WorldWideScience

Sample records for unit artsedge curricula

  1. Monsters. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, Steve

    How have "monsters" been viewed in society, what purpose do they serve, and why are they necessary? In this language-arts-based curriculum unit for grades 9-12, students explore the ways "monsters" are depicted in literature, music, and drama. According to the unit, students will: define what a monster is; read the classic "Beowulf"; then read…

  2. Shakespeare Stealer. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauernschub, Mary Beth

    A book called "The Shakespeare Stealer" (Gary Blackwood) is about a young boy during the time of Shakespeare who sneaks into the Globe Theater and meets the Bard. The book has been turned into a play. The five lessons in this curriculum unit revolve around "The Shakespeare Stealer." The lessons in the unit support many major…

  3. Mythology Across Time and Borders: Online Workshop. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Lynne Boone

    This curriculum unit can be adapted for students as young as grade 6 or 7 and as old as grade 12. The unit integrates writing process instruction, storytelling lore, mythology, and arts instruction and is in support of standards as defined by the Consortium of National Arts Education Associations and the National Council of Teachers of English.…

  4. Exploring Romeo and Juliet. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullard, Barbara Lois; Karsten, Jayne

    This curriculum unit examines William Shakespeare's tragic play, "Romeo and Juliet." The unit calls the play "one of the greatest and saddest love stories of all time," and notes that artists across centuries and oceans have retold the tale of "Romeo and Juliet" in various forms and incarnations. It first presents…

  5. Magic Words, Magic Brush: The Art of William Butler and Jack Yeats. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Jayne

    This curriculum unit, designed for grades 7-12, integrates various artistic disciplines with geography, history, social studies, media, and technology. This unit on William Butler Yeats, the writer, and Jack Yeats, the painter, seeks to immerse students in a study of the brothers as voices of Ireland and as two of the most renowned artists of the…

  6. Comparison of Elementary Social Studies Curricula of Turkey and the United States on Values Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merey, Zihni; Kus, Zafer; Karatekin, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the social studies teaching curricula of Turkey and the United States in terms of values education. The study is a model case study that relies upon one of the qualitative research methods. The data come from the elementary social studies curricula of both countries through the documents analysis method. The…

  7. Quantitative evaluation of flexibility in undergraduate engineering curricula in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif A. Darwish

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In academia, smooth progression of students significantly depends on the way curricula are developed and organized. Curricula or study plans with high degree of interconnectivity between courses, multiple prerequisites, and hierarchically structured courses tend to complicate the smooth progress of the enrolled students. In this work, a rigorous quantitative relaxation indicator, developed and published elsewhere by the first author, has been applied to quantify the degree of stiffness and rigidity in undergraduate engineering curricula at the American University of Sharjah (AUS, the University of Sharjah (UOS, United Arab Emirates University (UAEU, and the Petroleum Institute (PI, which are the leading universities in the United Arab Emirates. Results indicate high rigidity (low relaxation indices due to high degree of interconnectivity between courses, specifically in the second year of the study plans. The chemical engineering curriculum at PI exhibited the least flexibility due to very strong pre-and-co-requisite ties while the civil & environmental curriculum at UAEU showed the highest flexibility. The curricula considered require immediate attention and reorganization in order to facilitate smooth sequential progress of the students from one semester to another. A list of courses that require relaxation of strong pre-and corequisites ties has been presented for each curriculum.

  8. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care.

  9. Professionalism in Public Relations Pedagogy: A Comparative Analysis of Public Relations Curricula among the United States, the United Kingdom, and South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wonjun; Choi, Jinbong

    2012-01-01

    Based on a concept of professionalism, this study analyzed and compared current public relations curricula of higher education among the United States, the United Kingdom, and South Korea. In terms of three educational orientations, results indicated that public relations education in the United States is the most balanced among theoretical,…

  10. Professionalism in Public Relations Pedagogy: A Comparative Analysis of Public Relations Curricula among the United States, the United Kingdom, and South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wonjun; Choi, Jinbong

    2012-01-01

    Based on a concept of professionalism, this study analyzed and compared current public relations curricula of higher education among the United States, the United Kingdom, and South Korea. In terms of three educational orientations, results indicated that public relations education in the United States is the most balanced among theoretical,…

  11. SCDC Spanish Curricula Units. Fine Arts Strand, Unit 9, Grade 3, Supplement & Ditto Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanish Curricula Development Center, Miami Beach, FL.

    The supplement and ditto packet to the fine arts strand of unit nine for third graders contains illustrations, ditto masters, and four songbooks to help the teacher carry out the fine arts activities of this unit. Materials for both group activities and seatwork are included. Kit 33 uses the songbook "Canciones de Aqui y de Alla" and…

  12. Micro Computer Technician Course. Course Design, Course Curricula, Learning Units, Resource Requirements. InfoTVE 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia).

    This guide to the core curricula for the training of microcomputer technicians is designed for school leavers after 10 or more years of general/vocational education with a science and mathematics background. The 2-year course is to be administered in four semesters. An introductory outline of course design and curricula provides the rationale,…

  13. An Owl in the Woods. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Rose

    Introducing children to well written and beautifully illustrated books will help build basic skills while providing for the aesthetic need for beauty and pleasure. This lesson is designed as an integrated literature and visual arts lesson, revolving around the story book, "Owl Moon," written by Jane Yolen and illustrated by John…

  14. Greek Mythology: Cultures and Art. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Charles

    The visual arts offer aesthetic, perceptual, creative, and intellectual opportunities. This lesson points out that by creating and painting mythological characters, students will improve their ability to analyze, reorganize, critique, and create. The lesson also intends for fourth-grade students to gain insight into Greek culture through the…

  15. You Too Can Haiku. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen

    This lesson will introduce intermediate students to the Japanese poetic form of "haiku," which is most effectively taught after students have an understanding of syllables. The lesson plan's introductory activity is designed to introduce students to the geography of Japan, as well as Japanese culture through Asian art and music--after…

  16. Oceans: A Fact Haiku. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauernschub, Mary Beth

    This lesson plan intends for students in Grade 3 to write to inform about oceans, using all their five senses in the "haiku" style of poetry. The lesson presents an overview; suggests length of time and grade level; cites subjects and subtopics; lists dimensions of learning and intelligence being addressed; notes equipment and materials…

  17. The current state of physical therapy pain curricula in the United States: a faculty survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeger Bement, Marie K; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-02-01

    Insufficient pain education is problematic across the health care spectrum. Recent educational advancements have been made to combat the deficits in pain education to ensure that health care professionals are proficient in assessing and managing pain. The purpose of this survey was to determine the extent of pain education in current Doctorate of Physical Therapy schools in the United States, including how pain is incorporated into the curriculum, the amount of time spent teaching about pain, and the resources used to teach about pain. The survey consisted of 10 questions in the following subject areas: basic science mechanisms and concepts about pain, pain assessment, pain management, and adequacy of pain curriculum. The overall response was 77% (167/216) for the first series of responses of the survey (Question 1), whereas 62% completed the entire survey (Questions 2-10). The average contact hours teaching about pain was 31 ± 1.8 (mean ± standard error of the mean) with a range of 5 to 115 hours. The majority of schools that responded covered the science of pain, assessment, and management. Less than 50% of respondents were aware of the Institute of Medicine report on pain or the International Association for the Study of Pain guidelines for physical therapy pain education. Only 61% of respondents believed that their students received adequate education in pain management. Thus, this survey demonstrated how pain education is incorporated into physical therapy schools and highlighted areas for improvement such as awareness of recent educational advancements. This article demonstrates how pain education is incorporated into physical therapy curricula within accredited programs. Understanding the current structure of pain education in health professional curriculum can serve as a basis to determine if recent publications of guidelines and competencies impact education. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparison of Clinical Education in Baccalaureate Pharmacy Curricula in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, John W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A survey of North American schools of pharmacy to obtain information on the structure, methodology, and quantity of clinical instruction in B.S. pharmacy curricula is discussed. Canadian-U.S. differences included extent of reliance on the university hospital, variety of nonhospital clerkship sites, and types of required clerkship activities.…

  19. Mental health curricula at schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom and recent graduates' readiness to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Paul; Taylor, Denise; Branford, Dave

    2013-09-12

    To assess mental health education in the undergraduate pharmacy curricula in the United Kingdom and gauge how well prepared graduates are to manage mental health patients. The authors conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with pharmacy educators and administered an electronic self-administered survey instrument to pharmacy graduates. The mental health conditions of depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and Parkinson disease were taught, in detail, by all schools, but more specialized areas of mental health (eg, personality disorder, autism) were generally not taught. Just 5 of 19 schools attempted to teach the broader social aspects of mental health. A third of the schools provided experiential learning opportunities. Graduates and recently registered pharmacists stated that undergraduate education had prepared them adequately with regard to knowledge on conditions and treatment options, but that they were not as well prepared to talk with mental health patients and deal with practical drug management-related issues. The mental health portion of the undergraduate pharmacy curricula in colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom is largely theoretical, and pharmacy students have little exposure to mental health patients. Graduates identified an inability to effectively communicate with these patients and manage common drug management-related issues.

  20. Internationalizing curricula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jos Walenkamp; Andreas Funk; Joyce den Heijer; Anneke Schuurmans-Brouwer

    2014-01-01

    Internationalizing curricula. Needs and wishes of alumni and employers with regard to international competencies. Internationalization has become of great importance for universities acrossthe globe. The labour market is becoming international, with internationalopportunities and international

  1. The Core Curricula of Information Systems Undergraduate Programs: A Survey of AACSB-Accredited Colleges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    The author examines the present state of information systems undergraduate programs in the United States. He reviewed 516 institutions and collected data on 234 institutions offering information systems (IS) undergraduate programs. Of seven core courses required by the IS 2010 curriculum model, four are required by more than 50% of the programs,…

  2. University Curricula in Nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, Ivan Ring

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is having increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering. The advent of nanotechnology brings about new possibilities in nanoelectronics, including increasingly complex systems on chip, sophisticated technology fusion between electronic devices and non-electron...... examples of state-of-the-art curricula from major European universities are described. The possibilities for sharing of teaching material through the web via the EC-sponsored EuroTraining program is described....

  3. Incorporating sustainability into accounting curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazelton, James; Haigh, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the journey of two projects that sought to incorporate principles of sustainable development into predominantly technical postgraduate accounting curricula. The design and delivery of the projects were informed by Freirian principles of praxis and critical empowerment....... The first author introduced sustainability-related material into a core technical accounting unit and created an elective unit. The second author participated with students to evaluate critically social reports of employers, current and potential. In terms of an objective of bringing reflexivity...... as vocational skills) add to the difficulties for sustainability in penetrating already overcrowded curricula....

  4. Incorporating sustainability into accounting curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazelton, James; Haigh, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the journey of two projects that sought to incorporate principles of sustainable development into predominantly technical postgraduate accounting curricula. The design and delivery of the projects were informed by Freirian principles of praxis and critical empowerment....... The first author introduced sustainability-related material into a core technical accounting unit and created an elective unit. The second author participated with students to evaluate critically social reports of employers, current and potential. In terms of an objective of bringing reflexivity...... as vocational skills) add to the difficulties for sustainability in penetrating already overcrowded curricula....

  5. Initiating Tobacco Curricula in Dental Hygiene Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda D.; Fun, Kay; Madden, Theresa E.

    2006-01-01

    Two hours of tobacco instructions were incorporated into the baccalaureate dental hygiene curricula in a university in the Northwestern United States. Prior to graduation, all senior students were invited to complete anonymously a questionnaire surveying attitudes and clinical skills in providing tobacco services to their clinic patients. Twenty…

  6. Women's health topics in dental hygiene curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Howell, Joan C

    2010-01-01

    Minimal inclusion of women's health topics in dental and dental hygiene curricula may not prepare dental health care workers to provide comprehensive health care to females. The purposes of these surveys in 2001 and 2007 were to investigate United States dental hygiene school curricula regarding inclusion of women's health topics in differing degree programs (associate/certificate, baccalaureate, associate/baccalaureate) and course status (required or elective). The surveys also identified sources used to obtain women's health topics, assessed faculty continuing education participation in women's health, determined satisfaction with current curricula, questioned if change was anticipated and if so in what topics, identified where students apply their knowledge about women's health and in what ways and reported progress of dental hygiene curricula over the 6 year time period. Surveys were sent to dental hygiene program directors in 2001 (N=256) and in 2007 (N=288) asking them to complete the questionnaire. There was no statistically significant association between 2001 and 2007 survey results by degree or program setting. The educational issue, women's general health continuing education courses/topics completed by dental hygiene faculty in the past 2 years, showed a statistically significant difference during that time interval. No statistically significant difference existed between the survey years regarding topics on women's general health and oral health. Regardless of statistical significance, further details investigated percentage differences that may reveal relevant issues. These surveys establish a baseline of women's health topics included in dental hygiene curricula in order to assess knowledge of dental hygienists in practice.

  7. Digital Curricula Evolving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Week, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This special report is the latest installment in an ongoing series about how online education is changing teaching and learning and the development of curricula. It was produced with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. This paper contains the following articles: (1) Changing the Role of K-12…

  8. Algebra for All: California's Eighth-Grade Algebra Initiative as Constrained Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Thurston; Penner, Andrew M.; Penner, Emily K.; Conley, AnneMarie

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Across the United States, secondary school curricula are intensifying as a growing proportion of students enroll in high-level academic math courses. In many districts, this intensification process occurs as early as eighth grade, where schools are effectively constraining their mathematics curricula by restricting course…

  9. LGBTQ-Inclusive Curricula: Why Supportive Curricula Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Shannon D.; McGuire, Jenifer K.; Sinclair, Katarina O.; Gabrion, Karlee; Russell, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing attention to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) issues in schools, including efforts to address such issues through the curriculum. This study examines whether students' perceptions of personal safety and school climate safety are stronger when curricula that include LGBTQ people are present and…

  10. Presentation of a Nanoelectronics Curricula Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, Ivan Ring

    2008-01-01

    Future developments in nanoelectronics call for major changes in university curricula within engineering. It is found that three major factors influence the curricula: technology development, development of industrial environment, and development of university structures. It is also found that na...

  11. Sustainability curricula in design education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casais, M.; Christiaans, H.H.C.M.; Almendra, R.

    2012-01-01

    While sustainability in Design finds much attention in the literature, the education of sustainability in Design courses lacks discussion regarding curricula and importance. In an attempt to map the way sustainability is taught in Design Bachelor and Master Courses in the European Union, we began

  12. Developmentally Appropriate Peace Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewsader, Joellen; Myers-Walls, Judith A.

    2017-01-01

    Peace education has been offered to children for decades, but those curricula have been only minimally guided by children's developmental stages and needs. In this article, the authors apply their research on children's developmental understanding of peace along with peace education principles and Vygotsky's sociocultural theory to present…

  13. American Sign Language Curricula: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Russell S.

    2010-01-01

    There is an exponential growth in the number of schools that offer American Sign Language (ASL) for foreign language credit and the different ASL curricula that were published. This study analyzes different curricula in its assumptions regarding language, learning, and teaching of second languages. It is found that curricula vary in their…

  14. From the Contribution to the Action Approach: White Teachers' Experiences Influencing the Development of Multicultural Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriel, Regina L.; Atwater, Mary M.

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we sought to understand teacher's integration of multicultural curricula in science curriculum units, and how personal experiences influenced the level of integration in light of Bank's typology of ethnic content integration into school curricula. Five research participants volunteered and were selected so as to be…

  15. Information Systems Curricula: A Fifty Year Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Herbert E., Jr.; Feinstein, David; Clark, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of research to explore the nature of changes in skills over a fifty year period spanning the life of Information Systems model curricula. Work begun in 1999 was expanded both backwards in time, as well as forwards to 2012 to define skills relevant to Information Systems curricula. The work in 1999 was based on job…

  16. Integrating Sustainability Education into International Marketing Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Chamila Roshani; Hewege, Chandana Rathnasiri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to extend the current knowledge of curriculum developments in international business and marketing curricula. Integrating sustainability into business and marketing curricula of the universities are widely debated in previous literature. Sustainability is a global phenomenon; however, curriculum development…

  17. Integrating Sustainability Education into International Marketing Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Chamila Roshani; Hewege, Chandana Rathnasiri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to extend the current knowledge of curriculum developments in international business and marketing curricula. Integrating sustainability into business and marketing curricula of the universities are widely debated in previous literature. Sustainability is a global phenomenon; however, curriculum development…

  18. Can Law Become Curricula's Guidance Counselor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Kimberly G.

    2008-01-01

    This article asserts that curricula, a living text, ought to take into consideration the virtues of fairness, justice, and integrity as found in law, in order to judge controversial issues of curriculum. This assertion is argued through a comparison of jurisprudence and pedagogy, as well as law and curricula. Dworkin's (1986) contention of "law as…

  19. Curricula for sustainability in higher education

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This books presents the curricula necessary for sustainability in higher education. It shows how the learning process is transforming in order to promote sustainability. It prepares administrators, teachers and students to diffuse the development in the field, showing a curricula based on three interconnected pillars: the environment, the economic and the social aspects. It contains 8 chapters introducing research advances in the field.

  20. Review of selected national surgical curricula: quantity is not the sole marker of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pritam; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Darzi, Ara

    2014-01-01

    Despite marked global variations in length and structure of surgical training programs, their common end product is a trained surgeon capable of independent practice. If variations exist, yet the end product is similar, modifications to curricula could potentially enhance the quality and efficiency of surgical training. This review evaluates global general surgery training programs and compares their curricula against the established standards for assessment of curricula. A convenience sampling method was employed during an online search for nationally recognized general surgery curricula. Curricula of Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America were individually reviewed and subsequently evaluated against the General Medical Council's "Standards for curricula and assessment systems." Postgraduate surgical training is completed in 5 years in Canada and the United States, whereas this takes a minimum of 7, 7, and 10 years in Australia, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom, respectively. However, when their general surgery curricula are objectively compared, they are remarkably similar. The principle disparities noted were in documentation and standardization of the structured in-training assessment system. This review highlights variations in the structure of general surgery training programs globally. There is a need for an objective method to assess training quality, not reliant upon quantity alone. An evidence-based approach is the gold standard in patient care; it is essential to invest resources into developing an evidence-based curricular approach to ensure surgical training quality can be accurately evaluated to maintain and enhance the standards. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adapting bioinformatics curricula for big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Anna C; Giffin, Kristine A; Greene, Casey S; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Modern technologies are capable of generating enormous amounts of data that measure complex biological systems. Computational biologists and bioinformatics scientists are increasingly being asked to use these data to reveal key systems-level properties. We review the extent to which curricula are changing in the era of big data. We identify key competencies that scientists dealing with big data are expected to possess across fields, and we use this information to propose courses to meet these growing needs. While bioinformatics programs have traditionally trained students in data-intensive science, we identify areas of particular biological, computational and statistical emphasis important for this era that can be incorporated into existing curricula. For each area, we propose a course structured around these topics, which can be adapted in whole or in parts into existing curricula. In summary, specific challenges associated with big data provide an important opportunity to update existing curricula, but we do not foresee a wholesale redesign of bioinformatics training programs.

  2. Water Pollution in School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Abraham

    1979-01-01

    Water pollution curriculum units of four environmental secondary science programs in Britain, Germany, Israel, and the United States are examined. Comparisons reveal the use of quite different approaches in central topic selection, use of the laboratory and other media, controversial issues, and teacher-student roles. (CS)

  3. Water Pollution in School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Abraham

    1979-01-01

    Water pollution curriculum units of four environmental secondary science programs in Britain, Germany, Israel, and the United States are examined. Comparisons reveal the use of quite different approaches in central topic selection, use of the laboratory and other media, controversial issues, and teacher-student roles. (CS)

  4. Web Security in University Curricula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cristian Opincaru

    2010-01-01

    .... This paper presents the content of a course focused on Web security; as such it starts by defining the goals of the course, then defines the topics for the course units and finally describes the topics and the setup for laboratory units...

  5. The Exclusion of the Creative Arts from Contracted School Curricula for Teaching the Common Core Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Kathleen; McDermott, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many people would agree the creative arts are essential for children's education and development. For years, the creative arts were integrated into classroom learning units, especially in the language arts, by using drama, music, and drawing; this was considered good teaching. In this study we examined whether contracted curricula designed for…

  6. Embedding Multiple Literacies into STEM Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, Aline; Nielsen, Sarah; LeDuc, Danika; Inouye, Caron; Singley, Jason; Wildy, Erica; Seitz, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2012, an interdisciplinary team of science, English, and library faculty embedded reading, writing, and information literacy strategies in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) curricula as a first step in improving student learning and retention in science courses and aligning them with the Next Generation Science and…

  7. National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The "National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula" attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best…

  8. Introducing Cloud Computing Topics in Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Liu, Yang; Gallagher, Marcus; Pailthorpe, Bernard; Sadiq, Shazia; Shen, Heng Tao; Li, Xue

    2012-01-01

    The demand for graduates with exposure in Cloud Computing is on the rise. For many educational institutions, the challenge is to decide on how to incorporate appropriate cloud-based technologies into their curricula. In this paper, we describe our design and experiences of integrating Cloud Computing components into seven third/fourth-year…

  9. National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The "National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula" attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best…

  10. IFRS READINESS IN LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS CURRICULA

    OpenAIRE

    Myrna R. Berríos

    2012-01-01

    Multinational companies doing business in Latin America, and elsewhere in the world, must comply with individual countries’ financial reporting and financial market rules and local legislation when disclosing financial information. This research assesses international financial reporting standards (IFRS) readiness in the finance, accounting, and taxation curricula in Latin American universities.

  11. Introducing Cloud Computing Topics in Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Liu, Yang; Gallagher, Marcus; Pailthorpe, Bernard; Sadiq, Shazia; Shen, Heng Tao; Li, Xue

    2012-01-01

    The demand for graduates with exposure in Cloud Computing is on the rise. For many educational institutions, the challenge is to decide on how to incorporate appropriate cloud-based technologies into their curricula. In this paper, we describe our design and experiences of integrating Cloud Computing components into seven third/fourth-year…

  12. Occupational Curricula: The School/Job Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lee; West, Leonard J.

    1978-01-01

    Substantial gaps often exist between occupational education and actual job duties, dominantly because of technological developments. The schools' response to needed change in curricula has been sluggish, piecemeal, and tardy. Authors suggest a strategy for accomplishing a closer match between school and work, and they illustrate its use in…

  13. Web Modules: Integrating Curricula and Technology Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to provide the sequence of learning events about the integration of curricula and technology using modules prepared by the Southeast Teachers Are Revitalizing Teaching Through Technology (START) Technology Team and to describe the impact these technology modules had on university faculty and candidates at Alabama…

  14. Rich Literacy Curricula: Undocumented and Unstandardized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Ileana

    A study was conducted concerning the reduced and limited curricula which tests may represent. Observations were made at 18 different elementary and middle school classrooms in four school districts in central Pennsylvania during the language arts instructional period. All of the teachers were involved in promoting a holistic approach to literacy.…

  15. Cultural Intelligence (CQ) in MBA Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Mark J.; Ettner, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of cultural intelligence in MBA curricula. Shaping global corporate culture that manifests itself in powerful-shared values, group behavior, and persists despite changes in-group membership is decisive to organizational performance. In turn, cultural intelligence (CQ), defined, as an…

  16. Science Process Skills in Science Curricula Applied in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumusak, Güngör Keskinkiliç

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important objectives of the science curricula is to bring in science process skills. The science process skills are skills that lie under scientific thinking and decision-making. Thus it is important for a science curricula to be rationalized in such a way that it brings in science process skills. New science curricula were…

  17. INFORMATION SYSTEMS AUDIT CURRICULA CONTENT MATCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile-Daniel CARDOȘ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Financial and internal auditors must cope with the challenge of performing their mission in technology enhanced environment. In this article we match the information technology description found in the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC and the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA curricula against the Model Curriculum issued by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA. By reviewing these three curricula, we matched the content in the ISACA Model Curriculum with the IFAC International Education Practice Statement 2 and the IIAs’ Global Model Internal Audit Curriculum. In the IFAC and IIA Curriculum there are 16 content elements, out of 19 possible, which match, in their description, the ISACA Model Curriculum’s content. We noticed that a candidate who graduates an IFAC or IIA compliant program acquire IS auditing competences similar to the specific content of the ISACA model curriculum but less than the requirements for a professional information systems auditor.

  18. Student Perspectives on Oncology Curricula at United States Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Brandon C; Golden, Daniel W; Brower, Jeffrey V; Braunstein, Steve E; Hirsch, Ariel E; Mattes, Malcolm D

    2017-08-07

    Delivering a cohesive oncology curriculum to medical students is challenging due to oncology's multidisciplinary nature, predominantly outpatient clinical setting, and lack of data describing effective approaches to teaching it. We sought to better characterize approaches to oncology education at US medical schools by surveying third and fourth year medical students who serve on their institution's curriculum committee. We received responses from students at 19 schools (15.2% response rate). Key findings included the following: (1) an under-emphasis of cancer in the curriculum relative to other common diseases; (2) imbalanced involvement of different clinical subspecialists as educators; (3) infrequent requirements for students to rotate through non-surgical oncologic clerkships; and (4) students are less confident in their knowledge of cancer treatment compared to basic science/natural history or workup/diagnosis. Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations to achieve robust multidisciplinary curriculum design and implementation that better balances the clinical and classroom aspects of oncology education.

  19. An Overview of Medical Spanish Curricula in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Karol

    2015-01-01

    The US health care system faces linguistic challenges. Disparities in language-concordant care for Spanish speakers persist due to current demographics and a paucity of bilingual providers. A proliferation of courses in Spanish for health care professions suggests that universities and post-graduate institutions are attempting to meet this need;…

  20. An Overview of Medical Spanish Curricula in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Karol

    2015-01-01

    The US health care system faces linguistic challenges. Disparities in language-concordant care for Spanish speakers persist due to current demographics and a paucity of bilingual providers. A proliferation of courses in Spanish for health care professions suggests that universities and post-graduate institutions are attempting to meet this need;…

  1. Thrust joint manipulation curricula in first-professional physical therapy education: 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noteboom, J Timothy; Little, Christian; Boissonnault, William

    2015-06-01

    Descriptive online observational survey. To identify the extent of thrust joint manipulation (TJM) integration into first-professional physical therapy program curricula. The most recent survey of TJM curricula was published in 2004, with a wide variation in faculty responses noted. Since that time, faculty resources have been developed and TJM language in "A Normative Model of Physical Therapist Professional Education" from the American Physical Therapy Association has been updated, leaving the current status of TJM education in curricula unknown. Faculty from 205 accredited physical therapy programs were invited to participate in an anonymous 35-item electronic survey during the summer of 2012. Seventy-two percent of programs responded to the survey, with 99% of programs teaching TJM and 97% of faculty believing TJM to be an entry-level skill. Cervical spine TJM is still being taught at a lower rate than techniques for other body regions. Faculty deemed 91% and 77% of students, respectively, at or above entry-level competency for implementing TJM in their clinical practice upon graduation. Most respondents indicated that increased utilization of TJM during clinical affiliations (78%) and lab hours (78%) would be beneficial to the student's knowledge/application of TJM. The utilization of TJM and faculty perceptions in first-professional physical therapy programs in the United States have evolved over the past decade. With TJM content more fully integrated into educational curricula, programs can now look to refine teaching strategies that enhance learning outcomes.

  2. Found in transition: applying milestones to three unique discharge curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B. Meade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A safe and effective transition from hospital to post-acute care is a complex and important physician competency. Milestones and Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA form the new educational rubric in Graduate Medical Education Training. “A safe and effective discharge from the hospital” is an EPA ripe for educational innovation.Methods. The authors collaborated in a qualitative process called mapping to define 22 of 142 Internal Medicine (IM curricular milestones related to the transition of care. Fifty-five participant units at an Association for Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM workshop prioritized the milestones, using a validated ranking process called Q-sort. We analyzed the Q-sort results, which rank the milestones in order of priority. We then applied this ranking to three innovative models of training IM residents in the transitions of care: Simulation (S, Discharge Clinic Feedback (DCF and TRACER (T.Results. We collected 55 Q-sort rankings from particpants at the APDIM workshop. We then identified which milestones are a focus of the three innovative models of training in the transition of care: Simulation = 5 of 22 milestones, Discharge Clinic Feedback = 9 of 22 milestones, and TRACER = 7 of 22 milestones. Milestones identified in each innovation related to one of the top 8 prioritized milestones 75% of the time; thus, more frequently than the milestones with lower priority. Two milestones are shared by all three curricula: Utilize patient-centered education and Ensure succinct written communication. Two other milestones are shared by two curricula: Manage and coordinate care transitions across multiple delivery systems and Customize care in the context of the patient’s preferences. If you combine the three innovations, all of the top 8 milestones are included.Discussion. The milestones give us a context to share individual innovations and to compare and contrast using a standardized frame. We

  3. Integrating ultrasound into modern medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shilpan G; Benninger, Brion; Mirjalili, S Ali

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasonography is widely practiced in many disciplines. It is becoming increasingly important to design well-structured curricula to introduce imaging to students during medical school. This review aims to analyze the literature for evidence of how ultrasonography has been incorporated into anatomy education in medical school curricula worldwide. A literature search was conducted using multiple databases with the keywords: "Ultrasound OR Ultrasonographic examination*" and "Medical student* OR Undergraduate teaching* OR Medical education*" and "Anatomy* OR Living anatomy* OR Real-time anatomy.*" This review found that ultrasound curricula vary in stage of implementation, course length, number of sessions offered to students as well as staffing and additional course components. Most courses consisted of didactic lectures supplemented with demonstration sessions and/or hands-on ultrasound scanning sessions. The stage of course implementation tended to depend on the aim of the course; introductory courses were offered earlier in a student's career. Most courses improved student confidence and exam performance, and more junior students tended to benefit more from learning anatomy with ultrasound guidance rather than learning clinical examination skills. Students tended to prefer smaller groups when learning ultrasound to get more access to using the machines themselves. Ultrasonography is an important skill, which should be taught to medical students early in their careers as it facilitates anatomical education and is clinically relevant, though further objective research required to support the use of ultrasound education as a tool to improve clinical examination skills in medical students. Clin. Anat. 30:452-460, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Wind for Schools: A National Data and Curricula Development Activity for Schools (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2011-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America?s Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community 'host' schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

  5. Constructivism theory analysis and application to curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Amy F; All, Anita C

    2010-01-01

    Today's nursing programs are struggling to accommodate the changing needs of the health care environment and need to make changes in how students are taught. Using constructivism theory, whereby learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current or past knowledge, leaders in nursing education can make a paradigm shift toward concept-based curricula. This article presents a summary and analysis of constructivism and an innovative application of its active-learning principles to curriculum development, specifically for the education of nursing students.

  6. The Concordance between EFL Learners' Linguistic Sequential Development and the Curricula of Formal and Informal Learning Settings: An Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaqshi, Jalal H.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the sequence of content in ESP curricula to our learners' linguistic development and to authentic situations. This study has been conducted in Alahsa College of Technology, Saudi Arabia. Methodology used was an analysis of an ESP textbook in corpus-based approach and matching the units of the textbook to students' needs…

  7. The Use and Misuse of Pleasure in Sex Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Sharon; Lustig, Kara; Graling, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Since Michelle Fine's writing on the missing discourse of desire in sex education, there has been considerable prompting among sexuality educators and feminist scholars to incorporate talk of pleasure into sex education curricula. While the calls for inclusion continue, few have actually examined the curricula for a pleasure discourse or…

  8. An Experimental Evaluation of Four Elementary School Math Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodini, Roberto; Harris, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of four elementary school math curricula: (a) "Investigations in Number, Data, and Space"; (b) "Math Expressions"; (c) "Saxon Math"; and (d) "Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Mathematics" ("SFAW"). These curricula are distinct from one another and represent many…

  9. Teachers' Reactions to Pre-Differentiated and Enriched Mathematics Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Lisa DaVia; Gilson, Cindy M.; Bruce-Davis, Micah N.; Gubbins, E. Jean

    2015-01-01

    Modern classrooms are often comprised of a heterogeneous student population with varying abilities. To address this variance, third-grade teachers implemented researcher-designed, pre-differentiated, and enriched math curricula in algebra, geometry and measurement, and graphing and data analysis. The goal of the curricula was to provide academic…

  10. Learning Affordances of Language and Communication National Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the learning affordances of different language and communication curricula in the world. For reasons of space, only two national education systems (Finland and Singapore) and their language and communication curricula are referred to. The accounts of national education systems consist of the identification of mechanisms…

  11. Defining and Developing Curricula in the Context of Cooperative Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.; Worker, Steven M.; Meehan, Cheryl L.; Schmitt-McQuitty, Lynn; Ambrose, Andrea; Brian, Kelley; Schoenfelder, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Effective curricula are considered to be the cornerstone of successful programming in Extension. However, there is no universal operationalized definition of the term "curriculum" as it applies to Extension. Additionally, the development of curricula requires a systematic process that takes into account numerous factors. We provide an…

  12. Indigenous knowledge in Canadian science curricula: cases from Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-09-01

    To enhance Aboriginal students' educational opportunities in sciences, culturally relevant science curriculum has been examined and practiced in Western Canadian science classrooms. This article shares some examples of inclusion of indigenous knowledge in science curricula and discusses the improvement and challenges of culturally relevant science curricula in Canadian contexts.

  13. Craniosacral therapy and myofascial release in entry-level physical therapy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrett, S L

    1988-04-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to discover the extent to which craniosacral therapy (CST) and myofascial release (MFR) instruction are included in entry-level physical therapy curricula; 2) to determine the amount of faculty and program director interest in such instruction; and 3) to determine what educational materials, if any, are desired. A one-page questionnaire was distributed to the program directors of 109 accredited entry-level physical therapy programs in the United States. Of the 95 respondents, 1 (1%) included a unit on CST only, 14 (15%) included a unit on MFR only, 14 (15%) included units on both CST and MFR, and 66 (69%) included neither. The highest percentages of programs with CST and MFR units were entry-level masters' degree programs and programs located in the Pacific Coast and Middle Atlantic regions. All of the units were presented within required courses, usually during the second year; most were taught by physical therapists. The greatest amount of instructional time was allotted for CST laboratory sessions (mean = 5.8 hours), and the least amount of time was allotted for MFR lectures (mean = 1.7 hours). The mos frequently cited reason for noninclusion of CST or MFR instruction was inadequate room in the current curricula. The most frequently requested materials were bibliographies and laboratory guides on CST and MFR. Implications of these findings are addressed, and suggestions for further research are given.

  14. Gerontology course in the nursing undergraduate curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSenany, Samira; AlSaif, Amer A

    2014-12-01

    To explores nursing faculty members' attitudes towards older people, their thoughts about gerontological nursing education. Five focus groups and a survey were used with nursing faculty members 132 at the three nursing schools to explore their attitudes towards the care of older people and the perceived status of gerontological nursing education. The survey was given to 132 faculty members, including 76 clinical instructors, 40 associate professors and 16 professors. The nursing faculty in general had a positive attitude toward older people (M=3.36, SD 0.25), and teachers' attitudes were higher than those of their nursing students (M=3.18, SD0.29). This study results suggests that Saudi nursing curricula should include more extensive gerontology content and clinical experience with older people. This is the first time in Saudi Arabia that research has listened to their voices and examined their commitments toward gerontology education.

  15. Gerontology course in the nursing undergraduate curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira AlSenany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explores nursing faculty members’ attitudes towards older people, their thoughts about gerontological nursing education. Method Five focus groups and a survey were used with nursing faculty members 132 at the three nursing schools to explore their attitudes towards the care of older people and the perceived status of gerontological nursing education. The survey was given to 132 faculty members, including 76 clinical instructors, 40 associate professors and 16 professors. The nursing faculty in general had a positive attitude toward older people (M=3.36, SD 0.25, and teachers’ attitudes were higher than those of their nursing students (M=3.18, SD0.29. Results This study results suggests that Saudi nursing curricula should include more extensive gerontology content and clinical experience with older people. Conclusion This is the first time in Saudi Arabia that research has listened to their voices and examined their commitments toward gerontology education.

  16. Trends in cataract surgery training curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, Mona; Rolius, Ramunas; Lehman, Erik B; Pantanelli, Seth M; Scott, Ingrid U

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate trends in cataract surgery training curricula and factors affecting timing of resident participation as a primary surgeon. Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. Cross-sectional study of anonymous survey results. A description of the study and link to an online survey was e-mailed to program directors of each ophthalmology residency training program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Fifty-one (44%) of the 116 program directors completed the survey. First-year, second-year, and third-year residents performed a mean of 2, 25, and 155 phacoemulsification surgeries, respectively, as a primary surgeon. Only 1 program (2%) required residents to perform extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) before performing phacoemulsification. Clear corneal phacoemulsification was the first technique taught to trainees at 91% of programs. More than two thirds (71%) of program directors indicated that their program had a cataract surgery training curriculum designed to transition residents gradually to the operating room. These curricula included structured wet laboratory (92%) and lecture (89%) components. Inadequate resident knowledge and surgical skill base (57%) and anticipation of increased surgical complication risk (37%) were the most commonly reported factors impeding earlier exposure to phacoemulsification in residency. Results show that residents today begin surgical training with phacoemulsification rather than ECCE, perform a higher number of phacoemulsification surgeries than is required by the ACGME, and begin performing phacoemulsification as early as their first or second year of residency. Despite these evolutions, 29% of respondent ACGME-accredited ophthalmology residency programs reported not having a formal cataract surgery training curriculum. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Incorporating A Structured Writing Process into Existing CLS Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Karen; Latshaw, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Good communication and critical thinking are essential skills for all successful professionals, including Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Science (CLS/MLS) practitioners. Professional programs can incorporate writing assignments into their curricula to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Clearly defined, scenario-focused writing assignments provide student practice in clearly articulating responses to proposed problems or situations, researching and utilizing informational resources, and applying and synthesizing relevant information. Assessment rubrics, structured feedback, and revision writing methodologies help guide students through the writing process. This article describes how a CLS Program in a public academic medical center, located in the central United States (US) serving five centrally-located US states has incorporated writing intensive assignments into an existing 11-month academic year using formal, informal and reflective writing to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Faculty members and employers of graduates assert that incorporating writing intensive requirements have better prepared students for their professional role to effectively communicate and think critically.

  18. Moving Toward a Humanistic Social Studies and History Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Berg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Current reflective practices in the social studies are examined in light of how these strategies can add value and meaning to social studies curriculums. Many of these reflective practices were introduced within teacher education programs’ social studies methods courses, to expose pre-service teachers to innovative teaching practices that could be used in the classroom. An ineffective textbook-centered curriculum has dominated education in the United States for over a century. The researchers in this article argue for a new, reflective approach to teaching history and social studies curricula. New pedagogical models are needed to revive an ailing social studies program in the public school system. This article includes a selective examination of some traditional and non-traditional methods for promoting student learning and growth through reflective practices. Those considered in this article include dialogue journals, textbooks, culturally responsive texts (CRT, the Persona Doll Project, mask-making, primary source documents, and co-teaching. Each reflective practice strategy has its merits and could be easily implemented to improve pedagogical practice.

  19. Redesigning Curricula in Geology and Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, D. W.; Ewing, R. C.; Fowler, D.; Macik, M.; Marcantonio, F.; Miller, B.; Newman, J.; Olszewski, T.; Reece, R.; Rosser, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the summer of 2014, the Texas A&M Department of Geology and Geophysics partnered with the Texas A&M Center for Teaching Excellence to implement TAMU's curriculum revision process: a data-informed, faculty-driven, educational-developer-supported rebuilding of our degree programs and course offerings. The current curricula (B.S. and B.A. in Geology, B.S. in Geophysics) were put into place in 1997, following the merger of two separate departments. The needs and capabilities of the Department and the student body have changed significantly since that time: more than 50% turnover of the faculty, a rapidly-changing job climate for geologists and geophysicists, and a nearly five-fold increase in the undergraduate population to over 500 majors in Fall 2015. Surveys of former students, employers and faculty at other universities revealed more reasons to address the curriculum. Some of the most desired skills are also those at which our graduates feel and are perceived to be least prepared: oral communication and the ability to learn software packages (skills that are most challenging to teach with growing class sizes). The challenge facing the Department is to accommodate growing student numbers while maintaining strength in traditional instructor-intensive activities such as microscopy and field mapping, and also improving our graduates' non-geological skills (e.g., communication, software use, teamwork, problem-solving) to insulate them from volatility in the current job market. We formed the Curriculum Study Group, consisting of faculty, graduate students, advisors and curriculum experts, to gather and analyze data and define the knowledge and skill base a graduate of our department must have. In addition to conducting external surveys, this group interviewed current students and faculty to determine the strengths and weaknesses of our program. We developed program learning goals that were further specified into over fifty criteria. For each criteria we defined

  20. Logic in the curricula of Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Quindeless

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the programs in Computer Science is to educate and train students to understand the problems and build systems that solve them. This process involves applying a special reasoning to model interactions, capabilities, and limitations of the components involved. A good curriculum must involve the use of tools to assist in these tasks, and one that could be considered as a fundamental is the logic, because with it students develop the necessary reasoning. Besides, software developers analyze the behavior of the program during the designed, the depuration, and testing; hardware designers perform minimization and equivalence verification of circuits; designers of operating systems validate routing protocols, programing, and synchronization; and formal logic underlying all these activities. Therefore, a strong background in applied logic would help students to develop or potentiate their ability to reason about complex systems. Unfortunately, few curricula formed and properly trained in logic. Most includes only one or two courses of Discrete Mathematics, which in a few weeks covered truth tables and the propositional calculus, and nothing more. This is not enough, and higher level courses in which they are applied and many other logical concepts are needed. In addition, students will not see the importance of logic in their careers and need to modify the curriculum committees or adapt the curriculum to reverse this situation.

  1. Internationalizing curricula : Needs and wishes of alumni and employers with

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funk, Andreas; Heijer, Joyce den; Schuurmans-Brouwer, Anneke; Walenkamp, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Internationalizing curricula. Needs and wishes of alumni and employers with regard to international competencies. Internationalization has become of great importance for universities acrossthe globe. The labour market is becoming international, with internationalopportunities and international comp

  2. The state of cancer epidemiology curricula in postgraduate schools worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi-Jarrahi, Alireza; Azargashb, Ezanollah; Mousavi-Jarrahi, Yasaman; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali

    2011-09-01

    The study aimed to describe the cancer epidemiology curricula in postgraduate schools worldwide. Using a stepwise approach, information on the cancer epidemiology curricula were abstracted through an internet search of medical or public heath schools worldwide. The common scientific outline (a scholarly developed classification of cancer-related topics) was used to describe the extents that cancer epidemiology and its scientific domains are incorporated into postgraduate degrees in the epidemiology. Among the 120 studied schools, no school offered an explicitly doctoral degree in cancer epidemiology. Just eight schools offered cancer epidemiology as an area of concentration in their epidemiology curricula. The contents of the cancer epidemiology courses offered in different schools were related in 44% of times to topics of cancer control, 19% times to risk factors, and just 11% of times to biology of cancer. The need for comprehensive re-evaluation of the cancer epidemiology curricula in postgraduate teaching was concluded.

  3. A Content Analysis of Phonological Awareness and Phonics in Commonly Used Head Start Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibbe, Lori E.; Gerde, Hope K.; Wright, Tanya S.; Samples-Steele, Chelsea R.

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used early childhood curricula were examined to consider the degree to which they support research-based instruction for phonological awareness (PA) and phonics. A content analysis was completed for two types of curricula widely used in Head Start: overarching general curricula and lesson-based curricula, which usually provide more…

  4. A Content Analysis of Phonological Awareness and Phonics in Commonly Used Head Start Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibbe, Lori E.; Gerde, Hope K.; Wright, Tanya S.; Samples-Steele, Chelsea R.

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used early childhood curricula were examined to consider the degree to which they support research-based instruction for phonological awareness (PA) and phonics. A content analysis was completed for two types of curricula widely used in Head Start: overarching general curricula and lesson-based curricula, which usually provide more…

  5. Tool-Based Curricula and Visual Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Vasileska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years nanotechnology hasrevolutionized the world of information theory, computers andother important disciplines, such as medicine, where it hascontributed significantly in the creation of more sophisticateddiagnostic tools. Therefore, it is important for people working innanotechnology to better understand basic concepts to be morecreative and productive. To further foster the progress onNanotechnology in the USA, the National Science Foundation hascreated the Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCNand the dissemination of all the information from member andnon-member participants of the NCN is enabled by thecommunity website www.nanoHUB.org. nanoHUB’s signatureservices online simulation that enables the operation ofsophisticated research and educational simulation engines with acommon browser. No software installation or local computingpower is needed. The simulation tools as well as nano-conceptsare augmented by educational materials, assignments, and toolbasedcurricula, which are assemblies of tools that help studentsexcel in a particular area.As elaborated later in the text, it is the visual mode of learningthat we are exploiting in achieving faster and better results withstudents that go through simulation tool-based curricula. Thereare several tool based curricula already developed on thenanoHUB and undergoing further development, out of which fiveare directly related to nanoelectronics. They are: ABACUS –device simulation module; ACUTE – Computational Electronicsmodule; ANTSY – bending toolkit; and AQME – quantummechanics module. The methodology behind tool-based curriculais discussed in details. Then, the current status of each module ispresented, including user statistics and student learningindicatives. Particular simulation tool is explored further todemonstrate the ease by which students can grasp information.Representative of Abacus is PN-Junction Lab; representative ofAQME is PCPBT tool; and

  6. Nursing administration graduate programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine S

    2007-11-01

    Providing nursing administrators with excellent educational programming is imperative for the profession. The author analyzes trends in nursing administration education in the United States and how they compare with standards and future recommendations for graduate curricula. The degrees conferred, curricula, hours of study, and educational modalities are examined in 57 master's degrees in nursing programs with concentrations in administration.

  7. ASSURING QUALITY IN FARM ANIMAL WELFARE CURRICULA: THE CASE OF WELFOOD CURRICULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EVANGELIA N. SOSSIDOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to analyze virtual learning environments and to provide a framework for assuring quality in farm animal welfare curricula. The framework is constructed according to the experimental learning for a case study developed in the context of the Leonardo da Vinci Community Vocational Training Action Pilot Project entitled “WELFOOD-Promoting quality assurance in animal welfare-environment-food quality interaction studies through upgraded e-Learning”. WELFOOD addressed objectives such as improvement and competencies of the skills in vocational training to promote employability and facilitate integration and reintegration in terms of capabilities and knowledge, needed for improved technologies in animal husbandry and food industry.

  8. Knowledge, transfer, and innovation in physical literacy curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine D. Ennis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Literate individuals possess knowledge and skill and can apply these to perform tasks in novel settings. Knowledge is at the heart of physical literacy and provides the foundation for knowing what to do and how and when to perform. In this paper I argue that physical literacy includes not only knowledge for performance but also the ability to apply knowledge and use knowledge for innovation. Scholars since the 1930s have addressed the role of knowledge in physical literacy designing curricula centered on transmitting knowledge through a range of interdisciplinary approaches to physical education. This emphasis on physical literacy curricula continues today in the Science, PE, & Me! and The Science of Healthful Living interdisciplinary curricula.

  9. [Traditional and non-traditional curricula. Definitions and terminology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, N

    1995-03-30

    Differences between traditional (conventional) and innovative curricula are described. Technical terms are defined or explained. In traditional tracks, basic and clinical sciences are studied separately. The students meet the first patient after several years. The education is mainly discipline-, teacher-, lecture- and hospital-based. In innovative programmes, basic sciences are taught throughout the study parallel with clinical subjects (vertical integration), and subjects from related disciplines are often taught concurrently (horizontal integration). The students meet patients from the first day at the university, participate from the first week in courses in clinical skills, and, after some months, attend continuity clinics in the community. Teaching is student-directed, problem-based and/or community-oriented, with several electives. Many of the strategies above are also used in traditional curricula. The main difference between traditional and innovative curricula is whether basic and clinical sciences are vertically integrated or not.

  10. A model for the development of university curricula in nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, I

    2010-01-01

    into account that nanotechnology affects not only physics but also electrical engineering and computer engineering because of the advent of new nanoelectronics devices. The model suggests that curriculum development tends to follow one of three major tracks: physics; electrical engineering; computer......Nanotechnology is having an increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering and in physics. Major influencers affecting developments in university programmes related to nanoelectronics are discussed and a model for university programme development is described. The model takes...... engineering. Examples of European curricula following this framework are identified and described. These examples may serve as sources of inspiration for future developments and the model...

  11. Dental Students' Clinical Experience Across Three Successive Curricula at One U.S. Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joel M; Jenson, Larry E; Gansky, Stuart A; Walsh, Cameron J; Accurso, Brent T; Vaderhobli, Ram M; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Walji, Muhammad F; Cheng, Jing

    2017-04-01

    As dental schools continue to seek the most effective ways to provide clinical education for students, it is important to track the effects innovations have on students' clinical experience to allow for quantitative comparisons of various curricula. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of three successive clinical curricula on students' experience at one U.S. dental school. The three were a discipline-based curriculum (DBC), a comprehensive care curriculum (CCC), and a procedural requirement curriculum plus externships (PRCE). Students' clinic experience data from 1992 to 2013 were analyzed for total experience and in five discipline areas. Clinic experience metrics analyzed were patient visits (PVs), relative value units (RVUs), and equivalent amounts (EQAs). A minimum experience threshold (MET) and a high experience threshold (HET) were set at one standard deviation above and below the mean for the DBC years. Students below the MET were designated as low achievers; students above the HET were designated as high achievers. The results showed significant differences among the three curricula in almost all areas of comparison: total PVs, total EQAs, total RVUs, RVUs by discipline, and number of high and low achievers in total clinical experience and by discipline. The comprehensive care approach to clinical education did not negatively impact students' clinical experience and in many cases enhanced it. The addition of externships also enhanced student total clinical experience although more study is needed to determine their effectiveness. The insights provided by this study suggest that the methodology used including the metrics of PVs, EQAs, and RVUs may be helpful for other dental schools in assessing students' clinical experience.

  12. Assessment of a Bioinformatics across Life Science Curricula Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Abler, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, we have undertaken a program to integrate the study of bioinformatics across the undergraduate life science curricula. Our efforts have included incorporating bioinformatics exercises into courses in the biology, microbiology, and chemistry departments, as well as coordinating the efforts of faculty within…

  13. Sustainability Champions? Academic Identities and Sustainability Curricula in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bronwyn E.; Cornforth, Sue; Beals, Fiona; Taylor, Mike; Tallon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of academic staff who are committed to embedding sustainability within tertiary curricula and pedagogy. Design/Methodology/Approach: The focus of this paper is on a New Zealand university. A survey of staff was undertaken and in-depth interviews conducted with 11 sustainability…

  14. Homeschooling Education: Longitudinal Study of Methods, Materials, and Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Linda G.

    2012-01-01

    In a comprehensive study of two-hundred fifty homeschooling families in urban, rural and suburban areas of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the researcher examined all aspects of the instruction, materials and curricula employed by the families in a ten-year longitudinal study from 1998 through 2008. The researcher conducted interviews and…

  15. Final Report of the Careers and Curricula Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John L.; And Others

    The Center's Career and Curricula program bases its work upon a theory of career development. The report presents summaries of the theory upon which the program was based, of the work accomplished by the program, and of the research conducted. It also provides abstracts and ordering sources for the various reports completed. The theory assumes…

  16. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or intersexed content for nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Ann Marie Walsh; Barnsteiner, Jane; Siantz, Mary Lou de Leon; Cotter, Valeri T; Everett, Janine

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited identification of core lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or intersexed (LGBTI) experience concepts that should be included in the nursing curricula. This article addresses the gap in the literature. To move nursing toward the goals of health equity and cultural humility in practice, education, and research, nursing curricula must integrate core LGBTI concepts, experiences, and needs related to health and illness. This article reviews LGBTI health care literature to address the attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed to address curricular gaps and provide content suggestions for inclusion in nursing curricula. Also considered is the need to expand nursing students' definition of diversity before discussing the interplay between nurses' attitudes and culturally competent care provided to persons who are LGBTI. Knowledge needed includes a life span perspective that addresses developmental needs and their impact on health concerns throughout the life course; health promotion and disease prevention with an articulation of unique health issues for this population; mental health concerns; specific health needs of transgender and intersex individuals; barriers to health care; interventions and resources including Internet sites; and legal and policy issues. Particular assessment and communication skills for LGBTI patients are identified. Finally, there is a discussion of didactic, simulation, and clinical strategies for incorporating this content into nursing curricula at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  17. Making Curricula Competence-oriented at Vietnamese Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosma, RH.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many academic curricula suffer from a teacher-centred focus on knowledge transfer and do not consider the societal needs for competences. This paper reflects on the transformation from theory-centred towards competency-oriented curricula at three Vietnamese Agriculture Universities with support of a Netherlands-funded project. Experts guided the implementation, from analysis of labour market to evaluation of new courses. Based on students' evaluation and lecturers' experiences, both types of respondents reported that after having been exposed to a series of trainings and hands-on experience in and outside classrooms, they gained new sets of knowledge and skills. However, some issues emerged in the process. Among these are the lack of competence among lecturers to design curricula based on outcomes, particularly addressing competence of students' knowledge, skills and attitudes; lack of staff to develop and implement a competence-based curricula; non- aggregation of closely related courses in modules that avoid repetitions and provides time for training of skills and attitudes. There is also a need to train students for competency in performing more complex learning outcomes, such as critical thinking. For this change to happen, lecturers need continuous training in didactics for active teaching, and Universities need to provide means for participative learning.

  18. Curricula and Organization of Primary Care Residencies in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, John M.

    1980-01-01

    The organization and curricula of internal medicine residencies programs that emphasize primary care are described and compared with traditional residencies in internal medicine. It is noted that primary care residents spend more time in ambulatory care and are allowed more electives in specialties outside of internal medicine. Out-of-hospital…

  19. Survival Mode: The Stresses and Strains of Computing Curricula Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace; Venables, Anne

    2008-01-01

    In an ideal world, review and changes to computing curricula should be driven solely by academic concerns for the needs of students. The process should be informed by industry accreditation processes and international best practice (Hurst et al., 2001). However, Australian computing curricular review is often driven by the need for financial…

  20. The Status of Fluid Mechanics in Bioengineering Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gerald E.; Hyman, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the status of fluid mechanics courses in bioengineering curricula. A survey of institutions offering bioengineering degrees indicates that over half do not require fluid mechanics courses. Suggests increasing number of mechanics courses to increase the quality of bioengineering students and to prepare students for graduate work and more…

  1. Honors Thesis Preparation: Evidence of the Benefits of Structured Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A recent study of honors curricula across the nation indicates that 75.6% of honors programs and colleges at four-year institutions have thesis or capstone requirements (Savage and Cognard-Black). In addition to institutions with thesis requirements, many more also have the option for students to complete theses. For example, an earlier study…

  2. State Minimum Core Curricula: Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    State minimum core curricula for two-year and four-year colleges and universities have been approved by the Arkansas Board of Higher Education. Within the framework of the State Minimum Core, each state institution is required to propose 35 semester/credit hours from its institutional general education core to be recognized for purposes of the…

  3. State Minimum Core Curricula: Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    This document provides state minimum core curricula for each two- and four-year institution of higher education in Arkansas, determined by the Department of Higher Education. Courses within this core are to apply toward the general education core curriculum requirements for baccalaureate degrees at state-supported institutions and should be fully…

  4. Success factors of master of science curricula in business administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Monique; Van der Klink, Marcel; Boshuizen, Els

    2010-01-01

    Bijker, M. M., Van der Klink, M. R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2010, 25-27 August). Success factors of master of science curricula in business administration. Paper presented at the 5th EARLI-SIG14, Learning and Professional Development, Munich, Germany.

  5. The Internationalization of the Business Administration Curricula in Arab Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmed Abdel-Rahman

    2006-01-01

    This is a study of the extent of the internationalization of the business administration curricula in Arab universities. It is based on a survey of 110 Arab colleges of business that comprise more than half of the overall population, 35% of whom responded. The study found that Arab colleges of business appear to be only moderately…

  6. Assessment of a Bioinformatics across Life Science Curricula Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Abler, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, we have undertaken a program to integrate the study of bioinformatics across the undergraduate life science curricula. Our efforts have included incorporating bioinformatics exercises into courses in the biology, microbiology, and chemistry departments, as well as coordinating the efforts of faculty within…

  7. Sustainability Champions? Academic Identities and Sustainability Curricula in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bronwyn E.; Cornforth, Sue; Beals, Fiona; Taylor, Mike; Tallon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of academic staff who are committed to embedding sustainability within tertiary curricula and pedagogy. Design/Methodology/Approach: The focus of this paper is on a New Zealand university. A survey of staff was undertaken and in-depth interviews conducted with 11 sustainability…

  8. Campus Sustainability: Emerging Curricula Models in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Tamara; McKenna, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to build a detailed description of the Global Seminar (GS) curricula model by exploring its on-the-ground participatory practices in America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. Design/methodology/approach: Within a qualitative research design framework, the authors interviewed 20 faculty members from the…

  9. The Current Landscape of the School Librarianship Curricula in USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kwan; Turner, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The current landscape of the School Librarianship educational programs and curricula of master's degrees in the USA has been explored. The master's programs are currently offered in the following four venues: (1) programs that are American Library Association (ALA) accredited but not American Association of School Librarians (AASL) recognized,…

  10. Matrices to Revise Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Mary C.; Longer, David; Miller, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduate curricula for natural resource and agronomic programs have been introduced and revised during the past several decades with a desire to stay current with emerging issues and technologies relevant to constituents. For the past decade, the Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences (CSES) faculty at the University of Arkansas…

  11. Engineering Faculty Attitudes to General Chemistry Courses in Engineering Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garip, Mehmet; Erdil, Erzat; Bilsel, Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    A survey on the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry, physics, and mathematics was conducted with the aim of clarifying the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry courses in relation to engineering education or curricula and assessing their expectations. The results confirm that on the whole chemistry is perceived as having a…

  12. Visual and Plastic Arts in Teaching Literacy: Null Curricula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeland, Robin Gay

    2010-01-01

    Visual and plastic arts in contemporary literacy instruction equal null curricula. Studies show that painting and sculpture facilitate teaching reading and writing (literacy), yet such pedagogy has not been formally adopted into USA curriculum. An example of null curriculum can be found in late 19th - early 20th century education the USA…

  13. A Model for the Development of University Curricula in Nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, E.; Nielsen, I.

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is having an increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering and in physics. Major influencers affecting developments in university programmes related to nanoelectronics are discussed and a model for university programme development is described. The model takes into account that nanotechnology affects not only…

  14. Vocabulary Instruction in Commonly Used Kindergarten Core Reading Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tanya S.; Neuman, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which commonly used core reading curricular materials supported research-based pedagogical features for oral vocabulary instruction in kindergarten. A document analysis was completed for 12 weeks of instructional materials from the teacher's editions of the 4 most widely used curricula.…

  15. Nature's Nature: Ideas of Nature in Curricula for Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Maurice, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Two contrasting sets of ideas about nature in environmental education are described. An analytical framework is developed from inter-disciplinary histories of ideas and used in evaluating a specific curriculum. In conclusion, some general implications are suggested for curricula in environmental education. [This article was reprinted from…

  16. A Toolkit to Implement Graduate Attributes in Geography Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel; McLean, Angela; Smith, Nell; Bond, Carol; Jenkins, Martin; Marshall, Stephen; Frielick, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    This article uses findings from a project on engagement with graduate outcomes across higher education institutions in New Zealand to produce a toolkit for implementing graduate attributes in geography curricula. Key facets include strong leadership; academic developers to facilitate conversations about graduate attributes and teaching towards…

  17. The Status of Fluid Mechanics in Bioengineering Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gerald E.; Hyman, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the status of fluid mechanics courses in bioengineering curricula. A survey of institutions offering bioengineering degrees indicates that over half do not require fluid mechanics courses. Suggests increasing number of mechanics courses to increase the quality of bioengineering students and to prepare students for graduate work and more…

  18. Financial Capability and Asset Building in the Curricula: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Vernon; Birkenmaier, Julie; Hageman, Sally A.

    2017-01-01

    Although social work education competencies include economic justice, and practice includes addressing client finances and assets, social work curricula lack an emphasis on these topics. Little is known about students' perceptions of the relevancy of this information or how well their program is preparing them for contemporary practice. This study…

  19. Graduate Museum Studies Curricula: Meeting the Needs of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William Frank

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how graduate museum studies programs are meeting the current and anticipated future needs of the museum profession. A comprehensive assessment was conducted to determine the knowledge and skills most emphasized in graduate museum studies curricula and those most valued by leading museum practitioners. A total…

  20. The Traditional in Contemporary Curricula of Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopas-Vukašinovic, Emina; Savovic, Margit

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary curricula of preschool education are the result of the improvement of pedagogical and didactic theories. They imply a technical plan with which it is possible to achieve measurable objectives of preschool education. The curriculum is also defined as a tool for quality and equal education for all. It represents a reflection of the…

  1. Internationalization of University Curricula in Japan: Major Policies and Practice since the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2006-01-01

    This article begins by discussing the context and major policies as well as the rationales related to internationalization of the university curricula in Japan. It then touches on internationalization of the curricula in Japanese higher education institutions at home and on development of cross-border curricula that are both imported into Japan…

  2. Plagiarism Curricula May Reduce Need for Punitive Plagiarism Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin E. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To describe the development and implementation of two courses designed to help university students avoid plagiarism. Design – Quantitative and qualitative analysis. Setting – A university in the United Kingdom. Subjects – An unknown number of university students who took a Plagiarism Awareness Program (PAP course between 2008 and 2011, and approximately 3,000 university students enrolled in a Plagiarism Avoidance for New Students (PANS course delivered via a virtual learning environment (VLE between October and December 2012. The authors attempted to collect rates of continued plagiarism among students who had taken plagiarism education courses. The authors also surveyed 702 university students about plagiarism in 2011. Methods – Data collected from PAP participants informed revision of the authors’ approach to plagiarism education and led to development of the second course, PANS. At the end of the course, students completed a test of their knowledge about plagiarism. Authors compared scores from students who took a course supervised by a librarian to the scores from students who took the course independently. Main Results – Students reported that many aspects of citation and attribution are challenging (p. 149. The authors discovered that 93% of students who completed the PANS course facilitated by a librarian in-person passed the final exam with a grade of 70% or higher, while 85% of students who took the same course independently, without a librarian instructor, in an online VLE scored 70% or higher (p. 155. The authors report that referrals of students who plagiarized declined significantly (p-value < 0.001 since the implementation of a plagiarism avoidance curriculum. Conclusion – As reported by the authors, first-year university students require more extensive education about plagiarism avoidance. A university plagiarism avoidance program instructed by librarians reduces the total number of students caught

  3. International Appraisal of Nursing Culture and Curricula: A Qualitative Study of Erasmus Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Siles Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Globalization of knowledge has emphasized the need to promote the adoption of international exchange programs in nursing. Nevertheless, the differences in cultural, educational, and structural schemes have challenged the mutual appraisal and understanding of the nursing curricula between countries. Research on nursing curricula should allow performing an analysis of different cultural idiosyncrasies in which educational and health institutions are found. These studies would contribute valuable information to the educative and organizational systems and their cultural variability. Objective. To examine the experiences of nursing students on international exchange programs. Methods. Comparative Education was taken as theoretical background. The clinical practice diaries of seven Spanish Nursing Erasmus students (a European international exchange program were used as field journals. These students undertook their placements in the United Kingdom. A content analysis was carried out to find major themes. Results. Data extracted from the students clinical practice diaries indicated cultural, educational, and structural differences between countries. Most students reflected the hidden curriculum in their diaries, writing about affective, ideological, personal, and social elements and beliefs. Conclusions. The students’ experiences on international exchange programs were found to be sources of interest to clarify the ideological and cultural connections that underlie educational and health systems.

  4. Cornerstones: Literacy Units Ready for Teachers, Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasko, Jennifer; Donahue, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Every day, teachers face the time-consuming task of adapting materials from curricula that do not meet their students' needs or match their learning styles. This article discusses ready-made literacy units specifically designed for teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students. The units were part of the Cornerstones Project, an activity of the…

  5. The need to integrate values into environmental curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, John

    1989-03-01

    Many environmental problems are controversial because of conflicting values people hold and because there is not a consensus as to which values should have precedence over others. If environmental managers are to make ethical decisions that reflect environmental values, they must have full understanding of such values and types of ethics and principles of moral reasoning to use in the decision-making process. Unfortunately, integration of values into environmental curricula has often not been explicit or comprehensive. One result is that university-trained environmental managers do not possess the knowledge, skills, and methods necessary for more ethically based decisions. An analysis of attitudes about integrating values and/or ethics into environmental curricula and approaches to do so yields the conclusion that environmental programs should more fully include teaching about values and ethics so that environmental managers can make more ethically sound decisions.

  6. Assessment of health promotion content in undergraduate physiotherapy curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebogile Mokwena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The integration of health promotion in the treatment of patients should be included in all academic curricula in primary training of health professionals. However, the extent to which health promotion is included in the various curricula at undergraduate level is not known.Objective: To assess the extent to which health promotion content is integrated in undergraduate physiotherapy training programmes in South Africa. Method: This was a qualitative and descriptive study, using in-depth interviews with representatives of physiotherapy academic departments.Results: All universities have some content of health promotion, with the weighting varying between 12% and 40%. Health promotion is taught at various levels of study, and health promotion training blocks are in both urban and rural settings and include communities, schools and old-age homes. The theories of advocacy, enabling and mediation are covered, but there is limited practical training on these elements. There are limited human resources trained in health promotion, as well as a lack of clear processes of developing and reviewing teaching and training materials.Conclusion: There is lack of consensus on the weighting of health promotion, the level at which it is taught and how it is evaluated across universities. Challenges to integrate health promotion in physiotherapy curricula include lack of frequent curricula reviews, inadequate training of lecturers and lack of conducive practical sites.The physiotherapy profession needs to reach a consensus on minimum standards for integration of health promotion in undergraduate training, and the physiotherapy professional board has the potential to provide the required leadership.

  7. Development of mechanical engineering curricula at the University of Minho

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. F. Teixeira; Silva, Jaime F. da; Flores, Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of the Bologna protocol in the European Union has set new goals for the whole higher education system as: (a) a quality assessment for university courses; (b) a framework for the exchange of students and academics; and (c) an opportunity for changing the teaching/learning procedures and methodologies. Within the context, the mechanical engineering curricula at the University of Minho have been comprehensively formulated in order to meet these and future challenges and expec...

  8. Preservation of the discipline "Safety" by means of changing curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Kaslin, N. D.; Bogatov, О. І.

    2015-01-01

    During the past five years the regulatory and legal framework of education in Ukraine has been changing significantly. Especially important changes in the content and organization of education were stipulated by the law on “Higher Education” and the Resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine “List of Specialties” (correspondingly of 2014 and 2015 years of enactment). The introduction of the European credit transfer system in education has changed the structure of curricula and the list...

  9. A pilot comparison of standardized online surgical curricula for use in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth D; Papandria, Dominic; Linden, Allison; Azzie, Georges; Borgstein, Eric; Calland, James Forrest; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Jani, Pankaj; Klingensmith, Mary; Labib, Mohamed; Lewis, Frank; Malangoni, Mark A; O'Flynn, Eric; Ogendo, Stephen; Riviello, Robert; Abdullah, Fizan

    2014-04-01

    Surgical conditions are an important component of global disease burden, due in part to critical shortages of adequately trained surgical providers in low- and middle-income countries. To assess the use of Internet-based educational platforms as a feasible approach to augmenting the education and training of surgical providers in these settings. Access to two online curricula was offered to 75 surgical faculty and trainees from 12 low- and middle-income countries for 60 days. The Surgical Council on Resident Education web portal was designed for general surgery trainees in the United States, and the School for Surgeons website was built by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland specifically for the College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa. Participants completed an anonymous online survey detailing their experiences with both platforms. Voluntary respondents were daily Internet users and endorsed frequent use of both print and online textbooks as references. Likert scale survey questionnaire responses indicating overall and content-specific experiences with the Surgical Council on Resident Education and School for Surgeons curricula. Survey responses were received from 27 participants. Both online curricula were rated favorably, with no statistically significant differences in stated willingness to use and recommend either platform to colleagues. Despite regional variations in practice context, there were few perceived hurdles to future curriculum adoption. Both the Surgical Council on Resident Education and School for Surgeons educational curricula were well received by respondents in low- and middle-income countries. Although one was designed for US surgical postgraduates and the other for sub-Saharan African surgical providers, there were no significant differences detected in participant responses between the two platforms. Online educational resources have promise as an effective means to enhance the education of surgical providers in low

  10. Networked curricula: fostering transnational partnership in open and distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz Cacheiro-González

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transnational Networked Curricula (TNC provides many benefits to the institutions that offer them as well as to the different stakeholders involved, not only the students but also the academics, the institutions as a whole, and the wider society. Supporting Higher Education Institutions in enhancing and implementing international networked practices in virtual campus building is the main aim of the NetCU project, which has been developed by the EADTU, in partnership with 14 member organizations, from 2009 to 2012. The project outcomes intend to facilitate the future set-up of networked curricula in Higher Education institutions and potentially lead to more transnational partnerships in Open and Distance Education (ODE and blended learning, showing challenges, obstacles and ways to overcome them. This paper presents the main products developed in the project, assesses its completeness and usage, and discusses on the challenges of curricula networking starting from the ideas and opinions shared in different stakeholders workshops organized under the NetCU project.

  11. Algebra for All: California’s Eighth-Grade Algebra Initiative as Constrained Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Thurston; Penner, Andrew M.; Penner, Emily K.; Conley, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Background/Context Across the United States, secondary school curricula are intensifying as a growing proportion of students enroll in high-level academic math courses. In many districts, this intensification process occurs as early as eighth grade, where schools are effectively constraining their mathematics curricula by restricting course offerings and placing more students into Algebra I. This paper provides a quantitative single-case research study of policy-driven curricular intensification in one California school district. Research Questions (1a) What effect did 8th eighth grade curricular intensification have on mathematics course enrollment patterns in Towering Pines Unified schools? (2b) How did the distribution of prior achievement in Towering Pines math classrooms change as the district constrained the curriculum by universalizing 8th eighth grade Algebra? (3c) Did 8th eighth grade curricular intensification improve students’ mathematics achievement? Setting Towering Pines is an immigrant enclave in the inner-ring suburbs of a major metropolitan area. The district’s 10 middle schools together enroll approximately 4,000 eighth graders each year. The districts’ students are ethnically diverse and largely economically disadvantaged. The study draws upon administrative data describing 8th eighth graders in the district in the 2004–20-05 through 2007–20-08 school years. Intervention/Program/Practice During the study period, Towering Pines dramatically intensified middle school students’ math curricula: In the 2004–20-05 school year 32% of the district’s 8th eighth graders enrolled in Algebra or a higher- level mathematics course; by the 2007–20-08 school year that proportion had increased to 84%. Research Design We use an interrupted time-series design, comparing students’ 8th eighth grade math course enrollments, 10th grade math course enrollments, and 10th grade math test scores across the four cohorts, controlling for demographics and

  12. Algebra for All: California's Eighth-Grade Algebra Initiative as Constrained Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Thurston; Penner, Andrew M; Penner, Emily K; Conley, Annemarie

    2014-08-01

    Across the United States, secondary school curricula are intensifying as a growing proportion of students enroll in high-level academic math courses. In many districts, this intensification process occurs as early as eighth grade, where schools are effectively constraining their mathematics curricula by restricting course offerings and placing more students into Algebra I. This paper provides a quantitative single-case research study of policy-driven curricular intensification in one California school district. (1a) What effect did 8th eighth grade curricular intensification have on mathematics course enrollment patterns in Towering Pines Unified schools? (2b) How did the distribution of prior achievement in Towering Pines math classrooms change as the district constrained the curriculum by universalizing 8th eighth grade Algebra? (3c) Did 8th eighth grade curricular intensification improve students' mathematics achievement? Towering Pines is an immigrant enclave in the inner-ring suburbs of a major metropolitan area. The district's 10 middle schools together enroll approximately 4,000 eighth graders each year. The districts' students are ethnically diverse and largely economically disadvantaged. The study draws upon administrative data describing 8th eighth graders in the district in the 2004-20-05 through 2007-20-08 school years. During the study period, Towering Pines dramatically intensified middle school students' math curricula: In the 2004-20-05 school year 32% of the district's 8th eighth graders enrolled in Algebra or a higher- level mathematics course; by the 2007-20-08 school year that proportion had increased to 84%. We use an interrupted time-series design, comparing students' 8th eighth grade math course enrollments, 10th grade math course enrollments, and 10th grade math test scores across the four cohorts, controlling for demographics and prior achievement. We find that students' odds of taking higher level mathematics courses increased as this

  13. Leadership and management in UK medical school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Richard; Sheriff, Ibrahim H N; Matthews, Jacob H; Jagger, Olivia; Curtis, Sarah; Lees, Peter; Spurgeon, Peter C; Fountain, Daniel Mark; Oldman, Alex; Habib, Ali; Saied, Azam; Court, Jessica; Giannoudi, Marilena; Sayma, Meelad; Ward, Nicholas; Cork, Nick; Olatokun, Olamide; Devine, Oliver; O'Connell, Paul; Carr, Phoebe; Kotronias, Rafail Angelos; Gardiner, Rebecca; Buckle, Rory T; Thomson, Ross J; Williams, Sarah; Nicholson, Simon J; Goga, Usman

    2016-10-10

    Purpose Although medical leadership and management (MLM) is increasingly being recognised as important to improving healthcare outcomes, little is understood about current training of medical students in MLM skills and behaviours in the UK. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study used validated structured interviews with expert faculty members from medical schools across the UK to ascertain MLM framework integration, teaching methods employed, evaluation methods and barriers to improvement. Findings Data were collected from 25 of the 33 UK medical schools (76 per cent response rate), with 23/25 reporting that MLM content is included in their curriculum. More medical schools assessed MLM competencies on admission than at any other time of the curriculum. Only 12 schools had evaluated MLM teaching at the time of data collection. The majority of medical schools reported barriers, including overfilled curricula and reluctance of staff to teach. Whilst 88 per cent of schools planned to increase MLM content over the next two years, there was a lack of consensus on proposed teaching content and methods. Research limitations/implications There is widespread inclusion of MLM in UK medical schools' curricula, despite the existence of barriers. This study identified substantial heterogeneity in MLM teaching and assessment methods which does not meet students' desired modes of delivery. Examples of national undergraduate MLM teaching exist worldwide, and lessons can be taken from these. Originality/value This is the first national evaluation of MLM in undergraduate medical school curricula in the UK, highlighting continuing challenges with executing MLM content despite numerous frameworks and international examples of successful execution.

  14. Dysfunctional problem-based learning curricula: resolving the problem

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    Lim William K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based learning (PBL has become the most significant innovation in medical education of the past 40 years. In contrast to exam-centered, lecture-based conventional curricula, PBL is a comprehensive curricular strategy that fosters student-centred learning and the skills desired in physicians. The rapid spread of PBL has produced many variants. One of the most common is 'hybrid PBL' where conventional teaching methods are implemented alongside PBL. This paper contends that the mixing of these two opposing educational philosophies can undermine PBL and nullify its positive benefits. Schools using hybrid PBL and lacking medical education expertise may end up with a dysfunctional curriculum worse off than the traditional approach. Discussion For hybrid PBL schools with a dysfunctional curriculum, standard PBL is a cost-feasible option that confers the benefits of the PBL approach. This paper describes the signs of a dysfunctional PBL curriculum to aid hybrid PBL schools in recognising curricular breakdown. Next it discusses alternative curricular strategies and costs associated with PBL. It then details the four critical factors for successful conversion to standard PBL: dealing with staff resistance, understanding the role of lectures, adequate time for preparation and support from the administrative leadership. Summary Hybrid PBL curricula without oversight by staff with medical education expertise can degenerate into dysfunctional curricula inferior even to the traditional approach from which PBL emerged. Such schools should inspect their curriculum periodically for signs of dysfunction to enable timely corrective action. A decision to convert fully to standard PBL is cost feasible but will require time, expertise and commitment which is only sustainable with supportive leadership.

  15. Improving Fellowship Training in Microsurgery: A Threshold Concepts Perspective on the Curricula of Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Tsironi, Maria; Riley, David

    2015-10-01

    The theory of "threshold concepts" argues that within every discipline there is knowledge that transforms understanding and leads to a previously inaccessible way of thinking, without which the learner cannot progress. This study investigates the factors influencing the development of the characteristic ways of thinking and practicing as a microsurgeon during a microsurgical fellowship. We analyze the challenges in the development of these characteristics during focused fellowship training in microsurgery, of which some could potentially represent "threshold concepts." A qualitative research methodology was followed. Semistructured interviews with trainers and trainees from microsurgical units in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US) were conducted. Data were analyzed using the Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, CA) qualitative data analysis software and interpreted using the theory of "threshold concepts." Five trainees and four trainers from the UK and the US participated in this research project. Although initially some trainees had particular difficulty in developing their practical microsurgical skills, this improved rapidly with adequate practice. Cognitive skills and especially the ability to expect the unexpected and the ability recognize complications presented as a significant challenge for trainees and transformed their understandings regarding the qualities of a microsurgeon. Microsurgical fellowship curricula can be redesigned using the theory of threshold concepts, creating a dynamic framework that addresses individual trainee needs to develop the practical and cognitive skills necessary for independent practice of microsurgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Creating Educational Technology Curricula for Advanced Studies in Learning Technology

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    Minoru Nakayama

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum design and content are key factors in the area of human resource development. To examine the possibility of using a collaboration of Human Computer Interaction (HCI and Educational Technology (ET to develop innovative improvements to the education system, the curricula of these two areas of study were lexically analyzed and compared. As a further example, the curriculum of a joint course in HCI and ET was also lexically analyzed and the contents were examined. These analyses can be used as references in the development of human resources for use in advanced learning environments.

  17. Searching for scientific literacy and critical pedagogy in socioscientific curricula: A critical discourse analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kristina M.

    The omnipresence of science and technology in our society require the development of a critical and scientifically literate citizenry. However, the inclusion of socioscientific issues, which are open-ended controversial issues informed by both science and societal factors such as politics, economics, and ethics, do not guarantee the development of these skills. The purpose of this critical discourse analysis is to identify and analyze the discursive strategies used in intermediate science texts and curricula that address socioscientific topics and the extent to which the discourses are designed to promote or suppress the development of scientific literacy and a critical pedagogy. Three curricula that address the issue of energy and climate change were analyzed using Gee's (2011) building tasks and inquiry tools. The curricula were written by an education organization entitled PreSEES, a corporate-sponsored group called NEED, and a non-profit organization named Oxfam. The analysis found that the PreSEES and Oxfam curricula elevated the significance of climate change and the NEED curriculum deemphasized the issue. The PreSEES and Oxfam curricula promoted the development of scientific literacy while the NEED curricula suppressed its development. The PreSEES and Oxfam curricula both promoted the development of the critical pedagogy; however, only the Oxfam curricula provided authentic opportunities to enact sociopolitical change. The NEED curricula suppressed the development of critical pedagogy. From these findings, the following conclusions were drawn. When socioscientific issues are presented with the development of scientific literacy and critical pedagogy, the curricula allow students to develop fact-based opinions about the issue. However, curricula that address socioscientific issues without the inclusion of these skills minimize the significance of the issue and normalize the hegemonic worldview promoted by the curricula's authors. Based on these findings

  18. Opening Up a ‘Third Space’ To Innovate Curricula

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    Hannelize Jacobs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Against the background of innovating learner experiences in South African schools and higher learning institutions in the 21st century, it is crucial to determine, in the analogy to the words, ‘what holds a place together’. It is necessary to know how to create that sense of belonging, what the vision and mission are, what is valued and expected, what one can identify with and what will make educators move collectively towards taking united ownership of the future and create the next best learning and teaching practice. Approach: Appreciate inquiry, as research method for this study, searches for the identification and enhancement of the life-giving forces as it explores what should be present or need to be present in a uniquely constructed third space. Appreciative inquiry is crafted in a post-positivist tradition grounded in affirmation and appreciation. True to the vision of the creators of this method who regard it as an inquiry to uncover profound knowledge entities of human systems in order to co-construct the best and highest future of that system, this investigation focuses on uncovering past, present and future learning and teaching practices to innovate the next curricula. Conclusion/Recommendations: In this study we argue that when innovating curricula, South African educators have to elicit local pre-knowledge and experiences to shape them into a leveled playing field before they can add on global international knowledge. South African educators have to construct the next practice in learning and teaching by integrating local and global knowledge in a unique space (what Bhabha refers to as a ‘third’ space.

  19. The introduction of digital dental technology into BDS curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham, C; Spencer, M H; Wood, D J; Johnson, A

    2014-12-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree to which digital dental technologies have been introduced into the curricula of UK dental schools. A survey was carried out of all the UK dental schools that teach undergraduate dental students. The survey contained six questions and was designed to determine if digital dental technology techniques or systems were being taught in the curricula, what these techniques were, and whether the school dental laboratories supported these techniques. Sixteen schools were surveyed and 11 replied: a response rate of 69%. Forty-five percent of the schools that replied did not teach digital dental technology in their curriculum. Of the 55% of schools who did teach digital dental technology, 50% gave lectures or demonstrations while the other 50% allowed practical involvement by the student. Two thirds of these stated that not all the students participated in practical usage. Seventy-three percent of the schools that replied had dental laboratories using some, but not all the digital dental technology techniques listed. Eighty percent of the schools that were not teaching digital dental technology said it was because it was not included in the curriculum, and 20% stated it was due to a lack of technical expertise or support.

  20. Capacity Building through Geospatial Education in Planning and School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Siddiqui, A.; Gupta, K.; Jain, S.; Krishna Murthy, Y. V. N.

    2014-11-01

    Geospatial technology has widespread usage in development planning and resource management. It offers pragmatic tools to help urban and regional planners to realize their goals. On the request of Ministry of Urban Development, Govt. of India, the Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS), Dehradun has taken an initiative to study the model syllabi of All India Council for Technical Education for planning curricula of Bachelor and Master (five disciplines) programmes. It is inferred that geospatial content across the semesters in various planning fields needs revision. It is also realized that students pursuing planning curricula are invariably exposed to spatial mapping tools but the popular digital drafting software have limitations on geospatial analysis of planning phenomena. Therefore, students need exposure on geospatial technologies to understand various real world phenomena. Inputs were given to seamlessly merge and incorporate geospatial components throughout the semesters wherever seems relevant. Another initiative by IIRS was taken to enhance the understanding and essence of space and geospatial technologies amongst the young minds at 10+2 level. The content was proposed in a manner such that youngsters start realizing the innumerable contributions made by space and geospatial technologies in their day-to-day life. This effort both at school and college level would help in not only enhancing job opportunities for young generation but also utilizing the untapped human resource potential. In the era of smart cities, higher economic growth and aspirations for a better tomorrow, integration of Geospatial technologies with conventional wisdom can no longer be ignored.

  1. Unexpected attitudinal growth in a course combining reformed curricula

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    Michael M. Hull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show data from the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey that suggests that Georgetown physics majors become increasingly expert in their attitudes towards physics learning and knowing after taking a course that combines two reformed curricula, Matter and Interactions (M&I and Tutorials in Introductory Physics (TIPs. This occurs even though the two curricula do not send a consistent epistemological message to students. We analyze interview video data of two of these students to illustrate examples of this growth. We examine video data of one of these students in a tutorial session to describe a possible mechanism that may have contributed to the growth. Finally, we compare this qualitative video data with quantitative data from the newly developed Perceptions of Physics Classes survey and discuss aggregate responses to this survey in considering the ways in which other students developed more expertlike attitudes in this course. We conclude that the attitudinal growth observed cannot be explained simply “as the result of” either M&I or of TIPs but rather find the most plausible explanation to be that the growth is an emergent phenomena produced by M&I and TIPs working together in concert with other factors.

  2. Transcultural Nursing in Turkey's Bachelor's of Science Nursing Curricula

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    Gülbu Tanrıverdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aims of this manuscript are to examine the presence of transcultural Nursing concept and foundations in Turkey's Bachelor's Of Science In Nursing curricula.Methods: Tis study was planned as a descriptive study during the 2004-2005 academic year in Turkey's Bachelor's of Science in Nursing Curricula. The manuscript data were collected by internet, mail, fax and telephone calls. Percentage was used in the statistical evaluation.Results: According to findings none of the 66 Bachelor's of Science in Nursing curriculum programs had "transcultural Nursing" as a required course. There was only one nursing school that did have the course as an elective. However, There was courses like Socio-Anthropology, Medical Anthropology, Health Sociology and Anthropology which has the elements of transcultural nursing concept are included in BSN programs.Conclusions: Based on the findings it is recommended that Turkey's university curriculum programs in Nursing College and Health Colleges to be reevaluated for the inclusion of a transcultural Nursing Course.

  3. Unexpected attitudinal growth in a course combining reformed curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Michael M.; Lindsey, Beth A.; Archambault, Matthew; Davey, Kathleen; Liu, Amy Y.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show data from the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey that suggests that Georgetown physics majors become increasingly expert in their attitudes towards physics learning and knowing after taking a course that combines two reformed curricula, Matter and Interactions (M&I) and Tutorials in Introductory Physics (TIPs). This occurs even though the two curricula do not send a consistent epistemological message to students. We analyze interview video data of two of these students to illustrate examples of this growth. We examine video data of one of these students in a tutorial session to describe a possible mechanism that may have contributed to the growth. Finally, we compare this qualitative video data with quantitative data from the newly developed Perceptions of Physics Classes survey and discuss aggregate responses to this survey in considering the ways in which other students developed more expertlike attitudes in this course. We conclude that the attitudinal growth observed cannot be explained simply "as the result of" either M&I or of TIPs but rather find the most plausible explanation to be that the growth is an emergent phenomena produced by M&I and TIPs working together in concert with other factors.

  4. Influence of national culture on the adoption of integrated medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Majoor, Gerard D

    2011-03-01

    Integrated curricula have been implemented in medical schools all over the world. However, among countries different relative numbers of schools with integrated curricula are found. This study aims to explore the possible correlation between the percentage of medical schools with integrated curricula in a country and that country's cultural characteristics. Curricula were defined as not integrated if in the first 2 years of the program at least two out of the three monodisciplinary courses Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry were identified. Culture was defined using Hofstede's dimensions Power distance, Uncertainty avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, and Individualism/Collectivism. Consequently, this study had to be restricted to the 63 countries included in Hofstede's studies which harbored 1,195 medical schools. From each country we randomly sampled a maximum of 15 schools yielding 484 schools to be investigated. In total 91% (446) of the curricula were found. Correlation of percent integrated curricula and each dimension of culture was determined by calculating Spearman's Rho. A high score on the Power distance index and a high score on the Uncertainty avoidance index correlated with a low percent integrated curricula; a high score on the Individualism index correlated with a high percent integrated curricula. The percentage integrated curricula in a country did not correlate with its score on the Masculinity index. National culture is associated with the propensity of medical schools to adopt integrated medical curricula. Consequently, medical schools considering introduction of integrated and problem-based medical curricula should take into account dimensions of national culture which may hinder the innovation process.

  5. Assessing Cardiff University's Curricula Contribution to Sustainable Development Using the STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Peattie, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of the sustainable development curricula assessment undertaken at 19 of the 28 schools of Cardiff University using the Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversity's Curricula Holistically (STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)]. STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] was developed with two objectives: (1) to systematically assess how…

  6. Curricula and Instruction for Young Handicapped Children: A Guideline for Selection and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBose, Rebecca; Kelley, Jean

    The paper examines the theoretical constructs that underlie currently used curricula for young handicapped children and suggests guidelines for selecting and evaluating curricula. Three developmental perspectives are reviewed: the age related developmental milestones identified by A. Gesell and adhered to by diagnostic prescriptive advocates, the…

  7. Sustainbility and Undergraduate Management Curricula: Changes over a 5-Year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Josie; Bonn, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Global initiatives and a rapidly expanding academic literature identify the responsibility that universities have to incorporate sustainability education into their curricula. This study had two aims: first, to investigate the extent to which Australian undergraduate management curricula explicitly identified a focus on sustainability and, second,…

  8. On the Making and Faking of Knowledge Value in Higher Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordern, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses Bernstein's sociology of knowledge and studies of professional knowledge and expertise to identify how knowledge value is constituted in higher education curricula. It is argued that different knowledge structures and forms of disciplinary community influence how curricula are determined, and lead to distinctive types of knowledge…

  9. Ideas, Institutions, and School Curricula: Explaining Variation between England and France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Leah

    2015-01-01

    This study raises the question of why the French secondary school history curricula introduced in the late 2000s prescribed more extensive coverage of plural histories than did secondary school history curricula for English schools introduced in the same time period. Both countries share similar societal diversity. To explain the variation in…

  10. A Historical Analysis of Primary Mathematics Curricula in Terms of Teaching Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    This study carries out a comparative analysis of primary mathematics curricula put into practice during Turkish Republican period. The data for this study are composed of official curricula documents which are examined in terms of teaching principles. The study adopts a qualitative approach and employs document analysis method. The official…

  11. Engineering Education: Environmental and Chemical Engineering or Technology Curricula--A European Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavic, Peter; Lukman, Rebeka; Lozano, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Over recent years, universities have been incorporating sustainable development (SD) into their systems, including their curricula. This article analyses the incorporation of SD into the curricula of chemical and environmental engineering or technology bachelor degrees at universities in the European Union (EU) and European Free Trade Association…

  12. Using Variables in School Mathematics: Do School Mathematics Curricula Provide Support for Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogbey, James

    2016-01-01

    This study employed content analysis to examine 3 popular middle-grades mathematics curricula in the USA on the support they provide for teachers to implement concepts associated with variables in school mathematics. The results indicate that each of the 3 curricula provides some type of support for teachers, but in a varied amount and quality.…

  13. A Cross-National Comparison of Art Curricula for Kindergarten-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejin; Kim, Hajin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to make a cross-national comparison of art curricula for kindergarten-aged children across five countries--Korea, Norway, New Zealand, Slovakia and Singapore. A document analysis was conducted on the five curricula using a constant comparative approach for selected qualitative statements to analyse two major constructs:…

  14. Experiencing the Implementation of New Inquiry Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ower, Peter S.

    Using a phenomenological methodology, a cohort of four experienced science teachers was interviewed about their experience transitioning from traditional, teacher and fact-centered science curricula to inquiry-based curricula. Each teacher participated in two interviews that focused on their teaching backgrounds, their experience teaching the prior traditional curriculum, and their experience teaching the new inquiry-based curriculum. The findings are presented as a narrative of each teachers' experience with the new curriculum implementation. Analyzing the data revealed four key themes. 1) The teachers felt trapped by the old curriculum as it did not align with their positive views of teaching science through inquiry. 2) The teachers found a way to fit their beliefs and values into the old and new curriculum. This required changes to the curriculum. 3) The teachers attempted to make the science curriculum as meaningful as possible for their students. 4) The teachers experienced a balancing act between their beliefs and values and the various aspects of the curriculum. The revealed essence of the curriculum transition is one of freedom and reconciliation of their beliefs. The teachers experienced the implementation of the new curriculum as a way to ensure their values and beliefs of science education were embedded therein. They treated the new curriculum as a malleable structure to impart their grander ideas of science education (e.g. providing important skills for future careers, creating a sense of wonder, future problem solving) to the students. Their changes were aligned with the philosophy of the curriculum kits they were implementing. Thus, the fidelity of the curriculum's philosophy was not at risk even though the curriculum kits were not taught as written. This study showed that phenomenological methods are able to reveal the relationship between a teacher's prior experiences, values and beliefs and their current instructional philosophy in science

  15. Baccalaureate nursing students' attitudes toward poverty: implications for nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sword, Wendy; Reutter, Linda; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Rideout, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Given the link between poverty and health, nurses, in their work in hospitals and in the community, often come into contact with people who are poor. To be effective care providers, nurses must have an adequate understanding of poverty and a positive attitude toward people who are poor. This study examined attitudes toward poverty among baccalaureate nursing students (N = 740) at three Canadian universities. Students' attitudes were neutral to slightly positive. Personal experiences appeared to have an important influence on the development of favorable attitudes. The findings point to several considerations for nursing curricula. Students should not only be provided with classroom opportunities for critical exploration of poverty and its negative effects on individuals and society, but also have clinical learning experiences that bring them face-to-face with people who are poor, their health concerns, and the realities of their circumstances. Thoughtful critique of poverty-related issues and interpersonal contact may be effective strategies to foster attitude change.

  16. Teaching strategies to incorporate genomics education into academic nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo Garcia, Sylvia P; Greco, Karen E; Loescher, Lois J

    2011-11-01

    The translation of genomic science into health care has expanded our ability to understand the effects of genomics on human health and disease. As genomic advances continue, nurses are expected to have the knowledge and skills to translate genomic information into improved patient care. This integrative review describes strategies used to teach genomics in academic nursing programs and their facilitators and barriers to inclusion in nursing curricula. The Learning Engagement Model and the Diffusion of Innovations Theory guided the interpretation of findings. CINAHL, Medline, and Web of Science were resources for articles published during the past decade that included strategies for teaching genomics in academic nursing programs. Of 135 articles, 13 met criteria for review. Examples of effective genomics teaching strategies included clinical application through case studies, storytelling, online genomics resources, student self-assessment, guest lecturers, and a genetics focus group. Most strategies were not evaluated for effectiveness.

  17. Problem Based Internship in Surveying and Planning Curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Esben Munk; Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    another consulting agency ore company with a surveying ore land management profile. The internship is not focusing on practice training alone. The student has to prepare the internship by formulating a problem reflecting what they want to learn and how the can contribute to develop products, procedures...... by the society to serve the community with still more new knowledge and technology transfer from the international research community. The internship and still more real world influenced problem based learning by writing thesis will be and important bridge builder in the following years.......The University Programme for the education of Masters in Surveying and Planning has been reorganized. First of all the basic concept of Problem Based Learning at Aalborg University is still dominating the full curricula of the Danish Master Programme in Surveying and Planning. The five year...

  18. Integration of social responsability in the curricula: a case study

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    María Angela Prialé

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The document presented below combines the review of existing literature in the field of teaching ethics and social responsibility with a case study through which the integration of social responsibility is analyzed transversely in the curricula of undergraduate programs offered by a Peruvian university specializing in economics and business. An analysis method that exploits the concept of social responsibility defined in ISO 26000, to generate items that allow to evaluate the approach to social responsibility for the contents of 215 compulsory courses offered by the different academic departments of the university was created. The review of the courses was conducted using the discernment of five experts. The first contribution of this research is to design a transferable and replicable method for mapping if a generic competence, as is the social responsibility develops gradually throughout the whole training process. On the other hand, the case study shows that 21% of the courses offered address some of the subjects of social responsibility

  19. Identifying content for simulation-based curricula in urology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Bølling Hansen, Rikke; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen

    2017-01-01

    to identify technical procedures in urology that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum for residency training. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A national needs assessment was performed using the Delphi method involving 56 experts with significant roles in the education of urologists. Round 1 identified......OBJECTIVE: Simulation-based training is well recognized in the transforming field of urological surgery; however, integration into the curriculum is often unstructured. Development of simulation-based curricula should follow a stepwise approach starting with a needs assessment. This study aimed...... technical procedures that newly qualified urologists should perform. Round 2 included a survey using an established needs assessment formula to explore: the frequency of procedures; the number of physicians who should be able to perform the procedure; the risk and/or discomfort to patients when a procedure...

  20. An Evaluation of Relevance of Computing Curricula to Industry Needs

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    Ioana Chan Mow

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The research documented in this paper attempted to answer the question of how relevant the content of the Computing courses offered within programs of the Computing Department at the National University of Samoa (NUS were to meet the needs of industry and the workforce. The RINCCII study which was conducted in 2013 to 2014, surveyed 13 institutions and 19 graduates from the Computing programs. Findings from the survey indicated that the current course offerings within the Computing department are relevant to the needs of industry and the workplace. However there are aspects or topics which need inclusion or better coverage. The study also recommended regular surveys to gauge relevance of curricula to needs of industry.

  1. Multimedia and Communication Curricula: The Medium vs. the Message

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    Abderrahmane Azzi

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia technology is restructuring the field of communication in various ways. The prevalent nature of this new media invites flexibility which can make communication curricula accommodate a wide range of competencies including technical competency. I have argued in this paper that multimedia, much like printing, radio, television and film, is mainly the means whereby content is delivered. Central to multimedia are content and effects. Content requires perspective which can then be reproduced in texts and images, while effects involves assessment of the influence of multimedia on society and culture. As such, multimedia needs to be approached from a mass communication perspective which preserves the identity of the field and provides a vital link between theory and practical application.

  2. Decolonising medical curricula through diversity education: lessons from students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Mahdi; Kendall, Kathleen; Day, Lawrence; Nazar, Hamde

    2015-04-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) expects that medical students graduate with an awareness of how the diversity of the patient population may affect health outcomes and behaviours. However, little guidance has been provided on how to incorporate diversity teaching into medical school curricula. Research highlights the existence of two different models within medical education: cultural competency and cultural humility. The Southampton medical curriculum includes both models in its diversity teaching, but little was known about which model was dominant or about the students' experience. Fifteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were carried out with medical students at the University of Southampton. Data were analysed thematically using elements of grounded theory and constant comparison. Students identified early examples of diversity teaching consistent with a cultural humility approach. In later years, the limited diversity teaching recognised by students generally adopted a cultural competency approach. Students tended to perceive diversity as something that creates problems for healthcare professionals due to patients' perceived differences. They also reported witnessing a number of questionable practices related to diversity issues that they felt unable to challenge. The dissonance created by differences in the largely lecture based and the clinical environments left students confused and doubting the value of cultural humility in a clinical context. Staff training on diversity issues is required to encourage institutional buy-in and establish consistent educational and clinical environments. By tackling cultural diversity within the context of patient-centred care, cultural humility, the approach students valued most, would become the default model. Reflective practice and the development of a critical consciousness are crucial in the improvement of cultural diversity training and thus should be facilitated and encouraged. Educators can adopt a

  3. Graduate Ethics Curricula for Future Geospatial Technology Professionals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. J.; Dibiase, D.; Harvey, F.; Solem, M.

    2009-12-01

    Professionalism in today's rapidly-growing, multidisciplinary geographic information science field (e.g., geographic information systems or GIS, remote sensing, cartography, quantitative spatial analysis), now involves a commitment to ethical practice as informed by a more sophisticated understanding of the ethical implications of geographic technologies. The lack of privacy introduced by mobile mapping devices, the use of GIS for military and surveillance purposes, the appropriate use of data collected using these technologies for policy decisions (especially for conservation and sustainability) and general consequences of inequities that arise through biased access to geospatial tools and derived data all continue to be challenging issues and topics of deep concern for many. Students and professionals working with GIS and related technologies should develop a sound grasp of these issues and a thorough comprehension of the concerns impacting their use and development in today's world. However, while most people agree that ethics matters for GIS, we often have difficulty putting ethical issues into practice. An ongoing project supported by NSF seeks to bridge this gap by providing a sound basis for future ethical consideration of a variety of issues. A model seminar curriculum is under development by a team of geographic information science and technology (GIS&T) researchers and professional ethicists, along with protocols for course evaluations. In the curricula students first investigate the nature of professions in general and the characteristics of a GIS&T profession in particular. They hone moral reasoning skills through methodical analyses of case studies in relation to various GIS Code of Ethics and Rules of Conduct. They learn to unveil the "moral ecologies" of a profession through actual interviews with real practitioners in the field. Assignments thus far include readings, class discussions, practitioner interviews, and preparations of original case

  4. Iteration: Unit Fraction Knowledge and the French Fry Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, Ron; Hunt, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Often, students who solve fraction tasks respond in ways that indicate inadequate conceptual grounding of unit fractions. Many elementary school curricula use folding, partitioning, shading, and naming parts of various wholes to develop children's understanding of unit and then nonunit fractions (e.g., coloring three of four parts of a pizza and…

  5. Marginalization of Socioscientific Material in Science-Technology-Society Science Curricula: Some Implications for Gender Inclusivity and Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gwyneth

    2000-05-01

    Science education reformers have argued that presenting science in the abstract is neither motivating nor inclusive of the majority of students. Science-technology-society (STS) curricula that give science an accessible social context have developed in response, but controversy surrounds the extent to which students should be introduced to socioscientific debate. Using material from a case study of Salters' Advanced Chemistry in the United Kingdom, this article demonstrates how socioscientific material is marginalized through the structures and language of syllabus texts and through classroom practices. This means students are unlikely to engage with socioscientific aspects in their course. Socioscientific content is gendered through association with social concerns and epistemological uncertainty, and because gender is asymmetric, socioscience is devalued with respect to the masculinity of abstract science. Teachers fear that extensive coverage of socioscience devalues the curriculum, alienates traditional science students and jeopardizes their own status as gatekeepers of scientific knowledge. Thus, although STS curricula such as Salters' offer potential for making science more accessible, the article concludes that greater awareness of, and challenges to, gender binaries could result in more effective STS curriculum reform.

  6. Person-Oriented Organization of Academic Process – the Way of Genuine Flexibility and Individualization of Educational Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Sazonov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the necessity for Russian universities to switch over from the conservative stream-group scheduling to progressive individual scheduling of educational process where each particular student becomes an object of planning and implementing the higher educational curricula. The new liberal student- centered form called the «credit system» or in Russian variant the «credit units system» brings forward the students interests and rights. Gradually, such system tends to prevail in the world environment of vocational education, though in Russian higher school it still exist as an experiment and is not fast adopted. The prevailing stream-group model of educational process with steady group division throughout the whole academic period indicates our serious technological lagging behind the leaders of the world educational market. Rejection of traditional stream-group educational model and steady group formation brings about new opportunities for Russian universities providing real flexibility and individualization of educational curricula, giving students the option for individual term planning and scheduling, as well as the right for choosing teachers. Combining the modern approach to students’ assessment and person-oriented organization of academic process, the complete mass adoption of the model in question in bachelor and specialists training can guarantee a qualitative leap in developing Russian higher educational system. 

  7. Comparison of student success using "atoms first" versus "traditional" curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillesheim, Christina S.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between the "atoms first" and the "traditional" curricula. Specifically focusing on which curriculum better aligns to curricular expectations, leads to higher student success when students are grouped together, and when students are differentiated based on several factors. The main difference between the two approaches being the sequence of topics presented in the first semester general chemistry course. This study involves more than 9,500 general chemistry I and II students over 7 semesters with about half of them being taught using the "atoms first" approach. Student success was measured using the American Chemical Society's (ACS) final examination scores and the final letter grades. Alignment to curricular expectations was determined via a qualitative review of textbooks written for each of the approaches. This showed that the "atoms first" approach better aligns to research supported best practices. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to determine if there is a significant difference between the "atoms first" and the "traditional" curricula. The "traditional" approach was found to lead to higher student achievement for both measures of student success in both chemistry I and II courses. Lastly, multiple linear, multinomial logistic, and binary logistic regressions were run using all of the subgroups---gender, race/ethnicity, major, ACT composite, math ACT, overall GPA, and classroom size---as predictor variables to determine if any significant interactions between the curricular methods and the different subgroups existed. Results found that the relationship between gender, GPA, and classroom size groupings significantly impact student achievement in general chemistry. Specifically, the "traditional" approach lead to higher student success compared to the "atoms first" approach for males, females, below average GPA students, above average GPA students, and students in large classroom

  8. The Potential of Incorporating Computer Games in Foreign Language Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakaran Mukundan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that technology-enhanced instruction could result in students’ learning. With the advancement and ever-increasing growth of technology, the use of educational electronic games or computer games in education has appealed to both educators and students. Because of their potential to enhance students’ interest, motivation and creativity, computer games can be used to teach various skills and strategies to different types of students, particularly schoolchildren. These games have also made inroads into language learning classrooms as they provide language learners with a rich learning context to engage in authentic and meaningful learning experiences. This paper reviews the potential of integrating computer games into second/foreign language syllabi and curricula by offering a synopsis of the assumptions, prior studies and theoretical background in support of these games in language education. At the end, the paper touches upon the role of teachers and the likely inhibiting factors affecting the integration of computer games into English language programs.

  9. Development of security engineering curricula at US universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.L.

    1998-08-01

    The Southwest Surety Institute was formed in June 1996 by Arizona State University (ASU), New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech), New Mexico State University (NMSU), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to provide educational programs in Security Engineering, and to conduct research and development in security technologies. This is the first science-based program of its kind in the US, focused on educating Security Engineers to help government and industry address their security needs. Each member brings a unique educational capability to the Institute. NM Tech has a formidable explosives testing and evaluation facility. ASU is developing a Masters program in Security Engineering at their School of Technology located on a new campus in Mesa, Arizona. NMSU provides a Security Technology minor, merging programs in Criminal Justice and Engineering Technology. The Sandia National Laboratories security system design and evaluation process forms the basis for the Security Engineering curricula. In an effort to leverage the special capabilities of each university, distance education will be used to share courses among Institute members and eventually with other sites across the country.

  10. terrain analysis in the course curricula of the south african army ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a_lodi

    curricula presented by the South African Army School of Engineers. Methodology involved .... terrain to determine the manoeuvre potential, ways to reduce natural and .... terrain analysis knowledge throughout their formal training. The next ...

  11. Conflicts of Interest in Medicine. A Systematic Review of Published and Scientifically evaluated Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weißkircher, Janosch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Conflicts of interests resulting from interactions with pharmaceutical companies are pervasive in medicine and can result in an undue influence on physicians’ decision-making. The objective of this systematic review is to analyze published and scientifically evaluated curricula for medical students and residents regarding such conflicts of interest. We begin by describing the covered topics and teaching methods; afterwards we analyze the quality of the curricula using the published data on their evaluations and comparing the content with content recommended for such curricula.Methods: We searched Pubmed, PsycInfo, EMBASE, OECD, WISO, SOWI and googlescholar up to and including the 5th of September 2016. Publications describing curricula for residents or medical students on the topic of conflicts of interest in medicine and evaluating them for their effects on the participants’ learning were included. We analyzed the covered topics and the teaching methods used and compared them with recommendations by the American Medical Students’ Association (AMSA and Health Action International (HAI. Results: The literature search resulted in 20 publications that fulfilled our search criteria. In five trials, a control group was used, in no trial the participants were randomized to intervention or control group. 16/20 published curricula primarily covered marketing strategies by pharmaceutical companies, especially the interaction with pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSRs. Most curricula only covered a limited number of topics recommended by AMSA/HAI. The most frequent teaching method was a group discussion, which was used in 18/20 curricula; all curricula used at least one interactive teaching method. The evaluation of the curricula was heterogeneous in results as well as design. Some publications described a change of attitudes toward a stronger skepticism regarding interactions with pharmaceutical companies. Four publications

  12. Conflicts of Interest in Medicine. A Systematic Review of Published and Scientifically evaluated Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißkircher, Janosch; Koch, Cora; Dreimüller, Nadine; Lieb, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Conflicts of interests resulting from interactions with pharmaceutical companies are pervasive in medicine and can result in an undue influence on physicians' decision-making. The objective of this systematic review is to analyze published and scientifically evaluated curricula for medical students and residents regarding such conflicts of interest. We begin by describing the covered topics and teaching methods; afterwards we analyze the quality of the curricula using the published data on their evaluations and comparing the content with content recommended for such curricula. Methods: We searched Pubmed, PsycInfo, EMBASE, OECD, WISO, SOWI and googlescholar up to and including the 5th of September 2016. Publications describing curricula for residents or medical students on the topic of conflicts of interest in medicine and evaluating them for their effects on the participants' learning were included. We analyzed the covered topics and the teaching methods used and compared them with recommendations by the American Medical Students' Association (AMSA) and Health Action International (HAI). Results: The literature search resulted in 20 publications that fulfilled our search criteria. In five trials, a control group was used, in no trial the participants were randomized to intervention or control group. 16/20 published curricula primarily covered marketing strategies by pharmaceutical companies, especially the interaction with pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSRs). Most curricula only covered a limited number of topics recommended by AMSA/HAI. The most frequent teaching method was a group discussion, which was used in 18/20 curricula; all curricula used at least one interactive teaching method. The evaluation of the curricula was heterogeneous in results as well as design. Some publications described a change of attitudes toward a stronger skepticism regarding interactions with pharmaceutical companies. Four publications described improved knowledge

  13. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Packing and Unitization, 19-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint Military Packaging Training Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    This correspondence course on methods and techniques of packing materials and equipment for shipment and storage is designed to familiarize students with the subject matter area and to serve as a background for a more detailed and specialized study. One of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational…

  14. Typology of Logistics Curricula – Four Categories of Logistics of Logistics Undergraduate Education in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Tarvo Niine; Ott Koppel

    2015-01-01

    The field of logistics education is rather colorful. The range of possible topics is huge and so each curriculum has unique approach towards which topic areas to emphasize and which to treat briefly or even omit. There is only little effective standardization in logistics education. This study examines the content of 42 undergraduate logistics curricula in Europe via cluster analysis, with a goal to propose a typology of logistics curricula. The findings define the spectrum of logistics educa...

  15. Conflicts of Interest in Medicine. A Systematic Review of Published and Scientifically evaluated Curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Weißkircher, Janosch; Koch, Cora; Dreimüller, Nadine; Lieb, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Conflicts of interests resulting from interactions with pharmaceutical companies are pervasive in medicine and can result in an undue influence on physicians' decision-making. The objective of this systematic review is to analyze published and scientifically evaluated curricula for medical students and residents regarding such conflicts of interest. We begin by describing the covered topics and teaching methods; afterwards we analyze the quality of the curricula using the publishe...

  16. Culturally tailored postsecondary nutrition and health education curricula for indigenous populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McConnell

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . In preparation for the initial offering of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF, Interior–Aleutians Campus Rural Nutrition Services (RNS program, a literature review was conducted to establish the need for the proposed program and to substantiate the methodology for delivering integrated, culturally tailored postsecondary education and extension to Alaska Natives and rural Alaskans. There was a striking absence of peer-reviewed journal articles describing culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations. Objective . To complete and discuss a current (November 2012 literature review for culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula designed and delivered for indigenous populations. Methods/Design . The author conducted an expanded online search that employed multiple configurations of key terms using Google and Google Scholar, as well as pertinent sources. The author located archived reports in person and contacted authors by email. Results . The expanded search produced a modest amount of additional literature for review. A disappointing number of publications describing or evaluating culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula in mainstream institutions are available. Related resources on culturally tailored extension and resources for the development and delivery of culturally tailored nutrition and health curricula were identified. Conclusions . The present results demonstrate a significant absence of literature on the topic, which may or may not indicate the absence of sufficient culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations. There are indications that culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations have the potential to effectively address certain issues of health literacy and health disparities.

  17. Developing and applying quantitative skills maps for STEM curricula, with a focus on different modes of learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jackie; Wilkes, Janelle

    2016-08-01

    Mapping quantitative skills across the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) curricula will help educators identify gaps and duplication in the teaching, practice and assessment of the necessary skills. This paper describes the development and implementation of quantitative skills mapping tools for courses in STEM at a regional university that offers both on-campus and distance modes of study. Key elements of the mapping project included the identification of key graduate quantitative skills, the development of curriculum mapping tools to record in which unit(s) and at what level of attainment each quantitative skill is taught, practised and assessed, and identification of differences in the way quantitative skills are developed for on-campus and distance students. Particular attention is given to the differences that are associated with intensive schools, which consist of concentrated periods of face-to-face learning over a three-four day period, and are available to distance education students enrolled in STEM units. The detailed quantitative skills mapping process has had an impact on the review of first-year mathematics units, resulted in crucial changes to the curriculum in a number of courses, and contributed to a more integrated approach, and a collective responsibility, to the development of students' quantitative skills for both face-to-face and online modes of learning.

  18. Environmental Engineering Curricula assessment in the global world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, Enrica; Catelani, Marcantonio; Manfrida, Giampaolo; Valdiserri, Juna

    2014-05-01

    Environmental engineers are technicians with specific expertise on the sustainability of human presence in the environment. Among other global dilemmas, to the environmental engineers it is often demanded to be able in developing systematic, innovative solutions in order to simultaneously meet water and energy needs, to build resilience to natural and technological disasters, to more accurately gauge and manage countries' greenhouse gas emissions. The general objectives of the Environmental Engineers are to establish actions of environmental sustainability as well as to verify progress toward global goals or international commitments. The globalization of challenges and problems to be faced, leads, in general, to the globalization of the engineering profession. In particular, since the environmental issues are without boundaries, and many and different are the involved professions and the competences, the environmental engineer must have a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to adequately answer to the demand of technical innovative knowledge at global scale. The environmental engineers, more and more, are involved in international projects were the effective collaboration requires not only the capacity to communicate in a common technical language, but also the assurance of an adequate and common level of technical competences, knowledge and understanding. The Europe-based EUR ACE system, currently operated by ENAEE - European Network for Accreditation of Engineering Education, can represent the proper framework and accreditation system in order to provide a set of measures to assess the quality of engineering degree programmes in Europe and abroad. In the global frame of the knowledge triangle: education-innovation-research, the accreditation and quality assurance of engineering curricula in Europe is discussed with reference to the Environmental engineering curricula, of the 1st and 2nd cycle, based on the European Credit Transfer System and in

  19. The Traditional in Contemporary Curricula of Preschool Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopas-Vukašinović Emina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary curricula of preschool education are the result of the improvement of pedagogical and didactic theories. They imply a technical plan with which it is possible to achieve measurable objectives of preschool education. The curriculum is also defined as a tool for quality and equal education for all. It represents a reflection of the time, society and culture in which it exists, but also a model for future society and education. Thus an important research question arises as to what extent we recognize traditional ideas about learning and the development of a preschool child in contemporary preschool programs. Are traditional ideas about educating young children unjustly neglected or do we recognize them in contemporary pedagogical theory even today, at the same time forgetting about the past and declaring them innovations? This paper deals with the starting points for the development of a curriculum. The goal of the research was to determine to what extent can the starting points for the development of preschool children, which have existed in the first preschool programs in Serbia in the late 19th century, be recognized in contemporary preschool programs. A descriptive method was applied as well as a procedure for content analysis of program documents. Research results confirm that the elements of the first preschool programs, which remain relevant until today, can be recognized in contemporary preschool programs. They are related to target orientations, principles and functions of preschool education. However, these ideas are defined as contemporary tendencies, and the fact that they existed in preschool programs that were developed a long time ago is unjustly ignored.

  20. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational Curricula. Food Service. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Larry; Shin, Masako

    This document, one of eight in a multi-cultural competency-based vocational/technical curricula series, is on food service. This program is designed to run 24 weeks and cover 15 instructional areas: orientation, sanitation, management/planning, preparing food for cooking, preparing beverages, cooking eggs, cooking meat, cooking vegetables,…

  1. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational Curricula. Auto Body Repair. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Larry; Shin, Masako

    This document, one of eight in a multi-cultural competency-based vocational/technical curricula series, is on auto body repair. This program is designed to run 40 weeks and cover 7 instructional areas: use of basic repair tools; metal bumping (theory and practice); metal refinishing (theory and practice); panel replacement; glass work; spot…

  2. Assessing curricula contribution to sustainability more holistically: Experiences from the integration of curricula assessment and students’ perceptions at the Georgia Institute of Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, M.L.; Lozano, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/36412380X; Noyes, C.; Rodgers, M.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a rapid increase on the number of engineering schools in higher educational institutions that have incorporated sustainability into their teaching. Nonetheless, curricula reforms are still needed to better educate engineers on the implications that their work has on the environment

  3. Integrating Literacy and Space Science: Three Proven Curricula for the Early Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglierani, R.; Feldman, S.

    2009-12-01

    Elementary educators typically have only limited opportunity to teach extensive science units. This is due in great part to the primary focus on literacy and mathematics instruction in the early grades. It is not surprising then, that the time and resources allocated to science teaching are significantly less than those allocated to language arts and mathematics. The integration of elementary science curriculum with language arts provides one means of addressing the challenge of keeping science education robust in the elementary classroom. For this important audience—young learners—we have developed three successful K-4 NASA curricula, Eye on the Sky, Reading, Writing and Rings! and The Solar System Through the Eyes of Scientists. Together they suggest a model for successful age-appropriate science instruction. All have been developed by NASA scientists and UC Berkeley educators in partnership with classroom teachers. Eye on the Sky focuses on Heliospheric science for young students, making the Sun-Earth connection accessible in the primary grades; Reading Writing and Rings! contains a suite of lessons exploring Saturn, Titan and NASA’s Cassini Mission and The Solar System Through the Eyes of Scientists provides an introduction to the eight planets, and the moons of the solar system. The activities have been assessed by independent educational evaluators and have been tested in classrooms and used extensively by teachers. We will highlight best practices for developing materials for the early grades and strategies for integrating science across the curriculum—in particular the integration of science with math, language arts and art. Examples of student work will be included. The benefits and challenges inherent in implementing an EP/O program in the elementary school setting will also be addressed.

  4. Bundling in Place: Translating the NGSS into Place-Based Earth-System Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Bundling is the process of grouping Performance Expectations (PEs) from the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) into coherent units based on a defined topic, idea, question, or phenomenon. Bundling sorts the PEs for a given grade or grade band into a teachable narrative: a key stage in building curriculum, instruction, and assessment from the NGSS. To encourage and facilitate this, bundling guidelines have recently been released on the NGSS website (nextgenscience.org/glossary/bundlesbundling), and example bundles for different grade bands and disciplines are also being developed and posted there. According to these guidelines the iterative process of bundling begins with organization of PEs according to natural connections among them, and alignment of the three NGSS dimensions (Disciplinary Core Ideas, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Science and Engineering Practices) that underpin each PE. Bundles are grouped by coherence and increasing complexity into courses, and courses into course sets that should encompass all PEs for a grade band. Bundling offers a natural way to translate the NGSS into highly contextualized curricula such as place-based (PB) teaching, which is situated in specific places or regions and focused on natural and cultural features, processes, phenomena, history, and challenges to sustainability therein. Attributes of place and our individual and collective connections to place (sense of place) directly inform PB curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment. PEs can be bundled by their relevance to these themes. Following the NGSS guidelines, I model the process for PB instruction by bundling PEs around the themes of Paleozoic geology and carbonate deposition and their relationships to mining and calcining of limestone in Anthropocene cement production for developing communities. The bundles integrate aspects of Earth history, the carbon cycle, mineral resources, climate change, and sustainability using specific local examples and narratives. They are

  5. Capacity building of skilled birth attendants: a review of pre-service education curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Adetoro A; Mani, Safiyanu; Abubakar, Aisha; van den Broek, Nynke

    2013-07-01

    to assess the level, type and content of pre-service education curricula of health workers providing maternity services against the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice. We reviewed the quality and relevance of pre-service education curricula of four cadres of health-care providers of maternity care in Northern Nigeria. we adapted and used the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice to design a framework of criteria against which we assessed curricula for pre-service training. We reviewed the pre-service curricula for Nurses, Midwives, Community Health Extension Workers (CHEW) and Junior Community Health Extension Workers (JCHEW) in three states. Criteria against which the curricula were evaluated include: minimum entry requirement, the length of the programme, theory: practice ratio, curriculum model, minimum number of births conducted during training, clinical experience, competencies, maximum number of students allowable and proportion of Maternal, Newborn and Child Health components (MNCH) as part of the total curriculum. four pre-service education programmes were reviewed; the 3 year basic midwifery, 3 year basic nursing, 3 year Community Health Extension Worker (CHEW) and 2 year Junior Community Health Extension Worker (JCHEW) programme. Findings showed that, none of these four training curricula met all the standards. The basic midwifery curriculum most closely met the standards and competencies set out. The nursing curriculum showed a strong focus on foundations of nursing practice, theories of nursing, public health and maternal newborn and child health. This includes well-defined modules on family health which are undertaken from the first year to the third year of the programme. The CHEW and JCHEW curricula are currently inadequate with regard to training health-care workers to be skilled birth attendants. although the midwifery curriculum

  6. Decisions about Product Safety. A Multidisciplinary Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    A multidisciplinary educational unit featuring product safety decisions made by businesses and consumers is presented. teach critical thinking and decision making while supplementing the science, home economics, social studies, and economics curricula. The activities rely extensively, though not exclusively, on Procter & Gamble's experiences…

  7. Infusing Active Learning into the Research Methods Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The research methods unit of survey psychology classes introduces important concepts of scientific reasoning and fluency, making it an ideal course in which to deliver enhanced curricula. To increase interest and engagement, the author developed an expanded research methods and statistics module to give students the opportunity to explore…

  8. Decisions about Product Safety. A Multidisciplinary Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    A multidisciplinary educational unit featuring product safety decisions made by businesses and consumers is presented. teach critical thinking and decision making while supplementing the science, home economics, social studies, and economics curricula. The activities rely extensively, though not exclusively, on Procter & Gamble's experiences in…

  9. Geriatrics Curricula for Internal and Family Medicine Residents: Assessing Study Quality and Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huai Yong; Davis, Molly

    2017-02-01

    Prior reviews of geriatrics curricula for internal medicine (IM) and family medicine (FM) residents have not evaluated study quality or assessed learning objectives or specific IM or FM competencies. This review of geriatrics curricula for IM and FM residents seeks to answer 3 questions: (1) What types of learning outcomes were measured? (2) How were learning outcomes measured? and (3) What was the quality of the studies? We evaluated geriatrics curricula that reported learning objectives or competencies, teaching methods, and learning outcomes, and those that used a comparative design. We searched PubMed and 4 other data sets from 2003-2015, and assessed learning outcomes, outcome measures, and the quality of studies using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) and Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) methods. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. Most curricula were intended for IM residents in the inpatient setting; only 1 was solely dedicated to FM residents. Median duration was 1 month, and minimum geriatrics competencies covered were 4. Learning outcomes ranged from Kirkpatrick levels 1 to 3. Studies that reported effect size showed a considerable impact on attitudes and knowledge, mainly via pretests and posttests. The mean MERSQI score was 10.5 (range, 8.5-13) on a scale of 5 (lowest quality) to 18 (highest quality). Few geriatrics curricula for IM and FM residents that included learning outcome assessments were published recently. Overall, changes in attitudes and knowledge were sizeable, but reporting was limited to low to moderate Kirkpatrick levels. Study quality was moderate.

  10. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael H; Fierke, Kerry K; Sucher, Brandon J; Janke, Kristin K

    2015-05-25

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI experts for structuring and planning EI development. Finally, we make 9 recommendations' to inform the process of including EI in pharmacy curricula.

  11. What Computing Curricula is Needed: A Case at the University of Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juris BORZOVS

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer science undergraduate (bachelor curriculum of the University of Latvia was developed in late 80th based on curricula of several US universities while keeping strong practical setting. The very core of the curriculum comprises Software Engineering lectures and related information system development course project in the second year. Thus every undergraduate (even theoretical computer science major is prepared to start professional career of computer programmer by the second study year. It is amazing to realize how well this rather old curriculum conforms to the new ACM/IEEE Computing Curricula 2001.

  12. Preparation for Inclusion in Teacher Education Pre-Service Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, R. Allan; Neilsen-Gatti, Shelley; Hudson, Tina M.

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion of students with disabilities has been practiced and advocated for more than two decades in the United States. This practice involves the placement of students with disabilities in a general education classroom for part or all of the day, and the primary instructor is a general education teacher in collaboration with a special education…

  13. Ideas about Science Portrayed in the Existing and Proposed Science Curricula of Grades IX-X in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Mohammad Nure Alam

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents part of the findings from a comparative study on existing and proposed science curricula of grades IX-X in Bangladesh. It aims to explore relevant research to find out what ideas about science are recommended to include in school science curriculum, and then to compare the existing and proposed curricula in terms of ideas about…

  14. Facilitators and barriers to a nationwide implementation of competency-based postgraduate medical curricula : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, E.; Luijk, S.J.; Pols, J.; Achterkamp, M.C.; van Engelen, J.M.L.; Brand, P.L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Postgraduate medical education (PGME) curricula are being redesigned across the western world. Aim: This study examined the implementation process (what works where and why) of new competency-based PGME curricula and relevant factors influencing this process. Methods: In a nationwide pro

  15. The Nation, Europe, and Migration: A Comparison of Geography, History, and Citizenship Education Curricula in Greece, Germany, and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    National curricula are being challenged and transformed by the impact of migration and European integration. This paper examines how cultural diversity and Europe are intertwined in geography, history, and citizenship education curricula in Greece, Germany, and England. This question is explored using quantitative and qualitative methods through a…

  16. Making Agriculture Curricula Competence-Oriented While Inserting Issues on Gender and Climate Change at Vietnamese Universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, R.H.; Phung, L.D.; Le, An V.; Ngo, An T.; Tran, Hang M.T.; Pham, Son H.; Wals, A.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Many academic curricula suffer from a teacher­ centred focus on knowledge transfer and do not consider the societal needs for competences. This paper reflects on the transformation from theory­ centred towards competency-oriented curricula at three Vietnamese Agriculture Universities with support of

  17. Strategies for Leading Academics to Rethink Humanities and Social Sciences Curricula in the Context of Discipline Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Theda; Wallace, Joy; Allen, Pamela; Clark, Jennifer; Jones, Adrian; Lawrence, Jill; Cole, Bronwyn; Sheridan Burns, Lynette

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of discipline standards in Australia has required a comprehensive rethinking of humanities and social science curricula from first year through to graduation. This paper proposes a model to facilitate academics' engagement with discipline standards and their implication for first-year curricula. The model supports…

  18. The Nation, Europe, and Migration: A Comparison of Geography, History, and Citizenship Education Curricula in Greece, Germany, and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    National curricula are being challenged and transformed by the impact of migration and European integration. This paper examines how cultural diversity and Europe are intertwined in geography, history, and citizenship education curricula in Greece, Germany, and England. This question is explored using quantitative and qualitative methods through a…

  19. An Investigation of Co-Created Curricula within Higher Education in the UK, Ireland and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from research that investigated students and academic staff working in partnership to co-create curricula. Using case study methodology, the study investigated three examples within higher education in the UK, Ireland and the USA, where academic staff and students co-designed curricula. Findings focus on the approach…

  20. Facilitators and barriers to a nationwide implementation of competency-based postgraduate medical curricula : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, E.; Luijk, S.J.; Pols, J.; Achterkamp, M.C.; van Engelen, J.M.L.; Brand, P.L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Postgraduate medical education (PGME) curricula are being redesigned across the western world. Aim: This study examined the implementation process (what works where and why) of new competency-based PGME curricula and relevant factors influencing this process. Methods: In a nationwide

  1. Plagiarism Curricula May Reduce Need for Punitive Plagiarism Education

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective – To describe the development and implementation of two courses designed to help university students avoid plagiarism. Design – Quantitative and qualitative analysis. Setting – A university in the United Kingdom. Subjects – An unknown number of university students who took a Plagiarism Awareness Program (PAP) course between 2008 and 2011, and approximately 3,000 university students enrolled in a Plagiarism Avoidance for New Students (PANS) course delivered via a virt...

  2. An Analysis of Discourses of Writing and Writing Instruction in Curricula across Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a deductive content analysis of the grade 6 specific and general objectives in the writing curricula across Canada's 10 provinces and two of its three territories. The analysis uses Ivanic's six discourses of writing and learning to write: skills discourse, creativity discourse, process discourse, genre discourse, social…

  3. An Integrated Literature Review of Death Education in Pre-Registration Nursing Curricula: Key Themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Cavaye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent policy has raised the profile of end-of-life care internationally, with the aim of increasing access to quality care for everyone experiencing life-limiting illness. This reflects an international shift in the provision of palliative care to encompass chronic conditions other than cancer. Nurses have an important role in delivering this care and need to be equipped with particular knowledge and skills. However, pre-registration nursing curricula have traditionally had a limited emphasis on death and dying and nurses report feeling unprepared to care for dying patients. This has led to claims that death education in pre-registration curricula is inadequate. This integrated review explores the published literature that reports on death education within pre-registration nurse education. Presenting an international overview, the aim of the review is to contribute to knowledge about the nature and extent of death education in pre-registration curricula. In the context of this paper, death education encompasses both palliative and end-of-life care. Electronic searches of major bibliographic databases found inconsistencies across educational provision with variations in quantity, content, and approach. Despite an increasing amount of death education in pre-registration curricula, there remains a deficit in key areas such as knowledge, skills, organisation of care, and teamwork.

  4. Bioinformatics in Middle East Program Curricula--A Focus on the Arabian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucif, Samia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inclusion of bioinformatics in program curricula in the Middle East, focusing on educational institutions in the Arabian Gulf. Bioinformatics is a multidisciplinary field which has emerged in response to the need for efficient data storage and retrieval, and accurate and fast computational and…

  5. Comparative Study on Romanian School Science Curricula and the Curriculum of TIMSS 2007 Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciascai, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    The results of Romanian school students in Science PISA and TIMSS testings have been and continue to be systematically slack. In the present paper we intend to do a comparative analysis of Science curriculum TIMSS 2007 and Romanian Science school curricula of 4th and 8th grades. This analysis, based on Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive domain,…

  6. The Influence of Curricula Content on English Sociology Students' Transformations: The Case of Feminist Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Andrea; Ashwin, Paul; McLean, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Previous research identifies the importance of feminist knowledge for improving gender equity, economic prosperity and social justice for all. However, there are difficulties in embedding feminist knowledge in higher education curricula. Across England, undergraduate sociology is a key site for acquiring feminist knowledge. In a study of four…

  7. Chemistry education for sustainability: Assessing the chemistry curricula at Cardiff University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.; Watson, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    As more universities become interested in, and engaged with, sustainability, there has been a growing need to assess how their curricula addresses sustainable development and its myriad issues. Different tools and assessment exercises have looked at course descriptors. This paper presents the Sustai

  8. Philosophy for Welders: Colleges Offer Innovative Humanities Curricula for Liberal Arts and Career Track Students Alike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Does America needs more welders and fewer philosophers? Community college humanities professors and administrators say it benefits all students, whether liberal arts or career track, to take courses in philosophy, history, political science, language arts, and other liberal arts subjects. And they're developing innovative humanities curricula to…

  9. An Integrated Approach for Strategic Development of Engineering Curricula: Focus on Students' Design Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, H.-u.; Said, R. A.; Al-assaf, Y.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrated approach for developing the engineering curricula with a specific focus on engineering design. The proposed approach allows a continuous and coherent development of engineering students' design skills throughout the entire undergraduate curriculum. This ongoing design experience is delivered at an involvement and…

  10. The Nature of Science in Science Curricula: Methods and Concepts of Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sílvia; Morais, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    The article shows methods and concepts of analysis of the nature of science in science curricula through an exemplary study made in Portugal. The study analyses the extent to which the message transmitted by the Natural Science curriculum for Portuguese middle school considers the nature of science. It is epistemologically and sociologically…

  11. An Evaluation of Health and Sexuality Education in Turkish Elementary School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmaz, Fatma Hazir; Guler, Duygu S.

    2007-01-01

    Research was undertaken to evaluate whether and to what extent the health-related domains, including sexuality education, specified by the Development of Health Awareness in Adolescent Project Science Committee overlapped with the goals and objectives of the 2002/03 elementary school curricula (grades one to eight; ages 7-14 years) in Turkey. For…

  12. Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kimberly A; Geelhoed, Michael; Grice, Kimatha O; Murphy, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated whether critical thinking ability can be improved through participation in occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) curricula. The researchers compared levels of the critical thinking skills of OT and PT students at the beginning and end of their programs to determine whether changes occurred and to examine facets of the curricula that may have caused the differences. The curricula include teaching strategies of problem-based learning modules, small group discussion and problem-solving, case studies, clinical observation, and evidence-based practice assignments, as well as teaching about critical thinking as a process in itself. Fifty OT and PT students completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal at the beginning and end of 20 mos of the academic phase of their master's degree programs. Researchers analyzed the data using a one-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Results showed no differences between OT and PT students on the pretest or post-test and no differences for PT students between the pretest and post-test. OT students' scores increased significantly from pretest to post-test. The influence of the timing of teaching critical thinking skills in the resulting differences between the two curricula, as well as the validity of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal is a valid measure of critical thinking changes in allied health students are discussed.

  13. Form and Function of Educational Technology in Developmental Curricula in a Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Patrice M.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative action research study examines the form (where and how) and function (specific use) of Educational Technology in developmental curricula at a community college. The study uses theoretical frameworks of Educational Technology and Instructional Systems Design to review and analyze curricular materials (print and electronic) and…

  14. The Content of Educational Technology Curricula: A Cross-Curricular State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aesaert, Koen; Vanderlinde, Ruben; Tondeur, Jo; van Braak, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the content features of educational technology curricula for primary education developed by national governments. A qualitative cross-case document analysis of the national educational technology curriculum of Norway, Flanders and England was conducted. The analysis focuses on the underlying visions,…

  15. Examining the importance of incorporating emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and healthcare professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To date, there is no core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies that have been standardized at all levels across the various allied health curricula disciplines. To identify if emergency preparedness and disaster training content are currently being taught in allied health program courses, to identify possible gaps within allied health curricula, and to explore the perceptions of allied health college educators for implementing emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into their existing curricula, if not already included. A quantitative Internet-based survey was conducted in 2013. Convenient sample. Fifty-one allied health college educators completed the survey. Descriptive statistics indicated that the majority of allied health college instructors do not currently teach emergency preparedness and disaster training core competency content within their current allied health discipline; however, their perceived level of importance for inclusion of the competencies was high. The results of this study supported the need for developing and establishing a basic national set of standardized core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies at all levels across various allied health curricula disciplines to ensure victims receive the best patient care and have the best possible chance of survival.

  16. High Thinking Processes (HTP): Elements of Curricula and Teaching Able-Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniel, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses preparing able learners for the technologically dynamic future by teaching High Thinking Processes (HTP). It describes components of HTP and four main elements for developing HTP: well organized and justified curricula with appropriate tasks; metacognitive teaching; learning communities and challenging environments; and…

  17. The Role of Comparative Religion Curricula in Intra-Inter Civilizational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Haslina; Khambali @ Hambali, Khadijah Mohd; Sintang, Suraya; Senin, Nurhanisah; Shaharud-din, Suhaida; Ahmad, Mahmud; Nor, Mohd Roslan Mohd; Kadir, Nor Adina Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Comparative Religion is seen as an important curricula because it could serve as a mechanism for enhancing cross-cultural religious communication. The authors seek to examine the role of Comparative Religion as an important science for enhancing dialogue skills. Such a communication skill, however, must be developed from both intra- and…

  18. The Role of Comparative Religion Curricula in Intra-Inter Civilizational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Haslina; Khambali @ Hambali, Khadijah Mohd; Sintang, Suraya; Senin, Nurhanisah; Shaharud-din, Suhaida; Ahmad, Mahmud; Nor, Mohd Roslan Mohd; Kadir, Nor Adina Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Comparative Religion is seen as an important curricula because it could serve as a mechanism for enhancing cross-cultural religious communication. The authors seek to examine the role of Comparative Religion as an important science for enhancing dialogue skills. Such a communication skill, however, must be developed from both intra- and…

  19. Added value and constraints of transdisciplinary case studies in environmental science curricula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, Margien C.; Vermeulen, Walter J V; Van Dijk, Jerry; Schot, Paul P.

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable development issues are characterised by their multidisciplinary character, and the fact they are not merely an academic exercise but pertain to real-world problems. Academic sustainable development curricula should therefore not only focus on developing the analytical and research skills

  20. A Survey of Business Alumni: Evidence of the Continuing Need for Law Courses in Business Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, John; Keaty, Anne; Major, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    For decades, faculty in colleges of business who teach various legal courses to business students (hereinafter referred to as legal studies faculty) have been advocates of the need for such law courses in the curricula of their business students. The purpose of this article is to continue the effort to reaffirm business students' need for exposure…

  1. Computer Science in K-12 School Curricula of the 2lst Century: Why, What and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Mary; Davis, Niki; Bell, Tim; Katz, Yaacov J.; Reynolds, Nicholas; Chambers, Dianne P.; Syslo, Maciej M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we have examined the position and roles of Computer Science in curricula in the light of recent calls for curriculum change and we have proposed principles and issues to consider in curriculum design as well as identifying priority areas for further research. The paper is based on discussions within and beyond the International…

  2. The New Curricula: How Media Literacy Education Transforms Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolls, Tessa

    2015-01-01

    As new online and cellular technologies advance, the implications for the traditional textbook model of curricular instruction are profound. The ability to construct, share, collaborate on and publish new instructional materials marks the beginning of a global revolution in curricula development. Research-based media literacy frameworks can be…

  3. Early Childhood Brain Development and Elementary Music Curricula: Are They in Tune?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Larissa K.

    2004-01-01

    This article examines elementary music curricula. It presents an overview of research on childhood mental development; the importance of the early experiences of children on childhood development; the impact of environmental factors on language development; children's acquisition of music ability; enhancing elementary music curriculum; and…

  4. Nationalism and Globalism in the Junior Secondary History Curricula of Hong Kong and Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Joe Tin-yau

    2007-01-01

    Facing the trend and pressure of globalisation, the history curricula of Hong Kong and Shanghai have been undergoing reforms in order to better equip the youth for coping with rapid contextual changes. At the same time, there have been attempts to reposition nationalism in the changing contexts. This paper aims to compare and contrast how the…

  5. Exploring the Integration of Social Justice into Social Work Research Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    The Council on Social Work Education mandates that social justice content be integrated throughout social work curricula. Although much has been written about integrating social justice into practice, policy, and human behavior and social environment courses, little attention has been given to research methods courses. This study surveyed a…

  6. Research Ethics Education in Post-Graduate Medical Curricula in I.R. Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravanfard, Nazila; Khorasanizadeh, Faezeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-08-16

    Research ethics training during post-graduate education is necessary to improve ethical standards in the design and conduct of biomedical research. We studied quality and quantity of research ethics training in the curricula of post-graduate programs in the medical science in I.R. Iran. We evaluated curricula of 125 post-graduate programs in medical sciences in I.R. Iran. We qualitatively studied the curricula by education level, including the Master and PhD degrees and analyzed the contents and the amount of teaching allocated for ethics training in each curriculum. We found no research ethics training in 72 (58%) of the programs. Among the 53 (42%) programs that considered research ethics training, only 17 programs had specific courses for research ethics and eight of them had detailed topics on their courses. The research ethics training was optional in 25% and mandatory in 76% of the programs. Post-graduate studies that were approved in the more recent years had more attention to the research ethics training. Research ethics training was neglected in most of the medical post-graduate programs. We suggest including sufficient amount of mandatory research ethics training in Master and PhD programs in I.R. Iran. Further research about quality of research ethics training and implementation of curricula in the biomedical institutions is warranted.

  7. Critical Commentary on the New Soviet Secondary School Mathematics and Science Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Beatrice Beach, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This issue presents a collection of articles which critique the educational reforms in science and mathematics initiated in 1983. The articles devote special attention to physics, biology, mathematics, geography, and the instructional problems Soviet teachers encountered in presenting the new curricula. (JDH)

  8. The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education Core Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Myriam; Mercado, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The "information era" has brought up new literacies, although most of them are still not part of the K-12 curriculum or the teacher education curriculum. One of these new literacies is critical media literacy. The purpose of this article is to document the urgency for including this new literacy in school and teacher education curricula given the…

  9. The Influence of Curricula Content on English Sociology Students' Transformations: The Case of Feminist Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Andrea; Ashwin, Paul; McLean, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Previous research identifies the importance of feminist knowledge for improving gender equity, economic prosperity and social justice for all. However, there are difficulties in embedding feminist knowledge in higher education curricula. Across England, undergraduate sociology is a key site for acquiring feminist knowledge. In a study of four…

  10. Development of Curricula for Nuclear Radiation Protection, Nuclear Instrumentation, and Nuclear Materials Processing Technologies. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Daniel M.

    A study was conducted to assist two-year postsecondary educational institutions in providing technical specialty courses for preparing nuclear technicians. As a result of project activities, curricula have been developed for five categories of nuclear technicians and operators: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and…

  11. Tale of Two Curricula: The Performance of 2000 Students in Introductory Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmyer, Matthew A.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Catrambone, Richard; Chabay, Ruth W.; Ding, Lin; Haugan, Mark P.; Marr, M. Jackson; Sherwood, Bruce A.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of over 2000 students in introductory calculus-based electromagnetism (E&M) courses at four large research universities was measured using the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA). Two different curricula were used at these universities: a traditional E&M curriculum and the Matter & Interactions (M&I)…

  12. Multiple Integrated Examinations: An Observational Study of Different Academic Curricula Based on a Business Administration Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardolino, Piermatteo; Noventa, Stefano; Formicuzzi, Maddalena; Cubico, Serena; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    An observational study has been carried out to analyse differences in performance between students of different undergraduate curricula in the same written business administration examination, focusing particularly on possible effects of "integrated" or "multi-modular" examinations, a recently widespread format in Italian…

  13. Education on Adult Urinary Incontinence in Nursing School Curricula: Can It Be Done in Two Hours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Lynne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Responses from 339 undergraduate nursing programs (74%) showed that 98% included urinary incontinence content in their curricula. Although most agreed the subject was important and felt their teaching was effective, the didactic component averaged two hours, and clinical experience was not systematic; few faculty are prepared to teach this…

  14. Higher Education Program Curricula Models in Tourism and Hospitality Education: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    The relevancy of program curricula in tourism and hospitality education has been called into question by key stakeholders in light of ongoing changes in the multifaceted tourism and hospitality industry. Various program models have been identified. Program content and quality of student preparedness have been debated. Balance and areas of emphasis…

  15. Representation of the Ethiopian Multicultural Society in Secondary Teacher Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egne, Robsan Margo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the multi-ethnic and multicultural characteristics of the diverse Ethiopian society are incorporated into the current secondary teacher education curricula of the country. To that end, both qualitative and quantitative content analyses were used as tools for data collection. The Ethiopian general…

  16. Integrating the Concept of Customer Needs into an Undergraduate Professional Selling Course in a Marketing Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Vaughan C.

    This paper argues that professional selling within the context of a marketing curricula in a business school should be described and practiced in a manner compatible with the marketing concept, which emphasizes satisfaction of consumers' needs. The paper looks at textbook approaches to sales presentations to determine their congruency with the…

  17. National Kitchen Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    In 1983, as part of its overall review of craft catering education and training in Ireland, the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board commissioned a nationwide research study of the trends and developments in professional kitchen practice in all sectors of the hotel and catering industry. The study was conducted through interviews with…

  18. Students as Co-Creators of Teaching Approaches, Course Design, and Curricula: Implications for Academic Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, Catherine; Cook-Sather, Alison; Felten, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Within higher education, students' voices are frequently overlooked in the design of teaching approaches, courses and curricula. In this paper we outline the theoretical background to arguments for including students as partners in pedagogical planning processes. We present examples where students have worked collaboratively in design processes,…

  19. Comparison of Primary School Foreign Language Curricula of Turkey, Germany and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Foreign language education at early ages involves a broad spectrum of communication skills using communication, culture, connections, comparisons and community. The aim of this study is to compare the primary foreign language curricula of Turkey, Germany and the Netherlands in terms of objectives, content, teaching processes and evaluation…

  20. Teachers' Perceptions of National Identity in the English and Taiwanese Citizenship Curricula: Civic or Ethnic Nationalism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Cheng-Yu

    2014-01-01

    This article examines and compares the hotly debated issue of national identity in the Taiwanese and English citizenship curricula and investigates the extent to which schoolteachers' perceptions fall in line with the written curriculum. The author describes the background to the evolution of national identity in each country. Following this…

  1. Nationalism and Globalism in the Junior Secondary History Curricula of Hong Kong and Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Joe Tin-yau

    2007-01-01

    Facing the trend and pressure of globalisation, the history curricula of Hong Kong and Shanghai have been undergoing reforms in order to better equip the youth for coping with rapid contextual changes. At the same time, there have been attempts to reposition nationalism in the changing contexts. This paper aims to compare and contrast how the…

  2. The Relevance of the Portuguese Language in the Higher Education Secretarial Courses´ Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Cristina de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is discussing the importance of Portuguese Language in the curricula of the Higher Education Secretarial Courses with bachelor degree. As indicated in the National Curricula Guidelines established by the Education Ministry, the Executive Secretary must have knowledge accuracy in at least one foreign language, besides acquiring teaching-learning conditions that propitiate a deeper knowledge of the national language. However, we note that the national courses´ curricula set the focus on the study of the foreign idioms, thus reducing the class hours dedicated to the study of Portuguese Language and its related subjects. Based on that, we developed, via exploratory and documental researches, an analysis of the curricula of the Higher Education Secretarial Courses in Federal and Private Universities in five Brazilian regions, in order to assess the impact that such reduction may cause on the development of the communication skills which are required to perform the Executive Secretary´s activities in the corporative environment. After analysing the results, we understood that a future reformulation of the curriculum is necessary, focused on Portuguese Language and correlated subjects, to upgrade the professional’s skills in relation to the present labour market requirements.

  3. An Evaluation of High School Curricula Employing Using the Element-Based Curriculum Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Dolgun; Günay, Rafet

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the curricula that constitute the basis of education provision at high schools in Turkey from the perspective of the teachers involved. A descriptive survey model, a quantitative research method was employed in this study. An item-based curriculum evaluation model was employed as part of the…

  4. Management Science in U.S. AACSB International-Accredited Core Undergraduate Business School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palocsay, Susan W.; Markham, Ina S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, accreditation standards were revised to require coverage of management science (MS) after previously removing it in 1991. Meanwhile, increasing awareness of the value of business analytics stimulated a renewed interest in MS. To examine its present status in undergraduate core business curricula, the authors conducted two studies to…

  5. "You Have to Know Why": The Influence of Different Curricula on Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredholm Nilsson, Angelica; Silen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The need in modern healthcare for professionals who are self-directed and autonomous has increased in recent decades. Problem-based learning is spreading in nursing education as one strategy for meeting these demands. This article deals with the relationship between the design and execution of nursing education curricula and students'…

  6. Chemistry education for sustainability: Assessing the chemistry curricula at Cardiff University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.; Watson, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    As more universities become interested in, and engaged with, sustainability, there has been a growing need to assess how their curricula addresses sustainable development and its myriad issues. Different tools and assessment exercises have looked at course descriptors. This paper presents the Sustai

  7. Management Science in U.S. AACSB International-Accredited Core Undergraduate Business School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palocsay, Susan W.; Markham, Ina S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, accreditation standards were revised to require coverage of management science (MS) after previously removing it in 1991. Meanwhile, increasing awareness of the value of business analytics stimulated a renewed interest in MS. To examine its present status in undergraduate core business curricula, the authors conducted two studies to…

  8. Vertical and Horizontal Integration of Laboratory Curricula and Course Projects across the Electronic Engineering Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Goulart, Ana; Morgan, Joseph A.; Porter, Jay R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the details of the curricular development effort with a focus on the vertical and horizontal integration of laboratory curricula and course projects within the Electronic Engineering Technology (EET) program at Texas A&M University. Both software and hardware aspects are addressed. A common set of software tools are…

  9. Future Directions of Management Science and Operations Management in Business School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jack A.; Denton, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The fields of Management Science (MS) and Operations Management (OM) have co-existed in business school curricula for over a half century. This paper examines five trends that point toward a bright future for Operations Management in the business curriculum. These trends include an increasing emphasis on global competition, the growth of the…

  10. Added value and constraints of transdisciplinary case studies in environmental science curricula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, Margien C.; Vermeulen, Walter J V; Van Dijk, Jerry; Schot, Paul P.

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable development issues are characterised by their multidisciplinary character, and the fact they are not merely an academic exercise but pertain to real-world problems. Academic sustainable development curricula should therefore not only focus on developing the analytical and research skills

  11. Bioinformatics in Middle East Program Curricula--A Focus on the Arabian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucif, Samia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inclusion of bioinformatics in program curricula in the Middle East, focusing on educational institutions in the Arabian Gulf. Bioinformatics is a multidisciplinary field which has emerged in response to the need for efficient data storage and retrieval, and accurate and fast computational and…

  12. Citizenship Education Curricula: The Changes and Challenges Presented by Global and European Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Avril; Ortloff, Debora Hinderliter; Philippou, Stavroula

    2009-01-01

    Citizenship education has been the subject of growing attention in policy and academic circles over the past 20 years. Citizenship education curricula have typically focused on national institutions, issues, and ties. Citizenship education has been closely bound up with the legitimacy of the nation-state, and alternative institutions and…

  13. National Kitchen Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    In 1983, as part of its overall review of craft catering education and training in Ireland, the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board commissioned a nationwide research study of the trends and developments in professional kitchen practice in all sectors of the hotel and catering industry. The study was conducted through interviews with…

  14. Business Communication Skills in Information Systems (IS) Curricula: Perspectives of IS Educators and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled A.; Lane, Peggy L.; Miller, Donald

    2011-01-01

    As the importance of communication skills for students, regardless of their disciplines, becomes evident, it is important to determine whether colleges provide students with adequate opportunities to acquire such skills. The authors compared information systems (IS) educator and student perceptions of communication skills in IS curricula. Gender,…

  15. A Study of the FEPAC Accredited Graduate Forensic Science Programs' Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Catherine Genice

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute of Justice (1999) and the National Academy of Sciences (2009) recommended that forensic science training shift from on-the-job training to formal education; however, the reports cited inconsistencies in the curricula of the forensic science degree programs as an impediment to this. The Forensic Science Education Programs…

  16. Tale of Two Curricula: The Performance of 2000 Students in Introductory Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmyer, Matthew A.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Catrambone, Richard; Chabay, Ruth W.; Ding, Lin; Haugan, Mark P.; Marr, M. Jackson; Sherwood, Bruce A.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of over 2000 students in introductory calculus-based electromagnetism (E&M) courses at four large research universities was measured using the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA). Two different curricula were used at these universities: a traditional E&M curriculum and the Matter & Interactions (M&I) curriculum. At…

  17. Developing a Foundation for Constructing New Curricula in Soil, Crop, and Turfgrass Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Holly D.; Collett, Ryan; Wingenbach, Gary; Heilman, James L.; Fowler, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Some soil and crop science university programs undergo curricula revision to maintain relevancy with their profession and/or to attract the best students to such programs. The Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Texas A&M University completed a thorough data gathering process as part of its revision of the undergraduate curriculum and…

  18. Challenges and Opportunities in Mainstreaming Environmental Education into the Curricula of Teachers' Colleges in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waktola, Daniel Kassahun

    2009-01-01

    Lack of environmental awareness is one of the underlying causes of severe environmental degradation in Ethiopia. As teachers' colleges are a seedbed of such awareness, assessment of college curricula should shed light on the possibilities they offer to develop capacities to address environmental degradation. This small-scale study is based on the…

  19. Promoting Problem-Based Learning in Retailing and Services Marketing Course Curricula with Reality Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Mark S.; Otalora, Mauricio Losada; Ramírez, Germán Contreras

    2015-01-01

    This research provides business educators who teach retailing and services courses with an innovative way to encourage students to engage in problem-based learning solving by incorporating reality television into their curricula. The authors explore the reality television genre from several theoretical perspectives to lend support to the…

  20. A Civic Rebalancing of British Multiculturalism? An Analysis of Geography, History and Citizenship Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on history, geography and citizenship education curricula and six semi-structured interviews with policy-makers--three with officials from the Department for Children, Schools and Families, two from the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority and one from the Office for Standards in Education. It argues that the governmental…

  1. Business Communication Skills in Information Systems (IS) Curricula: Perspectives of IS Educators and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled A.; Lane, Peggy L.; Miller, Donald

    2011-01-01

    As the importance of communication skills for students, regardless of their disciplines, becomes evident, it is important to determine whether colleges provide students with adequate opportunities to acquire such skills. The authors compared information systems (IS) educator and student perceptions of communication skills in IS curricula. Gender,…

  2. The Nature of Science in Science Curricula: Methods and Concepts of Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sílvia; Morais, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    The article shows methods and concepts of analysis of the nature of science in science curricula through an exemplary study made in Portugal. The study analyses the extent to which the message transmitted by the Natural Science curriculum for Portuguese middle school considers the nature of science. It is epistemologically and sociologically…

  3. Conceptual Demand of Science Curricula: A Study at the Middle School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Sílvia; Neves, Isabel P.; Morais, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of the level of conceptual demand of science curricula by analysing the case of the current Portuguese Natural Sciences curriculum for middle school. Conceptual demand is seen in terms of the complexity of cognitive skills, the complexity of scientific knowledge and the intra-disciplinary relations between distinct…

  4. Promoting Problem-Based Learning in Retailing and Services Marketing Course Curricula with Reality Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Mark S.; Otalora, Mauricio Losada; Ramírez, Germán Contreras

    2015-01-01

    This research provides business educators who teach retailing and services courses with an innovative way to encourage students to engage in problem-based learning solving by incorporating reality television into their curricula. The authors explore the reality television genre from several theoretical perspectives to lend support to the…

  5. Developing Academic Writing Skills as Part of Graduate Attributes in Undergraduate Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, I.; Fossey, A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of graduate attributes in higher education is enjoying much attention worldwide. Employers consistently rank communication skills, in particular writing ability, among the most important skills for graduates to possess. The inclusion and development of graduate attributes in undergraduate curricula have received little attention.…

  6. Programming Interpersonal Curricula for Adolescents (PICA) Project Year Three: A Laboratory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Harold L.; And Others

    The report reviews the third year of a 4-year demonstration and research project, Programing Interpersonal Curricula for Adolescents (PICA). General purpose is to develop remedial procedures for adolescents with both scholastic and social or behavioral problems. In a half day educational program 12 such students study academic and interpersonal…

  7. The PICA Project. Year 2. Project Interim Report. Programming Interpersonal Curricula for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Harold L.; And Others

    An operant conditioning program for 12 problematic adolescent boys is described in detail. Complete procedures are discussed, including criteria for student selection and the Programming Interpersonal Curricula for Adolescents (PICA) academic and psychological test battery. The academic component of the program focuses on mathematics and English…

  8. Upper Secondary School Physical Science Curricula in New Zealand after the National Qualifications Framework Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Taylor, T. G. Neil

    2007-01-01

    The recent structural reforms in New Zealand education have given schools and teachers unprecedented freedom in curricular design and delivery. Using official educational award statistics for 2004 and data arising from a study of 23 schools' upper secondary science curricula in the same year, this study represents an early monitoring of the impact…

  9. Developing Academic Writing Skills as Part of Graduate Attributes in Undergraduate Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, I.; Fossey, A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of graduate attributes in higher education is enjoying much attention worldwide. Employers consistently rank communication skills, in particular writing ability, among the most important skills for graduates to possess. The inclusion and development of graduate attributes in undergraduate curricula have received little attention.…

  10. Preserving Social Studies as Core Curricula in an Era of Common Core Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, David W.; Sink, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Education reform over the last two decades has changed perceptions of core curricula. Although social studies has traditionally been part of the core, emphasis on standards-based teaching and learning, along with elaborate accountability schemes, is causing unbalanced treatment of subjects. While the research literature indicates teachers are…

  11. Developing Culturally Sensitive HIV/AIDS and Substance Abuse Prevention Curricula for Native American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Julie A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Critical steps in developing these curricula included: selecting integrative theory to address multidimensional antecedents of HIV/AIDS and substance abuse among Native Americans; using ethnography to obtain input from target groups and community members to ensure developmental and cultural sensitivity; and using process and outcome evaluations of…

  12. Chemistry education for sustainability: Assessing the chemistry curricula at Cardiff University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.; Watson, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    As more universities become interested in, and engaged with, sustainability, there has been a growing need to assess how their curricula addresses sustainable development and its myriad issues. Different tools and assessment exercises have looked at course descriptors. This paper presents the

  13. Assessing sustainability in university curricula: exploring the influence of student numbers and course credits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.; Young, W.

    2013-01-01

    As more universities become interested in, and engaged with, sustainability, there has been a growing need to assess how their curricula addresses sustainable development and its myriad issues. Different tools and assessment exercises have looked at course descriptors; however, the influence of the

  14. Medical School Librarians Need More Training to Support their Involvement in Evidence Based Medicine Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislinn Conway

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To describe the self-perceived role of librarians in developing evidence based medicine (EBM curricula and identify their current and desired level of training to support these activities. Design – Multi-institutional qualitative study. Setting – Nine medical schools in Canada and the United States of America. Subjects – Nine librarians identified by medical school faculty as central to the provision of EBM training for medical students at their institution. Methods – The researchers designed a semi-structured interview schedule based on a review of the literature and their own experiences as librarians teaching EBM. The topics covered were; librarians’ perceptions of their roles in relation to the curriculum, the training required to enable them to undertake these roles, and their professional development needs. The interviews were conducted by telephone and then audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The authors present five main themes; curricular design, curricular deployment, curricular assessment, educational training, and professional development. Profiles were developed for each participant based on the latter two themes and from this information common characteristics were identified. Main Results – The participants described the importance of collaboration with faculty and student bodies when designing a curriculum. Information literacy instruction and specifically literature searching and forming a research question were taught by all of the participants to facilitate curricular deployment. Some of the librarians were involved or partly involved in curricular assessment activities such as formulating exam questions or providing feedback on assignments. Educational training of participants varied from informal observation to formal workshops offered by higher education institutions. All librarians indicated a willingness to partake in professional development focused on teaching and EBM. The subjects

  15. Survey of animal welfare, animal behavior, and animal ethics courses in the curricula of AVMA Council on Education-accredited veterinary colleges and schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivley, Chelsey B; Garry, Franklyn B; Kogan, Lori R; Grandin, Temple

    2016-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To explore the extent to which veterinary colleges and schools accredited by the AVMA Council on Education (COE) have incorporated specific courses related to animal welfare, behavior, and ethics. DESIGN Survey and curriculum review. SAMPLE All 49 AVMA COE-accredited veterinary colleges and schools (institutions). PROCEDURES The study consisted of 2 parts. In part 1, a survey regarding animal welfare, behavior, and ethics was emailed to the associate dean of academic affairs at all 49 AVMA COE-accredited institutions. In part 2, the curricula for the 30 AVMA COE-accredited institutions in the United States were reviewed for courses on animal behavior, ethics, and welfare. RESULTS Seventeen of 49 (35%) institutions responded to the survey of part 1, of which 10 offered a formal animal welfare course, 9 offered a formal animal behavior course, 8 offered a formal animal ethics course, and 5 offered a combined animal welfare, behavior, and ethics course. The frequency with which courses on animal welfare, behavior, and ethics were offered differed between international and US institutions. Review of the curricula for the 30 AVMA COE-accredited US institutions revealed that 6 offered a formal course on animal welfare, 22 offered a formal course on animal behavior, and 18 offered a formal course on animal ethics. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that AVMA COE-accredited institutions need to provide more formal education on animal welfare, behavior, and ethics so veterinarians can be advocates for animals and assist with behavioral challenges.

  16. Supporting students' knowledge integration with technology-enhanced inquiry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jennifer Lopseen

    Dynamic visualizations of scientific phenomena have the potential to transform how students learn and understand science. Dynamic visualizations enable interaction and experimentation with unobservable atomic-level phenomena. A series of studies clarify the conditions under which embedding dynamic visualizations in technology-enhanced inquiry instruction can help students develop robust and durable chemistry knowledge. Using the knowledge integration perspective, I designed Chemical Reactions, a technology-enhanced curriculum unit, with a partnership of teachers, educational researchers, and chemists. This unit guides students in an exploration of how energy and chemical reactions relate to climate change. It uses powerful dynamic visualizations to connect atomic level interactions to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The series of studies were conducted in typical classrooms in eleven high schools across the country. This dissertation describes four studies that contribute to understanding of how visualizations can be used to transform chemistry learning. The efficacy study investigated the impact of the Chemical Reactions unit compared to traditional instruction using pre-, post- and delayed posttest assessments. The self-monitoring study used self-ratings in combination with embedded assessments to explore how explanation prompts help students learn from dynamic visualizations. The self-regulation study used log files of students' interactions with the learning environment to investigate how external feedback and explanation prompts influence students' exploration of dynamic visualizations. The explanation study compared specific and general explanation prompts to explore the processes by which explanations benefit learning with dynamic visualizations. These studies delineate the conditions under which dynamic visualizations embedded in inquiry instruction can enhance student outcomes. The studies reveal that visualizations can be deceptively clear

  17. The role of epistemic cognition in complex collaborative inquiry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Alisa

    This thesis examines the role of epistemic cognition within the context of a Knowledge Community and Inquiry (KCI) curriculum for secondary science. The study employs a new form of design-based research, called Model-Based Design Research (MBDR), which first maps a formal pedagogical model onto the curriculum design, and then assesses how the enacted curriculum adheres to the design. The curriculum design was a ten-week Grade 11 Biology unit that met the Ontario Ministry requirements for evolution and biodiversity, and included activities situated within a unique immersive environment called EvoRoom. The thesis includes an assessment of students' epistemological views about science and science learning, and evaluates the epistemic commitments of KCI using a relevant theoretical framework of epistemic cognition. The analysis reveals the complex interconnections amongst the epistemological, pedagogical and technological elements of the design, resulting in recommendations for future design iterations as well as theoretical insights concerning the KCI model.

  18. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high “motivation score” (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49–9.59; P = 0.005) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01–6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: “attending physician” (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86–11.37; P = 0.001); “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51–11.23; P = 0.006); “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91–6.46; P = 0.0001); and “male gender” (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02–3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33–15.19; P = 0.0002) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university

  19. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies: A Strobe-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high "motivation score" (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49-9.59; P = 0.005) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01-6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: "attending physician" (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86-11.37; P = 0.001); "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51-11.23; P = 0.006); "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91-6.46; P = 0.0001); and "male gender" (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02-3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33-15.19; P = 0.0002) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.46-4.77; P = 0.001). This is the

  20. Structured curricula and curriculum development in ophthalmology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew G; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    There has been a shift in graduate medical education (GME) from the traditional "apprenticeship" model to a more curriculum-based and competency driven model. Reflecting a global trend towards residency education reform, the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) introduced a resident and specialist curriculum and several live educational programs to promote standardization and more effective GME and continuing professional training. Implementation of these educational innovations will require efforts by local educator champions; modification and customization of teaching and assessing tools to the local learning environment; alignment of the implementation blueprint with available resources; and creation of accountability and sustainability mechanisms to insure long-term viability of the educational reforms. An ultimate goal of the ICO curriculum is to allow real world testing and modification so that the ideas generated in one part of the world might be applicable and generalizable in other areas. We aim to describe the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies in the United States (US) and ICO curriculum, as well as to provide a step-by-step plan for implementation of an ophthalmology residency curriculum.

  1. Diagnostic imaging in pregraduate integrated curricula; Radiologie in einem praegraduellen problembasiert-integrierten Medizincurriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainberger, F.; Kletter, K. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)

    2007-11-15

    Pregraduate medical curricula are currently undergoing a reform process that is moving away from a traditional discipline-related structure and towards problem-based integrated forms of teaching. Imaging sciences, with their inherently technical advances, are specifically influenced by the effects of paradigm shifts in medical education. The teaching of diagnostic radiology should be based on the definition of three core competencies: in vivo visualization of normal and abnormal morphology and function, diagnostic reasoning, and interventional treatment. On the basis of these goals, adequate teaching methods and e-learning tools should be implemented by focusing on case-based teaching. Teaching materials used in the fields of normal anatomy, pathology, and clinical diagnosis may help diagnostic radiology to play a central role in modern pregraduate curricula. (orig.)

  2. Teacher Characteristics and Perceptions of Pest Management Curricula: Clues to Adoption and Continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Makena; Aihara-Sasaki, Maria; Grace, J Kenneth

    2013-04-15

    Educate to Eradicate is a K-12 curriculum project using termite biology and control as the basis for science education that has been implemented in over 350 Hawaii public school classrooms. To encourage sustained implementation of the project, we aimed to identify factors that influence the adoption and continuation of pest management curricula in public school classrooms. Regression analysis of teacher survey data were used to create predictive models of teacher continuation. Teachers motivated by "exciting students about science", who perceived increases in "student understanding and comprehension of major termite knowledge concepts" and/or students as "more interested in termites after participating in this project" were more likely to continue curriculum. Teachers who had worked at their current school over 21 years at the time of curriculum adoption, and/or who identified having subject specialties not listed on the survey were less likely to continue curriculum. Additionally, teachers servicing lower socioeconomic level students were less likely to continue the curricula.

  3. Depression and suicidal ideation in medical students in China: a call for wellness curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Sobowale, Kunmi; Zhou, A. Ning; Fan, Jingyi; Liu, Ni; Sherer, Renslow

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate rates of depression and suicidal ideation in medical students in mainland China and to explore wellness curricula and mental health services available to students. Methods Second and third year medical students (N=348) at one medical school in mainland China completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Based on responses to the PHQ-9, students were labeled as depressed, with suicidal ideation, and/or impaired. Additionally, students’ feedback from a focus gr...

  4. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michael H.; Fierke, Kerry K.; Sucher, Brandon J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI exper...

  5. Identifying and Using ‘Core Competencies’ to Help Design and Assess Undergraduate Neuroscience Curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Kerchner, Michael; Hardwick, Jean C.; Thornton, Janice E.

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing emphasis on the use of core competencies to design and inform curricula. Based on our Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience workshop at Pomona we developed a set of neuroscience core competencies. Following the workshop, faculty members were asked to complete an online survey to determine which core competencies are considered most essential and the results are presented. Backward Design principles are then described and we discuss how core competencies, through a ba...

  6. AGRICULTURAL, AGRIBUSINESS, AND INTERNATIONAL MARKETING COURSES IN UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA: ISSUES AND IDEAS

    OpenAIRE

    Wysocki, Allen F.; Fairchild, Gary F.; Weldon, Richard N.; Biere, Arlo W.; Fulton, Joan R.; McIntosh, Christopher S.

    2003-01-01

    Agricultural marketing courses cover a broad spectrum of topics and issues. Undergraduate committees, program coordinators, and marketing-oriented faculty struggle with the appropriate number and content of marketing course offerings. Curricula issues are discussed from the perspectives of three agricultural economics departments. Size, expertise, interests, and pedagogic philosophy assist in determining the number, mix, and content of courses. Solving these problems includes modulization and...

  7. Open Source Software Alternatives in Higher Education Following Computer Science Curricula 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borislav Stoyanov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we overview the open source software, describe the advantages and disadvantages of using open source software in modern Higher Education following Computer Science Curricula 2013. The study’s main purposes are to clear the understanding of open source software, to present alternatives of the commercial software and demonstrate the potential benefits of integrating open source software in Higher Education.

  8. De-institutionalization of highbrow culture? Curricula in secondary education in Flanders, 1930-2000

    OpenAIRE

    Daenekindt, Stijn; Roose, Henk

    2014-01-01

    It is claimed that from the sixties onwards the educational system has contributed to the erosion of the institutionalized character of fine arts. In line with a worldwide trend towards more student-centred curricula—some authors argue that the exclusive focus on high culture in school curricula has dwindled. However, empirical research to substantiate these claims is scarce. We focus on secondary education in Flanders to study the centrality of high culture in the educational system: can we ...

  9. Developing a Foundation for Interprofessional Education Within Nursing and Medical Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Trisha Leann; Reed, Trent; Muccino, Keith; Quinones, Donna; Siddall, Viva Jo; McCarthy, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Effective teamwork is essential to foster patient safety and promote quality patient care. Students may have limited to no exposure to interprofessional education (IPE) or collaborative practice, therefore making it challenging to learn how to work in teams. This article describes how a nursing and a medical school collaborated to systematically integrate IPE simulations into the curricula so that every graduate from the respective schools received TeamSTEPPS® education and participated in a standardized IPE simulation experience.

  10. Transitions in Texas: The development of secondary science curricula, 1886--1917

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Larry Joe

    This dissertation reports an exploration of one statewide case in the remarkable expansion of the American public high school in the early twentieth century. Specifically, it focuses on the curricula of early twentieth century secondary school system of the state of Texas. In particular, its development was shepherded, from 1886--1917, by the University of Texas. The vehicle was the university's program of affiliation with its approval of high schools in the state. Affiliation essentially was a system of accreditation of the state's high schools. It contributed the first systematic effort to provide guidance for the academic programs, teachers, and facilities for the state's rapidly developing high schools. A variety of social, political, and economic conditions affected the University's affiliation system. These conditions external and internal to the state constituted the formative circumstances for the development of secondary curricula in Texas. Mathematics, history, English, and Latin were the primary affiliated subjects during the late 1800's. Science offerings did not become affiliated subjects in the University of Texas affiliation program until the early 1900's. This study focused on the development and inclusion of science offerings in the curricula of affiliated high schools. It probed the nature and extent of the science course offerings in the growing number of affiliated Texas high schools. Its findings identify among other matters, the science courses that were offered in affiliated Texas high schools, textbooks used, and laboratory facilities. The involvement of The University of Texas at Austin in establishing high school curricular standards, the reconfiguration of the school day, the redesign of the curricula, the inspection and affiliation process, all provided standards for improvements in school districts that lacked effective state governmental guidance and supervision. This endeavor by the university, assumed by the State Department of

  11. Development of Parallel Learning Strategies Curricula Using Videodisc and Standard Off-Line Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    AOM-ft67 246 DEVELOPMIENT OF PARALLEL LERNING STRATEGIES CURRICULA v𔃻 USING YIDEODISC RND.. (U) HUMAN RESOURCES RESEARCH ORGANIZATION ALEXANDRIA VA...research and development to produce and evaluate applications of an advanced multimedia , computer-based technology for basic skills education, which included...evaluations, the second task was the preparation of printed, off-line materials for all of the lessons. The last task was the production of two videotapes

  12. An Evidence-Based Approach to Integrate Civility, Professionalism, and Ethical Practice Into Nursing Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M

    This article presents an evidence-based approach to integrate concepts of civility, professionalism, and ethical practice into nursing curricula to prepare students to foster healthy work environments and ensure safe patient care. The author provides evidence to support this approach and includes suggestions for new student orientation, strategies for the first day of class, exemplars for incorporating active learning strategies to enhance student engagement, an emphasis on positive faculty role modeling, and suggestions for curricular integration.

  13. The updated ESTRO core curricula 2011 for clinicians, medical physicists and RTTs in radiotherapy/radiation oncology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksen, J.G.; Beavis, A.W.; Coffey, M.A.; Leer, J.W.H.; Magrini, S.M.; Benstead, K.; Boelling, T.; Hjalm-Eriksson, M.; Kantor, G.; Maciejewski, B.; Mezeckis, M.; Oliveira, A.; Thirion, P.; Vitek, P.; Olsen, D.R.; Eudaldo, T.; Enghardt, W.; Francois, P.; Garibaldi, C.; Heijmen, B.; Josipovic, M.; Major, T.; Nikoletopoulos, S.; Rijnders, A.; Waligorski, M.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Mullaney, L.; Boejen, A.; Vaandering, A.; Vandevelde, G.; Verfaillie, C.; Potter, R.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2007 ESTRO proposed a revision and harmonisation of the core curricula for radiation oncologists, medical physicists and RTTs to encourage harmonised education programmes for the professional disciplines, to facilitate mobility between EU member states, to reflect the rapid

  14. Development of perceived instrumentality for mathematics, reading and science curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Steve L.

    Perceptions of instrumentality (PI) are the connections one sees between a current activity and a future goal. With high PI, one is motivated to persist with quality effort because the current activity, even when difficult, is perceived as aligned with, and progress toward, the goal. Conversely, with low PI, one is motivated to relinquish effort in pursuit of other, more meaningful goals. In view of the alarming dropout rates in this country, it appears that PI research has much to offer in understanding students' motivations to stay in school and hence to become employed in their field of choice. Because academic achievement motivation can be affected by gender and ethnicity, particularly for specific components of the curriculum, and because curricular content varies across grade levels and school settings, this line of research offers significant potential for understanding and improving student outcomes. This research examined the development of PI among suburban 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th graders from a school district in the southwestern United States. Twelve hundred students completed a one-time paper and pencil survey measuring the perceived instrumentality of mathematics, literacy and science courses in terms of the students' occupational choices. MANOVA was used to determine factors that may affect students' overall PI and individual subject PI. Grade, gender, ethnicity, occupational choice, expectancy and value were the independent variables. A school setting variable was examined for effects on 12th graders. For the 8th through 12th grade sample, significant main effects were observed for grade, gender, minority status, occupational choice and expectancy on PI. Results show that PI is highest in the 6 th grade. Males reported higher Math PI than females. Females reported higher Reading PI and Science PI than males. Minority students reported lower overall PI and Science PI than non-minority students. Students who aspire to professional careers report the

  15. Comparative Study of the academic performance between different curricula in Agricultural Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, J. L.; Serrano, A.; Caniego, J.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the introduction of new degrees on the College of Agricultural Engineering of the Technical University of Madrid adapted to the European Space for Higher Education (Bologna), we have made a comparative study of academic achievement obtained by the students during their first year at the Centre according to different curricula. We used data from 2 curricula leading to the degree in Agricultural Engineering, Curriculumn 74 (6 years and annual structure) and Curriculum 96 modified in 2006 (5 years with quarterly structure) and the new curriculum in grades (4 years semi-structured). It has been used as a data source, the qualifications of new students during the last three years prior to the extinction of the curriculum.The study shows that current rates of academic success or failure and dropout during the first year of college are very similar to those happening 12 years ago, when it was assumed that the preparation of students from high school was much higher than today. Keywords: Academic performance, curricula, Bologna.

  16. The history of psychology course in Spanish psychology curricula: Past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisvert-Perales, Mauricio; Monteagudo-Soto, María J; Mestre, Vicenta

    2016-05-01

    Since the university education of psychologists began in Spain in 1954, the history of psychology course has been included in the curriculum. In the first few years, only half of the curricula offered the course. From 1973 to 2007, the universities' organization and regulation underwent successive reforms that involved changes in the curricula, decreeing specific national guidelines for each degree and establishing a minimum set of common required courses, called core courses, including the history of psychology. In 2007, the European Higher Education Area was set up, transforming the 5-year bachelor's degrees into 4-year degrees and eliminating the required guidelines, with each university being able to define the content of their curricula. The Dean's Conference for Psychology agreed on some recommendations related to core courses, which continued to include the history of psychology and were adopted by the majority of the universities. In 2015, the government established a new national regulation that makes it possible for each university to voluntarily reduce the length of the bachelor's degree to 3 years. Some psychology historians believe that this hypothetical reduction in the length of the degree, along with the already existing general tendency to prioritize applied or practical courses over basic or fundamental ones, could produce an appropriate scenario for the disappearance of the history of psychology course in some universities.

  17. Typology of Logistics Curricula – Four Categories of Logistics of Logistics Undergraduate Education in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarvo Niine

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of logistics education is rather colorful. The range of possible topics is huge and so each curriculum has unique approach towards which topic areas to emphasize and which to treat briefly or even omit. There is only little effective standardization in logistics education. This study examines the content of 42 undergraduate logistics curricula in Europe via cluster analysis, with a goal to propose a typology of logistics curricula. The findings define the spectrum of logistics education in four clusters, ranging from „business administration“ with little focus on most specific logistics topics, through „interdisciplinary logistics management“ and „modern transport management“ to „logistics engineering“ with a strong quantitative and technology approach. However, a problem remains that curriculum title does not always reflect actual profile. A typical title “logistics management” might in one case contain various engineering elements, but in another none at all. Such findings point out the need for curricula boards to decide, if trying to cover the entire scope by „one-size-fits-all“ program is the best option or if more distinct focus is needed. In both cases this decision needs to be intentional, agreed and clearly communicated to avoid confusing students and society. Furthermore, the study points out the need to refine standards of competences in logistics, especially for logistics engineering.

  18. Integrating Family as a Discipline by Providing Parent Led Curricula: Impact on LEND Trainees' Leadership Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisling, Bruce L; Bishop, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jenness M

    2017-01-20

    Background While the MCH Leadership Competencies and family as a discipline have been required elements of Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities (LEND) programs for over a decade, little research has been published on the efficacy of either programmatic component in the development of the next generation of leaders who can advocate and care for Maternal and Child Health (MCH) populations. Objective To test the effectiveness of integrating the family discipline through implementation of parent led curricula on trainees' content knowledge, skills, and leadership development in family-centered care, according to the MCH Leadership Competencies. Methods One hundred and two long-term (≥ 300 h) LEND trainees completed a clinical and leadership training program which featured intensive parent led curricula supported by a full-time family faculty member. Trainees rated themselves on the five Basic and Advanced skill items that comprise MCH Leadership Competency 8: Family-centered Care at the beginning and conclusion of their LEND traineeship. Results When compared to their initial scores, trainees rated themselves significantly higher across all family-centered leadership competency items at the completion of their LEND traineeship. Conclusions The intentional engagement of a full-time family faculty member and parent led curricula that include didactic and experiential components are associated with greater identification and adoption by trainees of family-centered attitudes, skills, and practices. However, the use of the MCH Leadership Competencies as a quantifiable measure of program evaluation, particularly leadership development, is limited.

  19. Tension Between Visions of Science Education. The Case of Energy Quality in Swedish Secondary Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Hultén, Magnus

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to contribute to an understanding of how curricular change is accomplished in practice, including the positions and conflicts of key stakeholders and participants, and their actions in the process. As a case, we study the treatment of energy in Swedish secondary curricula in the period 1962-2011 and, in particular, how the notion of energy quality was introduced in the curricula in an energy course at upper secondary school in 1983 and in physics at lower secondary school in 1994. In the analysis, we use Roberts' two competing visions of science education, Vision I in which school science subjects largely mirror their corresponding academic disciplines and Vision II that incorporates societal matters of science. In addition, a newly suggested Vision III represents a critical perspective on science education. Our analysis shows how Vision II and III aspects of science education have gained importance in curricula since the 1980s, but in competition with Vision I considerations. Energy quality played a central role in providing Vision II and III arguments in the curricular debate on energy teaching. Subsequent educational research has found that Swedish teachers and students struggle with how to relate to energy quality in physics teaching, which we explain as partly due to the tension between the competing visions.

  20. Veterinary Curricula Today: Curricular Management and Renewal at AAVMC Member Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F; Root Kustritz, Margaret V; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M

    2017-01-01

    Renewing a veterinary curriculum is challenging work and its impact is difficult to measure. Academic leaders are charged with regular review and updating of their curricula, but have few resources available to guide their efforts. Due to the paucity of published veterinary reports, most turn to colleagues at other veterinary schools for insider advice, while a few undertake the task of adapting information from the educational literature to suit the needs of the veterinary profession. In response to this paucity, we proposed a theme issue on curricular renewal and surveyed academic leaders regarding curricular challenges and major renewal efforts underway. We compiled the results of this survey (with respondents from 38 veterinary colleges) as well as publicly available information to create a digest of curricular activities at AAVMC member institutions. This introductory article summarizes the key survey findings, describes the methods used to create the curricular digest, and presents information about key aspects of selected programs. Our overarching research questions were as follows: (1) What was the extent and nature of curricular change at AAVMC-accredited veterinary colleges over the past 5 years? and (2) How are curricula and curricular changes managed at AAVMC accredited veterinary colleges? The appended curricular digests provide selected details of current DVM curricula at participating institutions. Additional articles in this issue report on institutional change efforts in more detail. It is our hope that this issue will help to pave the way for future curricular development, research, and peer-to-peer collaboration.

  1. Making Agriculture Curricula Competence-Oriented While Inserting Issues on Gender and Climate Change at Vietnamese Universities

    OpenAIRE

    R. H. Bosma; Phung, L.D.; Le, An V.; Ngo, An T.; Tran, Hang M.T.; Pham, Son H.; Wals, A.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Many academic curricula suffer from a teacher­ centred focus on knowledge transfer and do not consider the societal needs for competences. This paper reflects on the transformation from theory­ centred towards competency-oriented curricula at three Vietnamese Agriculture Universities with support of a Netherlands-funded project. Experts guided the implementation, from analysis of labour market to evaluation of new courses. Based on students' evaluation and lecturers' experiences, both types o...

  2. The composition of first-year engineering curricula and its relationships to matriculation models and institutional characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xingyu

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of technically excellent and innovative engineering graduates urges for a reform of the engineering curriculum to meet critical challenges in society (National Academy of Engineering, 2005). An examination of the current engineering curricula is needed to offer a baseline to further discuss if the curriculum reform meets the critical challenges. Meanwhile, concern about engineering retention prioritizes a review of the first-year engineering curricula. The existing literature ...

  3. Meritocracy, Tracking, and Elitism: Differentiated Citizenship Education in the United States and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Li-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted a clear civic achievement gap between students from different ethnic and economic backgrounds in countries such as Singapore and the United States. Concurrently, researchers from both countries have noted that access to government and civics classes and curricula differs considerably across and within schools and…

  4. Raising the Priority of Lifestyle-Related Noncommunicable Diseases in Physical Therapy Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth; Greig, Alison; Murphy, Sue; Roots, Robin; Nembhard, Nadine; Rankin, Anne; Bainbridge, Lesley; Anthony, Joseph; Hoens, Alison M; Garland, S Jayne

    2016-07-01

    Given their enormous socioeconomic burdens, lifestyle-related noncommunicable diseases (heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity) have become priorities for the World Health Organization and health service delivery systems. Health care systems have been criticized for relative inattention to the gap between knowledge and practice, as it relates to preventing and managing noncommunicable diseases. Physical therapy is a profession that can contribute effectively to patients'/clients' lifestyle behavior changes at the upstream end of prevention and management. Efforts by entry-to-practice physical therapist education programs to align curricula with epidemiological trends toward best health care practices are varied. One explanation may be the lack of a frame of reference for reducing the knowledge translation gap. The purpose of this article is to provide a current perspective on epidemiological indicators and societal priorities to inform physical therapy curriculum content. Such content needs to include health examination/evaluation tools and health behavior change interventions that are consistent with contemporary values, directions, and practices of physical therapy. These considerations provide a frame of reference for curriculum change. Based on 5 years of experience and dialogue among curriculum stakeholders, an example of how epidemiologically informed and evidence-based best health care practices may be systematically integrated into physical therapy curricula to maximize patient/client health and conventional physical therapy outcomes is provided. This novel approach can serve as an example to other entry-to-practice physical therapist education programs of how to align their curricula with societal health priorities, specifically, noncommunicable diseases. The intentions are to stimulate dialogue about effectively integrating health-based competencies into entry-level education and advancing

  5. The Embedment of Responsible Research and Innovation Aspects in European Science Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy KIKI-PAPADAKIS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent and current discourse on education policy across Europe places great emphasis on the importance of incorporating aspects of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI in science education. A key aspect of education policy is that citizens should become better equipped to enquire into and understand socio-scientific issues, as well as to apply scientific knowledge and ethical values in order to form evidence-based opinions. The question of how the intentions of policy-makers can be translated effectively into educational practice, however, has yet to be answered. Against this background, the present paper will investigate how aspects of RRI can be embedded in the curricula of science education in various European countries. The framework we will present illuminates both the intentions of policy-makers and current practices with regard to RRI within science curricula. It also helps map such policies and strategies in the area of science education across Europe. In the context of the ENGAGE project, this framework has been used as a tool for analysing the RRI components of curricula in the science education of students aged 11–16. The analysis is based on data gathered in 2014, takes into account prospective reforms and covers 11 European countries. The results of the analysis illustrate the potential of this framework as a tool for investigating how RRI can be embedded in science education and for exploring the space for intervention that policy-makers have. They also show that this framework can shed light on how the intentions of policy-makers and current practices with regard to RRI interrelate and on how moving from “words to deeds” can be achieved in a meaningful and constructive manner.

  6. Digital Curation Education and Training: From Digitization to Graduate Curricula to MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Tibbo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the development of digital and data curation curricula. Due to the brief length of this paper, the focus is on North American initiatives and primarily on continuing education programs. It explores the strengths and weaknesses of professional workshops and the creation of graduate-level courses, certificates, degrees and MOOCs, as well as the role of funding agencies in this process. It concludes with an analysis of what is missing and what is needed to create the workforce required to steward digital assets in the foreseeable future.

  7. Gap analysis survey: an aid in transitioning to standardized curricula for nuclear medicine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bires, Angela Macci; Mason, Donna L; Gilmore, David; Pietrzyk, Carly

    2012-09-01

    This article discusses the process by which the Society of Nuclear Medicine Technology Section (SNMTS) is assisting educators as they transition to comply with the fourth edition of the Curriculum Guide for Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology. An electronic survey was sent to a list of nuclear medicine technology programs compiled by the educational division of the SNMTS. The collected data included committee member demographics, goals and objectives, conference call minutes, consultation discussions, transition examples, 4- and 2-y program curricula, and certificate program curricula. There were 56 responses to the survey. All respondents were program directors, with 3 respondents having more than one type of program, for a total of 59 programs. Of these, 19 (33.93%) were baccalaureate, 19 (28.57%) associate, and 21 (37.5%) certificate. Forty-eight respondents (85.71%) had accreditation through the Joint Review Commission on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology, 6 (10.71%) had regional accreditation, and 2 (3.57%) were accredited through other entities. Thirteen categories of required general education courses were identified, and the existing program curricula of 9 (69.2%) courses were more than 50% compliant with the fourth edition Curriculum Guide. The fact that no measurable gap could be found within the didactic professional content across programs was due to the lack of a degree requirement and content standardization within the profession. The data indicated that the participating programs offer a minimum of 1-15 contact hours in emerging technology modalities. The required clinical hours ranged from 765 to 1,920 for degree or certificate completion. The average number of clinical hours required for all programs was 1,331.69. Standardization of the number and types of courses is needed both for current baccalaureate programs and for clinical education. This standardization will guide programs in transitioning from a

  8. Integrating genetics and genomics into nursing curricula: you can do it too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Jackson, Barbara; Belchez, Chito A; Elder, Betty; Hurley, Roxanne; Kerr, Peg; Nissen, Mary Kay

    2013-12-01

    Rapid advances in knowledge and technology related to genomics cross health care disciplines and touch almost every aspect of patient care. The ability to sequence a genome holds the promise that health care can be personalized. Health care professionals are faced with a gap in the ability to use the rapidly expanding technology and knowledge related to genomics in practice. Yet, nurses are key to bridging the gap between genomic discoveries and the human experience of illness. This article presents a case study documenting the experience of five nursing schools/colleges of nursing as they work to integrate genetics and genomics into their curricula.

  9. A Call for Innovation: Reflective Practices and Clinical Curricula of US Army Special Operations Forces Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocklein, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics have written and published numerous practice reflections that intricately describe their practice environments, clinical dilemmas, and suggestions for teaching and practice. The lack of translation of SOF medics experiential evidence to their curriculum has created a gap in evidence-based curriculum development. This study analyzed SOF medics learning and practice patterns and compared it to the evidence in the interdisciplinary clinical literature. After framing the problem, the literature was reviewed to determine appropriate tools by which perceptions and attitudes toward reflection-centered curricula could be measured. A recognizable practice reflection was extracted from the published SOF clinical literature and presented in writing to self-identified SOF medics and medic instructors via a descriptive crossover design, to ensure possible biases were mitigated. To measure SOF medics perceptions of reflection-based curricula, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure survey instrument was used, as it has validated psychometric properties and is used worldwide. SOF medics averaged scores of perceptions of their medic education indicated positive but not completely statistically significant preferences toward reflection-based curricula over traditional curriculum. Special Operations, medics, reflective practice, curricula BACKGROUND Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics practice in environments that are violent, austere, clandestine, and far removed from definitive hospital facilities. What was true almost 20 years ago?". . . academic demands of [Special Forces medic training] are roughly equivalent to those of an upper-level undergraduate curriculum in science or perhaps to those of first year medical school"?is even more challenging today. During this study, medics, physicians, and educators within the SOF medical community publicly and privately (ergo, names were redacted) expressed the need for curricular changes to

  10. UPGRADING THE UNIT-TYPE LEARNING PROGRAMS IN THE MAJOR “PRE-SCHOOL LEARNING AND UPBRINGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahila AUBAKIROVA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper emphasized the practices in implementing the project TEMPUS EDUCA JEP 517504-DE-2011 in the subject area “Upgrading and Developing the Curricula (Training pro-grams in Pedagogics and Education Management in the Countries of Central Asia“. Specific attention has been given to practices in working out the unit-type curricula in the ma-jor “Preschool Teaching and Upbringing” in Kazakhstan. The review submitted descriptions of the curricula units, the competences required for the B.A. graduates majored in “Preschool Teaching and Upbringing”. The paper gave a detailed description of the purpose, tasks and the outcomes of learning; and considered general and specific competenc-es, and the competences of the major subject area. General competences of a graduate were specified, with require-ments for general erudition taken into account and social and moral competences, and economic and managerial competences as well.

  11. Job requirements compared to medical school education: differences between graduates from problem-based learning and conventional curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federkeil Gero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based Learning (PBL has been suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve medical education. We sought to evaluate the differences in medical school education between graduates from PBL-based and conventional curricula and to what extent these curricula fit job requirements. Methods Graduates from all German medical schools who graduated between 1996 and 2002 were eligible for this study. Graduates self-assessed nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in medical school on a 6-point Likert scale. Results were compared between graduates from a PBL-based curriculum (University Witten/Herdecke and conventional curricula. Results Three schools were excluded because of low response rates. Baseline demographics between graduates of the PBL-based curriculum (n = 101, 49% female and the conventional curricula (n = 4720, 49% female were similar. No major differences were observed regarding job requirements with priorities for "Independent learning/working" and "Practical medical skills". All competencies were rated to be better taught in PBL-based curriculum compared to the conventional curricula (all p Conclusion Among medical graduates in Germany, PBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of physicians. Research and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  12. Diffusion of innovations in schools: a study of adoption and implementation of school-based tobacco prevention curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, L K; Steckler, A B; McLeroy, K R

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of implementation of school health education curricula, to identify factors which enhanced or impeded implementation, and to examine the link between the adoption and implementation phases of the diffusion process. The study used an experimental design; 22 school districts were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions. The study was conducted in North Carolina. All teachers in the study districts identified by their schools as "eligible to teach health" were included in the sample. An in-depth training was conducted on the use of the middle school tobacco prevention curriculum that had been adopted. Three measures were used to assess implementation of the curricula. Independent variables of interest included organizational size and climate, teacher training, how long it took to make the adoption decision, and attitudes toward tobacco use prevention curricula. Response rates for these measures ranged from 44% to 78%. Nonparametric correlations and regression modeling indicated that larger organizational size and teacher training were the strongest predictors of curricula implementation. A favorable organizational climate within school districts also improved implementation. While interventions to increase adoption of school health education curricula should focus on larger school districts, the majority of efforts to improve implementation should focus on smaller districts.

  13. Licensed physicians – competent physicians?: The new German licensure law as a basis for competency-based curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öchsner, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competency-based curricula define their educational goals according to profession-specific roles and competencies. Thus, this type of curricula is outcome-oriented, in contrast to the traditional German curricula, which are mainly procedure-oriented. This study investigates the new licensure legislation in Germany, mandatory for all medical faculties, to see if it allows the development of competency-based curricula.Methods: For the first step we clustered all demands to roles. In step two we transformed the procedure-oriented demands into outcome-oriented competencies, according to the 6 roles found, pursuing strictly the wording of the law.Results: Although the principal goals in the new German licensure law are outcome-oriented, namely three abilities of a certified physician, still the majority of requirements and demands remain procedure-oriented. Clustering resulted in the following six roles: medical expert, health advocate, teamworker, manager, representative of the medical profession and, life-long learner. The relevant competencies for the six roles, we could derive from the standards set by the law.Conclusion: We were able to show that the new German licensure order comprises a useful framework for the development of outcome-oriented, competency-based curricula.

  14. The Prevalence of Exercise Prescription-Related Course Offerings in United States Pharmacy School Curricula: Exercise is Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.; Griffiths, Carrie L.; Gibson, Jacob L.; Luu, Jacqueline A.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training has proven to be beneficial in the prevention of disease. In addition, exercise can improve the pathogenesis and symptoms associated with a variety of chronic disease states and can attenuate drug-induced adverse effects. Exercise is a drug-free polypill. Because the benefits of exercise are clear and profound, Exercise is…

  15. The Prevalence of Exercise Prescription-Related Course Offerings in United States Pharmacy School Curricula: Exercise is Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.; Griffiths, Carrie L.; Gibson, Jacob L.; Luu, Jacqueline A.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training has proven to be beneficial in the prevention of disease. In addition, exercise can improve the pathogenesis and symptoms associated with a variety of chronic disease states and can attenuate drug-induced adverse effects. Exercise is a drug-free polypill. Because the benefits of exercise are clear and profound, Exercise is…

  16. Mutual misunderstanding and avoidance, misrepresentations and disciplinary politics: spatial science and quantitative analysis in (United Kingdom) geographical curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, Ron; Harris, Richard J; Jones, Kelvyn

    2014-01-01

    One consequence of the fragmentation of their discipline and the consequent lack of awareness amongst human geographers of what is being done by many of their colleagues is misrepresentation of certain types of work ? in textbooks, for example. Amongst the areas often misrepresented in recent years...

  17. Creativity and Education: Comparing the National Curricula of the States of the European Union and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic; Ferrari, Anusca

    2015-01-01

    In the past 20 years the importance of creativity as part of young people's education has increasingly been recognised. The stimulus for the growing emphasis on creativity has come from diverse sources including drives for greater national economic prosperity and enlightenment visions of young people's education. One facet of creativity…

  18. Creativity and Education: Comparing the National Curricula of the States of the European Union and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic; Ferrari, Anusca

    2015-01-01

    In the past 20 years the importance of creativity as part of young people's education has increasingly been recognised. The stimulus for the growing emphasis on creativity has come from diverse sources including drives for greater national economic prosperity and enlightenment visions of young people's education. One facet of creativity in…

  19. The Shrinking of Formalized Nutrition Education in Health Professions Curricula and Postgraduate Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Gordon S

    2017-02-01

    The quantity of formalized nutrition education is shrinking in curricula of health professions, such as physicians, nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists. The current nutrition education being taught in U.S. schools of healthcare professionals does not appropriately prepare students for identification of patients at nutrition risk or management of undernourished hospitalized patients with specialized nutrition therapies. In U.S. schools of pharmacy, parenteral nutrition is considered a highly specialized and advanced practice so little time is devoted to this area and more attention is focused on chronic disease state management (ie, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and congestive heart failure). Nutrition support fellowships for physicians and nutrition support residency programs for pharmacists have dwindled in number over the years so that only a handful of these healthcare professionals are produced each year from the remaining formalized programs. Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and dietitians can positively affect patient care, but each profession must first determine how best to integrate basic and applied nutrition concepts into their professional curricula and training programs. There must also be consensus among the healthcare professions as to the depth of nutrition education and the stage of training at which these integrations should occur. Only by having these crucial conversations among all disciplines will we be able to develop new strategies to expand nutrition education in the training of future medical practitioners.

  20. Working together to make Indigenous health care curricula everybody's business: a graduate attribute teaching innovation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdun, Claudia; Gray, Joanne; Sherwood, Juanita; Power, Tamara; Phillips, Angela; Parker, Nicola; Jackson, Debra

    2013-12-01

    Previously there has been commitment to the idea that Indigenous curricula should be taught by Indigenous academic staff, whereas now there is increasing recognition of the need for all academic staff to have confidence in enabling Indigenous cultural competency for nursing and other health professional students. In this way, Indigenous content can be threaded throughout a curriculum and raised in many teaching and learning situations, rather than being siloed into particular subjects and with particular staff. There are many sensitivities around this change, with potential implications for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and staff, and for the quality of teaching and learning experiences. This paper reports on a collaborative process that was used to reconceptualise how Indigenous health care curricula would be positioned throughout a programme and who would or could work with students in this area. Effective leadership, establishing a truly collaborative environment, acknowledging fears and perceived inadequacies, and creating safe spaces for sharing and learning were crucial in effecting this change.

  1. Evidence-based practice in speech-language pathology curricula: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togher, Leanne; Yiannoukas, Corina; Lincoln, Michelle; Power, Emma; Munro, Natalie; Mccabe, Patricia; Ghosh, Pratiti; Worrall, Linda; Ward, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Alison; Harrison, Elisabeth; Douglas, Jacinta

    2011-12-01

    This scoping study investigated how evidence-based practice (EBP) principles are taught in Australian speech-language pathology (SLP) teaching and learning contexts. It explored how Australian SLP university programs: (1) facilitate student learning about the principles of EBP in academic and clinical settings, and (2) self-evaluate their curricula in relation to EBP. The research involved two surveys. Survey 1 respondents were 131 academic staff, program coordinators, and on-campus and off-campus clinical educators. This survey gathered information about EBP teaching and learning in SLP programs as well as future EBP curriculum plans. Survey 2 investigated how clinical educators incorporated EBP into the way they taught clinical decision-making to students. Surveys responses from 85 clinical educators were analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics and thematic grouping of open-ended qualitative responses. Both surveys revealed strengths and gaps in integrating EBP into Australian SLP curricula. Perceived strengths were that respondents were positive about EBP, most had EBP training and access to EBP resources. The perceived gaps included the academic staff's perceptions of students' understanding and application of EBP, respondents' understanding of research methodologies, communication and collaboration between academic staff and clinical educators, and a lack of explicit discussion by clinical educators and students of EBP in relation to clients.

  2. Embedding concepts of sex and gender health differences into medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia M; Rice, Morrisa; Schiebinger, Londa; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Werbinski, Janice; Núñez, Ana; Wood, Susan; Viggiano, Thomas R; Shuster, Lynne T

    2013-03-01

    Sex, a biological variable, and gender, a cultural variable, define the individual and affect all aspects of disease prevention, development, diagnosis, progression, and treatment. Sex and gender are essential elements of individualized medicine. However, medical education rarely considers such topics beyond the physiology of reproduction. To reduce health care disparities and to provide optimal, cost-effective medical care for individuals, concepts of sex and gender health need to become embedded into education and training of health professionals. In September 2012, Mayo Clinic hosted a 2-day workshop bringing together leading experts from 13 U.S. schools of medicine and schools of public health, Health Resources and Services Administration Office of Women's Health (HRSA OWH), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), and the Canadian Institute of Health and Gender. The purpose of this workshop was to articulate the need to integrate sex- and gender-based content into medical education and training, to identify gaps in current medical curricula, to consider strategies to embed concepts of sex and gender health into health professional curricula, and to identify existing resources to facilitate and implement change. This report summarizes these proceedings, recommendations, and action items from the workshop.

  3. The potential advantages and disadvantages of introducing interprofessional education into the healthcare curricula in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumar Méndez, María J; Armayor, Navidad Canga; Díaz Navarlaz, María Teresa; Wakefield, Ann

    2008-04-01

    The complexity of contemporary clinical practice demands that increasingly skilled high quality health and social care is provided to individuals. However, the failure of health and social care professionals to work collaboratively has been widely reported in the international literature. Hence, interprofessional education has been suggested as a means of improving both interprofessional understanding and respect across a diverse range of practice disciplines. In this way, functional barriers can be challenged or broken down; teamwork enhanced and healthcare outcomes improved. Lack of conclusive evidence to substantiate the above healthcare benefits has been attributed to weak methodological approaches when evaluating such educational initiatives. In Spain barriers to implementing interprofessional education are potentially less challenging. Recent legislative demands following the Bologna Agreement on European Higher Education is compelling Spanish higher education institutes to engage in radical educational reforms. Consequently, this paper examines some of the advantages and disadvantages of introducing interprofessional education into health and social care curricula in Spain to see when and how interprofessional initiatives might be assimilated into the health care curricula. In this way lessons learned from a thorough review of the relevant literature might help to inform such educational reforms across mainland Europe and beyond.

  4. Health economics education in undergraduate medical degrees: an assessment of curricula content and student knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Ewan; Lorgelly, Paula K

    2010-01-01

    To define the structure and content of health economics teaching in undergraduate medical degrees in the UK, and identify and quantify differences in student knowledge, with a view to informing the health economics curricula. Semi-structured interviews with senior teaching staff in three Medical Schools, a review of course documentation, and an online survey to assess student knowledge. The survey was scored and mean scores were compared across medical schools, year of study, and teaching components, including the professional background of the teachers. There was considerable diversity across the medical schools in terms of the content of the health economics education, and in the way that the learning was structured and delivered. Student knowledge was found to vary across medical schools; the school with the most intensive health economics curricula was found to perform marginally better. Students who were taught by health economists scored higher than those who were taught by other professions. The teaching and learning environment and level of student knowledge of health economics was found to differ considerably across medical schools. The delivery of health economics teaching by specialised health economists would appear to be one possible strategy to improve student knowledge.

  5. CERA: Clerkships Need National Curricula on Care Delivery, Awareness of Their NCC Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochella, Susan; Liaw, Winston; Binienda, Juliann; Hustedde, Carol

    2016-06-01

    The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's (STFM) National Clerkship Curriculum (NCC) was created to standardize and improve teaching of a minimum core curriculum in family medicine clerkships, promoting the Triple Aim of better care and population health at lower cost. It includes competencies all clerkships should teach and tools to support clerkship directors (CDs). This 2014 CERA survey of clerkship directors is one of several needs assessments that guide STFM's NCC Editorial Board in targeting improvements and peer-review processes. CERA's 2014 survey of CDs was sent to all 137 CDs at US and Canadian allopathic medical schools. Primary aims included: (1) Identify curricular topics of greatest need, (2) Inventory the percent of family medicine clerkships teaching each NCC topic, and (3) Determine if longitudinal or blended clerkship have unique needs. This survey also assessed use of NCC to advocate for teaching resources and collaborate with colleagues at other institutions. Ninety-one percent of CDs completed the survey. Sixty-four percent reported their clerkship covers all of the NCC minimum core, but on detailed analysis, only 1% teach all topics. CDs need curricula on care delivery topics (cost-effective approach to acute care, role of family medicine in the health care system, quality/safety, and comorbid substance abuse). Single-question assessments overestimate the percentage of clerkships teaching all of the NCC minimum core. Clerkships need national curricula on care delivery topics and tools to help them find their curricular gaps.

  6. The design of inclusive curricula for multi-user virtual environments: a framework for developers and educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Wood

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing access to Information Communication Technologies and a growing awareness of the importance of digital media literacy have led many educators to seek innovative solutions to harness the enthusiasm of ‘net gen’ learners while also enhancing their ability to collaborate, communicate and problem solve augmented by digital technologies. One of the emergent trends in response to these demands has been the shift away from traditional models of teaching to more flexible approaches such as the use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs designed to facilitate a more collaborative and participatory approach to student learning. At the same time, international initiatives such as the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, Education for All and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities have highlighted the importance of ensuring that such teaching and learning environments are inclusive of students with diverse needs. Many universities are also responding to a widening participation agenda; a policy focus which aims to increase both the access and success rates of students from low socio-economic backgrounds. Educational technology has long been regarded as a means by which students who may be isolated by disability, geographical location and/or social circumstances can gain access to such learning opportunities. The growth in the use of MUVEs combined with increasing access to mobile communications opens up new opportunities for engaging students from diverse backgrounds through virtual learning environments. Yet despite the potential, there are many challenges in ensuring that the very students who are most able to benefit from such e-learning technologies are not further disadvantaged by a lack of attention to both the technical and pedagogical considerations required in the design of inclusive e-learning environments. This paper reports on the findings of research funded through an Australian

  7. Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheet Amir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%, 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%. The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76% and journal clubs (64%. Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%, although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54% while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%. Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence.

  8. Assessing the Cognitive Demands of a Century of Reading Curricula: An Analysis of Reading Text and Comprehension Tasks from 1910 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert J.; Lu, Xiaofei; Baker, David P.; Ray, Melissa N.; Eckert, Sarah A.; Gamson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the cognitive demands of reading curricula from 1910 to 2000. We considered both the nature of the text used and the comprehension tasks asked of students in determining the cognitive demands of the curricula. Contrary to the common assumption of a trend of simplification of the texts and comprehension tasks in third-…

  9. "Europe" as an Alibi: An Overview of Twenty Years of Policy, Curricula and Textbooks in the Republic of Cyprus--and Their Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Stavroula

    2012-01-01

    This article compares discourses on "Europe" in Greek-Cypriot policy, curricula and textbooks over approximately the last twenty years, from the early 1990s, when Cyprus applied for European Union (EU) membership, until 2011-12, the school year during which the recently revised curricula were gradually introduced to schools for…

  10. The Impact of Migration on National Identity in a Globalized World: A Comparison of Civic Education Curricula in England, France and Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Laura; Faas, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which citizens of migrant origin are included within discourses of national identity in civic education curricula in England, France and Ireland. We explore how much space is given to citizens of migrant origin in discourses of national identity in civic education curricula and how they fit with central values…

  11. Paradigms in Swedish as a Second Language--Curricula for Primary School and Secondary School in Swedish as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes and compares the curricula of Swedish and Swedish as a second language for primary and secondary school. The school subject of Swedish as a second language is young, and its ideological foundation has not been debated to any large extent, in contrast to Swedish. This article analyzes the curricula of both subjects in terms of…

  12. The Examination of Secondary Education Chemistry Curricula Published between 1957-2007 in Terms of the Dimensions of Rationale, Goals, and Subject-Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdag, Bulent; Erol, Hilal

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen secondary education chemistry curricula published from 1957 until 2007 were examined based on the dimensions of rationale, goals, and subject matter. An examination of documents in the scope of qualitative research was carried out in the study. The goals included in the examined chemistry curricula were analyzed according to the cognitive,…

  13. An Analysis of the Content, Policies and Assessment of ICT Curricula in the Final Years of Secondary Schooling in Australia and Vietnam: A Comparative Educational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thang Manh; Stoilescu, Dorian

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores and analyses similarities and differences in ICT curricula, policies, and assessment between the Vietnamese and Australian educational systems for the final years of secondary educational level. It was found that while having a common core set of tendencies, the Australian ICT curricula, policies, and assessments differ…

  14. An evaluation of pharmacology curricula in Australian science and health-related degree programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Hilary; Hinton, Tina; Bullock, Shane; Babey, Anna-Marie; Davis, Elizabeth; Fernandes, Lynette; Hart, Joanne; Musgrave, Ian; Ziogas, James

    2013-11-19

    Pharmacology is a biomedical discipline taught in basic science and professional degree programs. In order to provide information that would facilitate pharmacology curricula to be refined and developed, and approaches to teaching to be updated, a national survey was undertaken in Australia that investigated pharmacology course content, teaching and summative assessment methods. Twenty-two institutions participated in a purpose-built online questionnaire, which enabled an evaluation of 147 courses taught in 10 different degrees. To enable comparison, degrees were grouped into four major degree programs, namely science, pharmacy, medicine and nursing. The pharmacology content was then classified into 16 lecture themes, with 2-21 lecture topics identified per theme. The resultant data were analysed for similarities and differences in pharmacology curricula across the degree programs. While all lecture themes were taught across degree programs, curriculum content differed with respect to the breadth and hours of coverage. Overall, lecture themes were taught most broadly in medicine and with greatest coverage in pharmacy. Reflecting a more traditional approach, lectures were a dominant teaching method (at least 90% of courses). Sixty-three percent of science courses provided practical classes but such sessions occurred much less frequently in other degree programs, while tutorials were much more common in pharmacy degree programs (70%). Notably, problem-based learning was common across medical programs. Considerable diversity was found in the types of summative assessment tasks employed. In science courses the most common form of in-semester assessment was practical reports, whereas in other programs pen-and-paper quizzes predominated. End-of-semester assessment contributed 50-80% to overall assessment across degree programs. The similarity in lecture themes taught across the four different degree programs shows that common knowledge- and competency-based learning

  15. Incorporating Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) into High School Curricula in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, P. A.; Lukaczyk, T.; Brendan, B.; Tomita, M.; Ralston, T.; Purdy, G.

    2016-12-01

    The availability of low-cost unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) permits their integration in educational programs. We report on experiences and future opportunities for incorporating UAS into High School curricula in Hawaii. We first review existing high school UAS programs and teaching material to highlight curricula options and needs. By working on the privately owned Island of Lana'i, we had permission for extensive UAS operation. Our initial focus of UAS educational outreach was on coastal ecosystems where erosion of overgrazed lands affects coral reefs and traditional coastal Hawaiian fishpond restoration projects which include high school students. We provide results of our classroom approach allowing students to learn to fly small, inexpensive UAS and discuss the different results at different grade levels. In addition to providing basic concepts of flight aeronautics, we reviewed information on safe and legal operation of UAS, as well as data management issues including geo-registration and imaging mosaics. We recommend science projects where UAS can study short-term events (e.g. storm runoff) or can be used for routine environmental monitoring over longer periods. Additionally, by linking students with local drone and drone racing clubs student participation and interest in UAS was extended beyond the classroom in a complementary manner. We propose inclusion of UAS into a future high school curriculum via a program called the Moonshot Laboratory which strives to repurpose traditional education structures toward design thinking, making use of individual and group collaborations to address self-selected projects relevant to local community interests. A Moonshot facility allows students to spend a portion of their week in a technology equipped makerspace, with access to university, business and community mentors, both local and remote. UAS projects are expected to address basic student questions, such as: how can I build a drone to take water samples?; how can I

  16. Scientific recognition in numbers: analysis of the profile of a vanguard from Lattes curricula vitae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ângelo Montagner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to analyze the possibilities and limitations of quantitative study on an institution and its professionals, taking into account the Lattes curriculum vitae platform. Through exploring this material, we sought to delineate the profile of professors of the UNICAMP School of Medical Sciences and to characterize their scientific production, main activities and academic profile. The methodology used was quantitative. Based on descriptive statistics, we outlined and analyzed the main characteristics these professors presented in their curricula vitae, which are stored in the database of the Lattes Platform. Next, using qualitative analysis based on the theories of Pierre Bourdieu, we emphasized the difficulties in achieving good descriptions of researchers' social and scientific paths based on the Lattes Platform. Thus, the Lattes system consists of a repository of finished scientific actions, comprising a linear, non-historical succession within official science.

  17. A Tale of Two Curricula: The performance of two thousand students in introductory electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Kohlmyer, Matthew A; Catrambone, Richard; Chabay, Ruth W; Ding, Lin; Haugan, Mark P; Marr, M Jackson; Sherwood, Bruce A; Schatz, Michael F

    2009-01-01

    The performance of over 2000 students in introductory calculus-based electromagnetism (E&M) courses at four large research universities was measured using the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA). Two different curricula were used at these universities: a traditional E&M curriculum and the Matter & Interactions (M&I) curriculum. At each university, post-instruction BEMA test averages were significantly higher for the M&I curriculum than for the traditional curriculum. The differences in post-test averages cannot be explained by differences in variables such as pre-instruction BEMA scores, grade point average, or SAT scores. BEMA performance on categories of items organized by subtopic was also compared at one of the universities; M&I averages were significantly higher in each topic. The results suggest that the M&I curriculum is more effective than the traditional curriculum at teaching E&M concepts to students, possibly because the learning progression in M&I ...

  18. A brief comparison of curricula at dental schools in China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hantang; Yang, Jingyi; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Wu; Wang, Ping

    2012-06-01

    This study compared the dental curricula at dental schools in China and Japan. A survey was conducted in representative dental schools in China and Japan. It was found that, in China and Japan where dental schools recruit students directly from high schools, more attention is paid to introduction of early professional education. Most dental schools in Japan arrange dental subjects for their students from the first through the fourth years, while in China, only a few dental schools take this path although many of them are currently making changes. It was also discovered that, in both countries, an increasing number of dental schools assign a specific dental subject to the same period with its relevant bioscience or biomedical counterparts, which makes it possible for them to enhance each other reciprocally in a positive way for students and consequently help dental students master the related topics.

  19. Integrating informatics in undergraduate nursing curricula: using the QSEN framework as a guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Julie A

    2012-12-01

    Informatics education must prepare today's nurses to manage a deluge of information and use technology effectively. In addition, U.S. health care is being redesigned with technology that improves patient safety and quality of care. The Institute of Medicine's recommendations for health care safety and professional education prompted initiatives by the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and others to make informatics a fundamental part of nursing education. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project outlines specific competency goals for informatics knowledge, skills, and attitudes. However, progress toward integration of informatics in nursing curricula has been slow, and additional strategies need further exploration and discussion in the nursing literature. This article uses the QSEN framework to present strategies for teaching multiple facets of informatics in the classroom, simulation laboratory, and clinical settings in a baccalaureate nursing curriculum.

  20. Identifying and Using ‘Core Competencies’ to Help Design and Assess Undergraduate Neuroscience Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerchner, Michael; Hardwick, Jean C.; Thornton, Janice E.

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing emphasis on the use of core competencies to design and inform curricula. Based on our Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience workshop at Pomona we developed a set of neuroscience core competencies. Following the workshop, faculty members were asked to complete an online survey to determine which core competencies are considered most essential and the results are presented. Backward Design principles are then described and we discuss how core competencies, through a backward design process, can be used to design and assess an undergraduate neuroscience curriculum. Oberlin College is used as a case study to describe the use of core competencies to help develop learning objectives, activities, and assessment measures for an undergraduate neuroscience major. PMID:23494749

  1. Identifying and using 'core competencies' to help design and assess undergraduate neuroscience curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerchner, Michael; Hardwick, Jean C; Thornton, Janice E

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing emphasis on the use of core competencies to design and inform curricula. Based on our Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience workshop at Pomona we developed a set of neuroscience core competencies. Following the workshop, faculty members were asked to complete an online survey to determine which core competencies are considered most essential and the results are presented. Backward Design principles are then described and we discuss how core competencies, through a backward design process, can be used to design and assess an undergraduate neuroscience curriculum. Oberlin College is used as a case study to describe the use of core competencies to help develop learning objectives, activities, and assessment measures for an undergraduate neuroscience major.

  2. A Place for Project Management in English Studies and Communication studies  curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance; Isohella, Suvi

    2009-01-01

    in a transitional setting which can serve as a bridge between the classroom and the workplace. The perceptions of the need for project management are examined with respect to interviews of Finnish technical communication graduates, and an example of a project management course focused on the communication aspects......In this paper, we argue for a place for project management in the English Studies and Communication Studies curricula, often the home of Technical Communication programs, in order to offer students an opportunity to apply their language, discourse analysis, analytical skills, and creativity...... inherent in project management tools and process from a Project Management course taught simultaneously at the Aarhus School of Business and the Helsinki School of Economics is described, including examples from Project Management assignments which correspond to problem-solving skills.  In addition, some...

  3. A Place for Project Management in English Studies and Communication studies  curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance; Isohella, Suvi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we argue for a place for project management in the English Studies and Communication Studies curricula, often the home of Technical Communication programs, in order to offer students an opportunity to apply their language, discourse analysis, analytical skills, and creativity...... in a transitional setting which can serve as a bridge between the classroom and the workplace. The perceptions of the need for project management are examined with respect to interviews of Finnish technical communication graduates, and an example of a project management course focused on the communication aspects...... inherent in project management tools and process from a Project Management course taught simultaneously at the Aarhus School of Business and the Helsinki School of Economics is described, including examples from Project Management assignments which correspond to problem-solving skills.  In addition, some...

  4. Topics in nuclear and radiochemistry for college curricula and high school science programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The concern with the current status and trends of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry education in academic institutions was addressed in a recent workshop. The 1988 workshop considered the important contributions that scientist with nuclear and radiochemistry backgrounds have made and are continuing to make to other sciences and to various applied fields. Among the areas discussed were environmental studies, life sciences, materials science, separation technology, hot atom chemistry, cosmochemistry, and the rapidly growing field of nuclear medicine. It is intent of the organizer and participants of this symposium entitled Topics in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for College Curricula and High School Science Program'' to provide lecture material on topics related to nuclear and radiochemistry to educators. It is our hope that teachers, who may or may not be familiar with the field, will find this collections of articles useful and incorporate some of them into their lectures.

  5. Position of information science in the medical and health studies curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralova, E; Kukurova, E; Bergendi, L; Traubner, P

    2006-01-01

    Innovation of both the content and forms of informatics teaching directed on exploitation of technical facilities and methods of information and communication technologies (ICT) in non-informatics universities study programmes and in life-long education is still actual today. Expanding knowledge base of the life and health sciences requires to form new skills to educate the end-users and facilitate an immediate information access. Theoretical and practical teaching in pregradual medical and health studies includes the basic contacts of students with the modern technique and special medical devices supported or completed by computers. The teaching of information science and corresponding subjects represents small but important part of medical and health studies curricula at all medical faculties in Slovakia (Fig. 2, Ref. 8).

  6. [Reflexions about the curricula at the faculty of medicine in the XXI century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca Treviño, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we review the main medical programs from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) faculty of medicine in the first seventy-five years of twentieth century. We have selected those instances that are representative of special moments in the development of Mexican medical knowledge, and also corresponding to the need to prepare medical students in view of social demands. The first programs are those of Ignacio Chavez in 1934, concerned mainly with the introduction into the curricula of medical specialties such as cardiology or neurology. After those, the 1956 and 1960 programs are mentioned and briefly analyzed; both were founded on the concern to develop a clinical reasoning in the student. Finally, the 1974 Integral General Medicine Program directed its interest to social and environmental themes.

  7. An Analysis of the Curricula of Business Administration Departments in Turkish Universities with the Perspective of Civil Society Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Aytul Ayse; Sarikaya, Muammer

    2009-01-01

    The authors' goal was to analyze the curricula of business administration departments in state and private universities in Turkey, which have been offering courses such as business and society, social responsibility, business ethics, and management of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Of the 74 universities with business administration…

  8. Agricultural Education (Postsecondary): Teaching Materials, Methods and Curricula. January 1990-March 1994. Quick Bibliography Series: QB 94-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Patricia A.

    This bibliography is intended primarily for current awareness on the topic of postsecondary agricultural education teaching materials, methods, and curricula, and as the title of the series implies, is not an indepth exhaustive bibliography on the subject. It is derived from a computerized search of the AGRICOLA database. The search strategy used…

  9. Emphasizing Research (Further) in Undergraduate Technical Communication Curricula: Involving Undergraduate Students with an Academic Journal's Publication and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julie Dyke; Newmark, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    This article presents follow-up information to a previous publication regarding ways to increase emphasis on research skills in undergraduate Technical Communication curricula. We detail the ways our undergraduate program highlights research by requiring majors to complete senior thesis projects that culminate in submission to an online…

  10. The Information Systems Core: A Study from the Perspective of IS Core Curricula in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Drew; Ma, Zhongming; Wang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    To keep up with technology changes and industry trends, it is essential for Information Systems (IS) programs to maintain up to date curricula. In doing so, IS educators need to determine what the IS core is and implement it in their curriculum. This study performed a descriptive analysis of 2,229 core courses offered by 394 undergraduate IS…

  11. Effects of Professional Development on Infusing Engineering Design into High School Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Zanj Kano

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of professional development (PD) on the infusion of engineering design into high school curricula. Four inservice teachers with backgrounds in physics, chemistry, industrial education, math, and electrical engineering participated in the 2006 National Center of Engineering and Technology…

  12. The updated ESTRO core curricula 2011 for clinicians, medical physicists and RTTs in radiotherapy/radiation oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.F. Eriksen (Erik); R.C. Beavis; A.J. Coffey (Alison); J-W.H. Leer (Jan-Willem); S.M. Magrini (Stefano); K. Benstead (Kim); T. Boelling (Tobias); M. Hjälm-Eriksson (Marie); R. Kantor (Rami); B. MacIejewski (Boguslaw); M. Mezeckis (Maris); A. Oliveira (Angelo); P. Thirion (Pierre); P. Vitek (Pavel); D.R. Olsen (Dag Rune); T. Eudaldo (Teresa); W. Enghardt (Wolfgang); P. Francois (Patrice); C. Garibaldi (Cristina); B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben); M. Josipovic (Mirjana); T. Major (Tibor); S. Nikoletopoulos (Stylianos); A. Rijnders (Alex); M. Waligorski (Michael); M. Wasilewska-Radwanska (Marta); L. Mullaney (Laura); A. Boejen (Annette); A. Vaandering (Aude); W. Vandevelde (Wouter); C. Verfaillie (Christine); R. Pötter (Richard)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In 2007 ESTRO proposed a revision and harmonisation of the core curricula for radiation oncologists, medical physicists and RTTs to encourage harmonised education programmes for the professional disciplines, to facilitate mobility between EU member states, to reflect the

  13. Undergraduate Leadership Students' Self-Perceived Level of Moral Imagination: An Innovative Foundation for Morality-Based Leadership Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Summer F.; Andenoro, Anthony C.; Sandlin, M'Randa R.; Jones, Jaron L.

    2015-01-01

    Leadership educators are faced with the challenge of preparing students to serve organizations and people in dynamic and ever changing contexts. The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate leadership students' self-perceived level of moral imagination to make recommendations for moral imagination curricula. Moral imagination is the…

  14. EFNS Task Force on Teaching of Neuroimaging in Neurology Curricula in Europe : present status and recommendations for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantano, P; Chollet, F; Paulson, O; von Kummer, R; Laihinen, A; Leenders, K; Yancheva, S

    2001-01-01

    A Task Force on 'Teaching of Neuroimaging in Neurology Curricula in Europe' was appointed in September 1998 by the education committee of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) in order to: (1) examine the present status of teaching of neuroimaging in the training of neurology in E

  15. The Health Professional as Writer: Two Models for Integrating Writing into the Curricula of Baccalaureate Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneline, Douglas

    Current changes in health care professions requiring practitioners to have more and better communications skills are necessitating the integration of writing into the health curricula of higher education programs. At Ferris State University, a number of models (in Optometry, Dental Hygiene, Health Systems Management, Nursing, Pharmacy, Medical…

  16. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  17. A Multisite Study of High School Mathematics Curricula and the Impact of Taking a Developmental Mathematics Course in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, Michael; Dupuis, Danielle; Post, Thomas R.; Medhanie, Amanuel; LeBeau, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between high school mathematics curricula and the likelihood of students who enroll in a developmental (non-credit bearing) course in college taking additional mathematics courses was studied. The results showed that high school mathematics curriculum, years of high school mathematics completed, and ACT mathematics scores were…

  18. Mind the Gap: Accounting Information Systems Curricula Development in Compliance with IFAC Standards in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleqab, Mahmoud Mohmad Ahmad; Nurunnabi, Mohammad; Adel, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    The authors examine the consistency between the current practices in designing and teaching accounting information systems (AIS) curricula and the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) requirements for International Education Practice Statement 2 and International Education Standards 2. Utilizing a survey and interviews data in Jordan,…

  19. Using Michael Young's Analysis on Curriculum Studies to Examine the Effects of Neoliberalism on Curricula in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavale, Nelson Casimiro

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to examine the effects of neoliberalism on curricula in Mozambique. Despite the fact that the introduction of neoliberal policies in Mozambique has affected the whole system of education, the focus in this article is only on curriculum reforms in secondary and technical/vocational education. The description and…

  20. The Training of Physical-Education Teachers in France and China: A Comparative Analysis of Curricula and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamampianina, Pierre; Moussa, Azzedine SI

    2005-01-01

    This study in comparative physical education examines the curricula followed by physical-education teachers in China and France. It explores how theories of physical education and sport in each country have developed out of specific political, cultural and educational contexts, yet resulted in strong similarities in terms of the priority given to…

  1. Teaching and Learning for the Twenty-First Century: Educational Goals, Policies, and Curricula from Six Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Fernando M., Ed.; Chung, Connie K., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This book describes how different nations have defined the core competencies and skills that young people will need in order to thrive in the twenty-first-century, and how those nations have fashioned educational policies and curricula meant to promote those skills. The book examines six countries--Chile, China, India, Mexico, Singapore, and the…

  2. Re-Inventing 'Europe': The Case of the European Dimension in Greek-Cypriot Geography and History Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Stavroula

    2007-01-01

    'Europe' has been increasingly 'invented' and 'reinvented' in discussions about education, curricula and identities over the last five decades. The 'European dimension in education' was a term increasingly used by the European Union and the Council of Europe to denote their educational policies encouraging national educational systems to endorse a…

  3. Workshop Physics and Related Curricula: "A 25-Year History of Collaborative Learning Enhanced by Computer Tools for Observation and Analysis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.; Willis, Maxine C.; Sokoloff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the 25-year history of development of the activity-based Workshop Physics (WP) at Dickinson College, its adaptation for use at Gettysburg Area High School, and its synergistic influence on curricular materials developed at the University of Oregon and Tufts University and vice versa. WP and these related curricula: 1) are…

  4. An Analysis of the Curricula of Business Administration Departments in Turkish Universities with the Perspective of Civil Society Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Aytul Ayse; Sarikaya, Muammer

    2009-01-01

    The authors' goal was to analyze the curricula of business administration departments in state and private universities in Turkey, which have been offering courses such as business and society, social responsibility, business ethics, and management of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Of the 74 universities with business administration…

  5. Mind the Gap: Accounting Information Systems Curricula Development in Compliance with IFAC Standards in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleqab, Mahmoud Mohmad Ahmad; Nurunnabi, Mohammad; Adel, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    The authors examine the consistency between the current practices in designing and teaching accounting information systems (AIS) curricula and the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) requirements for International Education Practice Statement 2 and International Education Standards 2. Utilizing a survey and interviews data in Jordan,…

  6. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  7. Where Research, Practice and the Authority Meet: A Collaborative Inquiry for Development of Technology-Enhanced Chinese Language Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lung Hsiang; Gao, Ping; Chai, Ching Sing; Chin, Chee Kuen

    2011-01-01

    This collaborative inquiry project brought together 14 Chinese Language teachers, 4 researchers and 2 Ministry of Education (MOE) curriculum specialists to co-design the Chinese Language curricula with the integrated use of information and communication technology (ICT). Three qualitative data sources--one-to-one interviews, focus group…

  8. A Multisite Study of High School Mathematics Curricula and the Impact of Taking a Developmental Mathematics Course in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, Michael; Dupuis, Danielle; Post, Thomas R.; Medhanie, Amanuel; LeBeau, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between high school mathematics curricula and the likelihood of students who enroll in a developmental (non-credit bearing) course in college taking additional mathematics courses was studied. The results showed that high school mathematics curriculum, years of high school mathematics completed, and ACT mathematics scores were…

  9. The Rationale and Challenge for the Integration of Science Studies in the Revision of General Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Christy; Dusek, Val

    2006-01-01

    A broadened view of scientific literacy for general education revision is detailed, including the history, philosophy, and sociology of science and science and technology studies. We provide a case study from an interdisciplinary college, argue for the integration of science studies into general education curricula, and discuss barriers to success.

  10. Using Michael Young's Analysis on Curriculum Studies to Examine the Effects of Neoliberalism on Curricula in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavale, Nelson Casimiro

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to examine the effects of neoliberalism on curricula in Mozambique. Despite the fact that the introduction of neoliberal policies in Mozambique has affected the whole system of education, the focus in this article is only on curriculum reforms in secondary and technical/vocational education. The description and…

  11. Development of a Conceptual Structure for Aquatic Education and Its Application to Existing Aquatic Curricula and Needed Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.

    1984-01-01

    Northern Minnesota secondary teachers (N=55) were surveyed on their knowledge of a priority for selected water topics. Teachers' assessment of these topic areas provide: (1) a suggested structure for marine education; (2) the evaluation of existing curricula; and (3) needs analysis to determine areas of future curriculum development. (BC)

  12. Effectively Adapting the Sport Management Curricula: Harnessing Internal and External Resources to Address Industry-Specific Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein-Minkove, Jessica R.; DeLuca, Jaime R.

    2015-01-01

    Academic programs must constantly evolve in order to ensure that students are best prepared for success in internships and subsequent post-collegiate endeavors within the dynamic, rapidly changing sport industry. Based upon qualitative research, this work assesses and recommends areas of development in sport management curricula using internal and…

  13. Assessment of Training Programs for Elementary Mathematics Teachers on Developed Curricula and Attitudes towards Teaching in Najran-Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Hassan Shawky; Abdulhakeem, Hassan Daker

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the training programs for Mathematics teachers at elementary stage on developed Curricula and attitudes toward teaching at Najran educational administration in Saudi Arabia. To achieve this objective, two instruments were developed, one of them measures the opinions of Mathematics teachers about the training programs…

  14. Textbook Questions in Context-Based and Traditional Chemistry Curricula Analysed from a Content Perspective and a Learning Activities Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    In this study, questions in context-based and traditional chemistry textbooks were analysed from two perspectives that are at the heart of chemistry curricula reforms: a content perspective and a learning activities perspective. To analyse these textbook questions, we developed an instrument for each perspective. In total, 971 textbook questions…

  15. Prospective Physics Teachers' Views on Their Knowledge about the New Concepts in Turkish High School Physics Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yildirim, Ufuk

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to a) investigate prospective physics teachers' views on their knowledge about new physics concepts introduced in Turkish High School Physics Curricula; b) investigate the sources of their acquired knowledge about these new physics concepts; and c) explore if there were differences in views on knowledge about these…

  16. Workshop Physics and Related Curricula: "A 25-Year History of Collaborative Learning Enhanced by Computer Tools for Observation and Analysis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.; Willis, Maxine C.; Sokoloff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the 25-year history of development of the activity-based Workshop Physics (WP) at Dickinson College, its adaptation for use at Gettysburg Area High School, and its synergistic influence on curricular materials developed at the University of Oregon and Tufts University and vice versa. WP and these related curricula: 1) are…

  17. The updated ESTRO core curricula 2011 for clinicians, medical physicists and RTTs in radiotherapy/radiation oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper G; Beavis, Andrew W; Coffey, Mary A;

    2012-01-01

    In 2007 ESTRO proposed a revision and harmonisation of the core curricula for radiation oncologists, medical physicists and RTTs to encourage harmonised education programmes for the professional disciplines, to facilitate mobility between EU member states, to reflect the rapid development...... of the professions and to secure the best evidence-based education across Europe....

  18. INTEGRATING ARTS IN EFL CURRICULA: A FOCUS ON LANGUAGE LISTENING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin TİMUÇİN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arts are commonly used in primary and secondary classrooms for learning purposes, but arts integration in higher education curricula could benefit university-level students academically and emotionally as well. Integrating arts into an English as a Foreign Language (EFL curriculum could benefit students who experience foreign language anxiety, which hinders them from being socially and linguistically successful in the classroom according to multiple studies outlined in the literature section. The focus for students in this study was on listening skills because it is a major element in foreign language development that is explored to a lesser degree than reading, writing and speaking skills. The eight introductory-level classes were split between control and experimental classes. During the first part of the arts implementation, the experimental classes began with drama theatre for 30 minutes. This consisted of students taking a theme in English, such as home and directions, then creating a creative performance for their peers involving relevant vocabulary and phrases. The second part consisted of a 15 minute music cloze section, where students were filling in lyrics for a song that they were actively listening to. Two academic assessments were given as department-wide mid-term and final academic assessments, two subjective surveys and the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS were given at the beginning and end of the school semester. The FLCAS determined that students’ anxieties lowered on 15 questions and increased on 18 questions, so the arts integration has not notably altered foreign language anxiety. The arts-integrated classes received average scores of 80.5%, while the control classes received 74%. Students have performed higher academically with an arts integrated curriculum. It is therefore recommended that arts in the form of music cloze and drama theatre should be included in EFL curricula to increase academic achievement

  19. Incorporating Sustainability and Green Design Concepts into Engineering and Technology Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radian G. Belu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human society is facing an uncertain future due to the present day unsustainable use of natural resources and the growing imbalance with our natural environment. Sustainability is an endeavour with uncertain outcomes requiring collaboration, teamwork, and abilities to work with respect and learn from other disciplines and professions, as well as with governments, local communities, political and civic organizations. The creation of a sustainable society is a complex and multi-stage endeavour that will dominate twenty first century.  Sustainability has four basic aspects: environment, technology, economy, and societal organization. Schools with undergraduate engineering or engineering technology programs are working to include sustainability and green design concepts into their curricula. Teaching sustainability and green design has increasingly become an essential feature of the present day engineering education. It applies to all of engineering, as all engineered systems interact with the environment in complex and important ways. Our project main goals are to provide the students with multiple and comprehensive exposures, to what it mean to have a sustainable mindset and to facilitate the development of the passion and the skills to integrate sustainable practices into engineering tools and methods. In this study we are describing our approaches to incorporating sustainability and green design into our undergraduate curricula and to list a variety of existing resources that can easily be adopted or adapted by our faculty for this purpose. Our approaches are: (1 redesigning existing courses through development of new curricular materials that still meet the objectives of the original course and (2 developing upper division elective courses that address specific topics related to sustainability, green design, green manufacturing and life-cycle assessment. 

  20. Infusing bioethics into biology and microbiology courses and curricula: a vertical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Kathleen S; Furlong, Jack

    2014-12-01

    With the rise of biomedicine and biotechnology, there has been a corresponding growth in the need for better understanding of consequent ethical questions. Increasingly, biologists are being asked not only to offer technical clarifications but also to venture ethical opinions, for which most feel poorly equipped. This expectation puts pressure on biology instructors at the university level to provide biology majors the skills and experience to discuss with some confidence and competence bioethical issues which may arise in either the workplace or through public discourse in everyday contexts. Many fine curricular resources about bioethics are available for varied pedagogical purposes, but few target undergraduate biology or microbiology student audiences. When it occurs in the context of a course, bioethics instruction often is taught by non-biologists outside standard biology curricula. We propose that biologists should strive to "infuse" bioethical thinking into their courses and major curricula but not in such a way as merely to point at ethical problems, treating them at a surface level. We suggest what we call "vertical infusion": taking one bioethical issue per course and integrating this issue within the context of a relevant biological topic, challenging students to push their thinking beyond their initial intuitions toward underlying scientific and ethical principles. While the vertical approach lacks widespread coverage of ethical issues throughout a single course, it has the advantage of taking the bioethical dimension seriously and in intimate relation to contemporary discoveries in biology and to the biological principles, processes, or procedures that occasioned the ethical quandaries in the first place.

  1. Health Systems Science Curricula in Undergraduate Medical Education: Identifying and Defining a Potential Curricular Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Dekhtyar, Michael; Starr, Stephanie R; Borkan, Jeffrey; Brunett, Patrick; Fancher, Tonya; Green, Jennifer; Grethlein, Sara Jo; Lai, Cindy; Lawson, Luan; Monrad, Seetha; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Schwartz, Mark D; Skochelak, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The authors performed a review of 30 Accelerating Change in Medical Education full grant submissions and an analysis of the health systems science (HSS)-related curricula at the 11 grant recipient schools to develop a potential comprehensive HSS curricular framework with domains and subcategories. In phase 1, to identify domains, grant submissions were analyzed and coded using constant comparative analysis. In phase 2, a detailed review of all existing and planned syllabi and curriculum documents at the grantee schools was performed, and content in the core curricular domains was coded into subcategories. The lead investigators reviewed and discussed drafts of the categorization scheme, collapsed and combined domains and subcategories, and resolved disagreements via group discussion. Analysis yielded three types of domains: core, cross-cutting, and linking. Core domains included health care structures and processes; health care policy, economics, and management; clinical informatics and health information technology; population and public health; value-based care; and health system improvement. Cross-cutting domains included leadership and change agency; teamwork and interprofessional education; evidence-based medicine and practice; professionalism and ethics; and scholarship. One linking domain was identified: systems thinking. This broad framework aims to build on the traditional definition of systems-based practice and highlight the need for medical and other health professions schools to better align education programs with the anticipated needs of the systems in which students will practice. HSS will require a critical investigation into existing curricula to determine the most efficient methods for integration with the basic and clinical sciences.

  2. Infusing Bioethics into Biology and Microbiology Courses and Curricula: A Vertical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Kathleen S.; Furlong, Jack

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of biomedicine and biotechnology, there has been a corresponding growth in the need for better understanding of consequent ethical questions. Increasingly, biologists are being asked not only to offer technical clarifications but also to venture ethical opinions, for which most feel poorly equipped. This expectation puts pressure on biology instructors at the university level to provide biology majors the skills and experience to discuss with some confidence and competence bioethical issues which may arise in either the workplace or through public discourse in everyday contexts. Many fine curricular resources about bioethics are available for varied pedagogical purposes, but few target undergraduate biology or microbiology student audiences. When it occurs in the context of a course, bioethics instruction often is taught by non-biologists outside standard biology curricula. We propose that biologists should strive to “infuse” bioethical thinking into their courses and major curricula but not in such a way as merely to point at ethical problems, treating them at a surface level. We suggest what we call “vertical infusion”: taking one bioethical issue per course and integrating this issue within the context of a relevant biological topic, challenging students to push their thinking beyond their initial intuitions toward underlying scientific and ethical principles. While the vertical approach lacks widespread coverage of ethical issues throughout a single course, it has the advantage of taking the bioethical dimension seriously and in intimate relation to contemporary discoveries in biology and to the biological principles, processes, or procedures that occasioned the ethical quandaries in the first place. PMID:25574281

  3. Infusing Bioethics into Biology and Microbiology Courses and Curricula: A Vertical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen S. Jagger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the rise of biomedicine and biotechnology, there has been a corresponding growth in the need for better understanding of consequent ethical questions. Increasingly, biologists are being asked not only to offer technical clarifications but also to venture ethical opinions, for which most feel poorly equipped. This expectation puts pressure on biology instructors at the university level to provide biology majors the skills and experience to discuss with some confidence and competence bioethical issues which may arise in either the workplace or through public discourse in everyday contexts. Many fine curricular resources about bioethics are available for varied pedagogical purposes, but few target undergraduate biology or microbiology student audiences. When it occurs in the context of a course, bioethics instruction often is taught by non-biologists outside standard biology curricula. We propose that biologists should strive to “infuse” bioethical thinking into their courses and major curricula but not in such a way as merely to point at ethical problems, treating them at a surface level. We suggest what we call “vertical infusion”: taking one bioethical issue per course and integrating this issue within the context of a relevant biological topic, challenging students to push their thinking beyond their initial intuitions toward underlying scientific and ethical principles. While the vertical approach lacks widespread coverage of ethical issues throughout a single course, it has the advantage of taking the bioethical dimension seriously and in intimate relation to contemporary discoveries in biology and to the biological principles, processes, or procedures that occasioned the ethical quandaries in the first place.

  4. Challenges to Learning Evidence-Based Medicine and Educational Approaches to Meet These Challenges: A Qualitative Study of Selected EBM Curricula in U.S. and Canadian Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Lauren A; ten Cate, Olle; Chen, H Carrie; Irby, David M; O'Brien, Bridget C

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a fixture in many medical school curricula. Yet, little is known about the challenges medical students face in learning EBM or the educational approaches that medical schools use to overcome these challenges. A qualitative multi-institutional case study was conducted between December 2013 and July 2014. On the basis of the Association of American Medical Colleges 2012 Medical School Graduation Questionnaire data, the authors selected 22 U.S. and Canadian Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited medical schools with graduates reporting confidence in their EBM skills. Participants were interviewed and asked to submit EBM curricular materials. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive approach. Thirty-one EBM instructors (17 clinicians, 11 librarians, 2 educationalists, and 1 epidemiologist) were interviewed from 17 medical schools (13 in the United States, 4 in Canada). Four common EBM learning challenges were identified: suboptimal role models, students' lack of willingness to admit uncertainty, a lack of clinical context, and students' difficulty mastering EBM skills. Five educational approaches to these challenges that were common across the participating institutions were identified: integrating EBM with other courses and content, incorporating clinical content into EBM training, EBM faculty development, EBM whole-task exercises, and longitudinal integration of EBM. The identification of these four learner-centered EBM challenges expands on the literature on challenges in teaching and practicing EBM, and the identification of these five educational approaches provides medical educators with potential strategies to inform the design of EBM curricula.

  5. Do different medical curricula influence self-assessed clinical thinking of students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlhar, Kirsten; Klimke-Jung, Kathrin; Stosch, Christoph; Fischer, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Zielsetzung: Das klinische Denken ist eine zentrale Grundlage des ärztlichen Handelns und sollte durch das Studium in den humanmedizinischen Studiengängen gefördert werden. Welche Lehr- und Lernformen hierzu vor allem beitragen, ist bis heute allerdings noch nicht abschließend gezeigt. Zur Messung der wissensunabhängigen Komponente des klinischen Denkens wurde das Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) entwickelt. Die vorliegende Pilotstudie untersucht, ob dieses Instrument dazu geeignet ist, Unterschiede im klinischen Denken von Studierenden in unterschiedlichen Ausbildungsabschnitten dreier medizinischer Curricula aufzuzeigen. Methodik: Das Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) umfasst 41 Items in zwei Subskalen („Flexibilität des Denkens“ und „Strukturierung des Wissens“). Jedes Item enthält eine Aussage oder Feststellung über das klinische Denken in Form eines Stammes und darunter jeweils eine 6-Punkt-Skala an deren beiden Enden gegensätzliche Aussagen stehen. Zwischen diesen beiden Extremen sollen die Probanden ihr eigenes klinisches Denken einordnen. Die deutsche Übersetzung des DTI wurde von 247 freiwilligen Studierenden aus drei Fakultäten und verschiedenen klinischen Semestern ausgefüllt. In einem quasi experimentellen Design waren 219 Teilnehmer aus Regel- und Modellstudiengängen in Nordrheinwestfalen beteiligt, genauer aus dem 5., 6. und 8. Semester des Modellstudiengangs der Universität Witten/Herdecke (UW/H), aus dem Modell- (7. und 9. Semester) und Regelstudiengang (7. Semester) der Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) und aus dem Modellstudiengang (9. Semester) der Universität zu Köln (UzK). Die gewonnenen Daten wurden quantitativ ausgewertet.Ergebnisse: Die Reliabilität des Gesamt-Fragebogens war gut (Cronbachs alpha zwischen 0,71 und 0,83); die Reliabilität der Subskalen lag zwischen 0,49 und 0,75. Die unterschiedlichen Gruppen wurden mittels Mann-Whitney Test miteinander verglichen. Dabei wurden signifikante Unterschiede sowohl

  6. Using an adaptive expertise lens to understand the quality of teachers' classroom implementation of computer-supported complex systems curricula in high school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Susan A.; Koehler-Yom, Jessica; Anderson, Emma; Lin, Joyce; Klopfer, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Background: This exploratory study is part of a larger-scale research project aimed at building theoretical and practical knowledge of complex systems in students and teachers with the goal of improving high school biology learning through professional development and a classroom intervention. Purpose: We propose a model of adaptive expertise to better understand teachers' classroom practices as they attempt to navigate myriad variables in the implementation of biology units that include working with computer simulations, and learning about and teaching through complex systems ideas. Sample: Research participants were three high school biology teachers, two females and one male, ranging in teaching experience from six to 16 years. Their teaching contexts also ranged in student achievement from 14-47% advanced science proficiency. Design and methods: We used a holistic multiple case study methodology and collected data during the 2011-2012 school year. Data sources include classroom observations, teacher and student surveys, and interviews. Data analyses and trustworthiness measures were conducted through qualitative mining of data sources and triangulation of findings. Results: We illustrate the characteristics of adaptive expertise of more or less successful teaching and learning when implementing complex systems curricula. We also demonstrate differences between case study teachers in terms of particular variables associated with adaptive expertise. Conclusions: This research contributes to scholarship on practices and professional development needed to better support teachers to teach through a complex systems pedagogical and curricular approach.

  7. Landscaping Locally: Fostering Stewardship with Real Science in High School Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajit Zachariah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Igniting Streams of Learning in Science (ISLS academy engages 11th and 12th grade students and their teachers in a year-long learning community (LC experience. ISLS transforms attitudes about science in school curricula, local communities, college classrooms, and government agencies. The goals of ISLS are ambitious: 1 to increase student interest in teaching high school science, 2 to increase the number of students pursing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM majors in college, and 3 to connect students to their local environments using methods of scientific investigation. The ISLS Academy uses a four-part model that can be replicated. The model is centered on a twelve day summer institute: 1 pre-institute formation of seven member learning communities, 2 immersion of LC members in the summer institute where they are introduced to bio-monitoring protocols while being mentored by college professors, graduate students, and professional scientists from government agencies and private industry, 3 post-institute adaptation of protocols in the development of learning objects (LOs (elements of a curriculum to address local environmental issues, and 4 follow-up activities with LC members using their LOs in teaching peers and others. This paper is a mid-project report on a three-year program. It concerns fourteen school districts from urban, suburban and rural areas where students and teachers demonstrate the applicability of real science curricula across districts. By using "real science", i.e. the bio-monitoring protocols of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, students recognize that they themselves can use science to assess and improve the health of their local environments. The success and applicability of the ISLS program to other regions is dependent upon fostering ownership in the use of scientific protocols and methods of learning that invite all students to become citizen scientists. Results thus far indicate a high level

  8. Current status of Kampo medicine curricula in all Japanese medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai Makoto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been a few but not precise surveys of the current status of traditional Japanese Kampo education at medical schools in Japan. Our aim was to identify problems and suggest solutions for a standardized Kampo educational model for all medical schools throughout Japan. Methods We surveyed all 80 medical schools in Japan regarding eight items related to teaching or studying Kampo medicine: (1 the number of class meetings, target school year(s, and type of classes; (2 presence or absence of full-time instructors; (3 curricula contents; (4 textbooks in use; (5 desire for standardized textbooks; (6 faculty development programmes; (7 course contents; and (8 problems to be solved to promote Kampo education. We conducted descriptive analyses without statistics. Results Eighty questionnaires were collected (100%. (1 There were 0 to 25 Kampo class meetings during the 6 years of medical school. At least one Kampo class was conducted at 98% of the schools, ≥4 at 84%, ≥8 at 44%, and ≥16 at 5%. Distribution of classes was 19% and 57% for third- and fourth-year students, respectively. (2 Only 29% of schools employed full-time Kampo medicine instructors. (3 Medicine was taught on the basis of traditional Japanese Kampo medicine by 81% of the schools, Chinese medicine by 19%, and Western medicine by 20%. (4 Textbooks were used by 24%. (5 Seventy-four percent considered using standardized textbooks. (6 Thirty-three percent provided faculty development programmes. (7 Regarding course contents, “characteristics” was selected by 94%, “basic concepts” by 84%, and evidence-based medicine by 64%. (8 Among the problems to be solved promptly, curriculum standardization was selected by 63%, preparation of simple textbooks by 51%, and fostering instructors responsible for Kampo education by 65%. Conclusions Japanese medical schools only offer students a short time to study Kampo medicine, and the impetus to include Kampo medicine

  9. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  10. Near peer teaching in medical curricula: integrating student teachers in pathology tutorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Tayler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to increased cognitive and social congruence with their tutees, near peer teachers (NPTs may be capable of more effectively delivering course material. This study examines NPTs as pathology tutors alongside more traditional teachers (e.g., consultants and registrars to explore their acceptability, effectiveness, and years of ‘distance’ between tutors and tutees. Method: In total, 240 first- and second-year undergraduate medical students were taught set material in a pathology tutorial setting by NPTs (fourth-year medical students, registrars, or consultants. Learners were then asked to provide feedback using a 15-item, Likert-type scale. Results: On 11 of the 15 items, there were no significant differences in students’ median ratings. However, NPTs were perceived to be significantly more approachable than consultants, more aware of learning outcomes, more receptive to student input, and more invested in exam success. Compared with second-year students, first-year students showed a preference towards registrar tutors in terms of perceived gain of knowledge and use of time. In contrast, second-year students showed a preference towards NPTs, who provided more perceived knowledge gain and investment in exam success. No significant differences were found regarding consultant tutors. Discussion: Perhaps due to increased congruence with tutees, NPTs show promise as tutors within medical curricula. This provides advantages not only to tutees, but also to tutors – who may gain vital teaching experience and offer an effective supplement to ‘traditional’ faculty educators.

  11. Solar Filters, Galileoscopes and Students: Analysis of Two Curricula and Attitudes Toward Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstrom, Erika

    2012-01-01

    One of the lasting legacies of the International Year of Astronomy in 2009 is the Galileoscope. People around the world have one, but there is a major astronomical object they aren't supposed to look at - the Sun! But in order to facilitate observations during the actual school day, one best incorporate the Sun. We report on a project to build and use solar filters for the Galileoscope, incorporate them into the standard daytime classroom, and measure attitudes toward science. We describe the solar filters and construction thereof (best done beforehand), use of Galileoscopes by students, and the joining of the two worlds. We have developed two curricula - one more-mathematics intensive and one less-mathematics intensive (suitable for advanced students and for middle-school students respectively) which we will describe. We will also describe some trials and tribulations that may be encountered (such as actually finding the Sun, personnel management, lack of sunspots, clouds, amount of time devoted to the observations, varying equipment abilities, etc.). Measurements of attitudes toward science show an increase in favorableness toward science and an increase of feeling like a scientist through this curriculum. We acknowledge a SEED grant from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and that this work is supported in part by the Vanderbilt University Learning Sciences Institute (LSI).

  12. Comparative Analysis on the Primary English Curricula of Japan and Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Tuswadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary English education in Indonesia and Japan is developing rapidly nowadays. Children in both countries have started to learn  English since they are at least in grade four or five. Although English is not a compulsory subject in primary schools, the interest of schools in the two countries toward English education for children is getting higher. This paper tried to reveal the similarities and differences of primary English curiculum  contents in Indonesia and in Japan in order to understand better about the development of English education in primary schools in the two countries. Abstrak Pendidikan bahasa Inggris dasar di Indonesia dan Jepang berkembang pesat saat ini. Anak-anak di kedua negara tersebut sudah mulai belajar bahasa Inggris setidaknya sejak mereka kelas empat atau kelas lima. Meskipun bahasa Inggris bukan mata pelajaran wajib di sekolah dasar, minat sekolah-sekolah di kedua negara terhadap pendidikan bahasa Inggris untuk anak-anak semakin tinggi. Tulisan ini mencoba untuk mengungkapkan persamaan dan perbedaan isi kurikulum bahasa Inggris dasar di Indonesia dan di Jepang untuk memahami lebih baik tentang perkembangan pendidikan bahasa Inggris di tingkat sekolah dasar di kedua negara. How to Cite : Tuswadi. (2016. Comparative Analysis of the Primary English Curricula of Japan and Indonesia. TARBIYA: Journal Of Education In Muslim Society, 3(1, 96-106. doi:10.15408/tjems.v3i1.3224. Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15408/tjems.v3i1.3224

  13. Conceptual Demand of Practical Work in Science Curricula. A Methodological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sílvia; Morais, Ana M.

    2014-02-01

    This article addresses the issue of the level of complexity of practical work in science curricula and is focused on the discipline of Biology and Geology at high school. The level of complexity is seen in terms of the emphasis on and types of practical work and, most importantly, in terms of its level of conceptual demand as given by the complexity of scientific knowledge, the degree of inter-relation between knowledges, and the complexity of cognitive skills. The study also analyzes recontextualizing processes that may occur within the official recontextualizing field. The study is psychologically and sociologically grounded, particularly on Bernstein's theory of pedagogic discourse. It uses a mixed methodology. The results show that practical work is poorly represented in the curriculum, particularly in the case of laboratory work. The level of conceptual demand of practical work varies according to the text under analysis, between the two subjects Biology and Geology, and, within each of them, between general and specific guidelines. Aspects studied are not clearly explicated to curriculum receivers (teachers and textbooks authors). The meaning of these findings is discussed in the article. In methodological terms, the study explores assumptions used in the analysis of the level of conceptual demand and presents innovative instruments constructed for developing this analysis.

  14. An assessment of oral cancer curricula in dental hygiene programmes: implications for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, K K; Kaste, L M; Homsi, K D; LeHew, C W

    2016-11-01

    To assess oral cancer prevention and early detection curricula in Illinois associate-degree dental hygiene programmes and highlight global health applications. An email invitation was sent to each Illinois associate-degree granting dental hygiene programme's oral cancer contact to participate in a survey via a SurveyMonkey™ link to a 21-item questionnaire. Questions elicited background information on each programme and inquired about curriculum and methods used for teaching oral cancer prevention and early detection. Eight of the 12 (67%) programmes responded. Three (37.5%) reported having a specific oral cancer curriculum. Five (62.5%) require students to perform examinations for signs and symptoms of oral cancer at each clinic visit. Variations exist across the programmes in the number of patients each student sees annually and the number of oral cancer examinations each student performs before graduation. Seven programmes (87.5%) conduct early detection screening in community settings. All programmes included risk assessment associated with tobacco. All other risk factors measured were treated inconsistently. Significant differences in training and experience were reported across Illinois dental hygiene programmes. Training is neither standardized nor uniformly comprehensive. Students' preparation for delivering prevention and early detection services to their patients could be strengthened to ensure competence including reflection of risk factors and behaviours in a global context. Regular review of curricular guidelines and programme content would help dental hygienists meet the expectations of the Crete Declaration on Oral Cancer Prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Public Management and Administration Studies. Should we Include Marketind in Our Curricula?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. VÁZQUEZ

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of continuous adaptation of public institutions to requirements of framing where they perform day by day, Public Management and Administration is behaving once and again as a “reinvented” discipline, aiming a new kind of rational, innovative public entities that focus their activities towards an effective achievement of their intended results and benefits. Concepts such as those of “efficiency”, “effectiveness”, “responsibility”, “organizational culture”, etc. are now not only applied to business disciplines, but also to Public Management and Administration. At this point, Marketing has proved to be an useful subject in PMA curricula, not only being in demand by students and syllabi designers, but also by experts in the public field. However, applying marketing techniques and procedures in the same way as used in private business is clearly nonsense. We must consider a proper “public marketing” or “public sector marketing” development. In this paper we debate on these issues, as well as present an overview into the situation of Spanish public universities offering PMA studies, just when they are facing the Bologna adaptation requirements. As a conclusion, some comments for reflection are suggested.

  16. Clinical reasoning skills in final-year dental students: A qualitative cross-curricula comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafea, E T; Dennick, R

    2017-03-23

    The aim of this research was to explore the perceptions of undergraduate dental students regarding clinical reasoning skills and also discover the influences of different curriculum designs on the acquisition of these skills by students. Eighteen final-year students from three different dental schools with varied curricula and cultures participated in the current research. The research used qualitative methodology. The study took place in 2013-2014. Interviews captured the participants' own understanding of clinical reasoning and its acquisition plus they "talked through" a clinical problem using a "think-aloud" technique. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the transcripts of the recorded interviews. Results obtained were related to curriculum structure. Unfamiliarity with the term clinical reasoning was common in students. Students from different schools used different strategies to reason when discussing clinical vignettes. Clinical reasoning process was dominated by pattern recognition. Students' behaviours seemed to be influenced by cultural factors. This research contributes to a greater understanding of how students learn, understand and apply dental clinical reasoning which will improve educational practices in the future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Tale of two curricula: The performance of 2000 students in introductory electromagnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Kohlmyer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance of over 2000 students in introductory calculus-based electromagnetism (E&M courses at four large research universities was measured using the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA. Two different curricula were used at these universities: a traditional E&M curriculum and the Matter & Interactions (M&I curriculum. At each university, postinstruction BEMA test averages were significantly higher for the M&I curriculum than for the traditional curriculum. The differences in post-test averages cannot be explained by differences in variables such as preinstruction BEMA scores, grade point average, or SAT Reasoning Test (SAT scores. BEMA performance on categories of items organized by subtopic was also compared at one of the universities; M&I averages were significantly higher in each topic. The results suggest that the M&I curriculum is more effective than the traditional curriculum at teaching E&M concepts to students, possibly because the learning progression in M&I reorganizes and augments the traditional sequence of topics, for example, by increasing early emphasis on the vector field concept and by emphasizing the effects of fields on matter at the microscopic level.

  18. Integrating photo-stimulable phosphor plates into dental and dental hygiene radiography curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, Cara L; Robb, Christine L; Brillant, Martha G S; Doucette, Heather J

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether the integration of photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) plates into dental and dental hygiene curricula creates unique learning challenges for students. The purpose of this two-year study was to determine if dental hygiene students had more and/or different types of errors when using PSP plates compared to film and whether the PSP imaging plates had any particular characteristics that needed to be addressed in the learning process. Fifty-nine first-year dental hygiene students at one Canadian dental school were randomly assigned to two groups (PSP or film) before exposing their initial full mouth series on a teaching manikin using the parallel technique. The principal investigator determined the number and types of errors based on a specific set of performance criteria. The two groups (PSP vs. film) were compared for total number and type of errors made. Results of the study indicated the difference in the total number of errors made using PSP or film was not statistically significant; however, there was a difference in the types of errors made, with the PSP group having more horizontal errors than the film group. In addition, the study identified a number of unique characteristics of the PSP plates that required special consideration for teaching this technology.

  19. Integrating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Content Into Undergraduate Medical School Curricula: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Gina M; Chakraborti, Chayan; Panunti, Brandy A

    2012-01-01

    The lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community is a diverse, underserved, and often stigmatized group that faces many barriers to accessing quality healthcare. Not only are few practicing physicians knowledgeable about and sensitive to the needs of LGBT patients, but medical school curricula include limited LGBT-related content. Our goals were to use LGBT-related educational sessions to gauge undergraduate medical students' interest and their perceptions of relevance and to eventually incorporate this topic into the curriculum. We provided 4 educational sessions to preclinical medical students at the Tulane University School of Medicine: 3 optional, 1-hour didactic sessions and 1 standardized patient encounter. Following sessions 1-3, students completed electronic feedback forms; we then analyzed their responses thematically. THE THEMATIC ANALYSIS OF STUDENT RESPONSES IDENTIFIED KEY THEMES: a current lack of exposure to LGBT content, agreement that LGBT material is applicable to students' work as future physicians, and the relevance of including such information in the medical school curriculum. The study validated the underlying assumption that LGBT educational sessions are meaningful to and valued by medical students.

  20. Seven Types of Ambiguity in Evaluating the Impact of Humanities Provision in Undergraduate Medicine Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion of the humanities in undergraduate medicine curricula remains controversial. Skeptics have placed the burden of proof of effectiveness upon the shoulders of advocates, but this may lead to pursuing measurement of the immeasurable, deflecting attention away from the more pressing task of defining what we mean by the humanities in medicine. While humanities input can offer a fundamental critical counterweight to a potentially reductive biomedical science education, a new wave of thinking suggests that the kinds of arts and humanities currently used in medical education are neither radical nor critical enough to have a deep effect on students' learning and may need to be reformulated. The humanities can certainly educate for tolerance of ambiguity as a basis to learning democratic habits for contemporary team-based clinical work. William Empson's 'seven types of ambiguity' model for analyzing poetry is transposed to medical education to: (a) formulate seven values proffered by the humanities for improving medical education; (b) offer seven ways of measuring impact of medical humanities provision, thereby reducing ambiguity; and

  1. Establishing the outcome indicators for the essential nursing competencies and curricula guidelines for genetics and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzone, Kathleen A; Jenkins, Jean; Prows, Cynthia A; Masny, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    The translation of genetics/genomics to clinical care has implications for nurses. The Essential Nursing Competencies and Curricula Guidelines for Genetics and Genomics, established by consensus, apply to all registered nurses. Learning outcomes and clinical practice indicators have been developed to provide additional guidance. The Essentials Advisory Group (EAG) established a team to establish the Outcome Indicators. A draft was developed based on published peer-reviewed documents and syllabi. The draft underwent three layers of review: (a) critique by the EAG; (b) review by representatives at a Genetics/Genomics Toolkit for Faculty meeting; and (c) review by workshop attendees of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's baccalaureate and master's education conferences, followed by EAG's final approval. Outcome Indicators clarify specific knowledge areas and suggest clinical performance indicators for each competency. They provide the foundation to establish a competency-based education repository with outcome indicator mapping matrixes for genetic/genomic education resources. A gap analysis of education resources identified resource deficits, and online unfolding case studies were developed. Outcome Indicators assist the academic and continuing education nurse community to prepare the nursing workforce in genetics/genomics and provide a platform from which to build tools needed to achieve this goal.

  2. A Cutting-Edge Education: Incorporating Nano into the Undergraduate Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Greta M.

    2008-03-01

    The Interdisciplinary Education Group (IEG) of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) on Nanostructured Interfaces at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) develops and uses hands-on, interactive education and outreach materials to engage a variety of audiences in learning about nanotechnology and advanced materials. Many of the education products created are inspired by UW MRSEC research; and faculty, staff, and students regularly contribute to the IEG's work to share nanotechnology with a broader audience. The UW MRSEC has developed numerous teaching modules, labs, and education resources devoted to nanotechnology concepts, and many of these materials have been integrated into key introductory and advanced undergraduate courses at UW and other institutions, including small liberal arts colleges and community colleges. This effort has taken place through both the creation of new courses and the modification of existing courses to include cutting-edge content based on current research and emerging applications in nanotechnology. In this talk, I will present some of the new instructional materials we have developed based on advances in nanoscale science and technology, the implementation and integration of these materials into undergraduate curricula, and an overview of the UW MRSEC education efforts.

  3. Radiology Undergraduate and Resident Curricula: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linaker, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the literature regarding radiology curricula for both undergraduates and residents. Methods A review of the literature was performed using relevant key words. Articles were retrieved through December 2012 using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ERIC, Proquest, and ICL databases along with a manual review of references. Results Of the 4716 unique abstracts reviewed by the author, 142 were found to be relevant to the purpose of this study. Undergraduate radiology education, radiology curriculum, and radiology pedagogy vary widely between disciplines and between colleges within disciplines. Formal radiology education is not taught at all medical programs and little radiology training is incorporated into non-radiology residencies. This results in some medical graduates not being taught how to interpret basic radiology images and not learning contraindications and indications for ordering diagnostic imaging tests. There are no definitive studies examining how to incorporate radiology into the curriculum, how to teach radiology to either undergraduates or residents, or how to assess this clinical competency. Conclusions This review shows that radiology education is perceived to be important in undergraduate and residency programs. However, some programs do not include radiology training, thus graduates from those programs do not learn radiology essentials. PMID:26770172

  4. Disaster management curricula: strategy to create doctors with disaster resilience in Aceh, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuniati, N.; Maulana, R.; Ichsan, I.

    2017-02-01

    Faculty of Medicine of Syiah Kuala University has one special block called Disaster Management block (the last block on the curricula) on Competency-Based Curriculum of Medical Sciences with the Problem-Based Learning method. This block has four credits, allocated seven weeks learning period including one week for evaluation. The placement of disaster management block in the 7th semester (last semester) aims to allow students to implement more easily the complete basic and clinical medical knowledge and then have it integrated with the management capabilities during adisaster. This article evaluates two components: 1) Disaster management module, by comparing the content of modules used in three different academic years, the academic year 2013/2014, 2014/2015 and 2015/2016, 2) The final grade, by comparing the final grade of disaster management block in 4 years (comparing students class of 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011). The results revealed that on every academic year there were additions and strengthening of the material to ensure that students achieve a complete learning experience, and there was a slight increase in student’s grades where the number of students who receive grades A has increased while the number of students who receive grades E decreased.

  5. Determining new trends with regard to the studies in curricula and instruction field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Hursen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study is to determine the new trends concerning curricula and instruction. The articles that are published in journals of SSCI and ERIC databases are taken into the scope of this study. The new trends regarding relevant literature are tried to be identified by analysing 3079 articles in total through the content analysis method. Also, the articles that are taken into the scope of the study are limited with the articles published between years of 2005 and 2014. The articles, throughout the study are analysed according to certain criteria like published year, method, journals that articles published, research subjects and sample population. The results of the study reveal that qualitative methods have been used more frequently in the studies carried out in 2014. Besides, it is clearly seen in the findings that articles are carried out with teachers as sampling population. Most of the articles are carried out as a case study and interview forms, questionnaires and documents are the main data collection instruments preferred to be used.

  6. Educating skilled birth attendants in Mexico: do the curricula meet international confederation of midwives standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Leslie; DeMaria, Lisa M; Campero, Lourdes; Walker, Dilys M

    2007-11-01

    Although the majority of births in Mexico are attended by skilled birth attendants, maternal mortality remains moderately high, raising questions about the quality of training and delivery care. We conducted an exhaustive review of the curricula of three representative schools for the education and clinical preparation of three types of birth attendant - obstetric nurses, professional midwives and general physicians - National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) School of Obstetric Nursing; CASA Professional Midwifery School; and UNAM School of Medicine, Iztacala Campus. All curricular materials were measured against the 214 indicators of knowledge and ability in the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) skilled attendant training guidelines. The CASA curriculum covered 83% of the competencies, 93% of basic knowledge and 86% of basic abilities, compared with 54%, 59% and 64% for UNAM Obstetric Nursing School and 43%, 60% and 36% for UNAM School of Medicine, respectively. Neither the Obstetric Nursing School nor the School of Medicine documented the quantity or types of clinical experience required for graduation. General physicians attend the most births in Mexico, yet based on our analysis, professional midwives had the most complete education and training as measured against the ICM competencies. We recommend that professional midwives and obstetric nurses should be formally integrated into the public health system to attend deliveries.

  7. APROXIMACIÓN AL NIVEL DE INCLUSIÓN DE LA SOSTENIBILIDAD EN LOS CURRICULA UNIVERSITARIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Azcárate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La universidad juega un papel determinante en la formación integral de los individuos, es por ello que tiene la obligación de incluir la sostenibilidad en sus curricula, con el fin de que los futuros profesionales desarrollen su trabajo desde una perspectiva sostenible, que los conduzca a actuarde manera responsable y comprometida con su entorno más directo. El proceso desostenibilización de la Universidad no es fácil y conlleva una profunda transformación del modelo educativo. El reto consiste en encontrar la mejor forma para que sea eficaz, camino que debe construir cada universidad. Teniendo en cuenta el contexto actual de convergencia europea,que aboga una formación en base a competencias, parece un buen momento para iniciar el viaje. Desde la universidad de Cádiz, pensamos que las propuestas metodológicas son una vía para incluir criterios de sostenibilidad en las aulas. Esta investigación se centra en la metodología empleada en las aulas de la Universidad de Cádiz, por docentes interesados en el ámbito de la sostenibilidad curricular y analizar cómo se reflejan en estas prácticas criterios asociados a la misma.

  8. A Review of Integrated Courses in Pharmacy Education and Impact of Integration in Pharm D Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nikanmehr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, due to ever-increasing knowledge and large volumes of information, educational planners of various fields around the world, have been seeking to establish a better and faster refresh for learning. Integration can be a good educational strategy by blending different subjects and contents when presented to students. The aim of this study is to evaluate the medical literature about integration in the curriculum; its process, importance, necessity and different types of it.This review article was prepared by searching the PubMed database, Google Scholar and science direct websites, national and international journals in the field of medical education curricula. The keywords were educational planning, curriculum integration, and medical education with integration and incorporation.Integration and its eleven steps can be an important strategy in educational planning. According to various studies, integration can enhance the students’ learning and skills in medicinal and pharmaceutical care. It also improves the satisfaction of faculty and students, the quality of education and increases the students’ grades at their examinations. Considering the proper planning, cooperation and co-teaching of faculty members, focus on the desired performance of students and correct assessment of the fundamental principles of integration are crucial to this strategy.

  9. Integrating information literacy in health sciences curricula: a case study from Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairoux, Natalie; Desbiens, Sylvie; Clar, Monique; Dupont, Patrice; St-Jean, Monique

    2013-09-01

    To portray an information literacy programme demonstrating a high level of integration in health sciences curricula and a teaching orientation aiming towards the development of lifelong learning skills. The setting is a French-speaking North American university. The offering includes standard workshops such as MEDLINE searching and specialised sessions such as pharmaceutical patents searching. A contribution to an international teaching collaboration in Haiti where workshops had to be thoroughly adapted to the clientele is also presented. Online guides addressing information literacy topics complement the programme. A small team of librarians and technicians taught 276 hours of library instruction (LI) during the 2011-2012 academic year. Methods used for evaluating information skills include scoring features of literature searches and user satisfaction surveys. Privileged contacts between librarians and faculty resulting from embedded LI as well as from active participation in library committees result in a growing reputation of library services across academic departments and bring forth collaboration opportunities. Sustainability and evolution of the LI programme is warranted by frequent communication with partners in the clinical field, active involvement in academic networks and health library associations, and reflective professional strategies. © 2013 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  10. Competency-based project to review community/public health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoneman, Doris; Simandl, Gladys; Hansen, Judith M; Garrett, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the delivery of community/public health (C/PH) nursing have challenged nursing educators to seek innovative ways to ensure that their educational programs produce competent entry-level practitioners. This article describes how public health professionals and faculty from eight regional colleges and universities in Southeastern Wisconsin came together to better understand both what C/PH nursing content was being taught in the region, and the extent to which that content was aligned with the Public Health Nurse Competencies defined by the Quad Council in 2004. Based on self-reporting by nursing school faculty as well as a separate mapping of course objectives into the competency areas, the project found that the curricula of the participating colleges and universities adequately addressed most of the competencies in the Quad Council domains one through six. Competencies in domains seven (financial planning/management skills) and eight (leadership/systems thinking skills) were not, however, adequately addressed and plans were subsequently developed to fill those gaps. In addition to helping each institution identify strengths and gaps in its own curriculum, the project provided an unprecedented opportunity for both public health professionals and academics to build relationships, share best practices, and exchange resources.

  11. Developing merged CDIO based curricula for diploma (B.Eng.) IT study programs at DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Probst, Christian W.; Stassen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Starting 2007, the Danish government drew up a new map of universities through a process of mergers of a number of universities and research institutions (UFM 2007), as part of the national innovation strategy. In the beginning of 2013, the Engineering College Copenhagen (IHK, now DTU Ballerup) m......; • Involvement of stakeholders in designing the new curricula; • Introduction of a common interdisciplinary innovation course in the programs; and • Education of teaching staff: Integration into one organization.......Starting 2007, the Danish government drew up a new map of universities through a process of mergers of a number of universities and research institutions (UFM 2007), as part of the national innovation strategy. In the beginning of 2013, the Engineering College Copenhagen (IHK, now DTU Ballerup......) merged with the Technical University of Denmark (DTU Lyngby). The goal of the merger was to educate ever more innovative diploma engineers to fulfill the needs by Danish industry through combining a practice-oriented development environment and a research-oriented environment. Merging a university...

  12. Teaching sign language in gaucho schools for deaf people: a study of curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper, which provides partial results of a master’s dissertation, has sought to give contribute Sign Language curriculum in the deaf schooling. We began to understand the importance of sign languages for deaf people’s development and found out that a large part of the deaf are from hearing parents, which emphasises the significance of teaching LIBRAS (Brazilian Sign Language in schools for the deaf. We should also consider the importance of this study in building deaf identities and strengthening the deaf culture. We have obtained the theoretical basis in the so-called Deaf Studies and some experts in the curriculum theories. The main objective for this study has been to conduct an analysis of the LIBRAS curriculum at work in schools for the deaf in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The curriculum analysis has shown a degree of diversity: in some curricula, content from one year is repeated in the next one with no articulation. In others, one can find preoccupation for issues of deaf identity and culture, but some of them include contents that are not related to LIBRAS, or the deaf culture, but rather to discipline for the deaf in general. By providing positive and negative aspects, the analysis data may help in discussions about difficulties, progress and problems in LIBRAS teacher education for deaf students.

  13. UNIT, TIBET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT OF STUDY DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF TIBET. THE UNIT COVERS SOME OF THE GENERAL FEATURES OF THE COUNTRY AND THEIR EFFECT UPON THE LIVES OF THE TIBETAN PEOPLE. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS ARE INSERTED TO STIMULATE THOUGHT. THE RELIGION OF TIBET IS DISCUSSED IN RELATION TO ITS INFLUENCE ON THE ART AND CULTURE…

  14. Integrating patient safety into health professionals’ curricula: a qualitative study of medical, nursing and pharmacy faculty perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane; Clarke, Beth; Norton, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background As efforts to integrate patient safety into health professional curricula increase, there is growing recognition that the rate of curricular change is very slow, and there is a shortage of research that addresses critical perspectives of faculty who are on the ‘front-lines’ of curricular innovation. This study reports on medical, nursing and pharmacy teaching faculty perspectives about factors that influence curricular integration and the preparation of safe practitioners. Methods ...

  15. Prospective Physics Teachers’ Views on Their Knowledge about the New Concepts in Turkish High School Physics Curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yıldırım, Ufuk

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to a) investigate prospective physics teachers’ views on their knowledge about new physics concepts introduced in Turkish High School Physics Curricula; b) investigate the sources of their acquired knowledge about these new physics concepts; and c) explore if there were differences in views on knowledge about these new physics concepts among prospective physics teachers of different genders, years of study and universities. A total of 98 prospectiv...

  16. Motivational component profiles in university students learning histology: a comparative study between genders and different health science curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The students’ motivation to learn basic sciences in health science curricula is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different components of motivation (intrinsic motivation, self-determination, self-efficacy and extrinsic -career and grade- motivation) on learning human histology in health science curricula and their relationship with the final performance of the students in histology. Methods Glynn Science Motivation Questionnaire II was used to compare students’ motivation components to learn histology in 367 first-year male and female undergraduate students enrolled in medical, dentistry and pharmacy degree programs. Results For intrinsic motivation, career motivation and self-efficacy, the highest values corresponded to medical students, whereas dentistry students showed the highest values for self-determination and grade motivation. Genders differences were found for career motivation in medicine, self-efficacy in dentistry, and intrinsic motivation, self-determination and grade motivation in pharmacy. Career motivation and self-efficacy components correlated with final performance in histology of the students corresponding to the three curricula. Conclusions Our results show that the overall motivational profile for learning histology differs among medical, dentistry and pharmacy students. This finding is potentially useful to foster their learning process, because if they are metacognitively aware of their motivation they will be better equipped to self-regulate their science-learning behavior in histology. This information could be useful for instructors and education policy makers to enhance curricula not only on the cognitive component of learning but also to integrate students’ levels and types of motivation into the processes of planning, delivery and evaluation of medical education. PMID:24612878

  17. "Negotiating, navigating, and networking": three strategies used by nursing leaders to shape the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula-a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplay, Karyn; Jack, Susan M; Baxter, Pamela; Eva, Kevin; Martin, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background. Implementing simulation requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. Despite this, little is known about the strategies used by academic nursing leaders to facilitate the implementation of a simulation program in nursing curricula. Methods. A constructivist grounded theory study was conducted within 13 nursing programs in Ontario, Canada. Perspectives of key stakeholders (n = 27) including nursing administrators (n = 6), simulation leaders (n = 9), and nursing faculty (n = 12) were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Results. Nursing leaders, specifically nursing administrators and simulation leaders who successfully led the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula, worked together and utilized negotiating, navigating, and networking strategies that impacted the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Conclusions. Strategies that were found to be useful when planning and executing the adoption and incorporation of an innovation, specifically simulation, into nursing curricula provide practical approaches that may be helpful to nurse leaders when embarking upon an organizational change.

  18. How could it be? calling for science curricula that cultivate morals and values towards other animals and nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Marianne R.; Russell, Joshua J.

    2016-12-01

    Can science curricula truly cultivate morals and values towards nature? This is the question that is raised by Carolina Castano Rodriguez in her critique of the new Australian Science curriculum. In this response to Castano Rodriguez's paper we ask two questions relating to: the influence of curricula on the relationships of children and other animals; and other models of science education regarding animals and nature that may be more relevant, just, or caring. In responding to these questions stimulated by the reading of Castano Rodriguez's paper, we reflect on our own experiences. We note the conflict between the values depicted in the curriculum priorities and the underlying anthropocentric view that appears to be embedded in the Australian Science Curriculum and in curricula generally. With this conflict in mind we encourage educators to examine our own practices regarding how the relationships between humans and other animals are promoted. We put forward the idea of science education that responds to the shifting views of science and its applications outside the confines of the laboratory to one that encourages both ethical and political discussion that is already taking place in the community relating to the role of science and technology in our lives and the lives of other animals.

  19. The potential of the inventory of learning styles to study students' learning patterns in three types of medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Veken, J; Valcke, M; Muijtjens, A; De Maeseneer, J; Derese, A

    2008-01-01

    Introducing innovative curricular designs can be evaluating by scrutinizing the learning patterns students use. Studying the potential of Vermunt's Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS) in detecting differences in student learning patterns in different medical curricula. Cross-sectional between-subjects comparison of ILS-scores in third-year medical students in a conventional, an integrated contextual and a PBL-curriculum using one-way post hoc ANOVA. Response rate was 85%: 197 conventional, 130 integrated contextual and 301 PBL students. The results show a differential impact from the three curricula. In relation to processing strategies, the students in the problem-based curriculum showed less rote learning and rehearsing, greater variety in sources of knowledge used and less ability to express study content in a personal manner than did the students in the conventional curriculum. The students of the integrated contextual curriculum showed more structuring of subject matter by integrating different aspects into a whole. In relation to regulation strategies, the students in the problem-based curriculum showed significantly more self-regulation of learning content and the students in the integrated contextual curriculum showed lower levels of regulation. As to learning orientations, the students in the problem-based curriculum showed less ambivalence and the students of the conventional curriculum were less vocationally oriented. The study provides empirical support for expected effects of traditional and innovative curricula which thus far were not well supported by empirical studies.

  20. Turnley Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facilities at this unit include cattle working pens, hydraulic squeeze chute and electronic scale, a maintenance building, and four hay storage sheds. There is one...

  1. Operable Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of operable unit data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  2. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  3. An evaluation of physical activity training in Australian medical school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Abigail; Stoutenberg, Mark; Hobson-Powell, Anita; Hargreaves, Mark; Beeler, Halle; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the current level of physical activity (PA) training provided to Australian medical students. Individual interviews were completed via phone interview or online survey from June-October 2015. Program leaders from Australian medical schools, who were knowledgeable about their curriculum content, were invited to participate in the study. The number of programs, hours of PA training instruction, institutional attitude towards offering PA, barriers experienced, and content areas in which PA training was offered, were explored. Seventeen of the 19 (89%) Australian medical schools participated in the study. Among the responding schools, 15 (88.2%) reported providing specific PA training to medical students. Thirteen of these 15 schools (86.7%) taught the national aerobic guidelines while only seven (46.7%) taught the national strength training recommendations. Four, five, and six year programs reported providing an average of 6.6, 5.0, and 12.3h of PA training, respectively, across their entire curriculum. Only 42.9% of the schools that had PA training reported that it was sufficient for their medical students. Nearly half (41.2%) of the respondents reported no barriers to implementing PA training into their medical curricula. Most Australian medical schools reported including some PA training in their medical curriculum. Key topics, such as the national strength recommendations, however, were not taught by most schools. Given the importance of PA for the prevention and treatment of numerous mental and physical health outcomes, it is unlikely that the attention it currently receives adequately prepares medical students to treat patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Residency Curricula on Physician-Pharmaceutical Industry Interaction: A CERA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David V; Waters, Richard C; Olsen, Cara; Stephens, Mark B; Brown, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Physician interaction with pharmaceutical representatives results in less evidence-based prescribing and increased costs. Many organizations have called for strong conflict of interest policies in academic institutions. Implementing policy without educational interventions may not adequately address the influence of industry on physician prescribing patterns. The objective of this study is to assess the implementation and content of family medicine residency curricula on the physician-pharmaceutical industry relationship. We surveyed US family medicine program directors using the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) platform. The presence of a formal curriculum on the physician-industry interaction and specific curricular elements (ethics of interaction, understanding detailing sessions and advertisements, use of unbiased pharmaceutical information) were the outcome measures of interest. Fifty-two percent (212 of 406) of program directors responded. Forty percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33%--46%) reported having a formal curriculum on physician-pharmaceutical industry interactions. The presence of a formal curriculum was more likely in residencies permitting interaction with industry (52% [48/92] versus 30% [36/120]) or with a university affiliation (43% [75/173] versus 19% [7/36]). The use of unbiased sources of information relating to pharmaceutical products and the ethics of the physician-pharmaceutical industry relationship were the most common curricular elements (59% and 55%, respectively). This study shows that less than half of US family medicine programs have a curriculum addressing physician-industry interactions. Further research on the efficacy of and barriers to curriculum creation and implementation is warranted.

  5. Entrepreneurship education: A systematic literature review of curricula contents and teaching methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Sirelkhatim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship education (EE is one of the fastest growing fields of education globally, yet the areas of “what” should be taught in these programmes and “how” to teach them have been mentioned by many researchers as ones that lack both consensus and devoted attention. The present paper aims to provide a detailed map of common and best practices in terms of curriculum content and methods of teaching entrepreneurship on the tertiary level, and to explore how they correlate with practices recommended by the entrepreneurial learning field of research, in order to contribute to extracting best practice. This paper uses a systematic literature review (SLR to help review the literature in a transparent and unbiased way. The review is undertaken through six stages using NVivo computer software. In each stage, the literature on EE is screened and filtered to reduce the size and try to reach the more relevant and useful papers. This process end up with 129 articles divided between EE and entrepreneurship learning. The result of the reviewing process reveals that the curricula content and teaching methods vary depending on the programme’s objectives—from theoretical courses aiming to increase entrepreneurial awareness to practical-oriented ones that aim to produce graduates ready to start a business. Practical-oriented courses correlate with entrepreneurial learning suggestions for practices to engage students in acquiring entrepreneurial competencies. However, to better extract best practice, it would be useful if future research could explore what, exactly, it is that we mean when we use the term “entrepreneurial course” and link it to the entrepreneurship process. Also, it would be useful to explore what are the results of EE programmes in terms of the actual graduates who start or grow a business, and link the findings to the teaching process.

  6. Reorientating dental curricula to reflect a minimally invasive dentistry approach for patient-centred management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidonis, J A; Skinner, V J; Lekkas, D; Winning, T A; Townsend, G C

    2013-06-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry (MID), together with patient-centred care (PCC), can be considered central to patient management. These approaches have been incorporated in the structure of various dental curricula and indeed formally assessed. However, there is limited evidence that students have an integrated skill-set and are able to apply these skills when providing direct patient care within the clinical setting. Assessment of students' application of core clinical skills has identified numerous deficiencies that need to be addressed. The revised Bachelor of Dental Surgery curriculum at the School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, provides an example of how MID, underpinned by PCC, can be presented throughout a dental curriculum. Essentially, MID and PCC are not considered as separate subjects but as a patient management approach that is 'woven into the whole fabric' of the curriculum. The programme relies on the development of empathic communication skills that enable students to obtain key patient information, including their patients' values, beliefs, needs, preferences and expectations, thereby allowing management to be tailor-made. As a result, patients are empowered to be a part of the oral health care team. The Adelaide undergraduate dental curriculum consists of one clinical stream called Dental Science and Practice (DSP), that promotes the application of student knowledge, skills and behaviours in the clinical setting. Vertical and horizontal integration, aligned with an integrated approach to assessment, drives the learning throughout the programme. Clearly-defined outcomes are introduced by Integrated Learning Activities (ILAs) that provide a focus for associated learning activities (e.g. class meetings, tutorials, simulation laboratories, etc). The aim of this approach to learning and teaching is to ensure the required learning outcomes are achieved. It also requires coordinated teaching teams including trained external tutors who clearly

  7. Have motivation theories guided the development and reform of medical education curricula? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Croiset, Gerda; Mann, Karen V; Custers, Eugene; Ten Cate, Olle

    2012-06-01

    Educational psychology indicates that learning processes can be mapped on three dimensions: cognitive (what to learn), affective or motivational (why learn), and metacognitive regulation (how to learn). In a truly student-centered medical curriculum, all three dimensions should guide curriculum developers in constructing learning environments. The authors explored whether student motivation has guided medical education curriculum developments. The authors reviewed the literature on motivation theory related to education and on medical education curriculum development to identify major developments. Using the Learning-Oriented Teaching model as a framework, they evaluated the extent to which motivation theory has guided medical education curriculum developers. Major developments in the field of motivation theory indicate that motivation drives learning and influences students' academic performance, that gender differences exist in motivational mechanisms, and that the focus has shifted from quantity of motivation to quality of motivation and its determinants, and how they stimulate academic motivation. Major developments in medical curricula include the introduction of standardized and regulated medical education as well as problem-based, learner-centered, integrated teaching, outcome-based, and community-based approaches. These curricular changes have been based more on improving students' cognitive processing of content or metacognitive regulation than on stimulating motivation. Motivational processes may be a substantially undervalued factor in curriculum development. Building curricula to specifically stimulate motivation in students may powerfully influence the outcomes of curricula. The elements essential for stimulating intrinsic motivation in students, including autonomy support, adequate feedback, and emotional support, appear lacking as a primary aim in many curricular plans.

  8. Challenges of Incorporating Earth and Space Sciences into Curricula Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards present a great opportunity for the increased exposure of contemporary geosciences into the K-12 curricula of most of the countries school. However, the manner by which the NGSS are being adopted by different schools and districts poses several challenges. So far, 13 states and Washington, D.C., have adopted the NGSS in full, accounting for about 30% of the nation's students. In addition, four states (Massachusetts, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and West Virginia), accounting for another 5% of U.S. students, have adopted new state science standards that are adapted from the NGSS, each in different ways. For West Virginia, language concerning climate change has been tempered. For Oklahoma and South Dakota, language concerning climate change has been nearly entirely removed. In addition, there are a large number of independent school districts, accounting for at least and additional 35% of the nation's students, that are in the process of designing curriculum aligned to some degree with the NGSS. These are in states that have either not yet adopted the NGSS or likely will never adopt the NGSS (at a state-wide level). This presents a challenge to the geosciences, because the level of geoscience content will greatly vary, state-to-state and district-to-district. The NGSS present the geosciences with a heavy emphasis on Earth Systems Science, particular as it relates to climate systems and human impacts on systems, but most K-12 teachers have not had exposure to the geosciences in these contexts, and will require significant professional development. In addition, the inclusion of a full year of geoscience content in high school (in addition to a year for middle school), presents another curricular challenge, as most schools have never taught this amount of geoscience to all of its students (the NGSS are designed to have all of its standards taught to all students). The NGSS also emphasizes learning through a set of 8 different practices

  9. Next generation paramedics, agents of change, or time for curricula renewal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2013-11-01

    improved uptake of evidence-based research into clinical practice and, ultimately, improve patient outcomes. Future research using a longitudinal study design to capture changing attitudes to knowledge translation in the postgraduate population may also prove valuable in curricula renewal. Keywords: curriculum, knowledge translation, paramedic students, practice style inventory

  10. How was the intern year?: self and clinical assessment of four cohorts, from two medical curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Problem-based curricula have provoked controversy amongst educators and students regarding outcome in medical graduates, supporting the need for longitudinal evaluation of curriculum change. As part of a longitudinal evaluation program at the University of Adelaide, a mixed method approach was used to compare the graduate outcomes of two curriculum cohorts: traditional lecture-based ‘old’ and problem-based ‘new’ learning. Methods Graduates were asked to self-assess preparedness for hospital practice and consent to a comparative analysis of their work-place based assessments from their intern year. Comparative data were extracted from 692 work-place based assessments for 124 doctors who graduated from the University of Adelaide Medical School between 2003 and 2006. Results Self-assessment: Overall, graduates of the lecture-based curriculum rated the medical program significantly higher than graduates of the problem-based curriculum. However, there was no significant difference between the two curriculum cohorts with respect to their preparedness in 13 clinical skills. There were however, two areas where the cohorts rated their preparedness in the 13 broad practitioner competencies as significantly different: problem-based graduates rated themselves as better prepared in their ‘awareness of legal and ethical issues’ and the lecture-based graduates rated themselves better prepared in their ‘understanding of disease processes’. Work-place based assessment: There were no significant differences between the two curriculum cohorts for ‘Appropriate Level of Competence’ and ‘Overall Appraisal’. Of the 14 work-place based assessment skills assessed for competence, no significant difference was found between the cohorts. Conclusions The differences in the perceived preparedness for hospital practice of two curriculum cohorts do not reflect the work-place based assessments of their competence as interns. No significant difference was found

  11. The Opticker's Apprentice Training In Optics Within Traditional Non-Optics Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Donald C.

    1989-04-01

    Historically most training in optics was done at the graduate level. It was assumed that a basic grounding in physics or engineering was required and that the demand could be met by the established programs. Recently, however, with the emergence of an entire new optical technology, the training in optics has taken place at a number of different levels. As doctoral research encompassed devices and techniques that were the basis of this new technology, newly minted PhD's, including the author, joined the faculties in the usual fields of studies, but brought with them their enthusiasm for and knowledge of things optical. Going beyond the usual sophomore sequence on image formation and the standard single upper level course in geometrical and physical optics, these new faculty members, began to develop new courses and laboratories that brought some of their optics into the standard undergraduate curriculum. This paper is an attempt to assess the current range of optical training in programs within the traditional non-optics curricula. For the purpose of economy and focus, I have restricted this overview to those institutions that have award bachelor degrees in physics and electrical engineering. While there are other optics programs at other levels, the description and analysis of this selected group will, I think, provide a reasonable description of the type of training being done today. The assessment was carried out by means of a questionnaire sent to 30 schools that award bachelor degrees in physics and electrical engineering. Other data was found in the SPIE publication, "Optics in Education"1. In addition, Ken Cupery of Eastman Kodak made available to me his database, a substantial effort. I extracted those programs from Ken's database and attached the results of my own questionnaire to it. Of the 30 schools I queried I received responses from 21 of them. Two of these indicated that the program was no longer in business, so the results will be based on 19

  12. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  13. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  14. The feasibility and appropriateness of introducing nursing curricula from developed countries into developing countries: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekara, Rasika; Schultz, Tim

    2006-09-01

    Objectives  The objective of this review was to appraise and synthesise the best available evidence on the feasibility and appropriateness of introducing nursing curricula from developed countries into developing countries. Inclusion criteria  This review considered quantitative and qualitative research papers that addressed the feasibility and appropriateness of introducing developed countries' nursing curricula into developing countries. Papers of the highest level of evidence rating were given priority. Participants of interest were all levels of nursing staff, nursing students, healthcare consumers and healthcare administrators. Outcomes of interest that are relevant to the evaluation of undergraduate nursing curricula were considered in the review including cost-effectiveness, cultural relevancy, adaptability, consumer satisfaction and student satisfaction. Search strategy  The search strategy sought to find both published and unpublished studies and papers, limited to the English language. An initial limited search of MEDLINE and CINAHL was undertaken followed by an analysis of the text words contained in the title and abstract, and of the index terms used to describe the article. A second extensive search was then undertaken using all identified key words and index terms. Finally, the reference list of all identified reports and articles was searched, the contents pages of a few relevant journals were hand searched and experts in the field were contacted to find any relevant studies missed from the first two searches. Methodological quality  Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality before inclusion in the review using an appropriate critical appraisal instrument from the System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (SUMARI) package. Results  A total of four papers, including one descriptive study and three textual papers, were included in the review. Because of the diverse nature of

  15. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice across Curricula-An Overview of a Professional Development Course for Occupational Therapy Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Marta M; DeAngelis, Tina M

    2017-01-01

    A professional development course for occupational therapy educators about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) was developed and piloted. The course was developed to promote increased awareness of resources and methods for teaching EBP that are applicable across entry-level curricula. Participants included full-time faculty (n = 7) from one entry-level occupational therapy program in the New York City area. The results of the pilot informed refinement of the course in preparation for delivery to a wider audience of educators. This paper provides a description of the course, results of the pilot, and implications for future delivery of the course.

  16. A set of vertically integrated inquiry-based practical curricula that develop scientific thinking skills for large cohorts of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardi, Kirsten; Bugarcic, Andrea; Colthorpe, Kay; Good, Jonathan P; Lluka, Lesley J

    2013-12-01

    Science graduates require critical thinking skills to deal with the complex problems they will face in their 21st century workplaces. Inquiry-based curricula can provide students with the opportunities to develop such critical thinking skills; however, evidence suggests that an inappropriate level of autonomy provided to underprepared students may not only be daunting to students but also detrimental to their learning. After a major review of the Bachelor of Science, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a series of three vertically integrated courses with inquiry-style laboratory practicals for early-stage undergraduate students in biomedical science. These practical curricula were designed so that students would work with increasing autonomy and ownership of their research projects to develop increasingly advanced scientific thinking and communication skills. Students undertaking the first iteration of these three vertically integrated courses reported learning gains in course content as well as skills in scientific writing, hypothesis construction, experimental design, data analysis, and interpreting results. Students also demonstrated increasing skills in both hypothesis formulation and communication of findings as a result of participating in the inquiry-based curricula and completing the associated practical assessment tasks. Here, we report the specific aspects of the curricula that students reported as having the greatest impact on their learning and the particular elements of hypothesis formulation and communication of findings that were more challenging for students to master. These findings provide important implications for science educators concerned with designing curricula to promote scientific thinking and communication skills alongside content acquisition.

  17. Teacher's Guide for Computational Models of Animal Behavior: A Computer-Based Curriculum Unit to Accompany the Elementary Science Study Guide "Behavior of Mealworms." Artificial Intelligence Memo No. 432.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Hal; Goldenberg, Paul

    This experimental curriculum unit suggests how dramatic innovations in classroom content may be achieved through use of computers. The computational perspective is viewed as one which can enrich and transform traditional curricula, act as a focus for integrating insights from diverse disciplines, and enable learning to become more active and…

  18. FLYING UNITED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Apart from selling hundreds of airplanes to China, Boeing buys locally made aircraft parts and transfers technology, in the true spirit of partnership Whenever Boeing's senior manager hear of a visit by one of China's state leaders, it's no doubt cause for celebration. Since China and the United States established diplomatic ties in 1978, every official trip by China's top statesmen has included a meeting with Boeing that

  19. Human sexuality education in the middle grades classroom: A review of curricula in a sample of Florida school districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Melinda D.

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the extent to which human sexuality topics are covered in Florida middle school science classrooms and the process by which curricular decisions are made regarding human sexuality education on a county-wide basis. Primary data included interviews with county-level administrators who oversee curricular decisions related to the middle-grades science curriculum or health curriculum in twelve school districts within the state. These districts represented four geographic locations and districts of various sizes. Administrators from four of the twelve studies in the sample chose to provide information regarding their human sexuality education curriculum. In two cases, teacher leads were identified and were interviewed to understand the implementation of the curriculum within the classroom. Additional data were collected from the district curriculum guides for human sexuality education and the adopted middle-grades science textbook for each county. The interview and documentary data were analyzed by comparison to established criteria for a comprehensive human sexuality education curriculum. The analysis revealed that the scope of human sexuality education varied considerably within the sample and that much of the curricula in place failed to include topics and activities that have been identified as important in a successful human sexuality education program. These findings are limited because few counties chose to fully participate. Additional research is clearly needed to examine the effectiveness of existing human sexuality education curricula in Florida. In addition, research is needed to understand the characteristics, values, and beliefs of successful human sexuality education instructors across the state.

  20. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority.

  1. European Dimension of Legal Education. A comparative study of the Romanian Law Curricula and EU Law Syllabus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinduşa Camelia Gorea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose is to provide a detailed view on the European legal education system in Romania.There are few papers on EU legal education policy in Romania. We try to fill this gap in some extend, as apart of a larger research we conducted in the past 3 years. Our sources of evidence were: the Romanianlegislation; a representative number of law curricula and EU law syllabus and a research survey of Romanianstudents, EU law professors and legal practitioners. We found out that the “traditional” Law specialization ismore desired by the potential students than the European Law specialization. Nevertheless, Romanian lawschools have enough discretion to introduce more EU law disciplines. By targeting the weak parts of the EUlegal education system, our study may reveal its benefits to law professors, legal researchers, responsiblefactors within the Romanian law departments and even to the Romanian legislator. This paper provides ashort explanation of the ascension and development of EU legal studies in Romania, an overview of the keyissues in the law curricula and the EU law syllabus and recommendations on the reforming the EU legaleducation in Romania.

  2. Competencies for Student Leadership Development in Doctor of Pharmacy Curricula to Assist Curriculum Committees and Leadership Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Andrew P.; Boyle, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assist curriculum committees and leadership instructors by gathering expert opinion to define student leadership development competencies for pharmacy curricula. Methods. Twenty-six leadership instructors participated in a 3-round, online, modified Delphi process to define competencies for student leadership development in pharmacy curricula. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Round 2 grouped responses for agreement rating and comment. Round 3 allowed rating and comment on competencies not yet meeting consensus, which was prospectively set at 80%. Results. Eleven competencies attained 80% consensus or higher and were grouped into 3 areas: leadership knowledge, personal leadership commitment, and leadership skill development. Connections to contemporary leadership development literature were outlined for each competency as a means of verifying the panel’s work. Conclusions. The leadership competencies will aid students in addressing: What is leadership? Who am I as a leader? What skills and abilities do I need to be effective? The competencies will help curriculum committees and leadership instructors to focus leadership development opportunities, identify learning assessments, and define program evaluation. PMID:24371346

  3. Toward competency-based curricula in patient-centered spiritual care: recommended competencies for family medicine resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Craigie, Frederic; Hatch, Robert; Kliewer, Stephen; Marchand, Lucille; King, Dana; Hobbs, Richard; Daaleman, Timothy P

    2010-12-01

    Spiritual care is increasingly recognized as an important component of medical care. Although many primary care residency programs incorporate spiritual care into their curricula, there are currently no consensus guidelines regarding core competencies necessary for primary care training. In 2006, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Interest Group on Spirituality undertook a three-year initiative to address this need. The project leader assembled a diverse panel of eight educators with dual expertise in (1) spirituality and health and (2) family medicine. The multidisciplinary panel members represented different geographic regions and diverse faith traditions and were nationally recognized senior faculty. They underwent three rounds of a modified Delphi technique to achieve initial consensus regarding spiritual care competencies (SCCs) tailored for family medicine residency training, followed by an iterative process of external validation, feedback, and consensus modifications of the SCCs. Panel members identified six knowledge, nine skills, and four attitude core SCCs for use in training and linked these to competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. They identified three global competencies for use in promotion and graduation criteria. Defining core competencies in spiritual care clarifies training goals and provides the basis for robust curricula evaluation. Given the breadth of family medicine, these competencies may be adaptable to other primary care fields, to medical and surgical specialties, and to medical student education. Effective training in this area may enhance physicians' ability to attend to the physical, mental, and spiritual needs of patients and better maintain sustainable healing relationships.

  4. Medien im Lehramtsstudium für die Sekundarstufe in Österreich. Eine quantitativ-inhaltsanalytische Lehrplananalyse von vier Curricula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Swertz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Medien sind für Erziehung und Unterricht notwendig sowie im Alltag, in der Politik und der Ökonomie relevant. Daher ist zu erwarten, dass Medien in den Curricula für die Lehramtsausbildung im Sekundarbereich vorkommen. Ob diese Erwartung zutrifft, wird an vier Curricula für den Sekundarbereich mit einem quantitativen inhaltsanalytischen Verfahren untersucht. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Medien im Allgemeinen und Medienpädagogik, Medienkompetenz und Mediendidaktik im Besonderen nur selten vorkommen und die meisten der seltenen Vorkommnisse irrelevant sind.

  5. The Effects of Integrated Curricula on Young Adolescent Problem-Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, David L.; St. Clair, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 4-week interdisciplinary unit on middle school students' problem-solving ability. Subjects, 459 students in 4 Midwestern school districts, were taught by 6 teams of teachers. Pre- and posttest results indicated that students identified as formal operational thinkers made significant gains in their problem-solving ability,…

  6. Implementing Collaborative Learning in Prelicensure Nursing Curricula: Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoening, Anne M; Selde, M Susan; Goodman, Joely T; Tow, Joyce C; Selig, Cindy L; Wichman, Chris; Cosimano, Amy; Galt, Kimberly A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated learning outcomes and student perceptions of collaborative learning in an undergraduate nursing program. Participants in this 3-phase action research study included students enrolled in a traditional and an accelerated nursing program. The number of students who passed the unit examination was not significantly different between the 3 phases. Students had positive and negative perceptions about the use of collaborative learning.

  7. Multiple Case Study of Event Management Curricula and Industry Professionals' Expectations of New Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Premila A.

    2016-01-01

    The event management segment of the hospitality industry has experienced tremendous growth in recent years. As a result, demand for qualified event management professionals continues to increase. To help prepare qualified professionals for the event management industry, higher education institutions in the United States are now offering…

  8. College and University Curricula in Ecotourism and Nature-Based Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides the results of a study designed to inventory and collect descriptive information about ecotourism and those institutions that offer such courses in the United States. Twenty-one programs that currently offer at least one ecotourism or nature-based tourism course are identified. (DDR)

  9. Integrating Responsible Conduct of Research Education into Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Tamara L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a requirement for directed responsible conduct in research (RCR) education has become a priority in the United States and elsewhere. In the US, both the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation require RCR education for all students who are financially supported by federal awards. The guidelines produced by these…

  10. Examining and Characterizing Changes in First Year High School Chemistry Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Kerry Kathleen McGee

    2010-01-01

    Many students currently entering college are able to solve mathematical problems but often do not understand the chemistry concepts underlying their calculations. High school chemistry teachers from Texas and the United States (US) were surveyed as to what topics they teach in their chemistry classes. A subset of Texas teachers was also…

  11. The Representation of Women in Academic Geography: Contexts, Climate and Curricula. Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Janice; Fortuijn, Joos Droogleever; Raleigh, Clionadh

    2004-01-01

    This Symposium integrates quantitative and qualitative information to assess the representation of women in academic geography in The Netherlands, Catalonia, Hungary and Singapore. It offers comparative commentary on the situation in the United States and additionally a focus on the experiences of a group of women geographers of colour in Canada,…

  12. United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Bernow

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and discusses an integrated set of policies designed to reduce U.S. carbon emissions over the next four decades. This innovation path also aims to promote environmental quality, particularly by reducing emissions of criteria air pollutants, to reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, and to induce technological innovation and diffusion in energy production and consumption. The innovation path would reduce economy-wide carbon emissions by 26% below baseline projections for 2010 and by 62% below baseline projections for 2030; this translates into 10% below 1990 levels in 2010 and 45% below 1990 levels in 2030. Emissions of criteria pollutants also would be significantly reduced, as would petroleum imports by the United States. Moreover, the innovation path would yield cumulative net savings for the United States of $218 billion (1993 dollars through 2010, or $19 billion on a leveled annual basis, and would result in 800,000 additional jobs nationwide by 2010. Although the overall findings from the innovation path analysis are robust, the results should be taken as indicative, rather than precisely predictive, owing to uncertainties in future costs, prices, technology performance, and consumer behavior.

  13. Teaching corner: an undergraduate medical education program comprehensively integrating global health and global health ethics as core curricula : student experiences of the medical school for international health in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichholtz, Sara; Kreniske, Jonah Susser; Morrison, Zachary; Shack, Avraham R; Dwolatzky, Tzvi

    2015-03-01

    The Medical School for International Health (MSIH) was created in 1996 by the Faculty of Health Sciences at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in affiliation with Columbia University's Health Sciences division. It is accredited by the New York State Board of Education. Students complete the first three years of the program on the Ben-Gurion University campus in Be'er-Sheva, Israel, while fourth-year electives are completed mainly in the United States (at Columbia University Medical Center and affiliates as well as other institutions) along with a two-month global health elective at one of numerous sites located around the world (including Canada, Ethiopia, India, Israel, Kenya, Nepal, Peru, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Uganda, the United States, and Vietnam). The unique four-year, American-style curriculum is designed not only to prepare physicians who will be able to work at both an individual and community level but also at both of these levels anywhere in the world. In this way, it combines elements of medical and public health curricula not limited to an American perspective.

  14. 搭建成人高等学历教育与非学历教育"立交桥"%Set up adult higher curricula education and non-curricula education "intersection"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包正桦

    2015-01-01

    当下中国,政治、经济、文化飞速发展,终身教育和学习化社会正在深刻影响着成人教育的发展趋势,成人教育作为国民教育的关键组成部分扮演着越来越重要的角色.成人教育有两种形式:学历教育与非学历教育.学历教育因为其发展较早已经比较完善;非学历教育因为适应经济、社会的发展要求,各种岗位、资格、证书培训如雨后春笋般出现而且发展壮大.本文试图对这两种教育形式如何交流融合进行探讨,搭建成人高等学历教育与非学历教育的"立交桥".%The rapid development of China's political, economic and cultural, life-long education and learning society are profoundly affects the trend of the development of adult education, adult education as a key part of the national education plays a more and more important role. There are two forms of adult education: academic education and non-academic education. Record of formal schooling education earlier because its development has been more perfect; Non-academic education for adapt to the development of economy, society, various positions, qualifications, certificate training sprang up and grow stronger. This article attempts to the two kinds of education form were discussed, how to communicate fusion structures of adult higher curricula education and non-curricula education "overpass".

  15. Feedback from educational supervisors and trainees on the implementation of curricula and the assessment system for core medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gavin; Barrett, James; Jones, Mike; Parry, David; Wade, Winnie

    2008-10-01

    A pilot of core medical training (CMT) was conducted in 2006-7 with 160 trainees and 130 supervisors in the 10 hospitals within the Mersey Deanery. Questionnaires and focus groups were used to gain feedback from trainees and supervisors in relation to the components of CMT (the curricula, workplace-based assessments, appraisal, and the e-portfolio). There was generally a positive attitude to the CMT package. In particular the opportunities to give and receive feedback were appreciated; the e-portfolio was identified as helpful for recording assessment outcomes and supporting educational development for the trainees. The workplace-based assessments were well received. Many of the benefits of the components of CMT depended on the skill of the supervisor. The time required for effective training supervision and workplace-based assessments was identified as an important issue. This pilot was invaluable in informing the widespread implementation of CMT in 2007.

  16. Integrating communication skills training in the curricula of 5 healthcare professions: nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiography and midwifery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Tørring, Birgitte; Hansen, Susanne Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    Structured training of communication skills are needed in undergraduate healthcare education in order to prepare the future professionals to cooperate with patients. Often education in communication is not integrated in the curriculum – making it seem a side activity of less importance...... for professionals. In the effort of integrating communication skills training in the undergraduate curricula of nursing, radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and midwifery, we established a communication skills laboratory and arranged a 5 day course for communication teachers from all 5 educational...... programs at University College North Denmark. After the course communication skills training was offered at least once during every 3½ year program and after 3 years this is retained and in some cases developed further. The combination of getting a room where to train and developing the skills to train...

  17. Integrating complementary medicine literacy education into Australian medical curricula: Student-identified techniques and strategies for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    Formal medical education about complementary medicine (CM) that comprises medicinal products/treatments is required due to possible CM interactions with conventional medicines; however, few guidelines exist on design and implementation of such education. This paper reports findings of a constructivist grounded theory method study that identified key strategies for integrating CM literacy education into medical curricula. Analysis of data from interviews with 30 medical students showed that students supported a longitudinal integrative and pluralistic approach to medicine. Awareness of common patient use, evidence, and information relevant to future clinical practice were identified as focus points needed for CM literacy education. Students advocated for interactive case-based, experiential and dialogical didactic techniques that are multiprofessional and student-centred. Suggested strategies provide key elements of CM literacy within research, field-based practice, and didactic teaching over the entirety of the curriculum. CM educational strategies should address CM knowledge deficits and ultimately respond to patients' needs.

  18. WWC Quick Review of the Report "Achievement Effects of Four Early Elementary School Math Curricula: Findings for First and Second Graders"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The study examined the relative effectiveness of four early elementary school math curricula: Investigations in Number, Data, and Space; Math Expressions; Saxon Math; and Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Mathematics. The study analyzed data on more than 8,000 first- and second-grade students in 110 schools in 12 districts in 10 states. In each of the…

  19. A Study of the Perceptions of Doctor of Nursing (DNP) Program Administrators regarding the Integration of Acupuncture and Acupressure in DNP Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voight, Rebecca W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive study was to explore the perceptions of DNP administrators regarding the extent acupuncture and acupressure are addressed in DNP curricula. Five research questions were addressed: 1. What are the perspectives of DNP program administrators regarding acupuncture and acupressure? 2. What are the…

  20. Institutional Influences on Nurse-Academics' Instructional Planning Decisions in the Implementation of Basic Nursing Curricula in Colleges of Advanced Education in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kathryn L.

    A study examined institutional influences on the instructional planning decisions of nurse-academics presenting basic nursing curricula in colleges of advanced education (CAEs) in New South Wales. Data were collected from the following sources: survey of 86 selected nurse-academics from 12 of New South Wales' 15 tertiary institutions running basic…

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Public Relations Curricula: Does It Matter Where You Go to School, and Is Academia Meeting the Needs of the Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Giselle A.; Cho, Moonhee

    2016-01-01

    According to scholars, there has been a move toward a more professional or occupational focus in postsecondary education, a focus that Grubb and Lazerson suggest "undermines education's moral, civic, and intellectual purposes." The purpose of this study was to evaluate the public relations curricula of U.S. universities and colleges and…

  2. Combination Welding Technical Terms. English-Thai Lexicon. Introduction to Combination Welding. Thai Version. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Masako T.

    This English-Thai lexicon and program introduction for combination welding is one of eight documents in the Multicultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series. It is intended for use in postsecondary, adult, and preservice teacher and administrator education. The first two sections provide Thai equivalencies of English…

  3. The Restaurant Manager/Headwaiter--A Professional Profile. Food and Beverage Service Level 2 Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    This report profiles the activities and responsibilities of senior restaurant personnel (managers and headwaiters) in three industry sectors--hotels, upmarket restaurants, and popular/fast food outlets--in Ireland. It was commissioned by the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board in order to gather information that could be used for…

  4. Occupational Task Analyses for the Development of Business Education Model Curricula with Emphasis on Banking and Financial Occupations. State Technical Committee Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaware State Board for Vocational Education, Milford.

    This guide, prepared for the Delaware State Board of Education and the State Department of Public Instruction, is intended to assist individuals developing curricula to prepare students for entry-level positions in various banking and financial occupations. It is divided into three sections, each of which consists of a cross-referenced listing of…

  5. Round table discussion on - Development of competency-based two-level curricula in Meteorology (TEMPUS JEP 26005-2005 COMBAT-METEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashmakova, I.; Belotserkovsky, A.; Ivanov, V.; Karlin, L.; Petrosyan, A.; Room, R.; Serditova, N.; Tyuryakov, S.; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2009-09-01

    The project in question (http://www.combat-meteo.net/) aims to provide the basis for the reform of the system of higher education in the area of hydrometeorology in the Russian Federation to comply with the Bologna Declaration. In this regard, the project puts the following specific objectives: 1. To develop internationally recognized competency-based two-level (Bachelor / Master) curricula in meteorology by December 2007. 2. To transform existing and to develop new syllabi supported by teaching materials according to the developed two-level curricula by December 2008. 3. To implement the developed competency-based two-level curricula in meteorology at Russian State Hydro-meteorological University and universities-members of Academic Association of Russian Universities in hydrometeorology by September 2009. These objectives are met by the consortium headed by the University of Helsinki (Finland) including the University of Tartu (Estonia), the Academic Association of Russian Universities in Hydrometeorology (Russia), the Faculty of Geography of the Moscow State University (Russia) and the State Environmental University (Ukraine), with the Russian State Hydrometeorological University (Russia) as target institution. The project provides opportunities for retraining of academic and administrative staff from target universities in the consortium EU universities, as well as for bidirectional student mobility. The project results in teaching meteorology in Russia according to competency-based two-level curricula that will start by 01 September, 2009.

  6. The Restaurant Manager/Headwaiter--A Professional Profile. Food and Beverage Service Level 2 Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    This report profiles the activities and responsibilities of senior restaurant personnel (managers and headwaiters) in three industry sectors--hotels, upmarket restaurants, and popular/fast food outlets--in Ireland. It was commissioned by the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board in order to gather information that could be used for…

  7. Towards an Online Bachelor of Information Science Degree Programme in a Nigerian University: Part 1--Lessons from the Literature and Existing Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiferuke, Isola; Tiamiyu, Mutawakilu; Longe, Folake; Nwagwu, Williams; Ogunsola, Kemi; Opesade, Adeola; Olatokun, Wole

    2012-01-01

    Training programmes for the information professions worldwide have been shifting and diversifying the scope of their claimed domains and curricula in order to empower their graduates with diverse knowledge and versatile technical skills required to compete successfully in the highly competitive job markets in the information industries. In line…

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Public Relations Curricula: Does It Matter Where You Go to School, and Is Academia Meeting the Needs of the Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Giselle A.; Cho, Moonhee

    2016-01-01

    According to scholars, there has been a move toward a more professional or occupational focus in postsecondary education, a focus that Grubb and Lazerson suggest "undermines education's moral, civic, and intellectual purposes." The purpose of this study was to evaluate the public relations curricula of U.S. universities and colleges and…

  9. 软件工程专业的认证标准和课程计划%Accreditation and Curricula for Software Engineering Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白征

    2001-01-01

    The article introduces the objectives and contents of SWEEP,a software engineering education project organized by SWECC (a joint force form IEEE computer society and ACM),and focuses on the introduction of guidance form WGSEET about the development of curricula for software engineeringprograms.

  10. Teaching Early Mathematics with PLATO[R] Software: An Overview of the New PLATO Elementary Mathematics Curricula and How To Use Them. Technical Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Bill; Foshay, Rob; Morris, Barbara

    The "PLATO[R] Math Expeditions" and "PLATO[R] Projects for the Real World" curricula are designed to implement effective, research-based instructional practices. "Math Expeditions" is designed to give elementary grade users the mathematics skills and practice needed to solve real-life problems. Across the eight…

  11. Marine Science Teaching at the University Level. Report of the Unesco Workshop on University Curricula. Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science No. 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    A group of marine science education educators from several countries were requested to provide guidelines for the education and training of marine scientists and formulate recommended curricula in the following disciplines: marine biology (including fisheries biology), physical oceanography, and marine geology. Included in the report are: (1)…

  12. The Development of Intentions for Adapted Teaching and Inclusive Education Seen in Light of Curriculum Potential. A Content Analysis of Norwegian National Curricula Post 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsrud, Halvor; Nilsen, Sven

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses and discusses the development of the principles of adapted teaching and inclusive education in the three most recent Norwegian national curricula, seen in light of curriculum potential as an overarching perspective. This potential highlights teachers' opportunities for choosing and adapting their teaching content. The area of…

  13. Unpacking the Learning-Work Nexus: "Priming" as Lever for High-Quality Learning Outcomes in Work-Integrated Learning Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Calvin; Worsfold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the impacts of work-integrated learning (WIL) curriculum components on general employability skills--professional work-readiness, self-efficacy and team skills. Regression analyses emphasise the importance of the "authenticity" of WIL placements for the development of these generic outcomes. Other curricula factors…

  14. A Set of Vertically Integrated Inquiry-Based Practical Curricula that Develop Scientific Thinking Skills for Large Cohorts of Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardi, Kirsten; Bugarcic, Andrea; Colthorpe, Kay; Good, Jonathan P.; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2013-01-01

    Science graduates require critical thinking skills to deal with the complex problems they will face in their 21st century workplaces. Inquiry-based curricula can provide students with the opportunities to develop such critical thinking skills; however, evidence suggests that an inappropriate level of autonomy provided to under prepared students…

  15. Unpacking the Learning-Work Nexus: "Priming" as Lever for High-Quality Learning Outcomes in Work-Integrated Learning Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Calvin; Worsfold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the impacts of work-integrated learning (WIL) curriculum components on general employability skills--professional work-readiness, self-efficacy and team skills. Regression analyses emphasise the importance of the "authenticity" of WIL placements for the development of these generic outcomes. Other curricula factors…

  16. The Impact of Engineering Integrated Science (EIS) Curricula on First-Year Technical High School Students' Attitudes toward Science and Perceptions of Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Younkyeong; Lee, Sun-Ju; Paik, Seoung-Hey

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how engineering integrated science (EIS) curricula affect first-year technical high school students' attitudes toward science and perceptions of engineering. The effect of the EIS participation period on students' attitudes toward science was also investigated via experimental study design. Two engineering integrated…

  17. Understanding factors that facilitate the inclusion of pain education in undergraduate curricula: Perspectives from a UK survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Eloise CJ; Briggs, Emma V; Briggs, Michelle; Allcock, Nick; Black, Pauline; Jones, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies in Europe, North America and Australasia suggest that one in five adults suffer from pain. There is increasing recognition that pain, particularly chronic pain, represents a global health burden. Many studies, including two national surveys exploring the content of undergraduate curricula for pain education, identify that documented pain education in curricula was limited and fragmentary. Methods: The study design used a questionnaire which included an open text comment box for respondents to add ‘further comments’ as part of larger study previously published. The sample consisted of 19 UK universities that offered 108 undergraduate programmes in the following: dentistry, medicine, midwifery, nursing (adult, child, learning disabilities and mental health branches), occupational therapy (OT), pharmacy, physiotherapy and veterinary science. An inductive content analysis was performed, and the data were managed using NVivo 10 software for data management. Results: A total of 57 participants across seven disciplines (dentistry, medicine, midwifery, nursing, pharmacy, physiotherapy and OT) completed the open text comment box (none were received from veterinary science). Analysis revealed two major themes of successes and challenges. Successes included expansion (extending coverage and/or increased student access), multidimensional curriculum content and diversity of teaching methods. Challenges included difficulties in identifying where pain is taught in the curriculum, biomedical versus biopsychosocial definitions of pain, perceived importance, time, resources and staff knowledge, and finally a diffusion of responsibility for pain education. Conclusion: This study identifies new insights of the factors attributed to successful implementation of pain education in undergraduate education. Many of the challenges previously reported were also identified. This is one of the first studies to identify a broad range of approaches, for pain education

  18. Termination unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  19. Integration of Basic-Clinical Sciences, PBL, CBL, and IPE in U.S. Dental Schools' Curricula and a Proposed Integrated Curriculum Model for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Venugopalan, Shankar Rengasamy; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Weistroffer, Paula; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2016-03-01

    The integration of basic and clinical sciences in dental curricula enhances the application of basic science principles to clinical decision making and improves students' critical thinking. The aim of this study was to define the characteristics of U.S. dental schools' curricula with regard to level of course integration and degree of incorporation of problem-based and case-based learning. A second aim was to propose a dental curriculum that supports effective integration of courses and addresses some of the concerns facing academic dentistry. A survey was sent to 58 academic deans in U.S. dental schools. The survey included questions about integrating courses in the schools' curricula and major changes in curricular structure or teaching pedagogy that respondents anticipated in the immediate future. A total of 31 schools responded to the survey, for a 53.4% response rate. The results showed that three-quarters of the responding schools still teach basic and clinical sciences separately, although 61.3% reported having an integrated curriculum. Among the responding schools, 16 had a PBL component integrated into their curricula (two had integrated PBL in all courses and 14 used a hybrid PBL approach). Two schools had CBL integrated in all courses, and ten had CBL integrated in >75% of courses. Only slightly more than half agreed that their curricula foster students' thinking "outside the box." Faculty shortages and lack of protected time and resources were the most frequent reasons given for a lack of integrated courses. The integrated model proposed in this article has the potential to provide a low stress environment for students and to address important issues like faculty shortages.

  20. Electromagnetic Radiation: A Curriculum Unit for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandovsky, N.; Hawkins, I.; Malina, R. F.

    1994-05-01

    The main goal of the new satellite operations class offered by UC Berkeley in collaboration with San Francisco State University is to provide teachers with detailed information about the goals, phases, and results of NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite mission. One of the outcomes of this class is to create new lesson plans, curricula for elective courses, and non-traditional teaching techniques and methods, all of which may be incorporated in schools in order to develop students' cognitive interest in science. The information about this unique NASA satellite mission may be presented to high school students in many different ways: class discussions, extra-curricular research assignments, expositions for school museums of science, computer animations, science conferences, educational games, etc. Another approach is to infuse the material related to this project directly into the existing science curricula. The unit ``Electromagnetic Radiation'' presents us with a variety of opportunities to include scientific information related to the EUVE mission in the most natural way. The following issues related to modern astrophysics may be introduced and discussed in this unit: the position that EUV radiation occupies on the electromagnetic spectrum, the sources that emit this type of radiation, the properties and characteristics of this radiation in comparison with other types of electromagnetic waves, and the methods used to detect and analyze EUV and other types of radiation during NASA missions. We will present an overview and a specific detailed example related to this curriculum unit. This work has been supported by NASA contract NAS5-29298. Class support has been provided by a NASA supplemental grant for education. Travel made possible by Research Corporation.

  1. Barriers to integrating information technology content in doctor of nursing practice curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Kezia; Fitzpatrick, Joyce; Madigan, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no benchmark data available on the measurement of program outcomes in doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to integration of IT content in the curriculum in DNP programs, perceived IT competencies taught, and DNP faculty perception of competencies. The study location was DNP programs in the United States, and focus was on doctorate-prepared faculty with a DNP or PhD. A descriptive design using an Internet-based survey was done with 113 DNP programs administrators and faculty across the United States. Limitation of the study was that few DNP administrators forwarded the study to faculty, limiting the sample size. For the purpose of this study, the results were limited to responses from DNP administrators, and some comparative data of the faculty were used. Barriers measured included lack of qualified faculty, faculty's limited knowledge or skills in IT, lack of interest, age, lack of time to learn IT, lack of time to use IT, too many work demands, lack of administrative vision, unclear expectations of faculty, lack of technical support to faculty, or lack of resources. Leading barriers to IT implementation were lack of time of faculty, too many other work demands of faculty, lack of resources dedicated to IT, and lack of qualified faculty to teach IT. Further research is necessary on doctorate-prepared faculty and on interventions to overcome these barriers is needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. A Comparison of the Financial Management Curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School and Other Graduate Public Financial Management Curricula in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    NASPAA, 1990]. A review of the directory indicated that 91 schools offer MPA programs with a Public Finance /Budget concentration. Those schools are...including debt management. 2) Public economics including cost/benefit analysis and pricing. 3) Governmental accounting. 4) Public finance . 5) Budgeting. 6...process & analysis, micro/macro economics, cost/benefit analysis, project planning and management, procurement, and public finance would round out the

  3. Environmental consciousness and education relationship: Determination of how environment-based concepts are placed in Turkish science curricula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezmen, H. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Primary Education; Karamustafaoglu, O. [Amasya Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Primary Education

    2006-12-15

    generations. During the last decades the trend for environmental protection has expanded in various areas including education. Paraskevopoulos et.al. (1998) state that (a) if people are aware of the need for and the ways of protecting the environment they will act to preserve it, (b) schools should assume responsibility for educating about environmental protection and (c) environmental education can be effective as a part of a school curriculum. Increased concern about the environment has paralleled the development of environmental education in the world. With this regard, both developed and developing countries have taken this reality into consideration in designing curricula for all schools. Some arrangements have also been made in science education curricula in Turkey as a developing country in last decades. Of the various subjects taught in secondary schools, science is often perceived as one that can make a significant contribution to environmental education (Ko and Lee, 2003). Therefore, our primarily aim in this study is to determine how the Turkish science curricula contain environmental concepts after some of the attempts on environmental issues in the world were presented. There have been steady developments of national and international declarations relevant to environmental issues. The first attempt in this regard was the Stockholm Declaration recognized the interdependency between humanity and the environment. The most important results emerged from the declaration were to provide fundamental right to freedom, equality and adequate conditions of life in an environment and to improve the environment for present and future generations (UNESCO, 1972). In addition, this declaration stated the need of environmental education from grade school to adulthood. After this first attempt, a number of similar assemblies were made. In these meetings, some decisions were taken for environmental issues in local and global scale. These meetings are given in Table 1

  4. Wirken sich unterschiedliche medizinische Curricula auf das selbst eingeschätzte klinische Denken von Studierenden aus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehlhar, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objectives: As a fundamental element of medical practice, clinical reasoning should be cultivated in courses of study in human medicine. To date, however, no conclusive evidence has been offered as to what forms of teaching and learning are most effective in achieving this goal. The Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI was developed as a means of measuring knowledge-unrelated components of clinical reasoning. The present pilot study examines the adequacy of this instrument in measuring differences in the clinical reasoning of students in varying stages of education in three curricula of medical studies. Methods: The Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI comprises 41 items in two subscales (“Flexibility in Thinking” and “Structure of Knowledge in Memory”. Each item contains a statement or finding concerning clinical reasoning in the form of a stem under which a 6-point scale presents opposing conclusions. The subjects are asked to assess their clinical thinking within this range. The German-language version of the DTI was completed by 247 student volunteers from three schools and varying clinical semesters. In a quasi-experimental design, 219 subjects from traditional and model courses of study in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia took part. Specifically, these were 5, 6 and 8 semester students from the model course of study at Witten/Herdecke University (W/HU, from the model (7 and 9 semester and traditional (7 semester courses of study at the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB and from the model course of study (9 semester at the University of Cologne (UoC. The data retrieved were quantitatively assessed.Results: The reliability of the questionnaire in its entirety was good (Cronbach’s alpha between 0.71 and 0.83; the reliability of the subscales ranged between 0.49 and 0.75. The different groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney test, revealing significant differences among semester cohorts within a school as well as

  5. Nutrition guidelines for undergraduate medical curricula: a six-country comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowley J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Crowley,1 Lauren Ball,2 Celia Laur,3 Clare Wall,1 Bruce Arroll,4 Phillippa Poole,5 Sumantra Ray3 1Discipline of Nutrition, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 3Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK; 4Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, 5Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Aim: To assess nutrition curriculum guidelines for undergraduate medical education in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand to highlight potential opportunities for shared learning on the advancement of nutrition in medical education. Methods: A comprehensive list of professional bodies, councils, organizations, and other groups relevant to education or nutrition was compiled for each country after a review of relevant white and gray literature. All documents that were published from 2000 onwards, and that provided guidance on nutrition education within undergraduate medical education for one of the identified countries were included in the review. Each curriculum guideline was evaluated for 1 the organization's or group's role in undergraduate medical education; 2 the extent of nutrition-related recommendations; and 3 mandatory implementation. Results: In the countries reviewed, a total of six nutrition-related curriculum guidelines were identified. All countries, aside from the Republic of Ireland, currently have externally visible curriculum guidelines to inform medical schools in undergraduate nutrition education, yet there is little evidence of mandatory enforcement. Curriculum guidelines predominantly focus on basic nutrition principles, nutrition assessment, the role

  6. Nursing students and intimate partner violence education: improving and integrating knowledge into health care curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Pamela D; Nouer, Simonne S; Speck, Patricia M; Mackey, Seétrail N; Tipton, Nathan G

    2013-01-01

    This study measured intimate partner violence (IPV) curriculum content exposure; knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and self-reported behaviors; and IPV prevalence within doctor of nursing practice and doctor of philosophy nursing programs at a university in the southern United States. The survey instrument was an adaptation of the Physician Readiness to Manage Intimate Partner Violence Survey modified with language that focused on students in the health care arena. Three summary scales-Perceived Preparedness, Perceived Knowledge, and Actual Knowledge-were also created. Mann-Whitney U tests and exploratory multivariable and logistic regression analyses were employed to analyze the data. Results indicated that nursing students who received IPV training prior to graduate school had significantly higher perceived preparation and perceived knowledge ratings than those reporting no IPV training prior to graduate school. Results also showed that 40% of nursing students surveyed had personally experienced some type of domestic violence including IPV. Identifying and responding to curricular shortcomings and ascertaining student IPV prevalence are critical steps in strategizing and implementing comprehensive curriculum revision, enabling students to enter the nursing profession with the capacity to directly impact the care and treatment of IPV victims. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrating Earth System Science Data Into Tribal College and University Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, P. J.; Perkey, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Universities Space Research Association and Sinte Gleska University (SGU) have teamed with eight Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) to participate in a NASA Earth Science funded project, TRibal Earth Science and Technology Education (TRESTE) project which focuses on TCU faculty teaching undergraduate Earth science courses to non-science and science students, with particular attention to TCU faculty teaching K-12 pre- and in- service teachers. The eight partner TCUs are: Blackfeet Community College (BCC), Browning, MT, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Cloquet, MN, Fort Berthold Community College, New Town, ND, Little Priest Tribal College, Winnebago, NE, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge, SD, Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, ND, Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, ND, United Tribes Technical College (UTTC), Bismarck, ND. The goal of this 3-year project is to promote the use of NASA Earth science data and products in the classroom thereby enabling faculty to inspire undergraduate students to careers in Earth system science, the physical sciences, and related fields of science and engineering. To accomplish this goal we are targeting three areas: (1) course content - enhance the utilization of Earth system science and physical science concepts, (2) teaching methodology - develop problem-based learning (PBL) methods, and (3) tools and technology - increase the utilization of GIS and remote sensing in the classroom. We also have enlisted ESRI, NativeView and the USGS as collaborators. To date we have held an introductory "needs" workshop at the USGS EROS Data Center and two annual workshops, one at UTTC and the second at BCC. During these annual workshops we have divided our time among the three areas. We have modeled the workshops using the PBL or Case Study approach by starting with a story or current event. Topics for the annual workshops have been Drought and Forest and Grassland Fires. These topics led us into the solar radiation budget

  8. Examining and characterizing changes in first year high school chemistry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Kerry Kathleen Mcgee

    Many students currently entering college are able to solve mathematical problems but often do not understand the chemistry concepts underlying their calculations. High school chemistry teachers from Texas and the United States (US) were surveyed as to what topics they teach in their chemistry classes. A subset of Texas teachers was also interviewed about their instruction. The survey indicated that less-experienced Texas teachers are omitting a number of topics from their chemistry instruction, as compared to more experienced teachers. No differences were seen for those topics among US teachers. Chemistry textbooks from 1930 to the current 2002 Texas state adoptions were analyzed for inclusion of these topics. The only textbooks that were missing topics were from the 1930s. All others contained the topics. In general, textbooks have been increasing numbers of questions and problems for each topic, with the number of quantitative problems increasing at a greater rate than qualitative problems. Analysis of interview transcripts revealed that the main reason for omission of topics by less-experienced Texas chemistry teachers is that these topics are not assessed on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills science exam. Omitted topics were both qualitative and quantitative; the common factor is that they are not tested. School administrators reportedly reinforce this practice. Archival data regarding textbook usage by general chemistry students showed that students' course grades are not correlated to the amount of time they spend using their textbook. With topics included in textbooks, and no relationship between textbook usage and student grades, observed changes in chemistry courses must be due to changes in classroom instruction. With new course standards adopted by Texas for chemistry and the development of end-of-course exams, these changes should produce graduates who understand chemistry concepts as well as they solve mathematical chemistry problems

  9. Post-Secondary Education and Diversity in the Geosciences: The Need for Innovative Courses and Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntoon, J. E.; Lane, M.

    2004-12-01

    Enrollments in bachelor's-level degree programs in the geosciences are decreasing nationwide. It seems clear that it will be difficult to reverse this falling trend by teaching the `same old' content in the `same old' way. Innovative geoscience instructors are already revising both content and pedagogy, particularly for introductory-level courses that reach large audiences of potential geoscience majors. As these courses are updated, it is critical that practices contributing to increased diversity in the geosciences are incorporated. The geosciences currently have the lowest diversity of any of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. In 2001, the most recent year for which data are available, ethnic and racial groups that are underrepresented in STEM disciplines made up approximately 25 percent of the population of the United States. In contrast, only 7 percent of the bachelor's, 5 percent of the master's, and 2 percent of the doctoral degrees awarded in the geosciences in 2001 went to members of underrepresented groups. The fact that diversity decreases less rapidly with increasing degree level (e.g. from B.S. to M.S.) in the geosciences than in other STEM disciplines indicates that the geosciences are of interest to members of underrepresented groups. Mechanisms that have been shown to be effective at increasing diversity in the geosciences (as well as total enrollment in bachelor's-level geoscience programs) are to: 1) demonstrate that the geosciences are relevant to technologically savvy, increasingly urban students; 2) engage students in research; 3) build partnerships between universities, community colleges, K-12 teachers, and guidance counselors, families, and communities to address pipeline issues; 4) promote mentoring relationships among scientists, educators, and students; 5) provide financial support to facilitate participation in the geosciences among all members of the diverse U.S. population; and 6) publicize traditional

  10. "You teach us to listen,… but you don't teach us about suffering": self-care and resilience strategies in medical school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Sue; Kelly, Brian

    2014-11-01

    This article examines the pre-vocational preparation of doctors to cope with the demands of clinical practice, drawing on literature from across a number of domains: mental health, psychological stress among medical students and medical practitioners; and self-care strategies in medicine curricula. High rates of psychological distress in medical students and medical practitioners were consistently reported. A number of questions remain pertinent to medical education: how does the experience of medical education impact on this level of distress, and possibly exacerbate pre-existing student vulnerabilities? What will help future doctors respond to, and cope with, suffering in their patients? Can the formal curriculum build resilience? Medical schools and educators have a responsibility to address these questions and to provide effective self-care curricula. In this review promising interventions such as mindfulness training are reported, frameworks to guide self-awareness in medical students are suggested, and recommendations for a self-care curriculum are made.

  11. Integrating patient safety into health professionals' curricula: a qualitative study of medical, nursing and pharmacy faculty perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane; Clarke, Beth; Norton, Peter

    2014-03-01

    As efforts to integrate patient safety into health professional curricula increase, there is growing recognition that the rate of curricular change is very slow, and there is a shortage of research that addresses critical perspectives of faculty who are on the 'front-lines' of curricular innovation. This study reports on medical, nursing and pharmacy teaching faculty perspectives about factors that influence curricular integration and the preparation of safe practitioners. Qualitative methods were used to collect data from 20 faculty members (n=6 medical from three universities; n=6 pharmacy from two universities; n=8 nursing from four universities) engaged in medical, nursing and pharmacy education. Thematic analysis generated a comprehensive account of faculty perspectives. Faculty perspectives on key challenges to safe practice vary across the three disciplines, and these different perspectives lead to different priorities for curricular innovation. Additionally, accreditation and regulatory requirements are driving curricular change in medicine and pharmacy. Key challenges exist for health professional students in clinical teaching environments where the culture of patient safety may thwart the preparation of safe practitioners. Patient safety curricular innovation depends on the interests of individual faculty members and the leveraging of accreditation and regulatory requirements. Building on existing curricular frameworks, opportunities now need to be created for faculty members to act as champions of curricular change, and patient safety educational opportunities need to be harmonises across all health professional training programmes. Faculty champions and practice setting leaders can collaborate to improve the culture of patient safety in clinical teaching and learning settings.

  12. Tutoring in problem-based learning medical curricula: the influence of tutor background and style on effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régo Patricia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for the superiority of particular characteristics in PBL tutors in medical curricula is generally inconclusive. Most studies have investigated the effectiveness of content experts compared with that of non-experts as measured either by student satisfaction or academic achievement. A few have compared academic staff tutors with student tutors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between students' perception of overall tutor effectiveness, particular tutor behaviours, clinical qualifications and academic appointment. Method A questionnaire designed to evaluate particular aspects of PBL tutoring technique, related either to subject-matter knowledge or to process-facilitation skill, as well as overall effectiveness, was distributed to students in first year of a PBL medical program at the end of each of three tutor terms. A total of 76 tutor terms were included in the study. Data analysis compared clinical with non-clinical tutors, and staff with non-staff tutors. Results Clinically qualified tutors used their subject-matter knowledge significantly more than non-clinical tutors and were seen as being more empathic with their students. Staff tutors placed more emphasis on assessment than non-staff tutors and were seen as having greater skill in establishing and maintaining an environment of cooperation within their PBL groups than non-staff tutors. Conclusion These results suggest that both subject-matter knowledge and process-facilitation skills are necessary but not individually sufficient characteristics of effective tutors.

  13. A Comparative Study on Sustainability in Architectural Education in Asia—With a Focus on Professional Degree Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Porras Álvarez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Architectural education is a key factor in the re-thinking of the whole industry toward a system of more sustainable buildings and cities. Asia is the continent with the highest population growth and the fastest urbanization rate on earth. It is necessary to educate professionals with a well-balanced and integrated knowledge of local issues and global standards. This paper focuses on education for sustainable architecture in Asian countries. This is an exploratory study, analyzing the curricula of 20 selected influential schools in 11 countries. Sustainability-related courses are identified, classified and summarized in qualitative tables (course matrix and in quantitative graphs. The analysis helps to identify trends and regional or individual uniqueness. The results show that sustainability education is organized in very diverse ways, according to contents, intensity and sequence. The percentages of sustainable courses range from less than 5% to 25%. Technology-related courses are the most numerous and homogeneous. Sustainability design studios show the greatest variation, from zero to almost 100%. General theory courses help in dealing with sustainability issues through traditional and vernacular philosophies, technologies and strategies that are very adequate to their geographical and cultural settings.

  14. What's the Right Referral Rate? Specialty Referral Patterns and Curricula Across I3 Collaborative Primary Care Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Mark; Page, Cristen; Reid, Alfred; Donahue, Katrina; Newton, Warren

    2017-02-01

    Specialty physician visits account for a significant portion of ambulatory visits nationally, contribute significantly to cost of care, and are increasing over the past decade. Marked variability in referral rates exists among primary care practices without obvious causality. We present data describing the referral process and specialty referral curriculum within the I3 collaborative. Residency directors were surveyed about residency characteristics related to referrals. Specialty physician referral rates were obtained from each program and then correlated to program characteristics referral rates in four domains: presence and type of referral curriculum, process of referral review, faculty preceptor characteristics, and use of referral data for administrative processes. The survey response rate was 87%; 10 programs submitted complete referral data. Three programs (23%) reported a formal curriculum addressing the process of making a referral, and four programs (31%) reported a curriculum on appropriateness of subspecialty referrals. Specialty referral rates varied from 7%-31% of active residency patients, with no relationship to age, payor status, or race. Marked variability in referral rates and patterns exist within primary care residency training programs. Specialty referral practices are a key driver of total cost of care yet few curricula exist that address appropriateness, quantity, or process of specialty referrals. Practice patterns often develop during residency training, therefore an opportunity exists to improve training and practice around referrals.

  15. Flexibility in individualized, competency-based workplace curricula with EPAs: Analyzing four cohorts of physician assistants in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Fraukje; Berkvens, Josephine; Ten Cate, Olle

    2017-05-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) were introduced as a principle for individualized physician assistant (PA) workplace curricula at the University of Applied Sciences (UAS) Utrecht in 2008. We studied how the focus on EPAs served the competency-based flexibility intention of the program. We analyzed data of those 119 students who enrolled in the program 2010 through 2013, and completed the program before April 2016. We analyzed the number of EPAs per student at start and end of the program, number changed during training and the reasons for change. Data of 101 students were suitable for evaluation. Excluded were 16 students ending the program prematurely and two with study delay. Mean number of EPAs per student at the start was 6.8 (range 4-12) and at the end 6.6 (range 3-13). On average 1.5 EPAs were altered (range 0-13). Reasons included extension of the EPA package during training (n = 10), lack of proficiency at planned moments of summative entrustment decisions (n = 9) and procedures not being suitable for PAs at closer look (n = 6). All changes resulted in a curriculum meeting the school's standards for graduation. The flexibility of the EPA concept enabled changes in the individualized curriculum of students, according to the intended competency-based nature of the educational program.

  16. [Longitudinal perception of the educational environment in two medical schools with traditional curricula in Chile and Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora G, Sergio; Escanero, Jesús F

    2016-11-01

    To establish an educational environment that ensures the quality of the teaching-learning process is a challenge for any educational institution. The questionnaire DREEM (Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure) is used to identify strengths and weaknesses of an educational environment and to compare different medical schools. To evaluate the changes in the perception of educational environment by students of the Schools of Medicine of the University of Zaragoza, UZar (Spain) and the University of Chile, UCh (Chile) at two points in their curricula. DREEM questionnaire was answered by 90 students from the UZar and 87 students of the UCh, when they were in the first year (2009) and in the fourth year of their career (2012). At both universities the overall mean scores of DREAM were significantly higher in students in their first year than those obtained in the fourth year (137.5/118.3 for UZar and 128.6/118.8 for UCh). Items with worse perception in the fourth year were observed in subscales Learning Perception and Atmosphere Perception. Items with good evaluation (≥ 3.0) were the subscales Perception of teachers, academic self-perception, perception of Environment and Social Self-perception. The perception of Chilean and Spanish students about their educational environments indicates that the stage of their medical training is more important than the geographical context or educational institution.

  17. Teachers' conceptions of learning and teaching in student-centred medical curricula: the impact of context and personal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Johanna C G; van Luijk, Scheltus J; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Croiset, Gerda; Scheele, Fedde

    2016-09-21

    Gibbs and Coffey (2004) have reported that teaching practices are influenced by teachers' conceptions of learning and teaching. In our previous research we found significant differences between teachers' conceptions in two medical schools with student-centred education. Medical school was the most important predictor, next to discipline, gender and teaching experience. Our research questions for the current study are (1) which specific elements of medical school explain the effect of medical school on teachers' conceptions of learning and teaching? How? and (2) which contextual and personal characteristics are related to conceptions of learning and teaching? How? Individual interviews were conducted with 13 teachers of the undergraduate curricula in two medical schools. Previously their conceptions of learning and teaching were assessed with the COLT questionnaire. We investigated the meanings they attached to context and personal characteristics, in relation to their conceptions of learning and teaching. We used a template analysis. Large individual differences existed between teachers. Characteristics mentioned at the medical school and curriculum level were 'curriculum tradition', 'support by educational department' and 'management and finances'. Other contextual characteristics were 'leadership style' at all levels but especially of department chairs, 'affordances and support', 'support and relatedness', and 'students' characteristics'. Personal characteristics were 'agency', 'experience with PBL (as a student or a teacher)','personal development', 'motivation and work engagement'and 'high content expertise'. Several context and personal characteristics associated with teachers' conceptions were identified, enabling a broader view on faculty development with attention for these characteristics, next to teaching skills.

  18. Doing it for Real: Designing Experiential Journalism Curricula that Prepare Students for the New and Uncertain World of Journalism Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanti St Clair

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The world of journalism in the digital age is changing faster than university curricula can keep up. News is now produced in forms and on platforms that were nonexistent 10 years ago. Journalists may increasingly generate their own work opportunities in entrepreneurial news outlets and start-ups, rather than as employees in legacy newsprint and broadcast media. Substantial workforce contraction has also occurred since 2012 as revenue in print and other traditional media has found new homes in social media and search engines, and over 1000 journalists (or 15 percent of the journalism workforce were made redundant. Journalism graduates therefore need to be flexible, innovative and enterprising to survive professionally in this evolving setting. Additionally, financial and funding pressures on universities are leading them to reduce course costs and deliver more courses online. Elongated unpaid internships provide real world experience but access to these will likely reduce as workforces continue to contract. This article considers student feedback from three authentic experiential journalism projects in light of these changing times in journalism. It explores how the performative and very practical nature of traditional and digital journalism skills may be developed through a learning-centred curriculum anchored in authentic and experiential activities and settings. The article briefly considers some of the challenges facing journalism educators in delivering such a curriculum in e-learning settings, and sets out a simple framework for supporting the development of digital media workforce readiness.

  19. The (non-effect of the knowledge era on undergraduate research methodology curricula in the social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Wagner

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Educational policy reform in South Africa seeks to address the real-life relevance of curricula, and specifically, reformists have turned to proponents of Mode 2 knowledge to inform initiatives for change. This study aimed to explore the extent to which trends in the knowledge production requirements for higher education are reflected in the beliefs held by academics about the way in which they construct under-graduate research courses. It is proposed that the way forward for curriculum construction lies in establishing academic communities of practice where academics share power and are open to the challenges that they face such as negotiating what is accepted as knowledge. Opsomming Opvoedkundige beleidshervorming in Suid-Afrika poog om die praktiese toepaslikheid van kurrikula aan te spreek en hervormers beroep hul spesifiek op Modus 2-kennis om verandering te bewerkstellig. Hierdie studie ondersoek die mate waarin tendense in die vereistes vir kennisproduksie vir hoër onderwys gereflekteer word in die oortuigings van akademici oor die manier wat hulle voorgraadse navorsingskursusse saamstel. Dit word voorgestel dat kurrikulumontwikkeling binne akademiese gemeenskappe wat praktykgerig is, gesetel word. Hier kan akademici mag deel en uitdagings, soos wat as kennis gereken kan word, aanspreek.

  20. Vertical stream curricula integration of problem-based learning using an autonomous vacuum robot in a mechatronics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Cheng; Yue, Keng

    2011-10-01

    Difficulties in teaching a multi-disciplinary subject such as the mechatronics system design module in Departments of Mechatronics Engineering at Temasek Polytechnic arise from the gap in experience and skill among staff and students who have different backgrounds in mechanical, computer and electrical engineering within the Mechatronics Department. The departments piloted a new vertical stream curricula model (VSCAM) to enhance student learning in mechatronics system design through integration of educational activities from the first to the second year of the course. In this case study, a problem-based learning (PBL) method on an autonomous vacuum robot in the mechatronics systems design module was proposed to allow the students to have hands-on experience in the mechatronics system design. The proposed works included in PBL consist of seminar sessions, weekly works and project presentation to provide holistic assessment on teamwork and individual contributions. At the end of VSCAM, an integrative evaluation was conducted using confidence logs, attitude surveys and questionnaires. It was found that the activities were quite appreciated by the participating staff and students. Hence, PBL has served as an effective pedagogical framework for teaching multidisciplinary subjects in mechatronics engineering education if adequate guidance and support are given to staff and students.