WorldWideScience

Sample records for underwent robotic radical

  1. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  2. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy versus open radical cystectomy: assessment of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru, Khurshid A; Wilding, Gregory E; Piacente, Pamela; Thompson, Jannah; Deng, Wei; Kim, Hyung L; Mohler, James; O'Leary, Kathleen

    2007-12-01

    To date, no study has compared postoperative pain and requirement for pain medications in open versus robot-assisted radical cystectomy. Patient reported pain and opiate use were reviewed retrospectively using prospectively collected data from postoperative day one to day of discharge. Twenty consecutive robot-assisted radical cystectomy patients were compared to the prior 20 patients who underwent open radical cystectomy. Data was collected prospectively to determine opiate requirements and pain scores in each group. Daily opiate use was converted to morphine sulfate equivalents (MSE) to facilitate comparison. A Likert pain perception scale was used to assess perceived pain. Statistical models were used to test for differences in opiate usage and pain perception between groups of patients who underwent open versus robot-assisted surgery. Seven patients were excluded from the study (three from the open group, and four from the robotic group): five due to preoperative opiate usage, one due to missing pain data, and one whose procedure was aborted due to unresectable disease. All patients were similar with respect to age, body mass index and pathological parameters. Average MSE usage differed significantly between the two groups on all postoperative days (p < 0.007) whereas average pain scores were similar in the two groups. Patients who underwent robot-assisted radical cystectomy achieved similar pain control but required less opiates than those who underwent open radical cystectomy.

  3. Pitfalls of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: a comparison of positive surgical margins between robotic and laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozawa, Keiichi; Yasui, Takahiro; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Mizuno, Kentaro; Okada, Atsushi; Kawai, Noriyasu; Takahashi, Satoru; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-10-01

    To compare the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, including the frequency and location of positive surgical margins. The study cohort comprised 708 consecutive male patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (n = 551) or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (n = 157) between January 1999 and September 2012. Operative time, estimated blood loss, complications, and positive surgical margins frequency were compared between laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. There were no significant differences in age or body mass index between the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients. Prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason sum and clinical stage of the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients were significantly higher than those of the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy patients. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients suffered significantly less bleeding (P robot-assisted radical prostatectomy group. In the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy group, positive surgical margins were detected in the apex (52.0%), anterior (5.3%), posterior (5.3%) and lateral regions (22.7%) of the prostate, as well as in the bladder neck (14.7%). In the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy patients, they were observed in the apex, anterior, posterior, and lateral regions of the prostate in 43.0%, 6.9%, 25.9% and 15.5% of patients, respectively, as well as in the bladder neck in 8.6% of patients. Positive surgical margin distributions after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are significantly different. The only disadvantage of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is the lack of tactile feedback. Thus, the robotic surgeon needs to take this into account to minimize the risk of positive surgical margins. © 2014 The Japanese Urological

  4. Overactive bladder is a negative predictor of achieving continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuta; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Toru; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Homma, Yukio

    2017-10-01

    To investigate predictors of continence outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Clinical records of 272 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were investigated. Preoperative Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, International Prostate Symptom Score and clinicopathological factors were investigated, and relationships between factors and recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were assessed. The presence of overactive bladder was defined as having urgency for more than once a week and having ≥3 points according to the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score. Age (≤66 years) was significantly associated with continence within 6 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (P = 0.033). The absence of overactive bladder and lower Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, Kaplan-Meier curves showed earlier recovery in "age ≤66 years," "prostate weight ≤40 g" and "overactive bladder symptom score robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Transperitoneal versus extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: A prospective single surgeon randomized comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akand, Murat; Erdogru, Tibet; Avci, Egemen; Ates, Mutlu

    2015-10-01

    To compare operative, pathological, and functional results of transperitoneal and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy carried out by a single surgeon. After having experience with 32 transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 317 extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 30 transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies and 10 extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 120 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and underwent either transperitoneal or extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The main outcome parameters between the two study groups were compared. No significant difference was found for age, body mass index, preoperative prostate-specific antigen, clinical and pathological stage, Gleason score on biopsy and prostatectomy specimen, tumor volume, positive surgical margin, and lymph node status. Transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy had shorter trocar insertion time (16.0 vs 25.9 min for transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, P robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy had shorter console time (101.5 vs 118.3 min, respectively, P robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, without statistical significance (200.9 vs 193.2 min; 221.8 vs 213.3 min, respectively). Estimated blood loss was found to be lower for extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (P = 0.001). Catheterization and hospitalization times were observed to be shorter in extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (7.3 vs 5.8 days and 3.1 vs 2.3 days for transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, respectively, P robot-assisted laparoscopic

  6. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Robotic radical anterior pelvic exenteration: the UCI experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Oskar G; Young, Jennifer L; Sountoulides, Petros; Kaplan, Adam G; Dash, Atreya; Ornstein, David K

    2011-07-01

    Robotic technology may be a promising tool in reduction of morbidity in radical anterior pelvic exenteration for invasive bladder cancer. We report our initial experience with robotic-assisted radical anterior pelvic exenteration in females in an attempt to evaluate the technique's feasibility and outcomes. A retrospective review of our bladder cancer database was performed. Twelve women that underwent robotic-assisted radical anterior pelvic exenteration, bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy, and urinary diversion for clinically localized urothelial carcinoma of the bladder between 2004 and 2008 were included in this retrospective study. Median age was 73.0 +/- 9.6 years and median body mass index (BMI) was 23.5 +/- 5.0 kg/m2. Ten patients underwent ileal conduit diversion, one had an orthotopic neobladder and one an Indiana pouch. Median total operating time was 6.4 +/- 1.5 hours with median console and diversion times of 4.7 +/- 0.9 and 2.5 +/- 1.5 hours respectively. Median blood loss was 275.0 +/- 165.8 ml. Median length of stay was 8.0 +/- 1.6 days. Four patients were T2N0 or less, five T3N0, one T3N1 and two patients T4N0. There was one patient with positive surgical margins. Median number of lymph nodes removed was 23.0 +/- 11.4. Median follow-up of 9.0 +/- 6.0 months was available for ten patients. One had a recurrent ureteroenteric stricture, one had colpocleisis for vault prolapse, and three had metastatic disease. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic anterior pelvic exenteration appears to be a favorable surgical option with acceptable operative, pathological, and short-term clinical outcomes. According to the UCI experience, robotic anterior exenteration appears to achieve the clinical and oncologic goals for the surgical treatment of bladder cancer.

  8. Robotic radical hysterectomy in the management of gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2008-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used with increasing frequency in gynecologic oncology. To date, 44 cases were reported in the literature of radical hysterectomy performed with robotic surgery. When comparing robotic surgery with laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy, the literature shows that robotic surgery offers an advantage over the other 2 surgical approaches with regard to operative time, blood loss, and length of hospitalization. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the equivalence or superiority of robotic surgery to laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy.

  9. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Hvarness, Helle

    2013-01-01

    We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients.......We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients....

  10. Robotic Salvage Lymph Node Dissection After Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction and objective:Radical prostatectomy is a first-line treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, in some cases, biochemical recurrence associated with imaging-detected nodal metastases may happen. Herein, we aim to present the surgical technique for salvage lymph node dissection after radical prostatectomy.Materials and Methods:A 70 year-old asymptomatic man presented with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA of 7.45ng/ mL. Digital rectal examination was normal and trans-rectal prostate biopsy revealed a prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason 7 (3+4. Pre-operative computed tomography scan and bone scintigraphy showed no metastatic disease. In other service, the patient underwent a robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy plus obturador lymphadenectomy. Pathologic examination showed a pT3aN0 tumor. After 6 months of follow-up, serum PSA was 1.45ng/mL. Further investigation with 11C–Choline PET/CT revealed only a 2-cm lymph node close to the left internal iliac artery. The patient was counseled for salvage lymph node dissection.Results:Salvage lymph node dissection was uneventfully performed. Operative time was 1.5 hour, blood loss was minimal, and there were no intra- or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged from hospital in the 1st postoperative day. After 12 months of follow-up, his PSA was undetectable with no other adjuvant therapy.Conclusion:Robotic salvage pelvic lymph node dissection is an effective option for treatment of patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and only pelvic lymph node metastasis detected by C11-Choline PET/CT.

  11. Initial experience with aspirin use during robotic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowfar, Sepehr; Kopp, Ryan; Palazzi-Churas, Kerrin; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Kane, Christopher J

    2012-04-01

    New cardiology guidelines recommend antiplatelet therapy for some patients with cardiac stents. Aspirin use is relatively contraindicated during urologic surgery because of increased bleeding risk. We sought to review the outcomes of patients who continued aspirin during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Between October 2007 and February 2010, 249 patients underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy by a single surgeon. After consultation with the patients' cardiologists, 6 patients had coronary artery stents and continued aspirin perioperatively (Group 1), and 7 patients had coronary artery stents but did not continue aspirin perioperatively (Group 2). The remaining 236 patients had no coronary artery stents and did not require continued aspirin (Group 3). We analyzed our patients' preoperative characteristics, including age, prostate-specific antigen volume, and D'Amico risk, as well as operative time, blood loss, hematocrit changes, transfusion requirements, length of hospital stay, and complications. We found no differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, changes in hematocrit, or length of hospital stay. No patients with any type of cardiac stent required a postoperative blood transfusion or had complications requiring more than simple anti-emetics, analgesics, or electrolyte correction. Nine patients in Group 3 required interventions for significant complications. Larger studies need to be performed to validate these observations.

  12. Concomitant mediastinal and extrarenal retroperitoneal angiomyolipomas in a patient who previously underwent ipsilateral radical nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Sheng-Chen Wen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The association of the tuberous sclerosis complex with angiomyolipoma (AML arising from the retroperitoneum and mediastinum has not been reported in the literature. We present the first case in which a patient presented with a combined retroperitoneal extrarenal and posterior mediastinal AML. Interestingly, the ipsilateral retroperitoneal AML emerged 15 years after radical nephrectomy for the left renal AML.

  13. Does robotic assistance confer an economic benefit during laparoscopic radical nephrectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, David Y; Monn, M Francesca; Bahler, Clinton D; Sundaram, Chandru P

    2014-09-01

    While robotic assisted radical nephrectomy is safe with outcomes and complication rates comparable to those of the pure laparoscopic approach, there is little evidence of an economic or clinical benefit. From the 2009 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database we identified patients 18 years old or older who underwent radical nephrectomy for primary renal malignancy. Robotic assisted and laparoscopic techniques were noted. Patients treated with the open technique and those with evidence of metastatic disease were excluded from analysis. Descriptive statistics were performed using the chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests, and the Student t-test. Multiple linear regression was done to examine factors associated with increased hospital costs and charges. We identified 24,312 radical nephrectomy cases for study inclusion, of which 7,787 (32%) were performed robotically. There was no demographic difference between robotic assisted and pure laparoscopic radical nephrectomy cases. Median total charges were $47,036 vs $38,068 for robotic assisted vs laparoscopic surgery (p robotic assisted surgery were $15,149 compared to $11,735 for laparoscopic surgery (p robotic assistance conferred an estimated $4,565 and $11,267 increase in hospital costs and charges, respectively, when adjusted for adapted Charlson comorbidity index score, perioperative complications and length of stay (p Robotic assisted radical nephrectomy results in increased medical expense without improving patient morbidity. Assuming surgeon proficiency with pure laparoscopy, robotic technology should be reserved primarily for complex surgeries requiring reconstruction. Traditional laparoscopic techniques should continue to be used for routine radical nephrectomy. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates based on vaginal cuff length in patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Cho, S Y; Park, S I; Kim, B J; Kim, M H; Choi, S C; Ryu, S Y; Lee, E D

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association of vaginal cuff length (VCL) with vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates in patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies. The clinicopathologic characteristics were collected from the medical records of 280 patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomies. The association of VCL with 3-year vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates was determined using a Z-test. The association of VCL with other clinicopathologic characteristics was also determined. The VCL was not associated with 3-year vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates. The 3-year vaginal recurrence rate was 0%-2% and the 3-year pelvic recurrence rate was 7%-8%, independent of VCL. The VCL and the age of patients had an inverse relationship. However, the VCL was not associated with histologic type, FIGO stage, clinical tumor size, tumor size in the surgical specimen, depth of invasion, lymphovascular space invasion, parametrial involvement, lymph node involvement, and adjuvant therapy. One-hundred ninety of 280 patients (68%) underwent adjuvant therapies following radical hysterectomies. Although it is limited by the high rate of adjuvant therapy, the current study suggested that the VCL following radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical cancer was not associated with vaginal and pelvic recurrence rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hemodynamic changes during robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanlal Darlong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effect on hemodynamic changes and experience of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP in steep Trendelenburg position (45° with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum is very limited. Therefore, we planned this prospective clinical trial to study the effect of steep Tredelenburg position with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum on hemodynamic parameters in a patient undergoing RALRP using FloTrac/Vigileo™1.10. Methods: After ethical approval and informed consent, 15 patients scheduled for RALRP were included in the study. In the operation room, after attaching standard monitors, the radial artery was cannulated. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (2 μg/kg and thiopentone (4-7 mg/kg, and tracheal intubation was facilitated by vecuronium bromide (0.1 mg/kg. The patient′s right internal jugular vein was cannulated and the Pre Sep™ central venous oximetry catheter was connected to it. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide and intermittent boluses of vecuronium. Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation was provided to maintain normocapnea. After CO 2 pneumoperitoneum, position of the patient was gradually changed to 45° Trendelenburg over 5 min. The robot was then docked and the robot-assisted surgery started. Intraoperative monitoring included central venous pressure (CVP, stroke volume (SV, stroke volume variation (SVV, cardiac output (CO, cardiac index (CI and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO 2 . Results: After induction of anesthesia, heart rate (HR, SV, CO and CI were decreased significantly from the baseline value (P>0.05. SV, CO and CI further decreased significantly after creating pneumoperitoneum (P>0.05. At the 45° Trendelenburg position, HR, SV, CO and CI were significantly decreased compared with baseline. Thereafter, CO and CI were persistently low throughout the 45° Trendelenburg position (P=0.001. HR at 20 min and 1 h, SV and mean arterial blood pressure

  16. Impact of metabolic syndrome on early recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masatomo; Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kurahashi, Toshifumi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The present study included a total of 302 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. In this study, postoperative urinary continence was defined as no leak or the use of a security pad. The continence status was assessed by interviews before and 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Metabolic syndrome was defined as follows: body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 and two or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. The effect of the presence of metabolic syndrome on the continence status of these patients was retrospectively examined. A total of 116 (38.4%) and 203 (67.2%) of the 302 patients were continent at 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. A total of 31 (10.3%) patients were judged to have metabolic syndrome. Despite the operative time being longer in patients with metabolic syndrome, no significant differences were observed in the remaining preoperative, intraoperative or postoperative variables between patients with or without metabolic syndrome. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome and the duration of hospitalization were significantly correlated with the 1-month continence status. Similarly, metabolic syndrome and estimated blood loss during surgery were independent predictors of continence rates at 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that the presence of metabolic syndrome could have a significant impact on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  17. Radical Nephroureterectomy Without Patient or Port Repositioning Using the Da Vinci Xi Robotic System: Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argun, Omer Burak; Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Tufek, Ilter; Tuna, Mustafa Bilal; Keskin, Selcuk; Obek, Can; Kural, Ali Riza

    2016-06-01

    To report our initial experience on robot-assisted radical nephroureterectomy, using the da Vinci Xi robotic system without patient or port repositioning. The patients were in a modified flank position. A Bugbee electrode was used to cauterize and mark the ureteral orifice, aiding in the final robotic excision of the distal ureter. For the first step of the procedure, the second robotic arm holds the scope, the fourth robotic arm holds Port #1 (monopolar curved scissors), the first robotic arm holds Port #2 (Fenestrated bipolar forceps), and the third robotic arm holds Port #4 (Prograsp forceps). After completion of nephrectomy, all robotic arms were released and reconfigured. In the new setting, the third robotic arm and second robotic arm were switched between the camera port and the fourth port. The first port remained working with the monopolar curved scissors whereas Prograsp forceps was moved to the second port and fenestrated bipolar forceps was moved to the third port. Two patients underwent 2 successful radical nephroureterectomies with the above-mentioned technique. The console time for the first patient was 150 minutes whereas the estimated blood loss was 200 mL. The console time and blood loss for the second patient were 140 minutes and 300 mL, respectively. The hospitalization time and catheter removal time were 3 days for both patients and no complications were observed. The use of the da Vinci Xi robotic system enabled us to perform both nephrectomy and distal ureterectomy and/or bladder cuff excision without any repositioning of the patient or trocars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Laparoscopic, robotic and open method of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puliyath Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Over the last two decades, numerous studies have indicated the feasibility of minimally invasive surgery for early cervical cancer without compromising the oncological outcome. Objective : Systematic literature review and meta analysis aimed at evaluating the outcome of laparoscopic and robotic radical hysterectomy (LRH and RRH and comparing the results with abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH. Search Strategy : Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists were searched for articles published until January 31 st 2011, using the terms radical hysterectomy, laparoscopic radical hysterectomy, robotic radical hysterectomy, surgical treatment of cervical cancer and complications of radical hysterectomy. Selection Criteria : Studies that reported outcome measures of radical hysterectomy by open method, laparoscopic and robotic methods were selected. Data collection and analysis: Two independent reviewers selected studies, abstracted and tabulated the data and pooled estimates were obtained on the surgical and oncological outcomes. Results : Mean sample size, age and body mass index across the three types of RH studies were similar. Mean operation time across the three types of RH studies was comparable. Mean blood loss and transfusion rate are significantly higher in ARH compared to both LRH and RRH. Duration of stay in hospital for RRH was significantly less than the other two methods. The mean number of lymph nodes obtained, nodal metastasis and positive margins across the three types of RH studies were similar. Post operative infectious morbidity was significantly higher among patients who underwent ARH compared to the other two methods and a higher rate of cystotomy in LRH. Conclusions : Minimally invasive surgery especially robotic radical hysterectomy may be a better and safe option for surgical treatment of cervical cancer. The laparoscopic method is not free from complications. However, experience of surgeon may

  19. Robot-Assisted Perineal Radical Prostatectomy in a Post-Kidney Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugcu, Volkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Yigitbasi, Ismail; Yenice, Mustafa Gurkan; Sahin, Selcuk; Tasci, Ali Ihsan

    2018-01-01

    Background: After almost two decades, transabdominal robotic radical prostatectomy techniques have been fully developed and are widely practiced by many robotic urologists. Recently, a transperineal robotic radical prostatectomy, a technique not yet popular to many, was introduced as an alternative approach in patients with previous abdominal surgery. Here, we present our unique experience with robotic perineal radical prostatectomy (r-PRP) on a kidney transplant recipient. Case Presentation: A 71-year-old man who had a kidney transplant 4 months previously was diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) and underwent r-PRP using the da Vinci Xi robotic system. The operative time was 110 minutes and blood loss was minimal. After the perineal drain was removed on postoperative day 3, the patient was discharged. The urethral catheter was subsequently removed on postoperative day 8. Pathologic analysis revealed localized PCa with negative surgical margins. Conclusion: The r-PRP offers all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Moreover, in a kidney transplant recipient, it provides additional benefits, such as avoidance of allograft vascular and ureteral injuries, while maintaining an equivalent oncologic efficacy and surgical safety compared with its transabdominal counterpart.

  20. Advances in Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. P. Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP, robotics has become increasingly more commonplace in the armamentarium of the urologic surgeon. Robotic utilization has exploded across surgical disciplines well beyond the fields of urology and prostate surgery. The literature detailing technical steps, comparison of large surgical series, and even robotically focused randomized control trials are available for review. RALP, the first robot-assisted surgical procedure to achieve widespread use, has recently become the primary approach for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer. As a result, surgeons are constantly trying to refine and improve upon current technical aspects of the operation. Recent areas of published modifications include bladder neck anastomosis and reconstruction, bladder drainage, nerve sparing approaches and techniques, and perioperative and postoperative management including penile rehabilitation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in perioperative management and surgical technique for RALP.

  1. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  2. The prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed AST/ALT (De Ritis) ratio on survival in patients underwent radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Kose, Osman; Koc, Esra Meltem; Ates, Erhan; Akin, Yigit; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate prognostic significance of preoperatively assessed aspartate aminotransaminase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (De Ritis) ratio on survival in bladder cancer (BC) patients underwent radical cystectomy (RC). We, respectively, analysed clinical and pathological data of 153 patients who underwent RC for BC between February 2006 and December 2016 at a tertiary level hospital. The potential prognostic value of De Ritis ratio was assessed by using ROC curve analysis. The effect of the De Ritis ratio was analysed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression hazard models for patients' disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OAS). We had 149 BC patients, in total. Mean age was 61.65 ± 9.13 years. One hundred and thirty-nine (93.3%) of the patients were men. According to ROC analysis, optimal threshold of De Ritis ratio for DSS was 1.30. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, the high De Ritis ratio group showed worse progression in DSS and OAS (all parameters, p < 0.001). On Cox regression models of clinical and pathological parameters to predict DSS, De Ritis ratio (HR 5.79, 95% CI 2.25-15.13), pathological T stage (HR 15.89, 95% CI 3.92-64.33, in all p < 0.001); and to predict OAS, De Ritis ratio (HR 2.61, 95% CI 1.49-4.56; p < 0.001), pathological T stage (HR 5.42, 95% CI 2.63-11.64; p < 0.001) and age (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08; p = 0.001) were determined as independent prognostic factors. Preoperative elevated De Ritis ratio could be an independent prognostic factor in BC patients underwent RC. Our results should be confirmed by large and properly designed prospective, randomized trials.

  3. Initial consecutive 125 cases of robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed in Ireland's first robotic radical prostatectomy centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bouchier-Hayes, D M

    2012-03-01

    We examined the patient characteristics, operative proceedings and the outcomes of the initial series of 125 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) in an independent hospital in Ireland, performed by two surgeons using the da Vinci(®) surgical system.

  4. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy: description of an evolved approach to radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Justin W; Tyritzis, Stavros; Nyberg, Tommy; Schumacher, Martin; Laurin, Oscar; Khazaeli, Dinyar; Adding, Christofer; Jonsson, Martin N; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Wiklund, N Peter

    2013-10-01

    Although open radical cystectomy (ORC) remains the gold standard of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) continues to gain wider acceptance. In this article, we focus on the steps of RARC, describing our approach, which has been developed over the past 10 yr. Totally intracorporeal RARC aims to offer the benefits of a complete minimally invasive approach while replicating the oncologic outcomes of open surgery. We report our outcomes of a totally intracorporeal RARC procedure, describing step by step our technique and highlighting the variations on this standard template of nerve-sparing and female organ-preserving approaches in men and women. Between December 2003 and October 2012, a total of 113 patients (94 male and 19 female) underwent totally intracorporeal RARC. We performed RARC, extended pelvic lymph node dissection, and a totally intracorporeal urinary diversion (UD) in all patients. In the accompanying video, we focus on the standard template for RARC, also describing nerve-sparing and female organ-preserving approaches. Complications and oncologic outcomes are reported, including overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RARC with intracorporeal UD was performed in 113 patients. Mean age was 64 yr (range: 37-84). Forty-three patients underwent intracorporeal ileal conduit, and 70 had intracorporeal neobladder. On surgical pathology, 48% of patients had ≤ pT1 disease, 27% had pT2 disease, 13% had pT3 disease, and 12% had pT4 disease. The mean number of lymph nodes removed was 21 (range: 0-57). Twenty percent of patients had lymph node-positive disease. Positive surgical margins occurred in six cases (5.3%). Median follow-up was 25 mo (range: 3-107). We recorded a total of 70 early complications (0-30 d) in 54 patients (47.8%), with 37 patients (32.7%) having Clavien grade ≥ 3. Thirty-six late complications (>30 d) were recorded in 30 patients (26.5%), with 20

  5. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the leading visceral malignancy in males. Patients who undergo cardiac transplantation are immune compromised, thus presenting a therapeutic challenge. Immunosuppresion could accelerate tumor growth, while medical intervention may be associated with increased treatment mortality or morbidity. Due to paucity of such cases, there are no randomized trials that address the treatment algorithm for cardiac transplant patients with CaP, with only a few scattered reports in the literature. Treatment options range from hormonal manipulation to radiation therapy to radical prostatectomy. To our knowledge, we report the first successful robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a heart transplant patient with CaP.

  6. The financial impact of robotic technology for partial and radical nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Max; Ball, Mark W; Patel, Hiten D; Gorin, Michael A; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Allaf, Mohamad E

    2015-03-01

    We sought to evaluate the financial impact of robotic technology for partial nephrectomy (PN) and radical nephrectomy (RN) in the state of Maryland. The Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC) documents all acute care hospital charges data. This database was queried for patients who underwent laparoscopic or robot-assisted RN and PN from 2008 to 2012. Total hospital charge, subcharge, and length of stay (LOS) were analyzed separately for RN and PN. Overall, 2834 patients were identified. Of those, 282 were laparoscopic PN (LPN), 1078 robot-assisted PN (RPN), 1098 laparoscopic RN (LRN), and 376 robot-assisted RN (RRN). For PN, the total hospital charge was $19,062 for LPN and $18,255 for RPN (P=0.138), with a charge savings of $807 per case in favor of robotics. For RN, the total hospital charge was $23,391 for RRN and $18,280 for LRN (P=0.004), with a charge premium of $5111 for robotic cases. LOS was shorter for RPN compared with LPN (2.51 vs 2.99 days, Pfinancial implications of RRN use for routine cases warrants further study.

  7. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Roberto Colombo Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the initial experience on robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil. Methods: From March 2008 to March 2009, a hundred patients were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patient’s demographic data, as well as perioperative results of the procedures, are described in this study. Rresults: Patients’ mean age and mean PSA were 58 years and 7.58 ng/ml, respectively. All procedures were performed through transperitoneal approach, with a mean bleeding of 480 mL and surgical time of 298 minutes. A surgical margin affected by cancer was present in 16% of the cases. There were four complications: bleeding requiring transfusion (two cases, rectal perforation corrected on the spot and inadequate functioning of the robot. There was no conversion to another access or obit occurrences in this caseload. Cconclusions: Robot-assisted prostatectomy is a reality in Brazil and the results herein presented demonstrate that this procedure can be safely performed. Long-term follow-up is still necessary to assess the oncological and functional outcomes.

  8. Systematic review and cumulative analysis of perioperative outcomes and complications after robot-assisted radical cystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novara, Giacomo; Catto, James W F; Wilson, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    and complications of RARC in comparison with ORC and LRC. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched using a free-text protocol including the terms robot-assisted radical cystectomy or da Vinci radical cystectomy or robot* radical cystectomy. RARC case series and studies...

  9. Early biochemical recurrence, urinary continence and potency outcomes following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Hvarness, Helle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe recovery of urinary continence and potency and report oncological and functional outcomes using the survival, continence and potency (SCP) system for patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 2009...... to 2012, 232 patients underwent RARP. Self-reported continence, erection sufficient for intercourse (ESI) and scores on the five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) were registered by questionnaire and physician's interview preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 month follow...

  10. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral sphincter function before and after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoiu, O S; Vozmediano-Chicharro, R; García-Galisteo, E; Soler-Martinez, J; del Rosa-Samaniego, J M; Machuca-Santacruz, J; Baena-Gonzalez, V

    2014-03-01

    Affectation of the bladder after open prostatectomy is demonstrated. Decrease in bladder capacity and bladder compliance, detrusor hyper-or hypo-activity and voiding dysfunction are observed. We propose to investigate the effects of robotic surgery on bladder and sphincter function through the comparative study of preoperative and postoperative urodynamic values 3 months after prostatectomy. Prospective study of 32 consecutive patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy. They all underwent urodynamic study one month before the intervention and 3 months after the radical prostatectomy. Twenty five percent of patients undergoing robotic prostatectomy showed detrusor hyperactivity accompanied by a decrease in bladder compliance of 30.2 to 21.8 ml/cmH2O. Urethral profile showed diminished functional length of 67 to 44 mm and decreased maximum urethral pressure of 48.5 to 29.3 cmH2O. After robotic prostatectomy 21.8% of patients had detrusor hypoactivity, obstruction decreased between 28.1% to 12.5%. Decreased bladder compliance, detrusor hypo- or hyperactivity and obstruction improvement observed in the study of the flow pressure have been associated with sphincter involvement. It is part of the complex of lower urinary tract dysfunction that occurs after robotic prostatectomy. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. [Half-day case robotic radical prostatectomy. Surgery of the future? A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclers, F; Dutheil, V; Poupot, D; Moalic, R; Gosseine, P-N; Cormier, L; Bierman, D

    2016-01-01

    Robotics and ambulatory are modern applications of surgery. This case study proves the feasibility of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy as an outpatient procedure. This report highlights the first, half-day, robotic prostatectomy performed on a 57-year-old man with localized prostate cancer. This operation was proposed to the subject because of his excellent physical condition and favorable environmental factors. He chose to undergo the surgery voluntarily. He underwent a nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Target-controlled infusion propofol was used in perioperative sedation and analgesia. Postoperative evaluation criteria was made with the Visual Analog Scale of Pain Intensity (VASPI), Chung score and a patient satisfaction survey. No perioperative or postoperative complications were reported. Blood loss was low (75 mL). The patient stayed less than 12 hours in the ambulatory unit thanks to a rapid recovery. The patient returned home after reporting a Chung score of 10. No hospital readmission was necessary. Functional results were: a bowel movement on day 1, back to work on day 2, normal urinary continence on day 8, a correct erectile function on day 9. Oncological results revealed negative surgical margins for cancer and PSA postoperativeprostatectomies can be performed on voluntarily-selected patients without affecting the high quality of urological surgery outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Robotic-assisted radical parametrectomy in patients with malignant gynecological tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorchev, Grigor A; Tomov, Slavcho T; Radionova, Zdravka V; Tanchev, Lachezar S

    2013-12-01

    We describe the operative technique of robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical parametrectomy and analyze perioperative data including adequacy of resections, pathology, and complications in our initial cases. A retrospective study was performed of seven patients with gynecological cancers involving the cervix who had previously been treated with simple hysterectomies and then underwent robotic-assisted radical parametrectomies. Pathology from the initial hysterectomies and the radical parametrectomies was reviewed. Postoperative complications, operative times, estimated blood loss, and length of hospital stay were assessed. The upper part of the vagina, parametrial tissue, and bilateral pelvic lymph nodes of all seven patients who had undergone a previous simple hysterectomy were removed. The mean age was 56.4 (SD ± 10.7) years. Diagnoses from hysterectomy specimens were invasive squamous carcinoma (n = 4), endometrial adenocarcinoma (n = 2), and clear-cell papillary adenocystic cervical carcinoma (n = 1). The median number of lymph nodes removed was 8 (min 4, max 29), and one patient had nodal metastasis. The mean operative time was 228.6 (SD ± 38.9) min, estimated blood loss was 147 (SD ± 58.2) ml, and length of hospital stay was five (SD ± 2.3) days. One intraoperative complication (cystotomy) occurred and was successfully repaired. One postoperative fistula developed on postoperative day 10. This early experience demonstrates that the basic surgical and anatomical principles of radical parametrectomy can be applied to robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery. Genitourinary fistulae are always a concern with this procedure, and minimization of electrocautery near the bladder and ureters may further reduce complications.

  13. Perioperative Outcomes of 3-Arm Versus 4-Arm Robotic Radical Hysterectomy in Patients with Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Ga Won; Eoh, Kyung Jin; Chung, Young Shin; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sunghoon; Nam, Eun Ji; Lee, Jung Yun; Kim, Young Tae

    2017-12-26

    To investigate and compare surgical outcomes of the 3 versus 4 robotic arm approaches for robotic surgery in patients with cervical cancer. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). An academic tertiary hospital. A total of 142 patients with stage 1A1 to IIB cervical carcinoma who underwent robotic surgery were included for analysis. The subjects were divided according to the surgical approach (i.e., the number of robotic arms), and the 2 groups were compared in terms of intraoperative data and postoperative outcomes. Robotic radical hysterectomy (RRH) with lymphadenectomy using 3 robotic arms (n = 101) versus 4 robotic arms (n = 41). Perioperative surgical outcomes. The 3-arm robotic approach consisted of a camera arm, 2 robotic arms, and 1 conventional assistant port. An additional robotic arm was placed on the right side of the patient's abdomen for the 4-arm robotic approach. The mean age, body mass index, cell type, Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique stage, and type of surgery were not significantly different between the 2 cohorts. The 3-arm approach showed favorable outcomes over the 4-arm approach in terms of postoperative pain at 6 and 24 hours (3.8 ± 1.8 vs 4.5 ± 1.7 and 2.8 ± 1.7 vs 3.4 ± 1.6, respectively; p = .033 and .049) and postoperative hemoglobin difference (1.8 ± 0.9 vs 2.6 ± 1.3 and 1.9 ± 1.1 vs 2.4 ± 0.9 on days 1 and 3, respectively; p = .002 and .004). The median length of postoperative hospital stay, total operative time, docking time, lymph node yield, and intraoperative and postoperative complication rates were comparable between the 2 cohorts. Surgical outcomes and complications rates of RRH for cervical cancer using the 4-arm approach were comparable with that of the 3-arm approach with decreased early postoperative pain in the 3-arm group. Cost-benefit analysis and the impact on surgical training

  14. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in an initial Japanese series: the impact of prior abdominal surgery on surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumioka, Tetsuya; Iwamoto, Hideto; Masago, Toshihiko; Morizane, Shuichi; Yao, Akihisa; Honda, Masashi; Muraoka, Kuniyasu; Sejima, Takehiro; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of prior abdominal surgery on surgical outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in an early single center experience in Japan. We reviewed medical records of patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from October 2010 to September 2013 at Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori, Japan. Patients with prior abdominal surgery were compared with those with no prior surgery with respect to total operative time, port-insertion time, console time, positive surgical margin and perioperative complication rate. Furthermore, the number of patients requiring minimal adhesion lysis was compared between the two groups. Of 150 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, 94 (63%) had no prior abdominal surgery, whereas 56 patients (37%) did. The mean total operative time was 329 and 333 min (P = 0.340), mean port insertion time was 40 and 34.5 min (P = 0.003), mean console time was 255 and 238 min (P = 0.145), a positive surgical margin was observed in 17.9% and 17.0% patients (P = 0.896), and the incidence of perioperative complications was 25% and 23.4% (P = 0.825), respectively, in those with and without prior abdominal surgery. In the prior abdominal surgery group, 48 patients (80.4%) required adhesion lysis at the time of trocar placement or while operating the robotic console. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy appears to be a safe approach for patients with prior abdominal surgery without increasing total operative time, robotic console time, positive surgical margin or the incidence of perioperative complications. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  15. A comparative study of complications and outcomes associated with radical retropubic prostatectomy and robot assisted radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew T.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes among a matched cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Materials and methods: Between 2002 and 2005, 294 patients underwent RARP at our institution. Comparison RRP patients were matched 2:1 for surgical year, age, PSA, clinical stage, and biopsy grade (n=588). Outcomes among groups were compared. From an oncologic standpoint, pathologic features among groups were assessed and Kaplan-Meier estimates of PSA recurrence free survival were compared. Results: Overall margin positivity was not significantly different between groups (RARP, 15.6%, RRP, 17%), yet risk of apical margin was significantly less with RARP. RARP was associated with significantly shorter hospitalization (ptransfusion (p group (16% vs 10%, pgroup (6.6% pgroups was equivalent (p=0.15). Potency at 1 year was better among RARP patients (p=0.02). At a median followup of 1.3 years, PSA recurrence free estimates were not significantly different (92% vs 92%, p=0.69). Conclusions: Early complications were higher in this RARP group, but this experience includes cases performed in the learning curve. Oncologic, quality of life, and functional data in this study revealed encouraging results for RARP when compared to RRP.

  16. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy is a promising alternative to open surgery in the Japanese population with a high rate of octogenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Hideto; Yumioka, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Noriya; Masago, Toshihiko; Morizane, Shuichi; Honda, Masashi; Sejima, Takehiro; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Japanese patients who undergo radical cystectomy have a unique feature, i.e., the ratio of octogenarians is higher than in Western patients because of the aging Japanese population. The purpose of this study was to compare perioperative outcomes, complications, and oncologic outcomes between robot-assisted radical cystectomy and open radical cystectomy. From 2010-2015, 20 (of which 8 were octogenarians) and 40 (of which 11 were octogenarians) patients underwent robot-assisted radical cystectomy and open radical cystectomy, respectively. There was no significant difference in terms of patient demographics between the two surgical cohorts, regardless of patient age. In the octogenarian patient cohort, the rates of previous abdominal surgery and the median age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index were higher. The median estimated blood loss, transfusion rate and the days to resumption of a regular diet were significantly lower in the robot-assisted radical cystectomy cohort, regardless of patient age. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy significantly decreased grade II or higher complications, but there were no significant differences in terms of decreasing grade III or higher complications, regardless of patient age. Positive surgical margin and the mean number of lymph nodes removed were similar between the two surgical cohorts, regardless of patient age. Although robot-assisted radical cystectomy has a short history in Japan, the outcomes were generally comparable to those of previous studies. In a country that is aging rapidly like Japan, robot-assisted radical cystectomy could be a valid option for the management of muscle-invasive and high-risk superficial bladder cancer.

  17. Cost analysis of open radical cystectomy versus robot-assisted radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sukhchain S; Dogra, Tara; Smith, Peter W; Amran, Maisarah; Auluck, Ishna; Bhambra, Maninder; Sura, Manraj S; Rowe, Edward; Koupparis, Anthony

    2018-03-01

    To perform a cost analysis comparing the cost of robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) with open RC (ORC) in a UK tertiary referral centre and to identify the key cost drivers. Data on hospital length of stay (LOS), operative time (OT), transfusion rate, and volume and complication rate were obtained from a prospectively updated institutional database for patients undergoing RARC or ORC. A cost decision tree model was created. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find key drivers of overall cost and to find breakeven points with ORC. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to quantify the variability in the dataset. One RARC procedure costs £12 449.87, or £12 106.12 if the robot was donated via charitable funds. In comparison, one ORC procedure costs £10 474.54. RARC is 18.9% more expensive than ORC. The key cost drivers were OT, LOS, and the number of cases performed per annum. High ongoing equipment costs remain a large barrier to the cost of RARC falling. However, minimal improvements in patient quality of life would be required to offset this difference. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Consumerism and its impact on robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Sultan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2011-12-01

    • Many experts consider that media coverage, marketing and/or direct-to-consumer advertising, particularly Internet-based forms, are fundamental to the widespread adoption of robotic-assisted prostatectomy (RARP). However, this has not been explored previously. • The primary objective of the present study was to delineate the role of media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet, whereas the secondary goal focused on website quality with respect to the presentation of prostatectomy. • Website content was evaluated for direct-to-consumer advertising after the retrieval of the first 50 websites using Google and Yahoo for each of the terms: 'robotic prostatectomy, laparoscopic prostatectomy (LP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP)'. • A linear regression analysis was performed for the annual number of Internet news hits over the last decade for each procedure. Website quality assessment was performed using WHO Honesty on the Internet (HON) code principles. • Of the retrieved sites, the proportion containing direct-to-consumer advertising for RARP vs LP vs ORP using Google was 64% vs 14% vs 0%, respectively (P 0.05). • Media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet is more widespread compared to LP and ORP. • Disturbingly, the quality of websites using any technique for prostatectomy was of poor quality when using principles of honest information presenting and such findings need to be discussed with respect to obtaining informed consent from patients. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  19. Transperitoneal robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, David S; Savatta, Dominic; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Kopelan, Adam; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy are at increased risk of development of post-operative inguinal hernias (IH). We present the largest series of transperitoneal combined robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) and IH. After IRB approval, data from patients undergoing RALP at two centers were prospectively entered into a database and analyzed. IH were repaired robotically via a transperitoneal route with mesh. Between June 2002 and May 2007, 837 RALPs were performed, 80 of which included combined IH repair (9.6%), by two surgeons, T.A. and D.S. Forty-two patients (52.5%) had IH on pre-operative exam. Twenty-four hernias were left, 32 right, and 24 bilateral. Twenty-two patients had prior ipsilateral or contralateral herniorrhaphy. After dissection of the hernia sac, a swatch of flat Marlex mesh (n = 22), a polypropylene mesh plug (n = 19), an Ultrapro hernia system (n = 7), a Proceed coated mesh (n = 19), a 3D-Max (n = 37), a combination of both umbrella and flat mesh (n = 3), or suture alone (n = 2) was used. Inguinal herniorrhaphy added approximately 15 min of operative time in all cases. There was one hernia recurrence over an average follow-up period of 12.5 months (0.2-52 months). There was one complication attributable to IH repair-a urine leak which was attributed to anastomotic stretch due to reperitonealization. Urological surgeons should perform a thorough inguinal exam during preoperative evaluation and intraoperatively to detect subclinical inguinal hernias. Inguinal herniorrhaphy at the time of RALP is safe and should be routinely performed.

  20. Care of the patient undergoing radical cystectomy with a robotic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Dana L; Sims, Terran Warren

    2006-04-01

    Radical cystectomy or cystoprostatectomy with urinary diversion is the gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Cystectomy can be through an open or robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach. Advances in laparoscopy, robotic surgery, and urological oncology have made it possible for select surgeons to perform nerve-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy. Advantages of robotic surgery may be minimal blood loss, shorter hospital stay, quicker recovery, and possibly more precise and rapid removal of the bladder depending on the experience and expertise of the surgeon. Appropriate patient selection and thorough pre-operative evaluation, however, are key in maximizing positive surgical outcomes. The experience at the University of Virginia with robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy will be discussed.

  1. Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy with Total Intracorporeal Urinary Diversion: Comparative Analysis with Extracorporeal Urinary Diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Keun; Cho, Seok; Kang, Sung Gu; Cheon, Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Kang, Seok Ho

    2016-05-01

    To compare the perioperative outcomes, postoperative complications, and early oncologic outcomes of intracorporeal urinary diversion (ICUD) with those of extracorporeal urinary diversion (ECUD) following robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) performed by a single surgeon at a tertiary referral hospital. We reviewed a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved database of 70 patients treated with RARC and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection for bladder cancer performed from 2007 through 2014. Data were collected for 64 patients who underwent either ICUD or ECUD. Thirty-eight patients underwent ECUD, and the remaining 26 underwent ICUD. Urinary diversion was performed extracorporeally in the first 37 cases and performed intracorporeally thereafter. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics between the ECUD and ICUD groups. Mean total operative time was 468 minutes for ECUD and 581 minutes for ICUD (P group and 26.9% in the ICUD group had pathologic stage T3 or T4 (P > .05). The mean LN yield was 23.2 and 31.8, respectively (P transfusion and complication rates than ECUD. A larger series and long-term follow-up data will be necessary to support our results.

  2. Single-centre evaluation of the extraperitoneal and transperitoneal approach in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Marcus; Vollmer, Christian; Schwab, Christoph; Kurz, Michael; Padevit, Christian; Horton, Kevin; John, Hubert

    2012-04-01

    Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) is feasible using either an extraperitoneal (EP) or a transperitoneal (TP) approach. This study reports on the experience of a single hospital using both techniques. From July 2009 to March 2011, 170 patients underwent RARP. EP was chosen in 103 patients and TP in 67. TP was preferred in cases previous mesh hernia repair or if extended lymph-node dissection (LND) was considered necessary. Otherwise, EP was performed; it was preferred in cases of obesity (body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2)) or previous intra-abdominal surgery. There were no significant differences in preoperative mean age (64.4 vs 65.6 years), BMI (26.5 vs 26.3 kg/m(2)) or prostate size (51.8 vs 55.8 cm(3)) between EP and TP patients. Owing to preoperative selection criteria, prostate-specific antigen levels and the average Gleason score were significantly lower in EP than in TP patients (p groups (EP 276 vs TP 281 ml, p = 0.88). Complication rates were lower in EP (n = 7, 6.8% vs n = 8, 12%, p = 0.024). Time until first defecation and last analgesic treatment were significantly shorter in EP (p advantages of an extraperitoneal approach for RARP. However, a transperitoneal approach is still considered necessary for extended LND or special clinical conditions. Robotic teams should be trained using both approaches.

  3. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy vs laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy: functional outcomes 18 months after diagnosis from a national cohort study in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossiter, Julie; Sujenthiran, Arunan; Charman, Susan C; Cathcart, Paul J; Aggarwal, Ajay; Payne, Heather; Clarke, Noel W; van der Meulen, Jan

    2018-02-20

    Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has been rapidly adopted without robust evidence comparing its functional outcomes against laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) or open retropubic radical prostatectomy (ORP) approaches. This study compared patient-reported functional outcomes following RARP, LRP or ORP. All men diagnosed with prostate cancer in England during April - October 2014 who underwent radical prostatectomy were identified from the National Prostate Cancer Audit and mailed a questionnaire 18 months after diagnosis. Group differences in patient-reported sexual, urinary, bowel and hormonal function (EPIC-26 domain scores) and generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL; EQ-5D-5L scores), with adjustment for patient and tumour characteristics, were estimated using linear regression. In all, 2219 men (77.0%) responded; 1310 (59.0%) had RARP, 487 (21.9%) LRP and 422 (19.0%) ORP. RARP was associated with slightly higher adjusted mean EPIC-26 sexual function scores compared with LRP (3·5 point difference; 95% CI: 1.1-5.9, P=0.004) or ORP (4.0 point difference; 95% CI: 1.5-6.5, P=0.002), which did not meet the threshold for a minimal clinically important difference (10-12 points). There were no significant differences in other EPIC-26 domain scores or HRQoL. It is unlikely that the rapid adoption of RARP in the English NHS has produced substantial improvements in functional outcomes for patients.

  4. Comparison of pathological outcomes of active surveillance candidates who underwent radical prostatectomy using contemporary protocols at a high-volume Korean center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Jung, Ha Bum; Lee, Seung Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Jun; Yang, Seung Choul; Chung, Byung Ha

    2012-11-01

    We compared contemporary active surveillance protocols based on pathological outcomes in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. We identified the experimental cohort from prostate cancer patients who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2001 and 2011, and who met the inclusion criteria of five published active surveillance protocols, namely Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, University of California at San Francisco, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, University of Miami and Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance. To compare each protocol, we evaluated the pathological outcomes and calculated the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each protocol according to the proportion of organ-confined Gleason≤6 disease. Overall, 376 patients met the inclusion criteria of the active surveillance protocols with 61, 325, 222, 212 and 206 patients meeting the criteria of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, University of California at San Francisco, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, University of Miami and Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance protocols, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity values of the five protocols, respectively, were 0.199 and 0.882 in Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, 0.855 and 0.124 in University of California at San Francisco, 0.638 and 0.468 in Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 0.599 and 0.479 in University of Miami, and 0.609 and 0.527 in Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance. In terms of both the sensitivity and specificity, Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance was the most balanced protocol. In addition, Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance showed a more accurate performance for favourable pathological outcomes than the others. However, using the area under the curve to compare the discriminative ability of each protocol, there were no statistically significant differences. The contemporary

  5. Extraperitoneal vs Transperitoneal Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy in the Setting of Prior Abdominal or Pelvic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horovitz, David; Feng, Changyong; Messing, Edward M; Joseph, Jean V

    2017-04-01

    During robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), the prostate may be approached extraperiteoneally (extraperitoneal robot-assisted radical prostatectomy [eRARP]) or transperitoneally (transperitoneal robot-assisted radical prostatectomy [tRARP]). The former avoids the abdominal cavity, which might be of benefit in patients who have had prior abdominal or pelvic surgery (PAPS). Our objective was to compare the outcomes of patients with PAPS undergoing either technique. A retrospective review of patients treated with RARP from July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2014 with a minimum follow-up of 3 months was undertaken. Of 2927 patients, 620 were identified as having undergone RARP (without concomitant unrelated procedures) and PAPS (excluding patients with prior inguinal hernia repair with mesh or unclear surgical histories) for prostate adenocarcinoma without prior pelvic radiotherapy. Of these, 340 patients underwent eRARP and 280 patients underwent tRARP. Patients in the eRARP group were younger (61.04 years vs 62.32, p = 0.02), had a higher body mass index (29.65 vs 28.98, p = 0.09), lower American Society of Anesthesiologists scores (p = 0.03), and lower D'Amico risk classification disease (p 2 PAPS. On univariate analysis, the eRARP group had lower operative time (188.96 minutes vs 197.92 minutes, p = 0.003), extensive lysis of adhesions (0.9% vs 14.3%, p surgeries. A lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications and a shorter length of stay were noted in the extraperitoneal cohort.

  6. Simultaneous Retzius-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdel Raheem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed with synchronous prostate cancer and suspicious renal cell carcinoma of the right kidney, treated with combined Retzius-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RS-RARP and robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN. The combined approach using RS-RARP and RAPN is technically feasible and safe surgical option for treatment of concomitant prostate cancer and suspicious renal cell carcinoma.

  7. First case of robotic laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy with single-site VesPa platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattevi, D; Luciani, L G; Vattovani, V; Chiodini, S; Puglisi, M; Malossini, G

    2017-07-07

    This study aimed at reporting our first experience with robotic laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy (R-LESS-RP) with single-site VesPa platform (Intuitive Surgical Inc.). A 68-year-old-man presenting with a cT1c adenocarcinoma Gleason Score 3 + 4 = 7 in 4/12 bilateral cores underwent a transperitoneal robotic LESS-RP with a single-site Vespa platform. Initial PSA, prostate weight, and body mass index (BMI) were 4.4 ng/ml, 45 g, and 25, respectively. Instruments and camera cross within the Single-Site port; the da Vinci System software detects and reassigns the user's hands with the instruments position. The single-site port is inserted through a 2-cm intraumbilical incision. The robotic 8.5 mm scope and two surgical curved instruments (fenestrated bipolar forceps and cautery hook) are introduced through the ports and used for most of the procedure, whereas a wristed needle driver on the right hand is used for the reconstructive steps. An additional 12 mm port (Air Seal, SurgiQuest) is placed in a midline between the umbilicus and the right iliac spine in order to facilitate table assistance during surgery and to place a drain at the end of the procedure.Operative time and blood loss were 300 min and 400 mL, respectively. The postoperative course was uneventful. The drain and the catheter were removed on days 1 and 6, respectively. The patient experienced a temporary mild stress incontinence (one pad at sixth month) and erectile dysfunction.Our first robotic laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy (R-LESS-RP) with the single-site VesPa platform was associated with acceptable operative times and perioperative outcome. This procedure is feasible without complications, provided that a proper patient selection has occurred. Limited movements together with the lack of the fourth robotic arm require a considerable expertise in robotic surgery. Some tricks can help overcome technical limitations. The Robotic LESS-RP reduces in some

  8. [High-risk prostate cancer surgical margins during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperron, C; Moulin, M; Koutlidis, N; Mourey, E; Cormier, L

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in high risk prostate cancer (HR). The rate of positive surgical margins (PSM) was compared between anticipated HR cancer according to D'Amico risk classification and discovered postoperative HR cancer. A retrospective study was conducted between 2006 and 2013 on patients who underwent RARP. Before surgery, patients were divided according to the D'Amico risk classification. After surgery, HR was defined as pT3a or pT3b, or Gleason score≥8 or positive lymph nodes. The rate of PSM was compared according to the D'Amico risk classification and postoperative HR. During the study, 485 patients were reviewed. Before surgery, 10 % of cancers were classified as D'Amico 3 (49/485). After surgery, 27.6 % (134/485) were classified as HR. There was a significant difference between the rate of PSM in HR/D'Amico 3 and HR/non D'Amico 3 cancer, respectively 22.9 % and 34.3 % (P<0.001). The RARP is feasible in HR with an average of 30 % of PSM as in open surgery. However, the accurate assessment of preoperative HR will allow a more adapted dissection and a decrease of rate of PSM. So it is necessary to improve the detection of HR and so to select the most suitable cancer for surgery. Level 5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative renal function in patients is unaltered after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hyun; Lim, Choon Hak; Chung, Hye In; Choi, Seong Uk; Youn, Seung Zoo; Lim, Hae Ja

    2011-03-01

    Pneumoperitoneum with an intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) of 14 mmHg is known to decrease renal function. Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) requires an IAP of more than 15 mmHg for operation. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated whether patients who underwent RARP experienced renal insufficiency during the postoperative period (at postoperative days 7 and 30). One hundred patients who underwent RARP were enrolled in this study. Preoperative serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Cr) levels were measured. Creatinine clearance (CrCl) was calculated using the Cockcroft and Gault formula. CrCl was calculated at 1 day before surgery (baseline), 2 hr postoperatively, and at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days postoperatively (POD 1, POD 3, POP 7, and POD 30). Patients were assigned to abnormal CrCl (n = 52) or normal CrCl groups (n = 48) on the basis of these measurements. Significant inter-group differences in BUN, Cr, and CrCl were observed at all postoperative time points. BUN and Cr decreased significantly at postoperative 2 hr and POD 1, 3, and 7 versus baseline in both groups, whereas CrCl increased significantly at postoperative 2 hr and POD 1, 3, and 7 versus baseline in both groups. However, BUN, Cr, and CrCl were similar at POD 30 and preoperatively in the two groups. RAPR, which requires an IAP of 15-20 mmHg for more than 4 hr, does not induce renal dysfunction during the postoperative period, and even in those patients with an abnormal CrCl.

  10. Erectile function post robotic radical prostatectomy: technical tips to improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, S S; Persad, R; Gillatt, D

    2016-09-01

    Robotic surgery is becoming more and more commonplace. At the same time, so are complications, especially related to erectile function. The population being diagnosed with cancer is younger, with more aggressive cancers and higher expectations for good erectile function postoperatively. We conduct a retrospective analysis of literature over 20 years for Embase and Medline. Search terms used include (Robotic) AND (prostatectomy) AND (erectile function). There are a variety of multifactorial causes, resulting in worsening ED post-robotic radical prostatectomy; however, there are a number of treatments that can support this. There is much we can do to help prevent patients getting postoperative erectile dysfunction post-radical surgery. However, part of this is management of realistic patient expectations.

  11. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  12. What if the hand piece spring disassembles during robotic radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Ziya; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Asil, Erem; Isgoren, Egemen; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2011-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is successfully being performed for treating prostate cancer (PCa). However, instrumentation failure associated with robotic procedures represents a unique new problem. We report the successful completion of RALRP in spite of a disassembled hand piece spring during the procedure. A PubMed/Medline search was made concerning robotic malfunction and robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to discuss our experience. We performed RALRP in a 60-year-old male patient with localized PCa. During the procedure, the spring of the hand piece disassembled, and we were not able to reassemble it. We completed the procedure successfully however without fixing the disassembled hand piece spring. We were able to grasp tissue and needles when we brought our fingers together. The only movement we needed to do was to move fingers apart to release tissue or needles caught by robotic instrument. Although malfunction risk related to the da Vinci Surgical System seems to be very low, it might still occur. Sometimes, simple maneuvers may compensate for the failed function as occurred in our case. However, patients should be informed before the operation about the possibility of converting their procedure to laparoscopic or open due to robotic malfunction.

  13. Early Experience with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gee Sim

    2004-10-01

    Conclusions: rLRP is feasible in a practice with a low volume of radical prostatectomies. Significant improvement in perioperative parameters occurs after the first eight cases. This technique confers the benefits of enhanced precision and dexterity for complex laparoscopic work in the pelvic cavity.

  14. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS, met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP. Median operative time (range: 157 (127–259 min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1–19; Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (−14–22; and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13–33. Median length of follow-up (range was 34 (24–43 months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  15. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sameer; Satkunasivam, Raj; Aron, Monish

    2016-01-01

    Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH) Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP). Median operative time (range): 157 (127-259) min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI) score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range) were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1-19); Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (-14-22); and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13-33). Median length of follow-up (range) was 34 (24-43) months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  16. Trends in radical prostatectomy: centralization, robotics, and access to urologic cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Wong, Yu-Ning; Nielsen, Matthew E; Egleston, Brian L; Uzzo, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery has been widely adopted for radical prostatectomy. We hypothesized that this change is rapidly shifting procedures away from hospitals that do not offer robotics and consequently increasing patient travel. A population-based observational study of all prostatectomies for cancer in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania from 2000 to 2009 was performed using hospital discharge data. Hospital procedure volume was defined as the number of prostatectomies performed for cancer in a given year. Straight-line travel distance to the treating hospital was calculated for each case. Hospitals were contacted to determine the year of acquisition of the first robot. From 2000 to 2009, the total number of prostatectomies performed annually increased substantially. The increase occurred almost entirely at the very high-volume centers (≥ 106 prostatectomies/year). The number of hospitals performing prostatectomy fell 37% from 2000 to 2009. By 2009, the 9% (21/244) of hospitals that had very high volume performed 57% of all prostatectomies, and the 35% (86/244) of hospitals with a robot performed 85% of all prostatectomies. The median travel distance increased 54% from 2000 to 2009 (Ppast decade, the number of radical prostatectomies performed has risen substantially. These procedures have been increasingly centralized at high-volume centers, leading to longer patient travel distances. Few prostatectomies are now performed at hospitals that do not offer robotic surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  17. Health resource use after robot-assisted surgery vs open and conventional laparoscopic techniques in oncology: analysis of English secondary care data for radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David; Camp, Charlotte; O'Hara, Jamie; Adshead, Jim

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate postoperative health resource utilisation and secondary care costs for radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England, via a comparison of robot-assisted, conventional laparoscopic and open surgical approaches. We retrospectively analysed the secondary care records of 23 735 patients who underwent robot-assisted (RARP, n = 8 016), laparoscopic (LRP, n = 6 776) or open radical prostatectomy (ORP, n = 8 943). We further analysed 2 173 patients who underwent robot-assisted (RAPN, n = 365), laparoscopic (LPN, n = 792) or open partial nephrectomy (OPN, n = 1 016). Postoperative inpatient admissions, hospital bed-days, excess bed-days and outpatient appointments at 360 and 1 080 days after surgery were reviewed. Patients in the RARP group required significantly fewer inpatient admissions, hospital bed-days and excess bed-days at 360 and 1 080 days than patients undergoing ORP. Patients undergoing ORP had a significantly higher number of outpatient appointments at 1 080 days. The corresponding total costs were significantly lower for patients in the RARP group at 360 days (£1679 vs £2031 for ORP; P surgeries lay at the approximate midpoint of those for robot-assisted and open surgeries. Our analysis provides compelling evidence to suggest that RARP leads to reduced long-term health resource utilisation and downstream cost savings compared with traditional open and laparoscopic approaches. Furthermore, despite the limitations that arise from the inclusion of a small sample, these results also suggest that robot-assisted surgery may represent a cost-saving alternative to existing surgical options in partial nephrectomy. Further exploration of clinical cost drivers, as well as an extension of the analysis into subsequent years, could lend support to the wider commissioning of robot-assisted surgery within the NHS. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons

  18. Ogilvie's Syndrome after Robotic-Assisted Radical Hysterectomy for Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Chung, Stephanie; Kohut, Adrian; Gibbon, Darlene; Leiser, Aliza

    2018-01-01

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO), also known as Ogilvie's syndrome, is defined by poor peristaltic activity of the colon that mimics mechanical obstruction in the absence of any mechanical occlusive gut lesion. This case report is the first to be published on ACPO occurring after robotic-assisted radical hysterectomy. Given that robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery has become the next major stage of advancement for a range of operations, especially in gynecologic oncology surgery, this report emphasizes the importance of recognizing precipitating factors associated with this syndrome, including minimally invasive surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Changing face of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Melbourne over 12 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathianathen, Niranjan J; Lamb, Alastair D; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Goad, Jeremy R; Peters, Justin; Costello, Anthony J; Murphy, Declan G; Moon, Daniel A

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to characterize the trends in disease presentation for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) over a 12-year period in Melbourne, Australia. All patients undergoing an RARP between 2004 and October 2016 while under the care of six high-volume surgeons were included in this study. Data were collected prospectively regarding patient demographics and clinical details of their cancer. Over the 12-year time span of the study, 3075 men underwent an RARP with a median age of 63.01 years. Temporal analysis demonstrated that the median age of patients undergoing prostatectomy advanced with time with the median age in 2016 being 65.51 years compared with 61.0 years in 2004 (P < 0.001). There was also a significant trend to increased D'Amico risk groups over time with the percentage procedures for high-risk patients increasing from 12.6% to 28.10% from 2004 to 2016 (P < 0.001). Upgrade rates between biopsy and pathological Gleason grade scoring significantly trended down over the period of the study (P < 0.001). There was also a shift to increased pathological stage over the 12 years with 22.1% of men having T3 disease in 2004 compared with 49.8% in 2016. Our analysis demonstrates increasing treatment of older men with higher risk tumours, consistent with international trends. While this largely reflects a shift in case selection, further work is needed to assess whether the stage shift may relate partially to a decline in screening and increased presentation of higher risk disease. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Robot-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy in a small child with rhabdomyosarcoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderberg, Magnus; Backman, Torbjorn; Annerstedt, Magnus

    2008-07-01

    We report the first case of a robot-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy in a 22-month-old boy with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in his urinary bladder. Treatment according to international protocol CWS-2002 P (Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studie) was given prior to surgery. The da Vinci S Surgical System from Intuitive Surgical (Sunnyvale, CA, USA) was used to laparoscopically remove the urinary bladder and prostate radically. The surgical procedure performed and the postoperative course were uneventful. This technique is safe and feasible also in small children. It seems to have advantages over open surgery and no disadvantages. We recommend this technique for further use.

  1. Predictors of Incisional Hernia after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Chennamsetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To explore the long term incidence and predictors of incisional hernia in patients that had RARP. Methods. All patients who underwent RARP between 2003 and 2012 were mailed a survey reviewing hernia type, location, and repair. Results. Of 577 patients, 48 (8.3% had a hernia at an incisional site (35 men had umbilical, diagnosed at (median 1.2 years after RARP (mean follow-up of 5.05 years. No statistically significant differences were found in preoperative diabetes, smoking, pathological stage, age, intraoperative/postoperative complications, operative time, blood loss, BMI, and drain type between patients with and without incisional hernias. Incisional hernia patients had larger median prostate weight (45 versus 38 grams; P=0.001 and a higher proportion had prior laparoscopic cholecystectomy (12.5% (6/48 versus 4.6% (22/480; P=0.033. Overall, 4% (23/577 of patients underwent surgical repair of 24 incisional hernias, 22 umbilical and 2 other port site hernias. Conclusion. Incisional hernia is a known complication of RARP and may be associated with a larger prostate weight and history of prior laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There is concern about the underreporting of incisional hernia after RARP, as it is a complication often requiring surgical revision and is of significance for patient counseling before surgery.

  2. Robot-assisted surgery for the radical treatment of deep infiltrating endometriosis with colorectal involvement: short- and mid-term surgical and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Luca; Perutelli, Alessandra; Palmeri, Matteo; Guadagni, Simone; Mariniello, Maria Donatella; Di Franco, Gregorio; Cela, Vito; Brundu, Benedetta; Salerno, Maria Giovanna; Di Candio, Giulio; Mosca, Franco

    2016-03-01

    Sexual and urinary dysfunctions are complications in radical treatment of deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) with colorectal involvement. The aim of this article is to report the preliminary results of our single-institution experience with robotic treatment of DIE, evaluating intraoperative and postoperative surgical outcomes and focusing on the impact of this surgical approach on autonomic functions such as urogenital preservation and sexual well-being. From January 2011 through December 2013, a case series of 10 patients underwent robotic radical treatment of DIE with colorectal resection using the da Vinci System. Surgical data were evaluated, together with perioperative urinary and sexual function as assessed by means of self-administered validated questionnaires. None of the patients reported significant postoperative complications. Questionnaires concerning sexual well-being, urinary function, and impact of symptoms on quality of life demonstrated a slight worsening of all parameters 1 month after surgery, while data were comparable to the preoperative period 1 year after surgery. Dyspareunia was the only exception, as it was significantly improved 12 months after surgery. Robot-assisted surgery seems to be advantageous in highly complicated procedures where extensive dissection and proper anatomy re-establishment is required, as in DIE with colorectal involvement. Our preliminary results show that robot-assisted surgery could be associated with a low risk of complications and provide good preservation of urinary function and sexual well-being.

  3. ROBOT-ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 80 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As a common disease, prostate cancer (PC has taken now first place among all malignancies in many countries of the world.The authors have analyzed the results of their series of robot-assisted radical laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP in patients with PC. They also present a number of surgical techniques that may be useful for novice surgeons. Materials and methods. In November 2008 to November 2009, the Department of Urology, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, performed 80 RALPs using the da Vinci S surgical robotic system. The patients’ mean age was 63.7 (49–71 years; the mean blood level of total prostate-specific antigen was 6.1 (2.1–20.84 ng/ml; the mean prostate volume was 44 (18–94 cm3, as evidenced by transrectal ultrasound study. The authors analyzed the following indicators: operating time, degree of blood loss, conversion of surgical intervention,degrees of intra- and postoperative complications, and oncological and functional results. Results. In our series, RALP was performed without preserving neurovascular bundles or by using a nerve-sparing procedure in 66 (82.5% and 14 (17.5%, respectively; 22 (27.5% patients underwent lymphadenectomy. The average length of hospital stay was 7 (4–21 days; the mean time of urethral catheter removal was 10 (6–21 days postoperatively. The mean time of surgical intervention was 174 (121–276 min. Mean blood loss was 248 (35–1950 ml. Postmortem study revealed a positive surgical margin in 19 (24% cases and tumor invasion into the seminal vesicles in 5 (6% patients. Stages pT2 and pT3 were found in 56 (70% and 24 (30%, respectively; total Gleason scores were 6 (3+3, 7 (3+4, 7 (4+3, 8 (4+4 in 38 (47.5%, 35 (43.75%, 5 (6.25%, and 2 (2.5% patients, respectively. Among 34 patients examined 3 months after RALP, 28 (82.4% patients completely retained urine; 5 (14.7% applied not more than a pad a day. In patients with preserved erectile function, the

  4. Development and validation of 3D printed virtual models for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy: urologists' and patients' perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porpiglia, Francesco; Bertolo, Riccardo; Checcucci, Enrico; Amparore, Daniele; Autorino, Riccardo; Dasgupta, Prokar; Wiklund, Peter; Tewari, Ashutosh; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Fiori, Cristian

    2018-02-01

    To test the face and content validity of 3D virtual-rendered printed models used before robot-assisted prostate cancer and nephron-sparing surgery. Patients who underwent live surgery during an international urological meeting organized in January 2017 were enrolled. Those with organ-confined prostate cancer underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patients with a single renal tumor underwent minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery. High-resolution (HR) imaging was obtained for all patients. Those with kidney tumors received contrast-enhanced CT scan with angiography; those with prostate cancer underwent mp-MRI. Images in DICOM format were processed by dedicated software. The first step was the rendering of a 3D virtual model. The models were then printed. They were presented during the live surgery of the urological meeting. All the participants and the operated patients were asked to fill a questionnaire about their opinion expressed in Likert scale (1-10) about the use and application of the 3D printed models. 18 patients were enrolled, including 8 undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and 10 undergoing minimally invasive partial nephrectomy. For each patient, a virtual 3D printed model was created. The attendants rated the utility of printed models in surgical planning, anatomical representation and the role of technology in surgical training as 8/10, 10/10 and 9/10, respectively. All patients reported favorable feedbacks (from 9 to 10/10) about the use of the technology during the case discussion with the surgeon. In our experience, 3D printing technology has been perceived as a useful tool for the purpose of surgical planning, physician education/training and patient counseling. Further researches are expected to increase the level of evidence.

  5. Robot-assisted single port radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy: description and technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota Filho, Francisco Hidelbrando Alves; Sávio, Luis Felipe; Sakata, Rafael Eiji; Ivanovic, Renato Fidelis; da Silva, Marco Antonio Nunes; Maia, Ronaldo; Passerotti, Carlo

    2018-01-01

    Robot-Assisted Single Site Radical Nephrectomy (RASS-RN) has been reported by surgeons in Europe and United States (1-3). To our best knowledge this video presents the first RASS-RN with concomitant cholecystectomy performed in Latin America. A 66 year-old renal transplant male due to chronic renal failure presented with an incidental 1.3cm nodule in the upper pole of the right kidney. In addition, symptomatic gallbladder stones were detected. Patient was placed in modified flank position. Multichannel single port device was placed using Hassan's technique through a 3cm supra-umbilical incision. Standard radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy were made using na 8.5mm camera, two 5mm robotic arms and an assistant 5mm access. Surgery time and estimated blood loss were 208 minutes and 100mL, respectively. Patient did well and was discharged within less than 48 hours, without complications. Pathology report showed benign renomedullary tumor of interstitial cells and chronic cholecystitis. Robotic technology improves ergonomics, gives better precision and enhances ability to approach complex surgeries. Robot-assisted Single Port aims to reduce the morbidity of multiple trocar placements while maintaining the advantages of robotic surgery (2). Limitations include the use of semi-rigid instruments providing less degree of motion and limited space leading to crash between instruments. On the other hand, it is possible to perform complex and concomitant surgeries with just one incision. RASS-RN seems to be safe and feasible option for selected cases. Studies should be performed to better understand the results using single port technique in Urology. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  6. Robot-assisted single port radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy: description and technical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Hidelbrando Alves Mota Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robot-Assisted Single Site Radical Nephrectomy (RASS-RN has been reported by surgeons in Europe and United States (1–3. To our best knowledge this video presents the first RASS-RN with concomitant cholecystectomy performed in Latin America. Case A 66 year-old renal transplant male due to chronic renal failure presented with an incidental 1.3cm nodule in the upper pole of the right kidney. In addition, symptomatic gallbladder stones were detected. Results Patient was placed in modified flank position. Multichannel single port device was placed using Hassan's technique through a 3 cm supra-umbilical incision. Standard radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy were made using an 8.5mm camera, two 5mm robotic arms and an assistant 5mm access. Surgery time and estimated blood loss were 208 minutes and 100mL, respectively. Patient did well and was discharged within less than 48 hours, without complications. Pathology report showed benign renomedullary tumor of interstitial cells and chronic cholecystitis. Discussion Robotic technology improves ergonomics, gives better precision and enhances ability to approach complex surgeries. Robot-assisted Single Port aims to reduce the morbidity of multiple trocar placements while maintaining the advantages of robotic surgery (2. Limitations include the use of semi-rigid instruments providing less degree of motion and limited space leading to crash between instruments. On the other hand, it is possible to perform complex and concomitant surgeries with just one incision. Conclusion RASS-RN seems to be safe and feasible option for selected cases. Studies should be performed to better understand the results using single port technique in Urology.

  7. [Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: What are the evidences at the time of a specific funding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J-A; Poinas, G; Fiard, G; Leprêtre, M; Delaitre-Bonnin, C; Rébillard, X; Descotes, J-L

    2017-03-01

    Despite a decreasing number of radical prostatectomies in France, the number of robot-assisted surgeries increases. The objective of this work is to assess the interest of robotic prostatectomy before asking a specific funding from health authorities. A systematic review of the literature on PubMed was performed. Prospective studies and meta-analyses comparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), laparoscopic (LRP) and open surgery (OP) were selected. There are only two randomized clinical trials comparing RARP and LRP. Erectile function was significantly better after RARP than after LRP. Compared to OP, sexuality evaluation, based on meta-analyses, was significantly better at 12 months and the absolute risk of erectile dysfunction significantly decreased. Continence after RARP was significantly better than LRP 3 months after surgery. Compared to OP, continence results were discordant, sometimes significantly in favor of RARP, sometimes similar. The rate of positive margins was similar whatever the technique. The long-term oncological outcomes were similar. In terms of perioperative complications, no significant difference was observed between RARP and LRP or OP. RARP provides same oncological outcomes as the open and laparoscopic approach. Continence and sexuality are better after RARP than after laparoscopic or open surgery. However, no randomized study comparing RARP and OP is available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term penile morphometric alterations in patients treated with robot-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogrosso, P; Ventimiglia, E; Cazzaniga, W; Stabile, A; Pederzoli, F; Boeri, L; Gandaglia, G; Dehò, F; Briganti, A; Montorsi, F; Salonia, A

    2018-01-01

    Neglected side effects after radical prostatectomy have been previously reported. In this context, the prevalence of penile morphometric alterations has never been assessed in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series. We aimed to assess prevalence of and predictors of penile morphometric alterations (i.e. penile shortening or penile morphometric deformation) at long-term follow-up in patients submitted to either robot-assisted (robot-assisted radical prostatectomy) or open radical prostatectomy. Sexually active patients after either robot-assisted radical prostatectomy or open radical prostatectomy prospectively completed a 28-item questionnaire, with sensitive issues regarding sexual function, namely orgasmic functioning, climacturia and changes in morphometric characteristics of the penis. Only patients with a post-operative follow-up ≥ 24 months were included. Patients submitted to either adjuvant or salvage therapies or those who refused to comprehensively complete the questionnaire were excluded from the analyses. A propensity-score matching analysis was implemented to control for baseline differences between groups. Logistic regression models tested potential predictors of penile morphometric alterations at long-term post-operative follow-up. Overall, 67 (50%) and 67 (50%) patients were included after open radical prostatectomy or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. Self-rated post-operative penile shortening and penile morphometric deformation were reported by 75 (56%) and 29 (22.8%) patients, respectively. Rates of penile shortening and penile morphometric deformation were not different after open radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy [all p > 0.5]. At univariable analysis, self-reported penile morphometric alterations (either penile shortening or penile morphometric deformation) were significantly associated with baseline international index of erectile function-erectile function scores, body mass index, post

  9. Associations of Intraoperative Flow Disruptions and or Teamwork during Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Weber, Jeannette; Hallett, Elyse; Pfandler, Michael; Schlenker, Boris; Becker, Armin; Catchpole, Ken

    2018-01-22

    To identify type and severity of surgical flow disruptions and to determine their impact on the perception of intraoperative teamwork. 40 radical prostatectomy cases were studied in an academic department for urology. A standardized observational tool for identification of type and severity of flow disruptions was applied during real-time prostatectomy procedures. Additionally, all OR team members evaluated intra-operative teamwork immediately after the procedure. Procedures were divided into four phases: pre-robot, docking, console time, and post-robot. A total of 2012 flow disruptions were observed with an average rate of 16.27 events per hour. The highest rate was during the robot docking phase. Although the frequency of disruption types varied across phases, the most severe disruptions were related to communication and coordination during the pre-robot and docking phase. Equipment- and communication-related disruptions were mostly severe during the time the surgeons were on the console. Among the surgeons, we identified a significant relationship between disruptions and intraoperative teamwork such that during procedures with frequent severe disruptions, surgeons experienced inferior teamwork (β = -.40, p=.01). This was not the case for nurses and anesthetists. Emphasis on improving OR team communication and coordination would help to establish efficient and smooth surgical workflow. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Robot-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy: Analysis of the complications and oncological and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanashiro, A; Gaya, J M; Palou, J; Gausa, L; Villavicencio, H

    2017-05-01

    To review our experience in robot-assisted radical cystectomy, assessing the complications and oncological and functional results. From 2007 to 2014, we performed 67 robot-assisted radical cystectomies combined with lymphadenectomy in 61 cases. The operations were performed on 37 patients due to muscle-invasive tumours and on 30 due to high-risk nonmuscle-invasive tumours. Urinary diversion was conducted extracorporeally, using a Studer neobladder in 47 cases. The mean blood loss was 300mL. No case required conversion to open surgery. The median number of lymph nodes extracted was 16 (range 3-33). Pathology revealed 16 pT0, 15 pTis,-pT1-pTa and 44 muscle-invasive tumours, 8 pN+ and 1 with positive margins. The mean hospital stay was 9 days. With a median follow-up of 16 months, 9 (13%) patients were readmitted after the discharge, most for infections associated with the vesical catheter and other catheters. Forty patients (59.7%) presented complications (most were Clavien grade 1-2). There was recurrence during the follow-up in 4 cases (6%), and 4 (5.9%) patients died from cancer. Nineteen (28.3%) patients had complications after 30 days, most of which were urinary tract infections. Of the 47 patients with a neobladder, 45 (96%) had proper daytime continence and 42 (89%) had proper nighttime continence. Ninety percent and 64% of the patients with previously normal sexual function and reduced sexual function, respectively, were able to preserve sexual function with or without drug treatment. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy plus lymphadenectomy, with extracorporeal reconstruction of the urinary diversion, offers good oncological and functional results without increasing the number of complications. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy: an Australian single-surgeon series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristos, Alexander; Basto, Marnique; Te Marvelde, Luc; Moon, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In Australia, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has steadily replaced open and laparoscopic surgery in the management of localized prostate cancer. Given the increased cost of this technology, we aimed to compare the perioperative, pathological, oncological and functional outcomes as well as short-term complications of laparoscopic and RARP. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 200 consecutive patients during the transition of a single surgeon (DM) from pure laparoscopic (n = 100) to RARP (n = 100) between September 2007 and March 2011. Median operative time and estimated blood loss were the same for both surgical approaches, 195 min (P = 0.29) and 300 mL (P = 0.88) respectively. Median length of hospital stay was shorter for RARP (P = 0.003). Complication rates were not statistically different between groups. There was no significant difference in positive surgical margin rates in pT2 (P = 0.36) or pT3 disease (0.99) or biochemical recurrence rate between groups (P = 0.14). The 12 months continence rate was improved with RARP compared with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (93% versus 82%; P = 0.025). The potency rate was 56% and 74% at 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and RARP respectively (P = 0.12) for a bilateral nerve sparing procedure. We conclude from our single-surgeon comparative series that the robotic approach results in a significantly shorter length of hospital stay and improved 12 months continence rates and demonstrated a trend towards better potency rates. Complications, positive surgical margin rates and the requirement for adjuvant therapy are all improved with the robotic approach but did not show statistically significant differences. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Management of pelvic lymphoceles following robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer A Raheem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic lymphocele is a potential complication of radical prostatectomy. Although lymphoceles often regress spontaneously, many may progress, precipitate clinical symptoms, and ultimately require intervention. To date, the best treatment of pelvic lymphoceles has not yet been fully defined. However, laparoscopic marsupialization is a definitive and efficacious surgical alternative to percutaneous drainage. It is effective, results in minimal patient morbidity, and allows for rapid recovery. We report our experience with management of clinically symptomatic pelvic lymphoceles following robotic-assisted prostatectomy using laparoscopic marsupialization.

  13. Factors associated with adoption of robotic surgical technology in US hospitals and relationship to radical prostatectomy procedure volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Gabriel I; Friedman, Bernard; Glied, Sherry A; Steiner, Claudia A

    2014-01-01

    Robotic technology has diffused rapidly despite high costs and limited additive reimbursement by major payers. We aimed to identify the factors associated with hospitals' decisions to adopt robotic technology and the consequences of these decisions. This observational study used data on hospitals and market areas from 2005 to 2009. Included were hospitals in census-based statistical areas within states in the State Inpatient Database that participated in the American Hospital Association annual surveys and performed radical prostatectomies. The likelihood that a hospital would acquire a robotic facility and the rates of radical prostatectomy relative to the prevalence of robots in geographic market areas were assessed using multivariable analysis. Hospitals in areas where a higher proportion of other hospitals had already acquired a robot were more likely to acquire one (P=0.012), as were those with more than 300 beds (Phospitals (Ptechnology in the United States. Significantly more radical prostatectomies were performed in hospitals with robots and in market areas of hospitals with robotic technology.

  14. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy with complete intracorporeal urinary diversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Sandberg

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (RARC-ICUD has only recently been explored as a viable surgical option for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer seeking satisfactory oncologic control while benefiting from minimally invasive surgical techniques. Inspired by earlier open and laparoscopic work, initial descriptions of RARC-ICUD were published in 2003, and have since been followed by multiple larger case series which have suggested promising outcomes for our patients. However, the rate of adoption has remained relatively slow when compared to other robot-assisted procedures such as the radical prostatectomy, likely owing to longer operative times, operative complexity, costs, and uncertainty regarding oncologic efficacy. The operative technique for RARC-ICUD has evolved over the past decade and several high-volume centers have shared tips to improve efficiency and make the operation possible for a growing number of urologists. Though there are still questions regarding economic costs, effectiveness, and generalizability of outcomes reported in published data, a growing dataset has brought us ever closer to the answers. Here, we present our current operative technique for RARC-ICUD and discuss the state of the literature so that the urologist may hold an informed discussion with his or her patients.

  15. Robotic Assisted Radical Cystoprostatectomy and Intracorporeal Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion for a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Caputo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and Objectives: Robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an alternative to open radical cystectomy. As experience is gained with the RARC approach the technique is being applied to more complex surgical cases. We describe here our technique for RARC with intracorporeal ileal conduit urinary diversion for a renal transplant recipient. Materials and Methods: The patient is a 60-year old man with high-grade muscle invasive bladder cancer. He has a history of renal failure due to polycystic kidney disease and received a deceased donor renal transplant in 2008. His hospital course at time of transplant was complicated by low-level BK virus viremia. Interestingly his trans-urethral bladder tumor resection specimen at time of bladder cancer diagnosis stained positive for SV40. His native kidneys were anuric so bilateral laparoscopic nephrectomy was performed in a staged fashion 2 weeks prior to RARC. Our surgical technique utilizes 6 trocars, of note a 12-mm assistant trocar is placed 1 cm superior to the pubic symphysis, and this trocar is solely used to pass a laparoscopic stapler to facilitate the excision of the ileal segment and the stapled enteric anastomosis. Surgical steps include: identification of native ureters bilaterally (removed en bloc with the bladder specimen; identification of the transplanted ureter at the right bladder dome; posterior bladder and prostate dissection along Denonvilliers’ fascia; development of the space of Retzius; ligation and transection of the bladder and prostate vascular bundles; apical prostate dissection and transection of urethra; left pelvic lymphadenectomy; ilium resection for creation of the ileal conduit; stapled enteric anastomosis; ureteroileal anastomosis; maturation of the ileal conduit stoma. Results: The surgery had no intraoperative complications. Operative time was 443 minutes (7.4 hours. Estimated blood loss was 250 cc. Length of hospital stay was 5 days. The patient

  16. Augmented reality during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: expert robotic surgeons' on-the-spot insights after live surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porpiglia, Francesco; Bertolo, Riccardo; Amparore, Daniele; Checcucci, Enrico; Artibani, Walter; Dasgupta, Prokar; Montorsi, Francesco; Tewari, Ashutosh; Fiori, Cristian

    2018-04-01

    3D reconstruction of the standard two-dimension cross-sectional imaging has known increasing diffusion. It may represent one of the key points for a tailored treatment planning. Along these lines, we used a novel software for augmented-reality robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (AR-RARP) at our Institution. 3D virtual models of the prostate and the prostate cancer were reconstructed from high resolution (1-mm slices) multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mp-MRI) by M3dics (Turin, Italy). The innovation in the study is represented by the software-based integration of the virtual model inside the Da Vinci (Intuitive, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) robotic console during robotic prostatectomy. In January 2018, the above-described AR-RARP technique has been used during the live surgery sessions of the 6th Techno-Urology Meeting held at San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (Orbassano, Turin, Italy). During this meeting, 6 experienced robotic surgeons (who have already performed more than 1000 RARP) used the software during nerve-sparing prostatectomy. The use of the technology was standardized to four key steps during the procedure: 1) bladder neck dissection; 2) nerve-sparing technique; 3) apex dissection; and 4) tailoring of eventual selective biopsies of prostatic lodge after prostatectomy). A Face Validity questionnaire was purpose-built aimed to collect the expert surgeons' insights about the eventual help of the technology in guiding the surgeon during the above-described AR-RARP steps. It was administered at the end of the surgeries to the respective surgeons. The questionnaire was made of open-ended questions of ordinal ten-point rating Likert Scale (where 1 corresponded to a strongly negative opinion and 10 to a strongly positive opinion). The median value of Likert scale from the evaluation of each of the aforementioned steps of AR-RARP was 9, (IQR 9-10). These findings are a confirmation of the increasing interest for a new-generation of image-guided surgery

  17. Complications and oncologic outcomes following robot-assisted radical cystectomy: What is the real benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Jae Bak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the advantages of robotic surgery, comparing perioperative and oncological outcomes between robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC and open radical cystectomy (ORC. Materials and Methods: Between August 2008 and May 2014, 112 radical cystectomies (42 RARCs and 70 ORCs were performed at a single academic institution following Institutional Review Board approval. Patient demographics, perioperative variables (e.g., complications, and oncologic outcomes including metastasis-free survival (MFS, cancer-specific survival (CSS, and overall survival (OS were reported using the Kaplan-Meier analyses. Results: The median follow-up period was 40 months (range, 0–70 months vs. 42 months (range, 0–74 months in RARC and ORC, respectively. Baseline characteristics of both groups were balanced. Blood loss (median, [range]; 300 mL [125–925 mL] vs. 598 mL [150–2,000 mL], p=0.001 and perioperative transfusion rates (23.8% vs. 45.7%, p=0.020 were significantly lower in the RARC group than in the ORC group. The overall complication rates were greater in the ORC group, but this was not statistically significant (65.7% vs. 64.3%, p=0.878. However, there were significantly higher major complication rates in the ORC group (45.7% vs. 26.2%, p=0.040. No significant differences were found with regards to MFS, CSS, and OS. Conclusions: While histopathological findings, overall complications, and survival rates do not reveal definite differences, RARC has more advantages compared to ORC in terms of estimated blood loss, perioperative transfusion rates and fewer perioperative major complications. We propose that RARC is a safer treatment modality with equivalent oncological outcomes compared to ORC.

  18. Intra-operative prostate motion tracking using surface markers for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamatian, Mehdi; Sarkar, Kripasindhu; Pautler, Stephen E.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy surgery (RP) is the gold standard for treatment of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, emergence of minimally invasive techniques such as Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (LRP) and Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (RARP) has improved the outcomes for prostatectomy. However, it remains difficult for the surgeons to make informed decisions regarding resection margins and nerve sparing since the location of the tumor within the organ is not usually visible in a laparoscopic view. While MRI enables visualization of the salient structures and cancer foci, its efficacy in LRP is reduced unless it is fused into a stereoscopic view such that homologous structures overlap. Registration of the MRI image and peri-operative ultrasound image using a tracked probe can potentially be exploited to bring the pre-operative information into alignment with the patient coordinate system during the procedure. While doing so, prostate motion needs to be compensated in real-time to synchronize the stereoscopic view with the pre-operative MRI during the prostatectomy procedure. In this study, a point-based stereoscopic tracking technique is investigated to compensate for rigid prostate motion so that the same motion can be applied to the pre-operative images. This method benefits from stereoscopic tracking of the surface markers implanted over the surface of the prostate phantom. The average target registration error using this approach was 3.25+/-1.43mm.

  19. Retropubic, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: surgical, oncological, and functional outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Francesco; Celestino, Francesco; Verri, Cristian; Masedu, Francesco; Liberati, Emanuele; Di Stasi, Savino Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide diffusion of minimally invasive approaches, such as laparoscopic (LRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP), few studies compare the results of these techniques with the retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) approach. The aim of this study is to compare the surgical, functional, and oncological outcomes and cost-effectiveness of RRP, LRP, and RALP. A systematic review of the literature was performed in the PubMed and Embase databases in December 2013. A 'free-text' protocol using the term 'radical prostatectomy' was applied. A total of 16,085 records were found. The authors reviewed the records to identify comparative studies to include in the review. 44 comparative studies were identified. With regard to the perioperative outcome, LRP and RALP were more time-consuming than RRP, but blood loss, transfusion rates, catheterisation time, hospitalisation duration, and complication rates were the most optimal in the laparoscopic approaches. With regard to the functional and oncological results, RALP was found to have the best outcomes. Our study confirmed the well-known perioperative advantage of minimally invasive techniques; however, available data were not sufficient to prove the superiority of any surgical approach in terms of functional and oncologic outcomes. On the contrary, cost comparison clearly supports RRP.

  20. Impact of tamsulosin on urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Gab; You, Dalsan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Sungwoo; Lim, Ju Hyun; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Choo, Myung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2014-02-01

    To examine the impact of tamsulosin on the rate of acute urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. A total of 236 patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer carried out by a single surgeon were enrolled in this randomized study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: treatment with tamsulosin (0.4 mg) from 1 day before to 14 days after surgery (tamsulosin group), or no tamsulosin treatment (control group). The urethral catheter was removed on the fifth postoperative day. The primary end-point was the acute urinary retention rate. Changes in each domain of the International Continence Society male short-form questionnaire and uroflowmetry parameters were secondary end-points. The primary end-point was assessed in 218 patients (92.4%; n = 109 in each group). It was not assessed in 18 patients because of cystographic leak from the vesicourethral anastomosis. The acute urinary retention rate was lower in the tamsulosin group (7.3%) than in the control group (17.4%, P = 0.018). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified tamsulosin treatment and the operative experience of the surgeon as independent risk factors for acute urinary retention. Tamsulosin-treated patients had a 0.30-fold lower risk of developing acute urinary retention compared with control patients (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.76; P = 0.011). None of the International Continence Society male questionnaire domain scores showed significant changes between the groups. Perioperative treatment with tamsulosin in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy reduces the rate of acute urinary retention after early catheter removal, without aggravating urinary incontinence. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  1. [Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of hospitals was 63%, though it marginally varied according to type and area. The annual case load was determined based on the results of the questionnaire and other modalities. It increased from 3,518 in 2009 to 6,425 in 2013. The case load seemed to be concentrated in hospitals with robot equipment since the increase of their number was very minimal over the 5 years. The hospitals with the robot treated a larger number of newly diagnosed patients with the disease than before. Most of the patients were those having localized cancer that was indicated for radical surgery, suggesting again the concentration of the surgical case loads in the hospitals with robots. While most hospitals believed that installation of a robot was necessary as an option for treatment procedures, the future strategy of the hospital, and other reasons, the action of the hospital to gain prestige may be involved in the process of purchasing the equipment. In conclusion, robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has become popular as a surgical procedure for prostate cancer in our society. This may lead to a concentration of the surgical case load in a limited number of hospitals with robots. We also discuss the typical action of an acute-care hospital when it purchases expensive clinical medical equipment.

  2. Preliminary results of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) after fellowship training and experience in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanski, Philippe; Chabert, Charles; Jones, Lee; Mullavey, Tarryn; Walsh, Sharon; Gianduzzo, Troy

    2012-12-01

    • To ascertain whether prior experience in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) shortens the 'learning curve' and therefore improves early patient outcomes when transitioning to robot-assisted laparoscopic RP (RALP). • Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of the most recent 87 cases of LRP compared with the initial 73 cases of RALP. • LRP was performed via a five-port extraperitoneal approach, while transperitoneal RALP was performed using a four-arm da Vinci S unit. • The median operative duration for RALP (skin-to-skin, including docking time) rapidly reduced, although never exceeded 3.5 h, for each consecutive set of 10 cases. • Oncological outcomes were preserved with no cases of pT2 positive surgical margins (PSMs) in any group. pT3 PSM rates were not significantly different at 50% and 38% for LRP and RALP, respectively. • Penetrative intercourse rates at 3 months for bilateral nerve-sparing procedures in preoperatively potent patients were similar, at 50% for LRP (median Sexual Health Inventory for Men [SHIM] 17) and 48.1% for RALP (median SHIM 18). The pad-free rate at 3 months was significantly better for RALP at 59.7%, compared with 39.8% for LRP (P= 0.043). • Complications were minimal and comparable for the two groups except for a higher LRP radiological anastomotic leak rate of 16 vs 1% (P= 0.004). • In this comparative series fellowship training and prior experience in LRP resulted in no significant RALP learning curve with regards to oncological and functional outcomes, while maintaining a low complication rate. • A short learning curve existed for operative duration but this improved rapidly and there were no prolonged cases. • Differences in early continence and radiological leaks may reflect changing from an interrupted anastomosis (LRP) to a continuous anastomosis with posterior rhabdosphincter reconstruction (RALP). © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  3. In-depth Critical Analysis of Complications Following Robot-assisted Radical Cystectomy with Intracorporeal Urinary Diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W; Tan, Mae-Yen; Ahmad, Imran; Sridhar, Ashwin; Nathan, Senthil; Hines, John; Shaw, Greg; Briggs, Timothy P; Kelly, John D

    2017-04-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (iRARC) is an attractive option to open cystectomy, but the benefit in terms of improved outcomes is not established. To evaluate the early postoperative morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing iRARC and conduct a critical analysis of complications using standardised reporting criteria as stratified according to urinary diversion. A total of 134 patients underwent iRARC for bladder cancer at a single centre between June 2011 and July 2015. Radical cystectomy with iRARC. Patient demographics, pathologic data, and 90-d perioperative mortality and complications were recorded. Complications were reported according to the Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification and stratified according to urinary diversion type and either surgical or medical complications. The chi-square test and t test were used for categorical and continuous variables respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was performed on variables with significance in univariate analysis. The 90-d all complication rate following ileal conduit and continent diversion was 68% and 82.4%, and major complications were 21.0% and 20.6% respectively. The 90-d mortality was 3% and 2.9% for ileal conduit and continent diversion patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the blood transfusion requirement was independently associated with major complications (p=0.002) and all 30-d (p=0.002) and 90-d (p=0.012) major complications. Male patients were associated with 90-d major complications (p=0.015). Critical analysis identified that surgical complications were responsible for 39.4% of all 90-d major complications. The incidence of surgical complications did not decline with increasing number of iRARC cases performed (p=0.742, r=0.31). Limitations of this study include its retrospective nature, limited sample size, and limited multivariate analysis due to the low number of major complications events. Although complications following i

  4. Best practices in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: recommendations of the Pasadena Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorsi, Francesco; Wilson, Timothy G; Rosen, Raymond C; Ahlering, Thomas E; Artibani, Walter; Carroll, Peter R; Costello, Anthony; Eastham, James A; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Menon, Mani; Novara, Giacomo; Patel, Vipul R; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Van der Poel, Henk; Van Poppel, Hein; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) has long been the most common surgical technique used to treat clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa). More recently, robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has been gaining increasing acceptance among patients and urologists, and it has become the dominant technique in the United States despite a paucity of prospective studies or randomized trials supporting its superiority over RRP. A 2-d consensus conference of 17 world leaders in prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy was organized in Pasadena, California, and at the City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, California, under the auspices of the European Association of Urology Robotic Urology Section to systematically review the currently available data on RARP, to critically assess current surgical techniques, and to generate best practice recommendations to guide clinicians and related medical personnel. No commercial support was obtained for the conference. A systematic review of the literature was performed in agreement with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis statement. The results of the systematic literature review were reviewed, discussed, and refined over the 2-d conference. Key recommendations were generated using a Delphi consensus approach. RARP is associated with less blood loss and transfusion rates compared with RRP, and there appear to be minimal differences between the two approaches in terms of overall postoperative complications. Positive surgical margin rates are at least equivalent with RARP, but firm conclusions about biochemical recurrence and other oncologic end points are difficult to draw because the follow-up in existing studies is relatively short and the overall experience with RARP in locally advanced PCa is still limited. RARP may offer advantages in postoperative recovery of urinary continence and erectile function, although there are methodological limitations in most studies to date and a need for

  5. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension......, surgeon, prostate volume and anastomotic leakage as variables. Owing to a low number of events, multivariable analyses only included smoking status, diabetes and prostate volume for anastomotic leakage, and age, smoking status, prostate volume and anastomotic leakage for anastomotic strictures. Results...

  6. [Interest of surgical companionship during the training period of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Pouget, L; Nouhaud, F X; Blah, M; Defortescu, G; Ndangang, M; Grise, P; Pfister, C

    2017-04-01

    Study of the learning curve of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, evaluating intraoperative difficulties and postoperative complications according to Clavien-Dindo classification. Retrospective study of our first 157 consecutive patients treated with robot-assisted prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer between September 2011 and December 2014. Comparison of learning for each group of 50 procedures and then comparison between patients operated on by a pair of two seniors specially trained for robotic surgery and patients operated on by one mixed pair including a surgeon junior coached by one senior of the first group. Only postoperative complications decreased significantly from the 51st patient (P=0.04). The curves showing the evolution of the operative time decreased with a parallel trend between the two pairs, but with more variability in the mixed pair. There was no significant difference in terms of intraoperative difficulties (P=0.59), nor postoperative complications (P=0.56) mainly of grade 2. The blood loss, transfusion rate, duration of hospitalization and readmission rates did not differ. Lymph node dissection did not affect outcomes. For oncological results, the overall rate of positive surgical margins (R+) was 30.6 % in the initial pair against 24.2 % in the mixed group with no significant difference. Nevertheless, the subpopulation study objectified a R+ rate of 12.86 % for pT2 against 42.85 % for pT3. The early involvement of a junior surgeon who did not receive specific training, but benefiting from the guidance of a senior surgeon, did not compromise the results while allowing a faster learning curve with a rate of operative complications close to the one observed by the senior pair. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Robotic versus open radical cystectomy: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Xia

    Full Text Available To critically review the currently available evidence of studies comparing robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC with open radical cystectomy (ORC.A comprehensive review of the literature from Pubmed, Web of Science and Scopus was performed in April 2014. All relevant studies comparing RARC with ORC were included for further screening. A pooled meta-analysis of all comparative studies was performed and publication bias was assessed by a funnel plot.Nineteen studies were included for the analysis, including a total of 1779 patients (787 patients in the RARC group and 992 patients in the ORC group. Although RARC was associated with longer operative time (p <0.0001, patients in this group might benefit from significantly lower overall perioperative complication rates within 30 days and 90 days (p = 0.005 and 0.0002, respectively, more lymph node yields (p = 0.009, less estimated blood loss (p <0.00001, lower need for perioperative and intraoperative transfusions (p <0.0001 and <0.0001, respectively, and shorter postoperative length of stay (p = 0.0002. There was no difference between two groups regarding positive surgical margin rates (p = 0.19.RARC appears to be an efficient alternative to ORC with advantages of less perioperative complications, more lymph node yields, less estimated blood loss, lower need for transfusions, and shorter postoperative length of stay. Further studies should be performed to compare the long-term oncologic outcomes between RARC and ORC.

  8. Posterior muscolofascial reconstruction incorporated into urethrovescical anastomosis during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gan, Melanie; Borghesi, Marco; Zattoni, Fabio; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    The rationale of posterior musculofascial plate reconstruction during radical prostatectomy is to shorten the time to reach urinary continence recovery and to reduce the risk of bleeding and anastomosis leakage. We describe our original technique incorporating the posterior muscolofascial reconstruction into urethrovesical anastomosis using robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). For this reconstructive step, we use a 30-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture (V-20 tapered needle). Specifically, the free edge of the posterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia is approximated to the posterior part of the sphincteric apparatus in a running fashion from left to right. The musculature of the urethral wall is incorporated in this first layer of the running suture. This suture is then continued back to the left in a second layer incorporating the anterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia (or prostatovesical muscle), the bladder neck, and again the urethra, this time also with urethral mucosa. The urethrovesical anastomosis is completed using a second running barbed suture (15-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture, V-20 tapered needle). No intraoperative complications were observed during this step of the procedure. Anastomotic leakages were observed only in 2% of cases. Only 12.5% showed urinary incontinence after catheter removal (1-2 pads). At mean follow-up of 9 months, the urinary continence recovery was 95%, and an anastomosis stricture necessitating an endoscopic incision developed in only three (1.5%) patients. Recent systematic reviews of the literature showed only a minimal advantage in favor of posterior musculofascial reconstruction in terms of urinary continence recovery within 1 month after radical prostatectomy. We support the use of this step of RARP because it is simple, reproducible, with a very limited increase in operative time, and with only a slight risk of potential harm to the patient. Moreover, it could improve hemostasis and provide greater support for a

  9. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of ho...

  10. Laparoscopic and robotic-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Evans, Sue M; Allan, Christie Ann; Jung, Jae Hung; Murphy, Declan; Frydenberg, Mark

    2017-09-12

    Prostate cancer is commonly diagnosed in men worldwide. Surgery, in the form of radical prostatectomy, is one of the main forms of treatment for men with localised prostate cancer. Prostatectomy has traditionally been performed as open surgery, typically via a retropubic approach. The advent of laparoscopic approaches, including robotic-assisted, provides a minimally invasive alternative to open radical prostatectomy (ORP). To assess the effects of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy or robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy compared to open radical prostatectomy in men with localised prostate cancer. We performed a comprehensive search using multiple databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE) and abstract proceedings with no restrictions on the language of publication or publication status, up until 9 June 2017. We also searched bibliographies of included studies and conference proceedings. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a direct comparison of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) and robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) to ORP, including pseudo-RCTs. Two review authors independently classified studies and abstracted data. The primary outcomes were prostate cancer-specific survival, urinary quality of life and sexual quality of life. Secondary outcomes were biochemical recurrence-free survival, overall survival, overall surgical complications, serious postoperative surgical complications, postoperative pain, hospital stay and blood transfusions. We performed statistical analyses using a random-effects model and assessed the quality of the evidence according to GRADE. We included two unique studies with 446 randomised participants with clinically localised prostate cancer. The mean age, prostate volume, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of the participants were 61.3 years, 49.78 mL, and 7.09 ng/mL, respectively. Primary outcomes We found no study that addressed the outcome of prostate cancer-specific survival. Based on data from one

  11. Ocular parameters before and after steep Trendelenburg positioning for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizumoto K

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kyoichi Mizumoto,1 Masahiko Gosho,2 Masayoshi Iwaki,1 Masahiro Zako3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Clinical Trial and Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Asai Hospital, Seto, Aichi, Japan Purpose: Intraocular pressure (IOP increases in patients in a steep Trendelenburg position during robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP. We hypothesized that a steep Trendelenburg position during RALP, an unusual systemic condition involving a transiently increased IOP, may induce ocular pathology that can be detected by detailed evaluations long after the surgery. This study aims to explore ocular structural and functional parameters in patients before and in the long term after the surgery. Patients and methods: A comparative observational study was performed. A total of 44 eyes of 22 male patients scheduled for RALP at Aichi Medical University from August 2012 to July 2013 were included. Clinical parameters before and after RALP were compared. Peri­operative IOP was measured immediately post-induction of anesthesia in the flat supine position (T1, immediately post-steep Trendelenburg position (T2, and prior to returning to a flat supine position while in a steep Trendelenburg position (T3. The thicknesses of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell complex (GCC, and central fovea were measured with spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Humphrey perimetry was performed before and at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Results: The average IOPs (mmHg at each stage were T1=10.4, T2=21.7, and T3=29.6, and differed significantly. The mean visual acuity (logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution, IOP, mean deviation, and pattern standard deviation measured by the Humphrey field analyzer showed no statistically significant difference before and after surgery. The ganglion

  12. Oncologic results, functional outcomes, and complication rates of transperitoneal robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: single centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan-Tasci, A; Simsek, A; Dogukan-Torer, M B; Sokmen, D; Sahin, S; Bitkin, A; Tugcu, V

    2015-03-01

    We report the operative details and short term oncologic and functional outcome of the first 334 Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy experiences for organ confined prostate cancer From August 2009 to December 2012, details of 334 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The analyzed parameters included: preoperative, per-operative characteristics, postoperative minor and major complications, positive surgical margin continence, potency, and biochemical progression at the follow-up period. The classical extrafascial, interfascial, intrafascial and fascia sparing radical prostatectomy were performed in 31, 41, 200, and 62 cases, respectively. The mean operation time was 213.8±90.1minutes, and the mean estimated blood loss was 116.1±58.9cc during operation. A nerve-sparing procedure was performed bilaterally in 198 (59.3%) cases and unilaterally in 126 (37.7%) cases. The catheter was removed on postoperative day 9, 1±1.9. Surgical margin was positive in 36 (10.7%) patients. The overall, pT2, pT3a and pT3b PSM rates were 8 (2.4%), 12 (3.6%), 16 (4.8%) respectively and PSM and BCR rates were not statistically different among four approach (P>.05). At the follow-up period, the continence rates were 74.4%, 80.4%, 80.5%, and 96.7% (P.05), in classic extrafascial, interfascial, intrafascial, and fascia sparing intrafascial prostatectomy, respectively. RARP is a safe and feasible technique in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Fascia sparing approach has better continence rate. This results need to be supported by new prospective, randomized studies. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  14. [Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy: Contribution of robotic support, functional and oncological outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepffner, Jean-Luc; Gaston, Richard; Mugnier, Camille; Rey, Denis; Lopez, Laurent; Roche, Jean-Baptiste; Riviere, Julien; Piechaud, Pierre-Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) remains a standard for localized prostate cancer treatment. The objective of this study is to present this operating technique of the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (PR-RA) and to evaluate oncological and functional results as well as on the surgical safety. A first series of 1679 patients consecutively operated in our institution with this technique from 2005 to 2010 and with a 5-year follow-up evaluated in 2014. The oncology monitoring is ensured with a PSA test every six months during the first three years and once a year the years after if the level remains undetectable. The oncologic outcomes show 17.4% for pT2 stages and 36.9% for pT3 stages positive margins. The level of biological recurrence is 21.27% with an average delay of 88 months as the time needed for the recurrence to occur. At 12 months, urinary continence (0-1pad/day) returned at 94% of all patients and potency with successful penetration for all men is 61.1% and 88.8% for men with sexual activity before surgery. The technique PRRA seems to be a reliable technique whose functional results studied from meta-analysis seem to be superior in terms of rapidity of recovery of the continence and erection in comparison with classical surgical or laparoscopic approach. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The new era of minimally invasive interventions for prostate cancer: robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and focal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatloff O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Schatloff1, Alyssa S Louis2, Uri Lindner21Global Robotics Institute, Florida Hospital Celebration Health, Celebration, FL, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Prostate cancer remains a common but highly treatable disease. Innovations in prostate cancer treatment have allowed a transition toward minimally invasive approaches in an attempt to avoid treatment-related morbidities. In the middle of the treatment spectrum between radical open surgeries and active surveillance lies robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP and focal therapy (FT. This review sets out the most current information on RALP and FT (including laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and irreversible electroporation.Keywords: PCa, RALP, FT, laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, irreversible electroporation

  16. Stratified analysis of 800 Asian patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with a median 64 months of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Kim, Dae Keun; Santok, Glen Denmer; Alabdulaali, Ibrahim; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2016-09-01

    To report the 5-year oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from the largest series ever reported from Asia. A retrospective analysis of 800 Asian patients who were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from July 2005 to May 2010 in the Department of Urology and Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea was carried out. The primary end-point was to evaluate the biochemical recurrence. The secondary end-point was to show the biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival and cancer-specific survival. A total of 197 (24.65%), 218 (27.3%), and 385 (48.1%) patients were classified as low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D'Amico risk stratification risk criteria, respectively. The median follow-up period was 64 months (interquartile range 28-71 months). The overall incidence of positive surgical margin was 36.6%. There was biochemical recurrence in 183 patients (22.9%), 38 patients (4.8%) developed distant metastasis and 24 patients (3%) died from prostate cancer. Actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates at 5 years were 76.4%, 94.6% and 96.7%, respectively. Positive lymph node was associated with lower 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival (9.1%), cancer-specific survival (75.7%) and metastasis-free survival (61.9%) rates (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, among all the predictors, positive lymph node was the strongest predictor of biochemical recurrence, cancer-specific survival and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.001). Herein we report the largest robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series from Asia. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is confirmed to be an oncologically safe procedure that is able to provide effective 5-year cancer control, even in patients with high-risk disease. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  17. Early urinary continence recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in older Australian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Marnique Y; Vidyasagar, Chinni; te Marvelde, Luc; Freeborn, Helen; Birch, Emma; Landau, Adam; Murphy, Declan G; Moon, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    To compare the recovery of urinary continence (UC) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in men aged ≥70 and continent and mean pads/day at 4-6 weeks, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after RARP. Of the 262 men, 9% (24) were aged ≥70 years. Older men had higher PSA levels (P = 0.007) and clinical stages (P continent (P = 0.08) than their younger counterparts; however, by 3 months and all time-points thereafter there was no difference. The 12-month UC rates were 89% and 92% for men aged <70 and ≥70 years, respectively. Neither age, body mass index, D'Amico risk group, nerve sparing nor use of Rocco suture were predictors of time to UC recovery. UC recovery after RARP in men aged ≥70 years appears comparable to younger men and therefore not a reason to deny older men with a reasonable life-expectancy curative surgical treatment of localised prostate cancer. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  18. Erectile Function and Oncologic Outcomes Following Open Retropubic and Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results from the LAParoscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Pini, Giovannalberto; Nyberg, Tommy; Derogar, Maryam; Carlsson, Stefan; Stranne, Johan; Bjartell, Anders; Hugosson, Jonas; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, Peter N

    2018-04-01

    Whether surgeons perform better utilising a robot-assisted laparoscopic technique compared with an open approach during prostate cancer surgery is debatable. To report erectile function and early oncologic outcomes for both surgical modalities, stratified by prostate cancer risk grouping. In a prospective nonrandomised trial, we recruited 2545 men with prostate cancer from seven open (n=753) and seven robot-assisted (n=1792) Swedish centres (2008-2011). Clinometrically-validated questionnaire-based patient-reported erectile function was collected before, 3 mo, 12 mo, and 24 mo after surgery. Surgeon-reported degree of neurovascular-bundle preservation, pathologist-reported positive surgical margin (PSM) rates, and 2-yr prostate-specific antigen-relapse rates were measured. Among 1702 preoperatively potent men, we found enhanced erectile function recovery for low/intermediate-risk patients in the robot-assisted group at 3 mo. For patients with high-risk tumours, point estimates for erectile function recovery at 24 mo favoured the open surgery group. The degree of neurovascular bundle preservation and erectile function recovery were greater correlated for robot-assisted surgery. In pT2 tumours, 10% versus 17% PSM rates were observed for open and robot-assisted surgery, respectively; corresponding rates for pT3 tumours were 48% and 33%. These differences were associated with biochemical recurrence in pT3 but not pT2 disease. The study is limited by its nonrandomised design and relatively short follow-up. Earlier recovery of erectile function in the robot-assisted surgery group in lower-risk patients is counterbalanced by lower PSM rates for open surgeons in organ-confined disease; thus, both open and robotic surgeons need to consider this trade-off when determining the plane of surgical dissection. Robot-assisted surgery also facilitates easier identification of nerve preservation planes during radical prostatectomy as well as wider dissection for pT3 cases. For

  19. Laparoscopic and robotic nephroureterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azawi, Nessn H; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thamsborg, Andreas Key Milan

    2017-01-01

    nephroureterectomy between January 2008 and December 2014 was conducted. Outcome measures were OS and CSM. RESULTS: In total, 298 patients underwent robot-assisted or laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy with a final histological diagnosis of UTUC. LND was performed in 46 (15.4%). One hundred and seventy...

  20. The Impact of Implementation of the European Association of Urology Guidelines Panel Recommendations on Reporting and Grading Complications on Perioperative Outcomes after Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Bravi, Carlo Andrea; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Mazzone, Elio; Fossati, Nicola; Scuderi, Simone; Robesti, Daniele; Barletta, Francesco; Grillo, Luca; Maclennan, Steven; N'Dow, James; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto

    2018-03-12

    The rate of postoperative complications might vary according to the method used to collect perioperative data. We aimed at assessing the impact of the prospective implementation of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on reporting and grading of complications in prostate cancer patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). From September 2016, an integrated method for reporting surgical morbidity based on the EAU guidelines was implemented at a single, tertiary center. Perioperative data were prospectively and systematically collected during a patient interview at 30 d after surgery as recommended by the EAU Guidelines Panel Recommendations on Reporting and Grading Complications. The rate and grading of complications of 167 patients who underwent RARP±pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) after the implementation of the prospective collection system (Group 1) were compared with 316 patients treated between January 2015 and August 2016 (Group 2) when a system based on patient chart review was used. No differences were observed in disease characteristics and PLND between the two groups (all p≥0.1). Postoperative complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Overall, the complication rate was higher when the prospective collection system based on the EAU guidelines was used (29%) than when retrospective chart review (10%; preporting perioperative outcomes roughly doubled the complication rate after RARP and allowed for the detection of complications after discharge in more than 15% of patients that would have been otherwise missed, where patients assessed with the EAU implemented protocol had a threefold higher likelihood of reporting complications. The implementation of the European Association of Urology guidelines on reporting and grading of complications after urologic procedures in prostate cancer patients roughly doubled the complication rate after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy compared

  1. Perioperative outcome of initial 190 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - A single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Dogra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the perioperative outcome of the first 190 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed at our center from July 2006 to December 2010. Materials and Methods: Operative and recovery data for men with localized prostate cancer undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy at our center were reviewed. All surgeries were performed using the 4-arm da Vinci-S surgical robot. Preoperative data included age, body mass index (BMI, prostate specific antigen (PSA level, prostate weight, biopsy Gleason score and TNM staging, while operative and recovery data included total operative time, estimated blood loss, complications, hospital stay and catheter time. These parameters were evaluated for the safety and efficacy of this procedure in our center. Results: The mean age of our patients was 65 ± 1.2 years. The mean BMI was 25.20 ± 2.88 and the median PSA was 14.8 ng/ml. Majority of our patients belonged to clinical stage T2 (51.58%. The mean total operative time was 166.44 ± 11.5 min. Six patients required conversion to open procedure and there was one rectal injury. The median estimated blood loss was 302 ± 14.45 ml and the median duration of hospital stay was 4 days. The overall margin positivity rate was 12.63%. Conclusion: Despite our limited robotic surgery experience, our perioperative outcome and complication rate is comparable to most contemporary series. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP is easy to learn and provides the patient with the benefits of minimally invasive surgery with minimal perioperative morbidity.

  2. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2017-11-08

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen greater 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p <0.01) and a higher positive surgical margin rate (19.3% vs 7.8%, p = 0.016). On multivariable analysis only tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason

  3. Does robot-assisted radical prostatectomy benefit patients with prostate cancer and bone oligometastases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won Sik; Kim, Myung Soo; Jeong, Won Sik; Chang, Ki Don; Cho, Kang Su; Ham, Won Sik; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Choi, Young Deuk

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the peri-operative and oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 79 patients with oligometastatic PCa treated with RARP or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) between 2005 and 2015 at our institution. Of these 79 patients, 38 were treated with RARP and 41 were treated with ADT without local therapy. Oligometastatic disease was defined as the presence of five or fewer hot spots detected by preoperative bone scan. We evaluated peri-operative outcomes, progression-free survival (PFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). We analysed data using Kaplan-Meier methods, with log-rank tests and multivariate Cox regression models. Patients treated with RARP experienced similar postoperative complications to those previously reported in RP-treated patients, and fewer urinary complications than ADT-treated patients. PFS and CSS were longer in RARP-treated compared with ADT-treated patients (median PFS: 75 vs 28 months, P = 0.008; median CSS: not reached vs 40 months, P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis further identified RARP as a significant predictor of PFS and CSS (PFS: hazard ratio [HR] 0.388, P = 0.003; CSS: HR 0.264, P = 0.004). We showed that RARP in the setting of oligometastatic PCa is a safe and feasible procedure which improves oncological outcomes in terms of PFS and CSS. In addition, our data suggest that RARP effectively prevents urinary tract complications from PCa. The study highlights results from expert surgeons and highly selected patients that cannot be extrapolated to all patients with oligometastatic PCa; to confirm our findings, large, prospective, multicentre studies are required. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pelvic lymph node dissection for patients with elevated risk of lymph node invasion during radical prostatectomy: comparison of open, laparoscopic and robot-assisted procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Vickers, Andrew J; Power, Nicholas E; Parra, Raul O; Coleman, Jonathan A; Pinochet, Rodrigo; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A; Laudone, Vincent P

    2012-06-01

    Published outcomes of pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) demonstrate significant variability. The purpose of the study was to compare PLND outcomes in patients at risk for lymph node involvement (LNI) who were undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) by different surgeons and surgical approaches. Institutional policy initiated on January 1, 2010, mandated that all patients undergoing RP receive a standardized PLND with inclusion of the hypogastric region when predicted risk of LNI was ≥ 2%. We analyzed the outcomes of consecutive patients meeting these criteria from January 1 to September 1, 2010 by surgeons and surgical approach. All patients underwent RP; surgical approach (open radical retropubic [ORP], laparoscopic [LRP], RALP) was selected by the consulting surgeon. Differences in lymph node yield (LNY) between surgeons and surgical approaches were compared using multivariable linear regression with adjustment for clinical stage, biopsy Gleason grade, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and age. Of 330 patients (126 ORP, 78 LRP, 126 RALP), 323 (98%) underwent PLND. There were no significant differences in characteristics between approaches, but the nomogram probability of LNI was slightly greater for ORP than RALP (P=0.04). LNY was high (18 nodes) by all approaches; more nodes were removed by ORP and LRP (median 20, 19, respectively) than RALP (16) after adjusting for stage, grade, PSA level, and age (P=0.015). Rates of LNI were high (14%) with no difference between approaches when adjusted for nomogram probability of LNI (P=0.15). Variation in median LNY among individual surgeons was considerable for all three approaches (11-28) (P=0.005) and was much greater than the variability by approach. PLND, including hypogastric nodal packet, can be performed by any surgical approach, with slightly different yields but similar pathologic outcomes. Individual surgeon commitment to PLND may be more important

  5. Higher number of transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy cores is associated with higher blood loss and perioperative complications in robot assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, A; Sivaraman, A; Sanchez-Salas, R; Nunes-Silva, I; Baghdadi, M; Srougi, V; di Trapani, E; Uriburu Pizzaro, F; Doizi, S; Barret, E; Rozet, F; Galiano, M; Cathelineau, X

    2017-04-01

    The local inflammatory process after prostate biopsies can have a negative impact on functional outcomes of radical prostatectomy. There is no evidence in literature demonstrating its impact on radical prostatectomy. To evaluate the impact of the number of TRUS core biopsies in the surgical morbidity and rate of positive margin on robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). A prospectively maintained database of 2,054 RARPs in a single institution. Patients were further grouped into 2 groups based on the number of TRUS biopsy cores (G1≤12 cores; G2>12 cores). Multivariable logistic regression model was applied to analyze the impact of number of cores on complications. A total number of 1,042 patients in the group 1 (≤12 cores) and 1,012 patients in the group 2 (>12 cores) were included. The rate of perioperative complications increased with higher number of biopsies (G1 6.4 vs. G2 8.5%; P=.03), but high grade complication (Clavien 3-4) were similar (G1 1.4 vs. G2 2.2%; P=.16). Positive surgical margin rates were similar in both groups (G1 11.8 vs. 9.98%; P=.2). At the multivariable logistic regression analysis shown that G2 had a 39% (OR 0.645) higher rate to experience perioperative complications during RARP. Higher number of TRUS biopsy cores (>12) is associated to higher blood loss and perioperative complications during RARP. Careful preoperative evaluation for those patients underwent multiple biopsies or saturation protocols is mandatory. Application of longer intervals (>6 weeks) between biopsy and surgery may be advisable to minimize potential risks of surgical complications in patients may benefit from RARP. Further studies are still necessary to confirm these results. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle and endopelvic fascia sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Augusto Monteiro Lins de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RAP is the dominant minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. The introduction of robotic assistance has the potential to improve surgical outcomes and reduce the steep learning curve associated with conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle without open the endopelvic fascia during RAP. Materials and Methods A 51-year old male, presenting histological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6 (3+3, in 4 cores of 12, with an initial PSA=3.41ng/dl and the digital rectal examination demonstrating a prostate with hardened nodule in the right lobe of the prostate base (clinical stage T2a. Surgical treatment with the robot-assisted technique was offered as initial therapeutic option and the critical technical point was the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle with endopelvic fascia preservation, during radical prostatectomy. Results The operative time was of 89 minutes, blood loss was 100ml. No drain was left in the peritoneal cavity. The patient was discharged within 24 hours. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. The pathological evaluation revealed prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6, with free surgical margins and seminal vesicles free of neoplastic involvement (pathologic stage T2a. At 3-month-follow-up, the patient lies with undetectable PSA, continent and potent. Conclusion This is a feasible technique combining the benefits of retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle, the preservation of the pubo-prostatic collar and the preservation of the antero-lateral cavernous nerves.

  7. A Randomized Study of Intraoperative Autologous Retropubic Urethral Sling on Urinary Control after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hao G; Punnen, Sanoj; Cowan, Janet E; Leapman, Michael; Cary, Clint; Welty, Christopher; Weinberg, Vivian; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Meng, Maxwell V; Greene, Kirsten L; Garcia, Maurice; Carroll, Peter R

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated whether placement of a retropubic urethral sling fashioned from autologous vas deferens during robotic assisted radical prostatectomy would improve recovery of continence. In a phase 2, single blind trial age stratified patients were randomized to undergo robotic assisted radical prostatectomy by multiple surgeons with or without sling placement. The outcomes were complete continence (0 urinary pads of any type) and near continence (0, an occasional or 1 pad per day) at 6 months, which was assessed by the Fisher exact test and logistic regression. The Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test were used to evaluate time to continence. EPIC-UIN (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-Urinary Inventory) and I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) 1, 3 and 6 months after catheter removal were evaluated by mixed models for repeated measures. Of 203 patients who were recruited 95 and 100 were randomized to undergo sling and no sling placement, respectively, and completed postoperative interviews. Six months after surgery the proportions reporting complete and near continence (66% and 87%, respectively) and times to complete and near continence were similar in the groups. Younger age was associated with a higher likelihood of complete continence (OR 1.74 per decreasing 5-year interval, 95% CI 1.23-2.48, p <0.01) and near continence (OR 2.18 per decreasing 5-year interval, 95% CI 1.21-3.92, p <0.01) adjusting for clinical, urinary and surgical factors. Adjusted EPIC-UIN and I-PSS scores changed with time but did not differ between the groups. No serious adverse events were observed. This trial failed to demonstrate a benefit of autologous urethral sling placement at robotic assisted radical prostatectomy on early return of continence at 6 months. Continence was related to patient age in adjusted models. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A preliminary oncologic outcome and postoperative complications in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical cystectomy: Initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Muto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC was originally intended to replace open radical cystectomy (ORC as a minimally invasive surgery for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of robotic surgery, comparing perioperative and oncologic outcomes between RARC and ORC. Materials and Methods: Between June 2012 and August 2016, 49 bladder cancer patients were given a radical cystectomy, 21 robotically and 28 by open procedure. We compared the clinical variables between the RARC and ORC groups. Results: In the RARC group, the median estimated blood loss (EBL during cystectomy, total EBL, operative time during cystectomy, and total operative time were 0 mL, 457.5 mL, 199 minutes, and 561 minutes, respectively. EBL during cystectomy (p<0.001, total EBL (p<0.001, and operative time during cystectomy (p=0.003 in the RARC group were significantly lower compared with the ORC group. Time to resumption of a regular diet (p<0.001 and length of stay (p=0.017 were also significantly shorter compared with the ORC group. However, total operative time in the RARC group (median, 561 minutes was significantly longer compared with the ORC group (median, 492.5 minutes; p=0.015. Conclusions: This Japanese study presented evidence that RARC yields benefits in terms of BL and time to regular diet, while consuming greater total operative time. RARC may be a minimally invasive surgical alternative to ORC with less EBL and shorter length of stay.

  9. Outcomes of robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy for patients in two extreme age-groups (years vs > 65 years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Radu-Tudor; Crisan, Nicolae; Andras, Iulia; Bud, Gabriela; Matei, Deliu-Victor; DE Cobelli, Ottavio; Coman, Ioan; Bocsan, Ioan-Stelian

    2018-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of robotic radical prostatectomy in two different age subgroups of pre-operatively potent patients: younger than 50 years and older than 65 years. We included in the present study a number of 202 patients with prostate cancer divided into two groups: 99 patients older than 65 years (group 1) and 103 patients younger than 50 years (group 2). More than half of the younger patients were low-risk vs 57% of the older patients who were high-risk. Overall positive surgical margins rate was 21.2% in group 1 vs 12.1% in group 2. The early biochemical recurrence at 6 months after radical prostatectomy was 4% in group 1 vs 11.6% in group 2. The continence rate at 6 months was similar between the two groups and was not correlated with the patients' age (p=0.72), nerve-sparing (p=0.3 for group 1, p=0.92 for group 2) or pathological staging (overall p=0.81, p=0.89 in group 1 and p=0.63 in group 2). We observed a significantly higher rate of potency for patients in group 2 (91.5% vs 47.2%, p<0.0001). The most important factor associated with the regain of potency at 6 months after the procedure was the age of the patient (p<0.0001), independently of the type of nerve-sparing performed. Age seems to be the most important predictor of the regain of potency after robotic radical prostatectomy. Patients should be counseled accordingly in order to have realistic expectations about the functional results after robotic-assisted surgery.

  10. Robotic and minimal access surgery: technology and surgical outcomes of radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stig; Grønning, Leif Erik; Nilsen, Frode S; Mygland, Vegard; Patel, Hiten R H

    2014-11-01

    Since the 1990s, minimal access surgery has been utilized in urology. In the past 15 years, robotic surgery has evolved and become a natural part of minimal access surgery. The dissemination has been fast and the opportunity of prospective trials has been missed. Nevertheless, robotic surgery has obvious benefits for the surgeon and patient. Even though the scientific evidence is not strong, robotic surgery is here to stay. However, there are lessons to learn from the implementation of the da Vinci system with regards to patient safety and prospective evaluation of the new technology. The future of surgery will include technologies derived from robotic surgery.

  11. Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?―Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data―

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of ...

  12. Best practices in robot-assisted radical cystectomy and urinary reconstruction: recommendations of the Pasadena Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timothy G; Guru, Khurshid; Rosen, Raymond C; Wiklund, Peter; Annerstedt, Magnus; Bochner, Bernard H; Chan, Kevin G; Montorsi, Francesco; Mottrie, Alexandre; Murphy, Declan; Novara, Giacomo; Peabody, James O; Palou Redorta, Joan; Skinner, Eila C; Thalmann, George; Stenzl, Arnulf; Yuh, Bertram; Catto, James

    2015-03-01

    Robot-assisted surgery is increasingly used for radical cystectomy (RC) and urinary reconstruction. Sufficient data have accumulated to allow evidence-based consensus on key issues such as perioperative management, comparative effectiveness on surgical complications, and oncologic short- to midterm outcomes. A 2-d conference of experts on RC and urinary reconstruction was organized in Pasadena, California, and the City of Hope Cancer Center in Duarte, California, to systematically review existing peer-reviewed literature on robot-assisted RC (RARC), extended lymphadenectomy, and urinary reconstruction. No commercial support was obtained for the conference. A systematic review of the literature was performed in agreement with the PRISMA statement. Systematic literature reviews and individual presentations were discussed, and consensus on all key issues was obtained. Most operative, intermediate-term oncologic, functional, and complication outcomes are similar between open RC (ORC) and RARC. RARC consistently results in less blood loss and a reduced need for transfusion during surgery. RARC generally requires longer operative time than ORC, particularly with intracorporeal reconstruction. Robotic assistance provides ergonomic value for surgeons. Surgeon experience and institutional volume strongly predict favorable outcomes for either open or robotic techniques. RARC appears to be similar to ORC in terms of operative, pathologic, intermediate-term oncologic, complication, and most functional outcomes. RARC consistently results in less blood loss and a reduced need for transfusion during surgery. RARC can be more expensive than ORC, although high procedural volume may attenuate this difference. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is an alternative to open surgery for patients with bladder cancer who require removal of their bladder and reconstruction of their urinary tract. RARC appears to be similar to open surgery for most important outcomes such as the rate of

  13. Technical refinement and learning curve for attenuating neurapraxia during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy to improve sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Duclos, Antoine; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Borza, Tudor; Yu, Hua-Yin; Kowalczyk, Keith J; Hu, Jim C

    2012-06-01

    While radical prostatectomy surgeon learning curves have characterized less blood loss, shorter operative times, and fewer positive margins, there is a dearth of studies characterizing learning curves for improving sexual function. Additionally, while learning curve studies often define volume thresholds for improvement, few of these studies demonstrate specific technical modifications that allow reproducibility of improved outcomes. Demonstrate and quantify the learning curve for improving sexual function outcomes based on technical refinements that reduce neurovascular bundle displacement during nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). We performed a retrospective study of 400 consecutive RARPs, categorized into groups of 50, performed after elimination of continuous surgeon/assistant neurovascular bundle countertraction. Our approach to RARP has been described previously. A single-console robotic system was used for all cases. Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite sexual function was measured within 1 yr of RARP. Linear regression was performed to determine factors influencing the recovery of sexual function. Greater surgeon experience was associated with better 5-mo sexual function (p = 0.007) and a trend for better 12-mo sexual function (p = 0.061), with improvement plateauing after 250-300 cases. Additionally, younger patient age (both p<0.02) and better preoperative sexual function (<0.001) were associated with better 5- and 12-mo sexual function. Moreover, trainee robotic console time during nerve sparing was associated with worse 12-mo sexual function (p=0.021), while unilateral nerve sparing/non-nerve sparing was associated with worse 5-mo sexual function (p = 0.009). Limitations include the retrospective single-surgeon design. With greater surgeon experience, attenuating lateral displacement of the neurovascular bundle and resultant neurapraxia improve postoperative sexual function. However, to maximize outcomes, appropriate patient

  14. Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  15. Robotic Assisted Radical Cystectomy with Extracorporeal Urinary Diversion Does Not Show a Benefit over Open Radical Cystectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen Tan

    Full Text Available The number of robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC procedures is increasing despite the lack of Level I evidence showing any advantages over open radical cystectomy (ORC. However, several systematic reviews with meta-analyses including non-randomised studies, suggest an overall benefit for RARC compared to ORC. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs to evaluate the perioperative morbidity and efficacy of RARC compared to ORC in patients with bladder cancer.Literature searches of Medline/Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov databases up to 10th March 2016 were performed. The inclusion criteria for eligible studies were RCTs which compared perioperative outcomes of ORC and RARC for bladder cancer. Primary objective was perioperative and histopathological outcomes of RARC versus ORC while the secondary objective was quality of life assessment (QoL, oncological outcomes and cost analysis.Four RCTs (from 5 articles met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 239 patients all with extracorporeal urinary diversion. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics of RARC and ORC patients were evenly matched. There was no significant difference between groups in perioperative morbidity, length of stay, positive surgical margin, lymph node yield and positive lymph node status. RARC group had significantly lower estimated blood loss (p<0.001 and wound complications (p = 0.03 but required significantly longer operating time (p<0.001. QoL was not measured uniformly across trials and cost analysis was reported in one RCTs. A test for heterogeneity did highlight differences across operating time of trials suggesting that surgeon experience may influence outcomes.This study does not provide evidence to support a benefit for RARC compared to ORC. These results may not have inference for RARC with intracorporeal urinary diversion. Well-designed trials with appropriate endpoints conducted

  16. Oncological and functional results of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy after permanent brachytherapy implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orré, M; Piéchaud, T; Sargos, P; Richaud, P; Roubaud, G; Thomas, L

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of robotic salvage prostatectomy for local recurrence after permanent brachytherapy implants for prostate cancer. Seven patients were operated by robotic salvage prostatectomy with or without pelvic lymph node dissection between October 2007 and March 2012, for a local recurrence after iodine 125 permanent brachytherapy implants. Local recurrence was proved by prostate biopsies, once biochemical relapse was diagnosed and imaging assessment performed. The average age of a patient at the time of diagnosis was 66 years (62-71 years). The median nadir prostate specific antigen (PSA) serum concentration after brachytherapy was 1.29ng/mL (0.6-2.1ng/mL), obtained after a median of 12 months (7-21 months). The average [PSA] before robotic salvage prostatectomy was 6.60ng/mL (4.17-13.80ng/mL). [PSA] at 1 and 3 months after prostatectomy was less than 0.05ng/mL in five patients. [PSA] remained below 0.05ng/mL for six patients at 12 and 24 months. One month after robotic salvage prostatectomy, all patients had at least partial urinary incontinence. At 12 and 24 months after robotic salvage prostatectomy four patients have regained full urinary continence. In terms of erectile function at 24 months, three patients retained erectile function with possible sexual intercourse. Robotic salvage prostatectomy appears to be a reliable treatment in terms of oncological outcome with convincing results both for urinary continence and erectile function for selected patients with local recurrence after permanent brachytherapy implants. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of a bulldog clamp to control the dorsal vein complex during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüfek, Ilter; Atuğ, Fatih; Argun, Burak; Keskin, Selçuk; Obek, Can; Coşkuner, Enis; Kural, Ali Riza

    2012-12-01

    Optimal control of the dorsal venous complex (DVC) is a critical step in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). If DVC is not controlled properly, bleeding may occur during the apical dissection. On the other hand, if it is controlled well, a bloodless field is attained and, thus, a precise apical dissection and urethral division is possible. Suture ligation is the most common technique used for dorsal vein control, while some authors recommend using an endovascular stapler. Recently, athermal division and selective suture ligation technique has been reported for DVC control. We describe a new technique: Use of a bulldog clamp to control the DVC during RARP. The control of the DVC with a bulldog clamp allows a bloodless field with precise apical dissection and provides preservation of maximum urethral length while avoiding sphincteral injury.

  18. Radical nephrectomy performed by open, laparoscopy with or without hand-assistance or robotic methods by the same surgeon produces comparable perioperative results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Nazemi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radical nephrectomy can be performed using open or laparoscopic (with or without hand assistance methods, and most recently using the da Vinci Surgical Robotic System. We evaluated the perioperative outcomes using a contemporary cohort of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy by one of the above 4 methods performed by the same surgeon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The relevant clinical information on 57 consecutive patients undergoing radical nephrectomy from September 2000 until July 2004 by a single surgeon was entered in a Microsoft Access DatabaseTM and queried. Following appropriate statistical analysis, p values < 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: Of 57 patients, the open, robotic, laparoscopy with or without hand assistance radical nephrectomy were performed in 18, 6, 21, and 12 patients, respectively. The age, sex, body mass index (BMI, incidence of malignancy, specimen and tumor size, tumor stage, Fuhrman grade, hospital stay, change in postoperative creatinine, drop in hemoglobin, and perioperative complications were not significantly different between the methods. While the estimated median blood loss, postoperative narcotic use for pain control, and hospital stay were significantly higher in the open surgery method (p < 0.05, the median operative time was significantly shorter compared to the robotic method (p = 0.02. Operating room costs were significantly higher in the robotic and laparoscopic groups; however, there was no significant difference in total hospital costs between the 4 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that radical nephrectomy can be safely performed either by open, robotic, or laparoscopic with or without hand assistance methods without significant difference in perioperative complication rates. A larger cohort and longer follow up are needed to validate our findings and establish oncological outcomes.

  19. Pediatric robot-assisted laparoscopic radical adrenalectomy and lymph-node dissection for neuroblastoma in a 15-month-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaydah, Nabeel I; Jones, Alex; Elkaissi, Mahmoud; Yu, Zhongxin; Palmer, Blake W

    2014-09-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in children and the most common malignancy in infants, with complete resection being curative in low-stage disease. The previous standard of treatment for many abdominal NBs involving the adrenal gland had been open surgery; however, there have been numerous descriptions of the safety and feasibility of a laparoscopic approach to resect adrenal masses in the pediatric population in benign and malignant disease, including improved cosmetic results, decreased length of stay, decreased surgical morbidity, and comparable oncological outcomes to open surgery. Despite these reported advantages over open surgery, the newer robot-assisted laparoscopy (RAL) offers benefits over the conventional laparoscopic approach that could further improve outcomes and expand the use of minimally invasive surgical approaches for pediatric adrenal masses. RAL offers many additional advantages over conventional laparoscopy, such as 3D visualization, increased range of motion of surgical instruments, tremor control, and a shorter learning curve compared with traditional laparoscopic surgery, while still maintaining the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. The body of literature concerning robot-assisted oncological surgery involving the adrenal gland in children is quite small, and to our knowledge no case reports have been published describing robot-assisted removal of an adrenal NB in a pediatric patient. We present our experience and technique of an RAL approach for lymph-node dissection and radical resection of a low-stage NB involving the adrenal gland with no image-defined risk factors in a 15-month-old infant.

  20. A decade of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: Time-based metrics and qualitative grading for fellows and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altok, Muammer; Achim, Mary F; Matin, Surena F; Pettaway, Curtis A; Chapin, Brian F; Davis, John W

    2018-01-01

    As modern urology residency and fellowship training in robot-assisted surgery evolves toward standardized curricula (didactics, dry/wet-laboratory exercises, and surgical assistance), additional tools are needed to evaluate on-console performance. At the start of our robotics program in 2006, we set-up a time- and quality-based evaluation program and aim to consolidate this data into a simple set of metrics for self-evaluation. Using our index procedure of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), we prospectively collected data on 2,215 cases over 10 years from 6 faculty surgeons and 94 trainees (43 urologic oncology fellows and 51 urology residents). The steps of the operation were divided into 11 consistent steps, and the metrics included time to completion and quality using a 6-level grading system. Time metrics were consolidated into quartiles for benchmarking. The median times for trainees to complete each step were 15% to 120% higher than those of the staff (Pstaff results. Steps performed by trainees were carefully chosen for a high success rate, and on our Likert-like scale were graded 4 to 5 in more than 95% of cases. There were no grade 0 (very poor) cases, and grades 1 (multiple technical errors) and 2 (could not be completed but without safety issues) were rare (staff. As a trainee progress through a rotation, these benchmarks can assist in prioritizing the need for more attention to a basic step vs. progression to more advanced steps. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictive Modeling of Two-Year Potency Outcomes via a Novel 90-Day Percent Fullness Scale after Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Linda M; Osann, Kathryn; Skarecky, Douglas; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2018-03-09

    To introduce a patient-reported erection fullness scale (% fullness) following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy as a qualitative adjunct to the IIEF-5 and as a 90-day predictor of two-year potency outcomes. Prospective data was collected from 540 men with preoperative IIEF-5 22-25 who underwent RARP by a single surgeon, of which 299 had complete data at all time points up to 2 years. In addition to standard assessment tools (IIEF-5 and erections sufficient for intercourse), patients were asked to "indicate the fullness you are able to achieve in erections compared to before surgery?" (0-10…100%). The primary outcome was prediction of potency (defined as ESI) at 24 months, based on 90-day % fullness (0-24%, 25-74%, and 75-100%). 299 men with complete follow-up were included. Significant predictors of 24 month potency included age, BMI, pathologic stage, nerve-sparing status, and % fullness tertiles. When men (pre-op IIEF-5 22-25) were assessed at 90 days post-RARP, 181/299 (61%) men had erections inadequate for intercourse. If IIEF-5 scores 1-6 is used, 142/181 (78%) would be targeted for early intervention. In distinction, if 0-24% fullness is used, 88/181 (49%) are targeted. If both the IIEF-5 and % fullness are used, this is reduced to 77/181 (43%). We introduce % fullness as a qualitative adjunct to the IIEF-5 and separately as a 90-day predictor of two-year potency recovery. This initial report is hypothesis-generating such that the use of % fullness enables the identification of men most likely to benefit from early, secondary intervention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence of positive surgical margins after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: Does the surgeon's experience have an influence on all pathological stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamil, A W; Costabel, J I; Billordo Peres, N; Martínez, P F; Giudice, C R; Damia, O H

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical and surgical features of patients who underwent robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) at our institution, and the impact of the surgeon's experience in the oncological results related to pathological stage. An analysis of 300 RARP consecutively performed by the same urologist was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups of 100 patients in chronological order, according to surgery date. All patients had organ-confined clinical stage. Variables which could impact in positive margins rates were analyzed. Finally, positive surgical margins (PSM) in regard to pathological stage and surgeon's experience were compared and analyzed. No significant differences were found in variables which could impact in PSM rates. The overall PSM rate was 21%, with 28% in the first group, 20% in the second, and 16% in the third (P = .108). Significant lineal decreasing tendency was observed (P = .024). In pT2 patients, the overall PSM rate was 16.6%, with 27%, 13.8%, and 7.3% in each group respectively (P = .009). A significant difference was found between group 1 and group 3 (P = .004). In pT3 patients, the surgeon's experience was not significantly associated with margin reductions with an overall PSM rate of 27.7% (28.2%, 28.6%, and 26.7% in each group respectively). Clinical and surgical features in our patients did not vary over time. We found a significant reduction of PSM related to surgeon's experience in pT2 patients. Contrariwise, the margin status remained stable despite increasing experience in pT3 patients. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors related to patient-perceived satisfaction after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy based on the expanded prostate cancer index composite survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Ha, Y-S; Jeong, S J; Kim, S; Kim, W-J; Jang, T L; Kim, I Y

    2013-12-01

    Few studies have analyzed factors that influence longitudinal changes in patient-perceived satisfaction during the recovery period following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for prostate cancer. We investigated variables that were associated with patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP using the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) survey. Of 175 men who underwent RARP between 2010 and 2011, 140 men completed the EPIC questionnaire preoperatively and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. On the basis of the EPIC question no. 32 (item number 80), patients were divided into four groups according to the pattern of satisfaction change at postoperative 3 and 12 months: satisfied to satisfied (group 1); satisfied to dissatisfied (group 2); dissatisfied to satisfied (group 3); and dissatisfied to dissatisfied (group 4). Longitudinal changes in EPIC scores over time in each group and differences in EPIC scores of each domain subscale between groups at each follow-up were analyzed. A linear mixed model with generalized estimating equation approach was used to identify independent factors that influence overall satisfaction among repeated measures from same patients. On the basis of the pattern of satisfaction change, groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 had 103 (74.3%), 21 (15.0%), 11 (7.9%) and 5 (2.9%) patients, respectively. The factor that was associated with overall satisfaction was urinary bother (UB) (β=0.283, 95% confidence interval (0.024, 0.543 ); P=0.033) adjusted for other factors under consideration. UB was the independent factor influencing patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP. During post-RARP follow-up, physician should have the optimal management for the patient's UB.

  4. Factors related to patient-perceived satisfaction after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy based on the expanded prostate cancer index composite survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JH; Ha, Y-S; Jeong, SJ; Kim, S; Kim, W-J; Jang, TL; Kim, IY

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few studies have analyzed factors that influence longitudinal changes in patient-perceived satisfaction during the recovery period following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for prostate cancer. We investigated variables that were associated with patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP using the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) survey. METHODS Of 175 men who underwent RARP between 2010 and 2011, 140 men completed the EPIC questionnaire preoperatively and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. On the basis of the EPIC question no. 32 (item number 80), patients were divided into four groups according to the pattern of satisfaction change at postoperative 3 and 12 months: satisfied to satisfied (group 1); satisfied to dissatisfied (group 2); dissatisfied to satisfied (group 3); and dissatisfied to dissatisfied (group 4). Longitudinal changes in EPIC scores over time in each group and differences in EPIC scores of each domain subscale between groups at each follow-up were analyzed. A linear mixed model with generalized estimating equation approach was used to identify independent factors that influence overall satisfaction among repeated measures from same patients. RESULTS On the basis of the pattern of satisfaction change, groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 had 103 (74.3%), 21 (15.0%), 11 (7.9%) and 5 (2.9%) patients, respectively. The factor that was associated with overall satisfaction was urinary bother (UB) (β = 0.283, 95% confidence interval (0.024, 0.543); P = 0.033) adjusted for other factors under consideration. CONCLUSIONS UB was the independent factor influencing patient-perceived satisfaction after RARP. During post-RARP follow-up, physician should have the optimal management for the patient’s UB. PMID:23917307

  5. [Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?--Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of a questionnaire survey for the hospitals with robots and on the Diagnostic Procedures Combination data provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Wealth for those without such equipment. The concentration of the case loads was principally defined as when hospitals with robots had more predominant proportion of cases than those without them in the comparison between case loads prior to instillation of robots (or in the initial year of the study) and those in the final years. The 11 selected areas included 44 hospitals with robots and 156 without them. Concentration of case loads was found in 5 areas. In 4 areas, installation of robots did not have a specific relation to the distribution pattern s of case loads in hospitals with or without the equipment. The remaining 2 areas tended to have a weak but not definite concentration of case loads. In the areas in which installation did not influence case loads the further analysis revealed that their case loads had already been concentrated in the initial year (2010) of the study. Although the current results were found in a single department of the hospital, robotic installation may result in concentration of prostatectomy case loads for such hospitals in some areas. The current results are intriguing when we consider the future roles of acute care hospitals and beds in our country where the number of aged patients having chronic diseases will increase. In conclusion, installation of robotic equipment may result in concentration

  6. Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Flek, O.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to design and produce a robot based on a four wheel chassis equipped with a robotic arm capable of manipulating small objects. The robot should be able to operate in an autonomous mode controlled by a microcontroller and in a mode controlled wirelessly by an operator in real time. Precision and accuracy of the robotic arm should be sufficient for the collection of small objects, such as syringes and needles. The entire robot should be easy to operate user-friend...

  7. Preliminary analysis of the feasibility and safety of salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after radiation failure: multi-institutional perioperative and short-term functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sanket; Patel, Manoj B; Coelho, Rafael; Liss, Michael; Rocco, Bernardo; Sivaraman, Ananth K; Palmer, Kenneth J; Coughlin, Geoffrey D; Ferrigni, Robert G; Castle, Erik P; Ahlering, Thomas E; Parra-Davila, Eduard; Patel, Vipul R

    2011-06-01

    Open radical prostatectomy after radiation treatment failure for prostate cancer is associated with significant morbidity. The purpose of the study is to report multi-institutional experiences while performing salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (sRARP). We retrospectively identified 15 patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy who underwent sRARP in three academic institutions over a 20-month period. Continence was defined as the use of 0 pads after surgery. Potency was defined as the ability to achieve erections adequate enough for penetration with or without the use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Biochemical recurrence after sRARP was defined as a prostate-specific antigen value of >0.2  ng/mL. Radiation treatment consisted of external-beam radiation therapy (XRT) in five cases, interstitial radioactive 125-iodine brachytherapy (BT) in five cases, proton beam therapy in two cases, and XRT followed by interstitial radioactive 125-iodine BT in three cases. The median operative time, the median estimated blood loss, and the median length of hospital stay were 140.5  min (interquartile range [IQR] 97.5-157  min), 75  mL (IQR 50-100  mL), and 1 day (IQR 1-2 d), respectively. There were no rectal injuries. Two (13.3%) patients had a positive surgical margin. A total of three (20%) patients had postoperative complications. One patient had a deep vein thrombosis (Clavien grade II), one had wound infection (Clavien grade II), and one patient had an anastomotic leak (Clavien gradeId). An anastomotic stricture (Clavien grade IIIa) later developed in this same patient, which was managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Of the patients, 71.4% were continent. At a median follow-up of 4.6 months (IQR 3-9.75 mos), four (28.6%) patients presented with biochemical recurrence after sRARP. The challenge during sRALP is the presence of extensive fibrosis and loss of dissection planes secondary to radiation therapy. It is a

  8. Robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheide, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    This article reviews some of the technical areas and history associated with robotics, provides information relative to the formation of a Robotics Industry Committee within the Industry Applications Society (IAS), and describes how all activities relating to robotics will be coordinated within the IEEE. Industrial robots are being used for material handling, processes such as coating and arc welding, and some mechanical and electronics assembly. An industrial robot is defined as a programmable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move material, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for a variety of tasks. The initial focus of the Robotics Industry Committee will be on the application of robotics systems to the various industries that are represented within the IAS

  9. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Brindha; Moon, Daniel; Love, Christopher; Meyer, Denny; Ferguson, Emma; Crowe, Helen; Howard, Nicholas; Mann, Sarah; Wootten, Addie

    2017-12-01

    treatment satisfaction between groups. Higher patient treatment satisfaction was more likely to be reported for couples whose depression scores were more similar. It is important to provide preoperative penile implant counseling and encourage patients to seek postoperative counseling if needed. This is one of the first Australian-based studies comprehensively assessing treatment satisfaction and psychosocial health of men after penile prosthesis surgery after RP. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study, so there is a possibility of recall bias, and causal associations could not be determined. Men in this Australian series who underwent penile prosthesis surgery after RP generally reported good sexual function and treatment satisfaction. Nevertheless, patient and partner mental health influenced their reported experience of the treatment. Pillay B, Moon D, Love C, et al. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy. J Sex Med 2017;14:1612-1620. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Validation of a Novel Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Virtual Reality Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Patrick; Raison, Nicholas; Abe, Takashige; Watkinson, William; Dar, Faizan; Challacombe, Ben; Van Der Poel, Henk; Khan, Muhammad Shamim; Dasgupa, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-09-30

    To perform the first validation of a full procedural virtual reality robotic training module and analysis of novice surgeon's learning curves. Participants completed the bladder neck dissection task and urethrovesical anastomosis task (UVA) as part of the prostatectomy module. Surgeons completed feedback questionnaires assessing the realism, content, acceptability and feasibility of the module. Novice surgeons completed a 5.5-hour training programme using both tasks. King's College London, London. 13 novice, 24 intermediate and 8 expert surgeons completed the validation study. Realism was scored highly for BDN (mean 3.4/5) and UVA (3.74/5), as was importance of BDN (4.32/5) and UVA (4.6/5) for training. It was rated as a feasible (3.95/5) and acceptable (4/5) tool for training. Experts performed significantly better than novice group in 6 metrics in the UVA including time (p = 0.0005), distance by camera (p = 0.0010) and instrument collisions (p = 0.0033), as well as task-specific metrics such as number of unnecessary needle piercing points (p = 0.0463). In novice surgeons, a significant improvement in performance after training was seen in many metrics for both tasks. For bladder neck dissection task, this included time (p instrument collisions (p = 0.0013) and total time instruments are out of view (p = 0.0251). For UVA, this included time (p = 0.0135), instrument collisions (p = 0.0066) and task-specific metrics such as injury to the urethra (p = 0.0032) and bladder (p = 0.0189). Surgeons found this full procedural VR training module to be a realistic, feasible and acceptable component for a robotic surgical training programme. Construct validity was proven between expert and novice surgeons. Novice surgeons have shown a significant learning curve over 5.5 hours of training, suggesting this module could be used in a surgical curriculum for acquisition of technical skills. Further implementation of this module into the curriculum and continued analysis would be

  11. Impact of posterior rhabdosphincter reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: retrospective analysis of time to continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jason R; Shikanov, Sergey; Zorn, Kevin C; Shalhav, Arieh L; Zagaja, Gregory P

    2009-12-01

    Posterior rhabdosphincter (PR) reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) was introduced in an attempt to improve postoperative continence. In the present study, we evaluate time to achieve continence in patients who are undergoing RARP with and without PR reconstruction. A prospective RARP database was searched for most recent cases that were accomplished with PR reconstruction (group 1, n = 69) or with standard technique (group 2, n = 63). We performed the analysis applying two definitions of continence: 0 pads per day or 0-1 security pad per day. Patients were evaluated by telephone interview. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. With PR reconstruction, continence was improved when defined as 0-1 security pad per day (median time of 90 vs 150 days; P = 0.01). This difference did not achieve statistical significance when continence was defined as 0 pads per day (P = 0.12). A statistically significant improvement in continence rate and time to achieve continence is seen in patients who are undergoing PR reconstruction during RARP, with continence defined as 0-1 security/safety pad per day. A larger, prospective and randomized study is needed to better understand the impact of this technique on postoperative continence.

  12. Noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitoring by the ClearSight system during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yoko; Yasuo M, Tsutsumi; Oyama, Takuro; Murakami, Chiaki; Kakuta, Nami; Tanaka, Katsuya

    2018-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is commonly performed in the surgical treatment of prostate cancer. However, the steep Trendelenburg position (25) and pneumoperitoneum required for this procedure can sometimes cause hemodynamic changes. Although blood pressure is traditionally monitored invasively during RALRP, the ClearSight system (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) enables a totally noninvasive and simple continuous blood pressure and cardiac output monitoring based on finger arterial pressure pulse contour analysis. We therefore investigated whether noninvasive continuous arterial blood pressure measurements using the ClearSight system were comparable to those obtained invasively in patients undergoing RALRP. Ten patients scheduled for RALRP with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II were included in this study. At each of the seven defined time points, noninvasive and invasive blood pressure measurements were documented and compared in each patient using Bland-Altman analysis. Although the blood pressure measured with the ClearSight system correlated with that measured invasively, a large difference between the values obtained by the two devices was noted. The ClearSight system was unable to detect blood pressure accurately during RALRP, suggesting that blood pressure monitoring using this device alone is not feasible in this small patient population. J. Med. Invest. 65:69-73, February, 2018.

  13. Development of a patient and institutional-based model for estimation of operative times for robot-assisted radical cystectomy: results from the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Ahmed A; May, Paul R; Ahmed, Youssef E; Saar, Matthias; Wijburg, Carl J; Richstone, Lee; Wagner, Andrew; Wilson, Timothy; Yuh, Bertram; Redorta, Joan P; Dasgupta, Prokar; Kawa, Omar; Khan, Mohammad S; Menon, Mani; Peabody, James O; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gaboardi, Franco; Pini, Giovannalberto; Schanne, Francis; Mottrie, Alexandre; Rha, Koon-Ho; Hemal, Ashok; Stockle, Michael; Kelly, John; Tan, Wei S; Maatman, Thomas J; Poulakis, Vassilis; Kaouk, Jihad; Canda, Abdullah E; Balbay, Mevlana D; Wiklund, Peter; Guru, Khurshid A

    2017-11-01

    To design a methodology to predict operative times for robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) based on variation in institutional, patient, and disease characteristics to help in operating room scheduling and quality control. The model included preoperative variables and therefore can be used for prediction of surgical times: institutional volume, age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, history of prior surgery and radiation, clinical stage, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, type, technique of diversion, and the extent of lymph node dissection. A conditional inference tree method was used to fit a binary decision tree predicting operative time. Permutation tests were performed to determine the variables having the strongest association with surgical time. The data were split at the value of this variable resulting in the largest difference in means for the surgical time across the split. This process was repeated recursively on the resultant data sets until the permutation tests showed no significant association with operative time. In all, 2 134 procedures were included. The variable most strongly associated with surgical time was type of diversion, with ileal conduits being 70 min shorter (P 66 RARCs) was important, with those with a higher volume being 55 min shorter (P < 0.001). The regression tree output was in the form of box plots that show the median and ranges of surgical times according to the patient, disease, and institutional characteristics. We developed a method to estimate operative times for RARC based on patient, disease, and institutional metrics that can help operating room scheduling for RARC. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting urinary continence recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Vincenzo; Novara, Giacomo; Rosen, Raymond C; Artibani, Walter; Carroll, Peter R; Costello, Anthony; Menon, Mani; Montorsi, Francesco; Patel, Vipul R; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Van der Poel, Henk; Wilson, Timothy G; Zattoni, Filiberto; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) was proposed to improve functional outcomes in comparison with retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) or laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP). In the initial RARP series, 12-mo urinary continence recovery rates ranged from 84% to 97%. However, the few available studies comparing RARP with RRP or LRP published before 2008 did not permit any definitive conclusions about the superiority of any one of these techniques in terms of urinary continence recovery. The aims of this systematic review were (1) to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for urinary incontinence after RARP, (2) to identify surgical techniques able to improve urinary continence recovery after RARP, and (3) to perform a cumulative analysis of all available studies comparing RARP versus RRP or LRP in terms of the urinary continence recovery rate. A literature search was performed in August 2011 using the Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases. The Medline search included only a free-text protocol using the term radical prostatectomy across the title and abstract fields of the records. The following limits were used: humans; gender (male); and publication date from January 1, 2008. Searches of the Embase and Web of Science databases used the same free-text protocol, keywords, and search period. Only comparative studies or clinical series including >100 cases reporting urinary continence outcomes were included in this review. Cumulative analysis was conducted using the Review Manager v.4.2 software designed for composing Cochrane Reviews (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). We analyzed 51 articles reporting urinary continence rates after RARP: 17 case series, 17 studies comparing different techniques in the context of RARP, 9 studies comparing RARP with RRP, and 8 studies comparing RARP with LRP. The 12-mo urinary incontinence rates ranged from 4% to 31%, with a mean value of 16% using a no pad definition. Considering a no pad or safety pad

  15. The Incidence and Anatomy of Accessory Pudendal Arteries as Depicted on Multidetector-Row CT Angiography: Clinical Implications of Preoperative Evaluation for Laparoscopic and Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Beom Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Yun Hwan; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kang, Seok Ho; Cheon, Jun

    2009-01-01

    To help preserve accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) and to ensure optimal postoperative sexual function after a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, we have evaluated the incidence of APAs as detected on multidetector-row CT (MDCT) angiography and have provided a detailed anatomical description. The distribution of APAs was evaluated in 121 consecutive male patients between February 2006 and July 2007 who underwent 64- channel MDCT angiography of the lower extremities. We defined an APA as any artery located within the periprostatic region running parallel to the dorsal vascular complex. We also subclassified APAs into lateral and apical APAs. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated the origin, course and number of APAs; the final APA subclassification based on MDCT angiography source data was determined by consensus. We identified 44 APAs in 36 of 121 patients (30%). Two distinct varieties of APAs were identified. Thirty-three APAs (75%) coursed near the anterolateral region of the prostatic apex, termed apical APAs. The remaining 11 APAs (25%) coursed along the lateral aspect of the prostate, termed lateral APAs. All APAs originated from the internal obturator artery and iliac artery or a branch of the iliac artery such as the inferior vesical artery. The majority of apical APAs arose from the internal obturator artery (84%). Seven patients (19%) had multiple APAs. APAs are more frequently detected by the use of MDCT angiography than as suggested by previous surgical studies. The identification of APAs on MDCT angiography may provide useful information for the surgical preservation of APAs during a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

  16. Blood Transfusion Requirement and Not Preoperative Anemia Are Associated with Perioperative Complications Following Intracorporeal Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W; Khetrapal, Pramit; Tan, Mae-Yen; Tan, Melanie El; Sridhar, Ashwin; Cervi, Elizabeth; Rodney, Simon; Busuttil, Gerald; Nathan, Senthil; Hines, John; Shaw, Greg; Mohammed, Anna; Baker, Hilary; Briggs, Timothy P; Klein, Andrew; Richards, Toby; Kelly, John D

    2017-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of preoperative anemia and the impact of preoperative anemia and blood transfusion requirement on 30- and 90-day complications in a cohort of patients undergoing robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (iRARC). IRARC was performed on 166 patients between June 2011 and March 2016. Prospective data were collected for patient demographics, clinical and pathologic characteristics, perioperative variables, transfusion requirements, and hospital length of stay. Thirty- and 90-day complications were classified according to the modified Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Clavien-Dindo system. Preoperative anemia was common (43.4%) and greatest in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (48.6%) (p blood transfusion (p = 0.001). Blood transfusion required in 20.4% of patients with intraoperative and postoperative blood transfusion rate was 10.2% and 13.9%, respectively. The 30-day all complication rate and 30-day major complication rate were 55.4% and 15.7%, respectively, while 90-day all complication rate and 90-day major complication rate were 65.7% and 19.3%, respectively. Intraoperative blood transfusion was not associated with increased complications, but postoperative blood transfusion requirement was independently associated with perioperative morbidity: all 30-day complications (p = 0.003), all 90-day complications (p = 0.009), and 90-day major complications (p = 0.004). The presence of preoperative anemia in patients undergoing iRARC is not associated with increased surgical risk, although preoperative anemic patients were significantly more likely to require blood transfusion. Blood transfusion requirement and specifically postoperative blood transfusion are independently associated with perioperative morbidity and are an important factor for the optimization of postoperative outcomes.

  17. Superior Biochemical Recurrence and Long-term Quality-of-life Outcomes Are Achievable with Robotic Radical Prostatectomy After a Long Learning Curve-Updated Analysis of a Prospective Single-surgeon Cohort of 2206 Consecutive Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James E; Egger, Sam; Böhm, Maret; Siriwardana, Amila R; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Matthews, Jayne; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Stricker, Phillip D

    2017-12-19

    Our earlier analysis suggested that robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) achieved superiority over open radical prostatectomy (ORP) in terms of positive surgical margin (PSM) rates and functional outcomes. With larger sample size and longer follow-up, the objective of this study update is to assess whether our previous findings are upheld and whether the improved PSM rates for RARP after an initial learning curve compared with ORP-as observed in our earlier analysis-ultimately resulted in improved biochemical control. Prospective observational study comparing two surgical techniques; 2271 consecutive men underwent RARP (1520) or ORP (751) at a single centre from 2006 to 2016. Demographic and clinicopathological data were prospectively collected. The EPIC-QOL questionnaire was administered at baseline and 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mo. Multivariate linear regression modelled the difference in quality of life (QOL) domains against case number; logistic and Cox regression modelled the differences in PSM and biochemical recurrence (BCR) hazard ratios (HR), respectively. A total of 2206 men were included in BCR/PSM analysis and 1045 consented for QOL analysis. Superior pT2 surgical margins, early and late sexual outcomes, and early urinary outcomes were upheld and became more robust (narrowing of 95% confidence intervals [CIs]). The risk of BCR was initially higher for RARP, improved after 191 RARPs, and was 35% lower (hazard ratio [HR] 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.90) at final RARP, plateauing after 226 RARPs. Improved late (12-24 mo) urinary bother scores (adjusted mean difference [AMD]=4.7, 95% CI 1.3-8.0) and irritative-obstructive scores (AMD=3.8, 95% CI 0.9-5.6) at final RARP were demonstrated. Limitations include observational single surgeon data, possible residual confounding, and short follow-up. The results from this updated analysis demonstrate that RARP can be beneficial for patients of high-volume surgeons, although more randomised studies and studies with

  18. Robotics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    computed torque method or feedback linearization. Hence, the resultant system is linear and for this the controller is easier to design. Software. Software, in addition to acting as a binding thread for the various robot subsystems, plays an important role in control. Physical devices like amplifiers, integrators, differentiators, etc.

  19. Advanced Reconstruction of Vesicourethral Support (ARVUS) during Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: One-year Functional Outcomes in a Two-group Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Student, Vladimir; Vidlar, Ales; Grepl, Michal; Hartmann, Igor; Buresova, Eva; Student, Vladimir

    2017-05-01

    The advent of robotics has facilitated new surgical techniques for radical prostatectomy. These allow adjustment of pelvic anatomical and functional relationships after removal of the prostate to ameliorate postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI) and reduce the time to complete continence. To describe the results of a new surgical technique for reconstruction of vesicourethral anastomosis using the levator ani muscle for support during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). A prospective, randomised, single-blind study among 66 consecutive patients with localised prostate cancer (cT1-2N0M0) undergoing RARP from June to September 2014, 32 using the new technique and 34 using the standard posterior reconstruction according to Rocco. In the advanced reconstruction of vesicourethral support (ARVUS) intervention group, the fibres of the levator ani muscle, Denonvilliers fascia, retrotrigonal layer, and median dorsal raphe were used to form the dorsal support for the urethrovesical anastomosis. Suture of the arcus tendineus to the bladder neck served as the anterior fixation. We compared demographic data and preoperative and postoperative functional and oncologic results for the two groups. The primary endpoint was continence evaluated at different time points (24h, 2, 4, and 8 wk, and 6 and 12 mo). The secondary endpoints were perioperative and postoperative complications and erectile function. Using a continence definition of 0 pads/d, the continence rates for the ARVUS versus the control group were 21.9% versus 5.9% at 24h (p=0.079), 43.8% versus 11.8% at 2 wk (p=0.005), 62.5% versus 14.7% at 4 wk (pInternational Index of Erectile Function questionnaire results at 6 and 12 mo after surgery showed similar potency rates for the control group (40.0% and 73.33%) and the ARVUS group (38.8% and 72.22%). There were four postoperative complications (2 in each group): three haematomas requiring transfusion and one lymphocele that needed drainage. No urinary retention

  20. Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Cystoprostatectomy for Prostatic Carcinosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer L.; Finley, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma of the prostate is a rare neoplasm with malignant epithelial and mesenchymal components. Herein, we report the case of a patient who underwent multiple transurethral resections of the prostate showing adenocarcinoma initially then carcinosarcoma. He underwent a robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystoprostatectomy, bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection, and ileal conduit urinary diversion and was discharged on postoperative day 7. Carcinosarcoma is discussed as an extremely rare malignancy of the prostate, with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Robotic-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy is also discussed as a new procedure in minimally invasive surgery and as the first reported use for prostatic carcinosarcoma. PMID:17651569

  1. Contemporary Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer have more surgical treatment options than in the past. This paper focuses on the procedures' oncological or functional outcomes and perioperative morbidities of radical retropubic prostatectomy, radical perineal prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods. A MEDLINE/PubMed search of the literature on radical prostatectomy and other new management options was performed. Results. Compared to the open procedures, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy has no confirmed significant difference in most literatures besides less blood loss and blood transfusion. Nerve sparing is a safe means of preserving potency on well-selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Positive surgical margin rates of radical prostatectomy affect the recurrence and survival of prostate cancer. The urinary and sexual function outcomes have been vastly improved. Neoadjuvant treatment only affects the rate of positive surgical margin. Adjuvant therapy can delay and reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of the high risk prostate cancer. Conclusions. For the majority of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy remains a most effective approach. Radical perineal prostatectomy remains a viable approach for patients with morbid obesity, prior pelvic surgery, or prior pelvic radiation. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP has become popular among surgeons but has not yet become the firmly established standard of care. Long-term data have confirmed the efficacy of radical retropubic prostatectomy with disease control rates and cancer-specific survival rates.

  2. Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a step–by-step technique description of this first brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tobias-Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy(RARP is a newly approach that preserve the Retzus structures and provide better recovery of continence and erectile function. In Brazil, this approach has not yet been previously reported. Objective: Our goal is to describe Step-by-Step the Retzus-sparing RARP surgical technique and report our first Brazilian experience. Methods: We present a case of a 60-year-old white man with low risk prostate cancer. Surgical materials were four arms Da Vinci robotic platform system, six transperitoneal portals, two prolene wires and Polymer Clips. This surgical technique was step-by-step described according to Galfano et al. One additional step was added as a modification of Galfano et al. Primary technique description: The closure of the Denovellier fascia. Results: We have operated one patient with this technique. The operative time was 180minutes, console time was135 min, the blood loss was 150ml, none perioperative or postoperative complications was found, hospital stay of 01 day. The anatomopathological classification revealed a pT2aN0M0 specimen with free surgical margins. The patient achieved continence immediately after bladder stent retrieval. Full erection reported after 30 days of surgery. Conclusion: Retzus-sparing RARP approach is feasible and reproducible. However, further comparative studies are necessary to demonstrate potential benefits in continence and sexual outcomes over the standard approaches.

  3. Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a step-by-step technique description of this first brazilian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Hidaka, Alexandre Kiyoshi; Sato, Leticia Lumy Kanawa; Almeida, Roberto; Colombo, Jose Roberto; Zampolli, Hamilton de Campos; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2016-01-01

    Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy(RARP) is a newly approach that preserve the Retzus structures and provide better recovery of continence and erectile function. In Brazil, this approach has not yet been pre¬viously reported. Our goal is to describe Step-by-Step the Retzus-sparing RARP surgical technique and report our first Brazilian experience. We present a case of a 60-year-old white man with low risk prostate cancer. Surgical materials were four arms Da Vinci robotic platform system, six transperitoneal portals, two prolene wires and Polymer Clips. This surgical tech¬nique was step-by-step described according to Galfano et al. One additional step was added as a modification of Galfano et al. Primary technique description: The closure of the Denovellier fascia. We have operated one patient with this technique. The operative time was 180minutes, console time was135 min, the blood loss was 150ml, none perioperative or postoperative complications was found, hospital stay of 01 day. The anatomopathological classification revealed a pT2aN0M0 specimen with free surgical margins. The patient achieved continence immediately after bladder stent retrieval. Full erection reported after 30 days of surgery. Retzus-sparing RARP approach is feasible and reproducible. However, further comparative studies are neces¬sary to demonstrate potential benefits in continence and sexual outcomes over the standard approaches. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  4. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology: impact on fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Anna V; Morgan, Jacqueline M; Lurain, John R; Buttin, Barbara M; Singh, Diljeet K; Schink, Julian C; Lowe, M Patrick

    2009-08-01

    To report the impact of a new robotic surgery program on the surgical training of gynecologic oncology fellows over a 12 month period of time. A robotic surgery program was introduced into the gynecologic oncology fellowship program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in June 2007. A database of patients undergoing surgical management of endometrial and cervical cancer between July 2007 and July 2008 was collected and analyzed. Changes in fellow surgical training were measured and analyzed. Fellow surgical training for endometrial and cervical cancer underwent a dramatic transition in 12 months. The proportion of patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery increased from 3.3% (4/110 patients) to 43.5% (47/108 patients). Fellow training transitioned from primarily an open approach (94.4%) to a minimally invasive approach (11% laparoscopic, 49% robotic, 40% open) for endometrial cancer stagings, and from an open approach (100%) to an open (50%) and robotic (50%) approach for radical hysterectomies. Fellow participation in robotic procedures increased from 45% in the first 3 months to 72% within 6 months, and 92% by 12 months. The role of the fellow in robotic cases transitioned from bedside assistant to console operator within 3 months. Fellow surgical training underwent a dramatic change with the introduction of a robotic surgery program. The management of endometrial and cervical cancer was impacted the most by robotics. Robotic surgery broadened fellowship surgical training, but balanced surgical training and standardized fellow training modules remain challenges for fellowship programs.

  5. The role of a well-trained team on the early learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic procedures: the example of radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, Thierry; Rouprêt, Morgan; Ferhi, Karim; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Richard, François; Vaessen, Christophe

    2012-03-01

    The robot-assisted laparoscopic approach for radical prostatectomy (RARP) is being performed increasingly worldwide to treat localized prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to compare the learning curves of two surgeons with different surgical experiences. A prospective collection of peri-operative data was made: age, body mass index, PSA, clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score, operative time (OT), blood loss (BL), pathological stages, final Gleason scores, and complications. Patients were included, in two groups. The first group comprised the first 100 patients undergoing RARP by an expert laparoscopic surgeon. The second group of 100 patients was operated on by a junior surgeon without robotic console experience. Post-operative complications were defined according to the Clavien grading system for surgical morbidity For groups 1 and 2 median age was 63 and 62 years, respectively; median pre-operative PSA level was 10 and 8, respectively; the median BMI was 24 and 25, respectively. The median operative time (OT) was 179 and 160 min, respectively (p > 0.05); and median blood loss was 217 and 346 ml, respectively (p = 0.04). The overall transfusion rate was 1.5% and two major complications were recorded in group 1 and four in group 2. RARP is safe and reproducible even during the initial learning curve. Overcoming the learning curve is multifactorial and is necessarily dependent on the surgeon. However, joining a well-trained team probably affects positively the performance of the surgeon. The value of expert centers to train new surgeons to RARP needs to be evaluated. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Reverse-hybrid robotic mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; You, Y Nancy; Schlette, Erika; Nguyen, Sa; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J

    2012-02-01

    The robotic system offers potential technical advantages over laparoscopy for total mesorectal excision with radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer. However, the requirement for fixed docking limits its utility when the working volume is large or patient repositioning is required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term outcomes associated with a novel setup to perform total mesorectal excision and radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer by the use of a "reverse" hybrid robotic-laparoscopic approach. This is a prospective consecutive cohort observational study of patients who underwent robotic rectal cancer resection from January 2009 to March 2011. During the study period, a technique of reverse-hybrid robotic-laparoscopic rectal resection with radical lymphadenectomy was developed. This technique involves reversal of the operative sequence with lymphovascular and rectal dissection to precede proximal colonic mobilization. This technique evolved from a conventional-hybrid resection with laparoscopic vascular control, colonic mobilization, and robotic pelvic dissection. Perioperative and short-term oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Thirty patients underwent reverse-hybrid resection. Median tumor location was 5 cm (interquartile range 3-9) from the anal verge. Median BMI was 27.6 (interquartile range 25.0-32.1 kg/m). Twenty (66.7%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. There were no conversions. Median blood loss was 100 mL (interquartile range 75-200). Total operation time was a median 369 (interquartile range 306-410) minutes. Median docking time was 6 (interquartile range 5-8) minutes, and console time was 98 (interquartile range 88-140) minutes. Resection was R0 in all patients; no patients had an incomplete mesorectal resection. Six patients (20%) underwent extended lymph node dissection or en bloc resection. Reverse-hybrid robotic surgery for rectal cancer maximizes the therapeutic applicability of the robotic and conventional laparoscopic

  7. The role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection in the management of high-risk prostate cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Bertram; Artibani, Walter; Heidenreich, Axel; Kimm, Simon; Menon, Mani; Novara, Giacomo; Tewari, Ashutosh; Touijer, Karim; Wilson, Timothy; Zorn, Kevin C; Eggener, Scott E

    2014-05-01

    The role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for men with high-risk (HR) prostate cancer (PCa) has not been well studied. To evaluate the indications for surgical treatment, technical aspects such as nerve sparing (NS) and lymph node dissection (LND), and perioperative outcomes of men with HR PCa treated with RARP. A systematic expert review of the literature was performed in October 2012, searching the Medline, Web of Science, and Scopus databases. Studies with a precise HR definition, robotic focus, and reporting of perioperative and pathologic outcomes were included. A total of 12 papers (1360 patients) evaluating RARP in HR PCa were retrieved. Most studies (67%) used the D'Amico classification for defining HR. Biopsy Gleason grade 8-10 was the most frequent HR identifier (61%). Length of follow-up ranged from 9.7 to 37.7 mo. Incidence of NS varied, although when performed did not appear to compromise oncologic outcomes. Extended LND (ELND) revealed positive nodes in up to a third of patients. The rate of symptomatic lymphocele after ELND was 3%. Overall mean operative time was 168 min, estimated blood loss was 189 ml, length of hospital stay was 3.2 d, and catheterization time was 7.8 d. The 12-mo continence rates using a no-pad definition ranged from 51% to 95% with potency recovery ranging from 52% to 60%. The rate of organ-confined disease was 35%, and the positive margin rate was 35%. Three-year biochemical recurrence-free survival ranged from 45% to 86%. Although the use of RARP for HR PCa has been relatively limited, it appears safe and effective for select patients. Short-term results are similar to the literature on open radical prostatectomy. Variability exists for NS and the template of LND, although ELND improves staging and removes a higher number of metastatic nodes. Further study is required to assess long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Superior quality of life and improved surgical margins are achievable with robotic radical prostatectomy after a long learning curve: a prospective single-surgeon study of 1552 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James E; Egger, Sam; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Matthews, Jayne; Rasiah, Krishan; Stricker, Phillip D

    2014-03-01

    Comparative studies suggest functional and perioperative superiority of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) over open radical prostatectomy (ORP). To determine whether high-volume experienced open surgeons can improve their functional and oncologic outcomes with RARP and, if so, how many cases are required to surpass ORP outcomes and reach the learning curve plateau. A prospective observational study compared two surgical techniques: 1552 consecutive men underwent RARP (866) or ORP (686) at a single Australian hospital from 2006 to 2012, by one surgeon with 3000 prior ORPs. Demographic and clinicopathologic data were collected prospectively. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite quality of life (QoL) questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mo. Multivariate linear and logistic regression modelled the difference in QoL domains and positive surgical margin (PSM) odds ratio (OR), respectively, against case number. A total of 1511 men were included in the PSM and 609 in the QoL analysis. RARP sexual function scores surpassed ORP scores after 99 RARPs and increased to a mean difference at 861st case of 11.0 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9-16.1), plateauing around 600-700 RARPs. Early urinary incontinence scores for RARP surpassed ORP after 182 RARPs and increased to a mean difference of 8.4 points (95% CI, 2.1-14.7), plateauing around 700-800 RARPs. The odds of a pT2 PSM were initially higher for RARP but became lower after 108 RARPs and were 55% lower (OR: 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22-0.92) by the 866th RARP. The odds of a pT3/4 PSM were initially higher for RARP but decreased, plateauing around 200-300 RARPs with an OR of 1.15 (0.68-1.95) at the 866th RARP. Limitations include single-surgeon data and residual confounding. RARP had a long learning curve with inferior outcomes initially, and then showed progressively superior sexual, early urinary, and pT2 PSM outcomes and similar pT3 PSM and late urinary outcomes. Learning RARP

  9. Prevention of Urethral Retraction with Stay Sutures (PURS) During Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Improves Early Urinary Control: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argun, Omer Burak; Tuna, Mustafa Bilal; Doganca, Tunkut; Obek, Can; Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Tufek, Ilter; Erdogan, Sarper; Cetinel, Bulent; Kural, Ali Rıza

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate early continence rates with a novel modified vesicourethral anastomosis technique based on prevention of urethral retraction using anastomosis sutures as stay sutures (PURS) during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Sixty patients operated by a single surgeon were enrolled and data collected prospectively. This cohort was compared with another consecutive 60 patients operated with standard anastomosis. The new technique is based on preventing urethral retraction of the posterior urethra with two anastomosis sutures being used as stay sutures. The outcomes were prospectively followed and groups compared regarding early continence. International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form was used to assess incontinence and its impact on the quality of life. Pad use (yes or no pads) was evaluated as a more stringent criterion. Preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the two groups. Anastomosis was completed faster in PURS group (15.1 vs 18.5 min, p = 0.05). At postoperative week 1 and month 1, the severity and bother of incontinence were significantly less in the PURS group (12.7 vs 4.1 and 10.1 vs 2.6, p controlled studies would be required to further test the reproducibility of this technique.

  10. Towards development and validation of an intraoperative assessment tool for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Hoogenes, Jen; Shayegan, Bobby; Matsumoto, Edward D

    2017-01-01

    As urology training shifts toward competency-based frameworks, the need for tools for high stakes assessment of trainees is crucial. Validated assessment metrics are lacking for many robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). As it is quickly becoming the gold standard for treatment of localized prostate cancer, the development and validation of a RARP assessment tool for training is timely. We recruited 13 expert RARP surgeons from the United States and Canada to serve as our Delphi panel. Using an initial inventory developed via a modified Delphi process with urology residents, fellows, and staff at our institution, panelists iteratively rated each step and sub-step on a 5-point Likert scale of agreement for inclusion in the final assessment tool. Qualitative feedback was elicited for each item to determine proper step placement, wording, and suggestions. Panelist's responses were compiled and the inventory was edited through three iterations, after which 100% consensus was achieved. The initial inventory steps were decreased by 13% and a skip pattern was incorporated. The final RARP stepwise inventory was comprised of 13 critical steps with 52 sub-steps. There was no attrition throughout the Delphi process. Our Delphi study resulted in a comprehensive inventory of intraoperative RARP steps with excellent consensus. This final inventory will be used to develop a valid and psychometrically sound intraoperative assessment tool for use during RARP training and evaluation, with the aim of increasing competency of all trainees. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  11. Towards development and validation of an intraoperative assessment tool for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: results of a Delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Morris

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction As urology training shifts toward competency-based frameworks, the need for tools for high stakes assessment of trainees is crucial. Validated assessment metrics are lacking for many robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP. As it is quickly becoming the gold standard for treatment of localized prostate cancer, the development and validation of a RARP assessment tool for training is timely. Materials and methods We recruited 13 expert RARP surgeons from the United States and Canada to serve as our Delphi panel. Using an initial inventory developed via a modified Delphi process with urology residents, fellows, and staff at our institution, panelists iteratively rated each step and sub-step on a 5-point Likert scale of agreement for inclusion in the final assessment tool. Qualitative feedback was elicited for each item to determine proper step placement, wording, and suggestions. Results Panelist’s responses were compiled and the inventory was edited through three iterations, after which 100% consensus was achieved. The initial inventory steps were decreased by 13% and a skip pattern was incorporated. The final RARP stepwise inventory was comprised of 13 critical steps with 52 sub-steps. There was no attrition throughout the Delphi process. Conclusions Our Delphi study resulted in a comprehensive inventory of intraoperative RARP steps with excellent consensus. This final inventory will be used to develop a valid and psychometrically sound intraoperative assessment tool for use during RARP training and evaluation, with the aim of increasing competency of all trainees.

  12. Usefulness of robot-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Yoshiaki; Tachibana, Shingo; Ota, Yoshihiro; Suda, Takeshi; Makuuti, Yosuke; Watanabe, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Katsumata, Kenji; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2018-04-01

    We started robot-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy using the da Vinci surgical system from June 2010 and operated on 30 cases by December 2013. Herein, we examined the usefulness of robot-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy and compared it with conventional esophagectomy by right thoracotomy. Patients requiring an invasion depth of up to the muscularis propria with preoperative diagnosis were considered for surgical adaptation, excluding bulky lymph node metastasis or salvage surgery cases. The outcomes of 30 patients who underwent robot-assisted surgery (robot group) and 30 patients who underwent conventional esophagectomy by right thoracotomy (thoracotomy group) up to December 2013 were retrospectively examined. Five ports were used in the robot-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy: 3rd intercostal (da Vinci right arm), 6th intercostal (da Vinci camera), 9th intercostal (da Vinci left arm), 4th and 8th intercostals (for assistance). There was no significant difference in patient characteristics. Robot group/right thoracotomy group: Operation time, 563/398 min; thoracic procedure bleeding volume, 21/135 ml; number of thoracic lymph node radical dissections, 25/23. Postoperative complications were recurrent nerve paralysis, 16.7/16.7%; pneumonia, 6.7%/10.0%; anastomotic leakage, 10.0/20.0%; surgical site infection, 0/10.0%; hospitalization, 17/30 days. For the robot group, the operation time was significantly longer, but the amount of intraoperative bleeding and postoperative hospitalization were significantly reduced. Robot-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy enables delicate surgical procedures owing to the 3D effect of the field of view and articulated forceps of the da Vinci. This procedure reduces bleeding and postoperative hospitalization and is less invasive than conventional esophagectomy by right thoracotomy.

  13. Return to work following robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy: A single-center cohort study to compare duration of sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mechow, Stefanie; Graefen, Markus; Haese, Alexander; Tennstedt, Pierre; Pehrke, Dirk; Friedersdorff, Frank; Beyer, Burkhard

    2018-03-15

    To compare the duration of sick leave in patients with localized prostate cancer after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic RP (ORP) at a German high-volume prostate cancer center. The data of 1,415 patients treated with RP at Martini Klinik, Prostate Cancer Center between 2012 and 2016 were, retrospectively, analyzed. Information on employment status, monthly revenues and days of work missed due to sickness were assessed via online questionnaire. Additional data were retrieved from our institutional database. Medians and interquartile ranges (IQR) were reported for continuous data. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to compare both surgical techniques for return to work time after RP. Median time elapsed between surgery and return to work comprised 42 days in patients undergoing RARP (IQR: 21-70) and ORP (IQR: 28-84, P = 0.05). In Cox regression analysis, surgical approach showed no impact on return to work time (RARP vs. ORP hazard ratio = 1, 95% CI: 0.91-1.16, P = 0.69). Return to work time was significantly associated with employment status, physical workload and monthly income (all P<0.001). Limitation of this study is the nonrandomized design in a single-center. As the surgical approach did not show any influence on the number of days missed from work in patients undergoing RP, no superiority of either RARP or ORP could be identified for return to work time in a German cohort. Both surgical approaches are safe options usually allowing the patients to resume normal activities including work after an appropriate convalescence period. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Does prostate volume have an impact on the functional and oncological results of Retzius-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfano, Antonio; Panarello, Daniele; Secco, Silvia; DI Trapani, Dario; Barbieri, Michele; Napoli, Giancarlo; Strada, Elena; Petralia, Giovanni; Bocciardi, Aldo M

    2018-03-28

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the effect of prostatic volume on the outcomes of Retzius-Sparing robot-assisted radical Prostatectomy (RSP). All the consecutive patients undergoing RSP up to January 2015 were included. The series was divided into three groups (60 g). Perioperative, oncological and functional data were prospectively recorded. Potency was defined as erections sufficient for penetration; continence as no pad or 1 safety liner. Oncological results were reported as positive surgical margins (PSMs) and 1-year biochemical disease- free survival (PSA60 g prostates). Median follow-up was 22 months; PSA was higher in larger prostates (6.6 ng/ml vs 6.8 ng/ml vs 8 ng/ml). Nerve-sparing and bladder-neck sparing procedures were in similar percentages. Larger prostates required longer surgeries (90 minutes vs 100 minutes vs 100 minutes, p=0.002). Perioperative results were similar (blood loss, discharge, complications, catheter removal). Larger prostates had more frequently localized disease (pT2 in 49.5% vs 60.7% vs 68.5% - p=0.001); PSMs were similar both in pT2 (15.5% vs 9.4% vs 11.8%) and in pT3 cases (40.1% vs 42% vs 34%). In the 3 groups, immediate continence was reached by 88%, 89.5% and 81.3% (p=0.045), while no differences were observed concerning continence (93.4%, 94.1%, 94.7% - p=0.892) or potency after follow-up. Retzius-sparing prostatectomy is feasible in patients with prostates of any volume, with similar oncological and functional outcomes. Despite being inferior to the figures obtained in low volume prostates, the very high immediate continence rates observed in larger prostates encourage the use of this approach also in larger prostates.

  15. The surgical learning curve for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: experience of a single surgeon with 500 cases in Taiwan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chuan Ou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the learning curve for cancer control from an initial 250 cases (Group I and subsequent 250 cases (Group II of robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP performed by a single surgeon. Five hundred consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received RALP and were evaluated. Surgical parameters and perioperative complications were compared between the groups. Positive surgical margin (PSM and biochemical recurrence (BCR were assessed as cancer control outcomes. Patients in Group II had significantly more advanced prostate cancer than those in Group I (22.2% vs 14.2%, respectively, with Gleason score 8-10, P= 0.033; 12.8% vs 5.6%, respectively, with clinical stage T3, P= 0.017. The incidence of PSM in pT3 was decreased significantly from 49% in Group I to 32.6% in Group II. A meaningful trend was noted for a decreasing PSM rate with each consecutive group of 50 cases, including pT3 and high-risk patients. Neurovascular bundle (NVB preservation was significantly influenced by the PSM in high-risk patients (84.1% in the preservation group vs 43.9% in the nonpreservation group. The 3-year, 5-year, and 7-year BCR-free survival rates were 79.2%, 75.3%, and 70.2%, respectively. In conclusion, the incidence of PSM in pT3 was decreased significantly after 250 cases. There was a trend in the surgical learning curve for decreasing PSM with each group of 50 cases. NVB preservation during RALP for the high-risk group is not suggested due to increasing PSM.

  16. [A prospective trial comparing consecutive series of open retropubic and robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a centre: Oncologic and functional outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauval, J-B; Roumiguié, M; Ouali, M; Doumerc, N; Thoulouzan, M; Mazerolles, C; Rischmann, P; Malavaud, B; Soulié, M

    2015-06-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) is an oncologic and functional challenge. Few series compare prospectively the two approaches, open retropubic (ORP) and laparoscopic robot-assisted RP (LRARP). The objective was to compare the oncological and functional results of ORP and LRARP. From January 2009 to March 2012, two practiced surgeons conducted 304 consecutive RP: respectively 129 ORP and 175 LRARP. Preoperative, perioperative and postoperative data (location and size of positive surgical margins [PSM]) were recorded prospectively and compared with oncological results (PSM, biochemical recurrence-free survival [BCR]) and functional outcomes (urinary and erectile) by self-validated questionnaires (USP, IIEF-15). The comparison was made by the Chi(2) test and Student t-test for qualitative and quantitative variables. The preoperative data 2 groups were comparable. MCP rate was 13.2% for the ORP and 20% for the LRARP (ns) and was 1.4% and 29.6% (ORP) versus 9.4% and 36.7% (LRARP) for pT2 and pT3 for respectively (P=0.078). BCR was the same in both groups (95.2% at 13.1 months). At 12 months, the results of continence showed no difference (P=0.49) and about erectile function, the EF-score was significantly higher in LRARP: 22 versus 17 for the ORP (P=0.03). Oncological results were comparable after ORP and LRARP. The recovery of continence was excellent regardless of the surgical technique, the recovery of erectile function a bit faster by LRARP. 3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective randomised non-inferiority trial of pelvic drain placement vs no pelvic drain placement after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenam, Avinash; Yuh, Bertram; Zhumkhawala, Ali; Ruel, Nora; Chu, William; Lau, Clayton; Chan, Kevin; Wilson, Timothy; Yamzon, Jonathan

    2018-03-01

    To determine if eliminating the prophylactic placement of a pelvic drain (PD) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) affects the incidence of early (90-day) postoperative adverse events. In this parallel-group, blinded, non-inferiority trial, we randomised patients planning to undergo RARP to one of two arms: no drain placement (ND) or PD placement. Patients with demonstrable intraoperative leakage upon bladder irrigation were excluded. Randomisation sequence was determined a priori using a computer algorithm, and included a stratified design with respect to low vs intermediate/high D'Amico risk classifications. Surgeons remained blinded to the randomisation arm until final eligibility was verified at the end of the RARP. The primary endpoint was overall incidence of 90-day complications which, based on our standard treatment using PD retrospectively, was estimated at 13%. The non-inferiority margin was set at 10%, and the planned sample size was 312. An interim analysis was planned and conducted when one-third of the planned accrual and follow-up was completed, to rule out futility if the delta margin was in excess of 0.1389. From 2012 to 2016, 189 patients were accrued to the study, with 92 patients allocated to the ND group and 97 to the PD group. Due to lower than expected accrual rates, accrual to the study was halted by regulatory entities, and we did not reach the intended accrual goal. The ND and PD groups were comparable for median PSA level (6.2 vs 5.8 ng/mL, P = 0.5), clinical stage (P = 0.8), D'Amico risk classification (P = 0.4), median lymph nodes dissected (17 vs 18, P = 0.2), and proportion of patients receiving an extended pelvic lymph node dissection (70.7% vs 79.4%, P = 0.3). Incidence of 90-day overall and major (Clavien-Dindo grade >III) complications in the ND group (17.4% and 5.4%, respectively) was not inferior to the PD group (26.8% and 5.2%, respectively; P < 0.001 and P = 0.007 for difference of proportions <10%, respectively

  18. Positioning injury, rhabdomyolysis, and serum creatine kinase-concentration course in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and extended pelvic lymph node dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Agostino; Di Pierro, Giovanni Battista; Rafeld, Verena; Konrad, Christoph; Beutler, Jonas; Danuser, Hansjörg

    2013-01-01

    During robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), patients remain in a steep Trendelenburg position. This can cause positioning injuries as well as rhabdomyolysis. The primary diagnostic indicator of rhabdomyolysis is elevated serum creatine kinase (CK). We investigate whether RARP with extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) in a prolonged extreme Trendelenburg position can cause positioning injuries and rhabdomyolysis. We performed a prospective study of the first 60 patients undergoing RARP and ePLND for organ-confined prostate cancer at our institute. Positioning injuries were graded according to three degrees of clinical severity. Serum-CK, serum-pH, and base excess (BE) were measured before, during, and for 5 days after surgery. Rhabdomyolysis was defined by serum-CK levels >5000 IU/L. Median operative time was 317 minutes (range 200-475 min); median time in the Trendelenburg position was 282 minutes (range 170-470 min). Serum-CK was significantly elevated 6 hours postoperatively, peaking at 18 hours postoperatively. Serum-CK levels did not correlate with pH, BE, and perioperative creatinine values. Serum-CK course shows weak correlation with body mass index (BMI), operative time, Trendelenburg position time, and medium correlation with positioning injuries of any degree. Twenty-one of the 60 (35%) patients showed positioning-related injuries: 16 (27%) patients degree I, 2 (3%) patients degree II, and 3 (5%) patients degree III. Rhabdomyolysis developed in 10 patients. Postoperative renal failure did not develop in any patient receiving postoperative hypervolemic diuretic therapy nor any patient with injuries degrees I, II, or III. conclusion: Clinically relevant positioning injuries and rhabdomyolysis can occur in patients who are subjected to prolonged extreme Trendelenburg position during RARP and ePLND, especially at the beginning of the learning curve. Serum-CK increases significantly after surgery, peaking 18 hours postoperatively. Serum

  19. The Use of Unidirectional Barbed Suture for Urethrovesical Anastomosis during Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Efficacy and Safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixin Li

    Full Text Available Unidirectional barbed suture (UBS has been widely used for surgery in recent years, especially for urethrovesical anastomosis (UVA during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP. However, the efficacy and safety comparing it with conventional non-barbed suture (CS for UVA is still controversial.The objective of this study is to assess the current evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of UBS compared with CS for UVA during RARP.We comprehensively searched PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, SinoMed (Chinese and other databases on Oct. 9, 2014 to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs and other comparative studies evaluating these two types of suture. The outcome measures included anastomosis time operative time, posterior reconstruction (PR time, postoperative leakage (PL rate and continence rates at different time points (4-6 weeks, 3 months, 6-12 months after surgery. Secondary outcomes included estimated blood loss (EBL and length of catheterization (LOC.Three RCTs and six observational studies including 786 cases were identified. Meta-analysis of extractable data showed that use of UBS could significantly reduce anastomosis time (weighted mean difference [WMD]:-3.98min; 95% confidence interval [CI], -6.02 -1.95; p = 0.0001, operative time (WMD:-10.06min; 95% CI, -15.45--4.67; p = 0.0003 and PR time (WMD:-0.93min; 95% CI, -1.52--0.34; p = 0.002. No significant difference was found in PL rate, EBL, LOC, or continence rates at 4-6 weeks, 3 months and 6-12 months after surgery.Our meta-analysis indicates that UBS appears to be safe and efficient as CS for UVA during RARP with not only shorter anastomosis time, operative time, PR time, but also equivalent PL rate, EBL, LOC, and continence rates at 4-6 weeks, 3 months and 6-12 months after surgery. For the inherent limitations of the eligible studies, future more persuasive RCTs are needed to confirm and update our findings.

  20. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the setting of previous abdominal surgery: Perioperative results, oncological and functional outcomes, and complications in a single surgeon's series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Giovanni Battista; Grande, Pietro; Mordasini, Livio; Danuser, Hansjörg; Mattei, Agostino

    2016-12-01

    Data on safety and efficacy of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) after previous abdominal surgery are scarce. Hence, we assessed perioperative, oncological and functional outcomes, and complications of RARP in patients with previous abdominal surgery after 1-year minimum follow-up. Prospectively collected data from 339 consecutive patients undergoing transperitoneal RARP by a single surgeon (AM) between November 2008 and May 2014 were analysed. Complications were classified according to Modified Clavien System. Biochemical recurrence (BCR) was defined as two consecutive PSA values ≥ 0.2 ng/ml. Functional outcomes were assessed using validated, self-administered questionnaires. In particular, only patients undergoing nerve-sparing RARP with no erectile dysfunction (baseline IIEF-5 score >21) and no use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors preoperatively who were interested in erections and required no adjuvant therapy (radiation, orchiectomy and androgen-deprivation therapy) were evaluated concerning potency recovery. Patients without and with previous abdominal surgery were compared using Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests (or Fisher exact test). On 339 patients, 247 (71.6%) had not undergone previous abdominal surgery (Group 1) and 92 (28.4%) were pre-operated (Group 2). There were no statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 regarding mean operative time (260 vs. 257 min; p = 0.597), median number of resected nodes (16 vs. 17; p = 0.484), mean length of stay (7.2 vs. 7.1 d; p = 0.151), positive surgical margin (12.5% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.233) and complication rates (26.7% vs. 31.5%; p = 0.187). Median (IQR) follow-up was 36 (12-48) months. For Groups 1 and 2, BCR-free survival rates were 78.5% and 79.8% (p = 0.467); continence rates were 97.9% and 100% (p = 0.329), whereas a potency recovery was achieved in 69.5% and 62.2% of patients (p = 0.460), respectively. Transperitoneal RARP is a safe and efficient treatment for

  1. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical ...

  2. The robotic third arm as a competent analog of an assisting surgeon in radical gastrectomy: impact on short-term clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jung Ho; Kim, Jun Gi; Jeon, Hae Myung; Park, Cho Hyun; Song, Kyo Young

    2013-05-01

    Robotic surgery was invented to overcome difficulties associated with conventional laparoscopic surgery. However, ways in which to improve the efficacy of such surgery have not yet been discussed. This report focuses on the role of a robotic third arm in maximizing the efficacy of lymph node dissection in robot-assisted gastrectomy. Thirty-five robotic gastrectomies were performed between April 2009 and December 2010. We evaluated our surgical procedures by reviewing video recordings of robotic operations and analyzed the steps involved in lymph node dissections frame by frame. Then, we analyzed the short-term clinical outcomes to look at the impact of standardized use of the third arm on clinical outcomes. The initial 15 cases (Group A) were compared with 20 later cases (Group B) in terms of postoperative inflammation and pancreatitis. The clinicopathologic characteristics, including operation type, hospital stay, morbidity, and pathological features, were not different between the two groups. However, postoperative serum amylase levels as well as drain amylase levels were significantly lower in Group B than in Group A (Probotic third arm.

  3. Critical appraisal of management of rectal injury during radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Wilmer B; Tseng, Kenneth; Walsh, Patrick C; Han, Misop

    2010-11-01

    To critically evaluate the perioperative management of rectal injury during radical prostatectomy. Rectal injuries were identified from the departmental morbidity and mortality records and radical prostatectomy databases. The electronic patient records were reviewed for management and outcomes. From January 1997 to August 2007, 11 452 men underwent radical prostatectomy. Of these men, 10 183 underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and 1269, laparoscopic retropubic prostatectomy (LRP) with or without robotic assistance. Rectal injury occurred in 18 men-12 in the RRP group (0.12%) and 6 in the LRP group (0.47%). Of these rectal injuries, 16 were recognized intraoperatively and primarily repaired in multiple layers without a diverting colostomy. A pedicle of omentum was used as an interposing layer in 4 of these cases. Despite primary repair, 2 patients without omental interposition developed a rectourethral fistula. In 1 man in the RRP group, the fistula closed with prolonged catheterization (9 weeks). In the other patient, in the LRP group, the fistula persisted; thus, a diverting colostomy was performed. Eventually, a transrectal advancement flap was required. Two rectal injuries (1 each in the RRP and LRP groups) were unrecognized during radical prostatectomy but were discovered within 4 days. Despite conservative management, the rectourethral fistulas persisted in both men, requiring subsequent repair with a transrectal advancement flap. Rectal injury is an infrequent complication of radical prostatectomy. When recognized intraoperatively and primarily repaired, rectourethral fistula was prevented in 87.5% of men. Primary repair performed with vascularized tissue interposition prevented rectourethral fistula development. In men with unrecognized rectal injury, the rectourethral fistula tended to persist and eventually required delayed surgical repair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Soft Robotics: New Perspectives for Robot Bodyware and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschi, Cecilia; Cianchetti, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable advances of robotics in the last 50 years, which represent an incredible wealth of knowledge, are based on the fundamental assumption that robots are chains of rigid links. The use of soft materials in robotics, driven not only by new scientific paradigms (biomimetics, morphological computation, and others), but also by many applications (biomedical, service, rescue robots, and many more), is going to overcome these basic assumptions and makes the well-known theories and techniques poorly applicable, opening new perspectives for robot design and control. The current examples of soft robots represent a variety of solutions for actuation and control. Though very first steps, they have the potential for a radical technological change. Soft robotics is not just a new direction of technological development, but a novel approach to robotics, unhinging its fundamentals, with the potential to produce a new generation of robots, in the support of humans in our natural environments.

  5. Soft Robotics: new perspectives for robot bodyware and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia eLaschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable advances of robotics in the last fifty years, which represent an incredible wealth of knowledge, are based on the fundamental assumption that robots are chains of rigid links. The use of soft materials in robotics, driven not only by new scientific paradigms (biomimetics, morphological computation, and others, but also by many applications (biomedical, service, rescue robots, and many more, is going to overcome these basic assumptions and makes the well-known theories and techniques poorly applicable, opening new perspectives for robot design and control.The current examples of soft robots represent a variety of solutions for actuation, and control. Though very first steps, they have the potential for a radical technological change. Soft robotics is not just a new direction of technological development, but a novel approach to robotics, unhinging its fundamentals, with the potential to produce a new generation of robots, in the support of humans in our natural environments.

  6. Developing a robotic prostatectomy service and a robotic fellowship programme - defining the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdev, Nikhil; Bishop, Conrad; Kass-Iliyya, Atoine; Hamid, Sami; McNicholas, Thomas A; Prasad, Venkat; Mohan-S, Gowrie; Lane, Timothy; Boustead, Gregory; Adshead, James M

    2013-02-01

    Robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP) is an established treatment for prostate cancer in selected centres with appropriate expertise. We studied our single-centre experience of developing a RRP service and subsequent training of 2 additional surgeons by the initial surgeon and the introduction of United Kingdom's first nationally accredited robotic fellowship training programme. We assessed the learning curve of the 3 surgeons with regard to peri-operative outcomes and oncological results. Three hundred consecutive patients underwent RRP between November 2008 and August 2012. Patients were divided into 3 equal groups (Group 1, case 1-100; Group 2, case 101-200; and Group 3, case 201-300). Age, ASA score, preoperative co-morbidities and indications for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were comparable for all 3 patient groups. Peri-operative and oncological outcomes were compared across all 3 groups to assess the impact of the learning curve for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. All surgical complications were classified using the Clavien-Dindo system. The mean age was 60.7 years (range 41-74). There was a significant reduction in the mean console time (p learning curve peri-operative parameters and oncological outcomes improve. This learning curve is not affected by the introduction of a fellowship-training programme. Using a carefully structured mentored approach, RRP can be safely introduced as a new procedure without compromising patient outcomes.

  7. Exploratorium: Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic robotics. It explains how to make a vibrating robotic bug and features articles on robots. Contents include: (1) "Where Robot Mice and Robot Men Run Round in Robot Towns" (Ray Bradbury); (2) "Robots at Work" (Jake Widman); (3) "Make a Vibrating Robotic Bug" (Modesto Tamez); (4) "The Robot…

  8. Robot maps, robot moves, robot avoids

    OpenAIRE

    Farrugia, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Robotics is a cornerstone for this century’s innovations. From robot nurses to your own personal assistant, most robots need to know: ‘where is it?’ ‘Where should it go?’ And ‘how to get there?’ Without answers to these questions a robot cannot do much. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/robot-maps-robot-moves-robot-avoids/

  9. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  10. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  11. Robotic architectures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mtshali, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development of mobile robotic systems, a robotic architecture plays a crucial role in interconnecting all the sub-systems and controlling the system. The design of robotic architectures for mobile autonomous robots is a challenging...

  12. Robot Actors, Robot Dramaturgies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth

    This paper considers the use of tele-operated robots in live performance. Robots and performance have long been linked, from the working androids and automata staged in popular exhibitions during the nineteenth century and the robots featured at Cybernetic Serendipity (1968) and the World Expo...... discourse shapes how we perceive and use technology and also points to the ways in which emerging technologies “refashion our experience of space, time and human being filter through our art works, dreams and fantasies.” This paper considers a survey of robot dramaturgies to demonstrate how performance both...... shapes and reinforces popular awareness and misconceptions of robots. Flyvende Grise’s The Future (2013), Amit Drori’s Savanna (2010), Global Creatures’ King Kong (2013) and Louis Philip Demers’ Blind Robot (2013) each utilize tele-operated robots across a wide range of human and animal morphologies...

  13. Full robot-assisted gastrectomy with intracorporeal robot-sewn anastomosis produces satisfying outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-Xin; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Yan; Pan, Hua-Feng; Li, Jie-Shou

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of full robot-assisted gastrectomy with intracorporeal robot hand-sewn anastomosis in the treatment of gastric cancer. METHODS: From September 2011 to March 2013, 110 consecutive patients with gastric cancer at the authors’ institution were enrolled for robotic gastrectomies. According to tumor location, total gastrectomy, distal or proximal subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy was fully performed by the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. All construction, including Roux-en-Y jejunal limb, esophagojejunal, gastroduodenal and gastrojejunal anastomoses were fully carried out by the intracorporeal robot-sewn method. At the end of surgery, the specimen was removed through a 3-4 cm incision at the umbilicus trocar point. The details of the surgical technique are well illustrated. The benefits in terms of surgical and oncologic outcomes are well documented, as well as the failure rate and postoperative complications. RESULTS: From a total of 110 enrolled patients, radical gastrectomy could not be performed in 2 patients due to late stage disease; 1 patient was converted to laparotomy because of uncontrollable hemorrhage, and 1 obese patient was converted due to difficult exposure; 2 patients underwent extra-corporeal anastomosis by minilaparotomy to ensure adequate tumor margin. Robot-sewn anastomoses were successfully performed for 12 proximal, 38 distal and 54 total gastrectomies. The average surgical time was 272.52 ± 53.91 min and the average amount of bleeding was 80.78 ± 32.37 mL. The average number of harvested lymph nodes was 23.1 ± 5.3. All specimens showed adequate surgical margin. With regard to tumor staging, 26, 32 and 46 patients were staged as I, II and III, respectively. The average hospitalization time after surgery was 6.2 d. One patient experienced a duodenal stump anastomotic leak, which was mild and treated conservatively. One patient was readmitted for intra-abdominal infection and was

  14. Robot see, robot maps

    OpenAIRE

    Darmanin, Rachael N.

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘robot’ tends to conjure up images of well-known metal characters like C-3P0, R2-D2, and WALL-E. The robotics research boom has in the end enabled the introduction of real robots into our homes, workspaces, and recreational places. The pop culture icons we loved have now been replaced with the likes of robot vacuums such as the Roomba and home-automated systems for smoke detectors, or WIFI-enabled thermostats, such as the Nest. Nonetheless, building a fully autonomous mobile robot is...

  15. Robot and robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E. (Inventor); Marzwell, Neville I. (Inventor); Wall, Jonathan N. (Inventor); Poole, Michael D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A robot and robot system that are capable of functioning in a zero-gravity environment are provided. The robot can include a body having a longitudinal axis and having a control unit and a power source. The robot can include a first leg pair including a first leg and a second leg. Each leg of the first leg pair can be pivotally attached to the body and constrained to pivot in a first leg pair plane that is substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body.

  16. Robot engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seul

    2006-02-01

    This book deals with robot engineering, giving descriptions of robot's history, current tendency of robot field, work and characteristic of industrial robot, essential merit and vector, application of matrix, analysis of basic vector, expression of Denavit-Hartenberg, robot kinematics such as forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, cases of MATLAB program, and motion kinematics, robot kinetics like moment of inertia, centrifugal force and coriolis power, and Euler-Lagrangian equation course plan, SIMULINK position control of robots.

  17. Accessibility to surgical robot technology and prostate-cancer patient behavior for prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Toru; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Nagao, Go; Ishikawa, Akira; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ohori, Makoto; Homma, Yukio

    2017-07-01

    To examine how surgical robot emergence affects prostate-cancer patient behavior in seeking radical prostatectomy focusing on geographical accessibility. In Japan, robotic surgery was approved in April 2012. Based on data in the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database between April 2012 and March 2014, distance to nearest surgical robot and interval days to radical prostatectomy (divided by mean interval in 2011: % interval days to radical prostatectomy) were calculated for individual radical prostatectomy cases at non-robotic hospitals. Caseload changes regarding distance to nearest surgical robot and robot introduction were investigated. Change in % interval days to radical prostatectomy was evaluated by multivariate analysis including distance to nearest surgical robot, age, comorbidity, hospital volume, operation type, hospital academic status, bed volume and temporal progress. % Interval days to radical prostatectomy became wider for distance to nearest surgical robot robot emerged within 30 and 10 km, the prostatectomy caseload in non-robot hospitals reduced by 13 and 18% within 6 months, respectively, while the robot hospitals gained +101% caseload (P robotic minimally invasive radical prostatectomies in 483 non-robot hospitals revealed a significant inverse association between distance to nearest surgical robot and % interval days to radical prostatectomy (B = -17.3% for distance to nearest surgical robot ≥30 km and -11.7% for 10-30 km versus distance to nearest surgical robot Robotic surgery accessibility within 30 km would make patients less likely select conventional surgery. The nearer a robot was, the faster the caseload reduction was. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Radical Islam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Muslim insurgents have a real following in many countries. In Mao’s parlance, the radical Muslim insurgent is the fish swimming in the ocean of the...indigenous beliefs 5% Tanzania: mainland - Christian 45%, Muslim 35%, indigenous beliefs 20%; Zanzibar - more than 99% Muslim Zambia: Christian 50...leather, frozen fish and seafood Bosnia and Herzegovina NA Brunei: crude oil, natural gas, refined products Chad: cotton, cattle, textiles Cocos Islands

  19. Robots conquering local government services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Agger; Andersen, Kim Normann; Sigh, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The movement of robots from the production line to the service sector provides a potentially radical solution to innovate and transform public service delivery. Although robots are increasingly being adopted in service delivery (e.g., health- and eldercare) to enhance and in some cases substitute...... labour-intensive services, the public administration research community is short on knowledge of the impact on the work processes carried out in public organizations and how staff and clients react toward robots. This case study investigates the implementation and use of robot vacuum cleaners in Danish...... eldercare, demonstrating how robot vacuums have proven to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in the perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between key stakeholders in eldercare....

  20. Robot Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Putnam, Lance Jonathan

    This paper considers art-based research practice in robotics through a discussion of our course and relevant research projects in autonomous art. The undergraduate course integrates basic concepts of computer science, robotic art, live performance and aesthetic theory. Through practice...... in robotics research (such as aesthetics, culture and perception), we believe robot aesthetics is an important area for research in contemporary aesthetics....

  1. Evolutionary robotics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In evolutionary robotics, a suitable robot control system is developed automatically through evolution due to the interactions between the robot and its environment. It is a complicated task, as the robot and the environment constitute a highly dynamical system. Several methods have been tried by various investigators to ...

  2. Filigree Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Evers, Henrik Leander; Clausen Nørgaard, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Filigree Robotics experiments with the combination of traditional ceramic craft with robotic fabrication in order to generate a new narrative of fine three-dimensional ceramic ornament for architecture.......Filigree Robotics experiments with the combination of traditional ceramic craft with robotic fabrication in order to generate a new narrative of fine three-dimensional ceramic ornament for architecture....

  3. Radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    characteristics, surgeon, nerve sparing, surgical margins and blood loss were recorded prospectively in patients who underwent RRP or RALP between April 2008 and May 2012. Patients filled out the Danish Prostate Symptom Score (DAN-PSS) and International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF-5) questionnaires before...... loss and functional outcomes were compared between groups. RESULTS: Overall, 453 patients were treated with RRP and 585 with RALP. On multivariate logistic regression analyses, the type of surgery did not affect surgical margins (p = 0.96) or potency at 12 months (p = 0.7). Patients who had undergone...... RRP had an increased chance of reporting subjective continence at 12 months (odds ratio 2.6, p = 0.014). There was no difference in the proportion of RRP and RALP patients who underwent surgical treatment for incontinence (p = 0.57). On multivariate linear regression analysis, RALP was an independent...

  4. A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract Available A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) biopsy combined with pneumonectomy is presented. The patient developed hypoxia during the contralateral VATS biopsy. His hypoxia was treated with positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung and apneic ...

  5. Adoption of Robot-Assisted Partial Nephrectomies: A Population-Based Analysis of U.S. Surgeons from 2004 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Hoiwan; Wang, Ye; Chang, Steven L; Khandwala, Yash; Del Giudice, Francesco; Chung, Benjamin I

    2017-09-01

    Urological surgeries have contributed to the increasing prevalence of minimally invasive robotic procedures. Although factors influencing the adoption of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy have previously been identified, the explanation for the rapid rise in robotic partial nephrectomies remains unknown. Using a retrospective population-based sample, we attempt to determine hospital and surgeon-specific factors influencing a surgeon's decision to utilize robotic assistance for partial nephrectomies. A nationally representative weighted sample of all men who underwent a partial nephrectomy in the United States between 2003 and 2014 was identified within the Premier Hospital Database. Hospital, surgeon, and patient characteristics for each operation were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and a multivariate regression model stratified according to the Law of Diffusion of Innovation were performed. A weighted sample of 14,890 nephrectomies was included in the study. Patient demographics were similar between the two groups. The adoption of robotic technology followed the Law of Diffusion of Innovation with the percentage of partial nephrectomies with robotic assistance increasing yearly, reaching 64.1% by 2013. Surgical volume was a significant factor driving the use of robotic assistance, with high volume surgeons (>5 partial nephrectomies/year) performing 23.2% more robotic partial nephrectomies per year than their low volume colleagues (robotic technology for partial nephrectomies. Surgical volume and year of surgery were found to be the most significant factor in robotic adoption, with other patient and hospital-specific characteristics playing a minor role. Future studies are needed to correlate adoption rates with the clinical or cost-effectiveness of novel technologies within the medical field to determine whether rapid adoption is a patient-centered vs a clinician-centered decision point.

  6. NUTRITION SUPPORT COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENT WHO UNDERWENT CARDIAC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Krdžalić, Alisa; Kovčić, Jasmina; Krdžalić, Goran; Jahić, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nutrition support complications after cardiac surgery should be detected and treated on time. Aim: To show the incidence and type of nutritional support complication in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods: The prospective study included 415 patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2013 in Clinic for Cardiovascular Disease of University Clinical Center Tuzla. Complications of the delivery system for nutrition support (NS) and nutrition itself were analy...

  7. Robotic presacral neurectomy - technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Vasilis; Jacob, Kristina; Klauschie, Jennifer; Kho, Rosanne; Magrina, Javier

    2012-03-01

    The feasibility, safety and outcomes of robotic presacral neurectomy were evaluated. A retrospective analysis was performed of 33 patients with midline chronic pelvic pain, who underwent robotic presacral neurectomy. Data were collected during the period March 2004-March 2010. All patients underwent robotic presacral neurectomy and additional robotic procedures. Mean operating time for robotic presacral neurectomy was 5.8 (range 4.4-6.9) min. Mean blood loss, including concomitant procedures, was 39 (range 15-150) ml. Most patients were discharged the same day (60%) and mean hospital stay was 0.39 (range 0-2) days. There were no conversions or intra-operative complications. There were two postoperative complications: one pelvic abscess and one Clostridium difficile colitis. Pain improvement was reported by 73% (22/30) of patients. Robotic presacral neurectomy is safe and feasible, resulting in improvement of pelvic pain in selected patients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Radical trachelectomy in early-stage cervical cancer: A comparison of laparotomy and minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Marcelo A; Rendón, Gabriel J; Munsell, Mark; Echeverri, Lina; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene; Escobar, Pedro F; Reis, Ricardo Dos; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2015-09-01

    Radical trachelectomy is considered standard of care in patients with early-stage cervical cancer interested in future fertility. The goal of this study was to compare operative, oncologic, and fertility outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer undergoing open vs. minimally invasive radical trachelectomy. A retrospective review was performed of patients from four institutions who underwent radical trachelectomy for early-stage cervical cancer from June 2002 to July 2013. Perioperative, oncologic, and fertility outcomes were compared between patients undergoing open vs. minimally invasive surgery. A total of 100 patients were included in the analysis. Fifty-eight patients underwent open radical trachelectomy and 42 patients underwent minimally invasive surgery (MIS=laparoscopic or robotic). There were no differences in patient age, body mass index, race, histology, lymph vascular space invasion, or stage between the two groups. The median surgical time for MIS was 272min [range, 130-441min] compared with 270min [range, 150-373min] for open surgery (p=0.78). Blood loss was significantly lower for MIS vs. laparotomy (50mL [range, 10-225mL] vs. 300mL [50-1100mL]) (psurgery group (p=0.010). Length of hospitalization was shorter for MIS than for laparotomy (1day [1-3 days] vs. 4days [1-9 days]) (psurgery group. The median lymph node count was 17 (range, 5-47) for MIS vs. 22 (range, 7-48) for open surgery (p=0.03). There were no differences in the rate of postoperative complications (30% MIS vs. 31% open surgery). Among 83 patients who preserved their fertility (33 MIS vs. 50 open surgery), 34 (41%) patients attempted to get pregnant. Sixteen (47%) patients were able to do so (MIS: 2 vs. laparotomy: 14, p=0.01). The pregnancy rate was higher in the open surgery group when compared to the MIS group (51% vs. 28%, p=0.018). However, median follow-up was shorter is the MIS group compared with the open surgery group (25months [range, 10-69] vs. 66months [range, 11

  9. Robotic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic architectural environments to be implemented and tested in the last decade in virtual and physical prototypes. These prototypes are incorporating sensing-actuating

  10. Robotics in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcombe, M.H.E.; Halsall, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: foreword and definitions; introduction; robotics state of the art 1984; potential applications; advanced remote control; robot system design principles; robot system skills; planning of remote control robotics R and D; example systems; REMCON (advanced remote control robotic systems) guidelines; robot activation; robot instrumentation; robot guidance; design of equipment for robotic maintenance; ergonomics of control. (U.K.)

  11. Industrial Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  12. Basic Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Frank

    This curriculum outline consists of instructional materials and information concerning resources for use in teaching a course in robotics. Addressed in the individual sections of the outline are the following topics: the nature of an industrial robot; the parts of an industrial robot (the manipulator, the power structure, and the control system);…

  13. The evolution of robotic general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E B

    2009-01-01

    Surgical robotics in general surgery has a relatively short but very interesting evolution. Just as minimally invasive and laparoscopic techniques have radically changed general surgery and fractionated it into subspecialization, robotic technology is likely to repeat the process of fractionation even further. Though it appears that robotics is growing more quickly in other specialties, the changes digital platforms are causing in the general surgical arena are likely to permanently alter general surgery. This review examines the evolution of robotics in minimally invasive general surgery looking forward to a time where robotics platforms will be fundamental to elective general surgery. Learning curves and adoption techniques are explored. Foregut, hepatobiliary, endocrine, colorectal, and bariatric surgery will be examined as growth areas for robotics, as well as revealing the current uses of this technology.

  14. Robot Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Lenarcic, Jadran; Stanišić, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the area of robot mechanisms, primarily considering industrial manipulators and humanoid arms. The book is intended for both teaching and self-study. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of kinematic analysis and the design of robot mechanisms. The coverage of topics is untypical. The focus is on robot kinematics. The book creates a balance between theoretical and practical aspects in the development and application of robot mechanisms, and includes the latest achievements and trends in robot science and technology.

  15. Inspection robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Toshio; Oya, Tadashi

    1990-01-01

    Inspections of nuclear power plants make it possible to achieve and maintain high levels of plant reliability and availability. The Corporation is developing robots to perform inspection tasks. The benefits of robot use include maintaining higher surveillance levels, reducing occupational radiation exposure, and reduced labor costs. The article introduces two fully developed products: a remote-inspection robot for use inside nuclear reactor containment vessels, and a remote inspection and repair robot for use inside the the vacuum vessel of the JT-60 nuclear-fusion critical plasma test reactor. It also describes a prototype automatic inspection robot that detects abnormalities using video and infrared cameras and an image-processing system. (author)

  16. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Patient who Underwent Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS is a rare, benign, but a locally aggressive tumor. It is characterized by the proliferation of synovial membrane, but it can also be seen in tendon sheaths and bursae. Clinical presentation of solitary lesions include compression and locking of the joint suggesting loose bodies in the joint and a subsequent findings of an effusion, whereas diffuse lesions manifest with pain and chronic swelling. In this article, we presented a curious case of PVNS in a female patient who have been followed up due to an acetabular cystic lesion. She underwent total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis of the hip joint and associated pain. The diagnosis of PVNS was established intraoperatively. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 235-7

  17. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  18. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  19. [Surgical robotics in neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Zoltán

    2009-09-06

    Surgical robotics is one of the most dynamically advancing areas of biomedical engineering. In the past few decades, computer-integrated interventional medicine has gained significance internationally in the field of surgical procedures. More recently, mechatronic devices have been used for nephrectomy, cholecystectomy, as well as in orthopedics and radiosurgery. Estimates show that 70% of the radical prostatectomies were performed with the da Vinci robot in the United States last year. Robot-aided procedures offer remarkable advantages in neurosurgery both for the patient and the surgeon, making microsurgery and Minimally Invasive Surgery a reality, and even complete teleoperation accessible. This paper introduces surgical robotic systems developed primarily for brain and spine applications, besides, it focuses on the different research strategies applied to provide smarter, better and more advanced tools to surgeons. A new system is discussed in details that we have developed together with the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. This cooperatively-controlled system can assist with skull base drilling to improve the safety and quality of neurosurgery while reducing the operating time. The paper presents the entire system, the preliminary results of phantom and cadaver tests and our efforts to improve the accuracy of the components. An effective optical tracking based patient motion compensation method has been implemented and tested. The results verify the effectiveness of the system and allow for further research.

  20. Vitruvian Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Robots are simultaneously real machines and technical images that challenge our sense of self. In the Open Forum I discuss the movie Ex Machina by director Alex Garland. The robot Ava, played by Alicia Vikander, is a rare portrait of what could be interpreted as a feminist robot (and...... there are spoilers ahead for any readers unfamiliar with this movie). Though she apparently is created as the dream of the ‘perfect woman’, sexy and beautiful, she also develops and urges to free herself from the slavery of her creator, Nathan Bateman. She is a robot created along the perfect dimensions...... as a Vitruvian robot but is also a creature which could be interpreted as a human being. However, the point I want to raise is not whether Ava’s reaction to robot slavery is justified or not but how her portrait raises questions about the blurred lines between reality and fiction when we discuss our robotic...

  1. Robot Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Anja; Grindsted Nielsen, Sally; Jochum, Elizabeth Ann

    Robots are increasingly used in health care settings, e.g., as homecare assistants and personal companions. One challenge for personal robots in the home is acceptance. We describe an innovative approach to influencing the acceptance of care robots using theatrical performance. Live performance...... is a useful testbed for developing and evaluating what makes robots expressive; it is also a useful platform for designing robot behaviors and dialogue that result in believable characters. Therefore theatre is a valuable testbed for studying human-robot interaction (HRI). We investigate how audiences...... perceive social robots interacting with humans in a future care scenario through a scripted performance. We discuss our methods and initial findings, and outline future work....

  2. Robotics education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, O.

    1984-01-01

    Robotics education courses are rapidly spreading throughout the nation's colleges and universities. Engineering schools are offering robotics courses as part of their mechanical or manufacturing engineering degree program. Two year colleges are developing an Associate Degree in robotics. In addition to regular courses, colleges are offering seminars in robotics and related fields. These seminars draw excellent participation at costs running up to $200 per day for each participant. The last one drew 275 people from Texas to Virginia. Seminars are also offered by trade associations, private consulting firms, and robot vendors. IBM, for example, has the Robotic Assembly Institute in Boca Raton and charges about $1,000 per week for course. This is basically for owners of IBM robots. Education (and training) can be as short as one day or as long as two years. Here is the educational pattern that is developing now

  3. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  4. A unique instrumental malfunction during robotic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Yul; Ahn, Jenny Jin-Kyung; Jeong, Wooju; Ham, Won Sik; Rha, Koon Ho

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the introduction of robotics in the field of medicine has provided a new approach to patients requiring surgery, and both its advantages and disadvantages are currently under study by many groups worldwide. The use of robotics has especially been considered by the urological community as a treatment option in radical prostatectomy. The current case report is one in which the da Vinci Surgical System, with fourth arm use was employed in radical prostatectomy. This case presents a unique occurrence in which a bolt of the Prograsper forcep became loose during an operation, leading to diminished device functionality and later impedance of its removal. A circumstance such as this has not previously been reported, so we introduce for other robotic surgeons our unique instrumental malfunction case during a robotic prostatectomy.

  5. [Life without robots : What is left for the urologist?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakenberg, O

    2010-08-01

    The triumphal march of robots in urology seems to be unstoppable. In the meantime, a broadening of the scope for indications in urology can be observed: this applies to pyeloplasty and to a lesser degree also to partial nephrectomy and radical cystectomy. As yet no evidence has been provided that robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RP) is superior to open surgery. Furthermore, data are available which suggest that the midterm functional results are possibly even worse than those achieved with open RP.

  6. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  7. [Reprodcutive results of radical trachelectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Chapa, Arnulfo; Alonso-Reyes, Nelly; Luna-Macías, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Historically, cervical cancer in early stages has been treated with radical hysterectomy and radiotherapy with no option in keeping the uterine-ovarian function. Since two decades ago, evidence shows these cases are candidates for radical trachelectomy, a procedure capable of preserving the fertility without affecting the oncological outcome. To analyze reproductive results among patients treated with radical trachelectomy, in a reference center from the northeast of Mexico. Between March 1999 and December 2013, 27 cases with cervical cancer in early stages were treated with vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy in the ISSSTE Regional Hospital in Monterrey, NL (Mexico). We obtained the gynecological, medical and surgical clinical history. Plan of analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Age range was 27-39 years. Main complications were cervical stenosis (n=1) and erosion of cerclaje (n=2). Eighteen patients tried to get pregnant, 8 of them got a spontaneous pregnancy; 1 more patient required assisted reproduction technics and did not succeed. All pregnancies were delivered by cesarean section and were preterm births; 3 underwent premature rupture of membranes. Two pregnancies ended in abortion, one at 10 weeks with severe hemorrhage that needed hysterectomy; the second one, at 1 7 weeks, received a fine uterine curettage. Only 6 cases (33%) got a live birth. Only one third of the attempted pregnancies got a live birth. Assisted reproduction technics play an important role and should be offer to all cases. Cerclaje is an important factor to carry a pregnancy up to the third trimester.

  8. Robotic buildings(s)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic building to be in the last decade prototypically implemented. In this context, robotic building implies both physically built robotic environments and robotically

  9. Long term complications after radical cystoprostatectomy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Shelbaia

    A total of 44 male patients underwent radical cystectomy and orthotopic diversion (W-pouch) for invasive bladder cancer with minimum follow up 1 year. Assessment ... The tools used to assess the complications during each visit included; history including voiding diary ... and mortality rates in both males and females [3].

  10. Delta Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Herder, Justus Laurens; van der Wijk, V.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a delta robot comprising a stationary base (2) and a movable platform (3) that is connected to the base with three chains of links (4,5,6), and comprising a balancing system incorporating at least one pantograph (7) for balancing the robot's center of mass, wherein the at least one pantograph has a first free extremity (10) at which it supports a countermass (13) which is arranged to balance the center of mass of the robot.

  11. Robot Handcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The PER-Force robotic handcontroller provides a sense of touch or "feel" to an operator manipulating robots. The force simulation and wide range of motion greatly enhances the efficiency of robotic and computer operations. The handcontroller was developed for the Space Station by Cybernet Systems Corporation under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. Commercial applications include underwater use, underground excavations, research laboratories, hazardous waste handling and in manufacturing operations in which it is unsafe or impractical for humans to work.

  12. Soft Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M

    2018-04-09

    This description of "soft robotics" is not intended to be a conventional review, in the sense of a comprehensive technical summary of a developing field. Rather, its objective is to describe soft robotics as a new field-one that offers opportunities to chemists and materials scientists who like to make "things" and to work with macroscopic objects that move and exert force. It will give one (personal) view of what soft actuators and robots are, and how this class of soft devices fits into the more highly developed field of conventional "hard" robotics. It will also suggest how and why soft robotics is more than simply a minor technical "tweak" on hard robotics and propose a unique role for chemistry, and materials science, in this field. Soft robotics is, at its core, intellectually and technologically different from hard robotics, both because it has different objectives and uses and because it relies on the properties of materials to assume many of the roles played by sensors, actuators, and controllers in hard robotics. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Robot umanoidi o robot umani?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Parisi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Che cosa e' un robot? A che cosa serve un robot? Un robot e' qualcosa di fisico, costruito da noi, che somiglia a un organismo vivente e si comporta come un organismo vivente. Gli organismi viventi comprendono gli animali e le piante, ma i robot riproducono gli animali piuttosto che le piante, anche se ci sono tentativi di costruire robotpiante. Comportarsi come un animale significa avere degli organi sensoriali con cui ricevere informazioni dall'ambiente e degli organi motori che permettono di spostarsi nell'ambiente o di muovere una qualche parte del proprio corpo, ad esempio la testa o un braccio, in maniera non programmata, ma autonoma, cioe' rispondendo agli stimoli che arrivano momento per momento ai sensori del robot. Questo risponde alla domanda "Che cosa e' un robot?".

  14. A radical approach to radical innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInnovation pays. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google – nearly every one of today’s most successful companies has a talent for developing radical new ideas. But how best to encourage radical initiative taking from employees, and does their previous success or failure at it play a role?

  15. Immediate radical trachelectomy versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by conservative surgery for patients with stage IB1 cervical cancer with tumors 2cm or larger: A literature review and analysis of oncological and obstetrical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Rendón, Gabriel J; Vasquez, Monica; Echeverri, Lina; Sanz-Lomana, Carlos Millán; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2015-06-01

    Radical trachelectomy is the treatment of choice in women with early-stage cervical cancer wishing to preserve fertility. Radical trachelectomy can be performed with a vaginal, abdominal, or laparoscopic/robotic approach. Vaginal radical trachelectomy (VRT) is generally not offered to patients with tumors 2cm or larger because of a high recurrence rate. There are no conclusive recommendations regarding the safety of abdominal radical trachelectomy (ART) or laparoscopic radical trachelectomy (LRT) in such patients. Several investigators have used neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with tumors 2 to 4cm to reduce tumor size so that fertility preservation may be offered. However, to our knowledge, no published study has compared outcomes between patients with cervical tumors 2cm or larger who underwent immediate radical trachelectomy and those who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical trachelectomy. We conducted a literature review to compare outcomes with these 2 approaches. Our main endpoints for evaluation were oncological and obstetrical outcomes. The fertility preservation rate was 82.7%, 85.1%, 89%; and 91.1% for ART (tumors larger than >2cm), ART (all sizes), NACT followed by surgery and VRT (all sizes); respectively. The global pregnancy rate was 16.2%, 24% and 30.7% for ART, VRT, and NACT followed by surgery; respectively. The recurrence rate was 3.8%, 4.2%, 6%, 7.6% and 17% for ART (all sizes), VRT (all sizes), ART (tumors>2cm), NACT followed by surgery, and VRT (tumors>2cm). These outcomes must be considered when offering a fertility sparing technique to patients with a tumor larger than 2cm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Robotics 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Robots are used in all kinds of industrial settings. They are used to rivet bolts to cars, to move items from one conveyor belt to another, to gather information from other planets, and even to perform some very delicate types of surgery. Anyone who has watched a robot perform its tasks cannot help but be impressed by how it works. This article…

  17. The impact of robotic surgery in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedelman, C A; Abdul-Muhsin, H; Schatloff, O; Palmer, K; Lee, L; Sanchez-Salas, R; Cathelineau, X; Dávila, H; Cavelier, L; Rueda, M; Patel, V

    2013-01-01

    More than a decade ago, robotic surgery was introduced into urology. Since then, the urological community started to look at surgery from a different angle. The present, the future hopes, and the way we looked at our past experience have all changed. Between 2000 and 2011, the published literature was reviewed using the National Library of Medicine database and the following key words: robotic surgery, robot-assisted, and radical prostatectomy. Special emphasis was given to the impact of the robotic surgery in urology. We analyzed the most representative series (finished learning curve) in each one of the robotic approaches regarding perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes. This article looks into the impact of robotics in urology, starting from its background applications before urology, the way it was introduced into urology, its first steps, current status, and future expectations. By narrating this journey, we tried to highlight important modifications that helped robotic surgery make its way to its position today. We looked as well into the dramatic changes that robotic surgery introduced to the field of surgical training and its consequence on its learning curve. Basic surgical principles still apply in Robotics: experience counts, and prolonged practice provides knowledge and skills. In this way, the potential advantages delivered by technology will be better exploited, and this will be reflected in better outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Current status of robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ada T L; Tam, P C

    2014-06-01

    The introduction of robot-assisted surgery, and specifically the da Vinci Surgical System, is one of the biggest breakthroughs in surgery since the introduction of anaesthesia, and represents the most significant advancement in minimally invasive surgery of this decade. One of the first surgical uses of the robot was in orthopaedics, neurosurgery, and cardiac surgery. However, it was the use in urology, and particularly in prostate surgery, that led to its widespread popularity. Robotic surgery, is also widely used in other surgical specialties including general surgery, gynaecology, and head and neck surgery. In this article, we reviewed the current applications of robot-assisted surgery in different surgical specialties with an emphasis on urology. Clinical results as compared with traditional open and/or laparoscopic surgery and a glimpse into the future development of robotics were also discussed. A short introduction of the emerging areas of robotic surgery were also briefly reviewed. Despite the increasing popularity of robotic surgery, except in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, there is no unequivocal evidence to show its superiority over traditional laparoscopic surgery in other surgical procedures. Further trials are eagerly awaited to ascertain the long-term results and potential benefits of robotic surgery.

  19. Robotic seeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Fountas, Spyros; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural robotics has received attention for approximately 20 years, but today there are only a few examples of the application of robots in agricultural practice. The lack of uptake may be (at least partly) because in many cases there is either no compelling economic benefit......, or there is a benefit but it is not recognized. The aim of this chapter is to quantify the economic benefits from the application of agricultural robots under a specific condition where such a benefit is assumed to exist, namely the case of early seeding and re-seeding in sugar beet. With some predefined assumptions...... with regard to speed, capacity and seed mapping, we found that among these two technical systems both early seeding with a small robot and re-seeding using a robot for a smaller part of the field appear to be financially viable solutions in sugar beet production....

  20. Robot Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Martin Marietta Aero and Naval Systems has advanced the CAD art to a very high level at its Robotics Laboratory. One of the company's major projects is construction of a huge Field Material Handling Robot for the Army's Human Engineering Lab. Design of FMR, intended to move heavy and dangerous material such as ammunition, was a triumph in CAD Engineering. Separate computer problems modeled the robot's kinematics and dynamics, yielding such parameters as the strength of materials required for each component, the length of the arms, their degree of freedom and power of hydraulic system needed. The Robotics Lab went a step further and added data enabling computer simulation and animation of the robot's total operational capability under various loading and unloading conditions. NASA computer program (IAC), integrated Analysis Capability Engineering Database was used. Program contains a series of modules that can stand alone or be integrated with data from sensors or software tools.

  1. Robot Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Ess, Charles Melvin; Bhroin, Niamh Ni

    The world's first robot teacher, Saya, was introduced to a classroom in Japan in 2009. Saya, had the appearance of a young female teacher. She could express six basic emotions, take the register and shout orders like 'be quiet' (The Guardian, 2009). Since 2009, humanoid robot technologies have...... developed. It is now suggested that robot teachers may become regular features in educational settings, and may even 'take over' from human teachers in ten to fifteen years (cf. Amundsen, 2017 online; Gohd, 2017 online). Designed to look and act like a particular kind of human; robot teachers mediate human...... existence and roles, while also aiming to support education through sophisticated, automated, human-like interaction. Our paper explores the design and existential implications of ARTIE, a robot teacher at Oxford Brookes University (2017, online). Drawing on an initial empirical exploration we propose...

  2. Robot vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Almost all industrial robots use internal sensors such as shaft encoders which measure rotary position, or tachometers which measure velocity, to control their motions. Most controllers also provide interface capabilities so that signals from conveyors, machine tools, and the robot itself may be used to accomplish a task. However, advanced external sensors, such as visual sensors, can provide a much greater degree of adaptability for robot control as well as add automatic inspection capabilities to the industrial robot. Visual and other sensors are now being used in fundamental operations such as material processing with immediate inspection, material handling with adaption, arc welding, and complex assembly tasks. A new industry of robot vision has emerged. The application of these systems is an area of great potential

  3. Past, present and future of urological robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Wooju; Kumar, Ramesh; Menon, Mani

    2016-03-01

    The first urologic robotic program in the world was built at the Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Hospital Detroit, Michigan, in 2000 under the vision of surgical innovator, Dr. Mani Menon for the radical prostatectomy. The robot-assisted radical prostatectomy continues being modified with techniques to improve perioperative and surgical outcomes. The application of robotic surgical technique has since been expanded to the bladder and upper urinary tract surgery. The evolution of surgical technique and its expansion of application will continue to improve quality, outcome parameters and experience for the patients.

  4. Past, present and future of urological robotic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooju Jeong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The first urologic robotic program in the world was built at the Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Hospital Detroit, Michigan, in 2000 under the vision of surgical innovator, Dr. Mani Menon for the radical prostatectomy. The robot-assisted radical prostatectomy continues being modified with techniques to improve perioperative and surgical outcomes. The application of robotic surgical technique has since been expanded to the bladder and upper urinary tract surgery. The evolution of surgical technique and its expansion of application will continue to improve quality, outcome parameters and experience for the patients.

  5. Contemporary Radical Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Howard J.

    1984-01-01

    The origins of contemporary radical economics are examined. Applications of radical economics to price and value theory, labor segmentation theory, business cycles, industrial organization, government and business, imperialism and development, and comparative systems are reviewed. (Author/RM)

  6. An Intelligent Robot Programing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Yong

    2012-01-15

    This book introduces an intelligent robot programing with background of the begging, introduction of VPL, and SPL, building of environment for robot platform, starting of robot programing, design of simulation environment, robot autonomy drive control programing, simulation graphic. Such as SPL graphic programing graphical image and graphical shapes, and graphical method application, application of procedure for robot control, robot multiprogramming, robot bumper sensor programing, robot LRF sencor programing and robot color sensor programing.

  7. Micro intelligence robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yon Ho

    1991-07-01

    This book gives descriptions of micro robot about conception of robots and micro robot, match rules of conference of micro robots, search methods of mazes, and future and prospect of robots. It also explains making and design of 8 beat robot like making technique, software, sensor board circuit, and stepping motor catalog, speedy 3, Mr. Black and Mr. White, making and design of 16 beat robot, such as micro robot artist, Jerry 2 and magic art of shortening distances algorithm of robot simulation.

  8. An Intelligent Robot Programing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong Yong

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces an intelligent robot programing with background of the begging, introduction of VPL, and SPL, building of environment for robot platform, starting of robot programing, design of simulation environment, robot autonomy drive control programing, simulation graphic. Such as SPL graphic programing graphical image and graphical shapes, and graphical method application, application of procedure for robot control, robot multiprogramming, robot bumper sensor programing, robot LRF sencor programing and robot color sensor programing.

  9. Prediction of Pathological Complete Response Using Endoscopic Findings and Outcomes of Patients Who Underwent Watchful Waiting After Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kazushige; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Nonoperative management for patients with rectal cancer who have achieved a clinical complete response after chemoradiotherapy is becoming increasingly important in recent years. However, the definition of and modality used for patients with clinical complete response differ greatly between institutions, and the role of endoscopic assessment as a nonoperative approach has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the ability of endoscopic assessments to predict pathological regression of rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy and the applicability of these assessments for the watchful waiting approach. This was a retrospective comparative study. This study was conducted at a single referral hospital. A total of 198 patients with rectal cancer underwent preoperative endoscopic assessments after chemoradiotherapy. Of them, 186 patients underwent radical surgery with lymph node dissection. The histopathological findings of resected tissues were compared with the preoperative endoscopic findings. Twelve patients refused radical surgery and chose watchful waiting; their outcomes were compared with the outcomes of patients who underwent radical surgery. The endoscopic criteria correlated well with tumor regression grading. The sensitivity and specificity for a pathological complete response were 65.0% to 87.1% and 39.1% to 78.3%. However, endoscopic assessment could not fully discriminate pathological complete responses, and the outcomes of patients who underwent watchful waiting were considerably poorer than the patients who underwent radical surgery. Eventually, 41.7% of the patients who underwent watchful waiting experienced uncontrollable local failure, and many of these occurrences were observed more than 3 years after chemoradiotherapy. The number of the patients treated with the watchful waiting strategy was limited, and the selection was not randomized. Although endoscopic assessment after chemoradiotherapy correlated with pathological response

  10. Esophagojejunostomy reconstruction using a robot-sewing technique during totally robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Shu; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-Shou

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the feasibility of esophagojejunostomy reconstruction using a robot-sewing technique during a completely robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Between May 2011 and July 2012, 65 patients in whom gastric adenocarcinoma was diagnosed underwent a completely robotic total gastrectomy, including a robot-sewing esophagojejunal anastomosis. We demonstrated the surgical techniques with analysis of clinicopathologic data and short-term surgical outcomes. All robotic surgeries were successfully performed without conversion. Among the 65 patients, 46 were men and 19 were women. The mean age (± SD) was 57.8 ± 6.5 y. The mean total operative time (± SD), EJ anastomosis time (± SD), and blood loss (± SD) were 245 ± 53 min, 45 ± 26 min, and 75 ± 50 ml, respectively. The mean (± SD) post-operative hospital stay was 5.4 ± 2.5 d. One patient was readmitted for an intestinal obstruction and underwent re-operation 14 d post-operatively; he recovered uneventfully and was discharged 10 d post- operatively. During the follow-up, no patients developed an esophgojejunostomy stricture. A robot-sewing anastomosis for esophagojejunostomy reconstruction during robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer is feasible. Indeed, a robot-sewing anastomosis for esophagojejunostomy reconstruction may become a standard surgical technique during completely robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

  11. Radical theory of rings

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, JW

    2003-01-01

    Radical Theory of Rings distills the most noteworthy present-day theoretical topics, gives a unified account of the classical structure theorems for rings, and deepens understanding of key aspects of ring theory via ring and radical constructions. Assimilating radical theory's evolution in the decades since the last major work on rings and radicals was published, the authors deal with some distinctive features of the radical theory of nonassociative rings, associative rings with involution, and near-rings. Written in clear algebraic terms by globally acknowledged authorities, the presentation

  12. Social Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social robotics is a cutting edge research area gathering researchers and stakeholders from various disciplines and organizations. The transformational potential that these machines, in the form of, for example, caregiving, entertainment or partner robots, pose to our societies and to us...... as individuals seems to be limited by our technical limitations and phantasy alone. This collection contributes to the field of social robotics by exploring its boundaries from a philosophically informed standpoint. It constructively outlines central potentials and challenges and thereby also provides a stable...... fundament for further research of empirical, qualitative or methodological nature....

  13. Social Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social robotics is a cutting edge research area gathering researchers and stakeholders from various disciplines and organizations. The transformational potential that these machines, in the form of, for example, caregiving, entertainment or partner robots, pose to our societies and to us...... as individuals seems to be limited by our technical limitations and phantasy alone. This collection contributes to the field of social robotics by exploring its boundaries from a philosophically informed standpoint. It constructively outlines central potentials and challenges and thereby also provides a stable...

  14. [Lavoisier and radicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Lavoisier and his co-workers (Guyton de Morveau, Bertholet, Fourcroy) considered that acids were constituted of oxygen and of something else that they called radicals. These radicals were known in some cases, i.e. nitrogen for nitrous acid, carbon for carbonic acid, phosphorus for phosphoric acid. In the case of sulfur, the sulfuric radical could be associated with different quantities of oxigen leading to sulfuric or sulfurous acids. In other cases radicals remained unknown at the time i.e. muriatic radical for muriatic acid, or benzoyl radical for benzoic acid. It is interesting to notice that Lavoisier evoked the case of compound radicals constituted of different substances such as carbon and hydrogen.

  15. Applications of Evolving Robotic Technology for Head and Neck Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Albergotti, W Greer; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2016-03-01

    Assess the use and potential benefits of a new robotic system for transoral radical tonsillectomy, transoral supraglottic laryngectomy, and retroauricular thyroidectomy in a cadaver dissection. Three previously described robotic procedures (transoral radical tonsillectomy, transoral supraglottic laryngectomy, and retroauricular thyroidectomy) were performed in a cadaver using the da Vinci Xi Surgical System. Surgical exposure and access, operative time, and number of collisions were examined objectively. The new robotic system was used to perform transoral radical tonsillectomy with dissection and preservation of glossopharyngeal nerve branches, transoral supraglottic laryngectomy, and retroauricular thyroidectomy. There was excellent exposure without any difficulties in access. Robotic operative times (excluding set-up and docking times) for the 3 procedures in the cadaver were 12.7, 14.3, and 21.2 minutes (excluding retroauricular incision and subplatysmal elevation), respectively. No robotic arm collisions were noted during these 3 procedures. The retroauricular thyroidectomy was performed using 4 robotic ports, each with 8 mm instruments. The use of updated and evolving robotic technology improves the ease of previously described robotic head and neck procedures and may allow surgeons to perform increasingly complex surgeries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Robotic liver resection: initial experience with three-arm robotic and single-port robotic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Emad; Noureldine, Salem I; Saggi, Bob; Buell, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    Robotic-assisted surgery offers a solution to fundamental limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery, and its use is gaining wide popularity. However, the application of this technology has yet to be established in hepatic surgery. A retrospective analysis of our prospectively collected liver surgery database was performed. Over a 6-month period, all consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted hepatic resection for a liver neoplasm were included. Demographics, operative time, and morbidity encountered were evaluated. A total of 7 robotic-assisted liver resections were performed, including 2 robotic-assisted single-port access liver resections with the da Vinci-Si Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Sunnyvalle, Calif.) USA. The mean age was 44.6 years (range, 21-68 years); there were 5 male and 2 female patients. The mean operative time (± SD) was 61.4 ± 26.7 minutes; the mean operative console time (± SD) was 38.2 ± 23 minutes. No conversions were required. The mean blood loss was 100.7 mL (range, 10-200 mL). The mean hospital stay (± SD) was 2 ± 0.4 days. No postoperative morbidity related to the procedure or death was encountered. Our initial experience with robotic liver resection confirms that this technique is both feasible and safe. Robotic-assisted technology appears to improve the precision and ergonomics of single-access surgery while preserving the known benefits of laparoscopic surgery, including cosmesis, minimal morbidity, and faster recovery.

  17. Space Robotics Challenge

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Robotics Challenge seeks to infuse robot autonomy from the best and brightest research groups in the robotics community into NASA robots for future...

  18. Robotic vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  19. Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Light Robotics - Structure-Mediated Nanobiophotonics covers the latest means of sculpting of both light and matter for achieving bioprobing and manipulation at the smallest scales. The synergy between photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology spans the rapidly growing field of nanobiophotonics...

  20. Robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  1. Robotic arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwech, H.

    1989-01-01

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube is disclosed. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel. 23 figs

  2. Space Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Ellery

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In this second of three short papers, I introduce some of the basic concepts of space robotics with an emphasis on some specific challenging areas of research that are peculiar to the application of robotics to space infrastructure development. The style of these short papers is pedagogical and the concepts in this paper are developed from fundamental manipulator robotics. This second paper considers the application of space manipulators to on-orbit servicing (OOS, an application which has considerable commercial application. I provide some background to the notion of robotic on-orbit servicing and explore how manipulator control algorithms may be modified to accommodate space manipulators which operate in the micro-gravity of space.

  3. Robotic explorer

    OpenAIRE

    Selva Macià, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Development of a small autonomous robot for exploration purposes. This final degree project was looking how to demonstrate all the knowledge learned during those years using different aspects of engineering such as programming in different languages, conducting electronic schemes, preparing and welding circuits and integrate different elements of wireless communication. The idea was quite ambitious because it was wanted to achieve a wireless control on a robot. With this wireless control t...

  4. Quality of life after robotically assisted atrial myxoma excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesävuori, Risto; Raivio, Peter; Jokinen, Janne J; Sahlman, Antero; Vento, Antti

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome after robotically assisted myxoma surgery performed at our institution. Altogether nine patients underwent robotically assisted atrial myxoma excision. A control group was selected from 18 consecutive patients who underwent an isolated atrial myxoma excision via conventional sternotomy. Preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the two study groups. Postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was also evaluated. All robotic operations were completed successfully using the da Vinci™ telesurgical system. There was no mortality in either of the two study groups. Procedure, cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic occlusion, and ventilation times were shorter in the sternotomy group when compared to the robotic group. Length of stay was statistically significantly shorter in the robotically assisted group. Postoperative quality of life did not differ between the two study groups. We conclude that robotically assisted surgery is a feasible method for treating atrial myxomas.

  5. Recent advances in robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beni, G.; Hackwood, S.

    1984-01-01

    Featuring 10 contributions, this volume offers a state-of-the-art report on robotic science and technology. It covers robots in modern industry, robotic control to help the disabled, kinematics and dynamics, six-legged walking robots, a vector analysis of robot manipulators, tactile sensing in robots, and more

  6. Robot-assisted Surgery in Gynecologic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanagnolo, Vanna; Garbi, Annalisa; Achilarre, Maria Teresa; Minig, Lucas

    Robotic-assisted surgery is a technological advancement that facilitates the application of minimally invasive techniques for complex operations in gynecologic oncology. The objective of this article was to review the literature regarding the role of robotic-assisted surgery to treat women with gynecologic cancers. The majority of publications on robotic surgery are still retrospective or descriptive in nature; however, the data for managing patients with a robotic-assisted approach show comparable, and at times improved, outcomes compared with both laparoscopy (2-dimensional) and laparotomy approaches. Robotic-assisted surgery has been used for patients with endometrial cancer and resulted in the increased use of minimally invasive surgery with improved outcomes compared with laparotomy and partially with laparoscopy. This has been shown in large cohorts of patients as well as in obese patients in whom the complication rates have significantly decreased. For early cervical cancer, robotic radical hysterectomy seems to be safe and feasible and to be preferable to laparotomy with seemingly comparable oncologic outcomes. Robotic-assisted surgery and conventional laparoscopy to stage women with early-stage ovarian cancer seem to have similar surgical and oncologic outcomes, with a shorter learning curve for robotic-assisted surgery. However, robotic-assisted surgery appears to be more expensive than laparotomy and traditional laparoscopy. In conclusion, robotic-assisted surgery appears to facilitate the surgical approach for complex operations to treat women with gynecologic cancers. Although randomized controlled trials are lacking to further elucidate the equivalence of robot-assisted surgery with conventional methods in terms of oncologic outcome and patients' quality of life, the technology appears to be safe and effective and could offer a minimally invasive approach to a much larger group of patients. Copyright © 2017 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Commentary on "Robot-assisted laparoscopic vs open radical cystectomy: Comparison of complications and perioperative oncological outcomes in 200 patients." Kader AK, Richards KA, Krane LS, Pettus JA, Smith JJ, Hemal AK, Division of Urology, UC San Diego Health System, San Diego, CA.: BJU Int 2013; 112(4):E290-4. doi:10.1111/bju.12167. [Epub 2013 Jul 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, William A

    2014-11-01

    To compare perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy (RARC) to open RC (ORC) at a single institution. A retrospective analysis was performed on a consecutive series of patients undergoing RC (100 RARC and 100 ORC) at Wake Forest University with curative intent from 2006 until 2010. Complication data using the Clavien system were collected for 90 days postoperatively. Complications and other perioperative outcomes were compared between patient groups. Patients in both groups had comparable preoperative characteristics. The overall and major complication (Clavien ≥ 3) rates were lower for RARC patients at 35 vs 57% (P = 0.001) and 10 vs 22% (P = 0.019), respectively. There were no significant differences between groups for pathological outcomes, including stage, number of nodes harvested or positive margin rates. Our data suggest that patients undergoing RARC have perioperative oncological outcomes comparable with ORC, with fewer overall or major complications. Definitive claims about comparative outcomes with RARC require results from larger, randomised controlled trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Soft Robotics Week

    CERN Document Server

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Iida, Fumiya; Cianchetti, Matteo; Margheri, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive, timely snapshot of current research, technologies and applications of soft robotics. The different chapters, written by international experts across multiple fields of soft robotics, cover innovative systems and technologies for soft robot legged locomotion, soft robot manipulation, underwater soft robotics, biomimetic soft robotic platforms, plant-inspired soft robots, flying soft robots, soft robotics in surgery, as well as methods for their modeling and control. Based on the results of the second edition of the Soft Robotics Week, held on April 25 – 30, 2016, in Livorno, Italy, the book reports on the major research lines and novel technologies presented and discussed during the event.

  9. Medical robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management.

  10. Rehabilitation robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, H I; Volpe, B T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on rehabilitation robotics which can be used to augment the clinician's toolbox in order to deliver meaningful restorative therapy for an aging population, as well as on advances in orthotics to augment an individual's functional abilities beyond neurorestoration potential. The interest in rehabilitation robotics and orthotics is increasing steadily with marked growth in the last 10 years. This growth is understandable in view of the increased demand for caregivers and rehabilitation services escalating apace with the graying of the population. We provide an overview on improving function in people with a weak limb due to a neurological disorder who cannot properly control it to interact with the environment (orthotics); we then focus on tools to assist the clinician in promoting rehabilitation of an individual so that s/he can interact with the environment unassisted (rehabilitation robotics). We present a few clinical results occurring immediately poststroke as well as during the chronic phase that demonstrate superior gains for the upper extremity when employing rehabilitation robotics instead of usual care. These include the landmark VA-ROBOTICS multisite, randomized clinical study which demonstrates clinical gains for chronic stroke that go beyond usual care at no additional cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Generic robot architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses for a generic robot architecture providing a framework that is easily portable to a variety of robot platforms and is configured to provide hardware abstractions, abstractions for generic robot attributes, environment abstractions, and robot behaviors. The generic robot architecture includes a hardware abstraction level and a robot abstraction level. The hardware abstraction level is configured for developing hardware abstractions that define, monitor, and control hardware modules available on a robot platform. The robot abstraction level is configured for defining robot attributes and provides a software framework for building robot behaviors from the robot attributes. Each of the robot attributes includes hardware information from at least one hardware abstraction. In addition, each robot attribute is configured to substantially isolate the robot behaviors from the at least one hardware abstraction.

  12. Robot Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers and interns at this NASA field center are building the prototype of a robotic rover that could go where no wheeled rover has gone before-into the dark cold craters at the lunar poles and across the Moon s rugged highlands-like a walking tetrahedron. With NASA pushing to meet President Bush's new exploration objectives, the robots taking shape here today could be on the Moon in a decade. In the longer term, the concept could lead to shape-shifting robot swarms designed to explore distant planetary surfaces in advance of humans. "If you look at all of NASA s projections of the future, anyone s projections of the space program, they re all rigid-body architecture," says Steven Curtis, principal investigator on the effort. "This is not rigid-body. The whole key here is flexibility and reconfigurability with a capital R."

  13. Robotic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, H. I.; Hogan, N.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a remarkable shift in the neuro-rehabilitation paradigm. Neuroscientists and clinicians moved away from the perception that the brain is static and hardwired, to a new dynamic understanding that plasticity is a fundamental property of the adult human brain and might be harnessed to remap or create new neural pathways. Capitalizing on this innovative understanding, we introduced a paradigm shift in the clinical practice in 1989 when we initiated the development of the MIT-Manus robot for neuro-rehabilitation and deployed it in the clinic in 1994 10. Since then, we and others have developed and tested a multitude of robotic devices for stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Here we discuss whether robotic therapy has achieved a level of maturity to justify its broad adoption in the clinical realm as a tool for motor recovery. PMID:23080044

  14. Service Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Nielsen, Jeppe Agger; Andersen, Kim Normann

    The position presented in this paper is that in order to understand how service robots shape, and are being shaped by, the physical and social contexts in which they are used, we need to consider both work/organizational analysis and interaction design. We illustrate this with qualitative data...... and personal experiences to generate discussion about how to link these two traditions. This paper presents selected results from a case study that investigated the implementation and use of robot vacuum cleaners in Danish eldercare. The study demonstrates interpretive flexibility with variation...... in the perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between key stakeholders in eldercare. The case study approach and results is then briefly contrasted to the authors’ first hand experiences with appropriating robot vacuums in the home. The aim is to generate discussion of how...

  15. Robot Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (Canadarm) is a 50 foot robot arm used to deploy, retrieve or repair satellites in orbit. Initial spinoff version is designed to remove, inspect and replace large components of Ontario Hydro's CANDU nuclear reactors, which supply 50 percent of Ontario Hydro's total power reduction. CANDU robot is the first of SPAR's Remote Manipulator Systems intended for remote materials handling operations in nuclear servicing, chemical processing, smelting and manufacturing. Inco Limited used remote manipulator for remote control mining equipment to enhance safety and productivity of Inco's hardrock mining operations. System not only improves safety in a hazardous operation that costs more than a score of lives annually, it also increases productivity fourfold. Remote Manipulator System Division is also manufacturing a line of industrial robots and developing additional system for nuclear servicing, mining, defense and space operations.

  16. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  17. Robot Choreography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Heath, Damith

    2016-01-01

    We propose a robust framework for combining performance paradigms with human robot interaction (HRI) research. Following an analysis of several case studies that combine the performing arts with HRI experiments, we propose a methodology and “best practices” for implementing choreography and other...... performance paradigms in HRI experiments. Case studies include experiments conducted in laboratory settings, “in the wild”, and live performance settings. We consider the technical and artistic challenges of designing and staging robots alongside humans in these various settings, and discuss how to combine...

  18. Medical robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    In this book, we present medical robotics, its evolution over the last 30 years in terms of architecture, design and control, and the main scientific and clinical contributions to the field. For more than two decades, robots have been part of hospitals and have progressively become a common tool for the clinician. Because this domain has now reached a certain level of maturity it seems important and useful to provide a state of the scientific, technological and clinical achievements and still open issues. This book describes the short history of the domain, its specificity and constraints, and

  19. Muonium and muonic radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Geeson, D.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An energetic positive muon which is injected in a liquid sample of substrate molecules (S) creates an ionization track consisting of substrate cations (S + ) and electrons. Near the end of this track the muon may combine with an electron to form muonium (Mu) which is observable in inert liquids, but which reacts by addition to form a radical. Alternatively, the electron can add to S to form S - , which then combines with the muon to form the radical. Furthermore, instead of ending up in Mu or in a radical the muon may stay in a diamagnetic environment as a solvated muon, or as a muon substituting a proton in a molecule. Of interest in these schemes are the mechanisms and rates of formation of muonated radicals and in particular the rate constants for their reactions to products. Investigations are based on the observation of Mu and the radical by means of the μSR technique in transverse magnetic fields. (Auth.)

  20. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Samani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. According to the importance of the embodiment of robots in the sense of presence, the influence of robots in communication culture is anticipated. The sustainability of robotics culture based on diversity for cultural communities for various acceptance modalities is explored in order to anticipate the creation of different attributes of culture between robots and humans in the future.

  1. Robot vision for nuclear advanced robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Ryoichi; Okano, Hideharu; Kuno, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Shimada, Hideo; Okada, Satoshi; Kawamura, Astuo

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes Robot Vision and Operation System for Nuclear Advanced Robot. This Robot Vision consists of robot position detection, obstacle detection and object recognition. With these vision techniques, a mobile robot can make a path and move autonomously along the planned path. The authors implemented the above robot vision system on the 'Advanced Robot for Nuclear Power Plant' and tested in an environment mocked up as nuclear power plant facilities. Since the operation system for this robot consists of operator's console and a large stereo monitor, this system can be easily operated by one person. Experimental tests were made using the Advanced Robot (nuclear robot). Results indicate that the proposed operation system is very useful, and can be operate by only person. (author)

  2. Robot-assisted urologic surgery in 2010 - Advancements and future outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paurush Babbar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic surgery is a cutting edge and minimally invasive procedure, which has generated a great deal of excitement in the urologic community. While there has been much advancement in this emerging technology, it is safe to say that robotic urologic surgery holds tremendous potential for progress in the near future. Hence, it is paramount that urologists stay up-to-date regarding new developments in the realm of robotics with respect to novel applications, limitations and opportunities for incorporation into their practice. Robot-assisted surgery provides an enhanced 3D view, increased magnification of the surgical field, better manual dexterity, relatively bloodless field, elimination of surgeon′s tremor, reduction in a surgeon′s fatigue and mitigation of scattered light. All these factors translate into greater precision of surgical dissection, which is imperative in providing better intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Pioneering work assessing the feasibility of robotic surgery in urology began in the early 2000′s with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and has since expanded to procedures such as robot-assisted radical cystectomy, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, robot-assisted nephroureterectomy and robot-assisted pyeloplasty. A MEDLINE search was used to identify recent articles (within the last two years and publications of specific importance, which highlighted the recent developments and future direction of robotics. This review will use the aforementioned urologic surgeries as vehicles to evaluate the current status and future role of robotics in the advancement of the field of urology.

  3. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    , Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  4. Laws on Robots, Laws by Robots, Laws in Robots : Regulating Robot Behaviour by Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenes, R.E.; Lucivero, F.

    2015-01-01

    Speculation about robot morality is almost as old as the concept of a robot itself. Asimov’s three laws of robotics provide an early and well-discussed example of moral rules robots should observe. Despite the widespread influence of the three laws of robotics and their role in shaping visions of

  5. Robotics in Sinus and Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Sanjeet; Hachem, Ralph Abi; Ozer, Enver; Beer-Furlan, Andre; Prevedello, Daniel; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2017-06-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has been proven to be safe and to yield acceptable oncological and functional outcomes for surgery of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, supraglottis, and glottis. TORS has been successful at reducing morbidity, improving quality of life, and providing access to areas that previously required mandibulotomy or other more radical approaches in the past. This has changed the paradigm of management of tumors in these anatomic locations. In this article, the authors review the recent literature discussing the role of robotic surgery in managing sinonasal and skull base pathology and discuss its current advantages and limitations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Urologic robotic surgery in Korea: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ill Young

    2015-08-01

    Since 2005 when the da Vinci surgical system was approved as a medical device by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare, 51 systems have been installed in 40 institutions as of May 2015. Although robotic surgery is not covered by the national health insurance service in Korea, it has been used in several urologic fields as a less invasive surgery. Since the first robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in 2005, partial nephrectomy, radical cystectomy, pyeloplasty, and other urologic surgeries have been performed. The following should be considered to extend the indications for robotic surgery: training systems including accreditation, operative outcomes from follow-up results, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, the history and current status of robotic surgeries in Korea are presented.

  7. Radical's view of sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: General concept in radiation biology is that free radicals are highly reactive and they can damage vital cellular molecules leading to injurious effects. However, in this talk, evidence will be presented through the techniques of electron paramagnetic resonance ( EPR ) and pulse radiolysis that free radicals can be highly selective in their reaction with the target molecules. In addition, attempts will be made to present a brief account of emerging scenario of free radical generation, identification and their involvement in radiation damage mechanisms in chemical and biological systems

  8. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)); Hollema, H. (Dept. of Pathology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged {le} 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB ({le} 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors).

  9. Homegrown religious radicalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    It has been reported that a growing number of youngsters from Western Europe are engaging in conflicts motivated by religious and political conflicts in the Middle East. This paper explores the reasons behind this seemingly religious radicalization from the point of view of the youngsters...... and their families. Existing literature and ways of defining the social psychological process of radicalization will be discussed, and a theoretical framework based on a focus on (non-)belonging, Otherness and sense of community will be proposed. The framework will be utilized in an analysis of narratives from...... youngsters and parents of youngsters who have chosen a radicalized path in life. The paper will shed light on how the sense of and yearning for belonging and recognition have to be taken into account in our understanding of homegrown religious radicalization...

  10. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 6 months. You will learn exercises (called Kegel exercises) that strengthen the muscles in your pelvis. ... Radical prostatectomy Retrograde ejaculation Urinary incontinence Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Suprapubic catheter care Urinary catheters - ...

  11. Moderate and Radical Islam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabasa, Angel

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the statement of Angel Rabasa, PhD, Senior Policy Analyst, The RAND Corporation, to the Committee on Armed Services, Defense Review Terrorism and Radical Islam Gap Panel, United...

  12. Towards Sociable Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Trung Dung

    This thesis studies aspects of self-sufficient energy (energy autonomy) for truly autonomous robots and towards sociable robots. Over sixty years of history of robotics through three developmental ages containing single robot, multi-robot systems, and social (sociable) robots, the main objective...... of roboticists mostly focuses on how to make a robotic system function autonomously and further, socially. However, such approaches mostly emphasize behavioural autonomy, rather than energy autonomy which is the key factor for not only any living machine, but for life on the earth. Consequently, self......-sufficient energy is one of the challenges for not only single robot or multi-robot systems, but also social and sociable robots. This thesis is to deal with energy autonomy for multi-robot systems through energy sharing (trophallaxis) in which each robot is equipped with two capabilities: self-refueling energy...

  13. Presentation robot Advee

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejsa, Jiří; Věchet, Stanislav; Hrbáček, J.; Ripel, T.; Ondroušek, V.; Hrbáček, R.; Schreiber, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, 5/6 (2012), s. 307-322 ISSN 1802-1484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : mobile robot * human- robot interface * localization Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robot ics

  14. Micro Robotics Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our research is focused on the challenges of engineering robotic systems down to sub-millimeter size scales. We work both on small mobile robots (robotic insects for...

  15. Cloud Robotics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Mester, Gyula

    2015-01-01

    Cloud Robotics was born from the merger of service robotics and cloud technologies. It allows robots to benefit from the powerful computational, storage, and communications resources of modern data centres. Cloud robotics allows robots to take advantage of the rapid increase in data transfer rates to offload tasks without hard real time requirements. Cloud Robotics has rapidly gained momentum with initiatives by companies such as Google, Willow Garage and Gostai as well as more than a dozen a...

  16. Off-Clamp versus On-Clamp Robotic Partial Nephrectomy: A Multicenter Match-Paired Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Khene, Zine-Eddine; Pradère, Benjamin; Seisen, Thomas; Verhoest, Grégory; Masson-Lecomte, Alexandra; Grassano, Yohann; Roumiguié, Mathieu; Beauval, Jean-Baptiste; Baumert, Hervé; Droupy, Stéphane; Doumerc, Nicolas; Bernhard, Jean-Christophe; Vaessen, Christophe; Bruyère, Franck; de la Taille, Alexandre; Rouprêt, Morgan; Bensalah, Karim

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of on-clamp and off-clamp robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN). The charts of all patients who underwent an RPN at 8 institutions between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients who underwent an off-clamp RPN were matched to on-clamp RPN in a 1-4 fashion according to the following variables: RENAL score, tumor size and surgeon's experience. Pre-, intra-, and postoperative data were compared between both groups. Among 525 RPN, 26 were performed off-clamp (5%). They were matched to 104 on-clamp RPN. The complications rate (15.5 vs. 7.7%, p = 0.53), major complications rate (4.9 vs. 3.9%; p = 0.82), and transfusions rate (0 vs. 4.9%; p = 0.58) did not differ significantly between the clamped and unclamped groups. Conversely, estimated blood loss was higher in the off-clamp group (266.4 vs. 284.6 mL, p = 0.048) and so was the rate of conversion to radical nephrectomy (0 vs. 7.7%, p = 0.04). Postoperative preservation of renal function was comparable in both groups. Off-clamp RPN is feasible for a small subgroup of renal tumors without increased risk of postoperative complications but at the cost of higher estimated blood loss and increased risk of conversion to radical nephrectomy. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. ROBOT "MICROMOUSE"

    OpenAIRE

    Rman, Marko

    2011-01-01

    V diplomski nalogi je predstavljena izvedba robota "micromouse" za premagovanje naključnega labirinta. Cilj projekta je bila izdelava avtonomnega robota, ki je sposoben opraviti takšno nalogo. Robot je opremljen z različnimi senzorji za zaznavanje okolice, motorji za pogon, upravljanje pa se izvaja z mikrokrmilnikom podjetja Atmel. V nalogi je podrobno opisana izvedba in delovanje posameznih elektronskih delov. Predstavljeno je tudi delovanje programske opreme za izbran mikrokrmilnik.

  18. Robot Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Paris, France, June, 1982, 519-530. Latoinbe, J. C. "Equipe Intelligence Artificielle et Robotique: Etat d’avancement des recherches," Laboratoire...8217AD-A127 233 ROBOT PROGRRMMING(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OFGTECHi/ CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB T LOZANO-PEREZ UNCLASSIFIED DC8 AI-9 N884...NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory AREA I WORK UNIT NUMBERS ,. 545 Technology Square Cambridge

  19. Friendly network robotics; Friendly network robotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This paper summarizes the research results on the friendly network robotics in fiscal 1996. This research assumes an android robot as an ultimate robot and the future robot system utilizing computer network technology. The robot aiming at human daily work activities in factories or under extreme environments is required to work under usual human work environments. The human robot with similar size, shape and functions to human being is desirable. Such robot having a head with two eyes, two ears and mouth can hold a conversation with human being, can walk with two legs by autonomous adaptive control, and has a behavior intelligence. Remote operation of such robot is also possible through high-speed computer network. As a key technology to use this robot under coexistence with human being, establishment of human coexistent robotics was studied. As network based robotics, use of robots connected with computer networks was also studied. In addition, the R-cube (R{sup 3}) plan (realtime remote control robot technology) was proposed. 82 refs., 86 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS. We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise.

  1. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  2. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Samani, Hooman; Saadatian, Elham; Pang, Natalie; Polydorou, Doros; Fernando, Owen Noel Newton; Nakatsu, Ryohei; Koh, Jeffrey Tzu Kwan Valino

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. Ac...

  3. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Telis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. As new focal therapies become more popular in treatment of prostate cancer, failure cases requiring salvage therapy with either surgical or other techniques are being reported. Objective. To report the options in treatment of prostate cancer after recurrence or failure of the primary treatment modality. Methods. We report a salvage robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP for prostate cancer recurrence following high intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU in the United States. Results. A 67-year-old man who underwent HIFU treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma 2 years prior was presented with a rising prostate specific antigen of 6.1 ng/mL to our clinic. A biopsy proven recurrent disease in the area of previous treatment documented the failure of treatment. The patient elected to undergo a salvage RALP. The operation time was 159 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1 with no complications. The catheter was removed on post-op day 10. The patient reserved sexual function and urinary continence. The PSA levels on 6 months’ follow-up are undetectable. Conclusions. Salvage RALP is an effective and safe treatment choice for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following failed HIFU treatment if operated by an experienced surgeon.

  4. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy: technique, feasibility, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, José Martín; Perrotta, Myriam; Orti, Roberto; Salvo, Gloria; Giavedoni, María Eugenia; Gogorza, Sebastían; Testa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives are to describe our surgical technique for laparoscopic radical trachelectomy, to evaluate its feasibility, and to present the perioperative results at Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina. We analyzed 4 patients who underwent laparoscopic radical trachelectomy for early-stage cervical cancer between December 2011 and May 2013. Four patients were included in this study. Total laparoscopic radical trachelectomy was performed in all cases. The mean age was 26 years (range, 19-32 years), the mean body mass index was 21 (range, 18-23), and the mean length of hospital stay was 33 hours (range, 24-36 hours). The mean operative time was 225 minutes (range, 210-240 minutes), and no complications were reported. During the postoperative period, only 1 patient presented with left vulvar edema, which resolved spontaneously. The pelvic and parametrial lymph nodes, as well as the vaginal cuff and cervical resection margins, were negative for malignancy in all cases. On average, 18 pelvic lymph nodes (range, 15-20) were removed. The tumor stage was IB in all 4 patients, and the mean tumor size was 17 mm (range, 12-31 mm). No patient required conversion to laparotomy. We consider laparoscopic radical trachelectomy, performed by trained surgeons, a feasible and safe therapeutic option as a fertility-sparing surgical technique, with good perioperative outcomes for women with early-stage cervical cancer with a desire to preserve their fertility. Minimally invasive surgery provides the widely known benefits of this type of approach.

  5. Postoperative C-reactive protein concentration and clinical outcome: comparison of open cystectomy to robot-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy with extracorporeal or intracorporeal urinary diversion in a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingo, Pernille Skjold; Nørregaard, Rikke; Borre, Michael; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to compare clinical outcome and postoperative systemic inflammatory response using C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, to quantify the degree of tissue injury in open mini-laparotomy cystectomy (OMC) versus robot-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy with extracorporeal (RALC-EUD) or intracorporeal urinary diversion (RALC-IUD). From September 2012 to September 2015, 309 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer underwent radical cystectomy with urinary diversion. Of these, 175 patients were eligible for the study and underwent OMC (n = 125), RALC-EUD (n = 12) or RALC-IUD (n = 38). Blood samples were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively on days 1-7. Clinical and perioperative parameters, including demographics, comorbidity, tumour stage and postoperative outcomes, were collected from medical records. Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score and Charlson score were significantly higher in OMC than in the robotic groups (p = 0.020, 0.012 and 0.008, respectively). Other demographic data showed no significant group differences. Estimated blood loss and blood transfusion volume were higher in OMC (p OMC and RALC-EUD (p OMC CRP levels were higher than RALC-EUD. In this study, robotic techniques seem less traumatic overall than open surgery, as OMC had higher postoperative CRP levels than RALC-EUD. The higher CRP levels in RALC-IUD may be more reflective of the urinary diversion technique than the true tissue trauma.

  6. Calibration of Robot Reference Frames for Enhanced Robot Positioning Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Frank Shaopeng

    2008-01-01

    This chapter discussed the importance and methods of conducting robot workcell calibration for enhancing the accuracy of the robot TCP positions in industrial robot applications. It shows that the robot frame transformations define the robot geometric parameters such as joint position variables, link dimensions, and joint offsets in an industrial robot system. The D-H representation allows the robot designer to model the robot motion geometry with the four standard D-H parameters. The robot k...

  7. Gangs, Terrorism, and Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Decker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available What can street gangs tell us about radicalization and extremist groups? At first glance, these two groups seem to push the boundaries of comparison. In this article, we examine the important similarities and differences across criminal, deviant, and extremist groups. Drawing from research on street gangs, this article explores issues such as levels of explanation,organizational structure, group process, and the increasingly important role of technology and the Internet in the context of radicalization. There are points of convergence across these groups, but it is important to understand the differences between these groups. This review finds little evidence to support the contention that American street gangs are becoming increasingly radicalized. This conclusion is based largely on organizational differences between gangs and terror groups.

  8. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radical prostatectomies can result in urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Traditionally, these issues have been studied separately, and the sexual problem that has received the most focus has been erectile dysfunction. AIM: To summarize the literature on sexually related side...... effects and their consequences after radical prostatectomy and focus on the occurrence and management of problems beyond erectile dysfunction. METHODS: The literature on sexuality after radical prostatectomy was reviewed through a Medline search. Original research using quantitative and qualitative...... methodologies was considered. Priority was given to studies exploring aspects of sexuality other than erectile function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The prevalence, predictive factors, and management of post-prostatectomy sexual problems beyond erectile dysfunction. RESULTS: Most patients will develop urinary...

  9. Educational Robotics as Mindtools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikropoulos, Tassos A.; Bellou, Ioanna

    2013-01-01

    Although there are many studies on the constructionist use of educational robotics, they have certain limitations. Some of them refer to robotics education, rather than educational robotics. Others follow a constructionist approach, but give emphasis only to design skills, creativity and collaboration. Some studies use robotics as an educational…

  10. [Surgical approach and sexual outcomes after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillet, K; Lipsker, A; Alezra, E; De Sousa, P; Pignot, G

    2017-04-01

    Radical prostatectomy is curative surgical treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer. The objectives are cancer control, preservation of continence and preservation of sexuality, the combination of the three constituting the Trifecta. The objective of this study was to assess, through the analysis of the literature, the sexual outcomes according to surgical approach: radical prostatectomy by laparotomy (PRL), laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (PRLa) and laparoscopic robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (PRLaRA), when nerve sparing was practiced. An exhaustive and retrospective review of literature was conducted using the Pubmed search with the following keywords: "Prostatic Neoplasms" [Mesh], "Prostatectomy" [Mesh], "Erectile Dysfunction" [Mesh], "Robotics" [Mesh], "Laparoscopy" [Mesh], Nerve sparing. The selected articles were prospective or retrospective series including more than 200 patients, randomized trials and meta-analyses published between 1990 and 2014. A total of 21 prospective studies (6 on PRL, 4 on PRLa and 11 on PRLaRA), 12 retrospective studies (6 on PRL, 1 on PRLa and 5 on PRLaRA), 2 randomized controlled trial and 3 meta-analyses were selected from 1992 to 2013. There was no evidence of the superiority of one surgical approach compared to others in terms of sexuality. Articles with level 1 of scientific evidence have discordant results, due to heterogeneity in the assessment criteria of postoperative sexual function. According to our knowledge, there is currently no difference in terms of sexual outcomes between PRL, PRLA and PRLaRA approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Radical dematerialization and degrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-05-01

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable `degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  12. Homegrown religious radicalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    and their families. Existing literature and ways of thinking about the social psychological process of radicalization will be reviewed, such as social identity theory and transformative learning theory, and a theoretical framework based on a focus on belonging, recognition and the sense of community will be proposed....... The framework will be utilized in an analysis of narratives from youngsters and parents of youngsters who have chosen a radicalized path in life. The paper will shed light on how the sense of and yearning for belonging and recognition have to be taken into account in our understanding of homegrown religious...

  13. Muon substituted free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Gygax, F.N.; Brinkman, G.A.; Louwrier, P.W.F.; McKenna, D.; Ramos, M.; Webster, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    Spin polarized energetic positive muons are injected as magnetic probes into unsaturated organic liquids. They are implemented via fast chemical processes ( -10 s) in various molecules. Of particular interest among these are muonium substituted free radicals. The technique allows determination of accurate rate coefficients for fast chemical reactions of radicals. Furthermore, radiochemical processes occuring in picoseconds after injection of the muon are studied. Of fundamental interest are also the structural and dynamical implications of substituting a proton by a muon, or in other terms, a hydrogen atom by a muonium atom. Selected examples for each of these three types of experiments are given. (Auth.)

  14. Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Omni-Hand was developed by Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The multiple digit hand has an opposable thumb and a flexible wrist. Electric muscles called Minnacs power wrist joints and the interchangeable digits. Two hands have been delivered to NASA for evaluation for potential use on space missions and the unit is commercially available for applications like hazardous materials handling and manufacturing automation. Previous SBIR contracts resulted in the Omni-Wrist and Omni-Wrist II robotic systems, which are commercially available for spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, as well as other uses.

  15. Balanserande robot

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Denna rapport behandlar utveckling av en tvåhjulig balanserande robot. En PID-regulator är implementerad i en mikrokontroller, som även AD-omvandlar en sensorsignal, samt styr motorer via H-bryggor med pulsbreddsmodulering. I rapporten förklaras framtagning av diskret PID-regulator, processorkort, motorkort, val av komponenter och sensor för att mäta robotens vinkel mot ett vertikalplan. Roboten kan balansera stillastående, men behöver kompletteras ytterligare med hjulåterkoppling för att kun...

  16. Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Light Robotics - Structure-Mediated Nanobiophotonics covers the latest means of sculpting of both light and matter for achieving bioprobing and manipulation at the smallest scales. The synergy between photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology spans the rapidly growing field of nanobiophotonics...... how nanophotonics can productively be used in both biomedical and life sciences, allowing readers to clearly see how structure-mediated nanobiophotonics can be used to increase our engineering toolbox for biology at the smallest scales. This book will be of great use to researchers and scientists...

  17. Industrial robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, R.H.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a three axis outer arm assembly for an industrial robot comprising: a hand assembly including a frame member, a transverse wrist pin mounted to the frame member, and a wrist rotary member rotatably mounted with respect to the frame member; a first tubular member, with the wrist pin of the hand assembly being transversely mounted at one end thereof, a second tubular member rotatably mounted coaxially within the first tubular member; first gear means; a second gear means; drive means; and means mounting the second and third tubular members.

  18. Radical Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Benign Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Kavanagh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Whipple's procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple's procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple's procedure during a 15-year period (1987–2002 were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%. One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30–75. The major presenting features included jaundice (five, pain (two, gastric outlet obstruction (one, and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one. Investigations included ultrasound (eight, computerised tomography (eight, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology, and endoscopic ultrasound (two. The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two, chronic pancreatitis (two, choledochal cyst (one, inflammatory pseudotumour (one, cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one, duodenal angiodysplasia (one, and granular cell neoplasm (one. There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one, anastomotic leak (one, liver abscess (one, and myocardial infarction (one. All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple'’s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound–guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA may reduce the need for Whipple's operation in

  19. Radical pancreaticoduodenectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2008-01-01

    Whipple\\'s procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple\\'s procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple\\'s procedure during a 15-year period (1987-2002) were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%). One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30-75). The major presenting features included jaundice (five), pain (two), gastric outlet obstruction (one), and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one). Investigations included ultrasound (eight), computerised tomography (eight), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology), and endoscopic ultrasound (two). The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two), chronic pancreatitis (two), choledochal cyst (one), inflammatory pseudotumour (one), cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one), duodenal angiodysplasia (one), and granular cell neoplasm (one). There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one), anastomotic leak (one), liver abscess (one), and myocardial infarction (one). All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple\\'s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) may reduce the need for Whipple\\'s operation

  20. Impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on complications of minimally invasive radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizée, D; Salas, R S; Barret, E; Galiano, M; Di Trapani, E; Montorsi, F; Cathelineau, X

    2017-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC) before minimally invasive radical cystectomy (MIRC) is considered a standard of care in muscle-invasive bladder cancer or recurrent high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. To evaluate the impact of NC on morbidity and mortality after MIRC. We prospectively evaluated 135 patients who underwent MIRC (laparoscopic: n=100; robotic: n=35) between 2007 and 2013 with ≥90 days of follow-up (median age: 66 year). Complications were analyzed and graded according to the Clavien Dindo classification system. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the impact of NC on postoperative complications. Kaplan-Meier methods with the log-rank test were used for cancer-specific survival probabilities and differences between the 2groups (MIRC with and without NC). Sixty-two of 135 patients received NC. A total of 118 patients (87.4%) developed 179 complications, chiefly infectious (48.0%) or gastrointestinal (21.2%), ≤90 days after surgery; 3 patients died bladder cancer who had NC versus no NC. We did not find any significant differences in terms of early or late complications, length of stay, or reintervention. The oncologic outcomes regarding NC were encouraging. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  1. Robotic Vision for Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  2. Collaborative Robotics Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-06

    traditional manner, by manually reviewing a large number of recent publications in multi-robot research. This effort, while able to consider the...robots." The IEEE multi-robot research groups, above, were manually created within the 354 abstracts file using terms/phrases taken from the text of...Robotics Technologies," [4] Bay, J., Borrelli , L., Chapman, K., Harrold, T., "User Interface and Display Management Design for Multiple Robot Command

  3. Modular Robotic Wearable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    In this concept paper we trace the contours and define a new approach to robotic systems, composed of interactive robotic modules which are somehow worn on the body. We label such a field as Modular Robotic Wearable (MRW). We describe how, by using modular robotics for creating wearable....... Finally, by focusing on the intersection of the combination modular robotic systems, wearability, and bodymind we attempt to explore the theoretical characteristics of such approach and exploit the possible playware application fields....

  4. Single-port, single-operator-light endoscopic robot-assisted laparoscopic urology: pilot study in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet, Sebastien; Haber, Georges-Pascal; White, Wesley M; Kamoi, Kazumi; Goel, Raj K; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2010-03-01

    To present our initial operative experience in which single-port-light endoscopic robot-assisted reconstructive and extirpative urological surgery was performed by one surgeon, using a pig model. This pilot study was conducted in male farm pigs to determine the feasibility and safety of single-port, single-surgeon urological surgery. All pigs had a general anaesthetic and were placed in the flank position. A 2-cm umbilical incision was made, through which a single port was placed and pneumoperitoneum obtained. An operative laparoscope was introduced and securely held using a novel low-profile robot under foot and/or voice control. Using articulating instruments, each pig had bilateral reconstructive and extirpative renal surgery. Salient intraoperative and postmortem data were recorded. Results were analysed statistically to determine if outcomes improved with surgeon experience. Five male farm pigs underwent bilateral partial nephrectomy and bilateral pyeloplasty before a completion bilateral radical nephrectomy. There were no intraoperative complications and there was no need for additional ports to be placed. The mean (range) operative duration for partial nephrectomy, pyeloplasty, and nephrectomy were 120 (100-150), 110 (95-130) and 20 (15-30) min, respectively. The mean (range) estimated blood loss for all procedures was 240 (200-280) mL. The preparation time decreased with increasing number of cases (P = 0.002). The combination of a single-port, a robotic endoscope holder and articulated instruments operated by one surgeon is feasible. With a single-port access, the robot allows more room to the surgeon than an assistant.

  5. Hexapod Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begody, Ericka

    2016-01-01

    The project I am working on at NASA-Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX is a hexapod robot. This project was started by various engineers at the Trick Lab. The goal of this project is to have the hexapod track a yellow ball or possibly another object from left to right and up/down. The purpose is to have it track an object like a real creature. The project will consist of using software and hardware. This project started with a hexapod robot which uses a senor bar to track a yellow ball but with a limited field of vision. The sensor bar acts as the robots "head." Two servos will be added to the hexapod to create flexion and extension of the head. The neck and head servos will have to be programmed to be added to the original memory map of the existing servos. I will be using preexisting code. The main programming language that will be used to add to the preexisting code is C++. The trick modeling and simulation software will also be used in the process to improve its tracking and movement. This project will use a trial and error approach, basically seeing what works and what does not. The first step is to initially understand how the hexapod works. To get a general understanding of how the hexapod maneuvers and plan on how to had a neck and head servo which works with the rest of the body. The second step would be configuring the head and neck servos with the leg servos. During this step, limits will be programmed specifically for the each servo. By doing this, the servo is limited to how far it can rotate both clockwise and counterclockwise and this is to prevent hardware damage. The hexapod will have two modes in which it works in. The first mode will be if the sensor bar does not detect an object. If the object it is programmed to look for is not in its view it will automatically scan from left to right 3 times then up and down once. The second mode will be if the sensor bar does detect the object. In this mode the hexapod will track the object from left to

  6. Violent Radicalization in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    and foiled plots inspired by militant Islamism have grabbed European and American headlines. This article identifies and discusses empirical studies of radicalization and points to the strengths as well as the weaknesses characterizing these studies. The aim is to take stock of the current state of research...

  7. Gnosticism and Radical Feminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahana, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and place demand an explanation; my attempt to do so also takes into account the important differences between the gnostic and the radical feminist postures, notably the latter belief in progress and the former nostalgia for an ungendered era. Both the similarities and the differences, however, may offer...

  8. Counter radicalization development assistance

    OpenAIRE

    van Hippel, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The paper reviews current research and practice and recommends strategies for development agencies working in the Arab and Muslim world. It builds on the basic assumption that the realization of the Millennium Development Goals will be vital to reduce support for terrorism in the long term. Within this overall framework, emphasis is placed on particular programs that could be specifically applied to counter radicalization.

  9. Electromeric rhodium radical complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puschmann, F.F.; Harmer, J.; Stein, D.; Rüegger, H.; de Bruin, B.; Grützmacher, H.

    2010-01-01

    Radical changes: One single P-Rh-P angle determines whether the odd electron in the paramagnetic complex [Rh(trop2PPh)(PPh3)] is delocalized over the whole molecule (see picture, blue) or is localized on the P—Rh unit (red). The two energetically almost degenerate electromers exist in a fast

  10. Radical Behaviorist Epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriff, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Various epistemological positions attributed to radical behaviorism are reviewed, and their problems are discussed. It is suggested that these problems may be resolved by interpreting the criterion of truth generated by a science of behavior as logically analagous to the set of ethical values generated by that science. (Author/DB)

  11. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. [History of robotics: from Archytas of Tarentum until da Vinci robot. (Part I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Martín, F M; Millán Rodríguez, F; Salvador Bayarri, J; Palou Redorta, J; Rodríguez Escovar, F; Esquena Fernández, S; Villavicencio Mavrich, H

    2007-02-01

    Robotic surgery is the newst technologic option in urology. To understand how new robots work is interesting to know their history. The desire to design machines imitating humans continued for more than 4000 years. There are references to King-su Tse (clasic China) making up automaton at 500 a. C. Archytas of Tarentum (at around 400 a.C.) is considered the father of mechanical engineering, and one of the occidental robotics classic referents. Heron of Alexandria, Hsieh-Fec, Al-Jazari, Roger Bacon, Juanelo Turriano, Leonardo da Vinci, Vaucanson o von Kempelen were robot inventors in the middle age, renaissance and classicism. At the XIXth century, automaton production underwent a peak and all engineering branches suffered a great development. At 1942 Asimov published the three robotics laws, based on mechanics, electronics and informatics advances. At XXth century robots able to do very complex self governing works were developed, like da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), a very sophisticated robot to assist surgeons.

  13. Robotic Buccal Ureteroplasty: a Review of the Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldorf, Benjamin; Lee, Ziho; Kidd, Laura; Kaplan, Joshua; Harris, Andrew; Metro, Michael; Liu, Jeffrey; Eun, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature on buccal mucosal ureteroplasty for ureteral stricture disease, with a specific focus on the application of the robotic platform to buccal ureteroplasty. In our review, we highlight the results of Zhao et al. from the New York University School of Medicine Department of Urology, as well as our own results from Temple University Hospital. Zhao et al. published the first series of four patients who underwent robotic buccal ureteroplasty. Mean stricture length was 3.0 cm, and at a mean follow-up of 15 months, all repairs remained patent. We also describe our results in 10 patients who underwent robotic buccal ureteroplasty at Temple University Hospital. Median stricture length was 3.0 cm, and at a median follow-up of 5 months, all repairs remain patent. Robotic buccal ureteroplasty offers a promising option for repair of complex ureteral strictures.

  14. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy in contemporary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef S. Tanagho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic renal surgery is associated with reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, enhanced cosmesis, and more rapid convalescence relative to open renal surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is a minimally invasive, nephron-sparing alternative to laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for the management of small renal masses. While offering similar oncological outcomes to laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, the technical challenges and prolonged learning curve associated with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy limit its wider dissemination. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, although still an evolving procedure with no long-term data, has emerged as a viable alternative to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, with favorable preliminary outcomes. This article provides an overview of the role of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy in the management of renal cell carcinoma. The clinical indications and principles of surgical technique for this procedure are discussed. The oncological, renal functional, and perioperative outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy are also evaluated, as are complication rates.

  15. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    This article offers a conceptual framework to understand radical change. It opens with a typology that defines change in terms of its pace and scope, and defines radical change as the swift transformation of an entire system...

  16. Robotic intelligence kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-11-17

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes a robot intelligence kernel (RIK) that includes a multi-level architecture and a dynamic autonomy structure. The multi-level architecture includes a robot behavior level for defining robot behaviors, that incorporate robot attributes and a cognitive level for defining conduct modules that blend an adaptive interaction between predefined decision functions and the robot behaviors. The dynamic autonomy structure is configured for modifying a transaction capacity between an operator intervention and a robot initiative and may include multiple levels with at least a teleoperation mode configured to maximize the operator intervention and minimize the robot initiative and an autonomous mode configured to minimize the operator intervention and maximize the robot initiative. Within the RIK at least the cognitive level includes the dynamic autonomy structure.

  17. Humanoid Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Strawser, Phillip A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); hide

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a torso, a pair of arms, two hands, a neck, and a head. The torso extends along a primary axis and presents a pair of shoulders. The pair of arms movably extend from a respective one of the pair of shoulders. Each of the arms has a plurality of arm joints. The neck movably extends from the torso along the primary axis. The neck has at least one neck joint. The head movably extends from the neck along the primary axis. The head has at least one head joint. The shoulders are canted toward one another at a shrug angle that is defined between each of the shoulders such that a workspace is defined between the shoulders.

  18. IRC robot

    OpenAIRE

    Rapavý, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Náplní téhle bakalářské práce je analýza aplikačního protokolu IRC, hlavně jeho klientské částí a možností použití. Práce podáva ucelený přehled funkcí IRC robotů a seznam ich jejich současných implementací. Poslední kapitoly rozebírají návrh programu - IRC robota z pohledu klientské části IRC protokolu a také z pohledu možností uživatelské konfigurace. Na závěr práce popisuje implementaci navrhnutého programu. This bachelor's thesis is dedicated to application protocol IRC, mainly to its ...

  19. Robotic single-port transumbilical total hysterectomy: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sang Wun; Lee, Maria; Yim, Ga Won; Paek, Ji Heum; Lee, San Hui; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Jae Wook; Kim, Young Tae

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of robotic single-port transumbilical total hysterectomy using a home-made surgical glove port system. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent robotic single-port transumbilical total hysterectomy between January 2010 and July 2010. All surgical procedures were performed through a single 3-4-cm umbilical incision, with a multi-channel system consisting of a wound retractor, a surgical glove, and two 10/12-mm and t...

  20. Pentafecta rates of three-dimensional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: our experience after 150 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Andrea; Varca, Virginia; Simonato, Alchiede; Terrone, Carlo; Gregori, Andrea

    2017-04-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) laparoscopy with a flexible camera was developed to overcome the main limitation of traditional laparoscopic surgery, which is two-dimensional (2D) vision.The aim of our article is to present the largest casistic of 3D laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) available in literature and evaluate our results in terms of pentafecta and compare it with the literature. We retrospectively evaluated consecutive patients who underwent LRP with 3D technology between March 2014 and December 2015. Total operative time (TOT), anasthomosis time (AT), blood loss and complications were registered. All patients presented at least 3 months of follow-up. Surgical outcome was evaluated in terms of Pentafecta. One hundred fifty consecutive patients underwent 3D LRP. Mean follow-up was 16.9 months. Mean age was 67.7 ± 8.3 years (range 50-76). Mean preoperative PSA value was 8.3 ± 5.8 ng/ml and mean bioptic Gleason Score (GS) was 6.6. We had a mean TOT of 158 ± 23 minutes and a mean AT of 25 ± 12.6. Mean blood loss was 240 ± 40 ml. Eighteen (12%) postoperative complications occurred. Pathologic results: pT2 in 91 patients (58%) and pT3 in 59 (39.3%). Pentafecta was reached by 31.3% of patients at 3 months and 51.6% at 12 months. Our oncological and functional results are comparable to those present in literature for laparoscopic and robotic surgery. We believe that our findings can encourage the use of 3D laparoscopy especially considering the increasing attention to healthcare costs.

  1. [Efficiency, risks, and advantages of using robotic support systems in interventional medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feussner, H; Can, S; Fiolka, A; Schneider, A; Wilhelm, D

    2010-08-01

    During the past decade, robotic systems were evaluated for the first time in practically all surgical disciplines. With only a few exceptions (radical prostatectomy), mechatronic systems did not achieve a breakthrough in any field of application. Second generation robotic devices with better integration of complementary technologies (preoperative therapy planning, intraoperative diagnostic work-up, navigation, etc.) and augmented functionality are now ready to be introduced into clinical practice. It is hoped that the specific advantages of robotics will result in increased use compared to previous systems. Robotics is a key technology if new surgical strategies ("scarless surgery") are to succeed.

  2. Anatomical location of metastatic lymph nodes: an indispensable prognostic factor for gastric cancer patients who underwent curative resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bochao; Zhang, Jingting; Zhang, Jiale; Chen, Xiuxiu; Chen, Junqing; Wang, Zhenning; Xu, Huimian; Huang, Baojun

    2018-02-01

    Although the numeric-based lymph node (LN) staging was widely used in the worldwide, it did not represent the anatomical location of metastatic lymph nodes (MLNs) and not reflect extent of LN dissection. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether the anatomical location of MLNs was still necessary to evaluate the prognosis of node-positive gastric cancer (GC) patients. We reviewed 1451 GC patients who underwent radical gastrectomy in our institution between January 1986 and January 2008. All patients were reclassified into several groups according to the anatomical location of MLNs and the number of MLNs. The prognostic differences between different patient groups were compared and clinicopathologic features were analyzed. In the present study, both anatomical location of MLNs and the number of MLNs were identified as the independent prognostic factors (p location of MLNs was considered (p location of MLNs had no significant effect on the prognosis of these patients, the higher number of MLNs in the extraperigastric area was correlated with the unfavorable prognosis (p location of MLNs was an important factor influencing the prognostic outcome of GC patients. To provide more accurate prognostic information for GC patients, the anatomical location of MLNs should not be ignored.

  3. Robotics Potential Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Lucero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This problem was to calculate the path a robot would take to navigate an obstacle field and get to its goal. Three obstacles were given as negative potential fields which the robot avoided, and a goal was given a positive potential field that attracted the robot. The robot decided each step based on its distance, angle, and influence from every object. After each step, the robot recalculated and determined its next step until it reached its goal. The robot's calculations and steps were simulated with Microsoft Excel.

  4. Adoption of robotics in a general surgery residency program: at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, J Hunter; Michaels, Alex D; Mullen, Matthew G; Yount, Kenan W; Meneveau, Max O; Smith, Philip W; Friel, Charles M; Schirmer, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Robotic technology is increasingly being utilized by general surgeons. However, the impact of introducing robotics to surgical residency has not been examined. This study aims to assess the financial costs and training impact of introducing robotics at an academic general surgery residency program. All patients who underwent laparoscopic or robotic cholecystectomy, ventral hernia repair (VHR), and inguinal hernia repair (IHR) at our institution from 2011-2015 were identified. The effect of robotic surgery on laparoscopic case volume was assessed with linear regression analysis. Resident participation, operative time, hospital costs, and patient charges were also evaluated. We identified 2260 laparoscopic and 139 robotic operations. As the volume of robotic cases increased, the number of laparoscopic cases steadily decreased. Residents participated in all laparoscopic cases and 70% of robotic cases but operated from the robot console in only 21% of cases. Mean operative time was increased for robotic cholecystectomy (+22%), IHR (+55%), and VHR (+61%). Financial analysis revealed higher median hospital costs per case for robotic cholecystectomy (+$411), IHR (+$887), and VHR (+$1124) as well as substantial associated fixed costs. Introduction of robotic surgery had considerable negative impact on laparoscopic case volume and significantly decreased resident participation. Increased operative time and hospital costs are substantial. An institution must be cognizant of these effects when considering implementing robotics in departments with a general surgery residency program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  6. Advanced mechanics in robotic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nava Rodríguez, Nestor Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Illustrates original and ambitious mechanical designs and techniques for the development of new robot prototypes Includes numerous figures, tables and flow charts Discusses relevant applications in robotics fields such as humanoid robots, robotic hands, mobile robots, parallel manipulators and human-centred robots

  7. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery: recent advances in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autorino, Riccardo; Zargar, Homayoun; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize recent developments in the field of urologic robotic surgery. A nonsystematic literature review was performed to retrieve publications related to robotic surgery in urology and evidence-based critical analysis was conducted by focusing on the literature of the past 5 years. The use of the da Vinci Surgical System, a robotic surgical system, has been implemented for the entire spectrum of extirpative and reconstructive laparoscopic kidney procedures. The robotic approach can be applied for a range of adrenal indications as well as for ureteral diseases, including benign and malignant conditions affecting the proximal, mid, and distal ureter. Current evidence suggests that robotic prostatectomy is associated with less blood loss compared with the open surgery. Besides prostate cancer, robotics has been used for simple prostatectomy in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Recent studies suggest that minimally invasive radical cystectomy provides encouraging oncologic outcomes mirroring those reported for open surgery. In recent years, the evolution of robotic surgery has enabled urologic surgeons to perform urinary diversions intracorporeally. Robotic vasectomy reversal and several other robotic andrological applications are being explored. In summary, robotic-assisted surgery is an emerging and safe technology for most urologic operations. The acceptance of robotic prostatectomy during the past decade has paved the way for urologists to explore the entire spectrum of extirpative and reconstructive urologic procedures. Cost remains a significant issue that could be solved by wider dissemination of the technology. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hernia repair during endoscopic (laparoscopic) radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Rabenalt, Robert; Dietel, Anja; Do, Minh; Pfeiffer, Heidemarie; Schwalbe, Steffen; Dorschner, Wolfgang

    2003-02-01

    We retrospectively reviewed our experience in performing endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) and totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair in one procedure to evaluate its feasibility and safety. Based on our experience of 70 laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, a total of 60 patients underwent EERPE. Eight of these had 10 hernias repaired with Prolene mesh. The median total operating time for EERPE was 165 minutes. Mesh placement required an additional 15 minutes for a unilateral hernia and 25 minutes for bilateral hernias. The conversion rate and the reoperation rate were 0%. The median duration of vesical catheterization was 8.3 days. One patient required a blood transfusion. The most common minor complications, occurring in eight patients, were edema and hematoma of the penis. No wound infection occurred. The only major complication was a deep venous thrombosis in one patient. No additional complications developed in the hernioplasty group. We conclude that the extraperitoneal approach for radical prostatectomy allows concomitant inguinal hernia repair with a low morbidity rate and within an acceptable operating time.

  9. Transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: ascending technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, J; Marrero, R; Hammady, A; Erdogru, T; Teber, D; Frede, T

    2004-09-01

    To demonstrate the operative steps of transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with the ascending approach (Heilbronn technique). The technique is based on our experience with more than 1000 cases of clinically localized prostate cancer from March 1999 to April 2004. The technical steps, instrumental requirements, patient data, complications, and reintervention rate were reviewed. The principles of the technique include the routine use of a voice-controlled robot (AESOP) for the camera, exposure of the prostatic apex with 120 degree retracting forceps, free-hand suturing for Santorini plexus control, application of 5-mm clips during the nerve-sparing technique, control of the prostatic pedicles by 12-mm Hem-o-Lock clips, the bladder neck-sparing technique in patients with stage T1c and T2a tumors, and use of interrupted sutures for the urethrovesical anastomosis. A considerable improvement was observed when comparing the first 300 with the most recent 300 cases (mean operating time 280 v 208 minutes; conversion rate 2.7% v 0.3%; reintervention rate 3.7% v 1.0%). Through our experience with more than 1000 cases, transperitoneal access for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has proven to be feasible and transferable with results comparable to those of the original open approach. Besides the well-known advantages of minimally invasive surgery, the video endoscopic approach may offer further benefits in permitting optimization of the technique by video assessment.

  10. Robots Social Embodiment in Autonomous Mobile Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Duffy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at demonstrating the inherent advantages of embracing a strong notion of social embodiment in designing a real-world robot control architecture with explicit ?intelligent? social behaviour between a collective of robots. It develops the current thinking on embodiment beyond the physical by demonstrating the importance of social embodiment. A social framework develops the fundamental social attributes found when more than one robot co-inhabit a physical space. The social metaphors of identity, character, stereotypes and roles are presented and implemented within a real-world social robot paradigm in order to facilitate the realisation of explicit social goals.

  11. Robotics_MobileRobot Navigation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Robots and rovers exploring planets need to autonomously navigate to specified locations. Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc. (ASC) and the University of Minnesota...

  12. Radical distinction : Support for radical left and radical right parties in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooduijn, Matthijs; Burgoon, Brian; van Elsas, Erika J.; van de Werfhorst, Herman G.

    2017-01-01

    Support for radical parties on both the left and right is on the rise, fueling intuition that both radicalisms have similar underpinnings. Indeed, existing studies show that radical left and right voters have overlapping positions and preferences. In this article, however, we focus on the

  13. "Integrative Social Robotics"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibt, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to sketch the basic motivations for “Integrative Social Robotics” (ISR), as a new paradigm for how to approach research, design, and development of social robotics applications that are culturally sustainable. I argue that social robotics saddles us with normative......-regulatory and descriptive questions that currently are kept too far apart. Currently HRI research investigates what social robots can do and robo-ethicists deliberate afterwards what robots should do. However, given the rapid pace of the robotics industry, descriptive and regulatory questions must be treated in combination....... On the ISR approach research in social robotics turns on what social robots can and should do--design and development are from the very beginning informed by value-theoretic and cultural research. ISR thus is a form of research organization that integrates robotics with empirical, conceptual, and value...

  14. Open middleware for robotics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namoshe, M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in recent years, autonomous multi-robot systems remain classed as complex systems, because control and coordination of these systems remain a challenging task. Autonomous mobile robot houses heterogeneous sets of connected modular...

  15. Robot skills for manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Rath; Nalpantidis, Lazaros; Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Due to a general shift in manufacturing paradigm from mass production towards mass customization, reconfigurable automation technologies, such as robots, are required. However, current industrial robot solutions are notoriously difficult to program, leading to high changeover times when new......-asserting robot skills for manufacturing. We show how a relatively small set of skills are derived from current factory worker instructions, and how these can be transferred to industrial mobile manipulators. General robot skills can not only be implemented on these robots, but also be intuitively concatenated...... to program the robots to perform a variety of tasks, through the use of simple task-level programming methods. We demonstrate various approaches to this, extensively tested with several people inexperienced in robotics. We validate our findings through several deployments of the complete robot system...

  16. Springer handbook of robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Khatib, Oussama

    2016-01-01

    The second edition of this handbook provides a state-of-the-art cover view on the various aspects in the rapidly developing field of robotics. Reaching for the human frontier, robotics is vigorously engaged in the growing challenges of new emerging domains. Interacting, exploring, and working with humans, the new generation of robots will increasingly touch people and their lives. The credible prospect of practical robots among humans is the result of the scientific endeavour of a half a century of robotic developments that established robotics as a modern scientific discipline. The ongoing vibrant expansion and strong growth of the field during the last decade has fueled this second edition of the Springer Handbook of Robotics. The first edition of the handbook soon became a landmark in robotics publishing and won the American Association of Publishers PROSE Award for Excellence in Physical Sciences & Mathematics as well as the organization’s Award for Engineering & Technology. The second edition o...

  17. CMS cavern inspection robot

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Robots which are immune to the CMS cavern environment, wirelessly controlled: -One actuated by smart materials (Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites and Macro Fiber Composites) -One regular brushed DC rover -One servo-driven rover -Stair-climbing robot

  18. Project ROBOTICS 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    Mathematical modelling of Alto Robot, direct- and inverse kinematic transformation,simulation and path control applying MATLAB/SIMULINK.......Mathematical modelling of Alto Robot, direct- and inverse kinematic transformation,simulation and path control applying MATLAB/SIMULINK....

  19. Project Tasks in Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben; Hansen, Poul Erik

    1998-01-01

    Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics......Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics...

  20. Reducing robotic guidance during robot-assisted gait training improves gait function: a case report on a stroke survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Kotsapouikis, Despina; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Rymer, William Z

    2013-06-01

    To test the feasibility of patient-cooperative robotic gait training for improving locomotor function of a chronic stroke survivor with severe lower-extremity motor impairments. Single-subject crossover design. Performed in a controlled laboratory setting. A 62-year-old man with right temporal lobe ischemic stroke was recruited for this study. The baseline lower-extremity Fugl-Meyer score of the subject was 10 on a scale of 34, which represented severe impairment in the paretic leg. However, the subject had a good ambulation level (community walker with the aid of a stick cane and ankle-foot orthosis) and showed no signs of sensory or cognitive impairments. The subject underwent 12 sessions (3 times per week for 4wk) of conventional robotic training with the Lokomat, where the robot provided full assistance to leg movements while walking, followed by 12 sessions (3 times per week for 4wk) of patient-cooperative robotic control training, where the robot provided minimal guidance to leg movements during walking. Clinical outcomes were evaluated before the start of the intervention, immediately after 4 weeks of conventional robotic training, and immediately after 4 weeks of cooperative control robotic training. These included: (1) self-selected and fast walking speed, (2) 6-minute walk test, (3) Timed Up & Go test, and (4) lower-extremity Fugl-Meyer score. Results showed that clinical outcomes changed minimally after full guidance robotic training, but improved considerably after 4 weeks of reduced guidance robotic training. The findings from this case study suggest that cooperative control robotic training is superior to conventional robotic training and is a feasible option to restoring locomotor function in ambulatory stroke survivors with severe motor impairments. A larger trial is needed to verify the efficacy of this advanced robotic control strategy in facilitating gait recovery after stroke. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  1. Open versus robotic cystectomy: Comparison of outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel B. Davis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Open radical cystectomy (ORC is the current gold standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer. As surgeons become more proficient in minimally invasive and robotic surgical techniques, the number of patients undergoing robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is increasing. Although minimally invasive methods are on the rise, research that critically compares open surgery with robotic methods is limited. In this review, we surveyed and appraised the current literature comparing ORC and RARC with regards to perioperative, functional, and oncologic outcomes in order to distinguish the benefits and disadvantages of each method. Here we report that RARC is associated with several perioperative advantages over ORC such as lower estimated blood loss and transfusion rate, and possibly faster gastrointestinal recovery, lower narcotic requirement, and shorter length of stay. ORC is less costly and permits less time in the operating room. Recent data suggests that there is no difference between ORC and RARC when comparing urinary continence and postoperative quality of life. Moreover, ORC and RARC are both associated with similar rates of obtaining positive surgical margins, lymph node yield, and recurrence. However, RARC patients had an increased likelihood of having distant metastases to extrapelvic lymph nodes and the peritoneum. At this point, it is unclear if ORC or RARC has superior patient outcomes, and more research is needed to ascertain management-altering conclusions.

  2. MODULAR MANIPULATOR FOR ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph W. Geisinger, Ph.D.

    2001-07-31

    ARM Automation, Inc. is developing a framework of modular actuators that can address the DOE's wide range of robotics needs. The objective of this effort is to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology by constructing a manipulator from these actuators within a glovebox for Automated Plutonium Processing (APP). At the end of the project, the system of actuators was used to construct several different manipulator configurations, which accommodate common glovebox tasks such as repackaging. The modular nature and quickconnects of this system simplify installation into ''hot'' boxes and any potential modifications or repair therein. This work focused on the development of self-contained robotic actuator modules including the embedded electronic controls for the purpose of building a manipulator system. Both of the actuators developed under this project contain the control electronics, sensors, motor, gear train, wiring, system communications and mechanical interfaces of a complete robotics servo device. Test actuators and accompanying DISC{trademark}s underwent validation testing at The University of Texas at Austin and ARM Automation, Inc. following final design and fabrication. The system also included custom links, an umbilical cord, an open architecture PC-based system controller, and operational software that permitted integration into a completely functional robotic manipulator system. The open architecture on which this system is based avoids proprietary interfaces and communication protocols which only serve to limit the capabilities and flexibility of automation equipment. The system was integrated and tested in the contractor's facility for intended performance and operations. The manipulator was tested using the full-scale equipment and process mock-ups. The project produced a practical and operational system including a quantitative evaluation of its performance and cost.

  3. MODULAR MANIPULATOR FOR ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisinger, Joseph W. Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    ARM Automation, Inc. is developing a FR-amework of modular actuators that can address the DOE's wide range of robotics needs. The objective of this effort is to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology by constructing a manipulator FR-om these actuators within a glovebox for Automated Plutonium Processing (APP). At the end of the project, the system of actuators was used to construct several different manipulator configurations, which accommodate common glovebox tasks such as repackaging. The modular nature and quickconnects of this system simplify installation into ''hot'' boxes and any potential modifications or repair therein. This work focused on the development of self-contained robotic actuator modules including the embedded electronic controls for the purpose of building a manipulator system. Both of the actuators developed under this project contain the control electronics, sensors, motor, gear train, wiring, system communications and mechanical interfaces of a complete robotics servo device. Test actuators and accompanying DISC(trademark)s underwent validation testing at The University of Texas at Austin and ARM Automation, Inc. following final design and fabrication. The system also included custom links, an umbilical cord, an open architecture PC-based system controller, and operational software that permitted integration into a completely functional robotic manipulator system. The open architecture on which this system is based avoids proprietary interfaces and communication protocols which only serve to limit the capabilities and flexibility of automation equipment. The system was integrated and tested in the contractor's facility for intended performance and operations. The manipulator was tested using the full-scale equipment and process mock-ups. The project produced a practical and operational system including a quantitative evaluation of its performance and cost

  4. Evolution of robotic arms

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of surgical robotics is in the development of the robotic arm. This is a thorough review of the literature on the nature and development of this device with emphasis on surgical applications. We have reviewed the published literature and classified robotic arms by their application: show, industrial application, medical application, etc. There is a definite trend in the manufacture of robotic arms toward more dextrous devices, more degrees-of-freedom, and capabilities beyond th...

  5. Autonomous Robot Retrieval System

    OpenAIRE

    Ahern, S.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile robots are increasingly being deployed in environments hazardous to humans. However, many of these robots require remote control operation or are tethered, requiring the human operator to remain within a potentially hazardous radius of the area of operation. To resolve this issue an Autonomous Robot Retrieval System (ARRS) utilising Open RatSLAM based on the Lego NXT 2.0 robotics platform is proposed but could not be implemented due to memory limitations of the hardware. An occupancy g...

  6. Industrial Robot Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Stenmark, Maj

    2013-01-01

    When robots are working in dynamic environments, close to humans lacking extensive knowledge of robotics, there is a strong need to simplify the user interaction and make the system execute as autonomously as possible. For industrial robots working side-by-side with humans in manufacturing industry, AI systems are necessary to lower the demand on programming time and expertise. One central concept in knowledge modeling for robots is action representation. In this paper, we describe ou...

  7. Micro robot bible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jin Yeong

    2000-08-01

    This book deals with micro robot, which tells of summary of robots like entertainment robots and definition of robots, introduction of micro mouse about history, composition and rules, summary of micro controller with its history, appearance and composition, introduction of stepping motor about types, structure, basic characteristics, and driving ways, summary of sensor section, power, understanding of 80C196KC micro controller, basic driving program searching a maze algorithm, smooth turn and making of tracer line.

  8. Micro robot bible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin Yeong

    2000-08-15

    This book deals with micro robot, which tells of summary of robots like entertainment robots and definition of robots, introduction of micro mouse about history, composition and rules, summary of micro controller with its history, appearance and composition, introduction of stepping motor about types, structure, basic characteristics, and driving ways, summary of sensor section, power, understanding of 80C196KC micro controller, basic driving program searching a maze algorithm, smooth turn and making of tracer line.

  9. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  10. Robots in the Roses

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    2014-04 Robots in the Roses A CRUSER Sponsored Event. The 4th Annual Robots in the Roses provides a venue for Faculty & NPS Students to showcase unmanned systems research (current or completed) and recruit NPS Students to join in researching on your project. Posters, robots, vehicles, videos, and even just plain humans welcome! Families are welcome to attend Robots in the Roses as we'll have a STEM activity for children to participate in.

  11. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

  12. Robots at Work

    OpenAIRE

    Graetz, Georg; Michaels, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Despite ubiquitous discussions of robots' potential impact, there is almost no systematic empirical evidence on their economic effects. In this paper we analyze for the first time the economic impact of industrial robots, using new data on a panel of industries in 17 countries from 1993-2007. We find that industrial robots increased both labor productivity and value added. Our panel identification is robust to numerous controls, and we find similar results instrumenting increased robot use wi...

  13. Robot 2015 : Second Iberian Robotics Conference : Advances in Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, António; Lima, Pedro; Montano, Luis; Muñoz-Martinez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This book contains a selection of papers accepted for presentation and discussion at ROBOT 2015: Second Iberian Robotics Conference, held in Lisbon, Portugal, November 19th-21th, 2015. ROBOT 2015 is part of a series of conferences that are a joint organization of SPR – “Sociedade Portuguesa de Robótica/ Portuguese Society for Robotics”, SEIDROB – Sociedad Española para la Investigación y Desarrollo de la Robótica/ Spanish Society for Research and Development in Robotics and CEA-GTRob – Grupo Temático de Robótica/ Robotics Thematic Group. The conference organization had also the collaboration of several universities and research institutes, including: University of Minho, University of Porto, University of Lisbon, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, University of Aveiro, University of Zaragoza, University of Malaga, LIACC, INESC-TEC and LARSyS. Robot 2015 was focussed on the Robotics scientific and technological activities in the Iberian Peninsula, although open to research and delegates from other...

  14. Robotic hand and fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  15. Building a Better Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navah, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Kids love to build robots, letting their imaginations run wild with thoughts of what they might look like and what they could be programmed to do. Yet when students use cereal boxes and found objects to make robots, often the projects look too similar and tend to fall apart. This alternative allows students to "build" robots in a different way,…

  16. Next generation light robotic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Conventional robotics provides machines and robots that can replace and surpass human performance in repetitive, difficult, and even dangerous tasks at industrial assembly lines, hazardous environments, or even at remote planets. A new class of robotic systems no longer aims to replace humans...

  17. Learning robotics using Python

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Lentin

    2015-01-01

    If you are an engineer, a researcher, or a hobbyist, and you are interested in robotics and want to build your own robot, this book is for you. Readers are assumed to be new to robotics but should have experience with Python.

  18. Robots de servicio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Aracil

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El término Robots de Servicio apareció a finales de los años 80 como una necesidad de desarrollar máquinas y sistemas capaces de trabajar en entornos diferentes a los fabriles. Los Robots de Servicio tenían que poder trabajar en entornos noestructurados, en condiciones ambientales cambiantes y con una estrecha interacción con los humanos. En 1995 fue creado por la IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, el Technical Committee on Service Robots, y este comité definió en el año 2000 las áreas de aplicación de los Robots de Servicios, que se pueden dividir en dos grandes grupos: 1 sectores productivos no manufactureros tales como edificación, agricultura, naval, minería, medicina, etc. y 2 sectores de servicios propiamente dichos: asistencia personal, limpieza, vigilancia, educación, entretenimiento, etc. En este trabajo se hace una breve revisión de los principales conceptos y aplicaciones de los robots de servicio. Palabras clave: Robots de servicio, robots autónomos, robots de exteriores, robots de educación y entretenimiento, robots caminantes y escaladores, robots humanoides

  19. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-04

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Day case laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Abboudi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the feasibility of performing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP as a day case procedure while maintaining patient satisfaction and safety. Herein we report our experience, selection criteria, and discharge criteria for day case LRP. Methods: We performed a prospective study with 32 patients undergoing extraperitoneal LRP. These patients were counselled before the procedure that they would go home the same evening of the procedure. Pain scores and quality of life data were recorded day 1 postoperatively via a telephone consultation. The patients underwent routine blood tests on day 2 and an outpatient review on day 7 and regularly thereafter via an assigned key worker. Socio-demographic data, comorbidities, and outcomes were collected for analysis. Results: All patients were successfully discharged the same day of surgery. Mean patient age was 62 years with a mean body mass index of 25. Mean operative time was 147 minutes, and estimated blood loss was 101 ml. Three patients were treated for post operative urinary tract infections; two patients developed infected lymphoceles which required percutaneous drainage and one patient required re-catheterisation due to a burst catheter balloon. Of these six complications four patients required re-admission. Post-operative pain, nausea and vomiting were low whilst patient satisfaction scores were unanimously high in all patients surveyed. Conclusions: The early experience with extraperitoneal LRP as a same day surgery is promising although patients who are at high risk of lymphocele should be excluded. Preoperative patient counselling and selection is paramount. Patient satisfaction is not adversely affected by the shortened stay. Surgeon experience, a well-motivated patient, meticulous attention to detail through an integrated pathway, a multidisciplinary team and adequate postoperative assessment are essential.

  1. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  2. Robot-assisted procedures in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedictis, Alessandro; Trezza, Andrea; Carai, Andrea; Genovese, Elisabetta; Procaccini, Emidio; Messina, Raffaella; Randi, Franco; Cossu, Silvia; Esposito, Giacomo; Palma, Paolo; Amante, Paolina; Rizzi, Michele; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE During the last 3 decades, robotic technology has rapidly spread across several surgical fields due to the continuous evolution of its versatility, stability, dexterity, and haptic properties. Neurosurgery pioneered the development of robotics, with the aim of improving the quality of several procedures requiring a high degree of accuracy and safety. Moreover, robot-guided approaches are of special interest in pediatric patients, who often have altered anatomy and challenging relationships between the diseased and eloquent structures. Nevertheless, the use of robots has been rarely reported in children. In this work, the authors describe their experience using the ROSA device (Robotized Stereotactic Assistant) in the neurosurgical management of a pediatric population. METHODS Between 2011 and 2016, 116 children underwent ROSA-assisted procedures for a variety of diseases (epilepsy, brain tumors, intra- or extraventricular and tumor cysts, obstructive hydrocephalus, and movement and behavioral disorders). Each patient received accurate preoperative planning of optimal trajectories, intraoperative frameless registration, surgical treatment using specific instruments held by the robotic arm, and postoperative CT or MR imaging. RESULTS The authors performed 128 consecutive surgeries, including implantation of 386 electrodes for stereo-electroencephalography (36 procedures), neuroendoscopy (42 procedures), stereotactic biopsy (26 procedures), pallidotomy (12 procedures), shunt placement (6 procedures), deep brain stimulation procedures (3 procedures), and stereotactic cyst aspiration (3 procedures). For each procedure, the authors analyzed and discussed accuracy, timing, and complications. CONCLUSIONS To the best their knowledge, the authors present the largest reported series of pediatric neurosurgical cases assisted by robotic support. The ROSA system provided improved safety and feasibility of minimally invasive approaches, thus optimizing the surgical

  3. Dissociation or cyclization: options for a triad of radicals released from oxime carbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBurney, Roy T; Walton, John C

    2013-05-15

    A set of oxime carbamates having N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl substituents were prepared via carbonyldiimidazole intermediates. It was shown by EPR spectroscopy that they underwent clean homolysis of their N-O bonds upon UV photolysis. During photolysis of acetophenone O-allylcarbamoyl oxime, the corresponding oxazolidin-2-onylmethyl radical was detected by EPR spectroscopy, providing the first evidence that N-monosubstituted carbamoyloxyl radicals can hold their structural integrity. N,N-Disubstituted carbamoyloxyl radicals dissociated rapidly at the lowest accessible temperatures. Above room temperature, both types of oxime carbamate acted as selective new precursors for aminyl and iminyl radicals. Rate parameters were measured for 5-exo cyclization of N-benzyl-N-pent-4-enylaminyl radicals; the rate constant was smaller than for C-centered and O-centered analogues. Oxime carbamates derived from the volatile diethylamine afforded aryliminyl radicals that proved convenient for phenanthridine preparations.

  4. Advances in robot kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Khatib, Oussama

    2014-01-01

    The topics addressed in this book cover the whole range of kinematic analysis, synthesis and design and consider robotic systems possessing serial, parallel and cable driven mechanisms. The robotic systems range from being less than fully mobile to kinematically redundant to overconstrained.  The fifty-six contributions report the latest results in robot kinematics with emphasis on emerging areas such as design and control of humanoids or humanoid subsystems. The book is of interest to researchers wanting to bring their knowledge up to date regarding modern topics in one of the basic disciplines in robotics, which relates to the essential property of robots, the motion of mechanisms.

  5. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  6. Robots and Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Putnam, Lance Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    We describe the design of an undergraduate course in art and robotics that aims to integrate basic concepts of computer science, robotics and art installation for undergraduate students within the problem-based learning model. Our methodology aims to bridge the gap that separates humanities from...... computer science and engineering education to prepare students to address real world problems in robotics, including human-robotic interaction and HCI. Given the proliferation of interactive, systems-based art works and the continued interest in human-centered factors in robotics research (such...

  7. Low cost submarine robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponlachart Chotikarn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A submarine robot is a semi-autonomous submarine robot used mainly for marine environmental research. We aim todevelop a low cost, semi-autonomous submarine robot which is able to travel underwater. The robot’s structure was designedand patented using a novel idea of the diving system employing a volume adjustment mechanism to vary the robot’s density.A light weight, flexibility and small structure provided by PVC can be used to construct the torpedo-liked shape robot.Hydraulic seal and O-ring rubbers are used to prevent water leaking. This robot is controlled by a wired communicationsystem.

  8. Teleoperated Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan GRUSHKO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Article describes technical solution of teleoperated humanoid robotic system. To acquire position data of operator’s body Kinect sensor is used. In article are described mathematical equations used to transform data from Kinect sensor to positions of each servomotor of the robot. Article also describes software and electric structure for both components of the system: robot and operator’s PC. All software solutions are developed using C#. For dynamic simulation of the system a detailed model of the robot has been created in V-Rep, simulation receives same data as real robot.

  9. Walking control of small size humanoid robot: HAJIME ROBOT 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hajime; Nakatsu, Ryohei

    2007-12-01

    HAJIME ROBOT 18 is a fully autonomous biped robot. It has been developed for RoboCup which is a worldwide soccer competition of robots. It is necessary for a robot to have high mobility to play soccer. High speed walking and all directional walking are important to approach and to locate in front of a ball. HAJIME ROBOT achieved these walking. This paper describes walking control of a small size humanoid robot 'HAJIME ROBOT 18' and shows the measurement result of ZMP (Zero Moment Point). HAJIME ROBOT won the Robotics Society of Japan Award in RoboCup 2005 and in RoboCup 2006 Japan Open.

  10. Robots and lattice automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The book gives a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art research and engineering in theory and application of Lattice Automata in design and control of autonomous Robots. Automata and robots share the same notional meaning. Automata (originated from the latinization of the Greek word “αυτόματον”) as self-operating autonomous machines invented from ancient years can be easily considered the first steps of robotic-like efforts. Automata are mathematical models of Robots and also they are integral parts of robotic control systems. A Lattice Automaton is a regular array or a collective of finite state machines, or automata. The Automata update their states by the same rules depending on states of their immediate neighbours. In the context of this book, Lattice Automata are used in developing modular reconfigurable robotic systems, path planning and map exploration for robots, as robot controllers, synchronisation of robot collectives, robot vision, parallel robotic actuators. All chapters are...

  11. Robotic-assisted surgery in gynecologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Abdulrahman K; Fader, Amanda N

    2014-10-01

    The quest for improved patient outcomes has been a driving force for adoption of novel surgical innovations across surgical subspecialties. Gynecologic oncology is one such surgical discipline in which minimally invasive surgery has had a robust and evolving role in defining standards of care. Robotic-assisted surgery has developed during the past two decades as a more technologically advanced form of minimally invasive surgery in an effort to mitigate the limitations of conventional laparoscopy and improved patient outcomes. Robotically assisted technology offers potential advantages that include improved three-dimensional stereoscopic vision, wristed instruments that improve surgeon dexterity, and tremor canceling software that improves surgical precision. These technological advances may allow the gynecologic oncology surgeon to perform increasingly radical oncologic surgeries in complex patients. However, the platform is not without limitations, including high cost, lack of haptic feedback, and the requirement for additional training to achieve competence. This review describes the role of robotic-assisted surgery in the management of endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancer, with an emphasis on comparison with laparotomy and conventional laparoscopy. The literature on novel robotic innovations, special patient populations, cost effectiveness, and fellowship training is also appraised critically in this regard. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Distributed Robotics Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Distributed robotics takes many forms, for instance, multirobots, modular robots, and self-reconfigurable robots. The understanding and development of such advanced robotic systems demand extensive knowledge in engineering and computer science. In this paper, we describe the concept...... of a distributed educational system as a valuable tool for introducing students to interactive parallel and distributed processing programming as the foundation for distributed robotics and human-robot interaction development. This is done by providing an educational tool that enables problem representation...... to be changed, related to multirobot control and human-robot interaction control from virtual to physical representation. The proposed system is valuable for bringing a vast number of issues into education – such as parallel programming, distribution, communication protocols, master dependency, connectivity...

  13. Marine Robot Autonomy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Autonomy for Marine Robots provides a timely and insightful overview of intelligent autonomy in marine robots. A brief history of this emerging field is provided, along with a discussion of the challenges unique to the underwater environment and their impact on the level of intelligent autonomy required.  Topics covered at length examine advanced frameworks, path-planning, fault tolerance, machine learning, and cooperation as relevant to marine robots that need intelligent autonomy.  This book also: Discusses and offers solutions for the unique challenges presented by more complex missions and the dynamic underwater environment when operating autonomous marine robots Includes case studies that demonstrate intelligent autonomy in marine robots to perform underwater simultaneous localization and mapping  Autonomy for Marine Robots is an ideal book for researchers and engineers interested in the field of marine robots.      

  14. VI.3. Rehabilitation robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munih, Marko; Bajd, Tadej

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the background, main achievements and components of rehabilitation robotics in a simple way, using non-technical terms. The introductory part looks at the development of robotic approaches in the rehabilitation of neurological patients and outlines the principles of robotic device interactions with patients. There follows a section on virtual reality in rehabilitation. Hapticity and interaction between robot and human are presented in order to understand the added value of robotics that cannot be exploited in other devices. The importance of passive exercise and active tasks is then discussed using the results of various clinical trials, followed by the place of upper and lower extremity robotic devices in rehabilitation practice. The closing section refers to the general importance of measurements in this area and stresses quantitative measurements as one of the advantages in using robotic devices.

  15. A comparison of quality outcome measures in patients having a hysterectomy for benign disease: robotic vs. non-robotic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Martin A; Berger, Elizabeth A; McFetridge, Jeffrey T; Shubella, Jocelyn; Gosciniak, Gabrielle; Wejkszner, Taylor; Kainz, Gregory F; Patriarco, Jeremy; Thomas, M Bijoy; Boulay, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To measure procedure-related hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for patients who have a hysterectomy for benign disease. Secondary outcome quality measures evaluated were cost, estimated blood loss, length of stay and sum of costs associated with readmissions. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Academic community hospital. Patients who underwent hysterectomy to treat benign disease from January 2008 to December 2012. Patients were grouped according to route of hysterectomy: robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy (robotic), laparoscopic hysterectomy (laparoscopic), abdominal hysterectomy (open via laparotomy), and vaginal hysterectomy (vaginal). Inclusion criteria were met by 2554 patients: 601 in the robotic group, 427 in the laparoscopic group, 1194 in the abdominal group, and 332 in the vaginal group. Readmission rates in the robotic cohort were significantly less (probotic cohorts: Robotic (1%), laparoscopic (2.5%), open (3.5%), vaginal (2.4%). Estimated blood loss, length of stay, and sum of readmission costs were also significantly less in the robotic cohort (probotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy have a significantly lower chance of readmission robotics cohort also experienced a shorter length of stay, less estimated blood loss, and a cost savings associated with readmissions when compared to non-robotic approaches. Prospective registries describing quality outcomes, total sum of costs including 30 days follow-up, as well as patient-related quality of life benefits are recommended to confirm these findings and determine which surgical route offers the highest patient and societal value. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy: a robotic or LESS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Carrie E; Ross, Sharona B; Sukharamwala, Prashant B; Sadowitz, Benjamin D; Wood, Thomas W; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The role and application of robotic surgery are debated, particularly given the expansion of laparoscopy, especially laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery. This cohort study was undertaken to delineate differences in outcomes between LESS and robotic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. With Institutional Review Board approval, patients undergoing LESS or robotic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy from September 1, 2012, through December 31, 2014, were prospectively observed, and data were collected. The results are expressed as the median, with the mean ± SD. Thirty-four patients underwent a minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy: 18 with robotic and 16 with LESS surgery. The patients were similar in sex, age, and body mass index. Conversions to open surgery and estimated blood loss were similar. There were two intraoperative complications in the group that underwent the robotic approach. Time spent in the operating room was significantly longer with the robot (297 vs 254 minutes, P = .03), although operative duration (i.e., incision to closure) was not longer (225 vs 190 minutes; P = .15). Of the operations studied, 79% were undertaken for neoplastic processes. Tumor size was 3.5 cm for both approaches; R0 resections were achieved in all patients. Length of stay was similar in the two study groups (5 vs 4 days). There was one 30-day readmission after robotic surgery. Patient outcomes are similar with LESS or robotic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. Robotic operations require more time in the operating room. Both are safe and efficacious minimally invasive operations that follow similar oncologic principles for similar tumors, and both should be in the surgeon's armamentarium for distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.

  17. Robust Method For Robotic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Benjamin J.; Byun, Yung-Tai

    1992-01-01

    Robot constructs map from experience. Topological model consists of nodes and arcs corresponding to distinctive places and local travel edges linking nearby distinctive places. Model created by linking places and edges. Enables accumulation of metrical information with reduced vulnerability to metrical errors. Applications include robotic sentires, robotic delivery trucks, robotic floor cleaners, and robotic lawnmowers.

  18. Robotic surgical education: a collaborative approach to training postgraduate urologists and endourology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirheydar, Hossein; Jones, Marklyn; Koeneman, Kenneth S; Sweet, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Currently, robotic training for inexperienced, practicing surgeons is primarily done vis-à-vis industry and/or society-sponsored day or weekend courses, with limited proctorship opportunities. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an extended-proctorship program at up to 32 months of follow-up. An extended-proctorship program for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was established at our institution. The curriculum consisted of 3 phases: (1) completing an Intuitive Surgical 2-day robotic training course with company representatives; (2) serving as assistant to a trained proctor on 5 to 6 cases; and (3) performing proctored cases up to 1 year until confidence was achieved. Participants were surveyed and asked to evaluate on a 5-point Likert scale their operative experience in robotics and satisfaction regarding their training. Nine of 9 participants are currently performing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) independently. Graduates of our program have performed 477 RALP cases. The mean number of cases performed within phase 3 was 20.1 (range, 5 to 40) prior to independent practice. The program received a rating of 4.2/5 for effectiveness in teaching robotic surgery skills. Our robotic program, with extended proctoring, has led to an outstanding take-rate for disseminating robotic skills in a metropolitan community.

  19. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  20. Dysphagia among Adult Patients who Underwent Surgery for Esophageal Atresia at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Huynh-Trudeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies.

  1. Evolution of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Moré Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a steady increase in the number of elderly patients with severe cardiovascular diseases who require a surgical procedure to recover some quality of life that allows them a socially meaningful existence, despite the risks.Objectives: To analyze the behavior of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Method: A descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with patients over 65 years of age who underwent surgery at the Cardiocentro Ernesto Che Guevara, in Santa Clara, from January 2013 to March 2014.Results: In the study, 73.1% of patients were men; and there was a predominance of subjects between 65 and 70 years of age, accounting for 67.3%. Coronary artery bypass graft was the most prevalent type of surgery and had the longest cardiopulmonary bypass times. Hypertension was present in 98.1% of patients. The most frequent postoperative complications were renal dysfunction and severe low cardiac output, with 44.2% and 34.6% respectively.Conclusions: There was a predominance of men, the age group of 65 to 70 years, hypertension, and patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft with prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass. Renal dysfunction was the most frequent complication.

  2. Acute myocardial infarctation in patients with critical ischemia underwent lower limb revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esdras Marques Lins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the main cause of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD of the lower limbs. Patients with PAOD often also have obstructive atherosclerosis in other arterial sites, mainly the coronary arteries. This means that patients who undergo infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia have a higher risk of AMI. There are, however, few reports in the literature that have assessed this risk properly. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia of the lower limbs caused by PAOD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 64 patients who underwent 82 infrainguinal bypass operations, from February 2011 to July 2012 were studied. All patients had electrocardiograms and troponin I blood assays during the postoperative period (within 72 hours. RESULTS: There were abnormal ECG findings and elevated blood troponin I levels suggestive of AMI in five (6% of the 82 operations performed. All five had conventional surgery. The incidence of AMI as a proportion of the 52 conventional surgery cases was 9.6%. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: There was a 6% AMI incidence among patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass due to PAOD. Considering only cases operated using conventional surgery, the incidence of AMI was 9.6%.

  3. Non-manufacturing applications of robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauchez, P.

    2000-12-01

    This book presents the different non-manufacturing sectors of activity where robotics can have useful or necessary applications: underwater robotics, agriculture robotics, road work robotics, nuclear robotics, medical-surgery robotics, aids to disabled people, entertainment robotics. Service robotics has been voluntarily excluded because this developing sector is not mature yet. (J.S.)

  4. An Adaptive Robot Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Svenstrup, Mikael; Dalgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe an adaptive robot game, which motivates elderly people to do a regular amount of physical exercise while playing. One of the advantages of robot based games is that the initiative to play can be taken autonomously by the robot. In this case, the goal is to im...... to the behavior of the interacting person. This paper presents a simple ball game between a single player and a mobile robot platform. The algorithm has been validated using simulation and real world experiments.......The goal of this paper is to describe an adaptive robot game, which motivates elderly people to do a regular amount of physical exercise while playing. One of the advantages of robot based games is that the initiative to play can be taken autonomously by the robot. In this case, the goal...... is to improve the mental and physical state of the user by playing a physical game with the robot. Ideally, a robot game should be simple to learn but difficult to master, providing an appropriate degree of challenge for players with different skills. In order to achieve that, the robot should be able to adapt...

  5. Robotic endovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Stephanie; Ko, Koel; Tsang, Josephine; Chan, Yiu Che

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to compare conventional endovascular procedures and the robotic endovascular approach in aortic aneurysm repair. Despite advantages over open surgery, conventional endovascular surgery has limitations. To develop an alternative, efforts have been focused on robotic endovascular systems. Two of the 3 studies comparing procedure times demonstrated reduced procedure time in the robotic group, by 6 times (p robotic procedures reduced fluoroscopic exposure time by 12 minute (p robotic surgery was reduced up to 10 times (p robotic performance score showed a better performance score in the robotic endovascular group (p = 0.007). These results demonstrate that the robotic technique has multiple advantages over the conventional procedure, including improved catheter stability, a shorter learning curve, reduced procedure time, and better performance in cannulating tortuous vessels. However, robotic endovascular technology may be limited by the cost of the system, the size of the catheter, and the setup time required preoperatively. Further comparative studies between conventional and robotic approaches regarding cost-effectiveness, safety, and performance in cases involving complex anatomy and fenestrated stent grafts are essential. Nevertheless, this revolutionary technology is increasingly popular and may be the next milestone in endovascular surgery.

  6. Robotic repair of retrocaval ureter: A case series | Nayak | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and methods: This is a prospective case series of five consecutive patients who underwent robotic retrocaval ureter repair at our institute from August 2006 to September 2009. Pre-operative imaging included intravenous urogram, contrast enhanced CT scan and diuretic renography. All cases were done through a ...

  7. Is Ethics of Robotics about Robots? Philosophy of Robotics Beyond Realism and Individualilsm.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2011-01-01

    If we are doing ethics of robotics, what exactly is the object of our inquiry? This paper challenges 'individualist' robot ontology and 'individualist' social philosophy of robots. It is argued that ethics of robotics should not study and evaluate robotics exclusively in terms of individual

  8. Delta robotsrobots for high speed manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Poppeová, Viera; Uríček, Juraj; Bulej, Vladimír; Šindler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper is oriented to parallel kinematic robots definition, description of their specific application, comparison of robots made by different producers and determination of velocity and acceleration parameters, kinematic analysis – inverse and forward kinematic. It brings information about development of Delta robots at Academia, including the University of Žilina and Delta robots in the market. Two models of Delta robots called M-1iA and M-3iA have been developed by FANUC Robotics during...

  9. Free radicals and polarized targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyatova, E. I.

    2004-06-01

    Many free radicals were added to organic compounds in search of high proton and deuteron polarizations. Few found practical application. A short review is presented, and special attention is given to some stable nitroxyl radicals which have lately been admixed to organic compounds solid at room temperature, in particular to scintillators.

  10. Free radicals and polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunyatova, E.I. E-mail: bunyatel@nusun.jinr.ru

    2004-06-21

    Many free radicals were added to organic compounds in search of high proton and deuteron polarizations. Few found practical application. A short review is presented, and special attention is given to some stable nitroxyl radicals which have lately been admixed to organic compounds solid at room temperature, in particular to scintillators.

  11. Hydroxyl radical reactivity with diethylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Lii, R.R.; Saunders, B.B.

    1977-01-01

    Diethylhydroxylamine (DEHA) reacts with gas-phase hydroxyl radicals on every third collision, whereas the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution is considerably slower. The high gas-phase reactivity explains the predicted inhibitory effect of DEHA in atmospheric smog processes. Results from the studies in the aqueous phase are helpful in predicting the mechanism of the reaction of DEHA with hydroxyl radicals

  12. Robotic kidney transplantation with regional hypothermia: a step-by-step description of the Vattikuti Urology Institute-Medanta technique (IDEAL phase 2a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Mani; Sood, Akshay; Bhandari, Mahendra; Kher, Vijay; Ghosh, Prasun; Abaza, Ronney; Jeong, Wooju; Ghani, Khurshid R; Kumar, Ramesh K; Modi, Pranjal; Ahlawat, Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    We recently reported on preclinical and feasibility studies (Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study [IDEAL] phase 0-1) of the development of robotic kidney transplantation (RKT) with regional hypothermia. This paper presents the IDEAL phase 2a studies of technique development. To describe the technique of RKT with regional hypothermia developed at two tertiary care institutions (Vattikuti Urology Institute and Medanta Hospital). We report on the safety profile and early graft function in these patients. This is a prospective study of 50 consecutive patients who underwent live-donor RKT at Medanta Hospital following a 3-yr planning/simulation phase at the Vattikuti Urology Institute. Demographic details, and perioperative and postoperative outcomes are reported for the initial 25 recipients who have completed a minimum 6-mo follow-up. Positioning and port placement were similar to that used for robotic radical prostatectomy. Allograft cooling was achieved by ice slush delivered through a GelPOINT device. The accompanying video details the operative technique. The primary outcome was posttransplant graft function. Secondary outcomes included technical success or failure and complication rates. Fifty patients underwent RKT successfully, 7 in the phase 1 and 43 in the phase 2 stages of the study. For the initial 25 patients, mean console, warm ischemia, arterial, and venous anastomotic times were 135, 2.4, 12, and 13.4 min, respectively. All grafts were cooled to 18-20 °C with no change in core body temperature. All grafts functioned immediately posttransplant and the mean serum creatinine level at discharge was 1.3mg/dl (range: 0.8-3.1mg/dl). No patient developed anastomotic leaks, wound complications, or wound infections. At 6-mo of follow-up, no patient had developed a lymphocele detected on CT scanning. Two patients underwent re-exploration, and one patient died of congestive heart failure (1.5 mo posttransplant). RKT with regional

  13. Humanlike robots: the upcoming revolution in robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2009-08-01

    Humans have always sought to imitate the human appearance, functions and intelligence. Human-like robots, which for many years have been a science fiction, are increasingly becoming an engineering reality resulting from the many advances in biologically inspired technologies. These biomimetic technologies include artificial intelligence, artificial vision and hearing as well as artificial muscles, also known as electroactive polymers (EAP). Robots, such as the vacuum cleaner Rumba and the robotic lawnmower, that don't have human shape, are already finding growing use in homes worldwide. As opposed to other human-made machines and devices, this technology raises also various questions and concerns and they need to be addressed as the technology advances. These include the need to prevent accidents, deliberate harm, or their use in crime. In this paper the state-of-the-art of the ultimate goal of biomimetics, the development of humanlike robots, the potentials and the challenges are reviewed.

  14. Humanlike Robots - The Upcoming Revolution in Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2009-01-01

    Humans have always sought to imitate the human appearance, functions and intelligence. Human-like robots, which for many years have been a science fiction, are increasingly becoming an engineering reality resulting from the many advances in biologically inspired technologies. These biomimetic technologies include artificial intelligence, artificial vision and hearing as well as artificial muscles, also known as electroactive polymers (EAP). Robots, such as the vacuum cleaner Rumba and the robotic lawnmower, that don't have human shape, are already finding growing use in homes worldwide. As opposed to other human-made machines and devices, this technology raises also various questions and concerns and they need to be addressed as the technology advances. These include the need to prevent accidents, deliberate harm, or their use in crime. In this paper the state-of-the-art of the ultimate goal of biomimetics, the development of humanlike robots, the potentials and the challenges are reviewed.

  15. Robotic thoracic surgery: technical considerations and learning curve for pulmonary resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia

    2014-05-01

    Retrospective series indicate that robot-assisted approaches to lung cancer resection offer comparable radicality and safety to video-assisted thoracic surgery or open surgery. More intuitive movements, greater flexibility, and high-definition three-dimensional vision overcome limitations of video-assisted thoracic surgery and may encourage wider adoption of robotic surgery for lung cancer, particularly as more early stage cases are diagnosed by screening. High capital and running costs, limited instrument availability, and long operating times are important disadvantages. Entry of competitor companies should drive down costs. Studies are required to assess quality of life, morbidity, oncologic radicality, and cost effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Grasping in Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Grasping in Robotics contains original contributions in the field of grasping in robotics with a broad multidisciplinary approach. This gives the possibility of addressing all the major issues related to robotized grasping, including milestones in grasping through the centuries, mechanical design issues, control issues, modelling achievements and issues, formulations and software for simulation purposes, sensors and vision integration, applications in industrial field and non-conventional applications (including service robotics and agriculture).   The contributors to this book are experts in their own diverse and wide ranging fields. This multidisciplinary approach can help make Grasping in Robotics of interest to a very wide audience. In particular, it can be a useful reference book for researchers, students and users in the wide field of grasping in robotics from many different disciplines including mechanical design, hardware design, control design, user interfaces, modelling, simulation, sensors and hum...

  17. [Organisation and early outcome after radical prostatectomy in Denmark 2004-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M.; Iversen, P.; Bendixen, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The organisation, volume and early morbidity after radical prostatectomy has not been researched in Denmark. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The National Hospital Register was searched for all radical prostatectomies in Denmark from 2004-2007, including mortality and readmissions. RESULTS......: In total, 1469 radical prostatectomies were performed, initially in 9 departments, decreasing to 6 departments in 2007. From 2004 to 2007 the number of operations increased by approximately 60%. Median hospital stay was 4 days (mean 5.1 days) without any differences between departments. Mortality was 0.......2%. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing rate of radical prostatectomies in Denmark. It is proposed that a national database be established to monitor early and long-term outcomes, including the role of surgical technique (nerve sparing, laparoscopic/robotic surgery, etc.) in order to ensure optimal organisation...

  18. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRobots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngeal tumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction is new but essential for oropharyngeal defects that result from robotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction of head and neck defects to exemplify the necessity for robotic reconstruction.MethodsWe investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgery and free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012, 5 cases were performed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstruction methods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time were investigated.ResultsAmong five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and one was an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and one flap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flap insetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured robotic instrument. The total operation time was 1,041.0 minutes (range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, and complications including flap necrosis, hematoma, and wound dehiscence did not occur.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates the clinically applicable use of robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insetting the flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditional mandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methods and is accepted as the most up-to-date method.

  19. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Saverio; Nozza, Arrigo; Del Pezzo, Chiara; Mereu, Liliana

    2014-09-01

    To examine the feasibility of performing pelvic lymphadenectomy with robotic single site approach. Recent papers described the feasibility of robotic-single site hysterectomy [1-3] for benign and malign pathologies but only with the development of new single site 5mm instruments as the bipolar forceps, robotic single site platform can be safely utilized also for lymphadenectomy. A 65 year-old, multiparous patient with a body mass index of 22.5 and diagnosed with well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the endometrium underwent a robotic single-site peritoneal washing, total hysterectomy, bilateral adnexectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. The procedure was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) through a single 2,5 cm umbilical incision, with a multi-channel system and two single site robotic 5mm instruments. A 3-dimensional, HD 8.5mm endoscope and a 5mm accessory instrument were also utilized. Type I lymphonodes dissection for external iliac and obturator regions was performed [4]. Total operative time was 210 min; incision, trocar placement and docking time occurring in 12 min. Total console time was 183 min, estimated blood loss was 50 ml, no intra-operative or post-operative complications occurred. Hospital discharge occurred on post operative day 2 and total number of lymphnodes removed was 33. Difficulties in term of instrument's clashing and awkward motions have been encountered. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy using bipolar forceps and monopolar hook is feasible. New developments are needed to improve surgical ergonomics and additional studies should be performed to explore possible benefits of this procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. From Leonardo to da Vinci: the history of robot-assisted surgery in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, David R; Vaessen, Christophe; Roupret, Morgan

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Numerous urological procedures can now be performed with robotic assistance. Though not definitely proven to be superior to conventional laparoscopy or traditional open surgery in the setting of a randomised trial, in experienced centres robot-assisted surgery allows for excellent surgical outcomes and is a valuable tool to augment modern surgical practice. Our review highlights the depth of history that underpins the robotic surgical platform we utilise today, whilst also detailing the current place of robot-assisted surgery in urology in 2011. The evolution of robots in general and as platforms to augment surgical practice is an intriguing story that spans cultures, continents and centuries. A timeline from Yan Shi (1023-957 bc), Archytas of Tarentum (400 bc), Aristotle (322 bc), Heron of Alexandria (10-70 ad), Leonardo da Vinci (1495), the Industrial Revolution (1790), 'telepresence' (1950) and to the da Vinci(®) Surgical System (1999), shows the incredible depth of history and development that underpins the modern surgical robot we use to treat our patients. Robot-assisted surgery is now well-established in Urology and although not currently regarded as a 'gold standard' approach for any urological procedure, it is being increasingly used for index operations of the prostate, kidney and bladder. We perceive that robotic evolution will continue infinitely, securing the place of robots in the history of Urological surgery. Herein, we detail the history of robots in general, in surgery and in Urology, highlighting the current place of robot-assisted surgery in radical prostatectomy, partial nephrectomy, pyeloplasty and radical cystectomy. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  1. Fundamentals of soft robot locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Calisti, M.; Picardi, G.; Laschi, C.

    2017-01-01

    Soft robotics and its related technologies enable robot abilities in several robotics domains including, but not exclusively related to, manipulation, manufacturing, human���robot interaction and locomotion. Although field applications have emerged for soft manipulation and human���robot interaction, mobile soft robots appear to remain in the research stage, involving the somehow conflictual goals of having a deformable body and exerting forces on the environment to achieve locomotion. This p...

  2. Robots are not just tools

    OpenAIRE

    Prescott, T.J.

    2017-01-01

    The EPSRC principles of robotics make a number of commitments about the ontological status of robots such as that robots are “just tools” or can give only “an impression or real intelligence”. This commentary proposes that this assumes, all too easily, that we know the boundary conditions of future robotics development, and argues that progress towards a more useful set of principles could begin by thinking carefully about the ontological status of robots. Whilst most robots are currently lit...

  3. Designing Modular Robotic Playware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Marti, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the design of modular robotic objects that may enhance playful experiences. The approach builds upon the development of modular robotics to create a kind of playware, which is flexible in both set-up and activity building for the end-user to allow easy creation of games...... robotic tiles, and discusses the challenges and opportunities of this modular playware when used by children with different cognitive abilities....

  4. Robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Presents new, cutting-edge algorithms for robot/camera calibration, sensor fusion and sensor calibration Explores the main challenges for accurate coil positioning, such as head motion, and outlines how active robotic motion compensation can outperform hand-held solutions Analyzes how a robotized system in medicine can alleviate concerns with a patient's safety, and presents a novel fault-tolerant algorithm (FTA) sensor for system safety

  5. Robotic liver surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  6. Industrial Robot Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Klas

    1996-01-01

    Industrial robots play a key role in manufacturing systems. Robots are distinguished from other types of machinery mainly on the basis of their programmability and ability to be adaptable to different tasks. The use of computer control to achieve desired flexibility implies that software issues for embedded control systems are central for the applicability and utilization of the equipment. The structure of control systems today, however, limits the applicability of robots, thus leaving many h...

  7. Robots as Confederates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of robots in experimental research for the study of human language, human interaction, and human nature. It is argued that robots make excellent confederates that can be completely controlled, yet which engage human participants in interactions that allow us to study...... numerous linguistic and psychological variables in isolation in an ecologically valid way. Robots thus combine the advantages of observational studies and of controlled experimentation....

  8. Robotics in General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, James; Chandra, Venita; Krummel, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In summary, robotics has made a significant contribution to General Surgery in the past 20 years. In its infancy, surgical robotics has seen a shift from early systems that assisted the surgeon to current teleoperator systems that can enhance surgical skills. Telepresence and augmented reality surgery are being realized, while research and development into miniaturization and automation is rapidly moving forward. The future of surgical robotics is bright. Researchers are working to address th...

  9. Raspberry Pi robotics projects

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This book is for enthusiasts who want to use the Raspberry Pi to build complex robotics projects. With the aid of the step-by-step instructions in this book, you can construct complex robotics projects that can move, talk, listen, see, swim, or fly. No previous Raspberry Pi robotics experience is assumed, but even experts will find unexpected and interesting information in this invaluable guide.

  10. Comparison of surgical outcomes between open and robot-assisted minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Seok; Han, Youngmin; Kang, Jae Seung; Kim, Hongbeom; Kim, Jae Ri; Koon, Wooil; Kim, Sun-Whe; Jang, Jin-Young

    2018-02-01

    Robot surgery is a new method that maintains advantages and overcomes disadvantages of conventional methods, even in pancreatic surgery. This study aimed to evaluate safety and benefits of robot-assisted minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (robot PD). This study included 237 patients who underwent PD between 2015 and 2017. Demographics and surgical outcomes were evaluated. Fifty-one patients underwent robot PD and 186 underwent open PD. Robot PD group had younger age (60.7 vs. 65.4 years, P = 0.006) and lower body mass index (22.7 vs. 24.0, P = 0.007). Robot PD group had lower proportion of patients with firm or hard pancreatic texture (15.7% vs. 38.2%, P = 0.004) and smaller pancreatic duct size (2.3 vs. 3.3 mm, P = 0.002). Two groups had similar operation time (robot vs. open: 335.6 vs. 330.1 min) and complications (15.7% vs. 21.0%), including postoperative pancreatic fistula rate (6.0% vs. 12.0%). Robot PD group had lower postoperative pain score (3.7 vs. 4.1 points, P = 0.008), and shorter postoperative stay (10.6 vs. 15.3 days, P = 0.001). Robot PD is comparable to open PD in early outcomes. Robot PD is safe and feasible and enables early recovery; indication for robot PD is expected to expand in the near future. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  11. Robotics for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Akira; Nakayama, Ryoichi; Kubo, Katsumi

    1988-01-01

    It is highly desirable that automatic or remotely controlled machines perform inspection and maintenance tasks in nuclear facilities. Toshiba has been working to develop multi-functional robots, with one typical example being a master-slave manipulator for use in reprocessing facilities. At the same time, the company is also working on the development of multi-purpose intelligent robots. One such device, an automatic inspection robot, to be deployed along a monorail, performs inspection by means of image processing technology, while and advanced intelligent maintenance robot is equipped with a special wheel-locomotion mechanism and manipulator and is designed to perform maintenance tasks. (author)

  12. Robotic hand project

    OpenAIRE

    Karaçizmeli, Cengiz; Çakır, Gökçe; Tükel, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the mechatronic based robotic hand is controlled by the position data taken from the glove which has flex sensors mounted to capture finger bending of the human hand. The angular movement of human hand’s fingers are perceived and processed by a microcontroller, and the robotic hand is controlled by actuating servo motors. It has seen that robotic hand can simulate the movement of the human hand that put on the glove, during tests have done. This robotic hand can be used not only...

  13. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  14. Autonomous military robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief reveals the latest techniques in computer vision and machine learning on robots that are designed as accurate and efficient military snipers. Militaries around the world are investigating this technology to simplify the time, cost and safety measures necessary for training human snipers. These robots are developed by combining crucial aspects of computer science research areas including image processing, robotic kinematics and learning algorithms. The authors explain how a new humanoid robot, the iCub, uses high-speed cameras and computer vision algorithms to track the objec

  15. Advanced robot locomotion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  16. Increasing Robotic Science Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The principal objectives are to demonstrate robotic-based scientific investigations and resource prospecting, and develop and demonstrate modular science instrument...

  17. Robotic assisted laparoscopic colectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pandalai, S

    2010-06-01

    Robotic surgery has evolved over the last decade to compensate for limitations in human dexterity. It avoids the need for a trained assistant while decreasing error rates such as perforations. The nature of the robotic assistance varies from voice activated camera control to more elaborate telerobotic systems such as the Zeus and the Da Vinci where the surgeon controls the robotic arms using a console. Herein, we report the first series of robotic assisted colectomies in Ireland using a voice activated camera control system.

  18. Robots de servicio

    OpenAIRE

    Aracil, Rafael; Balaguer, Carlos; Armada, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    8 págs, 9 figs. El término Robots de Servicio apareció a finales de los años 80 como una necesidad de desarrollar máquinas y sistemas capaces de trabajar en entornos diferentes a los fabriles. Los Robots de Servicio tenían que poder trabajar en entornos noestructurados, en condiciones ambientales cambiantes y con una estrecha interacción con los humanos. En 1995 fue creado por la IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, el Technical Committee on Service Robots, y este comité definió en el año...

  19. Hopping Robot with Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Edward; Marzwell, Nevellie; Fuller, Sawyer; Fionni, Paolo; Tretton, Andy; Burdick, Joel; Schell, Steve

    2003-01-01

    A small prototype mobile robot is capable of (1) hopping to move rapidly or avoid obstacles and then (2) moving relatively slowly and precisely on the ground by use of wheels in the manner of previously reported exploratory robots of the "rover" type. This robot is a descendant of a more primitive hopping robot described in "Minimally Actuated Hopping Robot" (NPO- 20911), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 50. There are many potential applications for robots with hopping and wheeled-locomotion (roving) capabilities in diverse fields of endeavor, including agriculture, search-and-rescue operations, general military operations, removal or safe detonation of land mines, inspection, law enforcement, and scientific exploration on Earth and remote planets. The combination of hopping and roving enables this robot to move rapidly over very rugged terrain, to overcome obstacles several times its height, and then to position itself precisely next to a desired target. Before a long hop, the robot aims itself in the desired hopping azimuth and at a desired takeoff angle above horizontal. The robot approaches the target through a series of hops and short driving operations utilizing the steering wheels for precise positioning.

  20. DSLs in robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Bordignon, Mirko; Stoy, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    Robotic systems blend hardware and software in a holistic way that intrinsically raises many crosscutting concerns such as concurrency, uncertainty, and time constraints. These concerns make programming robotic systems challenging as expertise from multiple domains needs to be integrated...... conceptually and technically. Programming languages play a central role in providing a higher level of abstraction. This briefing presents a case study on the evolution of domain-specific languages based on modular robotics. The case study on the evolution of domain-specific languages is based on a series...... of DSL prototypes developed over five years for the domain of modular, self-reconfigurable robots....

  1. [Robots and intellectual property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrieu, Jacques

    2013-12-01

    This topic is part of the global issue concerning the necessity to adapt intellectual property law to constant changes in technology. The relationship between robots and IP is dual. On one hand, the robots may be regarded as objects of intellectual property. A robot, like any new machine, could qualify for a protection by a patent. A copyright may protect its appearance if it is original. Its memory, like a database, could be covered by a sui generis right. On the other hand, the question of the protection of the outputs of the robot must be raised. The robots, as the physical embodiment of artificial intelligence, are becoming more and more autonomous. Robot-generated works include less and less human inputs. Are these objects created or invented by a robot copyrightable or patentable? To whom the ownership of these IP rights will be allocated? To the person who manufactured the machine ? To the user of the robot? To the robot itself? All these questions are worth discussing.

  2. Perioperative pain after robot-assisted versus laparoscopic rectal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstrup, Rikke; Funder, Jonas Amstrup; Lundbech, Liselotte; Thomassen, Niels; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild

    2018-03-01

    In order to improve the surgical treatment of rectal cancer, robot-assisted laparoscopy has been introduced. The robot has gained widespread use; however, the scientific basis for treatment of rectal cancer is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether robot-assisted laparoscopic rectal resection cause less perioperative pain than standard laparoscopic resection measured by the numerical rating scale (NRS score) as well as morphine consumption. Fifty-one patients were randomized to either laparoscopic or robot-assisted rectal resection at the Department of Surgery at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark. The intra-operative analgetic consumption was recorded prospectively and registered in patient records. Likewise all postoperative medicine administration including analgesia was recorded prospectively at the hospital medical charts. All morphine analogues were converted into equivalent oral morphine by a converter. Postoperative pain where measured by numeric rating scale (NRS) every hour at the postoperative care unit and three times a day at the ward. Opioid consumption during operation was significantly lower during robotic-assisted surgery than during laparoscopic surgery (p=0.0001). However, there were no differences in opioid consumption or NRS in the period of recovery. We found no differences in length of surgery between the two groups; however, ten patients from the laparoscopic group underwent conversion to open surgery compared to one from the robotic group (p=0.005). No significant difference between groups with respect to complications where found. In the present study, we found that patients who underwent rectal cancer resection by robotic technique needed less analgetics during surgery than patients operated laparoscopically. We did, however, not find any difference in postoperative pain score or morphine consumption postoperatively between the robotic and laparoscopic group.

  3. Voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Jawdat; Kocherov, Stanislav; Chertin, Leonid; Farkas, Amicur; Chertin, Boris

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood. Following IRB approval 103 (22.7%) of 449 adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair between 1978 and 1993 responded to the following questionnaires: International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF-12). Uroflowmetry (UF) was performed for all patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to the primary meatus localization. Group I had 63 patients (61.5%) treated for glanular hypospadias, group II had 19 patients (18.4%) treated for distal hypospadias, and group III comprised the remaining 21 patients (20.4%) treated for proximal hypospadias. The mean ± SD I-PSS score for all patients who responded to the questionnaire was 2.3 ± 2.4, and UF was 21.1 ± 4.3 mL/s. The patients from groups I and III had fewer urinary symptoms compared with those of the group II: 1.3 ± 1.5, 5.5 ± 2.4, and 1.6 ± 1.4, respectively (p hypospadias repair in childhood had normal or mild voiding disturbance, with no effects on their physical or mental status. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Prognostic Analysis of Breast Cancer Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Using QOL-ACD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yasuhiro; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Takada, Koji; Goto, Wataru; Asano, Yuka; Morisaki, Tamami; Noda, Satoru; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-11-01

    We investigated into association of quality of life(QOL)and prognosis of breast cancer patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC). We retrospectively studied 228 patients with breast cancer who were performed NAC during a period between 2007 and 2015. TheQ OL score was measured with"The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs(QOL-ACD)". We evaluate association between QOL score with antitumor effect and prognosis. Changes in the QOL score between before and after NAC were compared as well. We divided 2 groups by QOL-ACD scoreinto high and low groups. Therapeautic effect of NAC on 75 patients were pathological complete response(pCR). QOL-ACD score was not significantly associated with pCR rate in both high and low groups(p=0.199). High group was significantly associated with higher survival rate in both of disease free survival(p=0.009, logrank)and overall survival(p=0.040, logrank). QOLACD score decreased after NAC in both of pCR and non-pCR patients. In conclusion, QOL evaluation using QOL-ACD could be an indicator of breast cancer patients' prognosis who underwent NAC.

  5. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2012-09-01

    The role of HLA-G in several clinical conditions related to reproduction has been investigated. Important polymorphisms have been found within the 5'URR and 3'UTR regions of the HLA-G promoter. The aim of the present study was to investigate 16 SNPs in the 5'URR and 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism located in the 3'UTR region of the HLA-G gene and its possible association with the implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatments (ART). The case group was composed of 25 ART couples. Ninety-four couples with two or more term pregnancies composed the control group. Polymorphism haplotype frequencies of the HLA-G were determined for both groups. The Haplotype 5, Haplotype 8 and Haplotype 11 were absolute absence in ART couples. The HLA-G*01:01:02a, HLA-G*01:01:02b alleles and the 14-bp ins polymorphism, Haplotype 2, showed an increased frequency in case women and similar distribution between case and control men. However, this susceptibility haplotype is significantly presented in case women and in couple with failure implantation after treatment, which led us to suggest a maternal effect, associated with this haplotype, once their presence in women is related to a higher number of couples who underwent ART. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Circulating S100B and Adiponectin in Children Who Underwent Open Heart Surgery and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Varrica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. S100B protein, previously proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage in congenital heart disease (CHD newborns who underwent cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, has been progressively abandoned due to S100B CNS extra-source such as adipose tissue. The present study investigated CHD newborns, if adipose tissue contributes significantly to S100B serum levels. Methods. We conducted a prospective study in 26 CHD infants, without preexisting neurological disorders, who underwent cardiac surgery and CPB in whom blood samples for S100B and adiponectin (ADN measurement were drawn at five perioperative time-points. Results. S100B showed a significant increase from hospital admission up to 24 h after procedure reaching its maximum peak (P0.05 have been found all along perioperative monitoring. ADN/S100B ratio pattern was identical to S100B alone with the higher peak at the end of CPB and remained higher up to 24 h from surgery. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that, in CHD infants, S100B protein is not affected by an extra-source adipose tissue release as suggested by no changes in circulating ADN concentrations.

  7. Effect of different pneumoperitoneum pressure on stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Yun Shen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of different CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure on the stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy. Methods: A total of 90 patients who were admitted in our hospital from February, 2015 to October, 2015 for gynecological laparoscopy were included in the study and divided into groups A, B, and C according to different CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure. The changes of HR, BP, and PetCO2 during the operation process in the three groups were recorded. The changes of stress indicators before operation (T0, 30 min during operation (T1, and 12 h after operation (T2 were compared. Results: The difference of HR, BP, and PetCO2 levels before operation among the three groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05. HR, BP, and PetCO2 levels 30 min after pneumoperitoneum were significantly elevated when compared with before operation (P0.05. PetCO2 level 30 min after pneumoperitoneum in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P0.05. Conclusions: Low pneumoperitoneum pressure has a small effect on the stress state in patients underwent gynecological laparoscopy, will not affect the surgical operation, and can obtain a preferable muscular relaxation and vision field; therefore, it can be selected in preference.

  8. Management of Laryngoceles by Transoral Robotic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Fatma Tülin; Güneş, Selçuk; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Yiğider, Ayşe Pelin; Kaya, Kamil Hakan

    2016-06-01

    Laryngoceles are air-filled sacs which communicate with the laryngeal lumen. When filled with mucus or pus, they are called laryngomucoceles and laryngopyoceles, respectively. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is a new and remarkable technique that expands its usefullness in otorhinolaryngology. Conventional treatments for laryngoceles were previously performed using external approaches, with aesthetically unfavorable and less function-sparing results. Transoral laser microsurgical approaches for laryngoceles were seldom reported. It is aimed to present authors' clinical experience on laryngocele management with TORS which is a rather new technique. A retrospective patient serial. Patients were evaluated for demographic data, type of lesion, reasons for hospital admittance, complaint duration, and previous surgery. Robotic surgery panel including anesthesia time, duration of surgery, need for tracheotomy, postoperative care, follow-up, and recurrence rates were also summarized. Six men (mean age 51.7 years; range 41-62) with laryngoceles underwent successful TORS. Dyspnea and hoarseness were the main complaints. Two patients had undergone previous laryngeal surgery due to laryngeal cancer, with no recurrence of malignancy at admittance for laryngocele. Three had simple laryngocele, 2 had laryngomucocele, and 1 had laryngopyocele. No laryngoceles recurred and no complication such as dysphonia or prolonged dysphagia occurred. Transoral robotic surgery was found superior in safety, technical feasibility and curative effectiveness, when compared with classical methods, especially due to absence of skin incisions. Surgical modalities for laryngocele excision should be directed toward a curative target including cosmetic and functional success, technical achievability, and surgically curative methods. Transoral robotic surgery provided all these features.

  9. The effect of surgical approach on performance of lymphadenectomy and perioperative morbidity for radical nephroureterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Shane M; Pariser, Joseph J; Patel, Sanjay G; Steinberg, Gary D; Shalhav, Arieh L; Smith, Norm D

    2016-03-01

    To examine the effect of surgical approach on regional lymphadenectomy (LND) performance and inpatient complications for radical nephroureterectomy (NU) using a national administrative database. The National Inpatient Sample (2009-2012) was used to identify patients who underwent NU for urothelial carcinoma. Cohorts were stratified by performance of LND. Covariates included patient demographics, comorbidity, hospital characteristics, hospital volume, performance of LND, surgical approach (open [ONU], laparoscopic [LNU], or robotic [RNU]), and complications. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with LND performance and complications. A weighted population of 14,059 (85%) without LND and 2,560 (15%) with LND was identified. LND was more common in RNU (27%) compared with ONU (15%) and LNU (10%) (PONU, RNU was associated with increased odds of LND performance (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9, 95% CI: [1.3-2.8]; P = 0.001), whereas LNU was associated with decreased odds of LND performance (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: [0.4-0.8]; P = 0.004). Multivariable analysis of risk factors for complications demonstrated lower odds of complications with RNU (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: [0.4-0.8]; P = 0.001), whereas performance of LND increased the risk of complications (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: [1.001-1.7]; P = 0.049). When compared with ONU, RNU increased the odds of LND performance and had a lower inpatient complication rate, whereas LNU reduced the odds of LND performance and had no significant effect on inpatient complication rates. Performance of LND was independently associated with higher inpatient complication rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Salvage radical prostatectomy for recurrent prostate cancer. Morbidity, oncological and functional results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, R; Marcq, G; Flamand, V; Fantoni, J-C; Hénon, F; Villers, A; Ouzzane, A

    Salvage radical prostatectomy (sRP) for radiorecurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is a challenging procedure. To report our experience with sRP for selected patients with local recurrence after primary treatment for localised PCa. From 2005 to 2015, 24 patients underwent sRP for recurrent PCa in our center and were included in this retrospective study. Local recurrence was suspected by PSA increase>nadir+2ng/mL and was confirmed by biopsy. Perioperative complications according to Clavien-Dindo classification, oncological and functional results were analysed. Overall, 24 patients with a median age of 59 years (IQR: 55-60) were included. Median follow-up was 25 months (IQR: 9-26). Procedures were performed with open-retropubic approach in 50 % and robot-assisted laparoscopic approach in 50 %. Overall, 5 (21 %) and 2 (8 %) patients experienced grade≤IIIa and grade≥IIIb postoperative complication, respectively. Surgical margins were positive in 46 % of cases. Three out of 4 patients with postoperatively detectable PSA (>0.2ng/mL) had positive surgical margins. Seven patients experienced biochemical recurrence in a median delay of 19 months (9-62). Seventy-one percent (5) of these patients experienced clinical recurrence in a median delay of 24 months (10-113). Severe urinary incontinence (≥3 pads/day) and erectile dysfunction were reported in 25 % and 63 %, respectively. sRP for patients is a feasible procedure with encouraging local control rate and acceptable morbidity. This technique should be discussed as a treatment option for locally recurrent PCa in well-selected patients. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Radical production in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Akabani, G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes our effort to develop a metric for radiation exposure that is more fundamental than adsorbed dose and upon which a metric for exposure to chemicals could be based. This metric is based on the production of radicals by the two agents. Radicals produced by radiation in biological systems commonly assumed to be the same as those produced in water despite the presence of a variety of complex molecules. This may explain why the extensive efforts to describe the relationship between energy deposition (track structure) and molecular damage to DNA, based on the spectrum of radicals produced, have not been successful in explaining simple biological effects such as cell killing. Current models assume that DNA and its basic elements are immersed in water-like media and only model the production and diffusion of water-based radicals and their interaction with DNA structures; these models lack the cross sections associated with each macro-component of DNA and only treat water-based radicals. It has been found that such models are not realistic because DNA is not immersed in pure water. A computer code capable of simulating electron tracks, low-energy electrons, energy deposition in small molecules, and radical production and diffusion in water like media has been developed. This code is still in at a primitive stage and development is continuing. It is being used to study radical production by radiation, and radical diffusion and interactions in simple molecular systems following their production. We are extending the code to radical production by chemicals to complement our PBPK modeling efforts. It therefore has been developed primarily for use with radionuclides that are in biological materials, and not for radiation fields

  12. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  13. Multi-robot control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  14. Prophylactic belladonna suppositories on anesthetic recovery after robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavonetto, Federica; Lamborn, David R; McCaffrey, Joan M; Schroeder, Darrell R; Gettman, Mattew T; Sprung, Juraj; Weingarten, Toby N

    2013-06-01

    Two prospective trials have demonstrated prophylactic antimuscarinics following prostatectomy reduce pain from bladder spasms. Our practice adopted the routine administration of prophylactic belladonna and opium (B&O) suppositories to patients undergoing robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). The aim of this study is to determine if this change in clinical practice was associated with improvement of postoperative outcomes. The medical records of 202 patients that underwent RALP surgery who were or were not administered prophylactic B&O suppositories in the immediate postoperative period were abstracted for duration of anesthesia recovery, pain and analgesic use. Patient and surgical characteristics between groups were similar except B&O group were slightly older (p = 0.04) and administered less opioid analgesics (p = 0.05). There was no difference between groups in the duration of phase I recovery from anesthesia (p = 0.96). Multivariable adjustments for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and surgical duration were made, and again it was found that suppository administration had no association with phase I recovery times (p = 0.94). The use of antimuscarinic medication for bladder spams in the B&O group was less during phase I recovery (p suppositories at the immediate conclusion of RALP surgery was not associated with improvements of the postoperative course.

  15. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  16. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  17. A Pregnant Woman Who Underwent Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy due to Cushing’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Diri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome (CS may lead to severe maternal and fetal morbidities and even mortalities in pregnancy. However, pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and treatment of CS. This study describes a 26-year-old pregnant woman admitted with hypertension-induced headache. Hormonal analyses performed due to her cushingoid phenotype revealed a diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone- (ACTH- independent CS. MRI showed a 3.5 cm adenoma in her right adrenal gland. After preoperative metyrapone therapy, she underwent a successful unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy at 14-week gestation. Although she had a temporary postoperative adrenal insufficiency, hormonal analyses showed that she has been in remission since delivery. Findings in this patient, as well as those in previous patients, indicate that pregnancy is not an absolute contraindication for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Rather, such surgery should be considered a safe and efficient treatment method for pregnant women with cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas.

  18. Robots: l'embarras de richesses [:survey of robots available

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meieran, H.; Brittain, K.; Sturkey, R.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of robots available for use in the nuclear industry is presented. Two new categories of mobile robots have been introduced since the last survey (April 1987): pipe crawlers and underwater robots. The number of robots available has risen to double what it was two years ago and four times what it was in 1986. (U.K.)

  19. Biomass feeds vegetarian robot; Biomassa voedt vegetarische robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Brandt, M. [Office for Science and Technology, Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Washington (United States)

    2009-09-15

    This brief article addresses the EATR robot (Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot) that was developed by Cyclone Power and uses biomass as primary source of energy for propulsion. [Dutch] Een kort artikel over de door Cyclone Power ontwikkelde EATR-robot (Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot) die voor de voortdrijving biomassa gebruikt als primaire energiebron.

  20. Clinical outcomes for 14 consecutive patients with solid pseudopapillary neoplasms who underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Matsushita, Akira; Katsuno, Akira; Yamahatsu, Kazuya; Sumiyoshi, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    The postoperative results of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPN), including the effects of spleen-preserving resection, are still to be elucidated. Of the 139 patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatectomy for non-cancerous tumors, 14 consecutive patients (average age, 29.6 years; 1 man, 13 women) with solitary SPN who underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy between March 2004 and June 2015 were enrolled. The tumors had a mean diameter of 4.8 cm. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy was performed in eight patients (spleen-preserving group), including two cases involving pancreatic tail preservation, and laparoscopic spleno-distal pancreatectomy was performed in six patients (standard resection group). The median operating time was 317 min, and the median blood loss was 50 mL. Postoperatively, grade B pancreatic fistulas appeared in two patients (14.3%) but resolved with conservative treatment. No patients had postoperative complications, other than pancreatic fistulas, or required reoperation. The median postoperative hospital stay was 11 days, and the postoperative mortality was zero.None of the patients had positive surgical margins or lymph nodes with metastasis. The median follow-up period did not significantly differ between the two groups (20 vs 39 months, P = 0.1368). All of the patients are alive and free from recurrent tumors without major late-phase complications. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy might be a suitable treatment for patients with SPN. A spleen-preserving operation is preferable for younger patients with SPN, and this study demonstrated the non-inferiority of the procedure compared to spleno-distal pancreatectomy. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. [Patients with astigmatism who underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification: toric IOL x asferic IOL?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Netto, Emilio de Almeida; Gulin, Marina Carvalho; Zapparoli, Marcio; Moreira, Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Compare the visual acuity of patients who underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with IOL AcrySof(®) toric implantation versus AcrySof(®) IQ and evaluate the reduction of cylindrical diopters (CD) in the postoperative period. Analytical and retrospective study of 149 eyes with 1 or more diopters of regular symmetrical keratometric astigmatism, which underwent cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. The eyes were divided into two groups: the toric group with 85 eyes and the non-toric group with 64 eyes. In the pre-operative phase, topographic data and refraction of each eye to be operated were assessed. In the postoperative phase, refraction and visual acuity with and without correction were measured. The preoperative topographic astigmatism ranged from 1.00 to 5.6 DC in both groups. Average reduction of 1.37 CD (p<0.001) and 0.16 CD (p=0.057) was obtained for the toric and non-toric group when compared to the refractive astigmatism, respectively. Considering visual acuity without correction (NCVA), the toric group presented 44 eyes (51.7%) with NCVA of 0 logMAR (20/20) or 0.1 logMAR (20/25) and the toric group presented 7 eyes (10.93%) with these same NCVA values. The results show that patients with a significant keratometric astigmatism presented visual benefits with the toric IOL implantation. The reduction of the use of optical aids may be obtained provided aberrations of the human eye are corrected more accurately. Currently, phacoemulsification surgery has been used not only for functional improvement, but also as a refraction procedure.

  2. Enteral nutrition is superior to total parenteral nutrition for pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changli; Du, Zhi; Lou, Cheng; Wu, Chenxuan; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Jun; Shu, Guiming; Wang, Yijun

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effects of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and enteral nutrition (EN) on biochemical and clinical outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. From the year 2006 to 2008, 60 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy in Tianjin Third Central Hospital were enrolled in this study. They were randomly divided into the EN group and the TPN group. The biochemical and clinical parameters were recorded and analyzed between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the nutritional status, liver and kidney function, and blood glucose levels between the TPN and EN groups on the preoperative day, the 1st and 3 rd postoperative days. However, on the 7th postoperative day, there was significant difference between the two groups in 24 h urinary nitrogen, serum levels of, total protein (TP), transferrin (TF), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and γ-glutamyl transpeptadase (GGT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr). On the 14th postoperative day, there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of urinary levels of 24 h nitrogen, TP, TF, retinol binding protein, ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, BUN, Cr, and glucose. The incidence of delayed gastric emptying in the EN and TPN groups was 0% and 20%, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of pancreatic fistulas and hemorrhages in the EN group were 3.6% and 3.6%, versus 26.7% and 30% in the TPN group, respectively. EN is better than TPN for pancreatic cancer patients who received pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  3. Robotics in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  4. Robotics and Industrial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmison, Glenn A.; And Others

    Robots are becoming increasingly common in American industry. By l990, they will revolutionize the way industry functions, replacing hundreds of workers and doing hot, dirty jobs better and more quickly than the workers could have done them. Robotics should be taught in high school industrial arts programs as a major curriculum component. The…

  5. Robots Cannot Lie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggreen, Gunhild

    2014-01-01

    En analyse af den japanske robot-menneske teaterstykke Hataraku Watashi med fokus på Austins og Butlers begreb om performativitet.......En analyse af den japanske robot-menneske teaterstykke Hataraku Watashi med fokus på Austins og Butlers begreb om performativitet....

  6. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...

  7. Can we trust robots?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Can we trust robots? Responding to the literature on trust and e-trust, this paper asks if the question of trust is applicable to robots, discusses different approaches to trust, and analyses some preconditions for trust. In the course of the paper a phenomenological-social approach to trust is

  8. Robotics in gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, A C; Falcone, T

    2009-06-01

    Robotic surgery has evolved from an investigational surgical approach to a clinically useful adjunct in multiple surgical specialties over the past decade. Advocates of robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery revere the system's wristed instrumentation, ergonomic positioning, and three-dimensional high-definition vision system as significant improvements over laparoscopic equipment's four degrees of freedom and two-dimensional laparoscope that demand the surgeon stand throughout a procedure. The cost, lack of haptic feedback, and the bulky size of the equipment make robotics less attractive to others. Studies evaluating outcomes in robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery are limited. Multiple small retrospective studies demonstrate the safety and feasibility of robotic hysterectomy. With increased surgeon experience, operative times are similar to, or shorter than, laparoscopic cases. Robotic assistance can facilitate suturing in laparoscopic myomectomies, and is associated with decreased blood loss and a shorter hospital stay, although may require longer operative times. Robotic assistance has also been applied to multiple procedures in the subspecialties of infertility, urogynecology and gynecologic oncology with good success and relatively low morbidity. However, further research is warranted to better evaluate the relative benefits and costs of robotic assisted gynecologic surgery.

  9. Going Green Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jacqueline M.

    2011-01-01

    In looking at the interesting shapes and sizes of old computer parts, creating robots quickly came to the author's mind. In this article, she describes how computer parts can be used creatively. Students will surely enjoy creating their very own robots while learning about the importance of recycling in the society. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  10. Robot Vision Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Andrew B.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Litwin, Todd E.; Goldberg, Steven B.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Robot Vision Library (JPLV) provides real-time robot vision algorithms for developers who are not vision specialists. The package includes algorithms for stereo ranging, visual odometry and unsurveyed camera calibration, and has unique support for very wideangle lenses

  11. Robotics in endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibansky, David; Rothstein, Richard I

    2012-09-01

    The increasing complexity of intralumenal and emerging translumenal endoscopic procedures has created an opportunity to apply robotics in endoscopy. Computer-assisted or direct-drive robotic technology allows the triangulation of flexible tools through telemanipulation. The creation of new flexible operative platforms, along with other emerging technology such as nanobots and steerable capsules, can be transformational for endoscopic procedures. In this review, we cover some background information on the use of robotics in surgery and endoscopy, and review the emerging literature on platforms, capsules, and mini-robotic units. The development of techniques in advanced intralumenal endoscopy (endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection) and translumenal endoscopic procedures (NOTES) has generated a number of novel platforms, flexible tools, and devices that can apply robotic principles to endoscopy. The development of a fully flexible endoscopic surgical toolkit will enable increasingly advanced procedures to be performed through natural orifices. The application of platforms and new flexible tools to the areas of advanced endoscopy and NOTES heralds the opportunity to employ useful robotic technology. Following the examples of the utility of robotics from the field of laparoscopic surgery, we can anticipate the emerging role of robotic technology in endoscopy.

  12. Innovations in robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew; Rivera, Marcelino

    2016-05-01

    Developments in robotic surgery have continued to advance care throughout the field of urology. The purpose of this review is to evaluate innovations in robotic surgery over the past 18 months. The release of the da Vinci Xi system heralded an improvement on the Si system with improved docking, the ability to further manipulate robotic arms without clashing, and an autofocus universal endoscope. Robotic simulation continues to evolve with improvements in simulation training design to include augmented reality in robotic surgical education. Robotic-assisted laparoendoscopic single-site surgery continues to evolve with improvements on technique that allow for tackling previously complex pathologic surgical anatomy including urologic oncology and reconstruction. Last, innovations of new surgical platforms with robotic systems to improve surgeon ergonomics and efficiency in ureteral and renal surgery are being applied in the clinical setting. Urologic surgery continues to be at the forefront of the revolution of robotic surgery with advancements in not only existing technology but also creation of entirely novel surgical systems.

  13. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  14. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...

  15. 8-METHOXYNEORAUTENOL AND RADICAL SCAVENGING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    8-METHOXYNEORAUTENOL AND RADICAL SCAVENGING FLAVONOIDS FROM. ERYTHRINA ABYSSINICA. Abiy Yenesew1*, Hannington Twinomuhwezi1 ... shown that the plant elaborates alkaloids [1], flavanones, pterocarpans, chalcones and isoflavonoids [1, 3]; some of which have been shown to have antimicrobial ...

  16. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... Radical change by entrepreneurial design then becomes the focal point, in order to acquaint the reader with the strategies and tactics of well-known entrepreneurs who have been successful in molding...

  17. Ecoporn, Irrationalities and Radical Environmentalism

    OpenAIRE

    Măntescu, Liviu

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the ‘irrationalities’ of deep ecology activism in the context of radical environmentalism by using the empirical example of ecoporn. Fuck For Forest is an environmental Non-Governmental Organisation which undertakes fund-raising for re-forestation and forest protection by means of pornography. Following twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork, this study presents first research results on a radical environmental project which does not promote democratic and established pro...

  18. [Urine derivation after radical cystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarabák, J; Zachoval, R; Vik, V

    2014-01-01

    Radical cystectomy, performed both for the treatment of cancer and other conditions, needs to be followed by ensuring the derivation of urine. The aim of this work is to summarize the possibilities of urine derivation after cystectomy, their advantages, disadvantages and long-term results. A review article summarising relevant literature and the team of authors own experience. This work compares advantages and risks of different types of urine derivation following radical cystectomy.

  19. Towards Versatile Robots Through Open Heterogeneous Modular Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyder, Andreas

    Robots are important tools in our everyday life. Both in industry and at the consumer level they serve the purpose of increasing our scope and extending our capabilities. Modular robots take the next step, allowing us to easily create and build various robots from a set of modules. If a problem...... arises, a new robot can be assembled rapidly from the existing modules, in contrast to conventional robots, which require a time consuming and expensive development process. In this thesis we define a modular robot to be a robot consisting of dynamically reconfigurable modules. The goal of this thesis...... is to increase the versatility and practical usability of modular robots by introducing new conceptual designs. Until now modular robots have been based on a pre-specified set of modules, and thus, their functionality is limited. We propose an open heterogeneous design concept, which allows a modular robot...

  20. Designing Emotionally Expressive Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiourti, Christiana; Weiss, Astrid; Wac, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Socially assistive agents, be it virtual avatars or robots, need to engage in social interactions with humans and express their internal emotional states, goals, and desires. In this work, we conducted a comparative study to investigate how humans perceive emotional cues expressed by humanoid...... with abstract humanlike features. A qualitative and quantitative data analysis confirmed the expressive power of the face, but also demonstrated that body expressions or even simple head and locomotion movements could convey emotional information. These findings suggest that emotion recognition accuracy varies...... robots through five communication modalities (face, head, body, voice, locomotion) and examined whether the degree of a robot's human-like embodiment affects this perception. In an online survey, we asked people to identify emotions communicated by Pepper -a highly human-like robot and Hobbit – a robot...

  1. Robot Games for Elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg

    2011-01-01

    for players showing non-standard behaviour. The last game allows multiple users to compete against the robot based on an AI system originally created for real-time strategic computer games. This game has been evaluated in simulation, and the outcome is a generic software framework which can be used...... improve a person’s overall health, and this thesis investigates how games based on an autonomous, mobile robot platform, can be used to motivate elderly to move physically while playing. The focus of the investigation is on the development of games for an autonomous, mobile robot based on algorithms using...... spatio-temporal information about player behaviour - more specifically, I investigate three types of games each using a different control strategy. The first game is based on basic robot control which allows the robot to detect and follow a person. A field study in a rehabilitation centre and a nursing...

  2. Robotics: The next step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2014-02-01

    Robotic systems were introduced 15 years ago to support complex endoscopic procedures. The technology is increasingly used in gastro-intestinal surgery. In this article, literature on experimental- and clinical research is reviewed and ergonomic issues are discussed. literature review was based on Medline search using a large variety of search terms, including e.g. robot(ic), randomized, rectal, oesophageal, ergonomics. Review articles on relevant topics are discussed with preference. There is abundant evidence of supremacy in performing complex endoscopic surgery tasks when using the robot in an experimental setting. There is little high-level evidence so far on translation of these merits to clinical practice. Robotic systems may appear helpful in complex gastro-intestinal surgery. Moreover, dedicated computer based technology integrated in telepresence systems opens the way to integration of planning, diagnostics and therapy. The first high tech add-ons such as near infrared technology are under clinical evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence for robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Ravikiran; Nathwani, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Robots have been successfully used in commercial industry and have enabled humans to perform tasks which are repetitive, dangerous and requiring extreme force. Their role has evolved and now includes many aspects of surgery to improve safety and precision. Orthopaedic surgery is largely performed on bones which are rigid immobile structures which can easily be performed by robots with great precision. Robots have been designed for use in orthopaedic surgery including joint arthroplasty and spine surgery. Experimental studies have been published evaluating the role of robots in arthroscopy and trauma surgery. In this article, we will review the incorporation of robots in orthopaedic surgery looking into the evidence in their use. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  4. Prolegomena to Social Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We have begun to use robots in central areas of our lives, from health care to warfare, from education to entertainment—for tasks that we humans cannot perform and tasks that we simply do not wish to perform. This prospect challenges our values and cultural self-understanding. Public debate...... could qualify as a robot in some sense, depending on the definitions used. Nor does it aim to do applied ethics, although it is framed in the setting of ethics here. Its main research objective is to pose the question of how we should conceive of ourselves and our interactions with robots from......, the dissertation aims to illustrate the theoretical value of ‘intercultural philosophy of technology,’ as well as its potential practical implications for concrete design considerations of sociable robots and general attitudinal shifts in human-robot interaction....

  5. Robotics at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    A Robotics Technology Group was organized at the Savannah River Laboratory in August 1982. Many potential applications have been identified that will improve personnel safety, reduce operating costs, and increase productivity using modern robotics and automation. Several active projects are under way to procure robots, to develop unique techniques and systems for the site's processes, and to install the systems in the actual work environments. The projects and development programs are involved in the following general application areas: (1) glove boxes and shielded cell facilities, (2) laboratory chemical processes, (3) fabrication processes for reactor fuel assemblies, (4) sampling processes for separation areas, (5) emergency response in reactor areas, (6) fuel handling in reactor areas, and (7) remote radiation monitoring systems. A Robotics Development Laboratory has been set up for experimental and development work and for demonstration of robotic systems

  6. Modular Robotic Wearable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    In this concept paper we trace the contours and define a new approach to robotic systems, composed of interactive robotic modules which are somehow worn on the body. We label such a field as Modular Robotic Wearable (MRW). We describe how, by using modular robotics for creating wearable......, it is possible to obtain a flexible wearable processing system, where freely inter-changeable input/output modules can be positioned on the body suit in accordance with the task at hand. We describe the first rough prototypes and show an artistic application, as well as some drawing of future works and projects....... Finally, by focusing on the intersection of the combination modular robotic systems, wearability, and bodymind we attempt to explore the theoretical characteristics of such approach and exploit the possible playware application fields....

  7. Service Robots for Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    services to maintain the quality of healthcare provided. This thesis and the Industrial PhD project aim to address logistics, which is the most resource demanding service in a hospital. The scale of the transportation tasks is huge and the material flow in a hospital is comparable to that of a factory. We...... believe that these transportation tasks, to a great extent, can be and will be automated using mobile robots. This thesis consequently addresses the key technical issues of implementing service robots in hospitals. In simple terms, a robotic system for automating hospital logistics has to be reliable...... manual work and offer many advantages beyond robotics. Finally, this thesis outlines our contributions in representation of multi-floor buildings, which is a vital requirement to achieve robust and practical, real-world service robot applications....

  8. Utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic general and bariatric surgical procedures at Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamere, James; Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Stephen; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-07-01

    Robotic-assisted general and bariatric surgery is gaining popularity among surgeons. The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques for common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures performed at Academic Medical Centers. We analyzed data from University HealthSystem Consortium clinical database from October 2010 to February 2014 for all patients who underwent laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for eight common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures: gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric band, antireflux surgery, Heller myotomy (HM), cholecystectomy (LC), colectomy, rectal resection (RR). Utilization and outcome measures including demographics, in-hospital mortality, major complications, 30-day readmission, length of stay (LOS), and costs were compared between techniques. 96,694 laparoscopic and robotic procedures were analyzed. Utilization of the robotic approach was the highest for RR (21.4%), followed by HM (9.1%). There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality or major complications between laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for all procedures. Only two procedures had improved outcome associated with the robotic approach: robotic HM and robotic LC had a shorter LOS compared to the laparoscopic approach (2.8 ± 3.6 vs. 2.3 ± 2.1; respectively, p bariatric surgical procedures with the highest utilization for rectal resection. Compared to conventional laparoscopy, there were no observed clinical benefits associated with the robotic approach, but there was a consistently higher cost.

  9. Robotic Assisted Transanal Polypectomies: Is There Any Indication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Ruiz, Marcos; Cagigas Fernández, Carmen; Alonso Martín, Joaquín; Cristobal Poch, Lidia; Manuel Palazuelos, Carlos; Barredo Cañibano, Francisco Javier; Gómez Fleitas, Manuel; Castillo Diego, Julio

    2017-12-01

    Robotic assisted transanal polipectomy may have advantages compared with the conventional transanal minimally invasive surgery technique. We evaluate the safety, feasibility and advantages of this technique. Between February 2014 and October 2015, 9patients underwent robotic transanal polypectomy. We performed a retrospective study in which we analyse prospectively collected data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, perioperative outcomes, pathological report, morbidity and mortality. A total of 5 male and 4 female patients underwent robotic TAMIS. Lesions were 6,22cm from the anal verge. Mean size was 15,8cm 2 . All procedures were performed in the lithotomy position. Closure of the defect was performed in all cases. Mean blood loss was 39,8ml. Mean operative time was 71,9min. No severe postoperative complications or readmissions occured. Median hospital stay was 2,5 days. Robotic TAMIS is useful to treat complex rectal lesions. Our transanal platform allowed a wider range of movements of the robotic arms and to perform all procedures in the lithotomy position. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Remote controlled data collector robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozsef Suto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Today a general need for robots assisting different human activities rises. The goal of the present project is to develop a prototyping robot, which provides facilities for attaching and fitting different kinds of sensors and actuators. This robot provides an easy way to turn a general purpose robot into a special function one.

  11. Robots: An Impact on Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaesi, LaVon; Maness, Marion

    1984-01-01

    Provides background information on robotics and robots, considering impact of robots on the workplace and concerns of the work force. Discusses incorporating robotics into the educational system at all levels, exploring industry-education partnerships to fund introduction of new technology into the curriculum. New funding sources and funding…

  12. Robust autonomy for interactive robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodskiy, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The growing trend in robotics towards applications in an unstructured environment offers new challenges in robotic software and control. Assisting, interacting and serving humans, new robots will literally touch people and their lives. Performing tasks devised for such new robots demands high levels

  13. The future of Robotics Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade the robotics industry has created millions of additional jobs led by consumer electronics and the electric vehicle industry, and by 2020, robotics will be a $100 billion worth industry, as big as the tourism industry.. For example, the rehabilitation robot market has grown 10...... times between 2010 and 2016, thanks to advancements in rehab/therapy robots, active prostheses, exoskeletons, and wearable robotics. In short, the very next decade robotics will become vital components in a number of applications and robots paired with AI will be able to perform complex actions...

  14. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  15. Gleason Score Correlation Between Prostate Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Öztürk

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second cause of cancer-related mortality. Prostate biopsy and the Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. Several studies have investigated the correlation between biopsy scores and radical prostatectomy specimen scores. We also evaluated the correlation of Gleason scores of these specimens in our patient series. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 468 men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy between 2008 and 2017. Patients’ age, prostate-specific antigen levels at diagnosis, and prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason scores were recorded. Upgrading and downgrading were defined as increase or decrease of Gleason score of radical prostate specimen compared to Gleason score of prostate biopsy. Results: A total of 442 men diagnosed with prostate cancer were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 62.62±6.26 years (44-84 years and mean prostate specific antigen level was 9.01±6.84 ng/mL (1.09-49 ng/mL. Prostate biopsy Gleason score was 7 in 27 (6.1% men. Radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason score was 7 in 62 (14% men. Gleason correlation was highest in the 240 patients (71.6% with score <7 and was lowest in the 31 (38.75% patients with score =7. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the discordance rate between Gleason scores of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens was 35.7%.

  16. On polynomial and multiplicative radicals | Tumurbat | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We show that polynomial and multiplicative radicals in [1] are special cases of radicals defined by means of elements. We scrutinize the way of defining a radical γG by a subset G of polynomials in noncommuting indeterminates. Defining polynomial radicals, Drazin and Roberts [1] required that the set G be closed

  17. Partner Ballroom Dance Robot -PBDR-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Takahiro; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Nomura, Minoru; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Koizumi, Mizuo; Oconogi, Tatsuya

    In this research, we have developed a dance partner robot, which has been developed as a platform for realizing the effective human-robot coordination with physical interaction. The robot could estimate the next dance step intended by a human and dance the step with the human. This paper introduce the robot referred to as PBDR (Partner Ballroom Dance Robot), which has performed graceful dancing with the human in EXPO 2005, Aichi, Japan.

  18. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraiwa, Takanori; Watanabe, Atsuo; Miyasawa, Tatsuo

    1984-01-01

    Demand for robots in nuclear power plants is increasing of late in order to reduce workers' exposure to radiations. Especially, owing to the progress of microelectronics and robotics, earnest desire is growing for the advent of intellecturized robots that perform indeterminate and complicated security work. Herein represented are the robots recently developed for nuclear power plants and the review of the present status of robotics. (author)

  19. Comparative analysis of pain in patients who underwent total knee replacement regarding the tourniquet pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate through the visual analog scale (VAS the pain in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR with different pressures of the pneumatic tourniquet. METHODS: An observational, randomized, descriptive study on an analytical basis, with 60 patients who underwent TKR, divided into two groups, which were matched: a group where TKR was performed with tourniquet pressures of 350 mmHg (standard and the other with systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg (P + 100. These patients had their pain assessed by VAS at 48 h, and at the 5th and 15th days after procedure. Secondarily, the following were also measured: range of motion (ROM, complications, and blood drainage volume in each group; the data were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: After data analysis, there was no statistical difference regarding the incidence of complications (p = 0.612, ROM (p = 0.202, bleeding after 24 and 48 h (p = 0.432 and p = 0.254 or in relation to VAS. No correlation was observed between time of ischemia compared to VAS and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the pneumatic tourniquet pressure at 350 mmHg or systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg did not influence the pain, blood loss, ROM, and complications. Therefore the pressures at these levels are safe and do not change the surgery outcomes; the time of ischemia must be closely observed to avoid major complications.

  20. Assessment of quality of life in patients who underwent minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Marcello Simão; Haddad, Alessandra; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2013-06-01

    There are increasingly more patients seeking minimally invasive procedures, which have become more effective and safer in reducing the signs of facial aging. This study included 40 female adult patients who voluntarily underwent selected minimally invasive procedures (filling with hyaluronic acid and botulinum toxin injection) for facial rejuvenation. All patients were followed for a period of 6 months. They were evaluated with the use of questionnaires, a quality-of-life questionnaire (DLQI), the self-esteem scale of Rosenberg (EPM/Rosenberg), and a pain scale. The minimally invasive procedures resulted in improvement in quality of life and self-esteem, which were stronger the first 3 months after the procedures but remained at a higher level than that before treatment, even after 6 months. Hyaluronic acid with lidocaine in the formula is more comfortable for the patient as it makes the injection less painful. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  1. Assessment of Patients Who Underwent Nasal Reconstruction After Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Hakan; Bitik, Ozan; Kamburoğlu, Haldun Onuralp; Dadaci, Mehmet; Çaliş, Mert; Öcal, Engin

    2015-06-01

    Basal and squamous cell carcinomas are the most common malignant cutaneous lesions affecting the nose. With the rising incidence of skin cancers, plastic surgeons increasingly face nasal reconstruction challenges. Although multiple options exist, optimal results are obtained when "like is used to repair like". We aimed to introduce a simple algorithm for the reconstruction of nasal defects with local flaps, realizing that there is always more than one option for reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed 163 patients who underwent nasal reconstruction after excision of non-melanoma skin cancer between March 2011 and April 2014. We analyzed the location of the defects and correlated them with the techniques used to reconstruct them. There were 66 males and 97 females (age, 21-98 years). Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed in 121 patients and squamous cell carcinoma in 42. After tumor excision, all the defects were immediately closed by either primary closure or local flap options such as Limberg, Miter, glabellar, bilobed, nasolabial, V-Y advancement, and forehead flaps. Obtaining tumor-free borders and a pleasing aesthetic result are major concerns in nasal reconstruction. Defect reconstruction and cosmesis are as important as rapid recovery and quick return to normal daily activities, and these should be considered before performing any procedure, particularly in elderly patients.

  2. [A survey of perioperative asthmatic attack among patients with bronchial asthma underwent general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Kenya; Yoshizawa, Atsuto; Hirano, Satoru; Izumi, Sinyuu; Hojo, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kobayasi, Nobuyuki; Kudou, Kouichirou; Maehara, Yasuhiro; Kawachi, Masaharu; Miyakoshi, Kouichi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the risk factor of perioperative asthmatic attack and effectiveness of preventing treatment for asthmatic attack before operation. We performed retrospective chart review of one hundred eleven patients with asthma underwent general anesthesia and surgical intervention from January 2006 to October 2007 in our hospital. The rate of perioperative asthmatic attack were as follows; 10.2% (5 in 49 cases) in no pretreatment group, 7.5% (3 in 40 cases) in any pretreatments except for systemic steroid, and 4.5% (1 in 22 cases) in systemic steroid pretreatment group. Neither preoperative asthma severity nor duration from the last attack had significant relevancy to perioperative attack rate. The otolaryngological surgery, especially those have nasal polyp and oral surgery had high perioperative asthma attack rate, although there was no significant difference. We recommend the systemic steroid pretreatment for asthmatic patients, especially when they have known risk factor such as administration of the systemic steroid within 6 months, or possibly new risk factor such as nasal polyp, otolaryngological and oral surgery.

  3. Influence of perioperative administration of amino acids on thermoregulation response in patients underwent colorectal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Snježana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothermia in the surgical patients can be the consequence of long duration of surgical intervention, general anesthesia and low temperature in operating room. Postoperative hypothermia contributes to a number of postoperative complications such as arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, hypertension, bleeding, wound infection, coagulopathy, prolonged effect of muscle relaxants. External heating procedures are used to prevent this condition, but some investigations reported that infusion of aminoacids during surgery can induce thermogenesis and prevent postoperative hypothermia. Case report. We reported two males who underwent major colorectal surgery for rectal carcinoma. One patient received Aminosol 15% solution, 125 ml/h, while the other did not. The esophageal temperatures in both cases were measured every 30 minutes during the operation and 60 minutes after in Intensive Care Unit. We were monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, and shivering. Patient who received aminoacids showed ameliorated postoperative hypothermia without hypertension, arrhythmia, or shivering, while the other showed all symptoms mentioned above. Conclusion. According to literature data, as well as our findings, we can conclude that intraoperative intravenous treatment with amino acid solution ameliorates postoperative hypothermia along with its complications. .

  4. Congenital hydrocele: prevalence and outcome among male children who underwent neonatal circumcision in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifo, O D; Osaigbovo, E O

    2008-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and spontaneous resolution of congenital hydrocele diagnosed in male neonates who underwent circumcision at our centre. All male neonates presented for circumcision at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2006 were examined for the presence of hydrocele. Those diagnosed with this condition were recruited and followed up in a surgical outpatient clinic for 2 years. The number of cases of spontaneous resolution and age at which this occurred were documented on a structured pro forma. A total of 2715 neonates were circumcised and 128 (4.7%) were diagnosed with 163 cases of hydrocele, while 27 cases in 25 (0.9%) children failed to resolve at the age of 2 years. Neonatal hydrocele was bilateral in 112 (68.7%), and there were 20 (12.3%) right and 31 (19.0%) left. Among those with hydrocele, 28.1% were delivered preterm and resolution was spontaneous in many of them, with no observed significant statistical difference to those delivered full term (P=0.4740). Of the 163 hydrocele cases, 136 (83.4%) resolved spontaneously by age 18 months with peak resolution at 4-6 months. No spontaneous resolution occurred after 18 months and no hydrocele-related complication occurred during follow up. Neonates with congenital hydrocele should be observed for spontaneous resolution for at least 18 months before being subjected to surgery.

  5. Stress and Quality of Life for Taiwanese Women Who Underwent Infertility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Stevenson, Eleanor Lowndes; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liou, Shwu-Ru

    2018-04-28

    To describe the psychological stress and quality of life experienced by women who underwent fertility treatment in Taiwan. Cross-sectional, correlational study. Recruitment was conducted and questionnaires administered at a reproductive medicine center in Chiayi City, Taiwan. Informed consent to participate was obtained from 126 women who sought fertility treatment at the center. The Chinese Fertility Problem Inventory and Fertility Quality of Life scale were used to measure participants' levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis were used. Overall, participants reported low levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life; however, they had relatively high levels of stress related to need for parenthood. Women who were older, had greater body mass indexes, and consumed coffee regularly had lower fertility-related quality of life. Social and relationship concerns and stress related to need for parenthood were significant predictors of low fertility-related quality of life. In a culture in which childbearing is generally an expectation and an important part of family life, women who experience infertility are at risk to experience fertility-related stress. Social support and family consultation might be offered to improve women's fertility-related quality of life. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Robot-assisted reconstructive surgery of the distal ureter: single institution experience in 16 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musch, Michael; Hohenhorst, Lukas; Pailliart, Anne; Loewen, Heinrich; Davoudi, Yadollah; Kroepfl, Darko

    2013-05-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Open reconstructive surgery of the lower ureteric segment in adults often requires large incisions, as the basic prerequisite for such complex procedures is wide exposure. Published experience on minimally invasive techniques in this challenging surgical field, e.g. conventional laparoscopy or robot-assisted laparoscopy, still remains limited. We report our experience from one of the largest single institution series on robot-assisted reconstructive surgery of the distal ureter in adults, with a special focus on technical aspects of the different surgical procedures. To describe the feasibility of and operative techniques used during different daVinci® robot-assisted laparoscopic reconstructive procedures of the distal ureter, and to report the short-term outcome of such procedures. Between June 2009 and October 2011, 16 patients underwent robot-assisted operations of the distal ureter because of various underlying pathological conditions. We present a description of each procedure, the incidence of perioperative complications and the results of follow-up examination. The data were collected retrospectively using the patients' records and questionnaires sent to the patients and the referring urologists. The follow-up examinations were done at the discretion of the referring urologists. The surgical indications and operative techniques were as follows: seven distal ureteric resections [DUR] with psoas hitch procedures (+/- Boari flap; four), extravesical reimplantation (two) or end-to-end anastomosis (one) because of benign distal ureteric stricture; four DUR with psoas hitch procedure (+/- Boari flap) and pelvic lymphadenectomy for urothelial carcinoma of the ureter; one DUR with psoas hitch procedure and Boari flap because of unexpected locally recurrent prostate cancer; one extravesical reimplantation because of vesico-ureteric reflux; one bilateral intravesical reimplantation of ectopic ureters (as part

  7. Toward cognitive robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, John E.

    2009-05-01

    Our long-term goal is to develop autonomous robotic systems that have the cognitive abilities of humans, including communication, coordination, adapting to novel situations, and learning through experience. Our approach rests on the recent integration of the Soar cognitive architecture with both virtual and physical robotic systems. Soar has been used to develop a wide variety of knowledge-rich agents for complex virtual environments, including distributed training environments and interactive computer games. For development and testing in robotic virtual environments, Soar interfaces to a variety of robotic simulators and a simple mobile robot. We have recently made significant extensions to Soar that add new memories and new non-symbolic reasoning to Soar's original symbolic processing, which should significantly improve Soar abilities for control of robots. These extensions include episodic memory, semantic memory, reinforcement learning, and mental imagery. Episodic memory and semantic memory support the learning and recalling of prior events and situations as well as facts about the world. Reinforcement learning provides the ability of the system to tune its procedural knowledge - knowledge about how to do things. Mental imagery supports the use of diagrammatic and visual representations that are critical to support spatial reasoning. We speculate on the future of unmanned systems and the need for cognitive robotics to support dynamic instruction and taskability.

  8. Catalyzed Radical Termination in the Presence of Tellanyl Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribelli, Thomas G; Rahaman, S M Wahidur; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Poli, Rinaldo

    2017-10-09

    The decomposition of the diazo initiator dimethyl 2,2'-azobis(isobutyrate) (V-601), generating the Me 2 C . (CO 2 Me) radical, affords essentially the same fraction of disproportionation and combination in media with a large range of viscosity (C 6 D 6 , [D 6 ]DMSO, and PEG 200) in the 25-100 °C range. This is in stark contrast to recent results by Yamago et al. on the same radical generated from Me 2 C(TeMe)(CO 2 Me) and on other X-TeR systems (X=polymer chain or unimer model; R=Me, Ph). The discrepancy is rationalized on the basis of an unprecedented RTe . -catalyzed radical disproportionation, with support from DFT calculations and photochemicaL V-601 decomposition in the presence of Te 2 Ph 2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Door breaching robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Erik; Parrington, Lawrence; von Muehlen, Stephan

    2008-04-01

    As unmanned systems become more commonplace in military, police, and other security forces, they are tasked to perform missions that the original hardware was not designed for. Current military robots are built for rough outdoor conditions and have strong inflexible manipulators designed to handle a wide range of operations. However, these manipulators are not well suited for some essential indoor tasks, including opening doors. This is a complicated kinematic task that places prohibitively difficult control challenges on the robot and the operator. Honeybee and iRobot have designed a modular door-breaching manipulator that mechanically simplifies the demands upon operator and robot. The manipulator connects to the existing robotic arm of the iRobot PackBot EOD. The gripper is optimized for grasping a variety of door knobs, levers, and car-door handles. It works in conjunction with a compliant wrist and magnetic lock-out mechanism that allows the wrist to remain rigid until the gripper has a firm grasp of the handle and then bend with its rotation and the swing of the door. Once the door is unlatched, the operator simply drives the robot through the doorway while the wrist compensates for the complex, multiple degree-of-freedom motion of the door. Once in the doorway the operator releases the handle, the wrist pops back into place, and the robot is ready for the next door. The new manipulator dramatically improves a robot's ability to non-destructively breach doors and perform an inspection of a room's content, a capability that was previously out of reach of unmanned systems.

  10. Balanced gait generations of a two-legged robot on sloping surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pleaten et al 2003; Kajita et al 2003; Vukobratovic & Radic 2004; Kim et al 2005). In reality, however, a typical environment may also contain some sloping surfaces and staircases. During. ∗. For correspondence. 525 ... Pratt et al (2001) proposed a virtual model control for the biped robot walking on both the level as well as ...

  11. Indwelling Urinary Catheter-Related Problems After Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuvers, Sarah; Zonneveld, Willemijn; Meiland-van Bakel, Marja; Putter, Hein; Nicolai, Melianthe; Pelger, Rob; Elzevier, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine occurrence rates of catheter-related problems and their association to pertinent clinical characteristics in men with indwelling urinary catheters following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Descriptive, correlational study. One hundred twelve men who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between December 2010 and December 2012 at the Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands were included in this study. After surgery, a Charriere 20 (20F) silicone catheter was left indwelling for 1 week. Data were gathered from 2 sources; we reviewed participants' medical records, and participants completed a questionnaire designed for this study. Pearson χ tests were used to analyze associations between dichotomous and ordinal variables and catheter-related problems. Univariate logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the relationships between continuous factors and catheter-related problems. Seventy-five percent of participants reported at least 1 catheter-related problem. Univariate regression analyses revealed correlations between body weight and experiencing catheter-related problems (odds ratio [OR] = 1.050; P = .028) and between body mass index and experiencing catheter-related problems (OR = 1.159; P = .049). Indwelling catheter-related problems after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are prevalent, and they may occur at any time during the entire period of catheter use. High body mass index and high body weight were associated with an increased likelihood of catheter-related problems following radical prostatectomy.

  12. Our experiences with robot- assisted laparoscopic surgery in pediatric patients: the first case series from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibar, Yusuf; Yalçın, Serdar; Kaya, Engin; Köprü, Burak; Ebiloğlu, Turgay; Ergin, Giray; Tomruk, Hüseyin

    2017-09-01

    Robotic surgery is a leading treatment option for minimally invasive surgery and has an increasing popularity in pediatric population, as well. In this article, we reported our case series of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in pediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed 29 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent robot- assisted procedures between May 2014 and October 2016. Patient demographics, hospitalization time, estimated blood loss, robotic time and total operative and peri-, and post-operative complications were evaluated. A total of 24 ureter units (18 patients) with grade 1-5 vesicoureteral reflux in 13 female and 5 male, 1 male patient with vesicoureteral stenosis were underwent robot- assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation (RALUR). All patients had complete resolution after surgery. Robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty (RALP) was performed in 6 patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction. All patients had complete resolution after surgery. Completely intracorporeal robotic assisted laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty (RLAIC) was applied to two patients with neurogenic bladder. The symptoms and preoperative hydronephrosis were regressed on the first month of follow-up. Robot-assisted laparoscopic reduction cystoplasty (RALRC) was performed in 14-year-old boy with a bladder diverticula and recurrent urinary tract infection. The last case was eleven- year-old female patient with non-functioning kidney. She had recurrent urinary tract infections and was treated with robotic assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy (RALN). Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery is safe and efficient in pediatric population. Although open surgery is still the gold standard for many pediatric diseases, inherent reconstructive advantages of robotic assisted laparoscopy have a chance to change this view.

  13. Conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Hayakawa, N.; Kuriyama, I.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of alkyl radicals, the conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals and the trapping of allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene have been studied by electron spin resonance (e.s.r.). It has been suggested that in the crystal core alkyl radicals react with trans-vinylene double bonds and are converted into trans-vinylene allyl radicals; at the crystal surface, alkyl radicals react with vinyl end groups and are converted into allyl radicals with vinyl end groups. The decay of radical pairs and the formation of trans-vinylene double bonds are discussed. (author)

  14. Virtual modeling of robot-assisted manipulations in abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelavichus, Stanislav V; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Shirokov, Vadim S; Kubyshkin, Valeriy A; Kriger, Andrey G; Kondratyev, Evgeny V; Zakharova, Olga P

    2012-06-27

    To determine the effectiveness of using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) data in preoperative planning of robot-assisted surgery. Fourteen patients indicated for surgery underwent MDCT using 64 and 256-slice MDCT. Before the examination, a specially constructed navigation net was placed on the patient's anterior abdominal wall. Processing of MDCT data was performed on a Brilliance Workspace 4 (Philips). Virtual vectors that imitate robotic and assistant ports were placed on the anterior abdominal wall of the 3D model of the patient, considering the individual anatomy of the patient and the technical capabilities of robotic arms. Sites for location of the ports were directed by projection on the roentgen-positive tags of the navigation net. There were no complications observed during surgery or in the post-operative period. We were able to reduce robotic arm interference during surgery. The surgical area was optimal for robotic and assistant manipulators without any need for reinstallation of the trocars. This method allows modeling of the main steps in robot-assisted intervention, optimizing operation of the manipulator and lowering the risk of injuries to internal organs.

  15. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  16. Agile Walking Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.; Waldron, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed agile walking robot operates over rocky, sandy, and sloping terrain. Offers stability and climbing ability superior to other conceptual mobile robots. Equipped with six articulated legs like those of insect, continually feels ground under leg before applying weight to it. If leg sensed unexpected object or failed to make contact with ground at expected point, seeks alternative position within radius of 20 cm. Failing that, robot halts, examines area around foot in detail with laser ranging imager, and replans entire cycle of steps for all legs before proceeding.

  17. MVACS Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, R.; Slostad, J.; Bon, B.; Braun, D.; Brill, R.; Buck, C.; Fleischner, R.; Haldeman, A.; Herman, J.; Hertzel, M.; hide

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) Robotic Arm is to support to the other MVACS science instruments by digging trenches in the Martian soil; acquiring and dumping soil samples into the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA); positioning the Soil Temperature Probe (STP) in the soil: positioning the Robotic Arm Air Temperature Sensor (RAATS) at various heights above the surface, and positioning the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) for taking images of the surface, trench, soil samples, magnetic targets and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace.

  18. Next Generation Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    Light Robotics is a new field of research where ingredients from photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology are put together in new ways to realize light-driven robotics at the smallest scales to solve major challenges primarily within the nanobio-domain but not limited hereto. Exploring the full...... potential of this new ‘drone-like’ light-printed, light-driven, light-actuated micro- and nano-robotics in challenging geometries requires a versatile and real-time reconfigurable light addressing that can dynamically track a plurality of tiny tools in 3D to ensure real-time continuous light...

  19. Robots in mining

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available ? • FOG – Fall of ground • Who is at risk? • What is the cost of incident? • What can we do about it? The Robot Potential • Technology • Conclusion © CSIR 2010 Slide 3 Yes Robots can improve mine safety Robot patrols unoccupied areas Generates a... risk map Additional tool Inform miners in making safe © CSIR 2010 Slide 4 Miner Safety Statistics • from DME (2010/03) • March 2010 • 490 000 employed • 400 000 suppliers1 • 9 died, 7 in rockfall incidents 2 • Prior year- March 2010 • 152...

  20. Robotics in shoulder rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicuri, Chiara; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Merolla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the last few decades, several researches have been conducted in the field of robotic rehabilitation to meet the intensive, repetitive and task-oriented training, with the goal to recover the motor function. Up to now, robotic rehabilitation studies of the upper extremity have generally focused on stroke survivors leaving less explored the field of orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. In this review we analyse the present status of robotic technologies, in order to understand which are the current indications and which may be the future perspective for their application in both neurological and orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. PMID:25332937