WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit gps shorelines

  1. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  2. Accurate Linking of Lake Erie Water Level with Shoreline Datum Using GPS Buoy and Satellite Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chien Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to accurately link the water level to the shoreline vertical datum for various applications including coastal management, lake/river/estuary/wetland hydrological or storm surge modeling/forecasting. Coastal topography is historically surveyed and referenced to the predetermined vertical datum in terms of orthometric heights, or the heights above the geoid, which is poorly known in terms of accuracy and lack of adequate spatial resolution for coastal applications such as estuary or storm surge modeling. We demonstrate an accurate linking of the lake surface to a shoreline datum using satellite techniques, including GPS buoy and satellite altimetry, water level gauges, and local geoid and lake circulation models. The possible error sources are analyzed and an error budget is reported in this study. An innovated method to estimate geoid height near the water level gauge using a GPS buoy is proposed. It is found that at a 95% confidence interval, the method is consistent with the National Geodetic Survey GEOID03 geoid model. The lake surface represented using a lake circulation model provided by the Great Lakes Forecasting Systems is also verified with kriging based on the data (1999 - 2001 from the water level gauge, and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter. Mean discrepancies of 2.7 and 7.2 cm are found with the data from the gauges around Lake Erie, and from the combination of the gauges and the altimeter, respectively. It reveals that the current dominant limitation of more accurate linking of water surface to shoreline is the insufficient knowledge of geoid in the current models. Further improvement is feasible through more accurate and higher resolution modeling of the lake geoid.

  3. NOAA's Medium Resolution Digital Vector Shoreline (1998) for the Contiguous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's Medium Resolution Digital Vector Shoreline is a high-quality, Geographic Information System-ready, general-use digital vector data set created by the...

  4. Application of a wearable GPS unit for examining interindividual distances in a herd of Thoroughbred dams and their foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fumio; Tanabe, Tomoki; Murase, Harutaka; Tominari, Masataka; Kawai, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) units are now lightweight and compact. They have proven useful for analyzing the behavioral characteristics of horses in pastures. Because the GPS records data in latitude and longitude, it may be feasible to calculate the distance between GPS units. The present study aimed to confirm the applicability of GPS units in behavioral studies on horses. For this, we analyzed the accuracy of the distances calculated from GPS units using Hubeny's distance formula and of the monthly changes in interindividual distances obtained from GPS units worn by Thoroughbred dams and their foals in a pasture until weaning. The calculated inter-GPS distances were highly accurate. The regression line was linear, and the squared correlation coefficient (r(2)) was 0.9998. During the first month of age, the interindividual dam-dam and foal-foal distances were significantly greater than the dam-foal distance. During the second month of age, the dam-foal distance increased once and gradually decreased up to the fifth month of age. During the sixth month of age, the dam-foal distance was significantly greater than the foal-foal distance. The GPS distances calculated using Hubeny's distance formula were useful for analyzing changes in interindividual distances in a herd of Thoroughbred dams and their foals. Most likely, calculation of the distance between GPS units worn on equine head collars is likely to become a very useful tool as an objective index for quantifying equine behavioral observations.

  5. GPS Separator

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 70 degree ISOLDE GPS separator magnet MAG70 as well as the switchyard for the Central Mass and GLM (GPS Low Mass) and GHM (GPS High Mass) beamlines in the GPS separator zone. In the GPS20 vacuum sector equipment such as the long GPS scanner 482 / 483 unit, faraday cup FC 490, vacuum valves and wiregrid piston WG210 and WG475 and radiation monitors can also be seen. Also the RILIS laser guidance and trajectory can be seen, the GPS main beamgate switch box and the actual GLM, GHM and Central Beamline beamgates in the beamlines as well as the first electrostatic quadrupoles for the GPS lines. Close up of the GHM deflector plates motor and connections and the inspection glass at the GHM side of the switchyard.

  6. Validity and interunit reliability of 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units for assessing athlete movement demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Richard J; Watsford, Mark L; Kelly, Stephen J; Pine, Matthew J; Spurrs, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and interunit reliability of 10 Hz (Catapult) and 15 Hz (GPSports) Global Positioning System (GPS) units and investigate the differences between these units as measures of team sport athlete movement demands. A team sport simulation circuit was completed by 8 trained male participants. The movement demands examined included: total distance covered (TD), average peak speed, and the distance covered, time spent, and the number of efforts performed low-speed running (0.00-13.99 km · h(-1)), high-speed running (14.00-19.99 km · h(-1)), and very high-speed running (>20.00 km · h(-1)). The degree of difference between the 10 Hz and the 15 Hz GPS units and validity was assessed using a paired samples t-test. Pearson's correlations were also used for validity assessment. Interunit reliability was established using percentage typical error of measurement (%TEM) and intraclass correlations. The findings revealed that 10 Hz GPS units were a valid (p > 0.05) and reliable (%TEM = 1.3%) measure of TD. In contrast, the 15 Hz GPS units exhibited lower validity for TD and average peak speed. Further, as the speed of movement increased the level of error for the 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units increased (%TEM = 0.8-19.9). The findings from this study suggest that comparisons should not be undertaken between 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units. In general, the 10 Hz GPS units measured movement demands with greater validity and interunit reliability than the 15 Hz units, however, both 10 Hz and 15 Hz units provided the improved measures of movement demands in comparison to 1 Hz and 5 Hz GPS units.

  7. EnviroAtlas - Percentage of stream and water body shoreline lengths within 30 meters of >= 5% or >= 15% impervious cover by 12-Digit HUC for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the percentages of stream and water body shoreline lengths within 30 meters of impervious cover by 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC)...

  8. Garmin GPS waypoints delineating low-altitude transects over the Arctic Network of national park units and Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, July 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — GPS waypoints delineating the flight paths for low altitude transects from a Garmin GPS unit. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park...

  9. Using a Bayesian Network to predict shore-line change vulnerability to sea-level rise for the coasts of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sea-level rise is an ongoing phenomenon that is expected to continue and is projected to have a wide range of effects on coastal environments and infrastructure during the 21st century and beyond. Consequently, there is a need to assemble relevant datasets and to develop modeling or other analytical approaches to evaluate the likelihood of particular sea-level rise impacts, such as coastal erosion, and to inform coastal management decisions with this information. This report builds on previous work that compiled oceanographic and geomorphic data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for the U.S. Atlantic coast, and developed a Bayesian Network to predict shoreline-change rates based on sea-level rise plus variables that describe the hydrodynamic and geologic setting. This report extends the previous analysis to include the Gulf and Pacific coasts of the continental United States and Alaska and Hawaii, which required using methods applied to the USGS CVI dataset to extract data for these regions. The Bayesian Network converts inputs that include observations of local rates of relative sea-level change, mean wave height, mean tide range, a geomorphic classification, coastal slope, and observed shoreline-change rates to calculate the probability of the shoreline-erosion rate exceeding a threshold level of 1 meter per year for the coasts of the United States. The calculated probabilities were compared to the historical observations of shoreline change to evaluate the hindcast success rate of the most likely probability of shoreline change. Highest accuracy was determined for the coast of Hawaii (98 percent success rate) and lowest accuracy was determined for the Gulf of Mexico (34 percent success rate). The minimum success rate rose to nearly 80 percent (Atlantic and Gulf coasts) when success included shoreline-change outcomes that were adjacent to the most likely outcome. Additionally, the probabilistic approach determines the

  10. Structures, Other, Shoreline Protection Structures of Ninigret, Quonnie, and Point Judith Ponds; Shoreline protection structures of Ninigret Pond, Quonochontaug, and Point Judith delineated using orthophotography and GPS field observations. Hardened shorelines consist of, b, Published in 2006, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Structures, Other dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2006. It is described as...

  11. Accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS Unit in Measuring Shuttle Velocity Performed at Different Speeds and Distances (5 - 20 M).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beato, Marco; Bartolini, Davide; Ghia, Gianluigi; Zamparo, Paola

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS device (STATSports, Ireland) by comparing the instantaneous values of velocity determined with this device with those determined by kinematic (video) analysis (25 Hz). Ten male soccer players were required to perform shuttle runs (with 180° change of direction) at three velocities (slow: 2.2 m·s(-1); moderate: 3.2 m·s(-1); high: maximal) over four distances: 5, 10, 15 and 20 m. The experiments were video-recorded; the "point by point" values of speed recorded by the GPS device were manually downloaded and analysed in the same way as the "frame by frame" values of horizontal speed as obtained by video analysis. The obtained results indicated that shuttle distance was smaller in GPS than video analysis (p GPS than in video analysis (p GPS data underestimated criterion distance (0.31 ± 0.55 m). In conclusion, the inaccuracy of this GPS unit in determining shuttle speed can be attributed to inaccuracy in determining the shuttle distance.

  12. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  13. National assessment of shoreline change—Summary statistics for updated vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the Gulf of Mexico and Southeast Atlantic coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2017-07-18

    Long-term rates of shoreline change for the Gulf of Mexico and Southeast Atlantic regions of the United States have been updated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change project. Additional shoreline position data were used to compute rates where the previous rate-of-change assessment only included four shoreline positions at a given location. The long-term shoreline change rates also incorporate the proxy-datum bias correction to account for the unidirectional onshore bias of the proxy-based high water line shorelines relative to the datum-based mean high water shorelines. The calculation of uncertainty associated with the long-term average rates has also been updated to match refined methods used in other study regions of the National Assessment project. The average rates reported here have a reduced amount of uncertainty relative to those presented in the previous assessments for these two regions.

  14. The National Assessment of Shoreline Change:A GIS Compilation of Vector Shorelines and Associated Shoreline Change Data for the Sandy Shorelines of the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Reid, David

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive data clearinghouse of digital vector shorelines and shoreline change rates for the sandy shoreline along the California open coast. These data, which are presented herein, were compiled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project. Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information including rates and trends of shoreline migration. There is also a critical need for shoreline change data that is consistent from one coastal region to another. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic, systematic, and internally consistent updates of shorelines and shoreline change rates can be made at a National Scale. This data compilation for open-ocean, sandy shorelines of the California coast is one in a series that already includes the Gulf of Mexico and the Southeast Atlantic Coast (Morton et al., 2004; Morton et al., 2005) and will eventually cover Washington, Oregon, and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. Short- and long-term shoreline change evaluations are determined by comparing the positions of three historical shorelines digitized from maps, with a modern shoreline derived from LIDAR (light detection and ranging) topographic surveys. Historical shorelines generally represent the following time-periods: 1850s-1880s, 1920s-1930s, and late 1940s-1970s. The most recent shoreline is from data collected between 1997 and 2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated by linear regression using all four shorelines. Short-term rates of change are end-point rate calculations using the two most recent shorelines. Please refer to our full report on shoreline change of the

  15. GPS Separator HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 70 degree ISOLDE GPS separator magnet MAG70 as well as the switchyard for the Central Mass and GLM (GPS Low Mass) and GHM (GPS High Mass) beamlines in the GPS separator zone. In the GPS20 vacuum sector equipment such as the long GPS scanner 482 / 483 unit, faraday cup FC 490, vacuum valves and wiregrid piston WG210 and WG475 and radiation monitors can also be seen. Also the RILIS laser guidance and trajectory can be seen, the GPS main beamgate switch box and the actual GLM, GHM and Central Beamline beamgates in the beamlines as well as the first electrostatic quadrupoles for the GPS lines. Close up of the GHM deflector plates motor and connections and the inspection glass at the GHM side of the switchyard.

  16. Revisiting the deformed high shoreline of Lake Bonneville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christine Y.; Maloof, Adam C.

    2017-03-01

    Since G. K. Gilbert's foundational work in the eastern Great Basin during the late 1800s, the late Pleistocene Lake Bonneville (30-10 ka) has been recognized as a natural laboratory for various Quaternary studies, including lithospheric deformation due to surface loading and climate-forced water balance changes. Such studies rely on knowledge of the elevations of Lake Bonneville's paleoshoreline features and depositional landforms, which record a complex history of lake level variations induced by deglacial climate change. In this paper, we present (1) a new compilation of 178 elevation measurements of shoreline features marking Lake Bonneville's greatest areal extent measured using high-precision differential GPS (dGPS), and (2) a reconstructed outline of the highest shoreline based on dGPS measurements, submeter-resolution aerial imagery, topographic digital elevation models (DEMs), and field observations. We also (3) devise a simplified classification scheme and method for standardizing shoreline elevation measurement for different shoreline morphologies that includes constraints on the position of the still water level (SWL) relative to each feature type. The deformation pattern described by these shoreline features can help resolve the relative effects of local hydro-isostasy due to the lake load and regional solid earth deflection due to the Laurentide ice sheet, with potential implications for Earth rheology, glacial isostatic adjustment, and eustatic sea level change.

  17. NOAA Shoreline Website

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The original intent of this site was to alleviate confusion about shorelines generated by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) agencies. However,...

  18. Accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS Unit in Measuring Shuttle Velocity Performed at Different Speeds and Distances (5 – 20 M)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Davide; Ghia, Gianluigi; Zamparo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS device (STATSports, Ireland) by comparing the instantaneous values of velocity determined with this device with those determined by kinematic (video) analysis (25 Hz). Ten male soccer players were required to perform shuttle runs (with 180° change of direction) at three velocities (slow: 2.2 m·s-1; moderate: 3.2 m·s-1; high: maximal) over four distances: 5, 10, 15 and 20 m. The experiments were video-recorded; the “point by point” values of speed recorded by the GPS device were manually downloaded and analysed in the same way as the “frame by frame” values of horizontal speed as obtained by video analysis. The obtained results indicated that shuttle distance was smaller in GPS than video analysis (p GPS than in video analysis (p speed were averaged; from these data and from data of shuttle time, the distance covered was recalculated; the error (criterion distance-recalculated distance) was negligible for video data (0.04 ± 0.28 m) whereas GPS data underestimated criterion distance (0.31 ± 0.55 m). In conclusion, the inaccuracy of this GPS unit in determining shuttle speed can be attributed to inaccuracy in determining the shuttle distance. PMID:28031753

  19. A numerical shoreline model for shorelines with large curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new numerical model for shoreline change which can be used to model the evolution of shorelines with large curvature. The model is based on a one-line formulation in terms of coordinates which follow the shape of the shoreline, instead of the more common approach where the two...... orthogonal horizontal directions are used. The volume error in the sediment continuity equation which is thereby introduced is removed through an iterative procedure. The model treats the shoreline changes by computing the sediment transport in a 2D coastal area model, and then integrating the sediment...... transport field across the coastal profile to obtain the longshore sediment transport variation along the shoreline. The model is used to compute the evolution of a shoreline with a 90° change in shoreline orientation; due to this drastic change in orientation a migrating shoreline spit develops...

  20. USGS Northern California Shoreline Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive data clearinghouse of digital vector shorelines and shoreline...

  1. Interferometric shoreline mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, C.G. van; Groot, J.S.; Vogelzang, J.; Dierikx-Platschorre, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the location and evolution of shorelines is valuable. This information can be obtained from satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. Direct, unsupervised classifications methods give poor results because of the high noise level in SAR images and the scattering properties of (

  2. National assessment of shoreline change: historical shoreline change along the Pacific Northwest coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggerio, Peter; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Reid, David; Allan, Jonathan; Kaminsky, George

    2013-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to increase and infrastructure is threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along the open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic, systematic, and internally consistent updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally. In the case of the analysis of shoreline change in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), the shoreline is the interpreted boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the PNW coasts of Oregon and Washington is the seventh in a series of regionally focused reports on historical shoreline change. Previous investigations include analyses and descriptive reports of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (Morton and others, 2004), the southeastern Atlantic (Morton and Miller, 2005), the sandy shorelines (Hapke and others, 2006) and coastal cliffs (Hapke and Reid, 2007) of California, the New England and mid-Atlantic coasts (Hapke and others, 2011), and parts of the Hawaii coast (Fletcher and others, 2012). Like the earlier reports in this series, this report summarizes the methods of analysis, interprets the results of the analysis, provides explanations regarding long- and short-term trends and rates of shoreline change, and describes how different coastal communities are responding to coastal erosion. This report differs from the early USGS reports in the series in that those

  3. High-rate precise point positioning (PPP) to measure seismic wave motions: An experimental comparison of GPS PPP with inertial measurement units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peiliang; Shi, Chuang; Fang, Rongxin; Liu, Jingnan; Niu, Xiaoji; Zhang, Quan; Yanagidani, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    High-rate GPS has been widely used to construct displacement waveforms and to invert for source parameters of earthquakes. Almost all works on internal and external evaluation of high-rate GPS accuracy are based on GPS relative positioning. We build an experimental platform to externally evaluate the accuracy of 50 Hz PPP displacement waveforms. Since the shake table allows motion in any of six degrees of freedom, we install an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to measure the attitude of the platform and transform the IMU displacements into the GPS coordinate system. The experimental results have shown that high-rate PPP can produce absolute horizontal displacement waveforms at the accuracy of 2 to 4 millimeters and absolute vertical displacement waveforms at the sub-centimeter level of accuracy within a short period of time. The significance of the experiments indicates that high-rate PPP is capable of detecting absolute seismic displacement waveforms at the same high accuracy as GPS relative positioning techniques but requires no fixed datum station. We have also found a small scaling error of IMU and a small time offset of misalignment between high-rate PPP and IMU displacement waveforms by comparing the amplitudes of and cross-correlating both the displacement waveforms. For more details on this talk, one can now get access to the on-line-first version of our Journal of Geodesy paper: J Geod, DOI 10.1007/s00190-012-0606-z

  4. Hacking GPS

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley-Hughes, Kathie

    2005-01-01

    * This is the "user manual" that didn't come with any of the 30 million GPS receivers currently in use, showing readers how to modify, tweak, and hack their GPS to take it to new levels!* Crazy-cool modifications include exploiting secret keycodes, revealing hidden features, building power cords and cables, hacking the battery and antenna, protecting a GPS from impact and falls, making a screen protector, and solar-powering a GPS* Potential power users will take the function and performance of their GPS to a whole new level by hacking into the firmware and hacking into a PC connection with a GPS* Fear not! Any potentially dangerous mod (to the device) is clearly labeled, with precautions listed that should be taken* Game time! Readers can check out GPS games, check into hacking geocaching, and even use a GPS as a metal detector

  5. Accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS Unit in Measuring Shuttle Velocity Performed at Different Speeds and Distances (5 – 20 M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beato Marco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of a 10 Hz GPS device (STATSports, Ireland by comparing the instantaneous values of velocity determined with this device with those determined by kinematic (video analysis (25 Hz. Ten male soccer players were required to perform shuttle runs (with 180° change of direction at three velocities (slow: 2.2 m·s-1; moderate: 3.2 m·s-1; high: maximal over four distances: 5, 10, 15 and 20 m. The experiments were video-recorded; the “point by point” values of speed recorded by the GPS device were manually downloaded and analysed in the same way as the “frame by frame” values of horizontal speed as obtained by video analysis. The obtained results indicated that shuttle distance was smaller in GPS than video analysis (p < 0.01. Shuttle velocity (shuttle distance/shuttle time was thus smaller in GPS than in video analysis (p < 0.001; the percentage difference (bias, % in shuttle velocity between methods was found to decrease with the distance covered (5 m: 9 ± 6%; 20 m: 3 ± 3%. The instantaneous values of speed were averaged; from these data and from data of shuttle time, the distance covered was recalculated; the error (criterion distance-recalculated distance was negligible for video data (0.04 ± 0.28 m whereas GPS data underestimated criterion distance (0.31 ± 0.55 m. In conclusion, the inaccuracy of this GPS unit in determining shuttle speed can be attributed to inaccuracy in determining the shuttle distance.

  6. Estimation of shoreline position and change using airborne topographic lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, H.F.; Sallenger, A.H.; List, J.H.; Holman, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for estimating shoreline position from airborne scanning laser data. This technique allows rapid estimation of objective, GPS-based shoreline positions over hundreds of kilometers of coast, essential for the assessment of large-scale coastal behavior. Shoreline position, defined as the cross-shore position of a vertical shoreline datum, is found by fitting a function to cross-shore profiles of laser altimetry data located in a vertical range around the datum and then evaluating the function at the specified datum. Error bars on horizontal position are directly calculated as the 95% confidence interval on the mean value based on the Student's t distribution of the errors of the regression. The technique was tested using lidar data collected with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) in September 1997 on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Estimated lidar-based shoreline position was compared to shoreline position as measured by a ground-based GPS vehicle survey system. The two methods agreed closely with a root mean square difference of 2.9 m. The mean 95% confidence interval for shoreline position was ?? 1.4 m. The technique has been applied to a study of shoreline change on Assateague Island, Maryland/Virginia, where three ATM data sets were used to assess the statistics of large-scale shoreline change caused by a major 'northeaster' winter storm. The accuracy of both the lidar system and the technique described provides measures of shoreline position and change that are ideal for studying storm-scale variability over large spatial scales.

  7. National assessment of shoreline change: A GIS compilation of updated vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the Southeast Atlantic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzmann, Meredith; Himmelstoss, Emily; Thieler, E. Robert

    2017-01-01

    Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country.The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion.  In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards.  One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood feature representing the historical location of a beach position through time. All data can be viewed on the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards Portal at https://marine.usgs.gov/coastalchangehazardsportal/

  8. The National Assessment of Shoreline Change: A GIS Compilation of Vector Shorelines and Associated Shoreline Change Data for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tara L.; Morton, Robert A.; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Moore, Laura J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and shoreline change rates for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. These data, which are presented herein, were compiled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project. Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information including rates and trends of shoreline migration. There is also a critical need for shoreline change data that is consistent from one coastal region to another. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. This data compilation for open-ocean, sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico is the first in a series that will eventually include the Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. Short- and long-term shoreline change evaluations are based on merging three historical shorelines with a modern shoreline derived from lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic surveys. Historical shorelines generally represent the following time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1970s. The most recent shoreline is derived from data collected over the period of 1998-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated by linear regression using all four shorelines. Short-term rates of change are simple end-point rate calculations using the two most recent shorelines. Please refer to our full report on shoreline change in the Gulf of Mexico, National Assessment of Shoreline Change: Part 1, Historical Shoreline Changes and Associated Coastal Land Loss Along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (USGS Open File

  9. Multidecadal shoreline changes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabuth, Alina Kristin; Kroon, Aart; Pedersen, Jørn Bjarke Torp

    2014-01-01

    Multidecadal shoreline changes along ca. 7000 km coastline around Denmark were computed for the time interval between 1862 AD and 2005 AD and were connected with a geomorphological coastal classification. The shoreline data set was based on shoreline positions from historical and modern topographic...... maps. Coastal landforms were identified on a digital terrain model in combination with aerial photographs. Two shoreline-change computation methods were evaluated at a test site, aiming for optimized time efficiency and accuracy of the countrywide application: a Nearest Neighbor search and a cross...... were, therefore, computed with the DSAS method. Patterns in coastline dynamics were identified through the connection of shoreline-change rates with the occurrence of coastal landforms. Short-term changes and alterations of shoreline evolution through coastal structures were not resolved in this study...

  10. Numerical Modeling of Shoreline Undulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg

    The present thesis considers undulations on sandy shorelines. The aim of the study is to determine the physical mechanisms which govern the morphologic evolution of shoreline undulations, and thereby to be able to predict their shape, dimensions and evolution in time. In order to do so a numerical...... model has been developed which describes the longshore sediment transport along arbitrarily shaped shorelines. The numerical model is based on a spectral wave model, a depth integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model. First the theoretical...... length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a shoreline stability analysis based on the numerical model. The analysis shows that the length of the undulations in the linear regime depends on the incoming wave conditions and on the coastal profile. For larger waves...

  11. Evolving Shoreline Change Rates Along the US Pacific Northwest Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. L.; Ruggiero, P.; Allan, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    interannual, to further investigate coastal change hazards along the Oregon coast. The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) has surveyed several sites along Oregon's coastline at least annually since approximately the late 1990s. Shoreline positions are obtained either from beach profiles collected with Real Time Kinematic Differential GPS (RTK-DGPS) technology or extracted from lidar data. For consistency, we analyze shoreline change at the same transect locations as those used in the National Assessment, with the same analysis software, the USGS Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) within ArcGIS. With this approach, our study directly compares change rates at three distinct time scales yielding new insights into Oregon's shoreline evolution.

  12. National Assessment of Shoreline Change Part 3: Historical Shoreline Change and Associated Coastal Land Loss Along Sandy Shorelines of the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Reid, David; Richmond, Bruce M.; Ruggiero, Peter; List, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. In the case of this study, the shoreline being measured is the boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the California Coast represents the first of two reports on long-term sandy shoreline change for the western U.S., the second of which will include the coast of the Pacific NW, including Oregon and Washington. A report for the Gulf of Mexico shoreline was completed in 2004 and is available at: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1043/. This report summarizes the methods of analysis, interprets the results, provides explanations regarding long-term and short-term trends and rates of change, and describes how different coastal communities are responding to coastal erosion. Shoreline change evaluations are based on comparing three historical shorelines digitized from maps, with a recent shoreline derived from lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) topographic surveys. The historical shorelines generally represent the following periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1950s-1970s, whereas the lidar shoreline is from 1998-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated using all

  13. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Historic Shorelines by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  14. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Historic Shorelines by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  15. GPS & Roadpricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabic, Martina

    2005-01-01

    I denne artikel præsenteres analysemetoderne og resultaterne fra et eksamensprojekt omhandlende en analyse af GPS kvaliteten i forhold til roadpricing i København. Denne undersøgelse af GPS kvaliteten i forbindelse med roadpricing, er foretaget i tilknytning til det danske AKTA forsøg (www.......akta-kbh.dk), hvor GPS data er indsamlet for 500 biler over en 2-årig periode (2001-2003). Artiklen præsenterer således en analyse af GPS nøjagtigheden med henblik på at undersøge om kvalitet og pålidelighed er tilstrækkelig, til et GPS-baseret roadpricingssystem i København. Ved GPS-baseret roadpricing, udstyres...... med henblik på enhedsomkostningerne skulle være økonomisk realisable til brug i et så omfattende roadpricingssystem. Endvidere vanskeliggøres positionerings forholdene, idet bilen der ønskes positionsbestemt er i bevægelse. Når både satellitterne og GPS modtageren er i bevægelse, reduceres...

  16. GPS & Roadpricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabic, Martina

    2005-01-01

    I denne artikel præsenteres analysemetoderne og resultaterne fra et eksamensprojekt omhandlende en analyse af GPS kvaliteten i forhold til roadpricing i København. Denne undersøgelse af GPS kvaliteten i forbindelse med roadpricing, er foretaget i tilknytning til det danske AKTA forsøg (www.......akta-kbh.dk), hvor GPS data er indsamlet for 500 biler over en 2-årig periode (2001-2003). Artiklen præsenterer således en analyse af GPS nøjagtigheden med henblik på at undersøge om kvalitet og pålidelighed er tilstrækkelig, til et GPS-baseret roadpricingssystem i København. Ved GPS-baseret roadpricing, udstyres...... med henblik på enhedsomkostningerne skulle være økonomisk realisable til brug i et så omfattende roadpricingssystem. Endvidere vanskeliggøres positionerings forholdene, idet bilen der ønskes positionsbestemt er i bevægelse. Når både satellitterne og GPS modtageren er i bevægelse, reduceres...

  17. Analysis of Shoreline Change along Cape Coast-Sekondi Coast, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishmael Yaw Dadson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The two most important factors constantly impinging on the net movement of shorelines are erosion and accretion. This study analyzed the role of erosion and accretion in shoreline changes along the coast between Cape Coast and Sekondi in the central and western regions of Ghana, respectively. Aerial photographs, satellite images, and topographical maps were used. In addition, field survey using Global Positioning System (GPS was conducted at selected locations due to the unavailability of satellite image for 2013. Shoreline change analysis was conducted using Digital Shoreline Analysis Systems based on End Point Rate formula. In addition, community interactions were also conducted to get first-hand information from the local inhabitants. The study finds that the shoreline under study has been fluctuating. The sea advanced inland between 1972 and 2005, which is attributed mainly to intense erosion. The study further reveals that, in the past five years, the shoreline had been retreating mainly due to increased accretion. It is recommended that the shoreline under study should be monitored regularly to keep abreast with net movements that will occur in either the short term or the long term so as to factor the net effect into the management of the coastal zone.

  18. County Boundaries with Shorelines (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with shorelines cut in (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and...

  19. NOAA Coastal Mapping Shoreline Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Mapping Shoreline Products from the Remote Sensing Division are primarily for application to the nautical charts produced by NOAA's Office of Coast...

  20. NOAA Composite Shoreline - Vectorized Shoreline Derived From NOAA-NOS Coastal Survey Maps and Aerial Photographs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Composite Shoreline is primarily intended for high-resolution cartographic representation of the shoreline. It is a high-resolution vector shoreline based...

  1. National assessment of shoreline change: a GIS compilation of vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the north coast of Alaska, U.S.-Canadian border to Icy Cape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Ann E.; Karen A. Ohman,; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native communities, and encompasses unique habitats of global significance. Coastal erosion along the Arctic coast is chronic, widespread, and may be accelerating, which threatens defense- and energy-related infrastructure, natural shoreline habitats, and Native communities. There is an increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present shoreline changes across the United States. To meet these national needs, the Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey is compiling existing reliable historical shoreline data along sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii under the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (hereafter referred to as the "National Assessment project";http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/). A comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and rates of shoreline change for Alaska, from the U.S.-Canadian border to Icy Cape, is presented in this report as part of the National Assessment project.

  2. GPS Composite Clock Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS composite clock defines GPS time, the timescale used today in GPS operations. GPS time is illuminated by examination of its role in the complete estimation and control problem relative to UTC/TAI. The phase of each GPS clock is unobservable from GPS pseudorange measurements, and the mean phase of the GPS clock ensemble (GPS time) is unobservable. A new and useful observability definition is presented, together with new observability theorems, to demonstrate explicitly that GPS time is...

  3. Short-term shoreline evolution trend assessment: A case study in Glefe, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwadwo Y. Amoani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The growing economic, social and ecological importance of coastal areas in Ghana has increased the challenges associated with sustainably managing the coastal resources. The coastal areas have become more prone and vulnerable to natural and human-made hazards such as coastal erosion. Shoreline retreat is recognised as a burgeoning threat because of global climate change and other anthropogenic activities that alter the natural processes sustaining beaches and coasts. This article describes an application of Real-time Kinematic-Global Positioning System (RTK-GPS technology and digitising of shorelines from orthophotos to detect and analyse the spatial changes as well as quantify the result of shoreline change at Glefe, a suburb of Accra in Ghana. Shoreline positions from a 2005 orthophoto and a 2011 RTK-GPS survey were overlaid in MATLAB (Matrix Laboratory and the average rate of change determined using the endpoint rate (EPR method. The shoreline change rate determined for Glefe between 2005 and 2011 was 1.2 m/a ± 1.3 m/a, indicating a relatively high rate of erosion. Outcomes of the case study can be used as a basis for a sustainable integrated management plan for the coastal area.

  4. The Cosmic Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    in 2004 when there were just two transiting exoplanets to consider. The trend was well-defined by late 2007. Figure 1 shows how matters stood in Dec 2012 with approx.240 exoplanets. The figure shows that the boundary between planets with and without active volatiles - the cosmic shoreline, as it were - is both well-defined and follows a power law.

  5. USGS science for the Nation's changing coasts: shoreline change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The demands of increasing human population in the coastal zone create competition with coastal habitat preservation and with recreational and commercial uses of the coast and nearshore waters. As climate changes over the coming century, these problems facing coastal communities will likely worsen. Good management and policy decision-making require baseline information on the rates, trends, and scientific understanding of the processes of coastal change on a regional to national scale. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is engaged in a research project of national scope to measure, report, and interpret historical shoreline change along open-ocean coasts of the United States. One of the primary goals of this project is to understand shoreline change hazards using methods that are comparable from one area of the country to another and that will allow for future, repeatable analyses of shoreline movement, coastal erosion, and land loss.

  6. Shoreline as a controlling factor in commercial shrimp production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An ecological model was developed that relates marsh detritus export and shrimp production. It was based on the hypothesis that the shoreline is a controlling factor in the production of shrimp through regulation of detritus export from the marsh. LANDSAT data were used to develop measurement of shoreline length and areas of marsh having more than 5.0 kilometers of shoreline per square kilometer of area for the Louisiana coast, demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to provide important geographic information. These factors were combined with published tidal ranges and salinities to develop a mathematical model that predicted shrimp production for nine geographic units of the Louisiana coast, as indicated by the long term average commercial shrimp yield.

  7. Sand resources, regional geology, and coastal processes for shoreline restoration: case study of Barataria shoreline, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Kulp, Mark; Penland, Shea; Britsch, Louis D.

    2002-01-01

    The Louisiana barrier shoreline of Barataria Basin, which lies within the western Mississippi River delta, has undergone significant retreat during the past 100 years. The most practical restoration method to rebuild these shorelines is sand nourishment. Seismic and sonar interpretations verified with geologic samples (vibracores and borings) indicate that there are nine sand targets within the Barataria study area that meet or exceed the minimum criteria for potential resource sites. However, the near surface lithology in the basin is typically silts and clays. Locating suitable sand resources for shoreline restoration is challenging. The sand units are associated with geologic depositional systems such as ebb-tidal deltas, distributary mouth bars, and channel fill (undifferentiated fluvial or tidal inlet channels). The nine potential sand targets consist primarily of fine sand and can be delineated into three surficial and six buried features. The surficial features contain approximately 10% of the total sand resources identified. At least 90% of the sand resources need overburden sediment removed prior to use; almost 570 million yd3 (438.5 mil m3) of overburden will need to be removed if the entire resource is mined. In this study, we identified 396 to 532 mil yd3 (305.8 to 410.8 mil m3) of potential sand deposits for shoreline restoration. Previous studies using less dense survey methods greatly over-estimated sand resources available in this area. Many fluvial channels reported previously as sand-filled are mud-filled. Contrary to these previous studies, few fluvial subsystems in this region have abundant sand resources.

  8. Human effects on estuarine shoreline decadal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilo, A.; Freire, P.; Ceia, R.; Mendes, R. N.; Catalão, J.; Taborda, R.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their sheltered conditions and natural resources, estuaries were always attractive to human activities (industrial, agriculture, residential and recreation). Consequently, the complex interactions between anthropogenic and natural drivers increase estuarine shoreline vulnerability to climate changes impacts. The environmental sustainability of these systems depends on a fragile balance between societal development and natural values that can be further disturbed by climate change effects. This challenging task for scientific community, managers and stakeholders can only be accomplished with interdisplinary approaches. In this context, it seems clear that estuarine management plans should incorporate the concept of change into the planning of policy decisions since these natural dynamic areas are often under human pressure and are recognized as sensitive to climate change effects. Therefore, the knowledge about historical evolution of estuarine shoreline is important to provide new insights on the spatial and temporal dimensions of estuarine change. This paper aims to present and discuss shoreline changes due to human intervention in Tagus estuary, located on the west coast of Portugal. Detailed margins cartography, in a 550m fringe (drawn inland from the highest astronomical tide line), was performed based on 2007 orthophotos (spatial resolution of 0.5 m) analysis. Several classification categories were considered, as urbanized areas, industrial, port and airport facilities, agriculture spaces, green areas and natural zones. The estuarine bed (area bellow the highest astronomical tide line) was also mapped (including human occupation, natural habitats, morpho-sedimentary units) based on the geographic information above and LANSAT 7 TM+ images using image processing techniques. Aerial photographs dated from 1944, 1946, 1948, 1955 and 1958 were analyzed for a set of pilot zones in order to fully understand the decadal shoreline change. Estuarine bed presents

  9. Evaluating the Human Damage of Tsunami at Each Time Frame in Aggregate Units Based on GPS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of the human damage caused by the tsunami are required in order to consider disaster prevention at such a regional level. Hence, there is an increasing need for the assessments of human damage caused by earthquakes. However, damage assessments in japan currently usually rely on static population distribution data, such as statistical night time population data obtained from national census surveys. Therefore, human damage estimation that take into consideration time frames have not been assessed yet. With these backgrounds, the objectives of this study are: to develop a method for estimating the population distribution of the for each time frame, based on location positioning data observed with mass GPS loggers of mobile phones, to use a evacuation and casualties models for evaluating human damage due to the tsunami, and evaluate each time frame by using the data developed in the first objective, and 3 to discuss the factors which cause the differences in human damage for each time frame. By visualizing the results, we clarified the differences in damage depending on time frame, day and area. As this study enables us to assess damage for any time frame in and high resolution, it will be useful to consider provision for various situations when an earthquake may hit, such as during commuting hours or working hours and week day or holiday.

  10. Evaluating the Human Damage of Tsunami at Each Time Frame in Aggregate Units Based on GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y.; Akiyama, Y.; Kanasugi, H.; Shibasaki, R.; Kaneda, H.

    2016-06-01

    Assessments of the human damage caused by the tsunami are required in order to consider disaster prevention at such a regional level. Hence, there is an increasing need for the assessments of human damage caused by earthquakes. However, damage assessments in japan currently usually rely on static population distribution data, such as statistical night time population data obtained from national census surveys. Therefore, human damage estimation that take into consideration time frames have not been assessed yet. With these backgrounds, the objectives of this study are: to develop a method for estimating the population distribution of the for each time frame, based on location positioning data observed with mass GPS loggers of mobile phones, to use a evacuation and casualties models for evaluating human damage due to the tsunami, and evaluate each time frame by using the data developed in the first objective, and 3) to discuss the factors which cause the differences in human damage for each time frame. By visualizing the results, we clarified the differences in damage depending on time frame, day and area. As this study enables us to assess damage for any time frame in and high resolution, it will be useful to consider provision for various situations when an earthquake may hit, such as during commuting hours or working hours and week day or holiday.

  11. USGS science for the Nation's changing coasts; shoreline change assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Hapke, Cheryl J.

    2011-01-01

    The coastline of the United States features some of the most popular tourist and recreational destinations in the world and is the site of intense residential, commercial, and industrial development. The coastal zone also has extensive and pristine natural areas, with diverse ecosystems providing essential habitat and resources that support wildlife, fish, and human use. Coastal erosion is a widespread process along most open-ocean shores of the United States that affects both developed and natural coastlines. As the coast changes, there are a wide range of ways that change can affect coastal communities, habitats, and the physical characteristics of the coast?including beach erosion, shoreline retreat, land loss, and damage to infrastructure. Global climate change will likely increase the rate of coastal change. A recent study of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast, for example, found that it is virtually certain that sandy beaches will erode faster in the future as sea level rises because of climate change. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for conducting research on coastal change hazards, understanding the processes that cause coastal change, and developing models to predict future change. To understand and adapt to shoreline change, accurate information regarding the past and present configurations of the shoreline is essential. A comprehensive, nationally consistent analysis of shoreline movement is needed. To meet this national need, the USGS is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean coasts of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii, as well as the coasts of the Great Lakes.

  12. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems... the United States after importation of certain navigation products, including GPS devices, navigation... products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids,...

  13. GPS for land surveyors

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sickle, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The GPS SignalGlobal Positioning System (GPS) Signal StructureTwo ObservablesPseudorangingCarrier Phase RangingBiases and SolutionsThe Error BudgetDifferencingThe FrameworkTechnological ForerunnersVery Long Baseline InterferometryTransitNavstar GPSGPS Segment OrganizationGPS ConstellationThe Control SegmentReceivers and MethodsCommon Features of GPS ReceiversChoosing a GPS ReceiverSome GPS Surveying MethodsCoordinatesA Few Pertinent Ideas About Geodetic Datums for GPSState Plane CoordinatesHeightsGPS Surveying TechniquesStatic GPS SurveyingReal-Time Kinematic (RTK) and Differential GPS (DGPS)T

  14. 77 FR 37660 - ICWG Meeting for the NAVSTAR GPS Public Signals in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Department of the Air Force ICWG Meeting for the NAVSTAR GPS Public Signals in Space AGENCY: The United... meet September 5-6, 2012 to discuss the NAVSTAR GPS public Signals in Space (SiS) documents; IS-GPS-200 (Navigation User Interfaces), IS-GPS-705 (User Segment L5 Interfaces), and IS-GPS-800 (User Segment...

  15. Shoreline dissipation of infragravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bakker, A. T. M.; Tissier, M. F. S.; Ruessink, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    Infragravity waves (0.005-0.05 Hz) have recently been observed to dissipate a large part of their energy in the short-wave (0.05-1 Hz) surf zone, however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we analyse two new field data sets of near-bed pressure and velocity at up to 13 cross-shore locations in ≲2.5 m depth on a ≈1:80 and a ≈1:30 sloping beach to quantify infragravity-wave dissipation close to the shoreline and to identify the underlying dissipation mechanism. A frequency-domain Complex Eigenfunction analysis demonstrated that infragravity-wave dissipation was frequency dependent. Infragravity waves with a frequency larger than ≈0.0167-0.0245 Hz were predominantly onshore progressive, indicative of strong dissipation of the incoming infragravity waves. Instead, waves with a lower frequency showed the classic picture of cross-shore standing waves with minimal dissipation. Bulk infragravity reflection coefficients at the shallowest position (water depth ≈0.7 m) were well below 1 (≈0.20), implying that considerable dissipation took place close to the shoreline. We hypothesise that for our data sets infragravity-wave breaking is the dominant dissipation mechanism close to the shoreline, because the reflection coefficient depends on a normalised bed slope, with the higher infragravity frequencies in the mild-sloping regime where breaking is known to dominate dissipation. Additional numerical modelling indicates that, close to the shoreline of a 1:80 beach, bottom friction contributes to infragravity-wave dissipation to a limited extent, but that non-linear transfer of infragravity energy back to sea-swell frequencies is unimportant.

  16. SOCAL_BIASVALUES - Southern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  17. NORCAL_BIASVALUES - Northern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  18. SOCAL_BIASVALUES - Southern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  19. CENCAL_BIASVALUES - Central California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  20. NORCAL_BIASVALUES - Northern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  1. CENCAL_BIASVALUES - Central California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  2. Parallel-acquisition of GPS signal based on graphic processing unit%基于GPU的GPS信号并行捕获

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静; 刘一霏

    2012-01-01

    针对计算机中央处理器上串行实现GPS捕获算法耗时长的缺点,利用具有强并行处理能力的图形处理器设计实现了两种分别适用于不同载噪比信号的并行捕获算法以提高捕获速度.所提算法基于计算机统一设备架构的设计思想,采用了并行码相位搜索捕获策略,通过对GPS星座32颗卫星多通道、多频点的并行搜索实现了强信号捕获,而对弱信号则采用非相关积分法,通过对单颗卫星多时段、多频点的并行搜索再进行通道的串行处理来实现并行捕获.仿真结果表明:两种并行捕获算法比串行实现的捕获算法速度提高了10倍;采用非相干积分提高了弱信号捕获能力,对于载噪比为40 dB的10 ms中频数据,在保证捕获速度的同时,仍能够有效实现正确捕获.%Since the serial realization of GPS acquisition algorithm on CPU of PC is time-consuming, a parallel realization of two acquisition algorithms on graphic processing unit(GPU) were proposed for the GPS signal with different carrier to noise ratio(CNR) to improve the calculation speed. These algorithms were designed according to compute unified device architecture(CUDA) based on the parallel code phase search technology. The strong signal acquisition with high CNR was realized by parallel search of multi-frequency for all 32 satellites. As for the weak signal acquisition with low CNR, the noncoherent integration was adopted. The experimental results show that the calculation speeds of the two proposed algorithms are about 10 times faster than that of the traditional method, and for the weak signal with 40 dB noise, the proposed parallel realization algorithm acquires satellites effectively with the similar calculation speed by using noncoherent integration of 10 ms data.

  3. Low-cost implementation of Differential GPS using Arduino

    OpenAIRE

    Svaton, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The thesis proposes the low-cost solution of Differential GPS using Arduino as a Master Control Unit. The thesis provides the methods of GPS position augmentation, which is available for varied applications such as drones or autonomous lawnmowers operated in a private sector. Used methods of GPS positioning accuracy improvements are based on a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) and pseudorange residuals.

  4. National Assessment of Shoreline Change; historical shoreline change along the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; List, Jeffrey H.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2011-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic, systematic, internally consistent updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally. In the case of this study, the shoreline is the interpreted boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts is the fifth in a series of reports on historical shoreline change. Previous investigations include analyses and descriptive reports of the Gulf of Mexico, the Southeast Atlantic, and, for California, the sandy shoreline and the coastal cliffs. The rates of change presented in this report represent conditions up to the date of the most recent shoreline data and therefore are not intended for predicting future shoreline positions or rates of change. Because of the geomorphology of the New England and Mid-Atlantic (rocky coastlines, large embayments and beaches) as well as data gaps in some areas, this report presents beach erosion rates for 78 percent of the 1,360 kilometers of the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts. The New England and Mid-Atlantic shores were subdivided into a total of 10 analysis regions for the purpose of reporting regional trends in shoreline change rates. The average rate of long

  5. Effects of Shoreline Dynamics on Saltmarsh Vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shailesh; Goff, Joshua; Moody, Ryan M; McDonald, Ashley; Byron, Dorothy; Heck, Kenneth L; Powers, Sean P; Ferraro, Carl; Cebrian, Just

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of shoreline dynamics on fringing vegetation density at mid- and low-marsh elevations at a high-energy site in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Particularly, we selected eight unprotected shoreline stretches (75 m each) at a historically eroding site and measured their inter-annual lateral movement rate using the DSAS method for three consecutive years. We observed high inter-annual variability of shoreline movement within the selected stretches. Specifically, shorelines retrograded (eroded) in year 1 and year 3, whereas, in year 2, shorelines advanced seaward. Despite shoreline advancement in year 2, an overall net erosion was recorded during the survey period. Additionally, vegetation density generally declined at both elevations during the survey period; however, probably due to their immediate proximity with lateral erosion agents (e.g., waves, currents), marsh grasses at low-elevation exhibited abrupt reduction in density, more so than grasses at mid elevation. Finally, contrary to our hypothesis, despite shoreline advancement, vegetation density did not increase correspondingly in year 2 probably due to a lag in response from biota. More studies in other coastal systems may advance our knowledge of marsh edge systems; however, we consider our results could be beneficial to resource managers in preparing protection plans for coastal wetlands against chronic stressors such as lateral erosion.

  6. Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 6/15/2012 – 9/15/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline ” 5a. CONTRACT...this project. The paper, “Sea Spray Generation at Rocky Shoreline ” by Ed Andreas was accepted for publication and as of July 2016 was being...13 Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline 14 15 16 17 Edgar L Andreas 18 19 NorthWest Research Associates, Inc. 20 Lebanon, New

  7. 36 CFR 327.31 - Shoreline management fee schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shoreline management fee... THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.31 Shoreline management fee schedule. A charge will be made for Shoreline... permits for vegetative modification on Shoreline areas. In all cases the total administrative charge...

  8. 77 FR 23668 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of Meeting AGENCY: The United States... Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate will be hosting an open GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group (SSWG) meeting for manufacturers of GPS constellation simulators utilized by the federal...

  9. Historical Shoreline for Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, NOAA (2001) [shoreline_la_NOAA_1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — These data were automated to provide a suitable geographic information system (GIS) data layer depicting the historical shoreline for Louisiana. These data are...

  10. GPS Control Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Luke J. Schaub Chief, GPS Control Segment Division 29 Apr 15 GPS Control Segment Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Center, GPS Control Segment Division,Los Angeles AFB, El Segundo,CA,90245 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S

  11. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Shoreline REST Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for the U.S. and its territories, classified according to the...

  12. Numerical prediction of shoreline adjacent to breakwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahadevan, R.; Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.

    Existing mathematical models for prediction of shoreline changes in the vicinity of a breakwater were reviewed The analytical and numerical results obtained from these models have been compared Under the numerical approach, two different implicit...

  13. Archaeological sites as indicators of ancient shorelines

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vora, K.H.; Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.

    an acknowledge- able role by providing food security and water routes for the overseas trade and commerce. However, sea level fluctuations have played a significant role for the coastal settlement. Since the earliest time, study suggests, shoreline and sea...

  14. GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celalettin Karaali

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Use of GPS is becoming more widespread on surveying engineering. Especially, preference to GPS is increased by getting accuracy of order of milimeter, making observation on every weather forecast, without requiring intervisibility between station. Besides, developing new observation techniques and technologies in GPS increased its use in deformation easurements, monitoring crustal movements, mapping precise geoid maps, detail surveying, etc.

  15. Predicting Decades of Shoreline Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. D.; McNinch, J.

    2016-12-01

    Nearshore morphology models predicting storm-scale erosion have been in use for the past several decades. These tools have typically focused on a single time-scale, which limits the utilization. The present effort details the development of a physics-based numerical model that incorporates the cross-shore profile evolution as well as the alongshore variation at two distinct time-scales. The new method assumes that frequent (seconds) bed-level updates due to cross-shore transport gradients are necessary, while the longshore sediment balance can be accumulated numerically over times of about a day before the resultant bottom evolution is imposed. The new model remains consistent for use in a single storm as well as predictions for evolution over several decades. Some limitations exist on the longshore uniformity, and appropriate applications include shorelines with gentle variations in the alongshore conditions arising from nonuniform bathymetry or gradients in wave conditions. Sand transport predictions account for wave and current interaction, bedload and suspended load, and wave-related sediment transport. An initial comparison of 20 years of morphological evolution is conducted for Onslow Beach, NC, a gently-varying contiguous sandy barrier island. Shoreline position data are available for the 10 km of coast fronting the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. Wave conditions from the long-term WIS wave hindcast are used, while water levels are developed from the available NOAA tide gauge records. With a complete set of boundary and initial conditions, numerical model results constitute a complete 20 year history of transport and morphological evolution. The wave energy directional spectrum is nearly symmetric relative to the shore-normal transect, and although large sand transport is predicted to the North and to the South at times, a relatively small average residual longshore transport is computed. The measured morphological changes are mixed along the length of

  16. UAV survey of a Thyrrenian micro-tidal beach for shoreline evolution update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Guido; Pugliano, Giovanni; Di Paola, Gianluigi; Mucerino, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Coastal geomorphology requires increasingly accurate topographic information of the beach systems to perform reliable simulation of coastal erosion, flooding phenomena, and coastal vulnerability assessment. Among the range of terrestrial and aerial methods available to produce such a dataset, this study tests the utility of low-altitude aerial imageries collected by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The image-based approach was selected whilst searching for a rapid, inexpensive, and highly automated method, able to produce 3D information from unstructured aerial images. In particular, it was used to generate a high-resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM) of the micro-tidal beach of Serapo - Gaeta (LT) in order to obtain recent update of erosional/accretional trends already established through historical shoreline evolution. A UAV exacopter (fig. 1a) was used, weighing about 2500g, carrying on board a GPS and multi-directional accelerometer to ensure a recovery of the beach features (fig. 1b) through a sweep with constant speed, direction and altitude. The on-board camera was a Canon 16M pixels, with fixed and constant focal takeoff in order to perform the 3D cloud points. Six adjacent strips were performed for the survey realization with pictures taken every second in sequence, in order to allow a minimum 80% overlap. A direct on site survey was also carried out with a DGPS for the placement of GPS markers and the geo-referencing of the final product (fig. 1c). Each flight with constant speed, direction and altitude recorded from 500 to 800 shots. The height of flight was dictated by the scale of the final report, an altitude of 100m was used for the beach survey. The topographic survey on the ground for the placement of the control points was performed with the Trimble R6 DGPS in RTK mode. The long-term shoreline evolution was obtained by a sixty-year historical shoreline time-series, through the analysis of a number of aerial photographs dating from 1954 to 2013. The

  17. Boston_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  18. GPS Scintillation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE...Depletions from 1 October 1994 2 3. GPS data from Agua Verde, Chile on the night of 1 October 1994 3 4. PL-SCINDA display of GPS ionospheric...comparison of GPS measurements with GOES8 L-band scintillation data, are discussed. 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE, CHILE As

  19. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Space Command,Space and Missile Systems Center, GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division,Peterson AFB,CO,80916 8

  20. GPS Modernization Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    space vehicles currently set healthy • 6 GPS IIA, 12 GPS IIR , 7 GPS IIR -M, 5 GPS IIF – 5 additional satellites in residual status, 1 in test status...Advisory Board Final.pptx S P A C E A N D M I S S I L E S Y S T E M S C E N T E R Legacy GPS IIA/ IIR • Single Frequency (L1) • Coarse...acquisition (C/A) code • Y-Code (L1Y & L2Y) GPS IIR -M • 2nd Civil Signal (L2C) • M-Code (L1M & L2M) GPS IIF • 3rd civil signal (L5) • 2 Rb + 1 Cs

  1. MS_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Mississippi Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  2. AL_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Alabama Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  3. FL_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Florida Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  4. TX_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Texas Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  5. LA_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Louisiana Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  6. GPSIM: A Personal Computer-Based GPS Simulator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, D.

    Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are now in use in many applications, ranging from GIS to route guidance, automatic vehicle location (AVL), air, land, and marine navigation, and many other transportation and geographical based applications. In many applications, the GPS receiver is connected to some form of intelligent electronic system which receives the positional data from the GPS unit and then performs the required operation. When developing and testing GPS-based systems, one of the problems is that it is usually necessary to create GPS-compatible geographical data to simulate a GPS operation in real time. This paper provides the details of a Personal Computer (PC)-based GPS simulator system called GPSIM. The system receives user way-points and routes from Windows-based screen forms and then simulates a GPS operation in real time by generating most of the commonly used GPS sentences. The user-specified waypoints are divided into a number of small segments, each segment specifying a small distance in the direction of the original waypoint. The GPS sentence corresponding to the geographical coordinates of each segment is then sent out of the PC serial port. The system described is an invaluable testing tool for GPS-based system developers and also for people training to learn to use GPS-based products.

  7. Briefing highlights space weather risks to GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-07-01

    Solar storms, which are expected to increase as the Sun nears the most active phase of the solar cycle, can disrupt a variety of technologies on which society relies. Speakers at a 22 June briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D. C., focused on how space weather can affect the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is used in a wide range of industries, including commercial air travel, agriculture, national security, and emergency response. Rocky Stone, chief technical pilot for United Airlines, noted that GPS allows more aircraft to be in airspace, saves fuel, and helps aircraft move safely on runways. “Improvements in space weather forecasting need to be pursued,” he said. Precision GPS has also “changed the whole nature of farming,” said Ron Hatch, Director of Navigation Systems, NavCom Technology/John Deere. GPS makes it possible for tractors to be driven in the most efficient paths and for fertilizer and water to be applied precisely to the areas that most need them. Space weather-induced degradation of GPS signals can cause significant loss to farms that rely on GPS. Elizabeth Zimmerman, Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Response and Recovery at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), described how FEMA relies on GPS for disaster recovery. The agency is developing an operations plan for dealing with space weather, she said.

  8. 75 FR 51481 - In the Matter of Certain GPS Devices and Products Containing Same; Modification Proceeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain GPS Devices and Products Containing Same; Modification Proceeding Notice... within the United States after importation of certain GPS (Global Positioning System) devices and... within the United States after importation of certain GPS devices and products containing the same....

  9. Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    V Air Force Research Laboratory ••• Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT) Integrity *Service *Excellence 1 May 2015 Kevin Slimak Program Manager...2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at the GPS Partnership

  10. Shoreline clean-up methods : biological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoura, S.T. [Oil Spill Response Limited, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The cleanup of oil spills in shoreline environments is a challenging issue worldwide. Oil spills receive public and media attention, particularly in the event of a coastal impact. It is important to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of cleanup methods when defining the level of effort and consequences that are appropriate to remove or treat different types of oil on different shoreline substrates. Of the many studies that have compared different mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for their effectiveness on various types of oil, biological techniques have received the most attention. For that reason, this paper evaluated the effectiveness and effects of shoreline cleanup methods using biological techniques. It summarized data from field experiments and oil spill incidents, including the Exxon Valdez, Sea Empress, Prestige, Grand Eagle, Nakhodka, Guanabara Bay and various Gulf war oil spills. Five major shoreline types were examined, notably rocky intertidal, cobble/pebble/gravel, sand/mud, saltmarsh, and mangrove/sea-grass. The biological techniques that were addressed were nutrient enrichment, hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria, vegetable oil biosolvents, plants, surf washing, oil-particle interactions and natural attenuation. The study considered the oil type, volume and fate of stranded oil, location of coastal materials, extent of pollution and the impact of biological techniques. The main factors that affect biodegradation of hydrocarbons are the volume, chemical composition and weathering state of the petroleum product as well as the temperature, oxygen availability of nutrients, water salinity, pH level, water content, and microorganisms in the shoreline environment. The interaction of these factors also affect the biodegradation of oil. It was concluded that understanding the fate of stranded oil can help in the development of techniques that improve the weathering and degradation of oil on complex shoreline substrates. 39 refs.

  11. Decoupling processes and scales of shoreline morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Schwab, William C.; Nelson, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Behavior of coastal systems on time scales ranging from single storm events to years and decades is controlled by both small-scale sediment transport processes and large-scale geologic, oceanographic, and morphologic processes. Improved understanding of coastal behavior at multiple time scales is required for refining models that predict potential erosion hazards and for coastal management planning and decision-making. Here we investigate the primary controls on shoreline response along a geologically-variable barrier island on time scales resolving extreme storms and decadal variations over a period of nearly one century. An empirical orthogonal function analysis is applied to a time series of shoreline positions at Fire Island, NY to identify patterns of shoreline variance along the length of the island. We establish that there are separable patterns of shoreline behavior that represent response to oceanographic forcing as well as patterns that are not explained by this forcing. The dominant shoreline behavior occurs over large length scales in the form of alternating episodes of shoreline retreat and advance, presumably in response to storms cycles. Two secondary responses include long-term response that is correlated to known geologic variations of the island and the other reflects geomorphic patterns with medium length scale. Our study also includes the response to Hurricane Sandy and a period of post-storm recovery. It was expected that the impacts from Hurricane Sandy would disrupt long-term trends and spatial patterns. We found that the response to Sandy at Fire Island is not notable or distinguishable from several other large storms of the prior decade.

  12. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  13. Eureka Littoral Cell CRSMP Humboldt Bay Shoreline Types 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In 2011 Aldaron Laird walked and kayaked the entire shoreline of Humboldt Bay mapping the shoreline conditions onto 11x17 laminated fieldmaps at a scale of 1' = 200'...

  14. 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  15. 1922 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1922 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  16. Eureka Littoral Cell CRSMP Humboldt Bay Shoreline Types 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In 2011 Aldaron Laird walked and kayaked the entire shoreline of Humboldt Bay mapping the shoreline conditions onto 11x17 laminated fieldmaps at a scale of 1' = 200'...

  17. 1869 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1869 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  18. 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  19. 77 FR 16860 - Certain GPS Navigation Products, Components Thereof, and Related Software; Termination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain GPS Navigation Products, Components Thereof, and Related Software; Termination of... within the United States after importation of certain GPS navigation products, components thereof,...

  20. Shorelines of the Western Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Colville River to Point Barrow) used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes shorelines from 65 years ranging from 1947 to 2012 for the north coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow. Shorelines were...

  1. Shorelines of the Central Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Hulahula River to the Colville River) used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes shorelines from 63 years ranging from 1947 to 2010 for the north coast of Alaska between the Hulahula River and the Colville River. Shorelines...

  2. Aerial_Shorelines_1940_2015.shp - Dauphin Island, Alabama Shoreline Data Derived from Aerial Imagery from 1940 to 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial_WDL_Shorelines.zip features digitized historic shorelines for the Dauphin Island coastline from October 1940 to November 2015. This dataset contains 10 Wet...

  3. Observations of shoreline-sandbar coupling on an embayed beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Lageweg, W.I.; Bryan, K.R.; Coco, G.; Ruessink, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse a seven-year dataset (1999–2005) of shoreline and sandbar variations derived from video observations at the embayed Tairua Beach, New Zealand, to explore sandbar–shoreline coupling and to determine how this coupling is related to alongshore-averaged sandbar–shoreline separation and beach

  4. Freshman Orientation Evaluation, Shoreline Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Gordon

    Evaluation of the freshman orientation program at Shoreline Community College (Washington) was approached through the use of several criteria: (l) results of the Brown-Holtzman Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes (SSHA), (2) comparison of first-quarter grade averages with orientation program attendance records, (3) the completion of a…

  5. Aircraft landing using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David Gary

    The advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is revolutionizing the field of navigation. Commercial aviation has been particularly influenced by this worldwide navigation system. From ground vehicle guidance to aircraft landing applications, GPS has the potential to impact many areas of aviation. GPS is already being used for non-precision approach guidance; current research focuses on its application to more critical regimes of flight. To this end, the following contributions were made: (1) Development of algorithms and a flexible software architecture capable of providing real-time position solutions accurate to the centimeter level with high integrity. This architecture was used to demonstrate 110 automatic landings of a Boeing 737. (2) Assessment of the navigation performance provided by two GPS-based landing systems developed at Stanford, the Integrity Beacon Landing System, and the Wide Area Augmentation System. (3) Preliminary evaluation of proposed enhancements to traditional techniques for GPS positioning, specifically, dual antenna positioning and pseudolite augmentation. (4) Introduction of a new concept for positioning using airport pseudolites. The results of this research are promising, showing that GPS-based systems can potentially meet even the stringent requirements of a Category III (zero visibility) landing system. Although technical and logistical hurdles still exist, it is likely that GPS will soon provide aircraft guidance in all phases of flight, including automatic landing, roll-out, and taxi.

  6. A GIS compilation of vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for Breton Island, Louisiana: 1869-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrano, Joseph F.; Flocks, James G.; Smith, Kathryn E.L.

    2015-01-01

    Many barrier islands in the United States are experiencing substantive erosion and elevation loss due to storm surge, waves, and sea-level changes; this is particularly true for the deltaic barrier system in Louisiana. Breton Island is located near the mouth of the Mississippi River in the southern end of the Chandeleur Island chain in southeast Louisiana. This report expands on previous geomorphic studies of Breton Island by incorporating additional historic and recent datasets. Multiple analyses focused on long- and short-term shoreline change, as well as episodic events and anthropogenic modification. Analyses time periods included the long-term (1869–2014), long-term historic (1869–1950), post Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (1950–2014), pre/post Hurricane Katrina (2004–2005), and recent (2005–2014) change. In addition to shoreline change, barrier island geomorphology was evaluated using island area, elevation, and sediment volume change. In the long term (1969–2014), Breton Island has experienced landward transgression, island narrowing, and elevation loss. Major storm events are exacerbating the long-term trends. However, the short-term trends (2005–2014) show that Breton Island is eroding at a slower rate than long-term and has gained area and total sediment volume. The short-term accretion is likely due to the lack of major storms since Hurricane Katrina (2005).

  7. GPS Activities at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrend, Dirk

    2002-11-19

    The Alignment Engineering Group of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) started to use RTK (real-time kinematic) GPS equipment in order to perform structure mapping and GIS-related tasks on the SLAC campus. In a first step a continuously observing GPS station (SLAC M40) was set up. This station serves as master control station for all differential GPS activities on site and its coordinates have been determined in the well-defined global geodetic datum ITRF2000 at a given reference epoch. Some trials have been performed to test the RTK method. The tests have proven RTK to be very fast and efficient.

  8. Review of evidence for late Tertiary shorelines occurring on South Atlantic coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Patrick D.

    1984-06-01

    Recognition of (late) Tertiary shorelines on continental coasts is becoming increasingly common. It is argued that the elevations of such features are central to their approximate dating and the demonstration of contemporaneity with similar features elsewhere. South Atlantic coasts have not had a long history of investigation, yet there exist many diffuse observations, in both time and space, which are here drawn together into a preliminary synthesis and the case for widespread occurrences of late Tertiary shorelines in the region reviewed. This allows comparison with other areas from which Tertiary shorelines are known, the Atlantic seaboards of the Southeastern United States and Northwest Europe, for example. The coasts of oceanic islands are probably the best places to examine the legacy of late Cenozoic sea-level changes. It is suggested that, since many of the cliffed shores of these islands appear to be the result of a rapid emergence, coastal features predating this event might be preserved on the cliff-tops. Possible late Tertiary shorelines from South Atlantic islands are described, as are those which have been positively dated to this period, in the Eastern Canary Islands, for instance. Sedimentary and morphological indicators of Tertiary high sea-levels are described from Antarctic coasts. South American and African Atlantic continental margins. Evidence from the latter two areas is most suspect, owing to their generally more complex Quaternary tectonic histories. A summary of the evidence for Tertiary shorelines on South Atlantic coasts is tabulated. Methods which have been or could be used to date late Tertiary shorelines are described. Minimum age can be deduced from that of deposits resting on an erosional surface, maximum age from that of the youngest formation across which a surface is cut. More precise age can be estimated where a marine surface is sandwiched between datable non-marine formations or where periods of tectonic activity (responsible

  9. GPS Remote Sensing Measurements Using Aerosonde UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael S.; Katzberg, Stephen J.; Lawrence, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    In February 2004, a NASA-Langley GPS Remote Sensor (GPSRS) unit was flown on an Aerosonde unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) from the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) in Virginia. Using direct and surface-reflected 1.575 GHz coarse acquisition (C/A) coded GPS signals, remote sensing measurements were obtained over land and portions of open water. The strength of the surface-reflected GPS signal is proportional to the amount of moisture in the surface, and is also influenced by surface roughness. Amplitude and other characteristics of the reflected signal allow an estimate of wind speed over open water. In this paper we provide a synopsis of the instrument accommodation requirements, installation procedures, and preliminary results from what is likely the first-ever flight of a GPS remote sensing instrument on a UAV. The correct operation of the GPSRS unit on this flight indicates that Aerosonde-like UAV's can serve as platforms for future GPS remote sensing science missions.

  10. 77 FR 25150 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Amending GPS Simulator Working group Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: We are requesting to amend the date of the GPS Simulator Working group meeting notice published on April 20, 2012...

  11. The Role of Bioacoustic Signals in Koala Sexual Selection: Insights from Seasonal Patterns of Associations Revealed with GPS-Proximity Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Ellis

    Full Text Available Despite being a charismatic and well-known species, the social system of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus--the only extant member of the family Phascolarctidae is poorly known and much of the koala's sociality and mating behaviors remain un-quantified. We evaluated these using proximity logging-GPS enabled tracking collars on wild koalas and discuss their implications for the mating system of this species. The frequency and duration of male-female encounters increased during the breeding season, with male-male encounters quite uncommon, suggesting little direct mating competition. By comparison, female-female interactions were very common across both seasons. Body mass of males was not correlated with their interactions with females during the breeding season, although male size is associated with a variety of acoustic parameters indicating individuality. We hypothesise that vocal advertising reduces the likelihood of male-male encounters in the breeding season while increasing the rate of male-female encounters. We suggest that male mating-season bellows function to reduce physical confrontations with other males allowing them to space themselves apart, while, at the same time, attracting females. We conclude that indirect male-male competition, female mate choice, and possibly female competition, mediate sexual selection in koalas.

  12. The Role of Bioacoustic Signals in Koala Sexual Selection: Insights from Seasonal Patterns of Associations Revealed with GPS-Proximity Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Bill; Barth, Ben; Johnston, Stephen; Seddon, Jenny; Melzer, Alistair; Higgins, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Despite being a charismatic and well-known species, the social system of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus—the only extant member of the family Phascolarctidae) is poorly known and much of the koala’s sociality and mating behaviors remain un-quantified. We evaluated these using proximity logging-GPS enabled tracking collars on wild koalas and discuss their implications for the mating system of this species. The frequency and duration of male-female encounters increased during the breeding season, with male-male encounters quite uncommon, suggesting little direct mating competition. By comparison, female-female interactions were very common across both seasons. Body mass of males was not correlated with their interactions with females during the breeding season, although male size is associated with a variety of acoustic parameters indicating individuality. We hypothesise that vocal advertising reduces the likelihood of male-male encounters in the breeding season while increasing the rate of male-female encounters. We suggest that male mating-season bellows function to reduce physical confrontations with other males allowing them to space themselves apart, while, at the same time, attracting females. We conclude that indirect male-male competition, female mate choice, and possibly female competition, mediate sexual selection in koalas. PMID:26154295

  13. Multiscale analysis of restoration priorities for marine shoreline planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L; Sobocinski, Kathryn L; Thom, Ronald M; May, Christopher W; Borde, Amy B; Southard, Susan L; Vavrinec, John; Sather, Nichole K

    2009-10-01

    Planners are being called on to prioritize marine shorelines for conservation status and restoration action. This study documents an approach to determining the management strategy most likely to succeed based on current conditions at local and landscape scales. The conceptual framework based in restoration ecology pairs appropriate restoration strategies with sites based on the likelihood of producing long-term resilience given the condition of ecosystem structures and processes at three scales: the shorezone unit (site), the drift cell reach (nearshore marine landscape), and the watershed (terrestrial landscape). The analysis is structured by a conceptual ecosystem model that identifies anthropogenic impacts on targeted ecosystem functions. A scoring system, weighted by geomorphic class, is applied to available spatial data for indicators of stress and function using geographic information systems. This planning tool augments other approaches to prioritizing restoration, including historical conditions and change analysis and ecosystem valuation.

  14. Shoreline oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Zachary; Zengel, Scott; Baker, Mary; Steinhoff, Marla; Fricano, Gail; Rouhani, Shahrokh; Michel, Jacqueline

    2016-06-15

    We build on previous work to construct a comprehensive database of shoreline oiling exposure from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill by compiling field and remotely-sensed datasets to support oil exposure and injury quantification. We compiled a spatial database of shoreline segments with attributes summarizing habitat, oiling category and timeline. We present new simplified oil exposure classes for both beaches and coastal wetland habitats derived from this database integrating both intensity and persistence of oiling on the shoreline over time. We document oiling along 2113km out of 9545km of surveyed shoreline, an increase of 19% from previously published estimates and representing the largest marine oil spill in history by length of shoreline oiled. These data may be used to generate maps and calculate summary statistics to assist in quantifying and understanding the scope, extent, and spatial distribution of shoreline oil exposure as a result of the DWH incident.

  15. Bacteriological water quality along the Tijuana-Ensenada, Baja California, México shoreline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Borbón, Ma Victoria; Rico-Mora, Roxana; Weisberg, Stephen B; Noble, Rachel T; Dorsey, John H; Leecaster, Molly K; McGee, Charles D

    2006-10-01

    This survey was part of a Binational Program (Mexico-United States) in microbiological water quality, with a goal to assess the shoreline bacteriological water quality from Tijuana to Ensenada, Mexico. Samples were collected at 29 sites (19 beaches and 10 outfalls), from the United States border to Punta Banda, Baja California, during summer (1998) and winter (1999). Total coliforms, fecal coliforms and enterococci were used as bacterial indicators. Standard methods were used for total and fecal coliforms, while the Enterolert quick method (IDEXX) was used for the enterococci. Compared with outfalls, the beaches exceeded water quality standards by a small percent, 25.3% in summer and 17% in winter. For outfalls, the percentage of shoreline that exceeded bacterial indicator thresholds had a minor value in summer (32.7%) than in winter (50%). Sites near wastewater discharges had the lowest quality and did not meet the microbiological water quality criteria for recreational use.

  16. Shoreline monitoring programs for oil spills-of-opportunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harper, J.R; Owens, E.H

    1985-01-01

    This report outlines procedures for conducting shoreline monitoring programs of opportunity for accidental oil spills, the procedures outlined apply to documentation of oil contamination levels only...

  17. Extended Kalman Filter framework for forecasting shoreline evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2012-01-01

    A shoreline change model incorporating both long- and short-term evolution is integrated into a data assimilation framework that uses sparse observations to generate an updated forecast of shoreline position and to estimate unobserved geophysical variables and model parameters. Application of the assimilation algorithm provides quantitative statistical estimates of combined model-data forecast uncertainty which is crucial for developing hazard vulnerability assessments, evaluation of prediction skill, and identifying future data collection needs. Significant attention is given to the estimation of four non-observable parameter values and separating two scales of shoreline evolution using only one observable morphological quantity (i.e. shoreline position).

  18. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. La Peyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  19. Vector shorelines and associated shoreline change rates derived from Lidar and aerial imagery for Dauphin Island, Alabama: 1940-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rachel; Nelson, Paul R.; Long, Joseph W.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2017-01-01

    In support of studies and assessments of barrier island evolution in the Gulf of Mexico, rates of shoreline change for Dauphin Island, Alabama, were calculated using two different shoreline proxy datasets with a total temporal span of 75 years.  Mean High Water line (MHW) shorelines were generated from 14 lidar datasets from 1998 to 2014, and Wet Dry Line (WDL) shorelines were digitized from ten sets of georeferenced aerial images from 1940 to 2015. Rates of change for the open-ocean (south-facing) and back-barrier (north-facing) coast were calculated for three groups of shorelines:  MHW (lidar), WDL (aerial) and MHW and WDL shorelines combined. Calculations were performed using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3, an ArcGIS extension developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (Thieler and others, 2009).  Thieler, E.R., Himmelstoss, E.A., Zichichi, J.L., and Ergul, Ayhan, 2009, Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0—An ArcGIS extension for calculating shoreline change: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1278, https://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/DSAS/version4/.

  20. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T. Andrew; Humphries, Austin T.

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  1. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, Megan K; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T Andrew; Humphries, Austin

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y(-1). Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  2. 75 FR 8997 - National Environmental Policy Act; Wallops Flight Facility Shoreline Restoration and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act; Wallops Flight Facility Shoreline Restoration... Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Shoreline Restoration and Infrastructure Protection Program (SRIPP). SUMMARY... from the Wallops Island shoreline and the infrastructure behind it. Alternative One, NASA's...

  3. GPS satellite surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Leick, Alfred; Tatarnikov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE ON GPS TECHNOLOGY FOR SURVEYING Three previous editions have established GPS Satellite Surveying as the definitive industry reference. Now fully updated and expanded to reflect the newest developments in the field, this Fourth Edition features cutting-edge information on GNSS antennas, precise point positioning, real-time relative positioning, lattice reduction, and much more. Expert authors examine additional tools and applications, offering complete coverage of geodetic surveying using satellite technologies. The past decade has seen a major evolut

  4. GPS, su datum vertical.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Dörries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available La introducción de la metodología GPS en aplicaciones topográficas y geodésicas pone en notoria evidencia la clásica separación de sistemas de referencia en horizontal y vertical. Con GPS el posicionamiento es tridimensional, pero el concepto de altura difiere del clásico. Si se desea utilizar la información altimétrica debe contemplarse la ondulación del geoide.

  5. Numerical Modeling System for Shoreline Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    the cross-shore transport term, q. Thus, the gain or loss of sediment will be constant in time and independent of variations in the wave cli- mate...file, arid then read again from the beginning. A simple way to represent a wave climate which is constant in time , for test purposes, is to place only...presented. The offshore (d 40 m) wave climate was held constant in time (Ho = 1 m, ao = 30 degrees, and T = 5 seconds), and the initial shoreline was

  6. Geometry and earthquake potential of the shoreline fault, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The Shoreline fault is a vertical strike‐slip fault running along the coastline near San Luis Obispo, California. Much is unknown about the Shoreline fault, including its slip rate and the details of its geometry. Here, I study the geometry of the Shoreline fault at seismogenic depth, as well as the adjacent section of the offshore Hosgri fault, using seismicity relocations and earthquake focal mechanisms. The Optimal Anisotropic Dynamic Clustering (OADC) algorithm (Ouillon et al., 2008) is used to objectively identify the simplest planar fault geometry that fits all of the earthquakes to within their location uncertainty. The OADC results show that the Shoreline fault is a single continuous structure that connects to the Hosgri fault. Discontinuities smaller than about 1 km may be undetected, but would be too small to be barriers to earthquake rupture. The Hosgri fault dips steeply to the east, while the Shoreline fault is essentially vertical, so the Hosgri fault dips towards and under the Shoreline fault as the two faults approach their intersection. The focal mechanisms generally agree with pure right‐lateral strike‐slip on the OADC planes, but suggest a non‐planar Hosgri fault or another structure underlying the northern Shoreline fault. The Shoreline fault most likely transfers strike‐slip motion between the Hosgri fault and other faults of the Pacific–North America plate boundary system to the east. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the entire known length of the Shoreline fault would have a moment magnitude of 6.4–6.8. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the Shoreline fault and the section of the Hosgri fault north of the Hosgri–Shoreline junction would have a moment magnitude of 7.2–7.5.

  7. GPS computer navigators to shorten EMS response and transport times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, F S; Muramatsu, R S; Yoshida, B H; Yamamoto, L G

    2001-05-01

    GPS (global positioning satellite system to determine one's position on earth) units have become inexpensive and compact. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a GPS enhanced computer street map navigator to improve the ability of EMS drivers in an urban setting to locate their destination and shorten response times. For part I, residential addresses in the city were randomly selected from a telephone directory. Two driver/navigator teams were assigned to drive to the address adhering to speed limits. One team used a standard street map, whereas the other team used a GPS computer navigator. The travel time and distance of the runs were compared. For part II, the computer GPS navigator was placed on an ambulance to supplement their normal methods of navigation to find the address requesting EMS. After the run was completed, EMS providers were interviewed to determine their opinion of whether the GPS navigator was helpful. For part I the results showed that in the 29 initial test runs, comparing the GPS team versus the standard map team, the mean distances traveled were 8.7 versus 9.0 kilometers (not significant) and the mean travel times were 13.5 versus 14.6 minutes (P=.02), respectively. The GPS team arrived faster in 72% runs. For part II the results showed that most EMS providers surveyed noted that the GPS computer navigator enhanced their ability to find the destination and all EMS providers acknowledged that it would enhance their ability to find a destination in an area in which they were unfamiliar. These results suggest that a portable GPS computer navigator system is helpful and can enhance the ability of prehospital care providers to locate their destination. Because these units are accurate and inexpensive, GPS computer navigators may be a valuable tool in reducing pre-hospital transport times.

  8. Semantic enrichment of GPS trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de Victor; Keulen, van Maurice; By, de Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Semantic annotation of GPS trajectories helps us to recognize the interests of the creator of the GPS trajectories. Automating this trajectory annotation circumvents the requirement of additional user input. To annotate the GPS traces automatically, two types of automated input are required: 1) a co

  9. Variability in GPS sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jauncey, DL; King, EA; Bignall, HE; Lovell, JEJ; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Tzioumis, AK; Tingay, SJ; Macquart, JP; McCulloch, PM

    2003-01-01

    Flux density monitoring data at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz is presented for a sample of 33 southern hemisphere GPS sources, drawn from the 2.7 GHz Parkes survey. This monitoring data, together with VLBI monitoring data, shows that a small fraction of these sources, similar to10%, vary. Their variability falls

  10. Variability in GPS sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jauncey, DL; King, EA; Bignall, HE; Lovell, JEJ; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Tzioumis, AK; Tingay, SJ; Macquart, JP; McCulloch, PM

    2003-01-01

    Flux density monitoring data at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz is presented for a sample of 33 southern hemisphere GPS sources, drawn from the 2.7 GHz Parkes survey. This monitoring data, together with VLBI monitoring data, shows that a small fraction of these sources, similar to10%, vary. Their variability falls

  11. Numerical modeling of shoreline undulations part 1: Constant wave climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the non-linear development of alongshore undulations up to fully developed quasi-steady equilibrium. A numerical model which describes the longshore sediment transport along arbitrarily shaped shorelines is applied, based on a spectral wave model, a depth...... integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model.First the length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a stability analysis. Next the further evolution from the linear to the fully non-linear regime is described....... In the fully non-linear regime down-drift spits and migrating shoreline undulations are described.Three different shoreline shapes are found depending on the wave conditions: undulations with no spits, undulations with shore parallel spit and undulations with reconnecting spits. © 2012 Published by Elsevier B.V....

  12. NOAA's Shoreline Survey Maps - Raster NOAA-NOS Shoreline Survey Manuscripts that define the shoreline and alongshore natural and man-made features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOS coastal survey maps (often called t-sheet or tp-sheet maps) are special use planimetric or topographic maps that precisely define the shoreline and alongshore...

  13. Automated Large-Scale Shoreline Variability Analysis From Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearre, N. S.

    2006-12-01

    Land-based video has been used to quantify changes in nearshore conditions for over twenty years. By combining the ability to track rapid, short-term shoreline change and changes associated with longer term or seasonal processes, video has proved to be a cost effective and versatile tool for coastal science. Previous video-based studies of shoreline change have typically examined the position of the shoreline along a small number of cross-shore lines as a proxy for the continuous coast. The goal of this study is twofold: (1) to further develop automated shoreline extraction algorithms for continuous shorelines, and (2) to track the evolution of a nourishment project at Rehoboth Beach, DE that was concluded in June 2005. Seven cameras are situated approximately 30 meters above mean sea level and 70 meters from the shoreline. Time exposure and variance images are captured hourly during daylight and transferred to a local processing computer. After correcting for lens distortion and geo-rectifying to a shore-normal coordinate system, the images are merged to form a composite planform image of 6 km of coast. Automated extraction algorithms establish shoreline and breaker positions throughout a tidal cycle on a daily basis. Short and long term variability in the daily shoreline will be characterized using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. Periodic sediment volume information will be extracted by incorporating the results of monthly ground-based LIDAR surveys and by correlating the hourly shorelines to the corresponding tide level under conditions with minimal wave activity. The Delaware coast in the area downdrift of the nourishment site is intermittently interrupted by short groins. An Even/Odd analysis of the shoreline response around these groins will be performed. The impact of groins on the sediment volume transport along the coast during periods of accretive and erosive conditions will be discussed. [This work is being supported by DNREC and the

  14. Living Shorelines: Coastal Resilience with a Blue Carbon Benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny L Davis

    Full Text Available Living shorelines are a type of estuarine shoreline erosion control that incorporates native vegetation and preserves native habitats. Because they provide the ecosystem services associated with natural coastal wetlands while also increasing shoreline resilience, living shorelines are part of the natural and hybrid infrastructure approach to coastal resiliency. Marshes created as living shorelines are typically narrow (< 30 m fringing marshes with sandy substrates that are well flushed by tides. These characteristics distinguish living shorelines from the larger meadow marshes in which most of the current knowledge about created marshes was developed. The value of living shorelines for providing both erosion control and habitat for estuarine organisms has been documented but their capacity for carbon sequestration has not. We measured carbon sequestration rates in living shorelines and sandy transplanted Spartina alterniflora marshes in the Newport River Estuary, North Carolina. The marshes sampled here range in age from 12 to 38 years and represent a continuum of soil development. Carbon sequestration rates ranged from 58 to 283 g C m-2 yr-1 and decreased with marsh age. The pattern of lower sequestration rates in older marshes is hypothesized to be the result of a relative enrichment of labile organic matter in younger sites and illustrates the importance of choosing mature marshes for determination of long-term carbon sequestration potential. The data presented here are within the range of published carbon sequestration rates for S. alterniflora marshes and suggest that wide-scale use of the living shoreline approach to shoreline management may come with a substantial carbon benefit.

  15. FL_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Florida Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  16. SC_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for South Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  17. NC_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for North Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  18. GA_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Georgia Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  19. Indoor Positioning Using GPS Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik; Godsk, Torben

    2010-01-01

    It has been considered a fact that GPS performs too poorly inside buildings to provide usable indoor positioning. We analyze results of a measurement campaign to improve on the understanding of indoor GPS reception characteristics. The results show that using state-of-the-art receivers GPS...... low signal-to-noise ratios, multipath phenomena or bad satellite constellation geometry. We have also measured the indoor performance of embedded GPS receivers in mobile phones which provided lower availability and accuracy than state-of-the-art ones. Finally, we consider how the GPS performance...

  20. Adaptive Missile Guidance Using GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sharad Rupnar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The name adaptive means we can guide any missile using GPS in any critical conditions. GPS guided missiles, using the exceptional navigational and surveying abilities of GPS, after being launched, could deliver a warhead to any part of the globe via the interface of the onboard computer in the missile with the GPS satellite system.GPS allows accurate targeting of various military weapons including ICBMs, cruise missiles and precision-guided munitions. Artillery projectiles with embedded GPS receivers able to withstand accelerations of 12,000 G have been developed for use in 155mm.GPS guided weapons, with their technological advances over previous, are the superior weapon of choice in modern days

  1. Massachusetts Shoreline Change Mapping and Analysis Project, 2013 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Smith, Theresa L.; Knisel, Julia M.; Sampson, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Information on rates and trends of shoreline change can be used to improve the understanding of the underlying causes and potential effects of coastal erosion on coastal populations and infrastructure and can support informed coastal management decisions. In this report, we summarize the changes in the historical positions of the shoreline of the Massachusetts coast for the 165 years from 1844 through 2009. The study area includes the Massachusetts coastal region from Salisbury to Westport, including Cape Cod, as well as Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, and the Elizabeth Islands. New statewide shoreline data were developed for approximately 1,804 kilometers (1,121 miles) of shoreline using color aerial orthoimagery from 2008 and 2009 and topographic lidar from 2007. The shoreline data were integrated with existing historical shoreline data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) to compute long- (about 150 years) and short-term (about 30 years) rates of shoreline change. A linear regression method was used to calculate long- and short-term rates of shoreline change at 26,510 transects along the Massachusetts coast. In locations where shoreline data were insufficient to use the linear regression method, short-term rates were calculated using an end-point method. Long-term rates of shoreline change are calculated with (LTw) and without (LTwo) shorelines from the 1970s and 1994 to examine the effect of removing these data on measured rates of change. Regionally averaged rates are used to assess the general characteristics of the two-rate computations, and we find that (1) the rates of change for both LTw and LTwo are essentially the same; (2) including more data slightly reduces the uncertainty of the rate, which is expected as the number of shorelines increases; and (3) the data for the shorelines from the 1970s and 1994 are not outliers with respect to the long-term trend. These findings are true for regional

  2. Integrating data types to enhance shoreline change assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J.; Henderson, R.; Plant, N. G.; Nelson, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Shorelines represent the variable boundary between terrestrial and marine environments. Assessment of geographic and temporal variability in shoreline position and related variability in shoreline change rates are an important part of studies and applications related to impacts from sea-level rise and storms. The results from these assessments are used to quantify future ecosystem services and coastal resilience and guide selection of appropriate coastal restoration and protection designs. But existing assessments typically fail to incorporate all available shoreline observations because they are derived from multiple data types and have different or unknown biases and uncertainties. Shoreline-change research and assessments often focus on either the long-term trajectory using sparse data over multiple decades or shorter-term evolution using data collected more frequently but over a shorter period of time. The combination of data collected with significantly different temporal resolution is not often considered. Also, differences in the definition of the shoreline metric itself can occur, whether using a single or multiple data source(s), due to variation the signal being detected in the data (e.g. instantaneous land/water interface, swash zone, wrack line, or topographic contours). Previous studies have not explored whether more robust shoreline change assessments are possible if all available data are utilized and all uncertainties are considered. In this study, we test the hypothesis that incorporating all available shoreline data will lead to both improved historical assessments and enhance the predictive capability of shoreline-change forecasts. Using over 250 observations of shoreline position at Dauphin Island, Alabama over the last century, we compare shoreline-change rates derived from individual data sources (airborne lidar, satellite, aerial photographs) with an assessment using the combination of all available data. Biases or simple uncertainties in the

  3. GPS Receiver Performance Test at ROA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Javier Galindo, and Jorge Garate Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada 11100 San Fernando, Spain E-mail: hesteban@roa.es Abstract Real...Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) carries out daily intercomparisons of time and frequency using the GPS satellite system. For this type...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Real Instituto y Observatorio

  4. 76 FR 39896 - In the Matter of Certain GPS Navigation Products, Components Thereof, and Related Software...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain GPS Navigation Products, Components Thereof, and Related Software; Notice... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain GPS navigation products... States, the sale for importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain...

  5. A Numerical Model for Predicting Shoreline Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    problem of Figure 9(A). Of interest is that the undulatory patterns of the shoreline in Figure 9(A) dis- appear in Figure 9(B). Hence, diffraction...Mi clli;ia (south oh’ 1i .11 shio%\\ 1hat more t han 39 26 V --2i \\ \\’ . + ,i24Z 4 DEPTH IN FEET. MAR . 1973 ALL DEPTHS ARE REFERRED MAR . 1974 TO LOW...SS’,O averages for IHolland Ilarbor.1 Mont h If II., (’t) (tt) (s) .ali . ,1.3 4.3 0. 1 Feb. .4.0 3.6 6.0 Mar . 3.5 1.9 0. 3 Apr. 2. 6 2.. S. 5 Jlay 2.3

  6. Sandbar Migration and Shoreline Change on the Chirihama Coast, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Yuhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sandy beaches play a key role in regional tourism. It is important to understand the principal morphological processes behind preserving attractive beaches. In this study, morphological variation on the Chirihama Coast, Japan, an important local tourism resource, was investigated using two sets of field surveys. The objective was to analyze and document the multi-scale behaviors of the beach. First, long-term shoreline changes were examined based on shoreline surveys over the last two decades. Then, the middle-term behavior of multiple bar systems was analyzed based on the cross-shore profile surveys from 1998 to 2010. An empirical orthogonal function (EOF analysis was conducted to capture the principal modes of the systematic bar migration. The shoreline analysis indicated a long-term eroding trend and showed that the seasonal variation has recently tended to increase. The profile analysis demonstrated that net offshore migrations of bars have been repeated with a return period of approximately four years. This general behavior of the bar system is similar to the net offshore migration phenomena observed at other sites in the world. EOF analysis revealed a relationship between bar configuration and middle-term variations in shoreline location; when a new bar is generated near the shoreline and a triple bar configuration is established, the shoreline tends to temporarily retreat, whereas the shoreline experiences an advance when the outer bar has most evolved.

  7. Shoreline change analysis of Vedaranyam coast, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Usha; Thulasiraman, N; Deepthi, K; Kathiravan, K

    2013-06-01

    The coastal zone is one of the nation's greatest environmental and economic assets. The present research aims at studying the shoreline changes along Vedaranyam coast using conventional and modern techniques including field sampling, remote sensing, and geographical information system (GIS). The study area was divided into three zones. Dynamic Land/Sea polygon analysis was performed to obtain the shore line changes at different time periods between 1930 and 2005. From the multidate shoreline maps, the rate of shoreline change was computed using linear regression rate and end point rate. Further, the shoreline was classified into eroding, accreting, and stable regions through GIS analysis. The eroding, accreting, and stable coastal stretch along Vedaranyam is observed as 18 %, 80.5 %, and 1.5 %, respectively. Net shoreline movement is seaward, i.e., the coast is progressive with an average rate of 5 m/year. A maximum shoreline displacement of 1.3 km towards the sea is observed near Point Calimere. During the Asian Tsunami 2004, the eastern part of the study area showed high erosion. Sediment transport paths derived from the grain size analysis of beach sediments collected during different seasons help to identify the major sediment source and sinks. Point Calimere acts as the major sink for sediments whereas Agastiyampalli and Kodiakkarai are found to be the major sources for the sediment supply along the Vedaranyam coast. Shoreline change study from field and satellite data using GIS analysis confirms that Vedaranyam coast is accreting in nature.

  8. Historical shoreline mapping (I): improving techniques and reducing positioning errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Danforth, William W.

    1994-01-01

    A critical need exists among coastal researchers and policy-makers for a precise method to obtain shoreline positions from historical maps and aerial photographs. A number of methods that vary widely in approach and accuracy have been developed to meet this need. None of the existing methods, however, address the entire range of cartographic and photogrammetric techniques required for accurate coastal mapping. Thus, their application to many typical shoreline mapping problems is limited. In addition, no shoreline mapping technique provides an adequate basis for quantifying the many errors inherent in shoreline mapping using maps and air photos. As a result, current assessments of errors in air photo mapping techniques generally (and falsely) assume that errors in shoreline positions are represented by the sum of a series of worst-case assumptions about digitizer operator resolution and ground control accuracy. These assessments also ignore altogether other errors that commonly approach ground distances of 10 m. This paper provides a conceptual and analytical framework for improved methods of extracting geographic data from maps and aerial photographs. We also present a new approach to shoreline mapping using air photos that revises and extends a number of photogrammetric techniques. These techniques include (1) developing spatially and temporally overlapping control networks for large groups of photos; (2) digitizing air photos for use in shoreline mapping; (3) preprocessing digitized photos to remove lens distortion and film deformation effects; (4) simultaneous aerotriangulation of large groups of spatially and temporally overlapping photos; and (5) using a single-ray intersection technique to determine geographic shoreline coordinates and express the horizontal and vertical error associated with a given digitized shoreline. As long as historical maps and air photos are used in studies of shoreline change, there will be a considerable amount of error (on the

  9. CapeCodBay_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  10. SouthShore_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  11. MarthasVineyard_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the Martha's Vineyard coastal region including Vineyard Sound, Nantucket Sound, and the Atlantic Ocean-facing coasts of Martha's Vineyard and Nomans Land.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  12. OuterCapeCod_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the Outer Cape Cod coastal region from Long Point in Provincetown to Monomoy Island, Massachusetts.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  13. ElizabethIslands_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the Elizabeth Islands coastal region of Massachusetts from Nonamesset Island southwest of Woods Hole to Cuttyhunk Island north of Martha's Vineyard.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  14. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics for the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  15. The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) Version 4.0 - An ArcGIS extension for calculating shoreline change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Zichichi, Jessica L.; Ergul, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0 is a software extension to ESRI ArcGIS v.9.2 and above that enables a user to calculate shoreline rate-of-change statistics from multiple historic shoreline positions. A user-friendly interface of simple buttons and menus guides the user through the major steps of shoreline change analysis. Components of the extension and user guide include (1) instruction on the proper way to define a reference baseline for measurements, (2) automated and manual generation of measurement transects and metadata based on user-specified parameters, and (3) output of calculated rates of shoreline change and other statistical information. DSAS computes shoreline rates of change using four different methods: (1) endpoint rate, (2) simple linear regression, (3) weighted linear regression, and (4) least median of squares. The standard error, correlation coefficient, and confidence interval are also computed for the simple and weighted linear-regression methods. The results of all rate calculations are output to a table that can be linked to the transect file by a common attribute field. DSAS is intended to facilitate the shoreline change-calculation process and to provide rate-of-change information and the statistical data necessary to establish the reliability of the calculated results. The software is also suitable for any generic application that calculates positional change over time, such as assessing rates of change of glacier limits in sequential aerial photos, river edge boundaries, land-cover changes, and so on.

  16. The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) Version 4.0 - An ArcGIS Extension for Calculating Shoreline Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Zichichi, Jessica L.; Ergul, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0 is a software extension to ESRI ArcGIS v.9.2 and above that enables a user to calculate shoreline rate-of-change statistics from multiple historic shoreline positions. A user-friendly interface of simple buttons and menus guides the user through the major steps of shoreline change analysis. Components of the extension and user guide include (1) instruction on the proper way to define a reference baseline for measurements, (2) automated and manual generation of measurement transects and metadata based on user-specified parameters, and (3) output of calculated rates of shoreline change and other statistical information. DSAS computes shoreline rates of change using four different methods: (1) endpoint rate, (2) simple linear regression, (3) weighted linear regression, and (4) least median of squares. The standard error, correlation coefficient, and confidence interval are also computed for the simple and weighted linear-regression methods. The results of all rate calculations are output to a table that can be linked to the transect file by a common attribute field. DSAS is intended to facilitate the shoreline change-calculation process and to provide rate-of-change information and the statistical data necessary to establish the reliability of the calculated results. The software is also suitable for any generic application that calculates positional change over time, such as assessing rates of change of glacier limits in sequential aerial photos, river edge boundaries, land-cover changes, and so on.

  17. Shoreline OWC wave power plant on the island of Pico, Azores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Antonio F. de O. [IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Pontes, Maria Teresa [INETI/DER, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1997-07-01

    The paper briefly describe the basic studies, design and construction at the Island of Pico, Azores, of a shoreline wave-energy pilot plant of oscillating water column (OWC) type. Research in wave energy started in Portugal in 1978 at Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), later (1983) joined by Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial (INETI, a national laboratory owned by Ministry of Industry and Energy). The first plans to build a wave power plant at the Azores can be traced back to 1986, when a team from IST, INETI and Heriot-Watt University visited the archipelago at the invitation of EDA, the Azores utility. This was followed by further visits. A suitable site for erecting a shoreline OWC plant was identified in 1987 at Porto Cachorro, on the northern coast of the Island of Pico. In 1991 the European Commission (JOULE programme) started a series of Preliminary Actions in Wave Energy R&D. One of these actions was an European Pilot Plant Study (1992-93), which was carried out by an international team. The study identified several sites suitable for a shoreline pilot plant in European coastal waters. One of them was Porto Cachorro, in the Azores. In 1993 and 1995, contracts were signed with the European Commission (JOULE programme) for the basic studies, design and construction of a pilot plant at the island of Pico. This was to be carried out by an European team from Portugal, the United Kingdom and Ireland.

  18. Land Vehicle Positioning Using GPS and Dead Reckoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Dong-kai; C. L. Law; N. Nagarajan; Xu Ai-gong

    2003-01-01

    To ensure reliable land vehicle positioning, the Global Positioning System (GPS) is one of the best techniques commonly used in present-day positioning systems. However, GPS signals are not available if line of sight with the satellites is lost. In this respect, the addition of the Dead Reckoning (DR) method to complement the GPS unit would enhance the reliability of land vehicle positioning system. For implementing the DR method, the magnetic sensor and accelerometer are used for obtaining heading and velocity or distance information. Calibration of two sensors' dynamic model and DR algorithm are also introduced in this paper. The test result utilizing the GPS and DR methods is analyzed in this paper. It utilize spositioning information from GPS receiver when GPSsignal is available, otherwise DR is started to compensate GPS outage with the GPS output as the original point. The results showed that the error in east and north produced by the DR algorithm for a short time interval can be limitedwithin an acceptable range.

  19. Standardization of GPS data processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Pil Ho

    2001-06-15

    A nationwide GPS network has been constructed with about 60 permanent GPS stations after late 1990s in Korea. For using the GPS in variety of application area like crustal deformation, positioning, or monitoring upper atmosphere, it is necessary to have ability to process the data precisely. Now Korea Astronomy Observatory has the precise GPS data processing technique in Korea because it is difficult to understand characteristics of the parameters we want to estimate, resolve the integer ambiguity, and analyze many errors. There are three reliable GPS data processing software in the world ; Bernese(University of Berne), GIPSY-OASIS(JPL), GAMIT(MIT). These software allow us to achieve millimeter accuracy in the horizontal position and about 1 cm accuracy vertically even for regional networks with a diameter of several thousand kilometers. But we established the standard of GPS data processing using Bernese as main tool and GIPSY{sub O}ASIS as side.

  20. Update on GPS Modernization Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-02

    SPACE AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER , GPS constellation consists of 24+ satellites orbiting the earth at - 10,900 nautical miles (Medium Earth Orbit , MEO...estimates instantaneous state of GPS constellation PUBLICALL Y RELEASABLE 4 Civil Cooperation • 1 + Bill ion civil & commercial users worldwide...Observatory • PNT EXCOMS • GPS Partnership Council Maintenance/Security Spectrum 38 Satellites I 31 Set Healthy Baseline Constellation : 24 Satellites

  1. Military GPS User Equipment (MGUE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Space and Missile Systems Center Military GPS User Equipment (MGUE) Lt Col James “Mutt” Wilson Program Manager 29 Apr 15 Information contained in...SUBTITLE Military GPS User Equipment (MGUE) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at the GPS Partnership Council 2015 (GPSPC15), held April 29 to May 1, 2015, at the Los Angeles AFB, CA. 14. ABSTRACT

  2. Concurrent Validity of GPS for Deriving Mechanical Properties of Sprint Acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Ryu; Botter, Alberto; Rejc, Enrico; Koido, Masaaki; Shimizu, Takeshi; Samozino, Pierre; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2017-01-01

    To test the concurrent validity of data from 2 different global positioning system (GPS) units for obtaining mechanical properties during sprint acceleration using a field method recently validated by Samozino et al. Thirty-two athletes performed maximal straight-line sprints, and their running speed was simultaneously measured by GPS units (sampling rate: 20 or 5 Hz) and either a radar or laser device (devices taken as references). Lower-limb mechanical properties of sprint acceleration (theoretical maximal force, theoretical maximal speed, maximal power) were derived from a modeling of the speed-time curves using an exponential function in both measurements. Comparisons of mechanical properties from 20- and 5-Hz GPS units with those from reference devices were performed for 80 and 62 trials, respectively. The percentage bias showed a wide range of overestimation or underestimation for both systems (-7.9% to 9.7% and -5.1% to 2.9% for 20- and 5-Hz GPS), while the ranges of its 90% confidence limits for 20-Hz GPS were markedly smaller than those for 5-Hz GPS. These results were supported by the correlation analyses. Overall, the concurrent validity for all variables derived from 20-Hz GPS measurements was better than that obtained from the 5-Hz GPS units. However, in the current state of GPS devices' accuracy for speed-time measurements over a maximal sprint acceleration, it is recommended that radar, laser devices, and timing gates remain the reference methods for implementing the computations of Samozino et al.

  3. 2010 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) digital ortho imagery collected on May 10, 2010. This dataset contains digitized...

  4. Rapid Characterization of Shorelines using a Georeferenced Video Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael G.; Judd, Chaeli; Marcoe, K.

    2012-09-01

    Increased understanding of shoreline conditions is needed, yet current approaches are limited in ability to characterize remote areas or document features at a finer resolution. Documentation using video mapping may provide a rapid and repeatable method for assessing the current state of the environment and determining changes to the shoreline over time. In this study, we compare two studies using boat-based, georeferenced video mapping in coastal Washington and the Columbia River Estuary to map and characterize coastal stressors and functional data. In both areas, mapping multiple features along the shoreline required approximation of the coastline. However, characterization of vertically oriented features such as shoreline armoring and small features such as pilings and large woody debris was possible. In addition, end users noted that geovideo provides a permanent record to allow a user to examine recorded video anywhere along a transect or at discrete points.

  5. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Lower Derby Lake shoreline expansion project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Project Completion Report is to document the completion of the Lower Derby Lake Shoreline Expansion Project and summarize project highlights....

  6. Alabama ESI: ESI (Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for Alabama, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity...

  7. 2014 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on January 16-18, 2014 over Breton Island, Louisiana and released...

  8. 1983 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program. The NHAP was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey as an interagency project...

  9. Rebuilding Habitat and Shoreline Resilience through Improved Flood Control Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Rebuilding Habitat and Shoreline Resilience through Improved Flood Control Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  10. 1983 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program. The NHAP was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey as an interagency project...

  11. 2013 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on July 12-14, 2013 over Dauphin Island, Alabama and Chandeleur,...

  12. 2007 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) digital ortho imagery collected on October 11, 2007. This dataset contains digitized...

  13. 2013 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on July 12-14, 2013 over Dauphin Island, Alabama and Chandeleur,...

  14. 2014 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on January 16-18, 2014 over Breton Island, Louisiana and released...

  15. Louisiana ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Louisiana classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  16. Effects of shoreline erosion on infrastructure development along the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of shoreline erosion on infrastructure development along the coastal belt of Ghana: Case ... environment and affected the socio-economic life of local populations, threatened cultural heritage and hindered coastal tourism development.

  17. Decadal changes in shoreline patterns in Sundarbans, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterjee, N.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Mitra, D.

    , 248 001, Uttarakhand, India 1. IntroductionErosion and accretion processes are common phenomena acrossthe shoreline that demarcates land and sea, and the rate of suchchange in shoreline is an indicator of coastal dynamics (NRC Report1990... erosion because of strong tidal current,vigorous wave action and other factors including the land-fall oftropical cyclone (Allison and Kepple 2001). Rapid subsidence,perhaps tectonic but accentuated by compaction and dewatering ofsediments has been...

  18. Lake Shorelines: Earth Analogs for Hypothesized Martian Coastal Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Williams, S. H.; Johnston, A. K.; Head, James W.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of oceans on Mars has generated a lot of interest in the science community, but conclusive evidence supporting or refuting the ocean hypothesis has remained somewhat elusive. Precise topographic measurements of fresh-appearing shorelines from glacial Lake Lahontan were collected recently in an effort to obtain well-constrained data for comparison with the hypothesized Martian shorelines. This report summarizes the first results of the on-going research project.

  19. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Beach Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Event-driven backshore shoreline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  20. Hastighedskort for Danmark vha. GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Lahrmann, Harry; Torp, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Hastighed på vejnettet er en central metrik indenfor trafikplanlægning og trafikoptimering. I denne artikel beskrives, hvorledes et hastighedskort for hele Danmark er skabt udelukkende vha. GPS data. To tilgangsvinkler til at beregne hastigheder vha. GPS data er præsenteret. Dette er hhv. en punk...... foretages med et beskedent budget er uvist....

  1. Contribution of storms to shoreline changes in mesotidal dissipative beaches: case study in the Gulf of Cádiz (SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, María; Del Río, Laura; Plomaritis, Theocharis A.; Benavente, Javier

    2016-12-01

    In this study an analysis of storminess and rates of shoreline change is performed and discussed jointly in four geomorphological units of the Gulf of Cádiz (SW Spain) for the period of 1956-2010. For this purpose, storm events are identified based on the following characteristics: wave height above 2.5 m, a minimum duration of 12 h and events with calm periods of less than 24 h were considered as a single event. Subsequently, energy parameters are determined in order to characterize storm-induced impacts. Conversely, geographic information system (GIS) tools are used to measure shoreline changes in aerial photographs and orthophotographs of each site, selecting the high water line as shoreline proxy. Each geomorphological unit is divided into different behavioural patterns according to recorded coastal changes, so that each one shows a particular behaviour.In general the variability of shoreline changes that is explained by storms and the relation between storm parameters and coastal changes present better results in exposed areas (Cádiz and Vistahermosa) than in sheltered areas (Valdelagrana spit barrier) because the former are more sensitive to storm impacts. On the contrary, in areas where there is no relation between coastal changes and storm parameters (Valdelagrana and Sancti Petri sand spit), it is suggested that anthropogenic factors are the main forcing agents determining shoreline behaviour. However, in these areas the storminess also modulates coastline recession by increasing erosion when the number of storms is high.

  2. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Akos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs. However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities.

  3. A real-time capable software-defined receiver using GPU for adaptive anti-jam GPS sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities.

  4. Shoreline Response to Climate Change and Human Manipulations in a Model of Large-Scale Coastal Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slott, J. M.; Murray, A. B.; Valvo, L.; Ashton, A.

    2005-12-01

    Gradients in wave-driven alongshore sediment transport cause long-term change in the shape of sandy coastlines. Recent modeling work (Ashton, et. al. 2001) suggests coastlines can attain shapes that are in quasi-equilibrium with a regional wave climate (the distribution of wave influences as a function of wave-approach angles). Mid-latitude winter storms and tropical cyclones, for example, dominate the wave climate off of the Southeast coast of the United States. The resulting wave distribution likely determines the basic shape of the Carolina Capes, which extends along 400 kilometers of coastline. Global warming-related changes in storm (and therefore wave) patterns will likely cause this coastline pattern to adjust. In preliminary computer simulations, Murray, et. al. (in review) demonstrate coastline evolution accelerating by a factor of two to three times for a 5% increase in storminess and four to five times for a 10% increase in storminess after 200 years. Accelerated coastal change will undoubtedly place greater demand on shoreline stabilization techniques. Beach nourishment and seawalls ameliorate the effects shoreline erosion and migration have on homes and roads built on or near the beach. Beach nourishment rebuilds the beach using sand typically dredged from off-shore. Seawalls are hardened structures which prevent the shore from eroding farther landward. Scientific research on shoreline stabilization has focused on the local and short-term effects of these manipulations. In contrast, we study the longer-term (decades to centuries) and the larger scale (10's to 100's of kilometers) consequences of shoreline stabilization, coupling our experiments to scenarios of greatly-accelerated coastal migration induced by changes in global climate. Our modeling approach builds upon one-line coastal engineering models. It incorporates wave shadowing; protruding coastal features may shadow other parts of the coast from waves. Using the model, Ashton, et. al. (2001

  5. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  6. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  7. Evidential recovery from GPS devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cusack

    Full Text Available Global Positioning Systems (GPS have become more affordable, are now widely used in motor vehicles and in other frequently used applications. As a consequence GPS are increasingly becoming an important source of evidential data for digital forensic investigations. This paper acknowledges there are only disparate documents for the guidance of an investigator when extracting evidence form such systems. The focus of this paper is to provide the technical details of recovering artifacts from four GPS currently available to the New Zealand market. Navman brand GPS are used, following a forensically robust process. The steps of the process are described, results analysed and the associated risks are discussed. In addition, the paper discusses techniques related to the visual presentation of evidence suitable for Google Maps. Automation attempts to speed up the analysis to visualization steps are also included. The outcome is a road map that may assist digital forensic investigators develop GPS examination strategies for implementation in their own organizations.

  8. GPs' mental wellbeing and psychological resources: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Marylou Anna; Cardwell, Chris; Donnelly, Michael

    2017-08-01

    The negative impact of work has been the traditional focus of GP surveys. We know little about GP positive mental health and psychological resources. To profile and contextualise GP positive mental health and personal psychological resources. Cross-sectional survey of GPs working in Northern Ireland (NI). A questionnaire comprising the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) and measures of resilience, optimism, self-efficacy, and hope, and sociodemographic information was posted to 400 GPs randomly selected from a publicly available GP register. The response rate was 55% (n = 221 out of 400). Mean value for GP wellbeing (WEMWBS) was 50.2 (standard deviation [SD] 8) compared to UK vets 48.8 (SD 9), UK teachers 47.2 (SD 9), and the population of NI 50.8 (SD 9). After adjustment for confounding, mean WEMWBS was 2.4 units (95% CI = 0.02 to 4.7) higher in female GPs than males (P = 0.05), and 4.0 units (95% CI = 0.8 to 7.3) higher in GPs ≥55 years than GPs ≤44 years (P = 0.02). Optimism was 1.1 units higher in female GPs than male GPs (95% CI = 0.1 to 2.0), and 1.56 units higher in GPs ≥55 years (95% CI = 0.2 to 2.9) than in those ≤44 years. Hope was 3 units higher in GPs ≥55 years (95% CI = 0.4 to 5.7) than in those aged 45-54 years. Correlation between WEMWBS and psychological resources was highest with hope (r = 0.65, P GPs have levels of positive mental health that are comparable to the local population and better than other occupational groups, such as vets and teachers. Male and younger GPs may have most to gain from wellbeing interventions. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  9. Remote sensing of shorelines using data fusion of hyperspectral and multispectral imagery acquired from mobile and fixed platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Frystacky, Heather

    2012-06-01

    An optimized data fusion methodology is presented and makes use of airborne and vessel mounted hyperspectral and multispectral imagery acquired at littoral zones in Florida and the northern Gulf of Mexico. The results demonstrate the use of hyperspectral-multispectral data fusion anomaly detection along shorelines and in surface and subsurface waters. Hyperspectral imagery utilized in the data fusion analysis was collected using a 64-1024 channel, 1376 pixel swath width; temperature stabilized sensing system; an integrated inertial motion unit; and differential GPS. The imaging system is calibrated using dual 18 inch calibration spheres, spectral line sources, and custom line targets. Simultaneously collected multispectral three band imagery used in the data fusion analysis was derived either a 12 inch focal length large format camera using 9 inch high speed AGFA color negative film, a 12.3 megapixel digital camera or dual high speed full definition video cameras. Pushbroom sensor imagery is corrected using Kalman filtering and smoothing in order to correct images for airborne platform motions or motions of a small vessel. Custom software developed for the hyperspectral system and the optimized data fusion process allows for post processing using atmospherically corrected and georeferenced reflectance imagery. The optimized data fusion approach allows for detecting spectral anomalies in the resolution enhanced data cubes. Spectral-spatial anomaly detection is demonstrated using simulated embedded targets in actual imagery. The approach allows one to utilize spectral signature anomalies to identify features and targets that would otherwise not be possible. The optimized data fusion techniques and software has been developed in order to perform sensitivity analysis of the synthetic images in order to optimize the singular value decomposition model building process and the 2-D Butterworth cutoff frequency selection process, using the concept of user defined "feature

  10. De GPS al mapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Dörries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Las coordenadas Lambert obtenidas a partir de mediciones con equipos GPS de mano, llamados a veces navegadores, en ciertos casos confunden al usuario, por diferir claramente de su posición real al ser graficadas en un mapa del Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN: Esto puede resolverse con suficiente exactitud mediante una transformación de Molodensky, seguida de la correspondiente proyección cartográfica. Sin embargo, los tres parámetros necesarios para la transformación, supuestamente válidos para Costa Rica, se encuentran en muchas variantes y producen obviamente resultados diferentes. En este trabajo se analizan los fundamentos del problema y sus posibles soluciones, culminando con un estudio comparativo de ocho casos, que permite seleccionar los valores más adecuados para los parámetros.

  11. Application of GPS for transportation related engineering surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Roger L.

    1986-09-01

    The Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation (SDHPT) has been using GPS for over two years to establish primary geodetic reference points for engineering projects and mapping control. In accordance with a Five Year GPS Implementation Plant developed in 1982, four GPS, unmanned, automatic Regional Reference Point (RRP) stations will be installed by September 1, 1986. Five additional stations are planned as justified. Each RRP will consist of a dual frequency GPS receiver that will ultimately track the satellites continuously. Operation of the receiver, telecommunications and other station keeping chores will be handled by a microcomputer. The RRP station network will be controlled through another centrally located microcomputer which is also interfaced with a larger mainframe system. Each RRP is designed to service an area bounded by a 200 KM radius and will act as the “other” receiver for roving field units operating in a GPS differential measurement mode. In order to meet the installation schedule, early decisions are being made concerning satellite tracking rates, operational scenarios, and telecommunications to facilitate development of the basic hardware and software systems. A period of continual enhancement to hardware, software and RRP operational procedures is expected as GPS technology expands.

  12. 75 FR 8928 - Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS-800 Interface Control Working Group (ICWG...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Department of the Air Force Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS-800Interface Control Working Group... an Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) teleconference meeting for document/s IS-GPS-200E (NAVSTAR GPS Space Segment/Navigation User Interfaces), IS-GPS-705A (NAVSTAR GPS Space Segment/User Segment...

  13. Design and application of single-antenna GPS/accelerometers attitude determination system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Jie; Huang Xianlin; Wang Guofeng

    2008-01-01

    In view of the problem that the current single-antenna GPS attitude determination system can only determine the body attitude when the sideslip angle is zero and the multiantenna GPS/SINS integrated navigation system is of large volume, high cost, and complex structure, this approach is presented to determine the attitude based on vector space with single-antenna GPS and accelerometers in the micro inertial measurement unit (MIMU).It can provide real-time and accurate attitude information. Subsequently, the single-antenna GPS/SINS integrated navigation system is designed based on the combination of position, velocity, and attitude. Finally the semi-physical simulations of single-antenna GPS attitude determination system and single-antenna GPS/SINS integrated navigation system are carried out. The simulation results, based on measured data, show that the single-antenna GPS/SINS system can provide more accurate navigation information compared to the GPS/SINS system, based on the combination of position and velocity. Furthermore, the single-antenna GPS/SINS system is characteristic of lower cost and simpler structure. It provides the basis for the application of a single-antenna GPS/SINS integrated navigation system in a micro aerial vehicle (MAV).

  14. Investigation of GPS/IMU Positioning System for Mining Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken L. Stratton

    2006-09-13

    The objective of this project is to investigate the applicability of a combined Global Positioning System and Inertial Measurement Unit (GPS/IMU) for information based displays on earthmoving machines and for automated earthmoving machines in the future. This technology has the potential of allowing an information-based product like Caterpillar's Computer Aided Earthmoving System (CAES) to operate in areas with satellite shading. Satellite shading is an issue in open pit mining because machines are routinely required to operate close to high walls, which reduces significantly the amount of the visible sky to the GPS antenna mounted on the machine. An inertial measurement unit is a product, which provides data for the calculation of position based on sensing accelerations and rotation rates of the machine's rigid body. When this information is coupled with GPS it results in a positioning system that can maintain positioning capability during time periods of shading.

  15. 基于层序地层模拟的湖岸线迁移对层序定量识别的指示:以鄂尔多斯盆地山2段为例%Quantitative Recognition of Sequence Stratigraphic Units Based on Lacustrine Shoreline Migration Used Sequence Stratigraphic Simulation: Example from the Member 2 of Shanxi Formation, Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强虎; 朱红涛; 李敏; Keyu Liu

    2011-01-01

    Lacustrine shoreline is the boundary between the onshore deposits and the subaqueous deposits. This study uses the SEDPAK two-dimensional sequence modeling program to discuss the relationship between the migration and the sequence, member 2 of Shanxi Formation in Ordos Basin as the conceptual geological model. The lacustrine shoreline is redefined and re-classified in horizontal and vertical directions. The landward migration of lacustrine shoreline has been redefined as 'positive', which is equated with the process of transgression. On the contrary, the process of basin-ward migration has been redefined as 'negative' , corresponding to the process of regression. In the process of negative movement, the upward migration of the lacustrine shoreline has been redefined as 'codirectional', which is equated with the process of normal regression. In contrast, the process of downward migration has been redefined as 'reverse', corresponding to the process of forced regression. The interface of lacustrine shoreline from positive to negative corresponds to the maximum flooding surface, while the interface corresponds to the maximum regression surface. During the stage of negative movement, the interface of lacustrine shoreline from the codirectional to reverse has been equated with the forced regression bottom surface, whereas the interface is equated with the correlative conformity.%湖岸线是水陆沉积的分界线,为探讨其迁移规律与层序间的关系,利用SEDPAK二维层序模拟软件,以鄂尔多斯盆地山2段作为地质原型,对湖岸线迁移进行了定量模拟,进而提出了其可以有效指示层序及内部体系域识别的新认识.对湖岸线迁移规律在水平方向与垂直方向重新进行了划分、定义.在水平方向上,向物源区方向的迁移定义为“正向”,对应于湖侵过程;向盆地方向的迁移定义为“负向”,对应于湖退过程.“负向”迁移在垂向上可细分为向上方迁移的“同向

  16. Hastighedskort for Danmark vha. GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Lahrmann, Harry; Torp, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Hastighed på vejnettet er en central metrik indenfor trafikplanlægning og trafikoptimering. I denne artikel beskrives, hvorledes et hastighedskort for hele Danmark er skabt udelukkende vha. GPS data. To tilgangsvinkler til at beregne hastigheder vha. GPS data er præsenteret. Dette er hhv. en....... Opsummeret anses den turbaseret for at beregne det mest akkurate estimat, men metoden er meget datakrævende. Det er derfor nødvendigt at have den punktbaserede at falde tilbage på. Generelt mangler metoder til beregning af hastigheder vha. GPS data at blive valideret. Hvordan en sådan validering kan...

  17. Wave energy fluxes and multi-decadal shoreline changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabuth, Alina Kristin; Kroon, Aart

    2014-01-01

    Spatial patterns of multidecadal shoreline changes in two microtidal, low-energetic embayments of southern Zealand, Denmark, were investigated by using the directional distribution of wave energy fluxes. The sites include a barrier island system attached to moraine bluffs, and a recurved spit...... adjacent to a cliff coast. The barrier island system is characterized by cross-shore translation and by an alignment of the barrier alongshore alternating directions of barrier-spit progradation in a bidirectional wave field. The recurved spit adjacent to the cliff coast experienced shoreline rotation...... through proximal erosion and distal lateral accretion in a unidirectional wave climate. The multidecadal shoreline changes were coupled to a slope-based morphological coastal classification. All erosive shores occurred within a narrow range of onshore and offshore coastal slopes. The alongshore...

  18. GPS coordinate time series measurements in Ontario and Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi Alinia, Hadis; Tiampo, Kristy F.; James, Thomas S.

    2017-01-01

    New precise network solutions for continuous GPS (cGPS) stations distributed in eastern Ontario and western Québec provide constraints on the regional three-dimensional crustal velocity field. Five years of continuous observations at fourteen cGPS sites were analyzed using Bernese GPS processing software. Several different sub-networks were chosen from these stations, and the data were processed and compared to in order to select the optimal configuration to accurately estimate the vertical and horizontal station velocities and minimize the associated errors. The coordinate time series were then compared to the crustal motions from global solutions and the optimized solution is presented here. A noise analysis model with power-law and white noise, which best describes the noise characteristics of all three components, was employed for the GPS time series analysis. The linear trend, associated uncertainties, and the spectral index of the power-law noise were calculated using a maximum likelihood estimation approach. The residual horizontal velocities, after removal of rigid plate motion, have a magnitude consistent with expected glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). The vertical velocities increase from subsidence of almost 1.9 mm/year south of the Great Lakes to uplift near Hudson Bay, where the highest rate is approximately 10.9 mm/year. The residual horizontal velocities range from approximately 0.5 mm/year, oriented south-southeastward, at the Great Lakes to nearly 1.5 mm/year directed toward the interior of Hudson Bay at stations adjacent to its shoreline. Here, the velocity uncertainties are estimated at less than 0.6 mm/year for the horizontal component and 1.1 mm/year for the vertical component. A comparison between the observed velocities and GIA model predictions, for a limited range of Earth models, shows a better fit to the observations for the Earth model with the smallest upper mantle viscosity and the largest lower mantle viscosity. However, the

  19. GPS coordinate time series measurements in Ontario and Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi Alinia, Hadis; Tiampo, Kristy F.; James, Thomas S.

    2017-06-01

    New precise network solutions for continuous GPS (cGPS) stations distributed in eastern Ontario and western Québec provide constraints on the regional three-dimensional crustal velocity field. Five years of continuous observations at fourteen cGPS sites were analyzed using Bernese GPS processing software. Several different sub-networks were chosen from these stations, and the data were processed and compared to in order to select the optimal configuration to accurately estimate the vertical and horizontal station velocities and minimize the associated errors. The coordinate time series were then compared to the crustal motions from global solutions and the optimized solution is presented here. A noise analysis model with power-law and white noise, which best describes the noise characteristics of all three components, was employed for the GPS time series analysis. The linear trend, associated uncertainties, and the spectral index of the power-law noise were calculated using a maximum likelihood estimation approach. The residual horizontal velocities, after removal of rigid plate motion, have a magnitude consistent with expected glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). The vertical velocities increase from subsidence of almost 1.9 mm/year south of the Great Lakes to uplift near Hudson Bay, where the highest rate is approximately 10.9 mm/year. The residual horizontal velocities range from approximately 0.5 mm/year, oriented south-southeastward, at the Great Lakes to nearly 1.5 mm/year directed toward the interior of Hudson Bay at stations adjacent to its shoreline. Here, the velocity uncertainties are estimated at less than 0.6 mm/year for the horizontal component and 1.1 mm/year for the vertical component. A comparison between the observed velocities and GIA model predictions, for a limited range of Earth models, shows a better fit to the observations for the Earth model with the smallest upper mantle viscosity and the largest lower mantle viscosity. However, the

  20. Heavily Oiled Salt Marsh following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Ecological Comparisons of Shoreline Cleanup Treatments and Recovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zengel, Scott; Bernik, Brittany M; Rutherford, Nicolle; Nixon, Zachary; Michel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill affected hundreds of kilometers of coastal wetland shorelines, including salt marshes with persistent heavy oiling that required intensive shoreline "cleanup" treatment...

  1. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  2. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Communications, Navigation, and Networking reConfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) experiment is proposed to improve the performance of GPS during geomagnetic storms....

  3. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  4. Historical Shoreline for New Jersey (1971 to 1978): Vector Digital Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — New_Jersey_1971_78_Digitized_Shoreline.zip features a digitized historic shoreline for the New Jersey coastline (Point Pleasant, NJ to Longport, NJ) from 1971 to...

  5. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines...

  6. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  7. MarthasVineyard_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970-1979 and 1994 shorelines within the Martha's Vineyard coastal region including the Vineyard Sound-, Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Martha's Vineyard and Nomans Land

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  8. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (dates_meta.txt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  9. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  10. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  11. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  12. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines...

  13. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated...

  14. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  15. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines...

  16. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  17. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  18. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  19. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  20. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines...

  1. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  2. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated...

  3. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (dates_meta.txt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  4. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  5. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  6. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  7. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  8. Historical Shoreline for New Jersey (1971 to 1978): Vector Digital Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — New_Jersey_1971_78_Digitized_Shoreline.zip features a digitized historic shoreline for the New Jersey coastline (Point Pleasant, NJ to Longport, NJ) from 1971 to...

  9. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  10. Shoreline changes in and around the Thubon River mouth, Central Vietnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mau, L.D.; Nayak, G.N.; SanilKumar, V.

    Application of GENESIS model (GENEralized model for Simulating Shoreline change) for studying the shoreline change in and around the Thubon River Mouth, Central Vietnam is presented in this paper The input parameters used are the near shore wave...

  11. OuterCapeCod_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970's and 1994 shorelines within the Outer Cape Cod coastal region from Long Point in Provincetown to Monomoy Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  12. SouthShore_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970-1979 and 1994 shorelines within the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  13. CapeCodBay_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970-1979 and 1994 shorelines within the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  14. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  15. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  16. Continuous professional development for GPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, N K; Steenstrup, A P; Pedersen, L B

    2014-01-01

    randomly chosen Danish GPs. RESULTS: Focus groups: CPD activities are chosen based on personal needs analysis, and in order to be professionally updated, to meet engaged colleagues and to prevent burnout. GPs also attend CPD to assess their own pre-existing level of competence. CPD activities need...... by topics strengthening their professional capacity and preventing burnout. There would seem to be no need for a mandatory system....

  17. CentralBeaufort_shorelines.shp - Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  18. CentralBeaufort_shorelines.shp - Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  19. Grazing Behavior of Heifers Measured by Handheld GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to assess how previous grazing experience affects animal movement on pasture. Portable GPS units were used to monitor movements of 32 Holstein (n=21) and Holstein-Jersey (n=11) yearlings. Total distance walked was measured and analyzed as a randomized complete block e...

  20. Intent of Study on the Use of a Dual Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) in Conjunction with a Tactical Grade Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Navigation and Mapping in Unknown, Non-Global Positioning System (GPS), Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-05

    Zofia Starzyk a. REPORT UNCLASSIFIED b. ABSTRACT UNCLASSIFIED c. THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED UL 19 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code ...Navigation ( SITAN ) [2][3]. 5 Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center In the 1990s, the complementary nature of GPS to an IMU was quickly realized...ft AGL 14 Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center IV. DUAL ALS SIMULATION Software for the Dual ALS algorithm was written in MATLAB ™ and

  1. Global Positioning Systems Directorate: GPS Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Council Maintenance/Security Spectrum 39 Satellites /31 Set Healthy Baseline Constellation : 24 Satellites • All Level l and Level II...Department of Transportation • Federal Aviation Administration Satellite Block GPS IIA GPS IIR GPS IIR-M GPS IIF Constellation Department of...segment - India- IRNSS UNCLASSIFIED/APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE 3 UNCLASSIFIED/APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE GPS Constellation Status SPACE AND

  2. Hurricane Sandy beach response and recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and beach profile data, October 2012 to October 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehre Henderson, Rachel E.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen T.; Reynolds, Billy J.

    2015-04-30

    In response to the forecasted impact of Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall on October 29, 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a substantial data-collection effort to assess the morphological impacts to the beach and dune system at Fire Island, New York. Global positioning system (GPS) field surveys of the beach and dunes were conducted just prior to and after landfall and these data were used to quantify change in several focus areas. In order to quantify morphologic change along the entire length of the island, pre-storm (May 2012) and post-storm (November 2012) lidar and aerial photography were used to assess changes to the shoreline and beach.As part of the USGS Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Fire Island Study, the beach is monitored periodically to enable better understanding of post-Sandy recovery. The alongshore state of the beach is recorded using a differential global positioning system (DGPS) to collect data around the mean high water (MHW; 0.46 meter North American Vertical Datum of 1988) to derive a shoreline, and the cross-shore response and recovery are measured along a series of 10 profiles.Overall, Hurricane Sandy substantially altered the morphology of Fire Island. However, the coastal system rapidly began to recover after the 2012­–13 winter storm season and continues to recover in the form of volume gains and shoreline adjustment.

  3. 75 FR 10865 - Shoreline Management Initiative, Reservoirs in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Environmental Policy Act. In 1999, TVA adopted its current Shoreline Management Policy (SMP) to implement the preferred alternative in the November 1998 environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Shoreline Management... Shoreline Management Initiative, Reservoirs in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina...

  4. 78 FR 33051 - Non-Rock Alternatives to Shoreline Protection Demonstration Project (LA-16) Iberia, Jefferson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Non-Rock Alternatives to Shoreline Protection Demonstration Project... environmental impact statement is not being prepared for the Non-Rock Alternatives to Shoreline Protection... rock structures. The shoreline protection systems will be demonstrated in up to three (3) test sites in...

  5. 40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., shorelines or beaches. 227.10 Section 227.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. (a) Wastes which may... present a hazard to shorelines or beaches may be dumped only at sites and under conditions which...

  6. 18 CFR 1304.208 - Shoreline stabilization on TVA-owned residential access shoreland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shoreline stabilization... OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS TVA-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.208 Shoreline... landowners to stabilize eroding shorelines on TVA-owned residential access shoreland. TVA will determine...

  7. A multisource approach for coastline mapping and identification of shoreline changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zaccagnino

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Coastal dynamics are driven by phenomena of exogenous and endogenous nature. Characterizing factors that influence their equilibrium and continuous monitoring are fundamental for effective environmental planning and management of coastal areas. In order to monitor shoreline changes, we developed a methodology based on a multisource and multitemporal approach. A database, related to the Ionian coast of Basilicata region (about 50 km, was implemented by using cartographic data (IGMI data, satellite imagery (SPOT-PX/XS, Landsat-TM, Corona and aerial data covering the period form 1949 to 2001. In particular, airborne data (1 m spatial resolution were acquired during a specific campaign we performed in 2000 and 2001. To obtain the best performance from the available data, we applied a data fusion procedure on visible and thermal information. Different algorithms were tested, such as band ratios and clustering for extracting the coastline. The best results from multispectral data were obtained using a threshold algorithm we devised by exploiting the green, red and NIR bands, whereas for panchromatic data we selected clustering as the more suitable method. Moreover, a GPS survey was performed to evaluate the influence of tidal effects.

  8. Monazite in Atlantic shore-line features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Lincoln; Miller, Glen A.

    1954-01-01

    This report is a survey of present and potential production of monazite from part of the Maryland-Florida section of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The part of the Coastal Plain covered here is the outer (shore-ward) half. In this area, all the large heavy-mineral placers so far discovered occur in sand bodies that, by their shape, size, orientation, and lithology, appear to be ancient beaches, spits, bars, or dunes. Smaller placers have produced from recent shore-line features. The inner part of the Coastal Plain, to be treated in another report, is underlain generally by older rocks, ranging in age from Cretaceous to older Pleistocene. Only two large heavy-mineral placers are now in production at Trail Ridge, and near Jacksonville, both in Florida. Production is planned for the near future near Yulee, Fla.: in Folkston, Ga.: and at one or two localities in eastern North Carolina. Each of these three will produce monazite as a byproduct; the total new reserve for the three placers is about 33,000 tons of monazite. In large heavy-mineral placers of this type, monazite has not been found to run more than about 1 percent of total heavy minerals. In some large placers, notably Trail Ridge, it is almost or completely lacking. No reason for its sporadic occurrence has been found in this investigation. Two placers of potential economic value have been found by this project in Virginia, one west and one east of Chesapeake Bay. Neither is of promise for monazite production, but if they serve to open up exploration or production in the area, there is a chance for monazite as a byproduct from other placers. A discovery of considerable scientific interest has to do with the occurrence of two different suites of heavy minerals in the Coastal Plain, at least south of Virginia. One, an “older” suite, lacks epidote, hornblende, and garnet; this suite occurs in all older formations and in Pleistocene deposits lying above about 50 or 60 feet above sea level. The other,

  9. Investigating Atmospheric Rivers using GPS PW from Ocean Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, V.; Foster, J. H.; Businger, S.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric Rivers (AR) can be described as a long narrow feature within a warm conveyor belt where anomalous precipitable water (PW) is transported from low to high latitudes. Close monitoring of ARs is heavily reliant on satellites, which are limited both in space and time, to capture the fluctuations PW particularly over the ocean. Ship-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been successful in obtaining millimeter PW accuracy within 100 km from the nearest ground-based reference receiver at a 30 second sampling rate. We extended this capability with a field experiment using ship-based GPS PW on board a cargo ship to traverse over the Eastern Pacific Ocean. In one 14-day cruise cycle, between the periods of February 3-16, 2014, the ship-based GPS captured PW spikes >50 mm during the early development of two ARs, which lead to moderate to heavy rainfall events for Hawaii and flood conditions along the West Coast of the United States. Comparisons between PW solutions processed using different GPS reference sites at distances 100-2000 km provided an internal validation for the ship-based GPS PW with errors typically less than 5 mm. Land-based observations provided an external validation and are in good agreement with ship-based GPS PW at distances GPS receivers offer an extremely cost-effective approach for acquiring continuous meteorological observations over the oceans, which can provide important calibration/validation data for satellite retrieval algorithms. Ship-based systems could be particularly useful for augmenting our meteorological observing networks to improve weather prediction and nowcasting, which in turn provide critical support for hazard response and mitigation efforts in coastal regions.

  10. 15 CFR 923.25 - Shoreline erosion/mitigation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shoreline erosion/mitigation planning... erosion/mitigation planning. (a) The management program must include a planning process for assessing the... planning process may be within the broader context of coastal hazard mitigation planning. (b) The basic...

  11. Shoreline stability in the vicinity of Cochin Harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Vethamony, P.

    , showing stability over a period of one year. The growth of shoreline north of Cochin harbour channel takes place at the cost of sediment that should have otherwise by-passed the estuarine mouth. During the southwest monsoon the development of opposing...

  12. Evaluation of the Coastal Features Mapping System for Shoreline Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    participating in the report preparation included: Ms. Karen Pitchford , Atlantic Research Corporation, who provided technical assistance and helped...40 Tanner, William F., 1978. "Standards for Measuring Shoreline Change", Proceedings of a Workshop, Florida State Univ., 85 pg. Wolf, Paul R., 1983

  13. Teachers' Curriculum Guide to the Hayward Shoreline, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachle, Leo; And Others

    This teaching guide gives environmental education ideas for grades K-12. The field trips and activities all relate to the Hayward shoreline of the San Francisco, California, Bay. Included in the guide are 44 science activities, 15 social science activities, and 18 humanities activities. Each activity description gives the experience level, site…

  14. Shoreline development and degradation of coastal fish reproduction habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundblad, Göran; Bergström, Ulf

    2014-12-01

    Coastal development has severely affected habitats and biodiversity during the last century, but quantitative estimates of the impacts are usually lacking. We utilize predictive habitat modeling and mapping of human pressures to estimate the cumulative long-term effects of coastal development in relation to fish habitats. Based on aerial photographs since the 1960s, shoreline development rates were estimated in the Stockholm archipelago in the Baltic Sea. By combining shoreline development rates with spatial predictions of fish reproduction habitats, we estimated annual habitat degradation rates for three of the most common coastal fish species, northern pike (Esox lucius), Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus). The results showed that shoreline constructions were concentrated to the reproduction habitats of these species. The estimated degradation rates, where a degraded habitat was defined as having ≥3 constructions per 100 m shoreline, were on average 0.5 % of available habitats per year and about 1 % in areas close to larger population centers. Approximately 40 % of available habitats were already degraded in 2005. These results provide an example of how many small construction projects over time may have a vast impact on coastal fish populations.

  15. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF SHORELINE EVOLUTION NEAR COASTAL STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Ze-wei; Song Xiao-gang; Ye Chun-yang

    2003-01-01

    Numerical analysis was made for shoreline evolution in the vicinity of coastal structures, including spur dike, detached breakwaters. The nonlinear partial differential equation was derived, and numerical solutions were obtained by the finite difference method. The numerical results show good agreement with previous analytical results.

  16. Shoreline instability under low-angle wave incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idier, D.; Falqués, A.; Ruessink, B.G.; Garnier, R.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of megacusps as shoreline instabilities is investigated by examining the coupling between wave transformation in the shoaling zone, longshore transport in the surf zone, cross-shore transport, and morphological evolution. This coupling is known to drive a potential positive feedback in ca

  17. Shoaling and shoreline dissipation of low‐frequency waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dongeren, A.; Battjes, J.A.; Janssen, T.; Van Noorloos, J.; Steenhauer, K.; Steenbergen, G.; Reniers, A.

    2007-01-01

    The growth rate, shoreline reflection, and dissipation of low‐frequency waves are investigated using data obtained from physical experiments in the Delft University of Technology research flume and by parameter variation using the numerical model Delft3D‐SurfBeat. The growth rate of the shoaling inc

  18. Historical shoreline for New Jersey (1839 to 1875): T-sheets and vector digital data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrano, Joseph F.; Smith, Kathryn E. L.

    2016-01-01

    Historical shoreline surveys were conducted by the National Ocean Service (NOS), dating back to the early 1800s. The maps resulting from these surveys, often called t-sheets, provide a reference of historical shoreline position that can be compared to modern data to identify shoreline change. The t-sheets are stored at the National Archives and many have been scanned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and are available on the NOAA Shoreline website (http://www.shoreline.noaa.gov/data/datasheets/t-sheets.html). While some scanned t-sheets were georeferenced and digitized by NOAA, others remain as non-georeferenced raster files (http://nosimagery.noaa.gov/images/shoreline_surveys/survey_scans/NOAA_Shoreline_Survey_Scans.html).This data set features georeferenced t-sheets and digitized historic shoreline for the New Jersey coastline from 1839 to 1875. The data were scanned by NOAA, but were not georeferenced. The t-sheets included in this data release are: T-121 (1839), T-119 Part 1 (1841), T-1084 (1868), T-1166 (1870), T-1333 (1871), T-1315a (1872), T-1371 (1874), T-1407 (1875). Digital files were georeferenced, corrected to a modern datum, and shorelines digitized to provide a vector polyline depicting the historical shoreline position. All shorelines, including the foreshore, backshore, mainland and island shorelines were delineated and digitized for each survey using ArcMap 10.3.1. This data release includes 8 raster t-sheets and 1 vector shoreline. These shorelines were digitized for use in long-term shoreline and wetland analyses for Hurricane Sandy wetland physical change assessment.

  19. Subtidal Bathymetric Changes by Shoreline Armoring Removal and Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Salish Sea, a region with a diverse coastline, is altered by anthropogenic shoreline modifications such as seawalls. In recent years, local organizations have moved to restore these shorelines. Current research monitors the changes restoration projects have on the upper beach, lower beach, and intertidal, however little research exists to record possible negative effects on the subtidal. The purpose of this research is to utilize multibeam sonar bathymetric data to analyze possible changes to the seafloor structure of the subtidal in response to shoreline modification and to investigate potential ecosystem consequences of shoreline alteration. The subtidal is home to several species including eelgrass (Zostera marina). Eelgrass is an important species in Puget Sound as it provides many key ecosystem functions including providing habitat for a wide variety of organisms, affecting the physics of waves, and sediment transport in the subtidal. Thus bathymetric changes could impact eelgrass growth and reduce its ability to provide crucial ecosystem services. Three Washington state study sites of completed shoreline restoration projects were used to generate data from areas of varied topographic classification, Seahurst Park in Burien, the Snohomish County Nearshore Restoration Project in Everett, and Cornet Bay State Park on Whidbey Island. Multibeam sonar data was acquired using a Konsberg EM 2040 system and post-processed in Caris HIPS to generate a base surface of one-meter resolution. It was then imported into the ArcGIS software suite for the generation of spatial metrics. Measurements of change were calculated through a comparison of historical and generated data. Descriptive metrics generated included, total elevation change, percent area changed, and a transition matrix of positive and negative change. Additionally, pattern metrics such as, surface roughness, and Bathymetric Position Index (BPI), were calculated. The comparison of historical data to new data

  20. GPS/INS Sensor Fusion Using GPS Wind up Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Walton R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of stabilizing an inertial navigation system (INS), includes the steps of: receiving data from an inertial navigation system; and receiving a finite number of carrier phase observables using at least one GPS receiver from a plurality of GPS satellites; calculating a phase wind up correction; correcting at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables using the phase wind up correction; and calculating a corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position using the corrected at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables; and performing a step selected from the steps consisting of recording, reporting, or providing the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position to another process that uses the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position. A GPS stabilized inertial navigation system apparatus is also described.

  1. GPS Auto-Navigation Design for Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Caroline C. A.; Heinzen, Stearns N.; Hall, Charles E., Jr.; Chokani, Ndaona

    2003-01-01

    A GPS auto-navigation system is designed for Unmanned Air Vehicles. The objective is to enable the air vehicle to be used as a test-bed for novel flow control concepts. The navigation system uses pre-programmed GPS waypoints. The actual GPS position, heading, and velocity are collected by the flight computer, a PC104 system running in Real-Time Linux, and compared with the desired waypoint. The navigator then determines the necessity of a heading correction and outputs the correction in the form of a commanded bank angle, for a level coordinated turn, to the controller system. This controller system consists of 5 controller! (pitch rate PID, yaw damper, bank angle PID, velocity hold, and altitude hold) designed for a closed loop non-linear aircraft model with linear aerodynamic coefficients. The ability and accuracy of using GPS data, is validated by a GPS flight. The autopilots are also validated in flight. The autopilot unit flight validations show that the designed autopilots function as designed. The aircraft model, generated on Matlab SIMULINK is also enhanced by the flight data to accurately represent the actual aircraft.

  2. GPS Time Synchronization in School-Network Cosmic Ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Berns, H G; Gran, R; Wilkes, R J; Berns, Hans-Gerd; Burnett, Toby H.; Gran, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The QuarkNet DAQ card for school-network cosmic ray detectors provides a low-cost alternative to using standard particle and nuclear physics fast pulse electronics modules. Individual detector stations, each consisting of 4 scintillation counter modules, front-end electronics, and a GPS receiver, produce a stream of data in form of ASCII text strings in identifiable set of formats for different functions. The card includes a low-cost GPS receiver module, which permits timestamping event triggers to about 50 nanosecond accuracy in UTC between widely separated sites. The technique used for obtaining precise GPS time employs the 1PPS signal, which is not normally available to users of the commercial GPS module. We had the stock model slightly custom-modified to access this signal. The method for deriving time values was adapted from methods developed for the K2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. Performance of the low-cost GPS module used is compared to that of a more expensive unit with known quality.

  3. Impact of an offshore wind farm on wave conditions and shoreline development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Kristensen, Sten Esbjørn; Deigaard, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The influence of offshore wind farms on the wave conditions and impact on shoreline development is studied in a generic set-up of a coast and a shoreline. The objective was to estimate the impact of a typical sized offshore wind farm on a shoreline in a high wave energetic environment. Especially...... the shoreline’s sensitivity to the distance from the OWF to the shoreline was studied. The effect of the reduced wind speed inside and on the lee side of the offshore wind farm was incorporated in a parameterized way in a spectral wind wave model. The shoreline impact was studied with a one-line model....

  4. Analysis of shoreline and geomorphic change for Breton Island, Louisiana, from 1869 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrano, Joseph F.; Flocks, James G.; Smith, Kathryn E. L.

    2016-04-19

    Many barrier islands in the United States are eroding and losing elevation substantively because of storm surge, waves, and sea-level changes. This is particularly true for the deltaic barrier system in Louisiana. Breton Island is near the mouth of the Mississippi River at the southern end of the Chandeleur barrier island chain in southeast Louisiana. This report expands on previous geomorphic studies of Breton Island by incorporating additional historic and recent datasets. Multiple analyses focus on longand short-term shoreline change, as well as episodic events and anthropogenic modification. Analyses periods include long term (1869–2014), long-term historic (1869–1950), post-Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (1950–2014), pre/post-Hurricane Katrina (2004–5), and recent (2005–14). In addition to shoreline change, barrier island geomorphology is evaluated using island area, elevation, and sediment volume change. In the long term (1869–2014), Breton Island was affected by landward transgression, island narrowing, and elevation loss. Major storm events exacerbated the long-term trends. In the recent period (2005–14), Breton Island eroded at a slower rate than in the long-term and gained area and total sediment volume. The recent accretion is likely because of the lack of major storms since Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

  5. Extent and degree of shoreline oiling: Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Gulf of Mexico, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jacqueline; Owens, Edward H; Zengel, Scott; Graham, Andrew; Nixon, Zachary; Allard, Teresa; Holton, William; Reimer, P Doug; Lamarche, Alain; White, Mark; Rutherford, Nicolle; Childs, Carl; Mauseth, Gary; Challenger, Greg; Taylor, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented by shoreline assessment teams as stranding on 1,773 km of shoreline. Beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3% of the oiled shoreline. Shoreline cleanup activities were authorized on 660 km, or 73.3% of oiled beaches and up to 71 km, or 8.9% of oiled marshes and associated habitats. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 847 km; two years later, oil remained on 687 km, though at much lesser degrees of oiling. For example, shorelines characterized as heavily oiled went from a maximum of 360 km, to 22.4 km one year later, and to 6.4 km two years later. Shoreline cleanup has been conducted to meet habitat-specific cleanup endpoints and will continue until all oiled shoreline segments meet endpoints. The entire shoreline cleanup program has been managed under the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) Program, which is a systematic, objective, and inclusive process to collect data on shoreline oiling conditions and support decision making on appropriate cleanup methods and endpoints. It was a particularly valuable and effective process during such a complex spill.

  6. Extent and degree of shoreline oiling: Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Gulf of Mexico, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Michel

    Full Text Available The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented by shoreline assessment teams as stranding on 1,773 km of shoreline. Beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3% of the oiled shoreline. Shoreline cleanup activities were authorized on 660 km, or 73.3% of oiled beaches and up to 71 km, or 8.9% of oiled marshes and associated habitats. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 847 km; two years later, oil remained on 687 km, though at much lesser degrees of oiling. For example, shorelines characterized as heavily oiled went from a maximum of 360 km, to 22.4 km one year later, and to 6.4 km two years later. Shoreline cleanup has been conducted to meet habitat-specific cleanup endpoints and will continue until all oiled shoreline segments meet endpoints. The entire shoreline cleanup program has been managed under the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT Program, which is a systematic, objective, and inclusive process to collect data on shoreline oiling conditions and support decision making on appropriate cleanup methods and endpoints. It was a particularly valuable and effective process during such a complex spill.

  7. Extent and Degree of Shoreline Oiling: Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Gulf of Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jacqueline; Owens, Edward H.; Zengel, Scott; Graham, Andrew; Nixon, Zachary; Allard, Teresa; Holton, William; Reimer, P. Doug; Lamarche, Alain; White, Mark; Rutherford, Nicolle; Childs, Carl; Mauseth, Gary; Challenger, Greg; Taylor, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented by shoreline assessment teams as stranding on 1,773 km of shoreline. Beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3% of the oiled shoreline. Shoreline cleanup activities were authorized on 660 km, or 73.3% of oiled beaches and up to 71 km, or 8.9% of oiled marshes and associated habitats. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 847 km; two years later, oil remained on 687 km, though at much lesser degrees of oiling. For example, shorelines characterized as heavily oiled went from a maximum of 360 km, to 22.4 km one year later, and to 6.4 km two years later. Shoreline cleanup has been conducted to meet habitat-specific cleanup endpoints and will continue until all oiled shoreline segments meet endpoints. The entire shoreline cleanup program has been managed under the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) Program, which is a systematic, objective, and inclusive process to collect data on shoreline oiling conditions and support decision making on appropriate cleanup methods and endpoints. It was a particularly valuable and effective process during such a complex spill. PMID:23776444

  8. National assessment of shoreline change: historical change along the north coast of Alaska, U.S.-Canadian border to Icy Cape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Beach erosion is a persistent problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. Along the Arctic coast of Alaska, coastal erosion is widespread, may be accelerating, and is threatening defense and energy-related infrastructure, coastal habitats, and Native communities. As coastal populations continue to expand and infrastructure and habitat are increasingly threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There also is a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline change with metrics that are consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along the open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline change so that periodic, systematic, and internally consistent updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally.

  9. Inversion of GPS meteorology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available The GPS meteorology (GPS/MET experiment, led by the Universities Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR, consists of a GPS receiver aboard a low earth orbit (LEO satellite which was launched on 3 April 1995. During a radio occultation the LEO satellite rises or sets relative to one of the 24 GPS satellites at the Earth's horizon. Thereby the atmospheric layers are successively sounded by radio waves which propagate from the GPS satellite to the LEO satellite. From the observed phase path increases, which are due to refraction of the radio waves by the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, the atmospheric parameter refractivity, density, pressure and temperature are calculated with high accuracy and resolution (0.5–1.5 km. In the present study, practical aspects of the GPS/MET data analysis are discussed. The retrieval is based on the Abelian integral inversion of the atmospheric bending angle profile into the refractivity index profile. The problem of the upper boundary condition of the Abelian integral is described by examples. The statistical optimization approach which is applied to the data above 40 km and the use of topside bending angle profiles from model atmospheres stabilize the inversion. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared with corresponding profiles which have already been calculated by scientists of UCAR and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, using Abelian integral inversion too. The comparison shows that in some cases large differences occur (5 K and more. This is probably due to different treatment of the upper boundary condition, data runaways and noise. Several temperature profiles with wavelike structures at tropospheric and stratospheric heights are shown. While the periodic structures at upper stratospheric heights could be caused by residual errors of the ionospheric correction method, the periodic temperature fluctuations at heights below 30 km are most likely caused by atmospheric waves (vertically

  10. 1:1,000,000-Scale Coastline of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays the coastline of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The United States shoreline of the Great Lakes is also...

  11. Comparison of Four Different Methods for Agricultural Positioning Using GPS and IMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Goli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, four different positioning methods were compared in order to evaluate their accuracy, using a remotely controlled robot on a specific route. These methods included: using a single GPS module, combining the data from three GPS modules, using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU, and GPS/IMU data fusion. The comparison of these four methods showed that GPS/IMU data fusion along with a Kalman filter was the most precise method, having a root mean square error of 23.4cm. Integrating the data acquired simultaneously from three GPS modules with fixed and equally spaced position and far enough from each other, had a root mean square error of 31.3cm was the second most precise method. . Also analysis of the IMU data showed that due to cumulative errors, it was not a suitable method using a single IMU for positioning.

  12. Location - Global Positioning System (GPS) Photos

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — Digital photos tagged with GPS location information. The St. Paul District maintains a digital library of over 10,000 GPS photos. Photos are often associated with...

  13. GPS Attitude Determination for Launch Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Toyon Research Corporation proposes to develop a family of compact, low-cost GPS-based attitude (GPS/A) sensors for launch vehicles. In order to obtain 3-D attitude...

  14. GPS operations at Olkiluoto in 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, H.; Kallio, U.; Nyberg, S.; Jokela, J.; Poutanen, M. [Finnish Geodetic Institute, Masala (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    The Finnish Geodetic Institute has studied crustal deformations at Olkiluoto, Kivetty and Romuvaara in co-operation with Posiva Oy since 1995. At Olkiluoto a total of 32 GPS campaigns have been carried out at inner network since 1995 and 17 campaigns at outer network since 2003. Kivetty and Romuvaara were not measured in 2011. In the Olkiluoto inner network 80 percent of the estimated change rates are smaller than 0.10 mm/a. One third of the change rates are statistically significant. They are mainly related to the Olkiluoto permanent station (GPS1) and to the pillars GPS6 and GPS13. The change rates related to GPS6 are not realistic due to the site-specific changes affecting the time series. The maximum change rate (-0.20 mm/a {+-} 0.05 mm/a) is related to GPS13. The time series of GPS13 is half the length of other pillars and therefore, the change rates are more uncertain. In the Olkiluoto outer network the maximum and statistically significant change rate is between GPS1-GPS11 (0.39 mm/a {+-} 0.06 mm/a). Pillar GPS12 was not observed this year. The change rates of baselines GPS1-GPS14 and GPS1-GPS15 are first time statistically significant. The change rates indicate a small movement of the GPS1 pillar. The baseline GPS1-GPS11 crosses an old fracture zone locating in the direction of the Eurajoensalmi, which might be a reason for the deformation. On the other hand, the Onkalo excavations in the vicinity of the Olkiluoto permanent station (GPS1) may cause some movement. Electronic distance measurements have been performed at Olkiluoto at the baseline GPS7-GPS8 using the Mekometer since 2002. The measurements have been carried out simultaneously with GPS campaigns. Based on 19 measurements in 10 years, the trends of the two time series seems to be similar. Due to unmodelled or dismodelled geometrical offsets and the scale difference between GPS measurements and EDM there is about 0.3 mm difference between distances GPS7-GPS8 derived from GPS measurements and EDM

  15. GPS Receiver Performance Inspection by Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Lin-yuan; Liu Jing-nan; Lu Liang-xi

    2003-01-01

    As a powerful analysis tool and the result of contemporary mathematics development, wavelet transform has shown its promising application potentials through the research in the paper. Three aspects regarding GPS receiver performance is tackled: cycle slip detection, receiver noise analysis and receiver channel bias inspection. Wavelet decomposition for double differential observation has demonstrated that this multi-level transform can reveal cycle slips as small as 0.5 cycles without any pre-adjustment processes or satellite orbit information, it can therefore be regarded as a 'geometry free' method. Based on property assumption of receiver noise, signal of noise serial is obtained at the high frequency scale in wavelet decomposition layers. This kind of noise influence on GPSb aseline result can be effectively eliminated by reconstruction process during wavelet reconstruction. Through observed data analysis, the transform has detected a kind of receiver channel bias that has not been completely removed by processing unit of GPS receiver during clock offset resetting operation. Thus the wavelet approach can be employed as a kind of system diagnosis in a generalized point of view.

  16. IMU/GPS System Provides Position and Attitude Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching Fang

    2006-01-01

    A special navigation system is being developed to provide high-quality information on the position and attitude of a moving platform (an aircraft or spacecraft), for use in pointing and stabilization of a hyperspectral remote-sensing system carried aboard the platform. The system also serves to enable synchronization and interpretation of readouts of all onboard sensors. The heart of the system is a commercially available unit, small enough to be held in one hand, that contains an integral combination of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a differential GPS subsystem, and ancillary data-processing subsystems. The system utilizes GPS carrier-phase measurements to generate time data plus highly accurate and continuous data on the position, attitude, rotation, and acceleration of the platform. Relative to prior navigation systems based on IMU and GPS subsystems, this system is smaller, is less expensive, and performs better. Optionally, the system can easily be connected to a laptop computer for demonstration and evaluation. In addition to airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing applications, there are numerous potential terrestrial sensing, measurement, and navigation applications in diverse endeavors that include forestry, environmental monitoring, agriculture, mining, and robotics.

  17. Diagnosing dementia with confidence by GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, H.P.J. van; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier reports suggest limited clinical reasoning and substantial uncertainty of GPs in assessing patients suspected of dementia. OBJECTIVE: To explore the predictors of GPs to decide on the presence and absence of dementia as well as the predictors of diagnostic confidence of GPs.

  18. The SMS-GPS-Trip-Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner; Harder, Henrik; Weber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new method for collecting travel behavior data, based on a combination of GPS tracking and SMS technology, coined the SMS–GPS-Trip method. The state-of-the-art method for collecting data for activity based traffic models is a combination of travel diaries and GPS tracking...

  19. Diagnosing dementia with confidence by GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, H.P.J. van; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier reports suggest limited clinical reasoning and substantial uncertainty of GPs in assessing patients suspected of dementia. OBJECTIVE: To explore the predictors of GPs to decide on the presence and absence of dementia as well as the predictors of diagnostic confidence of GPs. DESI

  20. INS/GPS Integration Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    to maintain the mean code tracking error close to zero. RF FILTER I/Q DEMOD SAMPLING CORRELATION AND INTEGRATION SQUARE LAW DETECTION kth...Q(t) INERTIAL SENSORS OTHER SENSORS CORRELATOR BANK (n) x ′ˆ Figure 2.9: Code tracking information flow diagram for GPS-based navigator. The

  1. Recent GPS Results at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrend, Dirk; Imfeld, Hans L.; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    The Alignment Engineering Group (AEG) makes use of GPS technology for fulfilling part of its above ground surveying tasks at SLAC since early 2002. A base station (SLAC M40) has been set up at a central location of the SLAC campus serving both as master station for real-time kinematic (RTK) operations and as datum point for local GPS campaigns. The Leica RS500 system is running continuously and the GPS data are collected both externally (logging PC) and internally (receiver flashcard). The external logging is facilitated by a serial to Ethernet converter and an Ethernet connection at the station. Internal logging (ring buffer) is done for data security purposes. The weatherproof boxes for the instrumentation are excellent shelters against rain and wind, but do heat up considerably in sun light. Whereas the GPS receiver showed no problems, the Pacific Crest PDL 35 radio shut down several times due to overheating disrupting the RTK operations. In order to prevent heat-induced shutdowns, a protection against direct sun exposure (shading) and a constant air circulation system (ventilation) were installed. As no further shutdowns have occurred so far, it appears that the two measures successfully mended the heat problem.

  2. Contents of GPS Data Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carver, Matthew Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norman, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-09

    There are no very detailed descriptions of most of these instruments in the literature – we will attempt to fix that problem in the future. The BDD instruments are described in [1]. One of the dosimeter instruments on CXD boxes is described in [2]. These documents (or web links to them) and a few others are in this directory tree. The cross calibration of the CXD electron data with RBSP is described in [3]. Each row in the data file contains the data from one time bin from a CXD or BDD instrument along with a variety of parameters derived from the data. Time steps are commandable but 4 minutes is a typical setting. These instruments are on many (but not all) GPS satellites which are currently in operation. The data come from either BDD instruments on GPS Block IIR satellites (SVN41 and 48), or else CXD-IIR instruments on GPS Block IIR and IIR-M satellites (SVN53-61) or CXD-IIF instruments on GPS block IIF satellites (SVN62-73). The CXD-IIR instruments on block IIR and IIR(M) satellites use the same design.

  3. Optimal Preprocessing Of GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sien-Chong; Melbourne, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique for preprocessing data from Global Positioning System receiver reduces processing time and number of data to be stored. Optimal in sense that it maintains strength of data. Also increases ability to resolve ambiguities in numbers of cycles of received GPS carrier signals.

  4. Animal Tracking ARGOS vs GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. W.; Costa, D.; Arnould, J.; Weise, M.; Kuhn, C.; Simmons, S. E.; Villegas, S.; Tremblay, Y.

    2006-12-01

    ARGOS satellite tracking technology has enabled a tremendous increase in our understanding of the movement patterns of a diverse array of marine vertebrates from Sharks to marine mammals. Our current understanding has moved from simple descriptions of large scale migratory patterns to much more sophisticated comparisons of animal movements and behavior relative to oceanic features. Further, animals are increasingly used to carry sensors that can acquire water column temperature and salinity profiles. However, a major limitation of this work is the spatial precision of ARGOS locations. ARGOS provides 7 location qualities that range from 3,2,1,0,A,B,Z and correspond to locations with a precision of 150m to tens of kilometers. Until recently, GPS technology could not be effectively used with marine mammals because they did not spend sufficient time at the surface to allow complete acquisition of satellite information. The recent development of Fastloc technology has allowed the development of GPS tags that can be deployed on marine mammals. Here we compare the location quality and frequency derived from standard ARGOS PTTs to Fastloc GPS locations acquired from 11 northern elephant seals, 5 California and 5 Galapagos sea lions and 1 Cape and 3 Australian fur seals. Our results indicate that GPS technology will greatly enhance our ability to understand the movement patterns of marine vertebrates and the in-situ oceanographic data they collect.

  5. Integrated navigation of aerial robot for GPS and GPS-denied environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Min, Hongkyu; Wada, Tetsuya; Nonami, Kenzo

    2016-09-01

    In this study, novel robust navigation system for aerial robot in GPS and GPS- denied environments is proposed. Generally, the aerial robot uses position and velocity information from Global Positioning System (GPS) for guidance and control. However, GPS could not be used in several environments, for example, GPS has huge error near buildings and trees, indoor, and so on. In such GPS-denied environment, Laser Detection and Ranging (LIDER) sensor based navigation system have generally been used. However, LIDER sensor also has an weakness, and it could not be used in the open outdoor environment where GPS could be used. Therefore, it is desired to develop the integrated navigation system which is seamlessly applied to GPS and GPS-denied environments. In this paper, the integrated navigation system for aerial robot using GPS and LIDER is developed. The navigation system is designed based on Extended Kalman Filter, and the effectiveness of the developed system is verified by numerical simulation and experiment.

  6. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_LT - Long-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  7. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_LT - Long-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  8. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_ST - Short-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  9. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_ST - Short-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  10. Drivers of Coastal Shoreline Change: Case Study of Hon Dat Coast, Kien Giang, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai-Hoa; McAlpine, Clive; Pullar, David; Leisz, Stephen Joseph; Galina, Gramotnev

    2015-05-01

    Coastal shorelines are naturally dynamic, shifting in response to coastal geomorphological processes. Globally, land use change associated with coastal urban development and growing human population pressures is accelerating coastal shoreline change. In southern Vietnam, coastal erosion currently is posing considerable risks to shoreline land use and coastal inhabitants. The aim of this paper is to quantify historical shoreline changes along the Hon Dat coast between 1995 and 2009, and to document the relationships between coastal mangrove composition, width and density, and rates of shoreline change. The generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to quantify the major biophysical and land-use factors influencing shoreline change rates. Most significant drivers of the rates of change are cutting of mangroves, the dominant mangrove genus, changes in adjacent shoreline land use, changes of shoreline land cover, and width of fringing mangroves. We suggest that a possible and inexpensive strategy for robust mangrove shoreline defense is direct mangrove planting to promote mangrove density with the presence of breakwater structures. In the shorter term, construction of coastal barriers such as fence-structured melaleuca poles in combination with mangrove restoration schemes could help retain coastal sediments and increase the elevation of the accretion zone, thereby helping to stabilize eroding fringe shorelines. It also is recommended that implementation of a system of payments for mangrove ecosystem services and the stronger regulation of mangrove cutting and unsustainable land-use change to strengthen the effectiveness of mangrove conservation programs and coastal land-use management.

  11. Drivers of coastal shoreline change: case study of hon dat coast, Kien Giang, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai-Hoa; McAlpine, Clive; Pullar, David; Leisz, Stephen Joseph; Galina, Gramotnev

    2015-05-01

    Coastal shorelines are naturally dynamic, shifting in response to coastal geomorphological processes. Globally, land use change associated with coastal urban development and growing human population pressures is accelerating coastal shoreline change. In southern Vietnam, coastal erosion currently is posing considerable risks to shoreline land use and coastal inhabitants. The aim of this paper is to quantify historical shoreline changes along the Hon Dat coast between 1995 and 2009, and to document the relationships between coastal mangrove composition, width and density, and rates of shoreline change. The generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to quantify the major biophysical and land-use factors influencing shoreline change rates. Most significant drivers of the rates of change are cutting of mangroves, the dominant mangrove genus, changes in adjacent shoreline land use, changes of shoreline land cover, and width of fringing mangroves. We suggest that a possible and inexpensive strategy for robust mangrove shoreline defense is direct mangrove planting to promote mangrove density with the presence of breakwater structures. In the shorter term, construction of coastal barriers such as fence-structured melaleuca poles in combination with mangrove restoration schemes could help retain coastal sediments and increase the elevation of the accretion zone, thereby helping to stabilize eroding fringe shorelines. It also is recommended that implementation of a system of payments for mangrove ecosystem services and the stronger regulation of mangrove cutting and unsustainable land-use change to strengthen the effectiveness of mangrove conservation programs and coastal land-use management.

  12. Impacts of shoreline erosion on coastal ecosystems in Songkhla Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipaporn Chusrinuan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Songkhla Province is located on the eastern coast of the southern Thai Peninsula, bordering the Gulf of Thailand for approximately 107 km. Most of the basin’s foreshores have been extensively developed for housing, tourism and shrimp farming. The beaches are under deteriorating impacts, often causing sediment transport which leads to an unnaturally high erosion rate. This natural phenomenon is considered to be a critical problem in the coastal areas affected by the hazard of coastal infrastructure and reduced beach esthetics for recreation. In this study, shoreline changes were compared between 1975 and 2006 using aerial photographs and Landsat imageries using Geographic Information System (GIS. The results revealed that 18.5 km2 of the coastal areas were altered during the period. Of this, 17.3 km2 suffered erosion and 1.2 km2were subjected to accretion. The most significant changes occurred between 1975-2006. Shoreline erosion was found at Ban Paktrae, Ranot District, with an average erosion rate of 5.3 m/year, while accretion occurred at Laem Samila, MuangSongkhla District with an average accretion rate of 2.04 m/year. The occurrences of shoreline erosion have contributed to the degradation of coastal soil and water quality, destruction of beach and mangrove forests, loss of human settlements and livelihood.These processes have led to deterioration of the quality of life of the residents. Prevention and mitigation measures to lessen economic and social impacts due to shoreline erosion are discussed.

  13. Wave transformation and shoreline water level on Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetham, Edward; Kench, Paul S.; O'Callaghan, Joanne; Popinet, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The influence of sea swell (SS) waves, infragravity (IG) waves, and wave setup on maximum runup (Rmax) is investigated across different tidal stages on Fatato Island, Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu. Field results illustrate that SS waves are tidally modulated at the shoreline, with comparatively greater wave attenuation and setup occurring at low tide versus high tide. A shoreward increase in IG wave height is observed across the 100 m wide reef flat at all tidal elevations, with no tidal modulation of IG wave height at the reef flat or island shoreline. A 1-D shock-capturing Green-Naghdi solver is used to replicate the field deployment and analyze Rmax. Model outputs for SS wave height, IG wave height and setup at the shoreline match field results with model skill >0.96. Model outputs for Rmax are used to identify the temporal window when geomorphic activity can occur on the beach face. During periods of moderate swell energy, waves can impact the beach face at spring low tide, due to a combination of wave setup and strong IG wave activity. Under mean wave conditions, the combined influence of setup, IG waves and SS waves results in interaction with island sediment at midtide. At high tide, SS and IG waves directly impact the beach face. Overall, wave activity is present on the beach face for 71% of the study period, a significantly longer duration than is calculated using mean water level and topographic data.

  14. Anthropogenic currents and shoreline water quality in Avalon Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lin C; Litton, Rachel M; Grant, Stanley B

    2011-03-15

    Shoreline concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and fecal indicator viruses (FIV) in Avalon Bay (Catalina Island, California) display a marked diurnal pattern (higher at night and lower during the day) previously attributed to the tidal flux of sewage-contaminated groundwater and the tidal washing of contaminated sediments, coupled with light and dark die-off of FIB and FIV (Boehm, et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 2009, 43, 8046-8052). In this paper we document the existence of strong (peak velocities between 20 to 40 cm/s) transient currents in the nearshore waters of Avalon Bay that occur between 07:00 and 20:00 each day. These currents, which have a significant onshore component, are generated by anthropogenic activities in the Bay, including prop wash from local boat traffic and the docking practices of large passenger ferries. A budget analysis carried out on simultaneous measurements of FIB at two cross-shore locations indicates that anthropogenic currents contribute to the diurnal cycling of FIB concentrations along the shoreline, by transporting relatively unpolluted water from offshore toward the beach. The data and analysis presented in this paper support the idea that anthropogenic currents represent a significant, and previously overlooked, source of variability in shoreline water quality.

  15. The Shoreline Video Assessment Method (S-VAM): Using dynamic hyperlapse image acquisition to evaluate shoreline mangrove forest structure, values, degradation and threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jock R; Duke, Norman C; Wood, Apanie L

    2016-08-30

    Climate change with human direct pressures represent significant threats to the resilience of shoreline habitats like mangroves. A rapid, whole-of-system assessment strategy is needed to evaluate such threats, better linking innovative remote sensing with essential on-ground evaluations. Using the Shoreline Video Assessment Method, we surveyed around 190km of the mostly mangrove-fringed (78%) coastline of Kien Giang Province, Vietnam. The aim was to identify anthropogenic drivers of degradation, establishing baseline for specific rehabilitation and protection strategies. Fish traps occupy at least 87% of shoreline mangroves, around which there were abundant human activities - like fishing, crabbing, farming, plus collecting firewood and foliage. Such livelihoods were associated with remnant, fringing mangrove that were largely degraded and threatened by erosion retreat, herbivory, and excessive cutting. Our assessment quantified associated threats to shoreline stability, along with previous rehabilitation intervention measures. The method offers key opportunities for effective conservation and management of vulnerable shoreline habitats.

  16. Validating One-on-One GPS Instruction Methodology for Natural Resource Area Assessments Using Forestry Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Forestry (BSF) at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFA) attend an intensive 6-week residential hands-on instruction in applied field methods. The intensive 6-week instruction includes learning how to use the Global Positioning System (GPS) with a Garmin eTrex HCx GPS unit to accurately…

  17. On the Consistency of Large Earthquake Moment and Strain Rate Inferred from GPS Data in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Yongge; He Zhende; Shen Zhengkang; Gan Weijun; Wang Aijun

    2005-01-01

    The new GPS data can map crustal strain rates over large areas with a useful degree of precision. Stable strain measurement results open the door for improved estimates of earthquake occurrence. The Kostrov's formula (1974) translates the smoothed strain rates in North China into geodetic moment rates. In North China, the ratio of seismic moment released to moment accumulated from GPS measurement is 60.6% in NS direction, 68.9% in EW direction, and 104.1% in NE shear direction. The near unit ratio points to the reliability of GPS measurements there. The combination of historical seismicity and GPS measurement offers a powerful attack on earthquake hazard.

  18. Tsunami Waves Extensively Resurfaced the Shorelines of an Early Martian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J. A. P.; Fairen, A. G.; Linares, R.; Zarroca, M.; Platz, T.; Komatsu, G.; Kargel, J. S.; Gulick, V.; Jianguo, Y.; Higuchi, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Viking image-based mapping of a widespread deposit covering most of the northern low-lands of Mars led to the proposal by Parker et al. that the deposit represents the vestiges of an enormous ocean that existed approx. 3.4 Ga. Later identified as the Vastitas Borealis Formation, the latest geologic map of Mars identifies this deposit as the Late Hesperian lowland unit (lHl). This deposit is typically bounded by raised lobate margins. In addition, some margins have associated rille channels, which could have been produced sub-aerially by the back-wash of high-energy tsunami waves. Radar-sounding data indicate that the deposit is ice-rich. However, until now, the lack of wave-cut shoreline features and the presence of lobate margins have remained an im-pediment to the acceptance of the paleo-ocean hypothesis.

  19. Radio-tracking large wilderness mammals: integration of GPS and Argos technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Charles C.; Arthur, Steve M.

    1999-01-01

    We tested 30 prototype global positioning system (GPS) radiocollars on brown bears (Ursus arctos) over a 3-year period on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Collars were of 2 design types: GPS units with an Argos (Argos Data collection and Location System) satellite uplink (n = 19) and GPS units where the data were stored on board (n = 10) for retrieval at a later date. All units also contained a conventional VHF (very high frequency) transmitter and weighed 1.7 kg. GPS-Argos units obtained 10-82% of expected GPS fixes, and fix rate declined significantly (P technology using the course acquisition code. Reduced accuracy was likely a result of the proportion of 2-dimensional versus 3-dimensional fixes obtained, although we could not determine this statistic from recorded data. Increased overstory closure was the only variable measured that partially explained the reduced likelihood of a successful fix. Stem density, stem diameter, and overstory height measured within 3 m of the collar did not affect fix success. GPS fix success rates for collars attached to bears varied more and were lower than fix rates for stationary collars placed in various vegetation types, suggesting that the bear, terrain, and movement all influence both fix and uplink success rate. Application of this new technology to grizzly and brown bear research and comparisons to studies with moose (Alces alces) are discussed.

  20. Uncertainties in sandy shorelines evolution under the Bruun rule assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonéri eLe Cozannet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current practice of sandy shoreline change assessments, the local sedimentary budget is evaluated using the sediment balance equation, that is, by summing the contributions of longshore and cross-shore processes. The contribution of future sea-level-rise induced by climate change is usually obtained using the Bruun rule, which assumes that the shoreline retreat is equal to the change of sea-level divided by the slope of the upper shoreface. However, it remains unsure that this approach is appropriate to account for the impacts of future sea-level rise. This is due to the lack of relevant observations to validate the Bruun rule under the expected sea-level rise rates. To address this issue, this article estimates the coastal settings and period of time under which the use of the Bruun rule could be (invalidated, in the case of wave-exposed gently-sloping sandy beaches. Using the sedimentary budgets of Stive (2004 and probabilistic sea-level rise scenarios based on IPCC, we provide shoreline change projections that account for all uncertain hydrosedimentary processes affecting idealized coasts (impacts of sea-level rise, storms and other cross-shore and longshore processes. We evaluate the relative importance of each source of uncertainties in the sediment balance equation using a global sensitivity analysis. For scenario RCP 6.0 and 8.5 and in the absence of coastal defences, the model predicts a perceivable shift toward generalized beach erosion by the middle of the 21st century. In contrast, the model predictions are unlikely to differ from the current situation in case of scenario RCP 2.6. Finally, the contribution of sea-level rise and climate change scenarios to sandy shoreline change projections uncertainties increases with time during the 21st century. Our results have three primary implications for coastal settings similar to those provided described in Stive (2004 : first, the validation of the Bruun rule will not necessarily be

  1. Operational shoreline mapping with high spatial resolution radar and geographic processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E; Chi, Zhaohui; Ramsey, Elijah W.

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive mapping technology was developed utilizing standard image processing and available GIS procedures to automate shoreline identification and mapping from 2 m synthetic aperture radar (SAR) HH amplitude data. The development used four NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) data collections between summer 2009 and 2012 and a fall 2012 collection of wetlands dominantly fronted by vegetated shorelines along the Mississippi River Delta that are beset by severe storms, toxic releases, and relative sea-level rise. In comparison to shorelines interpreted from 0.3 m and 1 m orthophotography, the automated GIS 10 m alongshore sampling found SAR shoreline mapping accuracy to be ±2 m, well within the lower range of reported shoreline mapping accuracies. The high comparability was obtained even though water levels differed between the SAR and photography image pairs and included all shorelines regardless of complexity. The SAR mapping technology is highly repeatable and extendable to other SAR instruments with similar operational functionality.

  2. Extraction of shoreline changes in Selangor coastal area using GIS and remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamat, S. N.; Maulud, K. N. Abdul; Jaafar, O.; Ahmad, H.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, coastal zones are facing shoreline changes that stemming from natural and anthropogenic effect. The process of erosion and accretion will affect the physical environment of the shoreline. Therefore, the study of shoreline changes is important to identify the patterns of changes over time. The rapid growth of technology nowadays has facilitated the study of shoreline changes. Geographical Information System (GIS) alongside Remote Sensing (RS) technology is a useful tool to study these changes due to its ability to generate information, monitoring, analysis and prediction of the shoreline changes. Hence, the future projection of the trend for a specific coastal area can be done effectively. This study investigates the impact of shoreline changes to the community in Selangor area which mainly focus on the physical aspects. This study presents preliminary result using satellite image from SPOT 5 to identify the shoreline changes from the year 1984 to 2013 at Selangor coastal area. Extraction of shoreline from satellite image is vital to analyze the erosion and accretion along the shoreline area. This study shows that a shoreline change for the whole area is a categorized as a medium case. The total eroded and accretion of Selangor area from 1984 to 2013 is 2558 hectares and 2583 hectares respectively. As a result, Kapar, Jugra, Telok Panglima Garang and Kelanang are categorized as high risk erosion area. Shoreline changes analysis provides essential information to determine on the shoreline changes trends. Therefore, the results of this study can be used as essential information for conservation and preservation of coastal zone management.

  3. Case Study: Sensitivity Analysis of the Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline Wetland Value Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Barrier Shoreline Wetland Value Assessment Model1 by S. Kyle McKay2 and J. Craig Fischenich3 OVERVIEW: Sensitivity analysis is a technique for...relevance of questions posed during an Independent External Peer Review (IEPR). BARATARIA BASIN BARRIER SHORELINE (BBBS) STUDY: On average...scale restoration projects to reduce marsh loss and maintain these wetlands as healthy functioning ecosystems. The Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline

  4. GPS/MEMS IMU/Microprocessor Board for Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James; Ott, William E.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  5. GPs' views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP's workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. To explore GPs' views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient's interests. GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  6. INDOOR LOCALIZATION SOLUTION FOR GPS

    OpenAIRE

    Shreyanka B. Chougule; Dr.Sayed Abdulhayan

    2017-01-01

    GPS technology is used for positioning application and it is highly reliable and accurate when used outdoor. Due to multipath propagation, signal attenuation and blockage its performance is limited in indoor and dense urban environment. As a solution, technologies like Apple’s iBeacon, Radio-frequency identification (RFID), Ultrasonic and Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) access points are used to improve performance in Indoor environment. We are having a look at all these technologies which are mean...

  7. Projecting future wave climates and corresponding shoreline changes along the differently exposed coastal sections of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suursaar, Ülo; Tõnisson, Hannes

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study is to analyze the recently observed and projected future coastal changes in differently exposed Estonian coastal sections as a result of changing wind and wave climates. Along the shoreline of the practically tideless Baltic Sea, the increase in storminess has already impacted the coastal environment over the last 50 years. However, the number of storms, as well as their pathways, has been fluctuating considerably over the last decades. Furthermore, forecasting future hydrodynamic conditions and corresponding coastal changes is a rather mixed, yet crucial task. A number of Estonian study sites have been regularly examined by coastal scientists since the 1960s. Six coastal sections have been chosen for this study: Harilaid Peninsula (exposed to SW), Letipea-Sillamäe (N), Kõiguste-Nasva (SE), Kihnu-Pärnu (S), and two sides of the Osmussaar Island (W, N). Since the 2000s, use of GPS instruments and GIS software has enabled year-to-year changes in the shoreline to be tracked and the calculation of the corresponding areas or volumes due to accumulation and erosion. Recently digitized aerial photographs, as well as orthophotos and old topographic maps, enable the calculation of changes over longer sub-periods. Based on recorded and hindcasted changes in wind-driven hydrodynamic conditions, we found relationships between forcing conditions and the rates at which shorelines were changing. For future changes, wave climates were projected for the selected coastal sections of special geomorphic interest, where also a series of hydrodynamic surveys (waves, currents, sea level) were carried out using ADCP-s in 2006-2014. Wave parameters were consecutively hindcasted using a site-dependently calibrated fetch-based wave model. As the full calculation period (1966-2013) might suffer from inhomogeneity of wind input data, a confidently homogeneous time cut (2004-2013; 10 full years with hourly resolution) was chosen as a baseline (or control) period. An

  8. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  9. GPS-Aided Video Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Feuerhake

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tracking moving objects is both challenging and important for a large variety of applications. Different technologies based on the global positioning system (GPS and video or radio data are used to obtain the trajectories of the observed objects. However, in some use cases, they fail to provide sufficiently accurate, complete and correct data at the same time. In this work we present an approach for fusing GPS- and video-based tracking in order to exploit their individual advantages. In this way we aim to combine the reliability of GPS tracking with the high geometric accuracy of camera detection. For the fusion of the movement data provided by the different devices we use a hidden Markov model (HMM formulation and the Viterbi algorithm to extract the most probable trajectories. In three experiments, we show that our approach is able to deal with challenging situations like occlusions or objects which are temporarily outside the monitored area. The results show the desired increase in terms of accuracy, completeness and correctness.

  10. Applications of GPS technologies to field sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughey, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology was made possible after the invention of the atomic clock. The first suggestion that GPS could be used to assess the physical activity of humans followed some 40 y later. There was a rapid uptake of GPS technology, with the literature concentrating on validation studies and the measurement of steady-state movement. The first attempts were made to validate GPS for field sport applications in 2006. While GPS has been validated for applications for team sports, some doubts continue to exist on the appropriateness of GPS for measuring short high-velocity movements. Thus, GPS has been applied extensively in Australian football, cricket, hockey, rugby union and league, and soccer. There is extensive information on the activity profile of athletes from field sports in the literature stemming from GPS, and this includes total distance covered by players and distance in velocity bands. Global positioning systems have also been applied to detect fatigue in matches, identify periods of most intense play, different activity profiles by position, competition level, and sport. More recent research has integrated GPS data with the physical capacity or fitness test score of athletes, game-specific tasks, or tactical or strategic information. The future of GPS analysis will involve further miniaturization of devices, longer battery life, and integration of other inertial sensor data to more effectively quantify the effort of athletes.

  11. HATTERAS_SHORELINES_1978_2002: Hatteras Island shorelines from 1978 to 2002: fourteen high water shorelines from Oregon Inlet to Cape Hatteras Point, North Carolina (geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shoreline of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, is experiencing long-term coastal erosion. In order to better understand and monitor the changing coastline,...

  12. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Short-Term Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow, and community infrastructures are...

  13. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Long-Term Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow, and community infrastructures are...

  14. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Long-Term Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow, and community infrastructures are...

  15. Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  16. Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  17. Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  18. Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  19. Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  20. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Short-Term Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow, and community infrastructures are...

  1. Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  2. California Shoreline Sand Retention: Existing Structure Performance and Future Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, N. E.; Griggs, G. B.

    2008-12-01

    Amidst rising sea level, climate change and expanding coastal populations, sandy beaches are frequently exposed to erosional processes. Effective sea level rise will lead to recreational beach loss as a result of coastal inundation. Beach nourishment is growing in popularity as a mitigation approach to meet the increasing need to protect coastal resources. The practice of beach nourishment along high energy shorelines, such as in California, is often improved by the construction of sediment retention structures (groins) to enhance project lifespans. However, our current ability to design effective littoral barriers is extremely limited. An underutilized and cost-effective resource for critically analyzing engineered retention structure performance is the record of existing structures within California. The impacts of 205 structures along California's 1700 km shoreline have been systematically explored though measurements collected from aerial imagery and historic shoreline positions. The findings of this study suggest that approximately 30 million m3 of sand and 18% of California's total exposed sandy beach area is presently retained in fillet and salient beaches associated with man-made structures such as groins, breakwaters, piers and jetties. Preliminary results suggest statistically significant correlations between structure effectiveness and key characteristics such as orientation, littoral cell position and construction materials. The central product of this study is a complete and robust GIS catalog of retention structures along California's coastline. A detailed analysis of historic structure performance combined with a systematically measured record of structure characteristics for the entire state results in a useful product to help coastal planners use the lessons of the past to plan future beach management.

  3. Spatial data integration for analyzing the dynamics of Albanian Adriatic shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapi, Luan; Nikolli, Pal; Kovaçi, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Shoreline mapping and shoreline change detection are critical subjects for coastal resource management, coastal environmental protection and sustainable coastal development and planning. Coastal changes are attracting more focus since they are important environmental indicators that directly impact coastal economic development and land management. Changes in the shape of shoreline may essentially affect the environment of the coastal zone. These may be caused by natural processes and human activities. The undertaken work focuses on analyzing the Adriatic shoreline dynamics, using spatial temporal data, by taking advantage of Geographic Informatin System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS). Shoreline mapping focuses on some specific issues such as mapping methods used to acquire shoreline data, models and database design used to represent shoreline in the spatial database and shoreline -change analysis methods. The study area extends from the mouth of Buna River in the north to Vlora Bay in the south covering a total length of about 220 km. Detection and future assessment of Albanian Adriatic shoreline spatial position is carried out through integration of multi scale resolution of spatial temporal data and different processing methods. We have combined topographic maps at different scales (1:75 000, 1918; 1:50 000, 1937; 1:25 000, 1960, 1986 and 1:10 000, 1995), digital aerial photographs of 2007 year, satellite images of Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+ and field observed GIS data. Generation of spatial data is carried out through vectorization process and image processing. Monitoring the dynamics of shoreline position change requires understanding the coastal processes as well as coastal mapping methods. The net rates of variations in the position of the shoreline are calculated according to transects disposed perpendicularly to the baseline and spaced equally along the coast. Analysis of the relative impact of the natural factors and human activities, it is fundamental

  4. A shoreline sand wave formation event at Dungeness, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falqués, A.; Arriaga, J.; Francesca, R.; Eddie, C.

    2016-12-01

    Alongshore rhythmic morphological patterns at different length scales are quite common along sandy beaches. Well known examples are megacusps and crescentic bars/rip channel systems with alongshore wavelengths ˜ 100-1000 m. At larger scales (˜ 1-10 km or more) there are the km-scale shoreline sand waves. During the last two decades there has been much research to unravel the origin of such intriguing patterns and to get insight into their dynamics. The hypothesis that they emerge out of positive feedbacks between hydrodynamics and morphology has been amply confirmed by mathematical modelling. In particular, the potential role of high-angle waves (large incidence angles with respect to shore) in driving km-scale shoreline sand waves has been investigated (Ashton et al., 2001, van den Berg et al., 2012). However, direct tests with nature are very difficult and are inexistent to our knowledge. This is so because these tests would require detailed measurements of the bathymetry and the wave conditions at the moment of their formation from a featureless morphology. Dungeness beach is located at the English shore of the Dover straight facing northeast part of a cuspate foreland. It is a gravel beach (D50=6-10 mm) quite steep until 1 m depth (β≈0.13) and gentle until 3 m depth (β≈0.005) without shore-parallel bars. Bathymetric maps of this beach are available since 2007 and the wave conditions are also known from a wave buoy in 43 m depth. The shorelines from 2007 until 2013 show some subtle and evolving undulations. But remarkably, in 2014 a series of two undulations develop with a wavelength of about 0.5 km. They persist until 2016 and migrate to the N. This is a clear formation event that provides a unique opportunity to compare observations with the outputs of morphodynamic models for the initial formation of such features. Therefore, the objectives are: 1) Characterize the bathymetric evolution and the wave conditions prior/during the formation event, 2) run

  5. The Relationship Between Shoreline Change and Surf Zone Sand Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miselis, J. L.; McNinch, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    There is a lack of information concerning surf zone geologic processes and their relationship to shoreline behavior despite the consensus that the two are intimately linked. Variations in sand thickness over a highly irregular migration surface close to the shoreline may influence wave dynamics and sediment transport and thus may be connected to hotspot formation. A nearshore survey, spanning 40km from north of the USACE-FRF pier in Duck, NC to just north of Oregon Inlet, was conducted using an interferometric swath bathymetry system and a chirp sub-bottom profiler. The study was conducted within 1km of the shore (in the surf zone) to investigate the processes that may be responsible for the behavior of shoreline hotspots in the area. The topmost reflector and the seafloor of the seismic profile were digitized and the depth difference between them was calculated. Though no ground truths were done in the survey area, cores collected from just north of the site suggest that the topmost reflector is a pre-modern ravinement surface (cohesive muds with layers of sand and gravel) upon which the Holocene sands migrate. An isopach map was generated and shows that the layer of sand above the first sub-bottom reflector is very thin and in some places, exposed. There are many variables that may influence hotspot behavior, including bar position and wave conditions, however, the purpose of this study is to determine if there is a spatial correlation between a thin or absent (exposed reflector) nearshore sand layer and the presence of a shoreline hotspot. In an area associated with a hotspot approximately 14km south of the USACE-FRF pier in Duck, the maximum thickness of Holocene sands was less than 2.5m. The average thickness was less than 1m (0.705m). Thicknesses that were less than 0.2m were classified as areas where the reflector was exposed and accounted for 5 percent of those calculated. It seems the thin layer of sand may represent a deficient nearshore sand source

  6. Experimental Results on an Integrated GPS and Multisensor System for Land Vehicle Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Global position system (GPS is being widely used in land vehicles to provide positioning information. However, in urban canyons, rural tree canopies, and tunnels, the GPS satellite signal is usually blocked and there is an interruption in the positioning information. To obtain positioning solution during GPS outages, GPS can be augmented with an inertial navigation system (INS. However, the utilization of full inertial measurement unit (IMU in land vehicles could be quite expensive despite the use of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS-based sensors. Contemporary research is focused on reducing the number of inertial sensors inside an IMU. This paper explores a multisensor system (MSS involving single-axis gyroscope and an odometer to provide full 2D positioning solution in denied GPS environments. Furthermore, a Kalman filter (KF model is utilized to predict and compensate the position errors of the proposed MSS. The performance of the proposed method is examined by conducting several road tests trajectories using both MEMS and tactical grade inertial sensors. It was found that by using proposed MSS algorithm, the positional inaccuracies caused by GPS signal blockages are adequately compensated and resulting positional information can be used to steer the land vehicles during GPS outages with relatively small position errors.

  7. GPS in Travel and Activity Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Hovgesen, Henrik Harder

    2004-01-01

    The use of GPS-positioning as a monitoring tool in travel and activity surveys opens up a range of possibilities. Using a personal GPS device, the locations and movements of respondents can be followed over a longer period of time. It will then be possible to analyse how the use of urban spaces...... are embedded in the wider context of activity patterns (work, school etc.). The general pattern of everyday itineraries, including route choice and time spent at different locations ?on the way? can also be analysed. If the personal GPS device is combined with an electronic questionnaire, for example...... area. The paper presents the possibilities in travel and activity surveys with GPS and electronic questionnaires. Demonstrative mapping of test data from passive GPS registration of Copenhagen respondents is presented. The different survey possibilities given a combination of GPS and PDA based...

  8. Instantaneous Shoreline Extraction Utilizing Integrated Spectrum and Shadow Analysis From LiDAR Data and High-resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-Chieh

    Shoreline delineation and shoreline change detection are expensive processes in data source acquisition and manual shoreline delineation. These costs confine the frequency and interval of shoreline mapping periods. In this dissertation, a new shoreline delineation approach was developed targeting on lowering the data source cost and reducing human labor. To lower the cost of data sources, we used the public domain LiDAR data sets and satellite images to delineate shorelines without the requirement of data sets being acquired simultaneously, which is a new concept in this field. To reduce the labor cost, we made improvements in classifying LiDAR points and satellite images. Analyzing shadow relations with topography to improve the satellite image classification performance is also a brand-new concept. The extracted shoreline of the proposed approach could achieve an accuracy of 1.495 m RMSE, or 4.452m at the 95% confidence level. Consequently, the proposed approach could successfully lower the cost and shorten the processing time, in other words, to increase the shoreline mapping frequency with a reasonable accuracy. However, the extracted shoreline may not compete with the shoreline extracted by aerial photogrammetric procedures in the aspect of accuracy. Hence, this is a trade-off between cost and accuracy. This approach consists of three phases, first, a shoreline extraction procedure based mainly on LiDAR point cloud data with multispectral information from satellite images. Second, an object oriented shoreline extraction procedure to delineate shoreline solely from satellite images; in this case WorldView-2 images were used. Third, a shoreline integration procedure combining these two shorelines based on actual shoreline changes and physical terrain properties. The actual data source cost would only be from the acquisition of satellite images. On the other hand, only two processes needed human attention. First, the shoreline within harbor areas needed to be

  9. Part 4: GPS Telemetry Detection Rates (GPS Test Collar Sites), GCS NAD 83 (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bias correction in GPS telemetry data-sets requires a strong understanding of the mechanisms that result in missing data. We tested wildlife GPS collars in a variety...

  10. Part 2: GPS Telemetry Detection Rates (Northern Arizona GPS Test Collar Data), GCS NAD 83 (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bias correction in GPS telemetry data-sets requires a strong understanding of the mechanisms that result in missing data. We tested wildlife GPS collars in a variety...

  11. Miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention documents the efforts on the research and development of a miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system. A miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system is presented; Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) based alignment algorithm for space applications is discussed. Two navigation cameras are also included to measure the range and range rate which can be integrated into the GPS/MEMS IMU system to enhance the navigation solution.

  12. The estimation method of GPS instrumental biases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of estimating the global positioning system (GPS) instrumental biases and the methods to calculate the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver are presented. The calculated results of GPS instrumental biases, the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver, and total electron content (TEC) are also shown. Finally, the stability of GPS instrumental biases as well as that of satellite and receiver instrumental biases are evaluated, indicating that they are very stable during a period of two months and a half.

  13. Determination of Vessel Attitudes Using GPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王书寅; 周丰年; 金建霞; 吴敬文

    2002-01-01

    With the development of GPS carrier wave phase technology, it becomes possible that the height accuracy of centimeter level is got by GPS RTK technology. Vessel attitudes are very important parameters in marine survey. In this paper, they were determined by 4 GPS receivers. At the same time, the arithmetic and procedure of vessel attitude determining were given. Based on an experiment, some useful conclusions were obtained and the corresponding methods were put forward to improve the accuracy.

  14. The GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic co-location in space through the precision orbit determination of GPS satellites via satellite laser ranging will contribute significantly towards improving the accuracy and stability of the international terrestrial reference frame. NASA recently formed the GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project to develop and deliver retroreflectors for integration on the next generation of GPS satellites. These retroreflectors will be an important contributor to achieving a global accuracy of 1.0 mm and 0.1 mm/year stability in the international terrestrial reference frame. We report here the current status of the GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project.

  15. GPS operations at Olkiluoto in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallio, U.; Nyberg, S.; Koivula, H.; Jokela, J.; Poutanen, M.; Ahola, J. (Finnish Geodetic Institute, Masala (Finland))

    2010-06-15

    The GPS based deformation studies have been made at the investigation areas of Posiva since 1995, when the network of ten GPS pillars was established at Olkiluoto. One pillar in the investigation area belongs to the Finnish permanent GPS network, FinnRef. 28 GPS measurement campaigns have been carried out at Olkiluoto since 1995. According to the time series of the GPS results 1/3 of the baselines at Olkiluoto have statistically significant change rates. However, the observed movements are smaller than +-0.20 mm/a. There are five pillars, which have statistically significant horizontal velocities at Olkiluoto. These local velocity components are small but taking into account the standard deviations the largest velocity components seems to be reliably determined. At Olkiluoto a baseline for electronic distance measurements (EDM) was built in 2002. The baseline has been measured using EDM instruments in connection to the GPS observations. Changes in he difference between the GPS and EDM results indicate the systematic change in GPS results. No corrections based on only one baseline were not applied to GPS vectors. The GPS network at Olkiluoto was extended in 2003. The new pillars were built close to Kuivalahti village and on a small island of Iso Pyrekari. According to the geological evidence it is expected that a fracture zone is located between the new stations, thus enabling the determination of possible deformations along the fracture zone. The new pillars have been observed since 2003 and now we have computed the first deformation analysis from the six years data. Four new permanent stations will be established in summer 2010 at Olkiluoto. We have automated the processing of the campaign data by using the Bernese processing engine (BPE) together with our own Perl scripts. The local crustal deformations have been studied in GeoSatakunta project, too. This GPS network is located in Cities of Pori and Rauma and their neighbouring municipalities. Two new pillars

  16. Evaluating GPS Data in Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOTTE, H.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available With the latest generation of ultra-sensitive GPS-receivers, satellite signals can often be picked up even indoors, resulting in (inaccurate indoor GPS-localization. A covered position will therefore no longer be characterized by the absence of satellite signals, creating the need for another way of categorizing this data as potentially inaccurate. This paper describes the use of GPS-based localization in an indoor environment. Only high level, generally available, GPS-data (NMEA-0183 GNSS-subset are taken into account. Applications of ubiquitous location awareness, where the use of several RTLS (Real Time Location System combinations is feasible, may benefit from this information to discriminate between GPS and other available localization data. A quality indicating parameter is readily available in GPS-data; the DOP (Dilution Of Precision data field, which indicates the accuracy of the GPS localization based on the current satellite geometry. However since in indoor environments the roof and possible overlying floors often cause more signal attenuation compared to (outer walls or windows, the probability of a better reception of 'low' orbiting satellite signals increases, giving rise to an unjustified good horizontal DOP value. Standard NMEA-0183 GPS strings are therefore analyzed in search of other indicators for malicious GPS-data.

  17. Changes in the Position of the Zambales Shoreline Before and After the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo Eruption: Controls of Shoreline Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siringan

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Shoreline changes along the southern Zambales coast, both short-term - a few to several tens of years - and long-term - hundreds to a few thousands of years - have been determined from bathymetric and topographic maps, satellite images, space shuttle data, and aerial photographs. The dramatic increase of sediment input along the Zambales coast due to the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption resulted in immediate, extensive, and rapid rates of coastal progradation at and adjacent to river mouths. The Bucao River mouth experienced the highest rates of progradation following the eruption, but rapid retreats also occurred. Furthermore, similar advances and retreats of this shoreline were also observed prior to the 1991 eruption; thus, the net change in shoreline position has been minimal. In contrast, progradation has been more pronounced along the discharge area of the Pamatawan and Sto. Tomas Rivers. This is surprising, given that their combined sediment yield is less than that of the Bucao River. Along the more southern segment of the coast, there has been greater progradation which may be attributed to the relatively gentler gradient of the adjacent shelf. Off the Bucao River, a submarine canyon taps the river mouth directly; thus, most of the sediments bypass the coast and shelf.The deltaic promontory that now characterizes the mouth of Sto. Tomas River was formed only after 1944. The delta formation cannot be due to the shifting of the river mouth because the Sto. Tomas River had been emptying at the same point even before the delta buildup. An increase in precipitation in the early 60's increased the river's discharge, which could have elevated the sediment yield leading to the delta buildup.Autocyclic changes in the distributary system of the Sto. Tomas alluvial fan redirected the flow of sediment to the Pamatawan River probably during the two episodes of eruption of Mt. Pinatubo prior to 1991. This resulted in the buildup of a delta much larger than

  18. Shorelines_Oct2012_Sept2014: Hurricane Sandy Beach Response and Recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and Beach Profile Data, October 2012 to October 2014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile consists of Fire Island, NY pre- and post-storm shoreline data collected from October 2012 to September 2014. This dataset contains 13 Mean High Water...

  19. Lidar_MHW_Shorelines_1998_2014.shp - Mean High Water (MHW) Shorelines Extracted from Lidar Data for Dauphin Island, Alabama from 1998 to 2014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile consists of Dauphin Island, AL shorelines extracted from lidar data collected from November 1998 to January 2014. This dataset contains 14 Mean High...

  20. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Long-term back-barrier shoreline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  1. Shorelines_Oct2012_Sept2014: Hurricane Sandy Beach Response and Recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and Beach Profile Data, October 2012 to October 2014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile consists of Fire Island, NY pre- and post-storm shoreline data collected from October 2012 to September 2014. This dataset contains 13 Mean High...

  2. HATTERAS_TRANSECTS: Hatteras Island shoreline transects and shoreline change rate calculations: Oregon Inlet to Cape Hatteras Point, North Carolina (geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shoreline of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, is experiencing long-term coastal erosion. In order to better understand and monitor the changing coastline,...

  3. GOCE gradiometer validation by GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.

    The upcoming European Space Agency (ESA) Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) mission, foreseen to be launched in 2007 (status: July 2006) will carry a highly sensitive gradiometer, consisting of three orthogonal pairs of ultra-sensitive accelerometers. A challenging calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the gradiometer not only pre-launch by a series of on-ground tests, but also after launch by making use of on-board cold-gas thrusters to provoke a long series of gradiometer shaking events which will provide observations for its calibration. In addition, a number of quick-look post-launch methods has been designed and will be implemented that aim at validating the calibration of the gradiometer instrument and at the same time support the operations of the satellite. These methods are based on (1) comparison with the best available global gravity field models, (2) upward continuation of high-precision ground-based gravity field data over certain geographical areas, and (3) use of GPS Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) observations. The focus of this paper is on the third method. An assessment has been made of how well the gradiometer observations can be validated by a combination with GPS tracking observations of GOCE. It was found by a detailed simulation study that the most important parameters, the scale factors of the diagonal gravity gradient components, can be determined with an accuracy better than 0.004, provided a nominal behavior of the gradiometer and GPS instruments.

  4. LA_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Louisiana Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  5. AL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Alabama Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  6. TX_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Texas Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  7. FL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Florida Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  8. NC_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for North Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  9. GA_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Georgia Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  10. SC_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for South Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  11. FL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Florida Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  12. TOXICITY TRENDS DURING AN OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION EXPERIMENT ON A SANDY SHORELINE IN DELAWARE, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 13-week, refereed, inter-agency toxicity testing program involving five bioassay methods was used to document the effectiveness of shoreline bioremediation to accelerate toxicity reduction of an oiled sandy shoreline at Fowler Beach, Delaware, USA. The study was part of an inte...

  13. Sand spit and shoreline dynamics near Terekhol river mouth, Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasekaran, C.; Jayakumar, S.; Gowthaman, R.; Jishad, M.; Yadhunath, E.M.; Pednekar, P.S.

    between the sediment discharge from the river and the littoral transport Around 2km stretch of shoreline is under severe erosion in which a stretch of 500m of sea wall is completely damaged Sand spit present in the northern part of the shoreline plays a...

  14. 78 FR 23289 - Public Review of Draft National Shoreline Data Content Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... Data Content Standard is intended to enhance the shoreline framework by providing technical guidance on... Shoreline Data Content Standard and a summary analysis of the changes will be made available to the public... boundaries, developing nautical charts, and engaging in marine planning and other academic research and...

  15. Numerical modeling of shoreline undulations part 2: Varying wave climate and comparison with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    the observed shoreline features qualitatively and quantitatively. The model slightly over-predicts the scale of the feature and, associated with this, slightly under-predicts the migration speeds of the features. On the second shoreline, the west coast of Denmark, the shore is exposed to waves with an angle...

  16. Inferring autogenically induced depositional discontinuities from observations on experimental deltaic shoreline trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikes, D.; ten Veen, J.H.; Postma, G.; Steel, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Palaeo shoreline is a commonly used proxy for palaeo sea level, but only if deposition is continuous and constant will shoreline trajectory T(l) completely capture sea-level time-series E(t). Artificial deltas were generated in the Eurotank flume facility under stepwise tectonic subsidence, periodic

  17. Oil characterization and distribution in shoreline sediments of Pensacola Bay, Florida following the Deepwater Horizon spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier islands of Northwest Florida were heavily oiled during the Deepwater Horizon spill, but less is known about the impacts to the shorelines of the associated estuaries. Shoreline sediment oiling was investigated at 18 sites within the Pensacola Bay, Florida system prior to...

  18. Calibration of Numerical Model for Shoreline Change Prediction Using Satellite Imagery Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Sutikno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for calibration of numerical model for shoreline change prediction using satellite imagery data in muddy beach. Tanjung Motong beach, a muddy beach that is suffered high abrasion in Rangsang Island, Riau province, Indonesia was picked as study area. The primary numerical modeling tool used in this research was GENESIS (GENEralized Model for Simulating Shoreline change, which has been successfully applied in many case studies of shoreline change phenomena on a sandy beach.The model was calibrated using two extracted coastlines satellite imagery data, such as Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-8 OLI/TIRS. The extracted coastline data were analyzed by using DSAS (Digital Shoreline Analysis System tool to get the rate of shoreline change from 1990 to 2014. The main purpose of the calibration process was to find out the appropriate value for K 1 and K coefficients so that the predicted shoreline change had an acceptable correlation with the output of the satellite data processing. The result of this research showed that the shoreline change prediction had a good correlation with the historical evidence data in Tanjung Motong coast. It means that the GENESIS tool is not only applicable for shoreline prediction in sandy beach but also in muddy beach.

  19. MS_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Mississippi Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  20. SOCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  1. CENCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Central California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  2. NORCAL_BASELINES - Offshore Baseline for Northern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  3. CENCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Central California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  4. NORCAL_BASELINES - Offshore Baseline for Northern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  5. Integrated Shoreline Extraction Approach with Use of Rasat MS and SENTINEL-1A SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, N.; Oy, S.; Erdem, F.; Şeker, D. Z.; Bayram, B.

    2017-09-01

    Shorelines are complex ecosystems and highly important socio-economic environments. They may change rapidly due to both natural and human-induced effects. Determination of movements along the shoreline and monitoring of the changes are essential for coastline management, modeling of sediment transportation and decision support systems. Remote sensing provides an opportunity to obtain rapid, up-to-date and reliable information for monitoring of shoreline. In this study, approximately 120 km of Antalya-Kemer shoreline which is under the threat of erosion, deposition, increasing of inhabitants and urbanization and touristic hotels, has been selected as the study area. In the study, RASAT pansharpened and SENTINEL-1A SAR images have been used to implement proposed shoreline extraction methods. The main motivation of this study is to combine the land/water body segmentation results of both RASAT MS and SENTINEL-1A SAR images to improve the quality of the results. The initial land/water body segmentation has been obtained using RASAT image by means of Random Forest classification method. This result has been used as training data set to define fuzzy parameters for shoreline extraction from SENTINEL-1A SAR image. Obtained results have been compared with the manually digitized shoreline. The accuracy assessment has been performed by calculating perpendicular distances between reference data and extracted shoreline by proposed method. As a result, the mean difference has been calculated around 1 pixel.

  6. Chip Advancer For GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Thomas K.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, J. Brooks

    1989-01-01

    Instrument errors made negligible. For each integration interval, both delay and rate of change of delay initialized to small fraction of chip - for example, to order of 10 to the negative 7th power - thereby making feedback control and extraction of delay highly accurate and flexible. With appropriate selection of sampling rate relative to chip rate, commensurability errors reduced to extremely small levels. In Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, pseudorandom code sequence generated by simple digital logic incorporating effects of time, delay, and rate of change of delay. Flexibility in starting time and sum interval very useful in aligning correlation interval with beginnings and endings of data bits.

  7. Shoreline Delineation and Land Reclamation Change Detection Using Landsat Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, M. I.; Ahmad, M. A.; Kaamin, M.; Izhar, M. F. N.

    2016-07-01

    This study is conducted on the usage of remote sensing images from several different years in order to analyze the changes of shoreline and land cover of the area. Remote sensing images used in this study are the data captured by the Landsat satellite. The images are projecting the land surface in 30 by 30 meter resolution and it is processed by the ENVI software. ENVI is able to change each digital number of the pixels on the images into specific value according to the applied model for classification in which could be used as an approach in calculating the area different classes based from the images itself. Therefore, using this method, the changes on the coastal area are possible to be determined. Analysis of the shoreline and land reclamation around the coastal area is integrated with the land use changes to determine its impact. The study shows that Batu Pahat area might have undergone land reclamation whereas in Pasir Gudang is experiencing substantial amount of erosion. Besides, the changes of land use in both areas were considered to be rapid and due to the results obtained from this study, the issues may be brought about for the local authority awareness action.

  8. Radiation dates of Holocene shorelines in Peninsula Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjia, H.D. (National Univ. of Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor); Fuji, S. (Toyama Univ. (Japan)); Kigoshi, K. (Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen newly determined radiocarbon dates indicate the presence of former shorelines up to 3 meters above present high tide level in the tectonically stable Peninsula of Malaysia. The sea level indicators consist of oysters in growth position (9 samples), molluscs in beach deposits (2), corals in growth position (3), and beachrock (1). In the Peninsula living oysters occur up to or slightly above high tide, modern beach deposits may occur as high as 1.5 meters above high tide, and corals live up to low tide level. The literature shows that high tide, and corals live up to low tide level. The literature shows that beachrock marks intertidal zones. Combined with seven previously published ages of raised shorelines in the region, strong evidence is presented for one or more high Holocene, eustatic sea level stands in the continental part of Southeast Asia. Periods of high sea levels occur between 2500 and 2900 yr BP, and between 4200 and 5700 yr BP. There is also some indication of high sea level between 8300 and 9500 yr BP.

  9. Searching for shoreline change at Titan's north pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Chase; MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason W.

    2016-10-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only other place in the solar system with an active "hydrological" cycle. The conditions in Titan's thick, hazy atmosphere are suitable for methane to play that same role that water does here on Earth. In the ''hydrological cycle", methane rains down, flows across the surface into lakes, and eventually evaporates back into the atmosphere. As such, Titan's surface is dynamic: Cassini has found evidence for fluvial and pluvial activity and erosion. Additionally, evaporites (leftover solid hydrocarbon "salts") along the shores of some lakes demonstrate that lake levels have changed. The question of how fast lake filling or desiccation might happen is still unanswered. Hayes et al. (2011) found that Ontario Lacus experienced up to 9-11 km of shoreline retreat in 4 years on the southwestern margin, but Cornet et al. (2012) found no change in their analysis of the same data. Our project aims to clarify the discrepancy and search for shoreline changes in the north polar lakes during the extent of the Cassini mission. We survey lakes with multiple good resolution images in two Cassini datasets (those of the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer and RADAR). Our results inform a better understanding of the local and global climate, and constrain the timescale for lake-level changes on Titan.

  10. Central and South America GPS geodesy - CASA Uno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James N.; Dixon, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest GPS campaign in the world to date. A total of 43 GPS receivers collected approximately 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA Uno. Scientific goals of the project include measurements of strain in the northern Andes, subduction rates for the Cocos and Nazca plates beneath Central and South America, and relative motion between the Caribbean plate and South America. A second set of measurements are planned in 1991 and should provide preliminary estimates of crustal deformation and plate motion rates in the region.

  11. Central and South America GPS geodesy - CASA Uno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James N.; Dixon, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest GPS campaign in the world to date. A total of 43 GPS receivers collected approximately 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA Uno. Scientific goals of the project include measurements of strain in the northern Andes, subduction rates for the Cocos and Nazca plates beneath Central and South America, and relative motion between the Caribbean plate and South America. A second set of measurements are planned in 1991 and should provide preliminary estimates of crustal deformation and plate motion rates in the region.

  12. Modeling the Effects of Soil Moisture at a GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, C.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.; Nievinski, F. G.; Zavorotny, V.

    2011-12-01

    GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR) uses ground-reflected GPS signals to estimate near-surface soil moisture. Data are recorded by high-precision, geodetic-quality GPS antennas/receivers, for example those that comprise NSF's EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory. The ground reflections used in GPS-IR are representative of a ~1000 m2 area around an antenna. As the dielectric constant of the surface fluctuates, the phase, amplitude, and frequency of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data recorded by the GPS unit change. Based on field observations, it has been shown that these characteristics of the SNR data are sensitive to shallow soil moisture. A single-scattering, electrodynamic model was used to simulate SNR output over a range of soil moisture conditions. All simulations were for a 2.4 m tall antenna surrounded by a surface free of roughness or vegetation. The model was run using three different types of soil moisture profiles: constant with depth, monotonic variations with depth, and observed profiles interpolated from field data. For all profiles, amplitude, phase shift, and frequency changes were calculated from simulated SNR data. The three GPS metrics are well correlated with soil moisture content modeled at the soil surface because a majority of the incident microwave energy is reflected at the air-soil interface. When surface soil is dry relative to the underlying soil, GPS metrics are also strongly correlated with soil moisture averaged over the top 5 cm of the soil column. The relationship between GPS metrics and soil moisture averaged over 5 cm is not as strong when surface soil is relatively wet (>35% volumetric soil moisture). Interpolated profiles from field data resulted in a very strong correlation between SNR metrics and soil moisture averaged over the top 5 cm of soil, suggesting that soil moisture estimated from SNR data is useful for various hydrologic applications.

  13. Accuracy of WAAS-enabled GPS for the determination of position and speed over ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, T H; Wilson, A M

    2005-08-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) offers many advantages over conventional methods for the determination of subject speed during biomechanical studies. Recent advances in GPS technology, in particular the implementation of the Wide-Angle Augmentation System and European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (WAAS/EGNOS), mean that small, highly portable units are available offering the potential of superior accuracy in the determination of both position and speed. This study set out to examine the accuracy of a WAAS-enabled GPS unit for the determination of position and speed. Comparison with the new and published data showed significant enhancements in both position and speed accuracy over a non-WAAS system. Position data collected during straight line cycling showed significantly lower sample-to-sample variation (mean absolute deviation from straight line 0.11 vs. 0.78 m) and greater repeatability from trial to trial (mean absolute deviation from actual path 0.37 vs. 4.8 m) for the WAAS-enabled unit compared to the non-WAAS unit. The speed determined by the WAAS-enabled GPS receiver during cycling in a straight line was within 0.2 ms(-1) of the actual speed measured for 57% of the values with 82% lying within 0.4 ms(-1), however, the data tended towards underestimation of speed during circle cycling, with 65% of values within 0.2 ms(-1) and 87% within 0.4 ms(-1) of the actual value. Local dGPS and dual frequency techniques are more accurate still, however, traditional differential GPS (dGPS), employing FM radio transmission of correction data to a separate receiver, now offers no advantage over WAAS and appears redundant.

  14. BuzzardsBay_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 in the Buzzards Bay coastal region from Nobska Point in Woods Hole, to Westport at the Rhode Island border.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  15. NorthShore_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the North Shore coastal region from North Salisbury at the New Hampshire border to the west side of Deer Island in Boston Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  16. NorthShore_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics for the North Shore coastal region from North Salisbury at the New Hampshire border to the west side of Deer Island in Boston Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  17. Nantucket_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics within the Nantucket coastal region including the Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Nantucket, Muskeget and Tuckernuck Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  18. MarthasVineyard_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics within the Martha's Vineyard coastal region including the Vineyard Sound-, Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Martha's Vineyard and Nomans Land

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  19. Boston_intersects_LTw.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics for the Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  20. Nantucket_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics within the Nantucket coastal region including the Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Nantucket, Muskeget and Tuckernuck Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  1. CapeCodBay_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  2. Boston_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 in the Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  3. CapeCodBay_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  4. ElizabethIslands_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 in the Elizabeth Islands coastal region from Nonamesset Island southwest of Woods Hole to Cuttyhunk Island north of Martha's Vineyard.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  5. Boston_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  6. SouthCapeCod_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics for the South Cape Cod coastal region from Stage Harbor Light in Chatham to Nobska Point in Woods Hole.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  7. BuzzardsBay_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Buzzards Bay coastal region from Nobska Point in Woods Hole, to Westport at the Rhode Island border.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  8. SouthCapeCod_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the South Cape Cod coastal region from Stage Harbor Light in Chatham to Nobska Point in Woods Hole.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  9. SouthShore_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate)shoreline change statistics for the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  10. SouthShore_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term linear regression rate (LRR) shoreline change statistics for the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  11. SouthShore_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  12. CapeCodBay_intersects_LTw.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  13. CapeCodBay_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  14. 长江干线城市港口岸线综合利用分析%Analysis of comprehensive utilization of ports and shoreline in cities along stem Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘均卫; 刘涛; 张妍妍

    2015-01-01

    Based on the general plan of port cities along stem Yangtze River, the utilization situation of shoreline was investiga-ted. The management and utilization status of the shoreline resources is demonstrated and the shoreline utilization efficiency is an-alyzed in terms of the throughput per unit length. It is discovered that the problems include the poor integration and coordination of the planning, low intensive degree of shoreline utilization, unreasonable utilization structure, inefficiency use and waste of deepwater port, weak consciousness of shoreline protection etc. The countermeasures on shoreline comprehensive utilization are suggested, including strengthening the planning and management, setting up the compensation use system of shoreline, innova-ting the shoreline development and utilization mode, raising the deepwater shoreline standard, promoting the well-coordinative development of cities and ports.%以长江干线城市及港口总体规划为基础,对港口岸线利用情况进行了摸底调查。阐述了岸线资源的管理与利用现状,从单位长度岸线吞吐量角度,分析了岸线的使用效率。研究发现,目前长江岸线利用存在岸线规划整体性与协调性缺乏、岸线利用集约化程度低、利用结构不合理、深水浅用与多占少用现象突出,岸线保护意识不强。据此,有针对性地提出了岸线综合利用的措施建议,包括加强规划与管理,建立岸线资源有偿使用机制,创新岸线开发利用方式,提高内河深水岸线标准,促进港口与城市的协调发展等。

  15. Endocrine indicators of a stress response in nesting diamondback terrapins to shoreline barriers in Barnegat Bay, NJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Julianne M; Carruth, Wade C; Spotila, James R; Rostal, David C; Avery, Harold W

    2016-09-01

    Anthropogenic stressors such as habitat loss are a global problem for wildlife. Coastal development in the United States has replaced estuary shorelines with hard erosion barriers. In Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) encounters these barriers when approaching upland beaches for nesting. To determine the effects of shoreline barriers on this threatened species' nesting abilities, we measured adrenocortical response (i.e., stress response) by comparing natural corticosterone and testosterone levels of 91 terrapins following in situ exposure to either an experimentally blocked, or open nesting beach. In addition, we exposed 15 individuals, from various nesting beaches, to handling stress to identify acute corticosterone secretion, finding a significant increase over 60min to 8ng/ml. Corticosterone did not reach this level in terrapins exposed to barriers. Corticosterone and testosterone levels were not significantly higher among terrapins exposed to barriers compared to those at open reference beaches. This lack of a stress response suggests that terrapins do not physiologically respond to barriers when they approach nesting beaches and thus are not stressed. This may be due to an adaptive trait to help female turtles complete the nesting process despite the natural stresses inherent to coming on land. Our study suggests that this lack of stress response is also applied to non-natural, human made nesting barriers. If terrapins are not physiologically capable of adapting to shoreline barriers, future erosion control structures could support terrapin nesting with periodic upland access points. This endocrinological study provides a more quantitative approach to guiding management of anthropogenic stressors upon wildlife.

  16. 76 FR 18216 - Dominion Virginia Power/North Carolina Power; Notice of Availability of Shoreline Management Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Shoreline Management Plan Update for the Shoshone Falls Project and Soliciting Comments, Motions To... Commission and is available for public inspection: a. Application Type: Revised Shoreline Management Plan. b... revised Shoreline Management Plan (SMP) for the project. ] The SMP is a comprehensive plan to protect...

  17. The Southeastern Sicily GPS network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Broccio

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The area located between Catania and Syracuse (Southeastern Sicily, characterised by the presence of the Simeto-Scordia-Lentini graben, was affected in the past by a strong seismicity as proved by the occurrence of seismic events strong enough to reach the XI degree of the MCS scale. In particular the January 11 th, 1693 (l = XI MCS earthquake with a magnitude over 7.5 (estimated, caused huge damage and a great loss of human lives. Following the last seismic event which occurred on December 13th, 1990 (Ml = 5.4 which caused heavy damage and many victims in the Catania-Syracuse area, a geodetic Global Positioning System network (GPS was set up with the aim of monitoring ground movements in one of the Italian areas subjected to high seismic risk, This "pace geodesy technique supplies high precision measurements and represent, a powerful new tool for investigating both regional stress fields and the evolution of local tectonic areas. The GPS network will allow the detection of ground movements with a centimetric accuracy through repeated surveys in time. The results obtained in two surveys carried out il1 1991 al1d 1993, are described in this paper.

  18. Application of real-time GPS to earthquake early warning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard M. Allen; Alon Ziv

    2011-01-01

      Real-time GPS can provide static-offset observations during an earthquake Real-time GPS provides a robust constrain on magnitude for warnings GPS networks should be used as a companion to seismic...

  19. GPS queues with heterogeneous traffic classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Sem; Mandjes, Michel; Uitert, van Miranda

    2002-01-01

    We consider a queue fed by a mixture of light-tailed and heavy-tailed traffic. The two traffic classes are served in accordance with the generalized processor sharing (GPS) discipline. GPS-based scheduling algorithms, such as weighted fair queueing (WFQ), have emerged as an important mechanism for a

  20. Effect of GPS errors on Emission model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Anders; Gross, Allan

    n this paper we will show how Global Positioning Services (GPS) data obtained from smartphones can be used to model air quality in urban settings. The paper examines the uncertainty of smartphone location utilising GPS, and ties this location uncertainty to air quality models. The results presented...

  1. Stigma and GPs' perceptions of dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gove, D.; Downs, M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Small, N.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: General practitioners (GPs) are crucial to improving timely diagnosis, but little is reported about how they perceive dementia, and whether their perceptions display any elements of stigma. The aim of this study was to explore how GPs' perceptions of dementia map onto current

  2. Factors predicting trust between GPs and OPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Nauta; J. von Grumbkow (Jasper)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To study possible differences in trust between general practitioners (GPs) and occupational physicians (OPs) and the explanatory factors for trust. Insight into the factors predicting trust can improve programmes for stimulating the co-operation of GPs and OPs.

  3. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Coastline of the United States 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays the coastline of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The United States shoreline of the Great Lakes is also...

  4. An assisted GPS support for GPS simulators for embedded mobile positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Pradeep; Samant, Abhay; Sagiraju, Phani K.; Akopian, David

    2009-02-01

    During recent years, location technologies have emerged as a research area with many possible applications in wireless communications, surveillance, military equipment, etc. Location Based Services (LBS) such as safety applications have become very popular. For example, US Federal Communication Commission Enhanced 911 (E911) Mandate seeks to provide emergency services personnel with location information that will enable them to dispatch assistance to wireless 911 callers much more quickly. Assisted GPS (A-GPS) is an extension of the conventional Global Positioning System (GPS) which increases start-up sensitivity by as much as 25dB relative to conventional GPS and reduces start times to less than six seconds. In A-GPS assistance data is delivered to the receiver through communication links. This paper addresses the generation of the assistance for GPS simulators for testing A-GPS receivers. The proposed approach is to use IP-based links and location support standards for assistance delivery avoiding network-specific signaling mechanisms so that GPS receiver developers can use this information for testing A-GPS capabilities using basic GPS simulators. The approach is implemented for the GPS simulator developed by the National InstrumentsTM.

  5. Using GPS for studying pastoral mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    geographer familiar with satellite remote sensing and GIS, I pondered how these relatively new technologies could be combined with classic ethnographic fieldwork, which we also use in human geography. I decided to use handheld GPS devices for tracking the pastoralists and their herds. My study was, as far...... as I know, the first one to use GPS for studying pastoral mobility. A total of 10 pastoralists were trained in using a GPS and asked to map their movements. This information was combined with satellite imagery on one hand and qualitative interviews on the other. This case study provides an account...... of the practical aspects of using GPS, taking the reader to the heart of some methodological issues that arose in the course of the research. The case sheds light on the particular challenges in using GPS for eliciting information about pastoral mobility. Thinking about such challenges leads to more general...

  6. Multi buoy system observation for GPS/A seafloor positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaiyama, H.; Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Watanabe, T.; Chiba, H.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    We are developing a method for observation of seafloor crustal deformation using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging system. The system measures seafloor crustal deformation by determining position of benchmarks on the seafloor using a vessel which link-up GPS and acoustic signals. Acoustic ranging is used to measure distance between the vessel and the seafloor benchmarks. And kinematic GPS is used to locate the moving vessel every 0.2 seconds. Now we have deployed 4 seafloor benchmark units at Suruga Bay and 4 units at Kumano Basin both off-pacific coast Japan. At each survey site, three seafloor transponders are settled to define a benchmark unit. In this system, each measurement takes about ten hours and both sound speed structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted based on assumption that the sound speed structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. However, when sound speed structure has a heterogeneity, the assumption of a horizontal layering causes systematic error in the determination of seafloor benchmarks(Ikuta et al 2009AGU). So we are developing a new system using multi-buoy. Multi-buoy plays the role of vessel. Conducting observation using the buoys, we can estimate spatial variation of sound speed structures as a sloped structure every moment. With the single vessel system, we solve a kind of average sound speed over the different paths to the three seafloor transponders. Using the multi-buoy system, they can detect the lateral variation as difference of the average sound speeds obtained by different buoys, which improve the accuracy of the benchmark locations. In November 2013, Observation of seafloor crustal deformation using the buoys was held in Suruga Bay. In this study, we report the result of estimations of heterogeneous sound speed structures.

  7. WIRELESS ACCIDENT INFORMATION SYSTEM USING GSM AND GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.RATHINAKUMAR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses about designing a Smart Display and Control [SDC] which will monitor the zone and maintains the specified speed in the zone levels, which runs on an embedded system. This system includes three modules; automatic speed control module, accident detection and information sending module and security enabling module. Automatic speed control module includes RF transmitter placed in specific location and RF receiver in the vehicle. Accident detection module includes GSM and GPS technology. Security enabling module includes sensory units which ensures the condition of seat belt and the driver. This module includes alcohol sensor and eye sensor. The smart display and control is composed of two separate units: Zone status Transmitter unit and Receiver (speed Display and Control Unit.

  8. Shoreline oil cleanup, recovery and treatment evaluation system (SOCRATES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusin, J.; Lunel, T.; Sommerville, M. [National Environmental Technology Centre, Culham (United Kingdom); Tyler, A.; Marshall, I. [BMT Marine Information Systems Ltd., Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    A beach cleanup computer system was developed to mitigate the impact of shoreline oiling. The program, entitled SOCRATES, was meant to determine the most suitable cleanup methodologies for a range of different spill scenarios. The development, operation and capabilities of SOCRATES was described, with recent examples of successful use during the Sea Empress spill. The factors which influenced decision making and which were central to the numerical solution were: (1) the volumetric removal rate of oil, (2) area removal rate of oil, (3) length of oil slick removed per hour, (4) volumetric removal rate of oily waste, (5) area of the oil slick, (6) length of the oil slick, (7) volume of liquid emulsion, and (8) length of beach. 14 figs.

  9. A Java-based tool for creating KML files from GPS waypoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnicutt, P. G.; Rivard, C.; Rimer, S.

    2008-12-01

    Google Earth provides a free tool with powerful capabilities for visualizing geoscience images and data. Commercial software tools exist for doing sophisticated digitizing and spatial modeling , but for the purposes of presentation, visualization and overlaying aerial images with data Google Earth provides much of the functionality. Likewise, with current technologies in GPS (Global Positioning System) systems and with Google Earth Plus, it is possible to upload GPS waypoints, tracks and routes directly into Google Earth for visualization. However, older technology GPS units and even low-cost GPS units found today may lack the necessary communications interface to a computer (e.g. no Bluetooth, no WiFi, no USB, no Serial, etc.) or may have an incompatible interface, such as a Serial port but no USB adapter available. In such cases, any waypoints, tracks and routes saved in the GPS unit or recorded in a field notebook must be manually transferred to a computer for use in a GIS system or other program. This presentation describes a Java-based tool developed by the author which enables users to enter GPS coordinates in a user-friendly manner, then save these coordinates in a Keyhole MarkUp Language (KML) file format, for visualization in Google Earth. This tool either accepts user-interactive input or accepts input from a CSV (Comma Separated Value) file, which can be generated from any spreadsheet program. This tool accepts input in the form of lat/long or UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) coordinates. This presentation describes this system's applicability through several small case studies. This free and lightweight tool simplifies the task of manually inputting GPS data into Google Earth for people working in the field without an automated mechanism for uploading the data; for instance, the user may not have internet connectivity or may not have the proper hardware or software. Since it is a Java application and not a web- based tool, it can be installed on one

  10. Monitoring of shoreline changes using remote sensing (case study: coastal city of Bandar Abbas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamassoki, E.; Amiri, H.; Soleymani, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Shoreline change is one of the most common natural processes that prevail upon coastal areas. The most important aspect of managing coastal areas is identifying the location and change over time of shoreline. This requires frequent monitoring of the shoreline using satellite imagery over time. We have used imagery from the Landsat TM-5 sensor from 1984,1998 and 2009 in order to monitor shoreline changes using the Max Likelihood Classification method (MLC) in Bandar Abbas city. Monitoring showed that during the period from 1984 to 1998 the area of coastline of Bandar Abbas increased 804.09 hectares. The increase over the next 11-year period was as less, at only 140.81 hectares. In 2009 there was a drastic decrease in shoreline, with the total length of shoreline decreasing from 330 km to 271 km during the period from 1984 to 2009.Results showed that in each period in which the area of coastline advanced, changes in length of shoreline had been less prominent.

  11. The Pilot Valley shoreline: An early record of Lake Bonneville dynamics: Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David; Phelps, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The Pilot Valley shoreline is named for distinctive gravel beaches on the eastern, northern, and western sides of Pilot Valley playa, Utah. The shoreline has been identified across the Bonneville basin where it is characterized by one to three beach crests between ~ 1305 and 1309 m elevation, all overlain by deep-water marl of Lake Bonneville. It thus represents the lowest and earliest recognized shoreline of Lake Bonneville. Features of the shoreline indicate that both high wave energy and high stream sediment discharge contributed to shoreline development. Basin hypsometry did not play a role in the development of the shoreline, which must have been caused by a combination of climatically driven hydrologic and storm factors, such as reduced precipitation that stabilized lake level and increase in storm-driven wave energy. The Pilot Valley shoreline is poorly dated at about 30 ka. If it is somewhat older, correlation with Greenland Interstadial 5.1 at 30.8–30.6 ka could explain the stabilization of lake level.

  12. Understanding coastal change using shoreline trend analysis supported by cluster-based segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burningham, Helene; French, Jon

    2017-04-01

    Shoreline change analysis is a well defined and widely adopted approach for the examination of trends in coastal position over different timescales. Conventional shoreline change metrics are best suited to resolving progressive quasi-linear trends. However, coastal change is often highly non-linear and may exhibit complex behaviour including trend-reversals. This paper advocates a secondary level of investigation based on a cluster analysis to resolve a more complete range of coastal behaviours. Cluster-based segmentation of shoreline behaviour is demonstrated with reference to a regional-scale case study of the Suffolk coast, eastern UK. An exceptionally comprehensive suite of shoreline datasets covering the period 1881 to 2015 is used to examine both centennial- and intra-decadal scale change in shoreline position. Analysis of shoreline position changes at a 100 m alongshore interval along 74 km of coastline reveals a number of distinct behaviours. The suite of behaviours varies with the timescale of analysis. There is little evidence of regionally coherent shoreline change. Rather, the analyses reveal a complex interaction between met-ocean forcing, inherited geological and geomorphological controls, and evolving anthropogenic intervention that drives changing foci of erosion and deposition.

  13. Shoreline changes and Coastal Flooding impacts: South Gujarat coast (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    South Gujarat coast (India) is experiencing increased coastal inundation and erosion caused by sea-level rise affecting the population, infrastructure, and environment. The area falls under low elevation coastal zone (LEZ) and its topography of the area is also making coast highly susceptible to flooding, especially at high tides and during the rainy season. As part of studies on shoreline changes field trip carried on the coastal taluka's of South Gujarat coast i.e. Surat, Navsari and Valsad shows various temporal changes is taking place at coastal belt. There are ample of studies on coastal dynamics and impacts. The study focus on spatial temporal analysis shows the vulnerable zones covering various physical elements at risk. These coastal areas are attractive in nature for all kind of economic development and growth because of availability of the water & fertile land for house hold use, fishing and transportation. On the contrary, South Gujarat coast being tectonically active; makes this region high vulnerable for any kind of infrastructure development. The region had also witnessed loss of life and property, disruptions to transport & power and incidences of epidemics during the floods of 2006 in Surat. Coastal flooding would, under these scenarios, threaten region that are home of 370,000 approx (Census, 2011) people in seven coastal taluka's of Surat, Navsari and Valsad district. Among the people residing in the region, the most vulnerable communities are fishermen, farmer and industrial labours. The wide range of infrastructure such as roads, hospitals, schools, power plants, industries and port will also be at risk. Shoreline changes are inevitably changing the characteristics of south Gujarat coast; practices and policies should be put in place to mitigate the potentially adverse impacts on environment and human settlements. Key words: sea level rise, LEZ, vulnerable, erosion, inundation, spatial temporal analysis, landuse changes.

  14. Megascale rhythmic shoreline forms on a beach with multiple bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Pruszak

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study, carried out in 2003 and 2006 at the Lubiatowo Coastal ResearchStation (Poland, located on the non-tidal southern Baltic coast(tidal range < 0.06 m, focused on larger rhythmic forms (mega-cusps withwavelengths in the interval 500 m > Lc > 20 m. Statistical analyses of detailed shoreline configurations were performed mostly with the Discrete Wavelet Transformmethod (DWT. The beach is composed of fine sand with grain diameter D50 ≈ 0.22 mm, which produces 4 longshore sandbars and a gently sloping seabed with β = 0.015. The analysis confirms the key role of bars in hydro- and morphodynamic surf zone processes.The hypothesis was therefore set up that, in a surf zone with multiple bars, the bars and mega-scale shoreline rhythmic forms form one integrated physical system; experimental evidence to substantiate this hypothesis was also sought.In such a system not only do self-regulation processes include swash zone phenomena, they also incorporate processes in offshore surf zone locations.The longshore dimensions of large cusps are thus related to the distances between periodically active large bed forms (bars. The spatial dimension of bar system activity (number of active bars depends, at a given time scale, on the associated hydrodynamic conditions. It was assumed that such a time scale could include either the development and duration of a storm, or a period of stable, yet distinct waves, capable of remodelling the beach configuration.The indentation to wavelength ratio of mega-cusps for the studied non-tidal dissipative environment may be one order of magnitude greater than for mesotidal, reflective beaches.

  15. GPS Precision Timing at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Beetham, C G

    1999-01-01

    For the past decade, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been used to provide precise time, frequency and position co-ordinates world-wide. Recently, equipment has become available specialising in providing extremely accurate timing information, referenced to Universal Time Co-ordinates (UTC). This feature has been used at CERN to provide time of day information for systems that have been installed in the Proton Synchrotron (PS), Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Electron Positron (LEP) machines. The different systems are described as well as the planned developments, particularly with respect to optical transmission and the Inter-Range Instrumentation Group IRIG-B standard, for future use in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  16. Detection of Oil near Shorelines during the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Garcia-Pineda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During any marine oil spill, floating oil slicks that reach shorelines threaten a wide array of coastal habitats. To assess the presence of oil near shorelines during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill, we scanned the library of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR imagery collected during the event to determine which images intersected shorelines and appeared to contain oil. In total, 715 SAR images taken during the DWH spill were analyzed and processed, with 188 of the images clearly showing oil. Of these, 156 SAR images showed oil within 10 km of the shoreline with appropriate weather conditions for the detection of oil on SAR data. We found detectable oil in SAR images within 10 km of the shoreline from west Louisiana to west Florida, including near beaches, marshes, and islands. The high number of SAR images collected in Barataria Bay, Louisiana in 2010 allowed for the creation of a nearshore oiling persistence map. This analysis shows that, in some areas inside Barataria Bay, floating oil was detected on as many as 29 different days in 2010. The nearshore areas with persistent floating oil corresponded well with areas where ground survey crews discovered heavy shoreline oiling. We conclude that satellite-based SAR imagery can detect oil slicks near shorelines, even in sheltered areas. These data can help assess potential shoreline oil exposure without requiring boats or aircraft. This method can be particularly helpful when shoreline assessment crews are hampered by difficult access or, in the case of DWH, a particularly large spatial and temporal spill extent.

  17. Oyster reefs as natural breakwaters mitigate shoreline loss and facilitate fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B Scyphers

    Full Text Available Shorelines at the interface of marine, estuarine and terrestrial biomes are among the most degraded and threatened habitats in the coastal zone because of their sensitivity to sea level rise, storms and increased human utilization. Previous efforts to protect shorelines have largely involved constructing bulkheads and seawalls which can detrimentally affect nearshore habitats. Recently, efforts have shifted towards "living shoreline" approaches that include biogenic breakwater reefs. Our study experimentally tested the efficacy of breakwater reefs constructed of oyster shell for protecting eroding coastal shorelines and their effect on nearshore fish and shellfish communities. Along two different stretches of eroding shoreline, we created replicated pairs of subtidal breakwater reefs and established unaltered reference areas as controls. At both sites we measured shoreline and bathymetric change and quantified oyster recruitment, fish and mobile macro-invertebrate abundances. Breakwater reef treatments mitigated shoreline retreat by more than 40% at one site, but overall vegetation retreat and erosion rates were high across all treatments and at both sites. Oyster settlement and subsequent survival were observed at both sites, with mean adult densities reaching more than eighty oysters m(-2 at one site. We found the corridor between intertidal marsh and oyster reef breakwaters supported higher abundances and different communities of fishes than control plots without oyster reef habitat. Among the fishes and mobile invertebrates that appeared to be strongly enhanced were several economically-important species. Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus were the most clearly enhanced (+297% by the presence of breakwater reefs, while red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus (+108%, spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus (+88% and flounder (Paralichthys sp. (+79% also benefited. Although the vertical relief of the breakwater reefs was reduced over the course of our study

  18. Oyster reefs as natural breakwaters mitigate shoreline loss and facilitate fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scyphers, Steven B; Powers, Sean P; Heck, Kenneth L; Byron, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Shorelines at the interface of marine, estuarine and terrestrial biomes are among the most degraded and threatened habitats in the coastal zone because of their sensitivity to sea level rise, storms and increased human utilization. Previous efforts to protect shorelines have largely involved constructing bulkheads and seawalls which can detrimentally affect nearshore habitats. Recently, efforts have shifted towards "living shoreline" approaches that include biogenic breakwater reefs. Our study experimentally tested the efficacy of breakwater reefs constructed of oyster shell for protecting eroding coastal shorelines and their effect on nearshore fish and shellfish communities. Along two different stretches of eroding shoreline, we created replicated pairs of subtidal breakwater reefs and established unaltered reference areas as controls. At both sites we measured shoreline and bathymetric change and quantified oyster recruitment, fish and mobile macro-invertebrate abundances. Breakwater reef treatments mitigated shoreline retreat by more than 40% at one site, but overall vegetation retreat and erosion rates were high across all treatments and at both sites. Oyster settlement and subsequent survival were observed at both sites, with mean adult densities reaching more than eighty oysters m(-2) at one site. We found the corridor between intertidal marsh and oyster reef breakwaters supported higher abundances and different communities of fishes than control plots without oyster reef habitat. Among the fishes and mobile invertebrates that appeared to be strongly enhanced were several economically-important species. Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were the most clearly enhanced (+297%) by the presence of breakwater reefs, while red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) (+108%), spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) (+88%) and flounder (Paralichthys sp.) (+79%) also benefited. Although the vertical relief of the breakwater reefs was reduced over the course of our study and this

  19. Development of test protocols for effectiveness testing and working mechanisms for shoreline cleaning agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramstad, S.; Hansen, B.H.; Daling, P.; Frenzel, M.; Oksenvag, J.H.C. [SINTEF Marine Environmental Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Merlin, F. [Cedre, Brest Cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    One major spill and smaller accidental spills have occurred off the Norwegian Coast since the petroleum industry began operation in the area over 50 years ago. To date, no oil from these offshore spills has reached the coastal area, but with the expansion of the oil industry on the Norwegian continental shelf, there is a need for an effective shoreline cleanup response contingency. In general, shoreline cleanup operations are performed over a very long time period with rather low efficacy and generation of large quantities of waste materials. For these reasons, there is a need to develop and implement new and more cost-effective shore line protection, cleanup techniques and strategies. The primary purpose of this work was to develop test protocols for effectiveness quantification of shoreline cleaning agents (SCAs) to better understand their working mechanisms and effectiveness in treating oil-contaminated shorelines. A stepwise test regime was recommended to the Norwegian Climate and Pollution Agency. The test regime considers product ecotoxicology along with dispersibility and effectiveness. Its aim is to contribute to a better understanding for tactical use of these products in different spill scenarios. The paper reviewed non-mechanical in-situ shoreline cleanup techniques; shoreline washing and dispersing agents; bioremediation agents; ecotoxicity testing; dispersibility testing of SCAs; Warren Spring Laboratory (WSL) test of shoreline dispersants; wash-out effectiveness testing of shoreline dispersants on oil-contaminated bedrock using the simulated shoreline system (SSS); wave energy; oil type and soak time; and exposure period. Guidelines for the effective use of the proposed products were recommended based on data from these studies. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Nominal and Real Accuracy of the GPS Position Indicated by Different Maritime Receivers in Different Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Januszewski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays on the ship's bridge two or even more GPS receivers are installed. As in the major cases the coordinates of the position obtained from these receivers differ the following questions can be posed - what is the cause of this divergence, which receiver in the first must be taken into account etc. Based on information published in annual GPS and GNSS receiver survey it was estimated the percentage of GPS receivers designed for marine and/or navigation users. The measurements of GPS position based on the four different stationary GPS receivers were realized in the laboratory of Gdynia Maritime University in Poland in the summer 2012. The coordinates of the position of all these receivers were registered at the same time. The measurements in mode 3D were made for different input data, the same for all receivers. The distances between the individual unit's antenna were considered also. Next measurements in mode 3D also were realized on two ships in different European ports. Additional measurements were made in mode 2D with three receivers for different their's antenna heights. The results showed that the GPS position accuracy depends on the type of the receiver and its technical parameters particularly.

  1. Reinforced Ultra-Tightly Coupled GPS/INS System for Challenging Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among all integration levels currently available for Global Positioning System (GPS and Inertial Navigation System (INS Integrated System, ultra-tightly coupled (UTC GPS/INS system is the best choice for accurate and reliable navigation. Nevertheless the performance of UTC GPS/INS system degrades in challenging environments, such as jamming, changing noise of GPS signals, and high dynamic maneuvers. When low-end Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs based on MEMS sensors are employed, the performance degradation will be more severe. To solve this problem, a reinforced UTC GPS/INS system is proposed. Two techniques are adopted to deal with jamming and high dynamics. Firstly, adaptive integration Kalman filter (IKF based on fuzzy logics is developed to reinforce the antijamming ability. The parameters of membership functions (MFs are adjusted and optimized through self-developed neutral network. Secondly, a Doppler frequency error estimator based on Kalman filter is designed to improve the navigation performance under high dynamics. A complete simulation platform is established to evaluate the reinforced system. Results demonstrate that the proposed system architecture significantly improves navigation performance in challenging environments and it is a more advanced solution to accurate and reliable navigation than traditional UTC GPS/INS system.

  2. The future of GPS-based electric power system measurements, operation and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizy, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilson, R.E. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States); Martin, K.E.; Litzenberger, W.H. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Overholt, P.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Much of modern society is powered by inexpensive and reliable electricity delivered by a complex and elaborate electric power network. Electrical utilities are currently using the Global Positioning System-NAVSTAR (GPS) timekeeping to improve the network`s reliability. Currently, GPS synchronizes the clocks on dynamic recorders and aids in post-mortem analysis of network disturbances. Two major projects have demonstrated the use of GPS-synchronized power system measurements. In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) sponsored Phase Measurements Project used a commercially available Phasor Measurements Unit (PMU) to collect GPS-synchronized measurements for analyzing power system problems. In 1995, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) under DOE`s and EPRI`s sponsorship launched the Wide Area Measurements (WAMS) project. WAMS demonstrated GPS-synchronized measurements over a large area of their power networks and demonstrated the networking of GPS-based measurement systems in BPA and WAPA. The phasor measurement technology has also been used to conduct dynamic power system tests. During these tests, a large dynamic resistor was inserted to simulate a small power system disturbance.

  3. GPS Radio Occultation as Part of the Global Observing System for Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.; Ao, C. O.; Iijima, B. A.; Wilson, B. D.; Yunck, T. P.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: The Measurement (Physical retrievals based on time standards), GPS Retrieval Products, Retrievals and Radiances: CLARREO Mission, GPS RO and AIRS, GPS RO and Microwave, GPS RO and Radiosondes, GPS/GNSS Science, and Conclusions.

  4. Evaluating the Effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Clock Error via GPS Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh; Shafii, Shalini; Amin, Zainal Fitry M.; Jusoh, Asmariah; Zainun Ali, Siti

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock error using GPS simulation. Two conditions of tests are used; Case 1: All the GPS satellites have clock errors within the normal range of 0 to 7 ns, corresponding to pseudorange error range of 0 to 2.1 m; Case 2: One GPS satellite suffers from critical failure, resulting in clock error in the pseudorange of up to 1 km. It is found that increase of GPS satellite clock error causes increase of average positional error due to increase of pseudorange error in the GPS satellite signals, which results in increasing error in the coordinates computed by the GPS receiver. Varying average positional error patterns are observed for the each of the readings. This is due to the GPS satellite constellation being dynamic, causing varying GPS satellite geometry over location and time, resulting in GPS accuracy being location / time dependent. For Case 1, in general, the highest average positional error values are observed for readings with the highest PDOP values, while the lowest average positional error values are observed for readings with the lowest PDOP values. For Case 2, no correlation is observed between the average positional error values and PDOP, indicating that the error generated is random.

  5. Non-traditional approaches to teaching GPS online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, A.; Wolf, D. F., II

    2009-12-01

    Students are increasingly turning to the web for quality education that fits into their lives. Nonetheless, online learning brings challenges as well as a fresh opportunity for exploring pedagogical practices not present on traditional higher education programs, particularly in the sciences. A team of two dozen Empire State College-State University of New York instructional designers, faculty, and other staff are working on making science relevant to non-majors who may initially have anxiety about general education science courses. One of these courses, GPS and the New Geography, focuses on how Global Positioning System (GPS) technology provides a base for inquiry and scientific discovery from a range of environmental issues with local, regional, and global scope. GPS and the New Geography is an introductory level course developed under a grant supported by the Charitable Leadership Foundation. Taking advantage of the proliferation of tools currently available for online learning management systems, we explore current trends in Web 2.0 applications to aggregate and leverage data to create a nontraditional, interactive learning environment. Using our best practices to promote on-line discussion and interaction, these tools help engage students and foster deep learning. During the 15-week term students learn through case studies, problem-based exercises, and the use of scientific data; thus, expanding their spatial literacy and gain experience using real spatial technology tools to enhance their understanding of real-world issues. In particular, we present how the use of Mapblogs an in-house developed blogging platform that uses GIS interplaying with GPS units, interactive data presentations, intuitive visual working environments, harnessing RSS feeds, and other nontraditional Web 2.0 technology has successfully promoted active learning in the virtual learning environment.

  6. GPS radio interferometry of travelling ionospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Palamartchouk, K. S.; Perevalova, N. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents some results investigating the new possibilities of radio interferometry of Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) that are based on exploiting standard measurements of transionospheric radio signal characteristics and coordinate-time measurements using dual-frequency multichannel receivers of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method for GPS radio interferometry (SADM-GPS) is proposed for determining the characteristics of the TIDs dynamics by measuring variations of GPS phase derivatives with respect to time and spatial coordinates. These data are used to calculate corresponding values of the velocity vector, in view of a correction for satellite motions based on the current information available regarding the angular coordinates of the satellites. Subsequently, velocity and direction distributions are constructed and analyzed to verify the hypothesis of whether there is a predominant displacement. If it exists, then the pattern can be considered to be travelling, and the mean travel velocity can be determined from the velocity distribution. Through a computer simulation it was shown that multi-satellite GPS radio interferometry in conjunction with the SADM-GPS algorithm allows the detection and measurement of the velocity vector of TIDs in virtually the entire azimuthal range of possible TID propagation directions. The use of the proposed method is exemplified by an investigation of TIDs during the solar eclipse of 9 March 1997, using the GPS-radio interferometer GPSINT at Irkutsk.

  7. NASA's GPS tracking system for Aristoteles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. S.; Hajj, G.; Kursinski, E. R.; Kyriacou, C.; Meehan, T. K.; Melbourne, William G.; Neilan, R. E.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, Thomas P.

    1991-12-01

    NASA 's Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking system for Artistoteles receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles is described. It will include a global network of GPS ground receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles. The flight receiver will operate autonomously; it will provide real time navigation solutions for Aristoteles and tracking data needed by ESOC for operational control of the satellite. The GPS flight and ground receivers will currently and continuously track all visible GPS satellites. These observations will yield high accuracy differential positions and velocities of Aristoteles in a terrestrial frame defined by the locations of the globally distributed ground work. The precise orbits and tracking data will be made available to science investigators as part of the geophysical data record. The characteristics of the GPS receivers, both flight and ground based, that NASA will be using to support Aristoteles are described. The operational aspects of the overall tracking system, including the data functions and the resulting data products are summarized. The expected performance of the tracking system is compared to Aristoteles requirements and the need to control key error sources such as multipath is identified.

  8. National 2000' GPS control network of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An accurately unified national GPS network with more than 2500 stations, named "National 2000' GPS Control Network", signed the epoch 2000.0, has been established by integrating the existing six nationwide GPS networks of China set up by different departments with different objectives. This paper presents the characteristics of the existing GPS networks, summarizes the strategies in the integrated adjustment of the GPS network, including functional model, stochastic model as well as the adjustment principle modification. By modifying the adjustment strategies according to the characteristics of the existing GPS networks and under the support of the IGS stations, the accuracy of the integrated national GPS network is greatly improved. The datum differences among the sub networks disappear, the systematic error influences are weakened, and the effects of the outliers on the estimated coordinates and their variances are controlled. It is shown that the average standard deviation for the horizontal component is smaller than 1.0 cm, the vertical component is smaller than 2.0 cm, and the three-dimensional (3-D) position of geocenter coordinates is smaller than 3.0 cm. The exterior checking accuracy for the 3-D position is averagely better than 1.0 cm.

  9. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  10. Mining significant semantic locations from GPS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xin; Cong, Gao; Jensen, Christian S.

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing deployment and use of GPS-enabled devices, massive amounts of GPS data are becoming available. We propose a general framework for the mining of semantically meaningful, significant locations, e.g., shopping malls and restaurants, from such data. We present techniques capable...... of extracting semantic locations from GPS data. We capture the relationships between locations and between locations and users with a graph. Significance is then assigned to locations using random walks over the graph that propagates significance among the locations. In doing so, mutual reinforcement between...

  11. Mining significant semantic locations from GPS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xin; Cong, Gao; Jensen, Christian S.

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing deployment and use of GPS-enabled devices, massive amounts of GPS data are becoming available. We propose a general framework for the mining of semantically meaningful, significant locations, e.g., shopping malls and restaurants, from such data. We present techniques capable...... of extracting semantic locations from GPS data. We capture the relationships between locations and between locations and users with a graph. Significance is then assigned to locations using random walks over the graph that propagates significance among the locations. In doing so, mutual reinforcement between...

  12. Ionospheric Mapping Software Ensures Accuracy of Pilots GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    IonoSTAGE and SuperTruth software are part of a suite created at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to enable the Federal Aviation Administration's Wide Area Augmentation System, which provides pinpoint accuracy in aircraft GPS units. The system, used by more than 73,000 planes, facilitates landings under adverse conditions at small airports. In 2013, IonoSTAGE and SuperTruth found their first commercial license when NEC, based in Japan, with US headquarters in Irving, Texas, licensed the entire suite.

  13. The Cosmic Shoreline: The Evidence that Escape Determines which Planets Have Atmospheres, and what this May Mean for Proxima Centauri B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, David C.

    2017-07-01

    The planets of the solar system are neatly divided between those with atmospheres and those without when arranged by insolation (I) and escape velocity ({v}{esc}). The dividing line goes at I\\propto {v}{esc}4. Exoplanets with reported masses and radii are shown to crowd against the extrapolation of the solar system trend, making a metaphorical cosmic shoreline that unites all the planets. The I\\propto {v}{esc}4 relation may implicate thermal escape. We therefore address the general behavior of hydrodynamic thermal escape models ranging from Pluto to highly irradiated extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). Energy-limited escape is harder to test because copious XUV radiation is mostly a feature of young stars, and hence requires extrapolating to historic XUV fluences ({I}{xuv}) using proxies and power laws. An energy-limited shoreline should scale as {I}{xuv}\\propto {v}{esc}3\\sqrt{ρ }, which differs distinctly from the apparent {I}{xuv}\\propto {v}{esc}4 relation. Energy-limited escape does provide good quantitative agreement to the highly irradiated EGPs. Diffusion-limited escape implies that no planet can lose more than 1% of its mass as H2. Impact erosion, to the extent that impact velocities {v}{imp} can be estimated for exoplanets, fits a {v}{imp}≈ 4{--}5 {v}{esc} shoreline. The proportionality constant is consistent with what the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 showed us we should expect of modest impacts in deep atmospheres. With respect to the shoreline, Proxima Centauri b is on the metaphorical beach. Known hazards include its rapid energetic accretion, high impact velocities, its early life on the wrong side of the runaway greenhouse, and Proxima Centauri’s XUV radiation. In its favor is a vast phase space of unknown unknowns.

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Florida Panhandle: ESIL (ESI Shoreline Types - Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIL data set contains vector lines representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of the Florida Panhandle, classified according to the Environmental...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Florida Panhandle: ESIP (ESI Shoreline Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIP data set contains vector polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of the Florida Panhandle, classified according to the Environmental...

  16. Breton Island Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived from the Digital...

  17. Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (1869 - 2014) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (1869 - 2014) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived from the Digital...

  18. Breton Island Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre/Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre/Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived...

  19. Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that was derived from...

  20. Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived from the Digital...

  1. Shoreline Change Along Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Monitoring Report, 2011-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the first of a series of reports documenting the change in shoreline position along the ocean front of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. This report follows...

  2. Assateague Island Open-Ocean Shorelines Extracted from Orthoimagery, 1989 – 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Assessing the physical change to shorelines and wetlands is critical in determining the resiliency of wetland systems that protect adjacent habitat and communities....

  3. Assateague Island Back-Island Shorelines Extracted from orthoimagery, 1989 – 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Assessing the physical change to shorelines and wetlands is critical in determining the resiliency of wetland systems that protect adjacent habitat and communities....

  4. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Mean-high-water shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Mean-high-water (MHW) shoreline for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines were derived from lidar data collected...

  5. Assateague Island Back-Island Shoreline Points Extracted from Orthoimagery, 1989 – 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Assessing the physical change to shorelines and wetlands is critical in determining the resiliency of wetland systems that protect adjacent habitat and communities....

  6. Columbia River ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Columbia River classified according to the Environmental...

  7. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: ESIL (ESI Shoreline Types - Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIL data set contains vector lines representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of South Florida classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index...

  8. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: ESIP (ESI Shoreline Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIP data set contains vector polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of South Florida classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity...

  9. SOCAL1852_1889 - Vectorized Shoreline of Southern California Derived from 1852-1889 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  10. SOCAL_1971_1976 - Vectorized Shoreline of Southern California Derived from 1971-1976 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  11. NORCAL1854_1880 - Vectorized Shoreline of Northern California from 1854-1880 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  12. Virginia ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for Virginia, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity...

  13. NORCAL1952_1971 - Vectorized Shoreline of Northern California Derived from 1952-1971 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  14. SOCAL_1998 - Vectorized Shoreline of Southern California Derived from 1998 Lidar Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  15. SOCAL1920_1934 - Vectorized Shoreline of Southern California Derived from 1920-1934 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  16. CENCAL1929_1942 - Vectorized Shoreline of Central Califonia Derived from 1929-1942 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  17. SOCAL_1971_1976 - Vectorized Shoreline of Southern California Derived from 1971-1976 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  18. CENCAL1853_1910 - Vectorized Shoreline of Central California Derived from 1853-1910 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  19. NORCAL1928_1936 - Vectorized Shoreline of Northern California Derived from 1928-1936 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  20. Decadal shoreline assessment using remote sensing along the central Odisha coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ManiMurali, R.; Dhiman, R.; Choudhary, R.; Jayakumar, S.; Ilangovan, D.; Vethamony, P.

    breakwater to conserve the shoreline. This region had undergone severe geomorphologic changes due to natural as well as human interventions and poses a threat. This coast exhibits unique reasons for erosion with various degrees of combinations of sediment...

  1. Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (1869 - 2014) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (1869 - 2014) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived from the Digital...

  2. Breton Island Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre/Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre/Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived...

  3. Breton Island Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Pre-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived from the Digital...

  4. Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post-1950s) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that were derived from the Digital...

  5. Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Transects with Shoreline Change Rates (Post Hurricane Katrina) (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector transect data that was derived from...

  6. Assateague Island Open-Ocean Shorelines Extracted from Orthoimagery, 1989 – 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Assessing the physical change to shorelines and wetlands is critical in determining the resiliency of wetland systems that protect adjacent habitat and communities....

  7. Hawaii ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Polygons and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector arcs and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Hawaii classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index...

  8. LA1973-1978 - Vectorized Shoreline of Louisiana Derived from 1973-1978 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  9. TX2000-2001 - Vectorized Shoreline of Texas Derived from 2000-2001 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  10. AL2001 - Vectorized Shoreline of Alabama Derived from 2001 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  11. AL1918-1957 - Vectorized Shoreline of Alabama Derived from 1918-1957 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  12. AL1978-1981 - Vectorized Shoreline of Alabama Derived from 1978-1981 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  13. AL1849-1867 - Vectorized Shoreline of Alabama Derived from 1849-1867 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  14. TX1930-1938 - Vectorized Shoreline of Texas Derived from 1930-1938 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  15. TX1850-1883 - Vectorized Shoreline of Texas Derived from 1850-1883 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  16. FL1855-1895 - Vectorized Shoreline of Florida Derived from 1855-1895 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  17. MS1850 - Vectorized Shoreline of Mississippi Derived from 1850 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  18. GA1999 - Vectorized Shoreline of Georgia Atlantic Coast Derived from 1999 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  19. NC1997 - Vectorized Shoreline of North Carolina Atlantic Coast Derived from 1997 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  20. FL1998-2001 - Vectorized Shoreline of Florida Derived from 1998-2001 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  1. FL1999 - Vectorized Shoreline of Florida Atlantic Coast Derived from 1999 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  2. LA1855-1887 - Vectorized Shoreline of Louisiana Derived from 1855-1887 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  3. MS2001 - Vectorized Shoreline of Mississippi Derived from 2001 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  4. TX1970-1975 - Vectorized Shoreline of Texas Derived from 1970-1975 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  5. LA2001 - Vectorized Shoreline of Louisiana Derived from 2001 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  6. SC2000 - Vectorized Shoreline of South Carolina Atlantic Coast Derived from 2000 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  7. FL1976-1979 - Vectorized Shoreline of Florida Derived from 1976-1979 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  8. MS1917 - Vectorized Shoreline of Mississippi Derived from 1917 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  9. MS1986-1987 - Vectorized Shoreline of Mississippi Derived from 1986-1987 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  10. NORCAL1854_1880 - Vectorized Shoreline of Northern California from 1854-1880 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  11. SOCAL1852_1889 - Vectorized Shoreline of Southern California Derived from 1852-1889 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  12. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates) is a dataset consisting of 271 polygon shapefiles...

  13. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates) is a dataset consisting of 254 polygon shapefiles...

  14. A Collaborative Geospatial Shoreline Inventory Tool to Guide Coastal Development and Habitat Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Gies

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We are developing a geospatial inventory tool that will guide habitat conservation, restoration and coastal development and benefit several stakeholders who seek mitigation and adaptation strategies to shoreline changes resulting from erosion and sea level rise. The ESRI Geoportal Server, which is a type of web portal used to find and access geospatial information in a central repository, is customized by adding a Geoinventory tool capability that allows any shoreline related data to be searched, displayed and analyzed on a map viewer. Users will be able to select sections of the shoreline and generate statistical reports in the map viewer to allow for comparisons. The tool will also facilitate map-based discussion forums and creation of user groups to encourage citizen participation in decisions regarding shoreline stabilization and restoration, thereby promoting sustainable coastal development.

  15. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Individual Dates) is a dataset consisting of 268 polygon shapefiles...

  16. SOCAL_1998 - Vectorized Shoreline of Southern California Derived from 1998 Lidar Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  17. NORCAL2002 - Vectorized Shoreline of Northern California Derived from 2002 Lidar Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a comprehensive...

  18. NORCAL1952_1971 - Vectorized Shoreline of Northern California Derived from 1952-1971 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a...

  19. LA2001 - Vectorized Shoreline of Louisiana Derived from 2001 LIDAR Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  20. AL1918-1957 - Vectorized Shoreline of Alabama Derived from 1918-1957 Source Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...