distance Filtration Scheme Based on CPU-GPU Collaborative System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Smith-Waterman (SW algorithm has been widely utilized for searching biological sequence databases in bioinformatics. Recently, several works have adopted the graphic card with Graphic Processing Units (GPUs and their associated CUDA model to enhance the performance of SW computations. However, these works mainly focused on the protein database search by using the intertask parallelization technique, and only using the GPU capability to do the SW computations one by one. Hence, in this paper, we will propose an efficient SW alignment method, called CUDA-SWfr, for the protein database search by using the intratask parallelization technique based on a CPU-GPU collaborative system. Before doing the SW computations on GPU, a procedure is applied on CPU by using the frequency distance filtration scheme (FDFS to eliminate the unnecessary alignments. The experimental results indicate that CUDA-SWfr runs 9.6 times and 96 times faster than the CPU-based SW method without and with FDFS, respectively.

  17. GPU-based Green's function simulations of shear waves generated by an applied acoustic radiation force in elastic and viscoelastic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqun; Urban, Matthew W; McGough, Robert J

    2018-05-15

    Shear wave calculations induced by an acoustic radiation force are very time-consuming on desktop computers, and high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) achieve dramatic reductions in the computation time for these simulations. The acoustic radiation force is calculated using the fast near field method and the angular spectrum approach, and then the shear waves are calculated in parallel with Green's functions on a GPU. This combination enables rapid evaluation of shear waves for push beams with different spatial samplings and for apertures with different f/#. Relative to shear wave simulations that evaluate the same algorithm on an Intel i7 desktop computer, a high performance nVidia GPU reduces the time required for these calculations by a factor of 45 and 700 when applied to elastic and viscoelastic shear wave simulation models, respectively. These GPU-accelerated simulations also compared to measurements in different viscoelastic phantoms, and the results are similar. For parametric evaluations and for comparisons with measured shear wave data, shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs.

  18. GPU-based Green’s function simulations of shear waves generated by an applied acoustic radiation force in elastic and viscoelastic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqun; Urban, Matthew W.; McGough, Robert J.

    2018-05-01

    Shear wave calculations induced by an acoustic radiation force are very time-consuming on desktop computers, and high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) achieve dramatic reductions in the computation time for these simulations. The acoustic radiation force is calculated using the fast near field method and the angular spectrum approach, and then the shear waves are calculated in parallel with Green’s functions on a GPU. This combination enables rapid evaluation of shear waves for push beams with different spatial samplings and for apertures with different f/#. Relative to shear wave simulations that evaluate the same algorithm on an Intel i7 desktop computer, a high performance nVidia GPU reduces the time required for these calculations by a factor of 45 and 700 when applied to elastic and viscoelastic shear wave simulation models, respectively. These GPU-accelerated simulations also compared to measurements in different viscoelastic phantoms, and the results are similar. For parametric evaluations and for comparisons with measured shear wave data, shear wave simulations with the Green’s function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs.

  19. GPU-accelerated back-projection revisited. Squeezing performance by careful tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenhausen, Eric; Zheng, Ziyi; Mueller, Klaus [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Computer Science Dept.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, GPUs have become an increasingly popular tool in computed tomography (CT) reconstruction. In this paper, we discuss performance optimization techniques for a GPU-based filtered-backprojection reconstruction implementation. We explore the different optimization techniques we used and explain how those techniques affected performance. Our results show a nearly 50% increase in performance when compared to the current top ranked GPU implementation. (orig.)

  20. GENIE: a software package for gene-gene interaction analysis in genetic association studies using multiple GPU or CPU cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-gene interaction in genetic association studies is computationally intensive when a large number of SNPs are involved. Most of the latest Central Processing Units (CPUs have multiple cores, whereas Graphics Processing Units (GPUs also have hundreds of cores and have been recently used to implement faster scientific software. However, currently there are no genetic analysis software packages that allow users to fully utilize the computing power of these multi-core devices for genetic interaction analysis for binary traits. Findings Here we present a novel software package GENIE, which utilizes the power of multiple GPU or CPU processor cores to parallelize the interaction analysis. GENIE reads an entire genetic association study dataset into memory and partitions the dataset into fragments with non-overlapping sets of SNPs. For each fragment, GENIE analyzes: 1 the interaction of SNPs within it in parallel, and 2 the interaction between the SNPs of the current fragment and other fragments in parallel. We tested GENIE on a large-scale candidate gene study on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 graphics card, the GPU mode of GENIE achieves a speedup of 27 times over its single-core CPU mode run. Conclusions GENIE is open-source, economical, user-friendly, and scalable. Since the computing power and memory capacity of graphics cards are increasing rapidly while their cost is going down, we anticipate that GENIE will achieve greater speedups with faster GPU cards. Documentation, source code, and precompiled binaries can be downloaded from http://www.cceb.upenn.edu/~mli/software/GENIE/.

  1. GPU-accelerated few-view CT reconstruction using the OSC and TV techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenine, Dmitri [Montreal Univ., QC (Canada). Dept. de Physique; Hissoiny, Sami [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. de Genie Informatique et Genie Logiciel; Despres, Philippe [Centre Hospitalier Univ. de Quebec, QC (Canada). Dept. de Radio-Oncologie

    2011-07-01

    The present work proposes a promising iterative reconstruction technique designed specifically for X-ray transmission computed tomography (CT). The main objective is to reduce diagnostic radiation dose through the reduction of the number of CT projections, while preserving image quality. The second objective is to provide a fast implementation compatible with clinical activities. The proposed tomographic reconstruction technique is a combination of the Ordered Subsets Convex (OSC) algorithm and the Total Variation minimization (TV) regularization technique. The results in terms of image quality and computational speed are discussed. Using this technique, it was possible to obtain reconstructed slices of relatively good quality with as few as 100 projections, leading to potential dose reduction factors of up to an order of magnitude depending on the application. The algorithm was implemented on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and yielded reconstruction times of approximately 185 ms per slice. (orig.)

  2. Parallelizing the QUDA Library for Multi-GPU Calculations in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, Ronald; Clark, Michael; Joo, Balint

    2010-01-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are having a transformational effect on numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculations of importance in nuclear and particle physics. The QUDA library provides a package of mixed precision sparse matrix linear solvers for LQCD applications, supporting single GPUs based on NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). This library, interfaced to the QDP++/Chroma framework for LQCD calculations, is currently in production use on the '9g' cluster at the Jefferson Laboratory, enabling unprecedented price/performance for a range of problems in LQCD. Nevertheless, memory constraints on current GPU devices limit the problem sizes that can be tackled. In this contribution we describe the parallelization of the QUDA library onto multiple GPUs using MPI, including strategies for the overlapping of communication and computation. We report on both weak and strong scaling for up to 32 GPUs interconnected by InfiniBand, on which we sustain in excess of 4 Tflops.

  3. Parallelizing the QUDA Library for Multi-GPU Calculations in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Babich, Michael Clark, Balint Joo

    2010-11-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are having a transformational effect on numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculations of importance in nuclear and particle physics. The QUDA library provides a package of mixed precision sparse matrix linear solvers for LQCD applications, supporting single GPUs based on NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). This library, interfaced to the QDP++/Chroma framework for LQCD calculations, is currently in production use on the "9g" cluster at the Jefferson Laboratory, enabling unprecedented price/performance for a range of problems in LQCD. Nevertheless, memory constraints on current GPU devices limit the problem sizes that can be tackled. In this contribution we describe the parallelization of the QUDA library onto multiple GPUs using MPI, including strategies for the overlapping of communication and computation. We report on both weak and strong scaling for up to 32 GPUs interconnected by InfiniBand, on which we sustain in excess of 4 Tflops.

  4. Aerodynamic optimization of supersonic compressor cascade using differential evolution on GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aissa, Mohamed Hasanine; Verstraete, Tom [Von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (VKI) 1640 Sint-Genesius-Rode (Belgium); Vuik, Cornelis [Delft University of Technology 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-06-08

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a powerful stochastic optimization method. Compared to gradient-based algorithms, DE is able to avoid local minima but requires at the same time more function evaluations. In turbomachinery applications, function evaluations are performed with time-consuming CFD simulation, which results in a long, non affordable, design cycle. Modern High Performance Computing systems, especially Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), are able to alleviate this inconvenience by accelerating the design evaluation itself. In this work we present a validated CFD Solver running on GPUs, able to accelerate the design evaluation and thus the entire design process. An achieved speedup of 20x to 30x enabled the DE algorithm to run on a high-end computer instead of a costly large cluster. The GPU-enhanced DE was used to optimize the aerodynamics of a supersonic compressor cascade, achieving an aerodynamic loss minimization of 20%.

  5. Fast Simulation of Dynamic Ultrasound Images Using the GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storve, Sigurd; Torp, Hans

    2017-10-01

    Simulated ultrasound data is a valuable tool for development and validation of quantitative image analysis methods in echocardiography. Unfortunately, simulation time can become prohibitive for phantoms consisting of a large number of point scatterers. The COLE algorithm by Gao et al. is a fast convolution-based simulator that trades simulation accuracy for improved speed. We present highly efficient parallelized CPU and GPU implementations of the COLE algorithm with an emphasis on dynamic simulations involving moving point scatterers. We argue that it is crucial to minimize the amount of data transfers from the CPU to achieve good performance on the GPU. We achieve this by storing the complete trajectories of the dynamic point scatterers as spline curves in the GPU memory. This leads to good efficiency when simulating sequences consisting of a large number of frames, such as B-mode and tissue Doppler data for a full cardiac cycle. In addition, we propose a phase-based subsample delay technique that efficiently eliminates flickering artifacts seen in B-mode sequences when COLE is used without enough temporal oversampling. To assess the performance, we used a laptop computer and a desktop computer, each equipped with a multicore Intel CPU and an NVIDIA GPU. Running the simulator on a high-end TITAN X GPU, we observed two orders of magnitude speedup compared to the parallel CPU version, three orders of magnitude speedup compared to simulation times reported by Gao et al. in their paper on COLE, and a speedup of 27000 times compared to the multithreaded version of Field II, using numbers reported in a paper by Jensen. We hope that by releasing the simulator as an open-source project we will encourage its use and further development.

  6. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaréchal, Yannick; Bert, Julien; Schick, Ulrike; Pradier, Olivier; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boussion, Nicolas; Visvikis, Dimitris; Falconnet, Claire; Després, Philippe; Valeri, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled 125 I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400  × 250  × 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (≈500 ms 10 −6 simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications. (paper)

  7. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaréchal, Yannick; Bert, Julien; Falconnet, Claire; Després, Philippe; Valeri, Antoine; Schick, Ulrike; Pradier, Olivier; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boussion, Nicolas; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled 125I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400  × 250  × 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (≈500 ms 10-6 simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications.

  8. The Evolution of Computer Based Learning Software Design: Computer Assisted Teaching Unit Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, A. E.; Smith, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the style of design of computer simulations developed by Computer Assisted Teaching Unit at Queen Mary College with reference to user interface, input and initialization, input data vetting, effective display screen use, graphical results presentation, and need for hard copy. Procedures and problems relating to academic involvement are…

  9. GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

    2014-05-29

    The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

  10. GPU accelerated CT reconstruction for clinical use: quality driven performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Sneyders, Yuri; McLin, Matthew; Ricker, Alan; Kimpe, Tom

    2007-03-01

    We present performance and quality analysis of GPU accelerated FDK filtered backprojection for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction. Our implementation of the FDK CT reconstruction algorithm does not compromise fidelity at any stage and yields a result that is within 1 HU of a reference C++ implementation. Our streaming implementation is able to perform reconstruction as the images are acquired; it addresses low latency as well as fast throughput, which are key considerations for a "real-time" design. Further, it is scaleable to multiple GPUs for increased performance. The implementation does not place any constraints on image acquisition; it works effectively for arbitrary angular coverage with arbitrary angular spacing. As such, this GPU accelerated CT reconstruction solution may easily be used with scanners that are already deployed. We are able to reconstruct a 512 x 512 x 340 volume from 625 projections, each sized 1024 x 768, in less than 50 seconds. The quoted 50 second timing encompasses the entire reconstruction using bilinear interpolation and includes filtering on the CPU, uploading the filtered projections to the GPU, and also downloading the reconstructed volume from GPU memory to system RAM.

  11. GPU based contouring method on grid DEM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liheng; Wan, Gang; Li, Feng; Chen, Xiaohui; Du, Wenlong

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method to generate contour lines from grid DEM data based on the programmable GPU pipeline. The previous contouring approaches often use CPU to construct a finite element mesh from the raw DEM data, and then extract contour segments from the elements. They also need a tracing or sorting strategy to generate the final continuous contours. These approaches can be heavily CPU-costing and time-consuming. Meanwhile the generated contours would be unsmooth if the raw data is sparsely distributed. Unlike the CPU approaches, we employ the GPU's vertex shader to generate a triangular mesh with arbitrary user-defined density, in which the height of each vertex is calculated through a third-order Cardinal spline function. Then in the same frame, segments are extracted from the triangles by the geometry shader, and translated to the CPU-side with an internal order in the GPU's transform feedback stage. Finally we propose a "Grid Sorting" algorithm to achieve the continuous contour lines by travelling the segments only once. Our method makes use of multiple stages of GPU pipeline for computation, which can generate smooth contour lines, and is significantly faster than the previous CPU approaches. The algorithm can be easily implemented with OpenGL 3.3 API or higher on consumer-level PCs.

  12. The GPU implementation of micro - Doppler period estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyuan; Wang, Junling; Bi, Ran

    2018-03-01

    Aiming at the problem that the computational complexity and the deficiency of real-time of the wideband radar echo signal, a program is designed to improve the performance of real-time extraction of micro-motion feature in this paper based on the CPU-GPU heterogeneous parallel structure. Firstly, we discuss the principle of the micro-Doppler effect generated by the rolling of the scattering points on the orbiting satellite, analyses how to use Kalman filter to compensate the translational motion of tumbling satellite and how to use the joint time-frequency analysis and inverse Radon transform to extract the micro-motion features from the echo after compensation. Secondly, the advantages of GPU in terms of real-time processing and the working principle of CPU-GPU heterogeneous parallelism are analysed, and a program flow based on GPU to extract the micro-motion feature from the radar echo signal of rolling satellite is designed. At the end of the article the results of extraction are given to verify the correctness of the program and algorithm.

  13. Computing trends using graphic processor in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Niculescu, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges in Heavy Energy Physics is to make fast analysis of high amount of experimental and simulated data. At LHC-CERN one p-p event is approximate 1 Mb in size. The time taken to analyze the data and obtain fast results depends on high computational power. The main advantage of using GPU(Graphic Processor Unit) programming over traditional CPU one is that graphical cards bring a lot of computing power at a very low price. Today a huge number of application(scientific, financial etc) began to be ported or developed for GPU, including Monte Carlo tools or data analysis tools for High Energy Physics. In this paper, we'll present current status and trends in HEP using GPU.

  14. GAMUT: GPU accelerated microRNA analysis to uncover target genes through CUDA-miRanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-coding sequences such as microRNAs have important roles in disease processes. Computational microRNA target identification (CMTI) is becoming increasingly important since traditional experimental methods for target identification pose many difficulties. These methods are time-consuming, costly, and often need guidance from computational methods to narrow down candidate genes anyway. However, most CMTI methods are computationally demanding, since they need to handle not only several million query microRNA and reference RNA pairs, but also several million nucleotide comparisons within each given pair. Thus, the need to perform microRNA identification at such large scale has increased the demand for parallel computing. Methods Although most CMTI programs (e.g., the miRanda algorithm) are based on a modified Smith-Waterman (SW) algorithm, the existing parallel SW implementations (e.g., CUDASW++ 2.0/3.0, SWIPE) are unable to meet this demand in CMTI tasks. We present CUDA-miRanda, a fast microRNA target identification algorithm that takes advantage of massively parallel computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). CUDA-miRanda specifically focuses on the local alignment of short (i.e., ≤ 32 nucleotides) sequences against longer reference sequences (e.g., 20K nucleotides). Moreover, the proposed algorithm is able to report multiple alignments (up to 191 top scores) and the corresponding traceback sequences for any given (query sequence, reference sequence) pair. Results Speeds over 5.36 Giga Cell Updates Per Second (GCUPs) are achieved on a server with 4 NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Compared to the original miRanda algorithm, which is evaluated on an Intel Xeon E5620@2.4 GHz CPU, the experimental results show up to 166 times performance gains in terms of execution time. In addition, we have verified that the exact same targets were predicted in both CUDA-miRanda and the original mi

  15. Multi-GPU configuration of 4D intensity modulated radiation therapy inverse planning using global optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Aaron; Sawant, Amit; Folkerts, Michael; Modiri, Arezoo

    2018-01-01

    We report on the design, implementation and characterization of a multi-graphic processing unit (GPU) computational platform for higher-order optimization in radiotherapy treatment planning. In collaboration with a commercial vendor (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), a research prototype GPU-enabled Eclipse (V13.6) workstation was configured. The hardware consisted of dual 8-core Xeon processors, 256 GB RAM and four NVIDIA Tesla K80 general purpose GPUs. We demonstrate the utility of this platform for large radiotherapy optimization problems through the development and characterization of a parallelized particle swarm optimization (PSO) four dimensional (4D) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. The PSO engine was coupled to the Eclipse treatment planning system via a vendor-provided scripting interface. Specific challenges addressed in this implementation were (i) data management and (ii) non-uniform memory access (NUMA). For the former, we alternated between parameters over which the computation process was parallelized. For the latter, we reduced the amount of data required to be transferred over the NUMA bridge. The datasets examined in this study were approximately 300 GB in size, including 4D computed tomography images, anatomical structure contours and dose deposition matrices. For evaluation, we created a 4D-IMRT treatment plan for one lung cancer patient and analyzed computation speed while varying several parameters (number of respiratory phases, GPUs, PSO particles, and data matrix sizes). The optimized 4D-IMRT plan enhanced sparing of organs at risk by an average reduction of 26% in maximum dose, compared to the clinical optimized IMRT plan, where the internal target volume was used. We validated our computation time analyses in two additional cases. The computation speed in our implementation did not monotonically increase with the number of GPUs. The optimal number of GPUs (five, in our study) is directly related to the

  16. Graphics Processing Unit Accelerated Hirsch-Fye Quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Conrad; Abu Asal, Sameer; Rajagoplan, Kaushik; Poliakoff, David; Caprino, Joseph; Tomko, Karen; Thakur, Bhupender; Yang, Shuxiang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2012-02-01

    In Dynamical Mean Field Theory and its cluster extensions, such as the Dynamic Cluster Algorithm, the bottleneck of the algorithm is solving the self-consistency equations with an impurity solver. Hirsch-Fye Quantum Monte Carlo is one of the most commonly used impurity and cluster solvers. This work implements optimizations of the algorithm, such as enabling large data re-use, suitable for the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architecture. The GPU's sheer number of concurrent parallel computations and large bandwidth to many shared memories takes advantage of the inherent parallelism in the Green function update and measurement routines, and can substantially improve the efficiency of the Hirsch-Fye impurity solver.

  17. Reconstruction of the neutron spectrum using an artificial neural network in CPU and GPU; Reconstruccion del espectro de neutrones usando una red neuronal artificial (RNA) en CPU y GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez D, V. M.; Moreno M, A.; Ortiz L, M. A. [Universidad de Cordoba, 14002 Cordoba (Spain); Vega C, H. R.; Alonso M, O. E., E-mail: vic.mc68010@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    The increase in computing power in personal computers has been increasing, computers now have several processors in the CPU and in addition multiple CUDA cores in the graphics processing unit (GPU); both systems can be used individually or combined to perform scientific computation without resorting to processor or supercomputing arrangements. The Bonner sphere spectrometer is the most commonly used multi-element system for neutron detection purposes and its associated spectrum. Each sphere-detector combination gives a particular response that depends on the energy of the neutrons, and the total set of these responses is known like the responses matrix Rφ(E). Thus, the counting rates obtained with each sphere and the neutron spectrum is related to the Fredholm equation in its discrete version. For the reconstruction of the spectrum has a system of poorly conditioned equations with an infinite number of solutions and to find the appropriate solution, it has been proposed the use of artificial intelligence through neural networks with different platforms CPU and GPU. (Author)

  18. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  19. Large Scale Document Inversion using a Multi-threaded Computing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sungbo; Chang, Dar-Jen; Park, Juw Won

    2018-01-01

    Current microprocessor architecture is moving towards multi-core/multi-threaded systems. This trend has led to a surge of interest in using multi-threaded computing devices, such as the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), for general purpose computing. We can utilize the GPU in computation as a massive parallel coprocessor because the GPU consists of multiple cores. The GPU is also an affordable, attractive, and user-programmable commodity. Nowadays a lot of information has been flooded into the digital domain around the world. Huge volume of data, such as digital libraries, social networking services, e-commerce product data, and reviews, etc., is produced or collected every moment with dramatic growth in size. Although the inverted index is a useful data structure that can be used for full text searches or document retrieval, a large number of documents will require a tremendous amount of time to create the index. The performance of document inversion can be improved by multi-thread or multi-core GPU. Our approach is to implement a linear-time, hash-based, single program multiple data (SPMD), document inversion algorithm on the NVIDIA GPU/CUDA programming platform utilizing the huge computational power of the GPU, to develop high performance solutions for document indexing. Our proposed parallel document inversion system shows 2-3 times faster performance than a sequential system on two different test datasets from PubMed abstract and e-commerce product reviews. CCS Concepts •Information systems➝Information retrieval • Computing methodologies➝Massively parallel and high-performance simulations.

  20. Large Scale Document Inversion using a Multi-threaded Computing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sungbo; Chang, Dar-Jen; Park, Juw Won

    2017-06-01

    Current microprocessor architecture is moving towards multi-core/multi-threaded systems. This trend has led to a surge of interest in using multi-threaded computing devices, such as the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), for general purpose computing. We can utilize the GPU in computation as a massive parallel coprocessor because the GPU consists of multiple cores. The GPU is also an affordable, attractive, and user-programmable commodity. Nowadays a lot of information has been flooded into the digital domain around the world. Huge volume of data, such as digital libraries, social networking services, e-commerce product data, and reviews, etc., is produced or collected every moment with dramatic growth in size. Although the inverted index is a useful data structure that can be used for full text searches or document retrieval, a large number of documents will require a tremendous amount of time to create the index. The performance of document inversion can be improved by multi-thread or multi-core GPU. Our approach is to implement a linear-time, hash-based, single program multiple data (SPMD), document inversion algorithm on the NVIDIA GPU/CUDA programming platform utilizing the huge computational power of the GPU, to develop high performance solutions for document indexing. Our proposed parallel document inversion system shows 2-3 times faster performance than a sequential system on two different test datasets from PubMed abstract and e-commerce product reviews. •Information systems➝Information retrieval • Computing methodologies➝Massively parallel and high-performance simulations.

  1. gWEGA: GPU-accelerated WEGA for molecular superposition and shape comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Li, Jiabo; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2014-06-05

    Virtual screening of a large chemical library for drug lead identification requires searching/superimposing a large number of three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures. This article reports a graphic processing unit (GPU)-accelerated weighted Gaussian algorithm (gWEGA) that expedites shape or shape-feature similarity score-based virtual screening. With 86 GPU nodes (each node has one GPU card), gWEGA can screen 110 million conformations derived from an entire ZINC drug-like database with diverse antidiabetic agents as query structures within 2 s (i.e., screening more than 55 million conformations per second). The rapid screening speed was accomplished through the massive parallelization on multiple GPU nodes and rapid prescreening of 3D structures (based on their shape descriptors and pharmacophore feature compositions). Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fully accelerating quantum Monte Carlo simulations of real materials on GPU clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) has proved to be an invaluable tool for predicting the properties of matter from fundamental principles, combining very high accuracy with extreme parallel scalability. By solving the many-body Schrödinger equation through a stochastic projection, it achieves greater accuracy than mean-field methods and better scaling with system size than quantum chemical methods, enabling scientific discovery across a broad spectrum of disciplines. In recent years, graphics processing units (GPUs) have provided a high-performance and low-cost new approach to scientific computing, and GPU-based supercomputers are now among the fastest in the world. The multiple forms of parallelism afforded by QMC algorithms make the method an ideal candidate for acceleration in the many-core paradigm. We present the results of porting the QMCPACK code to run on GPU clusters using the NVIDIA CUDA platform. Using mixed precision on GPUs and MPI for intercommunication, we observe typical full-application speedups of approximately 10x to 15x relative to quad-core CPUs alone, while reproducing the double-precision CPU results within statistical error. We discuss the algorithm modifications necessary to achieve good performance on this heterogeneous architecture and present the results of applying our code to molecules and bulk materials. Supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DOE-DE-FG05-08OR23336 and by the NSF under No. 0904572.

  3. GPU acceleration of Eulerian-Lagrangian particle-laden turbulent flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Sweet, James; Thain, Douglas

    2017-11-01

    The Lagrangian point-particle approximation is a popular numerical technique for representing dispersed phases whose properties can substantially deviate from the local fluid. In many cases, particularly in the limit of one-way coupled systems, large numbers of particles are desired; this may be either because many physical particles are present (e.g. LES of an entire cloud), or because the use of many particles increases statistical convergence (e.g. high-order statistics). Solving the trajectories of very large numbers of particles can be problematic in traditional MPI implementations, however, and this study reports the benefits of using graphical processing units (GPUs) to integrate the particle equations of motion while preserving the original MPI version of the Eulerian flow solver. It is found that GPU acceleration becomes cost effective around one million particles, and performance enhancements of up to 15x can be achieved when O(108) particles are computed on the GPU rather than the CPU cluster. Optimizations and limitations will be discussed, as will prospects for expanding to two- and four-way coupled systems. ONR Grant No. N00014-16-1-2472.

  4. GPU Enhancement of the Trigger to Extend Physics Reach at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lujan, P.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; LeGresley, P.

    2014-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the trigger systems for the detectors must be able to process a very large amount of data in a very limited amount of time, so that the nominal collision rate of 40 MHz can be reduced to a data rate that can be stored and processed in a reasonable amount of time. This need for high performance places very stringent requirements on the complexity of the algorithms that can be used for identifying events of interest in the trigger system, which potentially limits the ability to trigger on signatures of various new physics models. In this paper, we present an alternative tracking algorithm, based on the Hough transform, which avoids many of the problems associated with the standard combinatorial track finding currently used. The Hough transform is also well-adapted for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-based computing, and such GPU-based systems could be easily integrated into the existing High-Level Trigger (HLT). This algorithm offers the ability to trigger on topological signa...

  5. Implementation of GPU parallel equilibrium reconstruction for plasma control in EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yao, E-mail: yaohuang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Xiao, B.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); School of Nuclear Science & Technology, University of Science & Technology of China (China); Luo, Z.P.; Yuan, Q.P.; Pei, X.F. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Yue, X.N. [School of Nuclear Science & Technology, University of Science & Technology of China (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We described parallel equilibrium reconstruction code P-EFIT running on GPU was integrated with EAST plasma control system. • Compared with RT-EFIT used in EAST, P-EFIT has better spatial resolution and full algorithm of EFIT per iteration. • With the data interface through RFM, 65 × 65 spatial grids P-EFIT can satisfy the accuracy and time feasibility requirements for plasma control. • Successful control using ISOFLUX/P-EFIT was established in the dedicated experiment during the EAST 2014 campaign. • This work is a stepping-stone towards versatile ISOFLUX/P-EFIT control, such as real-time equilibrium reconstruction with more diagnostics. - Abstract: Implementation of P-EFIT code for plasma control in EAST is described. P-EFIT is based on the EFIT framework, but built with the CUDA™ architecture to take advantage of massively parallel Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) cores to significantly accelerate the computation. 65 × 65 grid size P-EFIT can complete one reconstruction iteration in 300 μs, with one iteration strategy, it can satisfy the needs of real-time plasma shape control. Data interface between P-EFIT and PCS is realized and developed by transferring data through RFM. First application of P-EFIT to discharge control in EAST is described.

  6. Large-Scale Multi-Dimensional Document Clustering on GPU Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University; Zhang, Yongpeng [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Document clustering plays an important role in data mining systems. Recently, a flocking-based document clustering algorithm has been proposed to solve the problem through simulation resembling the flocking behavior of birds in nature. This method is superior to other clustering algorithms, including k-means, in the sense that the outcome is not sensitive to the initial state. One limitation of this approach is that the algorithmic complexity is inherently quadratic in the number of documents. As a result, execution time becomes a bottleneck with large number of documents. In this paper, we assess the benefits of exploiting the computational power of Beowulf-like clusters equipped with contemporary Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) as a means to significantly reduce the runtime of flocking-based document clustering. Our framework scales up to over one million documents processed simultaneously in a sixteennode GPU cluster. Results are also compared to a four-node cluster with higher-end GPUs. On these clusters, we observe 30X-50X speedups, which demonstrates the potential of GPU clusters to efficiently solve massive data mining problems. Such speedups combined with the scalability potential and accelerator-based parallelization are unique in the domain of document-based data mining, to the best of our knowledge.

  7. Edge-preserving image denoising via group coordinate descent on the GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaffin, Madison Gray; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    Image denoising is a fundamental operation in image processing, and its applications range from the direct (photographic enhancement) to the technical (as a subproblem in image reconstruction algorithms). In many applications, the number of pixels has continued to grow, while the serial execution speed of computational hardware has begun to stall. New image processing algorithms must exploit the power offered by massively parallel architectures like graphics processing units (GPUs). This paper describes a family of image denoising algorithms well-suited to the GPU. The algorithms iteratively perform a set of independent, parallel 1D pixel-update subproblems. To match GPU memory limitations, they perform these pixel updates in-place and only store the noisy data, denoised image, and problem parameters. The algorithms can handle a wide range of edge-preserving roughness penalties, including differentiable convex penalties and anisotropic total variation. Both algorithms use the majorize-minimize framework to solve the 1D pixel update subproblem. Results from a large 2D image denoising problem and a 3D medical imaging denoising problem demonstrate that the proposed algorithms converge rapidly in terms of both iteration and run-time.

  8. LDPC Decoding on GPU for Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqin Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A flexible software LDPC decoder that exploits data parallelism for simultaneous multicode words decoding on the mobile device is proposed in this paper, supported by multithreading on OpenCL based graphics processing units. By dividing the check matrix into several parts to make full use of both the local memory and private memory on GPU and properly modify the code capacity each time, our implementation on a mobile phone shows throughputs above 100 Mbps and delay is less than 1.6 millisecond in decoding, which make high-speed communication like video calling possible. To realize efficient software LDPC decoding on the mobile device, the LDPC decoding feature on communication baseband chip should be replaced to save the cost and make it easier to upgrade decoder to be compatible with a variety of channel access schemes.

  9. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: detector modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Légrády; Cserkaszky, Á; Lantos, J.; Patay, G.; Bükki, T.

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) are almost like the dedicated hardware designed for the specific task given the similarities between visible light transport and neutral particle trajectories. A GPU based MC gamma transport code has been developed for Positron Emission Tomography iterative image reconstruction calculating the projection from unknowns to data at each iteration step taking into account the full physics of the system. This paper describes the simplified scintillation detector modeling and its effect on convergence. (author)

  10. Proton Testing of nVidia GTX 1050 GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwas, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Single-Event Effects (SEE) testing was conducted on the nVidia GTX 1050 Graphics Processor Unit (GPU); herein referred to as device under test (DUT). Testing was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospitals (MGH) Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center on April 9th, 2017 using 200-MeV protons. This testing trip was purposed to provide a baseline assessment of the radiation susceptibility of the DUT as no previous testing had been conducted on this component.

  11. Fast Streaming 3D Level set Segmentation on the GPU for Smooth Multi-phase Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ojaswa; Zhang, Qin; Anton, François

    2011-01-01

    Level set method based segmentation provides an efficient tool for topological and geometrical shape handling, but it is slow due to high computational burden. In this work, we provide a framework for streaming computations on large volumetric images on the GPU. A streaming computational model...

  12. GPU-based large-scale visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Hadwiger, Markus

    2013-11-19

    Recent advances in image and volume acquisition as well as computational advances in simulation have led to an explosion of the amount of data that must be visualized and analyzed. Modern techniques combine the parallel processing power of GPUs with out-of-core methods and data streaming to enable the interactive visualization of giga- and terabytes of image and volume data. A major enabler for interactivity is making both the computational and the visualization effort proportional to the amount of data that is actually visible on screen, decoupling it from the full data size. This leads to powerful display-aware multi-resolution techniques that enable the visualization of data of almost arbitrary size. The course consists of two major parts: An introductory part that progresses from fundamentals to modern techniques, and a more advanced part that discusses details of ray-guided volume rendering, novel data structures for display-aware visualization and processing, and the remote visualization of large online data collections. You will learn how to develop efficient GPU data structures and large-scale visualizations, implement out-of-core strategies and concepts such as virtual texturing that have only been employed recently, as well as how to use modern multi-resolution representations. These approaches reduce the GPU memory requirements of extremely large data to a working set size that fits into current GPUs. You will learn how to perform ray-casting of volume data of almost arbitrary size and how to render and process gigapixel images using scalable, display-aware techniques. We will describe custom virtual texturing architectures as well as recent hardware developments in this area. We will also describe client/server systems for distributed visualization, on-demand data processing and streaming, and remote visualization. We will describe implementations using OpenGL as well as CUDA, exploiting parallelism on GPUs combined with additional asynchronous

  13. GPU PRO 3 Advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    GPU Pro3, the third volume in the GPU Pro book series, offers practical tips and techniques for creating real-time graphics that are useful to beginners and seasoned game and graphics programmers alike. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again brought together a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced GPU programming. With contributions by more than 50 experts, GPU Pro3: Advanced Rendering Techniques covers battle-tested tips and tricks for creating interesting geometry, realistic sha

  14. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S.; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities. PMID:22164116

  15. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Akos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs. However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities.

  16. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefan D

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU.

  17. SU-G-TeP1-15: Toward a Novel GPU Accelerated Deterministic Solution to the Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fallone, B [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); MagnetTx Oncology Solutions, Edmonton, AB (Canada); St Aubin, J [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Graphic Processor Unit (GPU) accelerated deterministic solution to the Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation (LBTE) for accurate dose calculations in radiotherapy (RT). A deterministic solution yields the potential for major speed improvements due to the sparse matrix-vector and vector-vector multiplications and would thus be of benefit to RT. Methods: In order to leverage the massively parallel architecture of GPUs, the first order LBTE was reformulated as a second order self-adjoint equation using the Least Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM). This produces a symmetric positive-definite matrix which is efficiently solved using a parallelized conjugate gradient (CG) solver. The LSFEM formalism is applied in space, discrete ordinates is applied in angle, and the Multigroup method is applied in energy. The final linear system of equations produced is tightly coupled in space and angle. Our code written in CUDA-C was benchmarked on an Nvidia GeForce TITAN-X GPU against an Intel i7-6700K CPU. A spatial mesh of 30,950 tetrahedral elements was used with an S4 angular approximation. Results: To avoid repeating a full computationally intensive finite element matrix assembly at each Multigroup energy, a novel mapping algorithm was developed which minimized the operations required at each energy. Additionally, a parallelized memory mapping for the kronecker product between the sparse spatial and angular matrices, including Dirichlet boundary conditions, was created. Atomicity is preserved by graph-coloring overlapping nodes into separate kernel launches. The one-time mapping calculations for matrix assembly, kronecker product, and boundary condition application took 452±1ms on GPU. Matrix assembly for 16 energy groups took 556±3s on CPU, and 358±2ms on GPU using the mappings developed. The CG solver took 93±1s on CPU, and 468±2ms on GPU. Conclusion: Three computationally intensive subroutines in deterministically solving the LBTE have been

  18. Study of the acceleration of nuclide burnup calculation using GPU with CUDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okui, S.; Ohoka, Y.; Tatsumi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The computation costs of neutronics calculation code become higher as physics models and methods are complicated. The degree of them in neutronics calculation tends to be limited due to available computing power. In order to open a door to the new world, use of GPU for general purpose computing, called GPGPU, has been studied [1]. GPU has multi-threads computing mechanism enabled with multi-processors which realize mush higher performance than CPUs. NVIDIA recently released the CUDA language for general purpose computation which is a C-like programming language. It is relatively easy to learn compared to the conventional ones used for GPGPU, such as OpenGL or CG. Therefore application of GPU to the numerical calculation became much easier. In this paper, we tried to accelerate nuclide burnup calculation, which is important to predict nuclides time dependence in the core, using GPU with CUDA. We chose the 4.-order Runge-Kutta method to solve the nuclide burnup equation. The nuclide burnup calculation and the 4.-order Runge-Kutta method were suitable to the first step of introduction CUDA into numerical calculation because these consist of simple operations of matrices and vectors of single precision where actual codes were written in the C++ language. Our experimental results showed that nuclide burnup calculations with GPU have possibility of speedup by factor of 100 compared to that with CPU. (authors)

  19. A GPU accelerated and error-controlled solver for the unbounded Poisson equation in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exl, Lukas

    2017-12-01

    An efficient solver for the three dimensional free-space Poisson equation is presented. The underlying numerical method is based on finite Fourier series approximation. While the error of all involved approximations can be fully controlled, the overall computation error is driven by the convergence of the finite Fourier series of the density. For smooth and fast-decaying densities the proposed method will be spectrally accurate. The method scales with O(N log N) operations, where N is the total number of discretization points in the Cartesian grid. The majority of the computational costs come from fast Fourier transforms (FFT), which makes it ideal for GPU computation. Several numerical computations on CPU and GPU validate the method and show efficiency and convergence behavior. Tests are performed using the Vienna Scientific Cluster 3 (VSC3). A free MATLAB implementation for CPU and GPU is provided to the interested community.

  20. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shawn Q; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W; Agard, David A

    2011-07-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096(2) × 512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096(2) pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024(2) × 256 voxels from 122 1024(2) pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sailfish: A flexible multi-GPU implementation of the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewski, M.; Kostur, M.

    2014-09-01

    We present Sailfish, an open source fluid simulation package implementing the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) on modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using CUDA/OpenCL. We take a novel approach to GPU code implementation and use run-time code generation techniques and a high level programming language (Python) to achieve state of the art performance, while allowing easy experimentation with different LBM models and tuning for various types of hardware. We discuss the general design principles of the code, scaling to multiple GPUs in a distributed environment, as well as the GPU implementation and optimization of many different LBM models, both single component (BGK, MRT, ELBM) and multicomponent (Shan-Chen, free energy). The paper also presents results of performance benchmarks spanning the last three NVIDIA GPU generations (Tesla, Fermi, Kepler), which we hope will be useful for researchers working with this type of hardware and similar codes. Catalogue identifier: AETA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU Lesser General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 225864 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 46861049 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, CUDA C, OpenCL. Computer: Any with an OpenCL or CUDA-compliant GPU. Operating system: No limits (tested on Linux and Mac OS X). RAM: Hundreds of megabytes to tens of gigabytes for typical cases. Classification: 12, 6.5. External routines: PyCUDA/PyOpenCL, Numpy, Mako, ZeroMQ (for multi-GPU simulations), scipy, sympy Nature of problem: GPU-accelerated simulation of single- and multi-component fluid flows. Solution method: A wide range of relaxation models (LBGK, MRT, regularized LB, ELBM, Shan-Chen, free energy, free surface) and boundary conditions within the lattice

  2. An SDR-Based Real-Time Testbed for GNSS Adaptive Array Anti-Jamming Algorithms Accelerated by GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, software-defined radio (SDR has become a common approach to evaluate new algorithms. However, in the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming, previous work has been limited due to the high computational power demanded by adaptive algorithms, and often lack flexibility and configurability. In this paper, the design and implementation of an SDR-based real-time testbed for GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming accelerated by a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU are documented. This testbed highlights itself as a feature-rich and extendible platform with great flexibility and configurability, as well as high computational performance. Both Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP and Space-Frequency Adaptive Processing (SFAP are implemented with a wide range of parameters. Raw data from as many as eight antenna elements can be processed in real-time in either an adaptive nulling or beamforming mode. To fully take advantage of the parallelism resource provided by the GPU, a batched method in programming is proposed. Tests and experiments are conducted to evaluate both the computational and anti-jamming performance. This platform can be used for research and prototyping, as well as a real product in certain applications.

  3. Gpufit: An open-source toolkit for GPU-accelerated curve fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Adrian; Thiel, Björn; Keller-Findeisen, Jan; Stock, Bernd; Bates, Mark

    2017-11-16

    We present a general purpose, open-source software library for estimation of non-linear parameters by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The software, Gpufit, runs on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and executes computations in parallel, resulting in a significant gain in performance. We measured a speed increase of up to 42 times when comparing Gpufit with an identical CPU-based algorithm, with no loss of precision or accuracy. Gpufit is designed such that it is easily incorporated into existing applications or adapted for new ones. Multiple software interfaces, including to C, Python, and Matlab, ensure that Gpufit is accessible from most programming environments. The full source code is published as an open source software repository, making its function transparent to the user and facilitating future improvements and extensions. As a demonstration, we used Gpufit to accelerate an existing scientific image analysis package, yielding significantly improved processing times for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy datasets.

  4. GPU acceleration for digitally reconstructed radiographs using bindless texture objects and CUDA/OpenGL interoperability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Eldeib, Ayman; Owis, Mohamed I

    2015-01-01

    This paper features an advanced implementation of the X-ray rendering algorithm that harnesses the giant computing power of the current commodity graphics processors to accelerate the generation of high resolution digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). The presented pipeline exploits the latest features of NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architectures, mainly bindless texture objects and dynamic parallelism. The rendering throughput is substantially improved by exploiting the interoperability mechanisms between CUDA and OpenGL. The benchmarks of our optimized rendering pipeline reflect its capability of generating DRRs with resolutions of 2048(2) and 4096(2) at interactive and semi interactive frame-rates using an NVIDIA GeForce 970 GTX device.

  5. Parallelized Local Volatility Estimation Using GP-GPU Hardware Acceleration

    KAUST Repository

    Douglas, Craig C.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an inverse problem for the local volatility model in option pricing. We solve the problem using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and use the notion of the Fréchet derivative when calculating the Jacobian matrix. We analyze the existence of the Fréchet derivative and its numerical computation. To reduce the computational time of the inverse problem, a GP-GPU environment is considered for parallel computation. Numerical results confirm the validity and efficiency of the proposed method. ©2010 IEEE.

  6. The CUBLAS and CULA based GPU acceleration of adaptive finite element framework for bioluminescence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Fei; Yang, Xin; Qin, Chenghu; Han, Dong; Ma, Xibo; Liu, Kai; Tian, Jie

    2010-09-13

    In molecular imaging (MI), especially the optical molecular imaging, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) emerges as an effective imaging modality for small animal imaging. The finite element methods (FEMs), especially the adaptive finite element (AFE) framework, play an important role in BLT. The processing speed of the FEMs and the AFE framework still needs to be improved, although the multi-thread CPU technology and the multi CPU technology have already been applied. In this paper, we for the first time introduce a new kind of acceleration technology to accelerate the AFE framework for BLT, using the graphics processing unit (GPU). Besides the processing speed, the GPU technology can get a balance between the cost and performance. The CUBLAS and CULA are two main important and powerful libraries for programming on NVIDIA GPUs. With the help of CUBLAS and CULA, it is easy to code on NVIDIA GPU and there is no need to worry about the details about the hardware environment of a specific GPU. The numerical experiments are designed to show the necessity, effect and application of the proposed CUBLAS and CULA based GPU acceleration. From the results of the experiments, we can reach the conclusion that the proposed CUBLAS and CULA based GPU acceleration method can improve the processing speed of the AFE framework very much while getting a balance between cost and performance.

  7. FAST CALCULATION OF THE LOMB-SCARGLE PERIODOGRAM USING GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, R. H. D.

    2010-01-01

    I introduce a new code for fast calculation of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram that leverages the computing power of graphics processing units (GPUs). After establishing a background to the newly emergent field of GPU computing, I discuss the code design and narrate key parts of its source. Benchmarking calculations indicate no significant differences in accuracy compared to an equivalent CPU-based code. However, the differences in performance are pronounced; running on a low-end GPU, the code can match eight CPU cores, and on a high-end GPU it is faster by a factor approaching 30. Applications of the code include analysis of long photometric time series obtained by ongoing satellite missions and upcoming ground-based monitoring facilities, and Monte Carlo simulation of periodogram statistical properties.

  8. Monte Carlo method for neutron transport calculations in graphics processing units (GPUs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrino, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is well suited for solving the Boltzmann neutron transport equation in an inhomogeneous media for complicated geometries. However, routine applications require the computation time to be reduced to hours and even minutes in a desktop PC. The interest in adopting Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for Monte Carlo acceleration is rapidly growing. This is due to the massive parallelism provided by the latest GPU technologies which is the most promising solution to the challenge of performing full-size reactor core analysis on a routine basis. In this study, Monte Carlo codes for a fixed-source neutron transport problem were developed for GPU environments in order to evaluate issues associated with computational speedup using GPUs. Results obtained in this work suggest that a speedup of several orders of magnitude is possible using the state-of-the-art GPU technologies. (author) [es

  9. GPU Based Software Correlators - Perspectives for VLBI2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Kimura, Moritaka; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Oyama, Tomoaki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Caused by historical separation and driven by the requirements of the PC gaming industry, Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved to massive parallel processing systems which entered the area of non-graphic related applications. Although a single processing core on the GPU is much slower and provides less functionality than its counterpart on the CPU, the huge number of these small processing entities outperforms the classical processors when the application can be parallelized. Thus, in recent years various radio astronomical projects have started to make use of this technology either to realize the correlator on this platform or to establish the post-processing pipeline with GPUs. Therefore, the feasibility of GPUs as a choice for a VLBI correlator is being investigated, including pros and cons of this technology. Additionally, a GPU based software correlator will be reviewed with respect to energy consumption/GFlop/sec and cost/GFlop/sec.

  10. A Kepler Workflow Tool for Reproducible AMBER GPU Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purawat, Shweta; Ieong, Pek U; Malmstrom, Robert D; Chan, Garrett J; Yeung, Alan K; Walker, Ross C; Altintas, Ilkay; Amaro, Rommie E

    2017-06-20

    With the drive toward high throughput molecular dynamics (MD) simulations involving ever-greater numbers of simulation replicates run for longer, biologically relevant timescales (microseconds), the need for improved computational methods that facilitate fully automated MD workflows gains more importance. Here we report the development of an automated workflow tool to perform AMBER GPU MD simulations. Our workflow tool capitalizes on the capabilities of the Kepler platform to deliver a flexible, intuitive, and user-friendly environment and the AMBER GPU code for a robust and high-performance simulation engine. Additionally, the workflow tool reduces user input time by automating repetitive processes and facilitates access to GPU clusters, whose high-performance processing power makes simulations of large numerical scale possible. The presented workflow tool facilitates the management and deployment of large sets of MD simulations on heterogeneous computing resources. The workflow tool also performs systematic analysis on the simulation outputs and enhances simulation reproducibility, execution scalability, and MD method development including benchmarking and validation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A New Parallel Approach for Accelerating the GPU-Based Execution of Edge Detection Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrani, Zahra; Bateni, Soroosh; Rabbani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Real-time image processing is used in a wide variety of applications like those in medical care and industrial processes. This technique in medical care has the ability to display important patient information graphi graphically, which can supplement and help the treatment process. Medical decisions made based on real-time images are more accurate and reliable. According to the recent researches, graphic processing unit (GPU) programming is a useful method for improving the speed and quality of medical image processing and is one of the ways of real-time image processing. Edge detection is an early stage in most of the image processing methods for the extraction of features and object segments from a raw image. The Canny method, Sobel and Prewitt filters, and the Roberts' Cross technique are some examples of edge detection algorithms that are widely used in image processing and machine vision. In this work, these algorithms are implemented using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV), and Matrix Laboratory (MATLAB) platforms. An existing parallel method for Canny approach has been modified further to run in a fully parallel manner. This has been achieved by replacing the breadth- first search procedure with a parallel method. These algorithms have been compared by testing them on a database of optical coherence tomography images. The comparison of results shows that the proposed implementation of the Canny method on GPU using the CUDA platform improves the speed of execution by 2-100× compared to the central processing unit-based implementation using the OpenCV and MATLAB platforms.

  12. Micromagnetic simulations using Graphics Processing Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Diaz, L; Aurelio, D; Torres, L; Martinez, E; Hernandez-Lopez, M A; Gomez, J; Alejos, O; Carpentieri, M; Finocchio, G; Consolo, G

    2012-01-01

    The methodology for adapting a standard micromagnetic code to run on graphics processing units (GPUs) and exploit the potential for parallel calculations of this platform is discussed. GPMagnet, a general purpose finite-difference GPU-based micromagnetic tool, is used as an example. Speed-up factors of two orders of magnitude can be achieved with GPMagnet with respect to a serial code. This allows for running extensive simulations, nearly inaccessible with a standard micromagnetic solver, at reasonable computational times. (topical review)

  13. Implicit Theories of Creativity in Computer Science in the United States and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chaoying; Baer, John; Kaufman, James C.

    2015-01-01

    To study implicit concepts of creativity in computer science in the United States and mainland China, we first asked 308 Chinese computer scientists for adjectives that would describe a creative computer scientist. Computer scientists and non-computer scientists from China (N = 1069) and the United States (N = 971) then rated how well those…

  14. Real-time unmanned aircraft systems surveillance video mosaicking using GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Aldo; Anderson, Kyle; Wang, Yi; Schultz, Richard R.; Fevig, Ronald A.

    2010-04-01

    Digital video mosaicking from Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) is being used for many military and civilian applications, including surveillance, target recognition, border protection, forest fire monitoring, traffic control on highways, monitoring of transmission lines, among others. Additionally, NASA is using digital video mosaicking to explore the moon and planets such as Mars. In order to compute a "good" mosaic from video captured by a UAS, the algorithm must deal with motion blur, frame-to-frame jitter associated with an imperfectly stabilized platform, perspective changes as the camera tilts in flight, as well as a number of other factors. The most suitable algorithms use SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform) to detect the features consistent between video frames. Utilizing these features, the next step is to estimate the homography between two consecutives video frames, perform warping to properly register the image data, and finally blend the video frames resulting in a seamless video mosaick. All this processing takes a great deal of resources of resources from the CPU, so it is almost impossible to compute a real time video mosaic on a single processor. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) offer computational performance that far exceeds current CPU technology, allowing for real-time operation. This paper presents the development of a GPU-accelerated digital video mosaicking implementation and compares it with CPU performance. Our tests are based on two sets of real video captured by a small UAS aircraft; one video comes from Infrared (IR) and Electro-Optical (EO) cameras. Our results show that we can obtain a speed-up of more than 50 times using GPU technology, so real-time operation at a video capture of 30 frames per second is feasible.

  15. GPU-based low-level trigger system for the standalone reconstruction of the ring-shaped hit patterns in the RICH Cherenkov detector of NA62 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Cretaro, P.; Frezza, O.; Cicero, F. Lo; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E.; Chiozzi, S.; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Neri, I.; Lorenzo, S. Di; Fantechi, R.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Lamanna, G.; Piccini, M.

    2017-01-01

    This project aims to exploit the parallel computing power of a commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to implement fast pattern matching in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for the level 0 (L0) trigger of the NA62 experiment. In this approach, the ring-fitting algorithm is seedless, being fed with raw RICH data, with no previous information on the ring position from other detectors. Moreover, since the L0 trigger is provided with a more elaborated information than a simple multiplicity number, it results in a higher selection power. Two methods have been studied in order to reduce the data transfer latency from the readout boards of the detector to the GPU, i.e., the use of a dedicated NIC device driver with very low latency and a direct data transfer protocol from a custom FPGA-based NIC to the GPU. The performance of the system, developed through the FPGA approach, for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics runs is presented.

  16. Optimized Laplacian image sharpening algorithm based on graphic processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tinghuai; Li, Lu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Xin; Tian, Yuan; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah

    2014-12-01

    In classical Laplacian image sharpening, all pixels are processed one by one, which leads to large amount of computation. Traditional Laplacian sharpening processed on CPU is considerably time-consuming especially for those large pictures. In this paper, we propose a parallel implementation of Laplacian sharpening based on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which is a computing platform of Graphic Processing Units (GPU), and analyze the impact of picture size on performance and the relationship between the processing time of between data transfer time and parallel computing time. Further, according to different features of different memory, an improved scheme of our method is developed, which exploits shared memory in GPU instead of global memory and further increases the efficiency. Experimental results prove that two novel algorithms outperform traditional consequentially method based on OpenCV in the aspect of computing speed.

  17. Enhancing professionalism at GPU Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Late in 1988, GPU Nuclear embarked on a major program aimed at enhancing professionalism at its Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island nuclear generating stations. The program was also to include its corporate headquarters in Parsippany, New Jersey. The overall program was to take several directions, including on-site degree programs, a sabbatical leave-type program for personnel to finish college degrees, advanced technical training for licensed staff, career progression for senior reactor operators, and expanded teamwork and leadership training for control room crew. The largest portion of this initiative was the development and delivery of professionalism training to the nearly 2,000 people at both nuclear generating sites

  18. A GPU-accelerated semi-implicit fractional step method for numerical solutions of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sanghyun; Park, Junshin; You, Donghyun

    2017-11-01

    Utility of the computational power of modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) is elaborated for solutions of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations which are integrated using a semi-implicit fractional-step method. Due to its serial and bandwidth-bound nature, the present choice of numerical methods is considered to be a good candidate for evaluating the potential of GPUs for solving Navier-Stokes equations using non-explicit time integration. An efficient algorithm is presented for GPU acceleration of the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) and the Fourier-transform-based direct solution method used in the semi-implicit fractional-step method. OpenMP is employed for concurrent collection of turbulence statistics on a CPU while Navier-Stokes equations are computed on a GPU. Extension to multiple NVIDIA GPUs is implemented using NVLink supported by the Pascal architecture. Performance of the present method is experimented on multiple Tesla P100 GPUs compared with a single-core Xeon E5-2650 v4 CPU in simulations of boundary-layer flow over a flat plate. Supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning NRF-2016R1E1A2A01939553, NRF-2014R1A2A1A11049599, and Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy 201611101000230).

  19. Validation of the GPU-Accelerated CFD Solver ELBE for Free Surface Flow Problems in Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian F. Janßen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is dedicated to demonstrating the high potential and manifold applications of state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD tools for free-surface flows in civil and environmental engineering. All simulations were performed with the academic research code ELBE (efficient lattice boltzmann environment, http://www.tuhh.de/elbe. The ELBE code follows the supercomputing-on-the-desktop paradigm and is especially designed for local supercomputing, without tedious accesses to supercomputers. ELBE uses graphics processing units (GPU to accelerate the computations and can be used in a single GPU-equipped workstation of, e.g., a design engineer. The code has been successfully validated in very different fields, mostly related to naval architecture and mechanical engineering. In this contribution, we give an overview of past and present applications with practical relevance for civil engineers. The presented applications are grouped into three major categories: (i tsunami simulations, considering wave propagation, wave runup, inundation and debris flows; (ii dam break simulations; and (iii numerical wave tanks for the calculation of hydrodynamic loads on fixed and moving bodies. This broad range of applications in combination with accurate numerical results and very competitive times to solution demonstrates that modern CFD tools in general, and the ELBE code in particular, can be a helpful design tool for civil and environmental engineers.

  20. To the problem of reliability standardization in computer-aided manufacturing at NPP units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yastrebenetskij, M.A.; Shvyryaev, Yu.V.; Spektor, L.I.; Nikonenko, I.V.

    1989-01-01

    The problems of reliability standardization in computer-aided manufacturing of NPP units considering the following approaches: computer-aided manufacturing of NPP units as a part of automated technological complex; computer-aided manufacturing of NPP units as multi-functional system, are analyzed. Selection of the composition of reliability indeces for computer-aided manufacturing of NPP units for each of the approaches considered is substantiated

  1. CUDA GPU based full-Stokes finite difference modelling of glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brædstrup, Christian; Egholm, D.L.

    advances in graphics card (GPU) technology for high performance computing have proven extremely efficient in accelerating many large scale scientific com- putations. The general purpose GPU (GPGPU) technology is cheap, has a low power consumption and fits into a normal desktop computer. It could therefore...... to minimize the short wavelength errors efficiently. This reduces the iteration count by several orders of magnitude. The run-time is further reduced by using the GPGPU technology where each card has up to 448 cores. Researchers utilizing the GPGPU technique in other areas have reported between 2 - 11 times...

  2. Aspects of GPU perfomance in algorithms with random memory access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkovsky, Alexander V.; Shershnev, Anton A.; Vashchenkov, Pavel V.

    2017-10-01

    The numerical code for solving the Boltzmann equation on the hybrid computational cluster using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method showed that on Tesla K40 accelerators computational performance drops dramatically with increase of percentage of occupied GPU memory. Testing revealed that memory access time increases tens of times after certain critical percentage of memory is occupied. Moreover, it seems to be the common problem of all NVidia's GPUs arising from its architecture. Few modifications of the numerical algorithm were suggested to overcome this problem. One of them, based on the splitting the memory into "virtual" blocks, resulted in 2.5 times speed up.

  3. High performance GPU processing for inversion using uniform grid searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetis, Ioannis E.; Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis; Gallopoulos, Efstratios

    2017-04-01

    Many geophysical problems are described by systems of redundant, highly non-linear systems of ordinary equations with constant terms deriving from measurements and hence representing stochastic variables. Solution (inversion) of such problems is based on numerical, optimization methods, based on Monte Carlo sampling or on exhaustive searches in cases of two or even three "free" unknown variables. Recently the TOPological INVersion (TOPINV) algorithm, a grid search-based technique in the Rn space, has been proposed. TOPINV is not based on the minimization of a certain cost function and involves only forward computations, hence avoiding computational errors. The basic concept is to transform observation equations into inequalities on the basis of an optimization parameter k and of their standard errors, and through repeated "scans" of n-dimensional search grids for decreasing values of k to identify the optimal clusters of gridpoints which satisfy observation inequalities and by definition contain the "true" solution. Stochastic optimal solutions and their variance-covariance matrices are then computed as first and second statistical moments. Such exhaustive uniform searches produce an excessive computational load and are extremely time consuming for common computers based on a CPU. An alternative is to use a computing platform based on a GPU, which nowadays is affordable to the research community, which provides a much higher computing performance. Using the CUDA programming language to implement TOPINV allows the investigation of the attained speedup in execution time on such a high performance platform. Based on synthetic data we compared the execution time required for two typical geophysical problems, modeling magma sources and seismic faults, described with up to 18 unknown variables, on both CPU/FORTRAN and GPU/CUDA platforms. The same problems for several different sizes of search grids (up to 1012 gridpoints) and numbers of unknown variables were solved on

  4. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  5. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc

  6. Parallel fuzzy connected image segmentation on GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Ying; Cao, Yong; Udupa, Jayaram K; Miller, Robert W

    2011-07-01

    Image segmentation techniques using fuzzy connectedness (FC) principles have shown their effectiveness in segmenting a variety of objects in several large applications. However, one challenge in these algorithms has been their excessive computational requirements when processing large image datasets. Nowadays, commodity graphics hardware provides a highly parallel computing environment. In this paper, the authors present a parallel fuzzy connected image segmentation algorithm implementation on NVIDIA's compute unified device Architecture (CUDA) platform for segmenting medical image data sets. In the FC algorithm, there are two major computational tasks: (i) computing the fuzzy affinity relations and (ii) computing the fuzzy connectedness relations. These two tasks are implemented as CUDA kernels and executed on GPU. A dramatic improvement in speed for both tasks is achieved as a result. Our experiments based on three data sets of small, medium, and large data size demonstrate the efficiency of the parallel algorithm, which achieves a speed-up factor of 24.4x, 18.1x, and 10.3x, correspondingly, for the three data sets on the NVIDIA Tesla C1060 over the implementation of the algorithm on CPU, and takes 0.25, 0.72, and 15.04 s, correspondingly, for the three data sets. The authors developed a parallel algorithm of the widely used fuzzy connected image segmentation method on the NVIDIA GPUs, which are far more cost- and speed-effective than both cluster of workstations and multiprocessing systems. A near-interactive speed of segmentation has been achieved, even for the large data set.

  7. Enhancing professionalism at GPU nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.; Landy, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Late in 1988, GPU Nuclear embarked on a major program aimed at enhancing Professionalism at its Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Stations. The program was also to include its Corporate Headquarters in Parsippany, New Jersey. The overall program was to take several directions which included on-site degree programs, a sabbatical leave-type program for personnel to finish college degrees, advanced technical training for licensed staff, career progression for SROs and expanded teamwork and leadership training for control room crews. The largest portion of this initiative was the development and delivery of professionalism training to the nearly two thousand people at both sites. Three primary philosophies guided the development of the program. Employees as Experts: First, GPU Nuclear employees were considered to be the most valuable source of information for designing a Professionalism program because it is these individuals who are sensitive to the issues encountered in the workplace. Realism: The second philosophy guiding this effort was that the program must be grounded in real life challenges that employees face and must address. Active Learning: The third guiding philosophy was that, in order to have any real impact on the way employees think about professionalism, the program must utilize active rather than passive learning techniques

  8. Risk management at GPU Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on GPU Nuclear. Among other goals, it established the independence of key safety functions as highlighted by the lessons learned from the accident. In particular, an independent Nuclear Assurance Division was established which include Quality Assurance, Training and Education, Emergency Preparedness, and Nuclear Safety Assessment. The latter consisted of corporate and site independent-safety-review groups. As the GPU Nuclear organization matured, a mid-1987 reorganization created an even more focused Planning and Nuclear Safety Division bringing together Nuclear Safety Assessment with Licensing and Regulatory Affairs and Risk Management. The Risk Management Group (RMG), which began its work in fall 1987, was formed to develop a framework for proactive identification, evaluation, and cost-effective reduction and management of risks of all types. The RMG set out to learn as much as possible about risks and their management in nuclear and other high-technology industries. This began with a thorough literature search. It progressed to interviews with individuals and organizations which have demonstrated innovative ideas, experience, and reputations for safe and reliable operation

  9. Simulation of reaction diffusion processes over biologically relevant size and time scales using multi-GPU workstations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Michael J; Stone, John E; Roberts, Elijah; Fry, Corey; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2014-05-01

    Simulation of in vivo cellular processes with the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a computationally expensive task. Our previous software enabled simulation of inhomogeneous biochemical systems for small bacteria over long time scales using the MPD-RDME method on a single GPU. Simulations of larger eukaryotic systems exceed the on-board memory capacity of individual GPUs, and long time simulations of modest-sized cells such as yeast are impractical on a single GPU. We present a new multi-GPU parallel implementation of the MPD-RDME method based on a spatial decomposition approach that supports dynamic load balancing for workstations containing GPUs of varying performance and memory capacity. We take advantage of high-performance features of CUDA for peer-to-peer GPU memory transfers and evaluate the performance of our algorithms on state-of-the-art GPU devices. We present parallel e ciency and performance results for simulations using multiple GPUs as system size, particle counts, and number of reactions grow. We also demonstrate multi-GPU performance in simulations of the Min protein system in E. coli . Moreover, our multi-GPU decomposition and load balancing approach can be generalized to other lattice-based problems.

  10. Accelerating VASP electronic structure calculations using graphic processing units

    KAUST Repository

    Hacene, Mohamed

    2012-08-20

    We present a way to improve the performance of the electronic structure Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) program. We show that high-performance computers equipped with graphics processing units (GPUs) as accelerators may reduce drastically the computation time when offloading these sections to the graphic chips. The procedure consists of (i) profiling the performance of the code to isolate the time-consuming parts, (ii) rewriting these so that the algorithms become better-suited for the chosen graphic accelerator, and (iii) optimizing memory traffic between the host computer and the GPU accelerator. We chose to accelerate VASP with NVIDIA GPU using CUDA. We compare the GPU and original versions of VASP by evaluating the Davidson and RMM-DIIS algorithms on chemical systems of up to 1100 atoms. In these tests, the total time is reduced by a factor between 3 and 8 when running on n (CPU core + GPU) compared to n CPU cores only, without any accuracy loss. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Accelerating VASP electronic structure calculations using graphic processing units

    KAUST Repository

    Hacene, Mohamed; Anciaux-Sedrakian, Ani; Rozanska, Xavier; Klahr, Diego; Guignon, Thomas; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We present a way to improve the performance of the electronic structure Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) program. We show that high-performance computers equipped with graphics processing units (GPUs) as accelerators may reduce drastically the computation time when offloading these sections to the graphic chips. The procedure consists of (i) profiling the performance of the code to isolate the time-consuming parts, (ii) rewriting these so that the algorithms become better-suited for the chosen graphic accelerator, and (iii) optimizing memory traffic between the host computer and the GPU accelerator. We chose to accelerate VASP with NVIDIA GPU using CUDA. We compare the GPU and original versions of VASP by evaluating the Davidson and RMM-DIIS algorithms on chemical systems of up to 1100 atoms. In these tests, the total time is reduced by a factor between 3 and 8 when running on n (CPU core + GPU) compared to n CPU cores only, without any accuracy loss. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A GPU-paralleled implementation of an enhanced face recognition algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Xiyang; Shao, Shuai; Zan, Jiguo

    2013-03-01

    Face recognition algorithm based on compressed sensing and sparse representation is hotly argued in these years. The scheme of this algorithm increases recognition rate as well as anti-noise capability. However, the computational cost is expensive and has become a main restricting factor for real world applications. In this paper, we introduce a GPU-accelerated hybrid variant of face recognition algorithm named parallel face recognition algorithm (pFRA). We describe here how to carry out parallel optimization design to take full advantage of many-core structure of a GPU. The pFRA is tested and compared with several other implementations under different data sample size. Finally, Our pFRA, implemented with NVIDIA GPU and Computer Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming model, achieves a significant speedup over the traditional CPU implementations.

  13. A Hybrid CPU/GPU Pattern-Matching Algorithm for Deep Packet Inspection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Lee

    Full Text Available The large quantities of data now being transferred via high-speed networks have made deep packet inspection indispensable for security purposes. Scalable and low-cost signature-based network intrusion detection systems have been developed for deep packet inspection for various software platforms. Traditional approaches that only involve central processing units (CPUs are now considered inadequate in terms of inspection speed. Graphic processing units (GPUs have superior parallel processing power, but transmission bottlenecks can reduce optimal GPU efficiency. In this paper we describe our proposal for a hybrid CPU/GPU pattern-matching algorithm (HPMA that divides and distributes the packet-inspecting workload between a CPU and GPU. All packets are initially inspected by the CPU and filtered using a simple pre-filtering algorithm, and packets that might contain malicious content are sent to the GPU for further inspection. Test results indicate that in terms of random payload traffic, the matching speed of our proposed algorithm was 3.4 times and 2.7 times faster than those of the AC-CPU and AC-GPU algorithms, respectively. Further, HPMA achieved higher energy efficiency than the other tested algorithms.

  14. The development of GPU-based parallel PRNG for Monte Carlo applications in CUDA Fortran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Kargaran

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of Monte Carlo simulation on the CUDA Fortran requires a fast random number generation with good statistical properties on GPU. In this study, a GPU-based parallel pseudo random number generator (GPPRNG have been proposed to use in high performance computing systems. According to the type of GPU memory usage, GPU scheme is divided into two work modes including GLOBAL_MODE and SHARED_MODE. To generate parallel random numbers based on the independent sequence method, the combination of middle-square method and chaotic map along with the Xorshift PRNG have been employed. Implementation of our developed PPRNG on a single GPU showed a speedup of 150x and 470x (with respect to the speed of PRNG on a single CPU core for GLOBAL_MODE and SHARED_MODE, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of our developed GPPRNG, its performance was compared to that of some other commercially available PPRNGs such as MATLAB, FORTRAN and Miller-Park algorithm through employing the specific standard tests. The results of this comparison showed that the developed GPPRNG in this study can be used as a fast and accurate tool for computational science applications.

  15. The development of GPU-based parallel PRNG for Monte Carlo applications in CUDA Fortran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kargaran, Hamed, E-mail: h-kargaran@sbu.ac.ir; Minuchehr, Abdolhamid; Zolfaghari, Ahmad [Department of nuclear engineering, Shahid Behesti University, Tehran, 1983969411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The implementation of Monte Carlo simulation on the CUDA Fortran requires a fast random number generation with good statistical properties on GPU. In this study, a GPU-based parallel pseudo random number generator (GPPRNG) have been proposed to use in high performance computing systems. According to the type of GPU memory usage, GPU scheme is divided into two work modes including GLOBAL-MODE and SHARED-MODE. To generate parallel random numbers based on the independent sequence method, the combination of middle-square method and chaotic map along with the Xorshift PRNG have been employed. Implementation of our developed PPRNG on a single GPU showed a speedup of 150x and 470x (with respect to the speed of PRNG on a single CPU core) for GLOBAL-MODE and SHARED-MODE, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of our developed GPPRNG, its performance was compared to that of some other commercially available PPRNGs such as MATLAB, FORTRAN and Miller-Park algorithm through employing the specific standard tests. The results of this comparison showed that the developed GPPRNG in this study can be used as a fast and accurate tool for computational science applications.

  16. GPGPU COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN OANCEA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the first idea of using GPU to general purpose computing, things have evolved over the years and now there are several approaches to GPU programming. GPU computing practically began with the introduction of CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture by NVIDIA and Stream by AMD. These are APIs designed by the GPU vendors to be used together with the hardware that they provide. A new emerging standard, OpenCL (Open Computing Language tries to unify different GPU general computing API implementations and provides a framework for writing programs executed across heterogeneous platforms consisting of both CPUs and GPUs. OpenCL provides parallel computing using task-based and data-based parallelism. In this paper we will focus on the CUDA parallel computing architecture and programming model introduced by NVIDIA. We will present the benefits of the CUDA programming model. We will also compare the two main approaches, CUDA and AMD APP (STREAM and the new framwork, OpenCL that tries to unify the GPGPU computing models.

  17. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbao Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT plan optimization needs pre-calculated beamlet dose distribution. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of high computation speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions, particularly in cases with high levels of inhomogeneity, may mislead optimization, hindering the resulting plan quality. It is desire to use Monte Carlo (MC methods for beamlet dose calculations. Yet, the long computational time from repeated dose calculations for a number of beamlets prevents this application. It is our objective to integrate a GPU-based MC dose engine in lung IMRT optimization using a novel two-steps workflow.Methods: A GPU-based MC code gDPM is used. Each particle is tagged with an index of a beamlet where the source particle is from. Deposit dose are stored separately for beamlets based on the index. Due to limited GPU memory size, a pyramid space is allocated for each beamlet, and dose outside the space is neglected. A two-steps optimization workflow is proposed for fast MC-based optimization. At first step, a rough dose calculation is conducted with only a few number of particle per beamlet. Plan optimization is followed to get an approximated fluence map. In the second step, more accurate beamlet doses are calculated, where sampled number of particles for a beamlet is proportional to the intensity determined previously. A second-round optimization is conducted, yielding the final result.Results: For a lung case with 5317 beamlets, 105 particles per beamlet in the first round, and 108 particles per beam in the second round are enough to get a good plan quality. The total simulation time is 96.4 sec.Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel two-step optimization workflow are developed. The high efficiency allows the use of MC for IMRT optimizations.--------------------------------Cite this article as: Li Y, Tian Z

  18. irGPU.proton.Net: Irregular strong charge interaction networks of protonatable groups in protein molecules--a GPU solver using the fast multipole method and statistical thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2015-04-05

    A cluster of strongly interacting ionization groups in protein molecules with irregular ionization behavior is suggestive for specific structure-function relationship. However, their computational treatment is unconventional (e.g., lack of convergence in naive self-consistent iterative algorithm). The stringent evaluation requires evaluation of Boltzmann averaged statistical mechanics sums and electrostatic energy estimation for each microstate. irGPU: Irregular strong interactions in proteins--a GPU solver is novel solution to a versatile problem in protein biophysics--atypical protonation behavior of coupled groups. The computational severity of the problem is alleviated by parallelization (via GPU kernels) which is applied for the electrostatic interaction evaluation (including explicit electrostatics via the fast multipole method) as well as statistical mechanics sums (partition function) estimation. Special attention is given to the ease of the service and encapsulation of theoretical details without sacrificing rigor of computational procedures. irGPU is not just a solution-in-principle but a promising practical application with potential to entice community into deeper understanding of principles governing biomolecule mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A GPU-accelerated implicit meshless method for compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Le; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Hong-Quan; Cao, Cheng

    2018-05-01

    This paper develops a recently proposed GPU based two-dimensional explicit meshless method (Ma et al., 2014) by devising and implementing an efficient parallel LU-SGS implicit algorithm to further improve the computational efficiency. The capability of the original 2D meshless code is extended to deal with 3D complex compressible flow problems. To resolve the inherent data dependency of the standard LU-SGS method, which causes thread-racing conditions destabilizing numerical computation, a generic rainbow coloring method is presented and applied to organize the computational points into different groups by painting neighboring points with different colors. The original LU-SGS method is modified and parallelized accordingly to perform calculations in a color-by-color manner. The CUDA Fortran programming model is employed to develop the key kernel functions to apply boundary conditions, calculate time steps, evaluate residuals as well as advance and update the solution in the temporal space. A series of two- and three-dimensional test cases including compressible flows over single- and multi-element airfoils and a M6 wing are carried out to verify the developed code. The obtained solutions agree well with experimental data and other computational results reported in the literature. Detailed analysis on the performance of the developed code reveals that the developed CPU based implicit meshless method is at least four to eight times faster than its explicit counterpart. The computational efficiency of the implicit method could be further improved by ten to fifteen times on the GPU.

  20. Sandia`s computer support units: The first three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Labs. Computing Dept.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes the method by which Sandia National Laboratories has deployed information technology to the line organizations and to the desktop as part of the integrated information services organization under the direction of the Chief Information officer. This deployment has been done by the Computer Support Unit (CSU) Department. The CSU approach is based on the principle of providing local customer service with a corporate perspective. Success required an approach that was both customer compelled at times and market or corporate focused in most cases. Above all, a complete solution was required that included a comprehensive method of technology choices and development, process development, technology implementation, and support. It is the authors hope that this information will be useful in the development of a customer-focused business strategy for information technology deployment and support. Descriptions of current status reflect the status as of May 1997.

  1. Real-time track-less Cherenkov ring fitting trigger system based on Graphics Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cretaro, P.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-12-01

    The parallel computing power of commercial Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) is exploited to perform real-time ring fitting at the lowest trigger level using information coming from the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector of the NA62 experiment at CERN. To this purpose, direct GPU communication with a custom FPGA-based board has been used to reduce the data transmission latency. The GPU-based trigger system is currently integrated in the experimental setup of the RICH detector of the NA62 experiment, in order to reconstruct ring-shaped hit patterns. The ring-fitting algorithm running on GPU is fed with raw RICH data only, with no information coming from other detectors, and is able to provide more complex trigger primitives with respect to the simple photodetector hit multiplicity, resulting in a higher selection efficiency. The performance of the system for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics run is presented.

  2. Classification of hyperspectral imagery using MapReduce on a NVIDIA graphics processing unit (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Andres; Rahnemoonfar, Maryam

    2017-04-01

    A hyperspectral image provides multidimensional figure rich in data consisting of hundreds of spectral dimensions. Analyzing the spectral and spatial information of such image with linear and non-linear algorithms will result in high computational time. In order to overcome this problem, this research presents a system using a MapReduce-Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) model that can help analyzing a hyperspectral image through the usage of parallel hardware and a parallel programming model, which will be simpler to handle compared to other low-level parallel programming models. Additionally, Hadoop was used as an open-source version of the MapReduce parallel programming model. This research compared classification accuracy results and timing results between the Hadoop and GPU system and tested it against the following test cases: the CPU and GPU test case, a CPU test case and a test case where no dimensional reduction was applied.

  3. Computer aided design of fast neutron therapy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gileadi, A.E.; Gomberg, H.J.; Lampe, I.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual design of a radiation-therapy unit using fusion neutrons is presently being considered by KMS Fusion, Inc. As part of this effort, a powerful and versatile computer code, TBEAM, has been developed which enables the user to determine physical characteristics of the fast neutron beam generated in the facility under consideration, using certain given design parameters of the facility as inputs. TBEAM uses the method of statistical sampling (Monte Carlo) to solve the space, time and energy dependent neutron transport equation relating to the conceptual design described by the user-supplied input parameters. The code traces the individual source neutrons as they propagate throughout the shield-collimator structure of the unit, and it keeps track of each interaction by type, position and energy. In its present version, TBEAM is applicable to homogeneous and laminated shields of spherical geometry, to collimator apertures of conical shape, and to neutrons emitted by point sources or such plate sources as are used in neutron generators of various types. TBEAM-generated results comparing the performance of point or plate sources in otherwise identical shield-collimator configurations are presented in numerical form. (H.K.)

  4. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua Univ. (China)

    2012-07-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  5. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2012-01-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  6. Parallel Algorithm for GPU Processing; for use in High Speed Machine Vision Sensing of Cotton Lint Trash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew G. Pelletier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main hurdles standing in the way of optimal cleaning of cotton lint isthe lack of sensing systems that can react fast enough to provide the control system withreal-time information as to the level of trash contamination of the cotton lint. This researchexamines the use of programmable graphic processing units (GPU as an alternative to thePC’s traditional use of the central processing unit (CPU. The use of the GPU, as analternative computation platform, allowed for the machine vision system to gain asignificant improvement in processing time. By improving the processing time, thisresearch seeks to address the lack of availability of rapid trash sensing systems and thusalleviate a situation in which the current systems view the cotton lint either well before, orafter, the cotton is cleaned. This extended lag/lead time that is currently imposed on thecotton trash cleaning control systems, is what is responsible for system operators utilizing avery large dead-band safety buffer in order to ensure that the cotton lint is not undercleaned.Unfortunately, the utilization of a large dead-band buffer results in the majority ofthe cotton lint being over-cleaned which in turn causes lint fiber-damage as well assignificant losses of the valuable lint due to the excessive use of cleaning machinery. Thisresearch estimates that upwards of a 30% reduction in lint loss could be gained through theuse of a tightly coupled trash sensor to the cleaning machinery control systems. Thisresearch seeks to improve processing times through the development of a new algorithm forcotton trash sensing that allows for implementation on a highly parallel architecture.Additionally, by moving the new parallel algorithm onto an alternative computing platform,the graphic processing unit “GPU”, for processing of the cotton trash images, a speed up ofover 6.5 times, over optimized code running on the PC’s central processing

  7. MAGI: a Node.js web service for fast microRNA-Seq analysis in a GPU infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihoon; Levy, Eric; Ferbrache, Alex; Stepanowsky, Petra; Farcas, Claudiu; Wang, Shuang; Brunner, Stefan; Bath, Tyler; Wu, Yuan; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-10-01

    MAGI is a web service for fast MicroRNA-Seq data analysis in a graphics processing unit (GPU) infrastructure. Using just a browser, users have access to results as web reports in just a few hours->600% end-to-end performance improvement over state of the art. MAGI's salient features are (i) transfer of large input files in native FASTA with Qualities (FASTQ) format through drag-and-drop operations, (ii) rapid prediction of microRNA target genes leveraging parallel computing with GPU devices, (iii) all-in-one analytics with novel feature extraction, statistical test for differential expression and diagnostic plot generation for quality control and (iv) interactive visualization and exploration of results in web reports that are readily available for publication. MAGI relies on the Node.js JavaScript framework, along with NVIDIA CUDA C, PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP), Perl and R. It is freely available at http://magi.ucsd.edu. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Arioc: high-throughput read alignment with GPU-accelerated exploration of the seed-and-extend search space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wilton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available When computing alignments of DNA sequences to a large genome, a key element in achieving high processing throughput is to prioritize locations in the genome where high-scoring mappings might be expected. We formulated this task as a series of list-processing operations that can be efficiently performed on graphics processing unit (GPU hardware.We followed this approach in implementing a read aligner called Arioc that uses GPU-based parallel sort and reduction techniques to identify high-priority locations where potential alignments may be found. We then carried out a read-by-read comparison of Arioc’s reported alignments with the alignments found by several leading read aligners. With simulated reads, Arioc has comparable or better accuracy than the other read aligners we tested. With human sequencing reads, Arioc demonstrates significantly greater throughput than the other aligners we evaluated across a wide range of sensitivity settings. The Arioc software is available at https://github.com/RWilton/Arioc. It is released under a BSD open-source license.

  9. Fast 3D elastic micro-seismic source location using new GPU features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingfeng; Wang, Yibo; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we describe new GPU features and their applications in passive seismic - micro-seismic location. Locating micro-seismic events is quite important in seismic exploration, especially when searching for unconventional oil and gas resources. Different from the traditional ray-based methods, the wave equation method, such as the method we use in our paper, has a remarkable advantage in adapting to low signal-to-noise ratio conditions and does not need a person to select the data. However, because it has a conspicuous deficiency due to its computation cost, these methods are not widely used in industrial fields. To make the method useful, we implement imaging-like wave equation micro-seismic location in a 3D elastic media and use GPU to accelerate our algorithm. We also introduce some new GPU features into the implementation to solve the data transfer and GPU utilization problems. Numerical and field data experiments show that our method can achieve a more than 30% performance improvement in GPU implementation just by using these new features.

  10. High-throughput sequence alignment using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapnell Cole

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent availability of new, less expensive high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies has yielded a dramatic increase in the volume of sequence data that must be analyzed. These data are being generated for several purposes, including genotyping, genome resequencing, metagenomics, and de novo genome assembly projects. Sequence alignment programs such as MUMmer have proven essential for analysis of these data, but researchers will need ever faster, high-throughput alignment tools running on inexpensive hardware to keep up with new sequence technologies. Results This paper describes MUMmerGPU, an open-source high-throughput parallel pairwise local sequence alignment program that runs on commodity Graphics Processing Units (GPUs in common workstations. MUMmerGPU uses the new Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA from nVidia to align multiple query sequences against a single reference sequence stored as a suffix tree. By processing the queries in parallel on the highly parallel graphics card, MUMmerGPU achieves more than a 10-fold speedup over a serial CPU version of the sequence alignment kernel, and outperforms the exact alignment component of MUMmer on a high end CPU by 3.5-fold in total application time when aligning reads from recent sequencing projects using Solexa/Illumina, 454, and Sanger sequencing technologies. Conclusion MUMmerGPU is a low cost, ultra-fast sequence alignment program designed to handle the increasing volume of data produced by new, high-throughput sequencing technologies. MUMmerGPU demonstrates that even memory-intensive applications can run significantly faster on the relatively low-cost GPU than on the CPU.

  11. Real-Time GPU Implementation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradway, David; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this work...... vector flow acquisition takes 2.3 milliseconds seconds on an Advanced Micro Devices Radeon HD 7850 GPU card. The detected velocities are accurate to within the precision limit of the output format of the display routine. Because this tool was developed as a module external to the scanner’s built...

  12. Comparison of image sharpness metrics and real-time sharpening methods with GPU implementations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, Johan P

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available , and not in trying to adjust the image to some fixed sharpness value. With the advent of the increased progammability of Graphics Pro- cessing Units (GPU) and their seemingly ever increasing number of processor cores (the dual-GPU NVidia GTX295 has 480 cores...) Quadro MDS 140M 16 400 64 700 ATI HD 2400XT 40 800 64 700 NVidia 9600GT 64 650 256 900 NVidia GTX280 240 602 512 1107 2 Metric descriptions Three metrics are used to evaluate images for sharpness. The first two are a measure of how much information...

  13. Interior Point Methods on GPU with application to Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade-Nielsen, Nicolai Fog

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate the application of interior point methods to solve dynamical optimization problems, using a graphical processing unit (GPU) with a focus on problems arising in Model Predictice Control (MPC). Multi-core processors have been available for over ten years now...... software package called GPUOPT, available under the non-restrictive MIT license. GPUOPT includes includes a primal-dual interior-point method, which supports both the CPU and the GPU. It is implemented as multiple components, where the matrix operations and solver for the Newton directions is separated...

  14. Non-parametric co-clustering of large scale sparse bipartite networks on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Toke Jansen; Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    of row and column clusters from a hypothesis space of an infinite number of clusters. To reach large scale applications of co-clustering we exploit that parameter inference for co-clustering is well suited for parallel computing. We develop a generic GPU framework for efficient inference on large scale...... sparse bipartite networks and achieve a speedup of two orders of magnitude compared to estimation based on conventional CPUs. In terms of scalability we find for networks with more than 100 million links that reliable inference can be achieved in less than an hour on a single GPU. To efficiently manage...

  15. Specialized Computer Systems for Environment Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oraiqat, Anas M.; Bashkov, Evgeniy A.; Zori, Sergii A.

    2018-06-01

    The need for real time image generation of landscapes arises in various fields as part of tasks solved by virtual and augmented reality systems, as well as geographic information systems. Such systems provide opportunities for collecting, storing, analyzing and graphically visualizing geographic data. Algorithmic and hardware software tools for increasing the realism and efficiency of the environment visualization in 3D visualization systems are proposed. This paper discusses a modified path tracing algorithm with a two-level hierarchy of bounding volumes and finding intersections with Axis-Aligned Bounding Box. The proposed algorithm eliminates the branching and hence makes the algorithm more suitable to be implemented on the multi-threaded CPU and GPU. A modified ROAM algorithm is used to solve the qualitative visualization of reliefs' problems and landscapes. The algorithm is implemented on parallel systems—cluster and Compute Unified Device Architecture-networks. Results show that the implementation on MPI clusters is more efficient than Graphics Processing Unit/Graphics Processing Clusters and allows real-time synthesis. The organization and algorithms of the parallel GPU system for the 3D pseudo stereo image/video synthesis are proposed. With realizing possibility analysis on a parallel GPU-architecture of each stage, 3D pseudo stereo synthesis is performed. An experimental prototype of a specialized hardware-software system 3D pseudo stereo imaging and video was developed on the CPU/GPU. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation of 3D pseudo stereo imaging to the architecture of GPU-systems is efficient. Also it accelerates the computational procedures of 3D pseudo-stereo synthesis for the anaglyph and anamorphic formats of the 3D stereo frame without performing optimization procedures. The acceleration is on average 11 and 54 times for test GPUs.

  16. Ramses-GPU: Second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestener, Pierre

    2017-10-01

    RamsesGPU is a reimplementation of RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) which drops the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) features to optimize 3D uniform grid algorithms for modern graphics processor units (GPU) to provide an efficient software package for astrophysics applications that do not need AMR features but do require a very large number of integration time steps. RamsesGPU provides an very efficient C++/CUDA/MPI software implementation of a second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver for compressible hydrodynamics as a magnetohydrodynamics solver based on the constraint transport technique. Other useful modules includes static gravity, dissipative terms (viscosity, resistivity), and forcing source term for turbulence studies, and special care was taken to enhance parallel input/output performance by using state-of-the-art libraries such as HDF5 and parallel-netcdf.

  17. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiasen; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100,000 spots with a target volume of ∼ 1000 cm(3) and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and

  18. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jiasen, E-mail: ma.jiasen@mayo.edu; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  19. Streaming Parallel GPU Acceleration of Large-Scale filter-based Spiking Neural Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.P. Slazynski (Leszek); S.M. Bohte (Sander)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractThe arrival of graphics processing (GPU) cards suitable for massively parallel computing promises a↵ordable large-scale neural network simulation previously only available at supercomputing facil- ities. While the raw numbers suggest that GPUs may outperform CPUs by at least an order of

  20. Multi-domain, higher order level set scheme for 3D image segmentation on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ojaswa; Zhang, Qin; Anton, François

    2010-01-01

    to evaluate level set surfaces that are $C^2$ continuous, but are slow due to high computational burden. In this paper, we provide a higher order GPU based solver for fast and efficient segmentation of large volumetric images. We also extend the higher order method to multi-domain segmentation. Our streaming...

  1. Stochastic Analysis of a Queue Length Model Using a Graphics Processing Unit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přikryl, Jan; Kocijan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2012), s. 55-62 ISSN 1802-971X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB091015 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : graphics processing unit * GPU * Monte Carlo simulation * computer simulation * modeling Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/AS/prikryl-stochastic analysis of a queue length model using a graphics processing unit.pdf

  2. A GPU implementation of a track-repeating algorithm for proton radiotherapy dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepes, Pablo P; Mirkovic, Dragan; Taddei, Phillip J

    2010-01-01

    An essential component in proton radiotherapy is the algorithm to calculate the radiation dose to be delivered to the patient. The most common dose algorithms are fast but they are approximate analytical approaches. However their level of accuracy is not always satisfactory, especially for heterogeneous anatomical areas, like the thorax. Monte Carlo techniques provide superior accuracy; however, they often require large computation resources, which render them impractical for routine clinical use. Track-repeating algorithms, for example the fast dose calculator, have shown promise for achieving the accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations for proton radiotherapy dose calculations in a fraction of the computation time. We report on the implementation of the fast dose calculator for proton radiotherapy on a card equipped with graphics processor units (GPUs) rather than on a central processing unit architecture. This implementation reproduces the full Monte Carlo and CPU-based track-repeating dose calculations within 2%, while achieving a statistical uncertainty of 2% in less than 1 min utilizing one single GPU card, which should allow real-time accurate dose calculations.

  3. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo

    2014-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of open-source software packages. One such package, hybridmantis, uses a novel hybrid concept to model indirect scintillator detectors by balancing the computational load using dual CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) processors, obtaining computational efficiency with reasonable accuracy. In this work, the authors describe two open-source visualization interfaces, webmantis and visualmantis to facilitate the setup of computational experiments via hybridmantis. The visualization tools visualmantis and webmantis enable the user to control simulation properties through a user interface. In the case of webmantis, control via a web browser allows access through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. webmantis acts as a server back-end and communicates with an NVIDIA GPU computing cluster that can support multiuser environments where users can execute different experiments in parallel. The output consists of point response and pulse-height spectrum, and optical transport statistics generated by hybridmantis. The users can download the output images and statistics through a zip file for future reference. In addition, webmantis provides a visualization window that displays a few selected optical photon path as they get transported through the detector columns and allows the user to trace the history of the optical photons. The visualization tools visualmantis and webmantis provide features such as on the fly generation of pulse-height spectra and response functions for microcolumnar x-ray imagers while allowing users to save simulation parameters and results from prior experiments. The graphical interfaces simplify the simulation setup and allow the user to go directly from specifying input parameters to receiving visual

  4. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of open-source software packages. One such package, hybridMANTIS, uses a novel hybrid concept to model indirect scintillator detectors by balancing the computational load using dual CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) processors, obtaining computational efficiency with reasonable accuracy. In this work, the authors describe two open-source visualization interfaces, webMANTIS and visualMANTIS to facilitate the setup of computational experiments via hybridMANTIS. Methods: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS enable the user to control simulation properties through a user interface. In the case of webMANTIS, control via a web browser allows access through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. webMANTIS acts as a server back-end and communicates with an NVIDIA GPU computing cluster that can support multiuser environments where users can execute different experiments in parallel. Results: The output consists of point response and pulse-height spectrum, and optical transport statistics generated by hybridMANTIS. The users can download the output images and statistics through a zip file for future reference. In addition, webMANTIS provides a visualization window that displays a few selected optical photon path as they get transported through the detector columns and allows the user to trace the history of the optical photons. Conclusions: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS provide features such as on the fly generation of pulse-height spectra and response functions for microcolumnar x-ray imagers while allowing users to save simulation parameters and results from prior experiments. The graphical interfaces simplify the simulation setup and allow the user to go directly from specifying

  5. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.badano@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Imaging, Diagnostics, and Software Reliability, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of op