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Sample records for underwent robotic radical

  1. Contemporary open and robotic radical prostatectomy practice patterns among urologists in the United States.

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    Lowrance, William T; Eastham, James A; Savage, Caroline; Maschino, A C; Laudone, Vincent P; Dechet, Christopher B; Stephenson, Robert A; Scardino, Peter T; Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2012-06-01

    We describe current trends in robotic and open radical prostatectomy in the United States after examining case logs for American Board of Urology certification. American urologists submit case logs for initial board certification and recertification. We analyzed logs from 2004 to 2010 for trends and used logistic regression to assess the impact of urologist age on robotic radical prostatectomy use. A total of 4,709 urologists submitted case logs for certification between 2004 and 2010. Of these logs 3,374 included 1 or more radical prostatectomy cases. Of the urologists 2,413 (72%) reported performing open radical prostatectomy only while 961 (28%) reported 1 or more robotic radical prostatectomies and 308 (9%) reported robotic radical prostatectomy only. During this 7-year period we observed a large increase in the number of urologists who performed robotic radical prostatectomy and a smaller corresponding decrease in those who performed open radical prostatectomy. Only 8% of patients were treated with robotic radical prostatectomy by urologists who were certified in 2004 while 67% underwent that procedure in 2010. Median age of urologists who exclusively performed open radical prostatectomy was 43 years (IQR 38-51) vs 41 (IQR 35-46) for those who performed only robotic radical prostatectomy. While the rate was not as high as the greater than 85% industry estimate, 67% of radical prostatectomies were done robotically among urologists who underwent board certification or recertification in 2010. Total radical prostatectomy volume almost doubled during the study period. These data provide nonindustry based estimates of current radical prostatectomy practice patterns and further our understanding of the evolving surgical treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does robotic assistance confer an economic benefit during laparoscopic radical nephrectomy?

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    Yang, David Y; Monn, M Francesca; Bahler, Clinton D; Sundaram, Chandru P

    2014-09-01

    While robotic assisted radical nephrectomy is safe with outcomes and complication rates comparable to those of the pure laparoscopic approach, there is little evidence of an economic or clinical benefit. From the 2009 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database we identified patients 18 years old or older who underwent radical nephrectomy for primary renal malignancy. Robotic assisted and laparoscopic techniques were noted. Patients treated with the open technique and those with evidence of metastatic disease were excluded from analysis. Descriptive statistics were performed using the chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests, and the Student t-test. Multiple linear regression was done to examine factors associated with increased hospital costs and charges. We identified 24,312 radical nephrectomy cases for study inclusion, of which 7,787 (32%) were performed robotically. There was no demographic difference between robotic assisted and pure laparoscopic radical nephrectomy cases. Median total charges were $47,036 vs $38,068 for robotic assisted vs laparoscopic surgery (p robotic assisted surgery were $15,149 compared to $11,735 for laparoscopic surgery (p robotic assistance conferred an estimated $4,565 and $11,267 increase in hospital costs and charges, respectively, when adjusted for adapted Charlson comorbidity index score, perioperative complications and length of stay (p Robotic assisted radical nephrectomy results in increased medical expense without improving patient morbidity. Assuming surgeon proficiency with pure laparoscopy, robotic technology should be reserved primarily for complex surgeries requiring reconstruction. Traditional laparoscopic techniques should continue to be used for routine radical nephrectomy. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

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    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  4. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

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    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... patients undergoing retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and to identify risk factors associated with these complications. Materials and methods The study included 735 consecutive patients who underwent RRP (n = 499) or RARP (236) at the Department...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension...

  5. Impact of robotic technique and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy.

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    Hyams, Elias S; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Partin, Alan W; Allaf, Mohamad E; Matlaga, Brian R

    2013-03-01

    Our present understanding of the effect of robotic surgery and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy (RP) is limited. Given the increasing pressures placed on healthcare resource utilization, such determinations of healthcare value are becoming increasingly important. Therefore, we performed a study to define the effect of robotic technology and surgical volume on the cost of RP. The state of Maryland mandates that all acute-care hospitals report encounter-level and hospital discharge data to the Health Service Cost Review Commission (HSCRC). The HSCRC was queried for men undergoing RP between 2008 and 2011 (the period during which robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy [RALRP] was coded separately). High-volume hospitals were defined as >60 cases per year, and high-volume surgeons were defined as >40 cases per year. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether robotic technique and high surgical volume impacted the cost of RP. There were 1499 patients who underwent RALRP and 2565 who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) during the study period. The total cost for RALRP was higher than for RRP ($14,000 vs 10,100; Probotic surgery has come to dominate the healthcare marketplace, strategies to increase the role of high-volume providers may be needed to improve the cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer surgical therapy.

  6. Impact of metabolic syndrome on early recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

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    Nishikawa, Masatomo; Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kurahashi, Toshifumi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The present study included a total of 302 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. In this study, postoperative urinary continence was defined as no leak or the use of a security pad. The continence status was assessed by interviews before and 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Metabolic syndrome was defined as follows: body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 and two or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. The effect of the presence of metabolic syndrome on the continence status of these patients was retrospectively examined. A total of 116 (38.4%) and 203 (67.2%) of the 302 patients were continent at 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. A total of 31 (10.3%) patients were judged to have metabolic syndrome. Despite the operative time being longer in patients with metabolic syndrome, no significant differences were observed in the remaining preoperative, intraoperative or postoperative variables between patients with or without metabolic syndrome. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome and the duration of hospitalization were significantly correlated with the 1-month continence status. Similarly, metabolic syndrome and estimated blood loss during surgery were independent predictors of continence rates at 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that the presence of metabolic syndrome could have a significant impact on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Robotic radical hysterectomy in the management of gynecologic malignancies.

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    Pareja, Rene; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2008-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used with increasing frequency in gynecologic oncology. To date, 44 cases were reported in the literature of radical hysterectomy performed with robotic surgery. When comparing robotic surgery with laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy, the literature shows that robotic surgery offers an advantage over the other 2 surgical approaches with regard to operative time, blood loss, and length of hospitalization. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the equivalence or superiority of robotic surgery to laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy.

  8. Tandem-robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to improve the neurovascular bundle visualization: a feasibility study.

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    Han, Misop; Kim, Chunwoo; Mozer, Pierre; Schäfer, Felix; Badaan, Shadie; Vigaru, Bogdan; Tseng, Kenneth; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-02-01

    To examine the feasibility of image-guided navigation using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to visualize the neurovascular bundle (NVB) during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). The preservation of the NVB during radical prostatectomy improves the postoperative recovery of sexual potency. The accompanying blood vessels in the NVB can serve as a macroscopic landmark to localize the microscopic cavernous nerves in the NVB. A novel, robotic transrectal ultrasound probe manipulator (TRUS Robot) and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction software were developed and used concurrently with the daVinci surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) in a tandem-robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (T-RALP). After appropriate approval and informed consent were obtained, 3 subjects underwent T-RALP without associated complications. The TRUS Robot allowed a steady handling and remote manipulation of the TRUS probe during T-RALP. It also tracked the TRUS probe position accurately and allowed 3-D image reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding structures. Image navigation was performed by observing the tips of the daVinci surgical instruments in the live TRUS image. Blood vessels in the NVB were visualized using Doppler ultrasound. Intraoperative 3-D image-guided navigation in T-RALP is feasible. The use of TRUS during radical prostatectomy can potentially improve the visualization and preservation of the NVB. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical benefit of T-RALP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Laparoscopic, robotic and open method of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer: A systematic review

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    Puliyath Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Over the last two decades, numerous studies have indicated the feasibility of minimally invasive surgery for early cervical cancer without compromising the oncological outcome. Objective : Systematic literature review and meta analysis aimed at evaluating the outcome of laparoscopic and robotic radical hysterectomy (LRH and RRH and comparing the results with abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH. Search Strategy : Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists were searched for articles published until January 31 st 2011, using the terms radical hysterectomy, laparoscopic radical hysterectomy, robotic radical hysterectomy, surgical treatment of cervical cancer and complications of radical hysterectomy. Selection Criteria : Studies that reported outcome measures of radical hysterectomy by open method, laparoscopic and robotic methods were selected. Data collection and analysis: Two independent reviewers selected studies, abstracted and tabulated the data and pooled estimates were obtained on the surgical and oncological outcomes. Results : Mean sample size, age and body mass index across the three types of RH studies were similar. Mean operation time across the three types of RH studies was comparable. Mean blood loss and transfusion rate are significantly higher in ARH compared to both LRH and RRH. Duration of stay in hospital for RRH was significantly less than the other two methods. The mean number of lymph nodes obtained, nodal metastasis and positive margins across the three types of RH studies were similar. Post operative infectious morbidity was significantly higher among patients who underwent ARH compared to the other two methods and a higher rate of cystotomy in LRH. Conclusions : Minimally invasive surgery especially robotic radical hysterectomy may be a better and safe option for surgical treatment of cervical cancer. The laparoscopic method is not free from complications. However, experience of surgeon may

  10. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Hvarness, Helle

    2013-01-01

    We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients.......We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients....

  11. The financial impact of robotic technology for partial and radical nephrectomy.

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    Kates, Max; Ball, Mark W; Patel, Hiten D; Gorin, Michael A; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Allaf, Mohamad E

    2015-03-01

    We sought to evaluate the financial impact of robotic technology for partial nephrectomy (PN) and radical nephrectomy (RN) in the state of Maryland. The Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC) documents all acute care hospital charges data. This database was queried for patients who underwent laparoscopic or robot-assisted RN and PN from 2008 to 2012. Total hospital charge, subcharge, and length of stay (LOS) were analyzed separately for RN and PN. Overall, 2834 patients were identified. Of those, 282 were laparoscopic PN (LPN), 1078 robot-assisted PN (RPN), 1098 laparoscopic RN (LRN), and 376 robot-assisted RN (RRN). For PN, the total hospital charge was $19,062 for LPN and $18,255 for RPN (P=0.138), with a charge savings of $807 per case in favor of robotics. For RN, the total hospital charge was $23,391 for RRN and $18,280 for LRN (P=0.004), with a charge premium of $5111 for robotic cases. LOS was shorter for RPN compared with LPN (2.51 vs 2.99 days, Pfinancial implications of RRN use for routine cases warrants further study.

  12. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: Multiparametric MR imaging-directed intraoperative frozen-section analysis to reduce the rate of positive surgical margins.

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    Petralia, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; Padhani, Anwar R; Summers, Paul; Renne, Giuseppe; Alessi, Sarah; Raimondi, Sara; Matei, Deliu V; Renne, Salvatore L; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    To investigate whether use of multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-directed intraoperative frozen-section (IFS) analysis during nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy reduces the rate of positive surgical margins. This retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data was approved by an institutional ethics committee, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Data were reviewed for 134 patients who underwent preoperative multiparametric MR imaging (T2 weighted, diffusion weighted, and dynamic contrast-material enhanced) and nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, during which IFS analysis was used, and secondary resections were performed when IFS results were positive for cancer. Control patients (n = 134) matched for age, prostate-specific antigen level, and stage were selected from a pool of 322 patients who underwent nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy without multiparametric MR imaging and IFS analysis. Rates of positive surgical margins were compared by means of the McNemar test, and a multivariate conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio of positive surgical margins for patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis compared with control subjects. Eighteen patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis underwent secondary resections, and 13 of these patients were found to have negative surgical margins at final pathologic examination. Positive surgical margins were found less frequently in the patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis than in control patients (7.5% vs 18.7%, P = .01). When the differences in risk factors are taken into account, patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS had one-seventh the risk of having positive surgical margins relative to control patients (adjusted odds ratio: 0.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.61). The significantly lower rate of positive surgical margins compared with that in control patients provides

  13. Robotic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy: our early experience.

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    Vasilescu, C; Sgarbură, O; Tudor, St; Popa, M; Turcanu, A; Florescu, A; Herlea, V; Anghel, R

    2009-01-01

    Robotic surgery overcomes some limitations of laparoscopic surgery for prostate, rectal and uterine cancer. In this study we analyze the feasibility of robotic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in gynecological cancers in a developping program of robotic surgery. This prospective study started the 1st of March 2008. Since then, 250 cases of robotic surgery were performed out of which 29 cases addressed gynecological conditions. We selected all radical interventions summing up to 19 cases. Our final group consisted of 19 patients, a gedbetween 30 and 78 years old, with an average age of 53.22 years (+/- 10.03). Twelve patients were diagnosed with cervical cancer, the rest of them with endometrial cancer. Mean operative time was 180 +/- 23.45 min. Oral intake were started the next day after the operation and the patients were discharged 3.5 (+/- 1.2) days postoperatively. There were 3 urinary complications in patients with tumors adherent to the urinary bladder. We believe that robotic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in gynecological cancers is a rapid, feasible, and secure method that should be used whenever available. However further prospective studies and late follow-up results are needed in order to fully assess the value of this new technology.

  14. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal neobladder diversion: The Karolinska experience.

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    Collins, Justin W; Sooriakumaran, P; Sanchez-Salas, R; Ahonen, R; Nyberg, T; Wiklund, N P; Hosseini, A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this report is to describe our surgical technique of totally intracorporeal robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) with neobladder formation. Between December 2003 and March 2013, a total of 147 patients (118 male, 29 female) underwent totally intracorporeal RARC for urinary bladder cancer. We also performed a systematic search of Medline, Embase and PubMed databases using the terms RARC, robotic cystectomy, robot-assisted, totally intracorporeal RARC, intracorporeal neobladder, intracorporeal urinary diversion, oncological outcomes, functional outcomes, and complication rates. The mean age of our patients was 64 years (range 37-87). On surgical pathology 47% had pT1 or less disease, 27% had pT2, 16% had pT3 and 10% had pT4. The mean number of lymph nodes removed was 21 (range 0-60). 24% of patients had lymph node positive dAQ1isease. Positive surgical margins occurred in 6 cases (4%). Mean follow-up was 31 months (range 4-115 months). Two patients (1.4%) died within 90 days of their operation. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, overall survival and cancer specific survival at 60 months was 68% and 69.6%, respectively. 80 patients (54%) received a continent diversion with totally intracorporeal neobladder formation. In the neobladder subgroup median total operating time was 420 minutes (range 265-760). Daytime continence and satisfactory sexual function or potency at 12 months ranged between 70-90% in both men and women. Our experience with totally intracorporeal RARC demonstrates acceptable oncological and functional outcomes that suggest this is a viable alternative to open radical cystectomy.

  15. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil: preliminary results

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    Jose Roberto Colombo Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the initial experience on robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil. Methods: From March 2008 to March 2009, a hundred patients were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patient’s demographic data, as well as perioperative results of the procedures, are described in this study. Rresults: Patients’ mean age and mean PSA were 58 years and 7.58 ng/ml, respectively. All procedures were performed through transperitoneal approach, with a mean bleeding of 480 mL and surgical time of 298 minutes. A surgical margin affected by cancer was present in 16% of the cases. There were four complications: bleeding requiring transfusion (two cases, rectal perforation corrected on the spot and inadequate functioning of the robot. There was no conversion to another access or obit occurrences in this caseload. Cconclusions: Robot-assisted prostatectomy is a reality in Brazil and the results herein presented demonstrate that this procedure can be safely performed. Long-term follow-up is still necessary to assess the oncological and functional outcomes.

  16. Robotic radical perineal cystectomy and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy: initial investigation using a purpose-built single-port robotic system.

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    Maurice, Matthew J; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2017-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of radical perineal cystoprostatectomy using the latest generation purpose-built single-port robotic surgical system. In two male cadavers the da Vinci ® SP1098 Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) was used to perform radical perineal cystoprostatectomy and bilateral extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND). New features in this model include enhanced high-definition three-dimensional optics, improved instrument manoeuvrability, and a real-time instrument tracking and guidance system. The surgery was accomplished through a 3-cm perineal incision via a novel robotic single-port system, which accommodates three double-jointed articulating robotic instruments, an articulating camera, and an accessory laparoscopic instrument. The primary outcomes were technical feasibility, intraoperative complications, and total robotic operative time. The cases were completed successfully without conversion. There were no accidental punctures or lacerations. The robotic operative times were 197 and 202 min. In this preclinical model, robotic radical perineal cystoprostatectomy and ePLND was feasible using the SP1098 robotic platform. Further investigation is needed to assess the feasibility of urinary diversion using this novel approach and new technology. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Initial consecutive 125 cases of robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed in Ireland's first robotic radical prostatectomy centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bouchier-Hayes, D M

    2012-03-01

    We examined the patient characteristics, operative proceedings and the outcomes of the initial series of 125 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) in an independent hospital in Ireland, performed by two surgeons using the da Vinci(®) surgical system.

  18. Karolinska prostatectomy: a robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy technique.

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    Nilsson, Andreas E; Carlsson, Stefan; Laven, Brett A; Wiklund, N Peter

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increasing trend towards minimally invasive management of prostate cancer, including laparoscopic and, more recently, robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Several different laparoscopic approaches have been continuously developed during the last 5 years and it is still unclear which technique yields the best outcome. We present our current technique of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The technique described has evolved during the course of >400 robotic prostatectomies performed by the robotic team since the robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy program was introduced at Karolinska University Hospital in January 2002. Our procedure comprises several modifications of previously reported ones, and we utilize fewer robotic instruments to reduce costs. An extended posterior dissection is performed to aid in the bladder neck-sparing dissection. In nerve-sparing procedures the vesicles are divided to avoid damage to the erectile nerves. In order to preserve the apical anatomy the dorsal venous complex is incised sharply and is first over-sewn after the apical dissection is completed. Our technique enables a more fluent dissection than previously described robotic techniques. Minimizing changes of instruments and the camera not only cuts costs but also reduces inefficient operating maneuvers, such as switching between 30 degrees and 0 degrees lenses during the procedure. We present a technique which in our hands has achieved excellent functional and oncological results.

  19. Systematic review and cumulative analysis of perioperative outcomes and complications after robot-assisted radical cystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novara, Giacomo; Catto, James W F; Wilson, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    and complications of RARC in comparison with ORC and LRC. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched using a free-text protocol including the terms robot-assisted radical cystectomy or da Vinci radical cystectomy or robot* radical cystectomy. RARC case series and studies...

  20. Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a different treatment for prostate cancer?

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    Alexandre Den Julio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the Health Care System in Brazil, a developing country,and public healthcare policies, robotic surgery is a reality to veryfew citizens. Therefore, robotic assisted radical prostatectomy isfar removed from the daily practice of the vast majority of Brazilianurologists. Scientific evidence of the superiority of robotic assistedradical prostatectomy does not presently justify public investmentsfor widespread development of robotic centers. Maybe over timeand with reductions in costs, robotic technology will become amore established practice, as observed in other countries, and morefeasible for the Brazilian urological community.

  1. Robotic Radical Cystectomy: Where are We Today, Where will We be Tomorrow?

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    Kyle A. Richards

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While open radical cystectomy remains the gold-standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer and high-risk non–muscle invasive disease, robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC has been gaining popularity over the past decade. The robotic approach has the potential advantages of less intraoperative blood loss, shorter hospital stay, less post-operative narcotic requirement, quicker return of bowel function, and earlier convalescence with an acceptable surgical learning curve for surgeons adept at robotic radical prostatectomy. While short to intermediate term oncologic results from several small RARC series are promising, bladder cancer remains a potentially lethal malignancy necessitating long-term follow-up. This article aims to review the currently published literature, important technical aspects of the operation, oncologic and functional outcomes, and the future direction of RARC.

  2. Advances in Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy over Time

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    Emma F. P. Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP, robotics has become increasingly more commonplace in the armamentarium of the urologic surgeon. Robotic utilization has exploded across surgical disciplines well beyond the fields of urology and prostate surgery. The literature detailing technical steps, comparison of large surgical series, and even robotically focused randomized control trials are available for review. RALP, the first robot-assisted surgical procedure to achieve widespread use, has recently become the primary approach for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer. As a result, surgeons are constantly trying to refine and improve upon current technical aspects of the operation. Recent areas of published modifications include bladder neck anastomosis and reconstruction, bladder drainage, nerve sparing approaches and techniques, and perioperative and postoperative management including penile rehabilitation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in perioperative management and surgical technique for RALP.

  3. Robots drive the German radical prostatectomy market: a total population analysis from 2006 to 2013.

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    Groeben, C; Koch, R; Baunacke, M; Wirth, M P; Huber, J

    2016-12-01

    To assess trends in the distribution of patients for radical prostatectomy in Germany from 2006 to 2013 and the impact of robotic surgery on annual caseloads. We hypothesized that the advent of robotics and the establishment of certified prostate cancer centers caused centralization in the German radical prostatectomy market. Using remote data processing we analyzed the nationwide German billing data from 2006 to 2013. We supplemented this database with additional hospital characteristics like the prostate cancer center certification status. Inclusion criteria were a prostate cancer diagnosis combined with radical prostatectomy. Hospitals with certification or a surgical robot in 2009 were defined as 'early' group. Linear covariant-analytic models were applied to describe trends over time. Annual radical prostatectomy numbers declined from 28 374 (2006) to 21 850 (2013). High-volume hospitals (⩾100 cases) decreased from 87 (22.0%) in 2006 to 43 (10.4%) in 2013. Low-volume hospitals (200 cases per year contrary to the overall trend (Pdecentralization of radical prostatectomy in Germany. The driving force for this development might consist in the overall decline of radical prostatectomy numbers. The most important factor for achieving higher caseloads was the presence of a robotic system. In order to optimize outcomes of radical prostatectomy additional health policy measures might be necessary.

  4. What if the hand piece spring disassembles during robotic radical prostatectomy?

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    Akbulut, Ziya; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Asil, Erem; Isgoren, Egemen; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2011-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is successfully being performed for treating prostate cancer (PCa). However, instrumentation failure associated with robotic procedures represents a unique new problem. We report the successful completion of RALRP in spite of a disassembled hand piece spring during the procedure. A PubMed/Medline search was made concerning robotic malfunction and robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to discuss our experience. We performed RALRP in a 60-year-old male patient with localized PCa. During the procedure, the spring of the hand piece disassembled, and we were not able to reassemble it. We completed the procedure successfully however without fixing the disassembled hand piece spring. We were able to grasp tissue and needles when we brought our fingers together. The only movement we needed to do was to move fingers apart to release tissue or needles caught by robotic instrument. Although malfunction risk related to the da Vinci Surgical System seems to be very low, it might still occur. Sometimes, simple maneuvers may compensate for the failed function as occurred in our case. However, patients should be informed before the operation about the possibility of converting their procedure to laparoscopic or open due to robotic malfunction.

  5. Erectile dysfunction in robotic radical prostatectomy: Outcomes and management

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    Patrick Whelan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP has emerged as the most common treatment for localized prostate cancer. With improved surgical precision, RALP has produced hope of improved potency rates, especially with the advent of nerve-sparing and other modified techniques. However, erectile dysfunction (ED remains a significant problem for many men regardless of surgical technique. To identify the functional outcomes of robotic versus open and laparoscopic techniques, new robotic surgical techniques and current treatment options of ED following RALP. A Medline search was performed in March 2014 to identify studies comparing RALP with open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, modified RALP techniques and treatment options and management for ED following radical prostatectomy. RALP demonstrates adequate potency rates without compromising oncologic benefit, with observed benefit for potency rates compared with RRP. Additionally, specific surgical technical modifications appear to provide benefit over traditional RALP. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5I demonstrate benefit for ED treatment compared with placebo. However, long-term benefit is often lost after use. Other therapies have been less extensively studied. Additionally, correct patient identification is important for greatest clinical benefit. RALP appears to provide beneficial potency rates compared with RRP; however, these effects are most pronounced at high-volume centers with experienced surgeons. No optimal rehabilitation program with PDE5Is has been identified based on current data. Additionally, vacuum erection devices, intracavernosal injections and other techniques have not been well validated for post RALP ED treatment.

  6. Early biochemical recurrence, urinary continence and potency outcomes following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Hvarness, Helle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe recovery of urinary continence and potency and report oncological and functional outcomes using the survival, continence and potency (SCP) system for patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 2009...... with preoperative ESI, 77.6% (67.9-86.1) and 34.4% (24.1-47.5) maintained ESI 12 months postoperatively after bilateral and unilateral nerve-sparing surgery (NS), respectively. NS (p .... Using the SCP system and defining potency as ESI, functional and oncological success 12 months after surgery was achieved in 69 out of 135 (51.1%) preoperative continent and potent patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral NS, and did not require adjuvant treatment; when defining potency as IIEF...

  7. Reverse-hybrid robotic mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

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    Park, In Ja; You, Y Nancy; Schlette, Erika; Nguyen, Sa; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J

    2012-02-01

    The robotic system offers potential technical advantages over laparoscopy for total mesorectal excision with radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer. However, the requirement for fixed docking limits its utility when the working volume is large or patient repositioning is required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term outcomes associated with a novel setup to perform total mesorectal excision and radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer by the use of a "reverse" hybrid robotic-laparoscopic approach. This is a prospective consecutive cohort observational study of patients who underwent robotic rectal cancer resection from January 2009 to March 2011. During the study period, a technique of reverse-hybrid robotic-laparoscopic rectal resection with radical lymphadenectomy was developed. This technique involves reversal of the operative sequence with lymphovascular and rectal dissection to precede proximal colonic mobilization. This technique evolved from a conventional-hybrid resection with laparoscopic vascular control, colonic mobilization, and robotic pelvic dissection. Perioperative and short-term oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Thirty patients underwent reverse-hybrid resection. Median tumor location was 5 cm (interquartile range 3-9) from the anal verge. Median BMI was 27.6 (interquartile range 25.0-32.1 kg/m). Twenty (66.7%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. There were no conversions. Median blood loss was 100 mL (interquartile range 75-200). Total operation time was a median 369 (interquartile range 306-410) minutes. Median docking time was 6 (interquartile range 5-8) minutes, and console time was 98 (interquartile range 88-140) minutes. Resection was R0 in all patients; no patients had an incomplete mesorectal resection. Six patients (20%) underwent extended lymph node dissection or en bloc resection. Reverse-hybrid robotic surgery for rectal cancer maximizes the therapeutic applicability of the robotic and conventional laparoscopic

  8. Perioperative and mid-term oncologic outcomes of robotic assisted radical cystectomy with totally intracorporeal neobladder: Results of a propensity score matched comparison with open cohort from a single-centre series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Giuseppe; Tuderti, Gabriele; Misuraca, Leonardo; Anceschi, Umberto; Ferriero, Mariaconsiglia; Minisola, Francesco; Guaglianone, Salvatore; Gallucci, Michele

    2018-04-17

    In this study, we compared perioperative and oncologic outcomes of patients treated with either open or robot-assisted radical cystectomy and intracorporeal neobladder at a tertiary care center. The institutional prospective bladder cancer database was queried for "cystectomy with curative intent" and "neobladder". All patients underwent robot-assisted radical cystectomy and intracorporeal neobladder or open radical cystectomy and orthotopic neobladder for high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer or muscle invasive bladder cancer with a follow-up length ≥2 years were included. A 1:1 propensity score matching analysis was used. Kaplan-Meier method was performed to compare oncologic outcomes of selected cohorts. Survival rates were computed at 1,2,3 and 4 years after surgery and the log rank test was applied to assess statistical significance between the matched groups. Overall, 363 patients (299 open and 64 robotic) were included. Open radical cystectomy patients were more frequently male (p = 0.08), with higher pT stages (p = 0.003), lower incidence of urothelial histologies (p = 0.05) and lesser adoption of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (open radical cystectomy cases (all p ≥ 0.22). Open cohort showed a higher rate of perioperative overall complications (91.3% vs 42.2%, p 0.001). At Kaplan-Meier analysis robotic and open cohorts displayed comparable disease-free survival (log-rank p = 0.746), cancer-specific survival (p = 0.753) and overall-survival rates (p = 0.909). Robot-assisted radical cystectomy and intracorporeal neobladder provides comparable oncologic outcomes of open radical cystectomy and orthotopic neobladder at intermediate term survival analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  9. Robotic radical cystectomy and intracorporeal urinary diversion: The USC technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Andre Luis de Castro; Chopra, Sameer; Azhar, Raed A; Berger, Andre K; Miranda, Gus; Cai, Jie; Gill, Inderbir S; Aron, Monish; Desai, Mihir M

    2014-07-01

    Radical cystectomy is the gold-standard treatment for muscle-invasive and refractory nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. We describe our technique for robotic radical cystectomy (RRC) and intracorporeal urinary diversion (ICUD), that replicates open surgical principles, and present our preliminary results. Specific descriptions for preoperative planning, surgical technique, and postoperative care are provided. Demographics, perioperative and 30-day complications data were collected prospectively and retrospectively analyzed. Learning curve trends were analyzed individually for ileal conduits (IC) and neobladders (NB). SAS(®) Software Version 9.3 was used for statistical analyses with statistical significance set at P < 0.05. Between July 2010 and September 2013, RRC and lymph node dissection with ICUD were performed in 103 consecutive patients (orthotopic NB=46, IC 57). All procedures were completed robotically replicating the open surgical principles. The learning curve trends showed a significant reduction in hospital stay for both IC (11 vs. 6-day, P < 0.01) and orthotopic NB (13 vs. 7.5-day, P < 0.01) when comparing the first third of the cohort with the rest of the group. Overall median (range) operative time and estimated blood loss was 7 h (4.8-13) and 200 mL (50-1200), respectively. Within 30-day postoperatively, complications occurred in 61 (59%) patients, with the majority being low grade (n = 43), and no patient died. Median (range) nodes yield was 36 (0-106) and 4 (3.9%) specimens had positive surgical margins. Robotic radical cystectomy with totally ICUD is safe and feasible. It can be performed using the established open surgical principles with encouraging perioperative outcomes.

  10. Application of da Vinci(®) Robot in simple or radical hysterectomy: Tips and tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavazzo, Christos; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2016-01-01

    The first robotic simple hysterectomy was performed more than 10 years ago. These days, robotic-assisted hysterectomy is accepted as an alternative surgical approach and is applied both in benign and malignant surgical entities. The two important points that should be taken into account to optimize postoperative outcomes in the early period of a surgeon's training are how to achieve optimal oncological and functional results. Overcoming any technical challenge, as with any innovative surgical method, leads to an improved surgical operation timewise as well as for patients' safety. The standardization of the technique and recognition of critical anatomical landmarks are essential for optimal oncological and clinical outcomes on both simple and radical robotic-assisted hysterectomy. Based on our experience, our intention is to present user-friendly tips and tricks to optimize the application of a da Vinci® robot in simple or radical hysterectomies.

  11. [Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of hospitals was 63%, though it marginally varied according to type and area. The annual case load was determined based on the results of the questionnaire and other modalities. It increased from 3,518 in 2009 to 6,425 in 2013. The case load seemed to be concentrated in hospitals with robot equipment since the increase of their number was very minimal over the 5 years. The hospitals with the robot treated a larger number of newly diagnosed patients with the disease than before. Most of the patients were those having localized cancer that was indicated for radical surgery, suggesting again the concentration of the surgical case loads in the hospitals with robots. While most hospitals believed that installation of a robot was necessary as an option for treatment procedures, the future strategy of the hospital, and other reasons, the action of the hospital to gain prestige may be involved in the process of purchasing the equipment. In conclusion, robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has become popular as a surgical procedure for prostate cancer in our society. This may lead to a concentration of the surgical case load in a limited number of hospitals with robots. We also discuss the typical action of an acute-care hospital when it purchases expensive clinical medical equipment.

  12. Robotic-assisted transperitoneal radical prostatectomy in a patient with pelvic kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabah, Danny M.; Alyami, Fahad A.

    2008-01-01

    Robots are increasingly utilized in urology, due to their favorable performance characteristics especially in prostatectomy and pyeloplasty. However, preoperative diagnosis of urogenital congenital anomalies and preoperative planning are important aspects to be considered. The presence of ectopic pelvic kidney is a challenge for the surgeon to perform robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) without injury to the pelvic kidney (PC) or its blood supply. We report our experience of performing RARP in a patient with a PK. (author)

  13. Robotic radical cystectomy and intracorporeal urinary diversion: The USC technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luis de Castro Abreu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radical cystectomy is the gold-standard treatment for muscle-invasive and refractory nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. We describe our technique for robotic radical cystectomy (RRC and intracorporeal urinary diversion (ICUD, that replicates open surgical principles, and present our preliminary results. Materials and Methods: Specific descriptions for preoperative planning, surgical technique, and postoperative care are provided. Demographics, perioperative and 30-day complications data were collected prospectively and retrospectively analyzed. Learning curve trends were analyzed individually for ileal conduits (IC and neobladders (NB. SAS ® Software Version 9.3 was used for statistical analyses with statistical significance set at P < 0.05. Results: Between July 2010 and September 2013, RRC and lymph node dissection with ICUD were performed in 103 consecutive patients (orthotopic NB=46, IC 57. All procedures were completed robotically replicating the open surgical principles. The learning curve trends showed a significant reduction in hospital stay for both IC (11 vs. 6-day, P < 0.01 and orthotopic NB (13 vs. 7.5-day, P < 0.01 when comparing the first third of the cohort with the rest of the group. Overall median (range operative time and estimated blood loss was 7 h (4.8-13 and 200 mL (50-1200, respectively. Within 30-day postoperatively, complications occurred in 61 (59% patients, with the majority being low grade (n = 43, and no patient died. Median (range nodes yield was 36 (0-106 and 4 (3.9% specimens had positive surgical margins. Conclusions: Robotic radical cystectomy with totally ICUD is safe and feasible. It can be performed using the established open surgical principles with encouraging perioperative outcomes.

  14. Intraoperative registered transrectal ultrasound guidance for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohareri, Omid; Ischia, Joseph; Black, Peter C; Schneider, Caitlin; Lobo, Julio; Goldenberg, Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2015-01-01

    To provide unencumbered real-time ultrasound image guidance during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, we developed a robotic transrectal ultrasound system that tracks the da Vinci® Surgical System instruments. We describe our initial clinical experience with this system. After an evaluation in a canine model, 20 patients were enrolled in the study. During each procedure the transrectal ultrasound transducer was manually positioned using a brachytherapy stabilizer to provide good imaging of the prostate. Then the transrectal ultrasound was registered to the da Vinci robot by a previously validated procedure. Finally, automatic rotation of the transrectal ultrasound was enabled such that the transrectal ultrasound imaging plane safely tracked the tip of the da Vinci instrument controlled by the surgeon, while real-time transrectal ultrasound images were relayed to the surgeon at the da Vinci console. Tracking was activated during all critical stages of the surgery. The transrectal ultrasound robot was easy to set up and use, adding 7 minutes (range 5 to 14) to the procedure. It did not require an assistant or additional control devices. Qualitative feedback was acquired from the surgeons, who found transrectal ultrasound useful in identifying the urethra while passing the dorsal venous complex suture, defining the prostate-bladder interface during bladder neck dissection, identifying the seminal vesicles and their location with respect to the rectal wall, and identifying the distal prostate boundary at the apex. Real-time, registered robotic transrectal ultrasound guidance with automatic instrument tracking during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is feasible and potentially useful. The results justify further studies to establish whether the approach can improve procedure outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathological confirmation of nerve-sparing types performed during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Woo Jin; Hruby, Gregory W; Turk, Andrew T; Landman, Jaime; Badani, Ketan K

    2013-03-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Incremental nerve-sparing techniques (NSTs) improve postoperative erectile function after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). However, there are no studies to date that histologically confirm the surgeon intended NST. Thus, in the present study, we histologically confirmed that the surgeon performed the nerve preservation as his intended NSTs during RARP. Also, we found that there was more variability in fascia width outcome on the left side compared with the right. Therefore, when performing nerve preservation on the surgeon's non-dominant side, we need to pay more close attention. To confirm that the surgeon achieved true intended histological nerve sparing during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) by studying RP specimens. To aid the novice robotic surgeon to develop the skills of RARP. Between June 2008 and May 2009, 122 consecutive patients underwent RARP by a single surgeon (K.K.B.). The degree of nerve sparing (wide resection [WR], interfascial nerve sparing [ITE-NS], intrafascial nerve sparing [ITR-NS]) on both sides was recorded. The posterior sectors of RP specimens from distal, mid, and proximal parts were evaluated. Fascia width (FW) of each position in RP specimens were compared across nerve-sparing types (NSTs). FW was recorded at 15 ° intervals (3-9 o'clock position), measured as the distance between the outermost prostate gland and surgical margin. The slides were reviewed by an experienced uropathologist who was 'blinded' to the NST. In all, 93 men were included. The overall mean (sd) FW was the greatest in the order of WR, ITE-NS, and ITR-NS, at 2.42 (1.62), 1.71 (1.40) and 1.16 (1.08) mm, respectively (P ITE-NS, bilateral ITE-NS, ITE-NS/WR, and bilateral WR, respectively. To further validate and confirm these preliminary findings, additional studies involving multicentre cohorts would be required. The surgeon intended dissection and FW correlate, with ITR

  16. Impact of tamsulosin on urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Gab; You, Dalsan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Sungwoo; Lim, Ju Hyun; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Choo, Myung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2014-02-01

    To examine the impact of tamsulosin on the rate of acute urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. A total of 236 patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer carried out by a single surgeon were enrolled in this randomized study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: treatment with tamsulosin (0.4 mg) from 1 day before to 14 days after surgery (tamsulosin group), or no tamsulosin treatment (control group). The urethral catheter was removed on the fifth postoperative day. The primary end-point was the acute urinary retention rate. Changes in each domain of the International Continence Society male short-form questionnaire and uroflowmetry parameters were secondary end-points. The primary end-point was assessed in 218 patients (92.4%; n = 109 in each group). It was not assessed in 18 patients because of cystographic leak from the vesicourethral anastomosis. The acute urinary retention rate was lower in the tamsulosin group (7.3%) than in the control group (17.4%, P = 0.018). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified tamsulosin treatment and the operative experience of the surgeon as independent risk factors for acute urinary retention. Tamsulosin-treated patients had a 0.30-fold lower risk of developing acute urinary retention compared with control patients (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.76; P = 0.011). None of the International Continence Society male questionnaire domain scores showed significant changes between the groups. Perioperative treatment with tamsulosin in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy reduces the rate of acute urinary retention after early catheter removal, without aggravating urinary incontinence. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  17. Development of robotic program: an Asian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahabudin, R M; Arni, T; Ashani, N; Arumuga, K; Rajenthran, S; Murali, S; Patel, V; Hemal, A; Menon, M

    2006-06-01

    Robotic surgery was started in the Department of Urology, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, in April 2004. We present our experience in developing the program and report the results of our first 50 cases of robotic radical prostatectomy. A three-arm da Vinci robotic system was installed in our hospital in March 2004. Prior to installation, the surgeons underwent training at various centers in the United States and Paris. The operating theatre was renovated to house the system. Subsequently, the initial few cases were done with the help of proctors. Data were prospectively collected on all patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Fifty patients underwent robot assisted radical prostatectomy from March 2004 to June 2005. Their ages ranged from 52 to 75 years, (average age 60.2 years). PSA levels ranged from 2.5 to 35 ng/ml (mean 10.6 ng/ml). Prostate volume ranged from 18 to 130 cc (average 32.4 cc). Average operating time for the first 20 cases was 4 h and for the next 30 cases was 2.5 h. Patients were discharged 1-3 days post-operatively. Catheters were removed on the fifth day following a cystogram. The positive margin rate as defined by the presence of cancer cells at the inked margin was 30%. Twenty-one patients had T1c disease and one had T1b on clinical staging. Of these, two were apical margin positive. Twenty-six patients had T2 disease and eight of them were apical margin positive. Two patients had T3 disease, one of whom was apical margin positive. Five patients (10%) had PSA recurrence. Five patients had a poorly differentiated carcinoma and the rest had Gleason 6 or 7. Eighty percent of the patients were continent on follow-up at 3 months. Of those who were potent before the surgery, 50% were potent at 3-6 months. The robotic surgery program was successfully implemented at our center on the lines of a structured program, developed at Vattikuti Urology Institute (VUI). We succeeded in creating a team and

  18. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost analysis of open radical cystectomy versus robot-assisted radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sukhchain S; Dogra, Tara; Smith, Peter W; Amran, Maisarah; Auluck, Ishna; Bhambra, Maninder; Sura, Manraj S; Rowe, Edward; Koupparis, Anthony

    2018-03-01

    To perform a cost analysis comparing the cost of robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) with open RC (ORC) in a UK tertiary referral centre and to identify the key cost drivers. Data on hospital length of stay (LOS), operative time (OT), transfusion rate, and volume and complication rate were obtained from a prospectively updated institutional database for patients undergoing RARC or ORC. A cost decision tree model was created. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find key drivers of overall cost and to find breakeven points with ORC. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to quantify the variability in the dataset. One RARC procedure costs £12 449.87, or £12 106.12 if the robot was donated via charitable funds. In comparison, one ORC procedure costs £10 474.54. RARC is 18.9% more expensive than ORC. The key cost drivers were OT, LOS, and the number of cases performed per annum. High ongoing equipment costs remain a large barrier to the cost of RARC falling. However, minimal improvements in patient quality of life would be required to offset this difference. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Robot-assisted single port radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy: description and technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota Filho, Francisco Hidelbrando Alves; Sávio, Luis Felipe; Sakata, Rafael Eiji; Ivanovic, Renato Fidelis; da Silva, Marco Antonio Nunes; Maia, Ronaldo; Passerotti, Carlo

    2018-01-01

    Robot-Assisted Single Site Radical Nephrectomy (RASS-RN) has been reported by surgeons in Europe and United States (1-3). To our best knowledge this video presents the first RASS-RN with concomitant cholecystectomy performed in Latin America. A 66 year-old renal transplant male due to chronic renal failure presented with an incidental 1.3cm nodule in the upper pole of the right kidney. In addition, symptomatic gallbladder stones were detected. Patient was placed in modified flank position. Multichannel single port device was placed using Hassan's technique through a 3cm supra-umbilical incision. Standard radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy were made using na 8.5mm camera, two 5mm robotic arms and an assistant 5mm access. Surgery time and estimated blood loss were 208 minutes and 100mL, respectively. Patient did well and was discharged within less than 48 hours, without complications. Pathology report showed benign renomedullary tumor of interstitial cells and chronic cholecystitis. Robotic technology improves ergonomics, gives better precision and enhances ability to approach complex surgeries. Robot-assisted Single Port aims to reduce the morbidity of multiple trocar placements while maintaining the advantages of robotic surgery (2). Limitations include the use of semi-rigid instruments providing less degree of motion and limited space leading to crash between instruments. On the other hand, it is possible to perform complex and concomitant surgeries with just one incision. RASS-RN seems to be safe and feasible option for selected cases. Studies should be performed to better understand the results using single port technique in Urology. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  1. Robot-assisted single port radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy: description and technical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Hidelbrando Alves Mota Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robot-Assisted Single Site Radical Nephrectomy (RASS-RN has been reported by surgeons in Europe and United States (1–3. To our best knowledge this video presents the first RASS-RN with concomitant cholecystectomy performed in Latin America. Case A 66 year-old renal transplant male due to chronic renal failure presented with an incidental 1.3cm nodule in the upper pole of the right kidney. In addition, symptomatic gallbladder stones were detected. Results Patient was placed in modified flank position. Multichannel single port device was placed using Hassan's technique through a 3 cm supra-umbilical incision. Standard radical nephrectomy and cholecystectomy were made using an 8.5mm camera, two 5mm robotic arms and an assistant 5mm access. Surgery time and estimated blood loss were 208 minutes and 100mL, respectively. Patient did well and was discharged within less than 48 hours, without complications. Pathology report showed benign renomedullary tumor of interstitial cells and chronic cholecystitis. Discussion Robotic technology improves ergonomics, gives better precision and enhances ability to approach complex surgeries. Robot-assisted Single Port aims to reduce the morbidity of multiple trocar placements while maintaining the advantages of robotic surgery (2. Limitations include the use of semi-rigid instruments providing less degree of motion and limited space leading to crash between instruments. On the other hand, it is possible to perform complex and concomitant surgeries with just one incision. Conclusion RASS-RN seems to be safe and feasible option for selected cases. Studies should be performed to better understand the results using single port technique in Urology.

  2. The "halo effect" in Korea: change in practice patterns since the introduction of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ee-Rah; Jeong, Wooju; Park, Sung Yul; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho

    2009-03-01

    Acquisition of the da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Mountain View, USA) has enabled robot-assisted surgery to become an acceptable alternative to open radical prostatectomy (ORP). Implementation of robotics at a single institution in Korea induced a gradual increase in the number of performances of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) to surgically treat localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the impact of robotic instrumentation on practice patterns among urologists and explain the change in value in ORP and RALP-the standard treatment and the new approach or innovation of robotic technology. The overall number of prostatectomies has increased over time because the number of RALPs has grown drastically whereas the number of OPRs did not decrease during the period of evaluation. Our experience emphasizes the potential of RALP to become the gold standard in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in various parts of the world.

  3. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS, met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP. Median operative time (range: 157 (127–259 min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1–19; Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (−14–22; and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13–33. Median length of follow-up (range was 34 (24–43 months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  4. Complications and health-related quality of life after robot-assisted versus open radical cystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Susanne Vahr; Tønnesen, Hanne; Jensen, Bente Thoft

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radical cystectomy is associated with high rates of perioperative morbidity. Robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is widely used today despite limited evidence for clinical superiority. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effect of RARC compared to open radical cystectomy...... (ORC) on complications and secondary on length of stay, time back to work and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods: The databases PubMed, The Cochrane Library, Embase and CINAHL were searched. A systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines and cumulative analysis was conducted...

  5. Surrogate pregnancy in a patient who underwent radical hysterectomy and bilateral transposition of ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azem, Foad; Yovel, Israel; Wagman, Israel; Kapostiansky, Rita; Lessing, Joseph B; Amit, Ami

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate IVF-surrogate pregnancy in a patient with ovarian transposition after radical hysterectomy for carcinoma of the cervix. Case report. A maternity hospital in Tel Aviv that is a major tertiary care and referral center. A 29-year-old woman who underwent Wertheim's hysterectomy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix and ovarian transposition before total pelvic irradiation. Standard IVF treatment, transabdominal oocyte retrieval, and transfer to surrogate mother. Outcome of IVF cycle. A twin pregnancy in the first cycle. This is the second reported case of controlled ovarian stimulation and oocyte retrieval performed on a transposed ovary.

  6. Correlation between location of transposed ovary and function in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Aera; Lee, Yoo-Young; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2015-05-01

    The study investigated the association between the location of transposed ovaries and posttreatment ovarian function in patients with early cervical cancer (IB1-IIA) who underwent radical hysterectomy and ovarian transposition with or without adjuvant therapies. Retrospective medical records were reviewed to enroll the patients with early cervical cancer who underwent ovarian transposition during radical hysterectomy at Samsung Medical Center between July 1995 and July 2012. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) level was used as a surrogate marker for ovarian function. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. The median age and body mass index (BMI) were 31 years (range, 24-39 years) and 21.3 kg/m² (range, 17.7-31.2 kg/m²), respectively. The median serum FSH level after treatment was 7.9 mIU/mL (range, 2.4-143.4 mIU/mL). The median distance from the iliac crest to transposed ovaries on erect plain abdominal x-ray was 0.5 cm (range, -2.7 to 5.2 cm). In multivariate analysis, posttreatment serum FSH levels were significantly associated with the location of transposed ovaries (β = -8.1, P = 0.032), concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) as an adjuvant therapy (β = 71.08, P = 0.006), and BMI before treatment (underweight: β = -59.93, P = 0.05; overweight: β = -40.62, P = 0.041). Location of transposed ovaries, adjuvant CCRT, and BMI before treatment may be associated with ovarian function after treatment. We suggest that ovaries should be transposed as highly as possible during radical hysterectomy to preserve ovarian function in young patients with early cervical cancer who might be a candidate for adjuvant CCRT and who have low BMI before treatment.

  7. Robotic and open radical prostatectomy in the public health sector: cost comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rohan Matthew; Linklater, Nicholas; Coughlin, Geoff

    2014-06-01

    During 2008, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital became the first public hospital in Australia to have a da Vinci Surgical Robot purchased by government funding. The cost of performing robotic surgery in the public sector is a contentious issue. This study is a single centre, cost analysis comparing open radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP) based on the newly introduced pure case-mix funding model. A retrospective chart review was performed for the first 100 RALPs and the previous 100 RRPs. Estimates of tangible costing and funding were generated for each admission and readmission, using the Royal Brisbane Hospital Transition II database, based on pure case-mix funding. The average cost for admission for RRP was A$13 605, compared to A$17 582 for the RALP. The average funding received for a RRP was A$11 781 compared to A$5496 for a RALP based on the newly introduced case-mix model. The average length of stay for RRP was 4.4 days (2-14) and for RALP, 1.2 days (1-4). The total cost of readmissions for RRP patients was A$70 487, compared to that of the RALP patients, A$7160. These were funded at A$55 639 and A$7624, respectively. RALP has shown a significant advantage with respect to length of stay and readmission rate. Based on the case-mix funding model RALP is poorly funded compared to its open equivalent. Queensland Health needs to plan on how robotic surgery is implemented and assess whether this technology is truly affordable in the public sector. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Outcome of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy in Men Over 74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubrig, Burkhard; Boy, Anselm; Heiland, Markus; Roosen, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    We set out to evaluate outcomes in patients over 74 after robotic radical prostatectomy. Six hundred forty-seven patients over 74 (≥75) were analyzed for preoperative factors (body mass index [BMI], American Society of Anestesiologists classification [ASA], prostate-specific antigen [PSA], International prostate symptome score [IPSS], International index of erectile function [IIEF]), operative and perioperative characteristics (technique, erythrocyte conc., complications), and histopathological results. After 12 months, following items were assessed: PSA, frequency of urine loss, number of pads used (including safety), incontinence at night, and potency as quantified by IIEF-5. Mean age in the group Clavien-Dindo III) were found in 1.6% vs. 1.3% (≥75) of cases. Minor complications were encountered in 22.8% vs. 26.3% (≥75). There was a remarkably high percentage of locally advanced disease (73.3% vs. 71.0%) in both groups. Patients ≥75 showed a tendency toward more aggressive cancer and more frequent nodal involvement; we found a higher percentage of R1-resections (19.5% vs. 30.4%, p < 0.05) and PSA relapse after 1 year (12.3% vs. 22.8%, p < 0.05). Twelve months pad-free continence rate (69.9% vs. 63.2%) showed no statistically significant difference between both groups as did the preservation rate of erectile function. We could show that robotic prostatectomy can be carried out safely with good functional and histopathological results in patients ≥75. It is therefore questionable if elderly patients can be precluded from curative radical treatment solely because of their age.

  9. Robot-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy: Analysis of the complications and oncological and functional aspects.

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    Kanashiro, A; Gaya, J M; Palou, J; Gausa, L; Villavicencio, H

    2017-05-01

    To review our experience in robot-assisted radical cystectomy, assessing the complications and oncological and functional results. From 2007 to 2014, we performed 67 robot-assisted radical cystectomies combined with lymphadenectomy in 61 cases. The operations were performed on 37 patients due to muscle-invasive tumours and on 30 due to high-risk nonmuscle-invasive tumours. Urinary diversion was conducted extracorporeally, using a Studer neobladder in 47 cases. The mean blood loss was 300mL. No case required conversion to open surgery. The median number of lymph nodes extracted was 16 (range 3-33). Pathology revealed 16 pT0, 15 pTis,-pT1-pTa and 44 muscle-invasive tumours, 8 pN+ and 1 with positive margins. The mean hospital stay was 9 days. With a median follow-up of 16 months, 9 (13%) patients were readmitted after the discharge, most for infections associated with the vesical catheter and other catheters. Forty patients (59.7%) presented complications (most were Clavien grade 1-2). There was recurrence during the follow-up in 4 cases (6%), and 4 (5.9%) patients died from cancer. Nineteen (28.3%) patients had complications after 30 days, most of which were urinary tract infections. Of the 47 patients with a neobladder, 45 (96%) had proper daytime continence and 42 (89%) had proper nighttime continence. Ninety percent and 64% of the patients with previously normal sexual function and reduced sexual function, respectively, were able to preserve sexual function with or without drug treatment. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy plus lymphadenectomy, with extracorporeal reconstruction of the urinary diversion, offers good oncological and functional results without increasing the number of complications. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgery-related complications in 1253 robot-assisted and 485 open retropubic radical prostatectomies at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.

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    Carlsson, Stefan; Nilsson, Andreas E; Schumacher, Martin C; Jonsson, Martin N; Volz, Daniela S; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, Peter N

    2010-05-01

    To quantify complications to surgery in patients treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) at our institution. Radical prostatectomy is associated with specific complications that can affect outcome results in patients. Between January 2002 and August 2007, a series of 1738 consecutive patients underwent RARP (n = 1253) or RRP (n = 485) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Surgery-related complications were assessed using a prospective hospital-based complication registry. The baseline characteristics of all patients were documented preoperatively. Overall, 170 patients required blood transfusions (9.7%), 112 patients (23%) in the RRP group compared with 58 patients (4.8%) in the RARP group. Infectious complications occurred in 44 RRP patients (9%) compared with 18 (1%) in the RARP group. Bladder neck contracture was treated in 22 (4.5%) patients who had undergone RRP compared with 3 (0.2%) in the RARP group. Clavien grade IIIb-V complications were more common in RRP patients (n = 63; 12.9%) than in RARP patients (n = 46; 3.7%). The introduction of RARP at our institution has resulted in decreased number of patients with Clavien grade IIIb-V complications, such as bladder neck contractures, a decrease in the number of patients who require blood transfusions, and decreased numbers of patients with postoperative wound infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Trends in radical prostatectomy: centralization, robotics, and access to urologic cancer care.

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    Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Wong, Yu-Ning; Nielsen, Matthew E; Egleston, Brian L; Uzzo, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery has been widely adopted for radical prostatectomy. We hypothesized that this change is rapidly shifting procedures away from hospitals that do not offer robotics and consequently increasing patient travel. A population-based observational study of all prostatectomies for cancer in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania from 2000 to 2009 was performed using hospital discharge data. Hospital procedure volume was defined as the number of prostatectomies performed for cancer in a given year. Straight-line travel distance to the treating hospital was calculated for each case. Hospitals were contacted to determine the year of acquisition of the first robot. From 2000 to 2009, the total number of prostatectomies performed annually increased substantially. The increase occurred almost entirely at the very high-volume centers (≥ 106 prostatectomies/year). The number of hospitals performing prostatectomy fell 37% from 2000 to 2009. By 2009, the 9% (21/244) of hospitals that had very high volume performed 57% of all prostatectomies, and the 35% (86/244) of hospitals with a robot performed 85% of all prostatectomies. The median travel distance increased 54% from 2000 to 2009 (Probotic surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  12. Radical nephrectomy performed by open, laparoscopy with or without hand-assistance or robotic methods by the same surgeon produces comparable perioperative results

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    Tanya Nazemi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radical nephrectomy can be performed using open or laparoscopic (with or without hand assistance methods, and most recently using the da Vinci Surgical Robotic System. We evaluated the perioperative outcomes using a contemporary cohort of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy by one of the above 4 methods performed by the same surgeon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The relevant clinical information on 57 consecutive patients undergoing radical nephrectomy from September 2000 until July 2004 by a single surgeon was entered in a Microsoft Access DatabaseTM and queried. Following appropriate statistical analysis, p values < 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: Of 57 patients, the open, robotic, laparoscopy with or without hand assistance radical nephrectomy were performed in 18, 6, 21, and 12 patients, respectively. The age, sex, body mass index (BMI, incidence of malignancy, specimen and tumor size, tumor stage, Fuhrman grade, hospital stay, change in postoperative creatinine, drop in hemoglobin, and perioperative complications were not significantly different between the methods. While the estimated median blood loss, postoperative narcotic use for pain control, and hospital stay were significantly higher in the open surgery method (p < 0.05, the median operative time was significantly shorter compared to the robotic method (p = 0.02. Operating room costs were significantly higher in the robotic and laparoscopic groups; however, there was no significant difference in total hospital costs between the 4 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that radical nephrectomy can be safely performed either by open, robotic, or laparoscopic with or without hand assistance methods without significant difference in perioperative complication rates. A larger cohort and longer follow up are needed to validate our findings and establish oncological outcomes.

  13. Patterns-of-care and health economic analysis of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the Australian public health system.

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    Basto, Marnique; Sathianathen, Niranjan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Ryan, Shane; Goad, Jeremy; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Costello, Anthony J; Moon, Daniel A; Heriot, Alexander G; Butler, Jim; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-06-01

    To compare patterns of care and peri-operative outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) with other surgical approaches, and to create an economic model to assess the viability of RARP in the public case-mix funding system. We retrospectively reviewed all radical prostatectomies (RPs) performed for localized prostate cancer in Victoria, Australia, from the Victorian Admitted Episode Dataset, a large administrative database that records all hospital inpatient episodes in Victoria. The first database, covering the period from July 2010 to April 2013 (n = 5 130), was used to compare length of hospital stay (LOS) and blood transfusion rates between surgical approaches. This was subsequently integrated into an economic model. A second database (n = 5 581) was extracted to cover the period between July 2010 and June 2013, three full financial years, to depict patterns of care and make future predictions for the 2014-2015 financial year, and to perform a hospital volume analysis. We then created an economic model to evaluate the incremental cost of RARP vs open RP (ORP) and laparoscopic RP (LRP), incorporating the cost-offset from differences in LOS and blood transfusion rate. The economic model constructs estimates of the diagnosis-related group (DRG) costs of ORP and LRP, adds the gross cost of the surgical robot (capital, consumables, maintenance and repairs), and manipulates these DRG costs to obtain a DRG cost per day, which can be used to estimate the cost-offset associated with RARP in comparison with ORP and LRP. Economic modelling was performed around a base-case scenario, assuming a 7-year robot lifespan and 124 RARPs performed per financial year. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed for the four-arm da Vinci SHD, Si and Si dual surgical systems (Intuitive Surgical Ltd, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). We identified 5 581 patients who underwent RP in 20 hospitals in Victoria with an open, laparoscopic or robot-assisted surgical approach in the

  14. Laparoscopic and robotic nephroureterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azawi, Nessn H; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thamsborg, Andreas Key Milan

    2017-01-01

    nephroureterectomy between January 2008 and December 2014 was conducted. Outcome measures were OS and CSM. RESULTS: In total, 298 patients underwent robot-assisted or laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy with a final histological diagnosis of UTUC. LND was performed in 46 (15.4%). One hundred and seventy...... in the selection of patients undergoing LND. CONCLUSIONS: Five-year OS and CSM are comparable between patients with N1 and N0 MID. This evidence may support the use of the LND procedure in patients with muscle-invasive UTUC....

  15. Effect of Regional Hospital Competition and Hospital Financial Status on the Use of Robotic-Assisted Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jason D; Tergas, Ana I; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Chen, Ling; Hu, Jim C; Neugut, Alfred I; Ananth, Cande V; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    Despite the lack of efficacy data, robotic-assisted surgery has diffused rapidly into practice. Marketing to physicians, hospitals, and patients has been widespread, but how this marketing has contributed to the diffusion of the technology remains unknown. To examine the effect of regional hospital competition and hospital financial status on the use of robotic-assisted surgery for 5 commonly performed procedures. A cohort study of 221 637 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, total nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, hysterectomy, or oophorectomy at 1370 hospitals in the United States from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2011, was conducted. The association between hospital competition, hospital financial status, and performance of robotic-assisted surgery was examined. The association between hospital competition was measured with the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI), hospital financial status was estimated as operating margin, and performance of robotic-assisted surgery was examined using multivariate mixed-effects regression models. We identified 221 637 patients who underwent one of the procedures of interest. The cohort included 30 345 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy; 20 802, total nephrectomy; 8060, partial nephrectomy; 134 985, hysterectomy; and 27 445, oophorectomy. Robotic-assisted operations were performed for 20 500 (67.6%) radical prostatectomies, 1405 (6.8%) total nephrectomies, 2759 (34.2%) partial nephrectomies, 14 047 (10.4%) hysterectomies, and 1782 (6.5%) oophorectomies. Use of robotic-assisted surgery increased for each procedure from January 2010 through December 2011. For all 5 operations, increased market competition (as measured by the HHI) was associated with increased use of robotic-assisted surgery. For prostatectomy, the risk ratios (95% CIs) for undergoing a robotic-assisted procedure were 2.20 (1.50-3.24) at hospitals in moderately competitive markets and 2.64 (1.84-3.78) for highly competitive markets

  16. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2018-05-01

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup of 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p <0.01) and a higher positive surgical margin rate (19.3% vs 7.8%, p = 0.016). On multivariable analysis only tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason score

  17. A novel robotic system for single-port urologic surgery: first clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaouk, Jihad H; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Autorino, Riccardo; Crouzet, Sebastien; Ouzzane, Adil; Flamand, Vincent; Villers, Arnauld

    2014-12-01

    The idea of performing a laparoscopic procedure through a single abdominal incision was conceived with the aim of expediting postoperative recovery. To determine the clinical feasibility and safety of single-port urologic procedures by using a novel robotic surgical system. This was a prospective institutional review board-approved, Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term Study (IDEAL) phase 1 study. After enrollment, patients underwent a major urologic robotic single-port procedure over a 3-wk period in July 2010. The patients were followed for 3 yr postoperatively. Different types of urologic surgeries were performed using the da Vinci SP Surgical System. This system is intended to provide the same core clinical capabilities as the existing multiport da Vinci system, except that three articulating endoscopic instruments and an articulating endoscopic camera are inserted into the patient through a single robotic port. The main outcomes were the technical feasibility of the procedures (as measured by the rate of conversions) and the safety of the procedures (as measured by the incidence of perioperative complications). Secondary end points consisted of evaluating other key surgical perioperative outcomes as well as midterm functional and oncologic outcomes. A total of 19 patients were enrolled in the study. Eleven of them underwent radical prostatectomy; eight subjects underwent nephrectomy procedures (partial nephrectomy, four; radical nephrectomy, two; and simple nephrectomy, two). There were no conversions to alternative surgical approaches. Overall, two major (Clavien grade 3b) postoperative complications were observed in the radical prostatectomy group and none in the nephrectomy group. At 1-yr follow-up, one radical prostatectomy patient experienced biochemical recurrence, which was successfully treated with salvage radiation therapy. The median warm ischemia time for three of the partial nephrectomies was 38 min. At 3-yr follow-up all

  18. Stratified analysis of 800 Asian patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with a median 64 months of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Kim, Dae Keun; Santok, Glen Denmer; Alabdulaali, Ibrahim; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2016-09-01

    To report the 5-year oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from the largest series ever reported from Asia. A retrospective analysis of 800 Asian patients who were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from July 2005 to May 2010 in the Department of Urology and Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea was carried out. The primary end-point was to evaluate the biochemical recurrence. The secondary end-point was to show the biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival and cancer-specific survival. A total of 197 (24.65%), 218 (27.3%), and 385 (48.1%) patients were classified as low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D'Amico risk stratification risk criteria, respectively. The median follow-up period was 64 months (interquartile range 28-71 months). The overall incidence of positive surgical margin was 36.6%. There was biochemical recurrence in 183 patients (22.9%), 38 patients (4.8%) developed distant metastasis and 24 patients (3%) died from prostate cancer. Actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates at 5 years were 76.4%, 94.6% and 96.7%, respectively. Positive lymph node was associated with lower 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival (9.1%), cancer-specific survival (75.7%) and metastasis-free survival (61.9%) rates (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, among all the predictors, positive lymph node was the strongest predictor of biochemical recurrence, cancer-specific survival and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.001). Herein we report the largest robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series from Asia. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is confirmed to be an oncologically safe procedure that is able to provide effective 5-year cancer control, even in patients with high-risk disease. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. A preliminary oncologic outcome and postoperative complications in patients undergoing robot-assisted radical cystectomy: Initial experience

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    Satoru Muto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC was originally intended to replace open radical cystectomy (ORC as a minimally invasive surgery for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of robotic surgery, comparing perioperative and oncologic outcomes between RARC and ORC. Materials and Methods: Between June 2012 and August 2016, 49 bladder cancer patients were given a radical cystectomy, 21 robotically and 28 by open procedure. We compared the clinical variables between the RARC and ORC groups. Results: In the RARC group, the median estimated blood loss (EBL during cystectomy, total EBL, operative time during cystectomy, and total operative time were 0 mL, 457.5 mL, 199 minutes, and 561 minutes, respectively. EBL during cystectomy (p<0.001, total EBL (p<0.001, and operative time during cystectomy (p=0.003 in the RARC group were significantly lower compared with the ORC group. Time to resumption of a regular diet (p<0.001 and length of stay (p=0.017 were also significantly shorter compared with the ORC group. However, total operative time in the RARC group (median, 561 minutes was significantly longer compared with the ORC group (median, 492.5 minutes; p=0.015. Conclusions: This Japanese study presented evidence that RARC yields benefits in terms of BL and time to regular diet, while consuming greater total operative time. RARC may be a minimally invasive surgical alternative to ORC with less EBL and shorter length of stay.

  20. A short-term cost-effectiveness study comparing robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwü, Lena; Borre, Michael; Ehlers, Lars

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cost effectiveness and cost utility comparing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) versus retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP). METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study a total of 231 men between the age of 50 and 69 years and with clinically localised prostate....... An economic evaluation was made to estimate direct costs of the first postoperative year and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per successful surgical treatment and per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). A successful RP was defined as: no residual cancer (PSA ... high volume urology centres and utilise the full potential of each robot....

  1. Percutaneous cystostomy drainage for early removing urethral catheter in robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: Improving on patients' discomfort

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    Che-Jui Yang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The use of a percutaneous cystostomy device is feasible and safe for the early removal of urethral Foley catheter in robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to decrease penile pain and patient discomfort.

  2. Hemodynamic changes during robotic radical prostatectomy

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    Vanlal Darlong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effect on hemodynamic changes and experience of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP in steep Trendelenburg position (45° with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum is very limited. Therefore, we planned this prospective clinical trial to study the effect of steep Tredelenburg position with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum on hemodynamic parameters in a patient undergoing RALRP using FloTrac/Vigileo™1.10. Methods: After ethical approval and informed consent, 15 patients scheduled for RALRP were included in the study. In the operation room, after attaching standard monitors, the radial artery was cannulated. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (2 μg/kg and thiopentone (4-7 mg/kg, and tracheal intubation was facilitated by vecuronium bromide (0.1 mg/kg. The patient′s right internal jugular vein was cannulated and the Pre Sep™ central venous oximetry catheter was connected to it. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide and intermittent boluses of vecuronium. Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation was provided to maintain normocapnea. After CO 2 pneumoperitoneum, position of the patient was gradually changed to 45° Trendelenburg over 5 min. The robot was then docked and the robot-assisted surgery started. Intraoperative monitoring included central venous pressure (CVP, stroke volume (SV, stroke volume variation (SVV, cardiac output (CO, cardiac index (CI and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO 2 . Results: After induction of anesthesia, heart rate (HR, SV, CO and CI were decreased significantly from the baseline value (P>0.05. SV, CO and CI further decreased significantly after creating pneumoperitoneum (P>0.05. At the 45° Trendelenburg position, HR, SV, CO and CI were significantly decreased compared with baseline. Thereafter, CO and CI were persistently low throughout the 45° Trendelenburg position (P=0.001. HR at 20 min and 1 h, SV and mean arterial blood pressure

  3. The new era of minimally invasive interventions for prostate cancer: robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and focal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatloff O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Schatloff1, Alyssa S Louis2, Uri Lindner21Global Robotics Institute, Florida Hospital Celebration Health, Celebration, FL, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Prostate cancer remains a common but highly treatable disease. Innovations in prostate cancer treatment have allowed a transition toward minimally invasive approaches in an attempt to avoid treatment-related morbidities. In the middle of the treatment spectrum between radical open surgeries and active surveillance lies robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP and focal therapy (FT. This review sets out the most current information on RALP and FT (including laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and irreversible electroporation.Keywords: PCa, RALP, FT, laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, irreversible electroporation

  4. Single plus one port robotic radical prostatectomy (SPORP; Initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Tugcu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article reports on patients with early stage prostate cancer treated with single plus one port robotic radical prostatectomy (SPORP. Materials and methods: Since January 2014, we performed SPORP in 8 patients with localized prostate cancer. Age of patients, clinical stage, operation time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, blood loss, histopathological evaluation, postoperative continence, serum level of PSA were evaluated. Results: Mean age of the 8 patients was 59.85 years. All operations were completed without conversion to standard robotic procedure or open surgery. No intra operative complications occurred. Mean operating time was 143 minutes; prostate excision 123 minutes and urethrovesical anastomosis 20 minutes. Mean blood loss was 45 ml. Preoperative Gleason scores were (3 + 4 in one patient and (3 + 3 in 7 patients. Postoperative Gleason scores were (3 + 4 in 2 patients, and (3 + 3 in 6 patients. All these 8 cases were in T1c clinical stage. Early postoperative complications were drain leakage (n = 1, atelectasis (n = 1, wound infection (n = 1 and fever (n = 1. There was no positive surgical margin. The serum level of PSA was less than 0.2 ng/ml and no other complications happened during the 4 to 12 months follow-up period. Postoperative continence and cosmetic results were excellent. Conclusions: It is relatively easy for urologists who are skilled in traditional laparoscopic and robotic surgeries to master SPORP. However long-term outcomes of this surgery need further investigations.

  5. [Short-term efficacy of da Vinci robotic surgical system on rectal cancer in 101 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dong-Zhu; Shi, Yan; Lei, Xiao; Tang, Bo; Hao, Ying-Xue; Luo, Hua-Xing; Lan, Yuan-Zhi; Yu, Pei-Wu

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility and safety of da Vinci robotic surgical system in rectal cancer radical operation, and to summarize its short-term efficacy and clinical experience. Data of 101 cases undergoing da Vinci robotic surgical system for rectal cancer radical operation from March 2010 to September 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Evaluation was focused on operative procedure, complication, recovery and pathology. All the 101 cases underwent operation successfully and safely without conversion to open procedure. Rectal cancer radical operation with da Vinci robotic surgical system included 73 low anterior resections and 28 abdominoperineal resections. The average operative time was (210.3±47.2) min. The average blood lose was (60.5±28.7) ml without transfusion. Lymphadenectomy harvest was 17.3±5.4. Passage of first flatus was (2.7±0.7) d. Distal margin was (5.3±2.3) cm without residual cancer cells. The complication rate was 6.9%, including anastomotic leakage(n=2), perineum incision infection(n=2), pulmonary infection (n=2), urinary retention (n=1). There was no postoperative death. The mean follow-up time was(12.9±8.0) months. No local recurrence was found except 2 cases with distant metastasis. Application of da Vinci robotic surgical system in rectal cancer radical operation is safe and patients recover quickly The short-term efficacy is satisfactory.

  6. Robotic Assisted Radical Cystoprostatectomy and Intracorporeal Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion for a Kidney Transplant Recipient

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    Peter A. Caputo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and Objectives: Robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an alternative to open radical cystectomy. As experience is gained with the RARC approach the technique is being applied to more complex surgical cases. We describe here our technique for RARC with intracorporeal ileal conduit urinary diversion for a renal transplant recipient. Materials and Methods: The patient is a 60-year old man with high-grade muscle invasive bladder cancer. He has a history of renal failure due to polycystic kidney disease and received a deceased donor renal transplant in 2008. His hospital course at time of transplant was complicated by low-level BK virus viremia. Interestingly his trans-urethral bladder tumor resection specimen at time of bladder cancer diagnosis stained positive for SV40. His native kidneys were anuric so bilateral laparoscopic nephrectomy was performed in a staged fashion 2 weeks prior to RARC. Our surgical technique utilizes 6 trocars, of note a 12-mm assistant trocar is placed 1 cm superior to the pubic symphysis, and this trocar is solely used to pass a laparoscopic stapler to facilitate the excision of the ileal segment and the stapled enteric anastomosis. Surgical steps include: identification of native ureters bilaterally (removed en bloc with the bladder specimen; identification of the transplanted ureter at the right bladder dome; posterior bladder and prostate dissection along Denonvilliers’ fascia; development of the space of Retzius; ligation and transection of the bladder and prostate vascular bundles; apical prostate dissection and transection of urethra; left pelvic lymphadenectomy; ilium resection for creation of the ileal conduit; stapled enteric anastomosis; ureteroileal anastomosis; maturation of the ileal conduit stoma. Results: The surgery had no intraoperative complications. Operative time was 443 minutes (7.4 hours. Estimated blood loss was 250 cc. Length of hospital stay was 5 days. The patient

  7. ROBOT-ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 80 CASES

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    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As a common disease, prostate cancer (PC has taken now first place among all malignancies in many countries of the world.The authors have analyzed the results of their series of robot-assisted radical laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP in patients with PC. They also present a number of surgical techniques that may be useful for novice surgeons. Materials and methods. In November 2008 to November 2009, the Department of Urology, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, performed 80 RALPs using the da Vinci S surgical robotic system. The patients’ mean age was 63.7 (49–71 years; the mean blood level of total prostate-specific antigen was 6.1 (2.1–20.84 ng/ml; the mean prostate volume was 44 (18–94 cm3, as evidenced by transrectal ultrasound study. The authors analyzed the following indicators: operating time, degree of blood loss, conversion of surgical intervention,degrees of intra- and postoperative complications, and oncological and functional results. Results. In our series, RALP was performed without preserving neurovascular bundles or by using a nerve-sparing procedure in 66 (82.5% and 14 (17.5%, respectively; 22 (27.5% patients underwent lymphadenectomy. The average length of hospital stay was 7 (4–21 days; the mean time of urethral catheter removal was 10 (6–21 days postoperatively. The mean time of surgical intervention was 174 (121–276 min. Mean blood loss was 248 (35–1950 ml. Postmortem study revealed a positive surgical margin in 19 (24% cases and tumor invasion into the seminal vesicles in 5 (6% patients. Stages pT2 and pT3 were found in 56 (70% and 24 (30%, respectively; total Gleason scores were 6 (3+3, 7 (3+4, 7 (4+3, 8 (4+4 in 38 (47.5%, 35 (43.75%, 5 (6.25%, and 2 (2.5% patients, respectively. Among 34 patients examined 3 months after RALP, 28 (82.4% patients completely retained urine; 5 (14.7% applied not more than a pad a day. In patients with preserved erectile function, the

  8. The Characteristics of Cervical Cancer Patients Who Underwent a Radical Hysterectomy at Sanglah Hospital Denpasar in 2015

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    I Nyoman Bayu Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer in women. It is the main cause of cancer-related death in women in developing countries. Cervical cancer in Indonesia is the second most cancer affecting Indonesian women and the prevalence is relatively stable in the last 30 years. Cervical cancer was closely related to the histologic type of itself. A squamous cell carcinoma has a specific route of local spreading and a lymphatic route. The sample of this study are cervical cancer patients who underwent a radical hysterectomy from January 1 to December 31, 2015 in Sanglah Hospital Denpasar, Bali. The aim of this study is to discover the characteristics of the patients by age, parity, education level, marital status, sexual activity, the first symptoms and the early screening done, and the clinical staging. Methods: This descriptive study involved 20 patients in Sanglah Hospital Denpasar who had a radical hysterectomy from January 1 until December 31, 2015. The characteristics are gathered from the patients’ medical record. Results: The most cases done radical hysterectomy between 41-45 years old which proportion was 40%, the most parity was parity 2 (60%, elementary school was the most education level (35%, all of the samples only married once and sexually active, the most first symptom was vaginal bleeding (55%, only 10% had pap smear as early detection, and the most clinical stage was stage IIB (50%.

  9. The efficacy and utilisation of preoperative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: does it change the surgical dissection plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavukçu, Hasan Hüseyin; Aytaç, Ömer; Balcı, Numan Cem; Kulaksızoğlu, Haluk; Atuğ, Fatih

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the use of multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. We prospectively evaluated 60 consecutive patients, including 30 patients who had (Group 1), and 30 patients who had not (Group 2) mp-MRI before robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Based on the findings of mp-MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial in the mp-MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason sum scores and surgical margin positivity. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy Gleason score, final pathological Gleason score and surgical margin positivity. mp-MRI changed the initial surgical plan in 18 of 30 patients (60%) in Group 1. In seventeen of these patients (56%) surgical plan was changed from non-nerve sparing to interfascial nerve sparing plan. In one patient dissection plan was changed to non-nerve sparing technique which had extraprostatic extension on final pathology. Surgical margin positivity was similar in Groups 1, and 2 (16% and 13%, respectively) although, Group 1 had higher number of high- risk patients. mp-MRI confirmed the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 27 of of 30 patients (90%). Preoperative mp-MRI effected the decision to perform a nerve-sparing technique in 56% of the patients in our study; moreover, changing the dissection plan from non-nerve-sparing technique to a nerve sparing technique did not increase the rate of surgical margin positivity.

  10. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle and endopelvic fascia sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Augusto Monteiro Lins de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RAP is the dominant minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. The introduction of robotic assistance has the potential to improve surgical outcomes and reduce the steep learning curve associated with conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle without open the endopelvic fascia during RAP. Materials and Methods A 51-year old male, presenting histological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6 (3+3, in 4 cores of 12, with an initial PSA=3.41ng/dl and the digital rectal examination demonstrating a prostate with hardened nodule in the right lobe of the prostate base (clinical stage T2a. Surgical treatment with the robot-assisted technique was offered as initial therapeutic option and the critical technical point was the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle with endopelvic fascia preservation, during radical prostatectomy. Results The operative time was of 89 minutes, blood loss was 100ml. No drain was left in the peritoneal cavity. The patient was discharged within 24 hours. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. The pathological evaluation revealed prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6, with free surgical margins and seminal vesicles free of neoplastic involvement (pathologic stage T2a. At 3-month-follow-up, the patient lies with undetectable PSA, continent and potent. Conclusion This is a feasible technique combining the benefits of retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle, the preservation of the pubo-prostatic collar and the preservation of the antero-lateral cavernous nerves.

  11. Learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for a single experienced surgeon: comparison with simultaneous laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ja Yoon; Ha, Hong Koo

    2015-04-01

    Despite the large number of analytical reports regarding the learning curve in the transition from open to robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), few comparative results with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) have been reported. Thus, we evaluated operative and postoperative outcomes in RARP versus 100 simultaneously performed LRPs. A single surgeon had performed more than 1,000 laparoscopic operations, including 415 cases of radical nephrectomy, 85 radical cystectomies, 369 radical prostatectomies, and treatment of 212 other urological tumors, since 2009. We evaluated operative (operation time, intraoperative transfusion, complications, hospital stay, margin status, pathological stage, Gleason score) and postoperative (continence and erectile function) parameters in initial cases of RARP without tutoring compared with 100 recently performed LRPs. Mean operation time and length of hospital stay for RARP and LRP were 145.5±43.6 minutes and 118.1±39.1 minutes, and 6.4±0.9 days and 6.6±1.1 days, respectively (p=0.003 and p=0.721). After 17 cases, the mean operation time for RARP was similar to LRP (less than 2 hours). Positive surgical margins in localized cancer were seen in 11.1% and 8.9% of cases in RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.733). At postoperative 3 months, sexual intercourse was reported in 14.0% and 12.0%, and pad-free continence in 96.0% and 81.0% in patients with RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.796 and p=0.012). Previous large-volume experience of LRPs may shorten the learning curve for RARP in terms of oncological outcome. Additionally, previous experience with laparoscopy may improve the functional outcomes of RARP.

  12. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of ho...

  13. Total robotic radical rectal resection with da Vinci Xi system: single docking, single phase technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, Anup Sunil; Jatal, Sudhir; Saklani, Avanish

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to assess the advantages of Da Vinci Xi system in rectal cancer surgery. It also assesses the initial oncological outcomes after rectal resection with this system from a tertiary cancer center in India. Robotic rectal surgery has distinct advantages over laparoscopy. Total robotic resection is increasing following the evolution of hybrid technology. The latest Da Vinci Xi system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, USA) is enabled with newer features to make total robotic resection possible with single docking and single phase. Thirty-six patients underwent total robotic resection in a single phase and single docking. We used newer port positions in a straight line. Median distance from the anal verge was 4.5 cm. Median robotic docking time and robotic procedure time were 9 and 280 min, respectively. Median blood loss was 100 mL. One patient needed conversion to an open approach due to advanced disease. Circumferential resection margin and longitudinal resection margins were uninvolved in all other patients. Median lymph node yield was 10. Median post-operative stay was 7 days. There were no intra-operative adverse events. The latest Da Vinci Xi system has made total robotic rectal surgery feasible in single docking and single phase. With the new system, four arm total robotic rectal surgery may replace the hybrid technique of laparoscopic and robotic surgery for rectal malignancies. The learning curve for the new system appears to be shorter than anticipated. Early perioperative and oncological outcomes of total robotic rectal surgery with the new system are promising. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical nephrectomy using the Da Vinci Si system: how to improve surgeon autonomy. Our step-by-step technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Hugo H; Storey, Raul E; Rose, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we describe several steps to improve surgeon autonomy during a Left Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Nephrectomy (RALRN), using the Da Vinci Si system. Our kidney cancer program is based on 2 community hospitals. We use the Da Vinci Si system. Access is obtained with the following trocars: Two 8 mm robotic, one 8 mm robotic, bariatric length (arm 3), 15 mm for the assistant and 12 mm for the camera. We use curved monopolar scissors in robotic arm 1, Bipolar Maryland in arm 2, Prograsp Forceps in arm 3, and we alternate throughout the surgery with EndoWrist clip appliers and the vessel sealer. Here, we described three steps and the use of 3 robotic instruments to improve surgeon autonomy. Step 1: the lower pole of the kidney was dissected and this was retracted upwards and laterally. This maneuver was performed using the 3rd robotic arm with the Prograsp Forceps. Step 2: the monopolar scissors was replaced (robotic arm 1) with the robotic EndoWrist clip applier, 10 mm Hem-o-Lok. The renal artery and vein were controlled and transected by the main surgeon. Step 3: the superior, posterolateral dissection and all bleeders were carefully coagulated by the surgeon with the EndoWrist one vessel sealer. We have now performed 15 RALRN following these steps. Our results were: blood loss 300 cc, console time 140 min, operating room time 200 min, anesthesia time 180 min, hospital stay 2.5 days, 1 incisional hernia, pathology: (13) RCC clear cell, (1) chromophobe and (1) papillary type 1. Tumor Stage: (5) T1b, (8) T2a, (2) T2b. We provide a concise, step-by-step technique for radical nephrectomy (RN) using the Da Vinci Si robotic system that may provide more autonomy to the surgeon, while maintaining surgical outcome equivalent to standard laparoscopic RN.

  15. Consumerism and its impact on robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Sultan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2011-12-01

    • Many experts consider that media coverage, marketing and/or direct-to-consumer advertising, particularly Internet-based forms, are fundamental to the widespread adoption of robotic-assisted prostatectomy (RARP). However, this has not been explored previously. • The primary objective of the present study was to delineate the role of media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet, whereas the secondary goal focused on website quality with respect to the presentation of prostatectomy. • Website content was evaluated for direct-to-consumer advertising after the retrieval of the first 50 websites using Google and Yahoo for each of the terms: 'robotic prostatectomy, laparoscopic prostatectomy (LP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP)'. • A linear regression analysis was performed for the annual number of Internet news hits over the last decade for each procedure. Website quality assessment was performed using WHO Honesty on the Internet (HON) code principles. • Of the retrieved sites, the proportion containing direct-to-consumer advertising for RARP vs LP vs ORP using Google was 64% vs 14% vs 0%, respectively (P 0.05). • Media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet is more widespread compared to LP and ORP. • Disturbingly, the quality of websites using any technique for prostatectomy was of poor quality when using principles of honest information presenting and such findings need to be discussed with respect to obtaining informed consent from patients. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  16. The Incidence and Anatomy of Accessory Pudendal Arteries as Depicted on Multidetector-Row CT Angiography: Clinical Implications of Preoperative Evaluation for Laparoscopic and Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Beom Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Yun Hwan; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kang, Seok Ho; Cheon, Jun

    2009-01-01

    To help preserve accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) and to ensure optimal postoperative sexual function after a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, we have evaluated the incidence of APAs as detected on multidetector-row CT (MDCT) angiography and have provided a detailed anatomical description. The distribution of APAs was evaluated in 121 consecutive male patients between February 2006 and July 2007 who underwent 64- channel MDCT angiography of the lower extremities. We defined an APA as any artery located within the periprostatic region running parallel to the dorsal vascular complex. We also subclassified APAs into lateral and apical APAs. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated the origin, course and number of APAs; the final APA subclassification based on MDCT angiography source data was determined by consensus. We identified 44 APAs in 36 of 121 patients (30%). Two distinct varieties of APAs were identified. Thirty-three APAs (75%) coursed near the anterolateral region of the prostatic apex, termed apical APAs. The remaining 11 APAs (25%) coursed along the lateral aspect of the prostate, termed lateral APAs. All APAs originated from the internal obturator artery and iliac artery or a branch of the iliac artery such as the inferior vesical artery. The majority of apical APAs arose from the internal obturator artery (84%). Seven patients (19%) had multiple APAs. APAs are more frequently detected by the use of MDCT angiography than as suggested by previous surgical studies. The identification of APAs on MDCT angiography may provide useful information for the surgical preservation of APAs during a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

  17. Fifteen years of experience radical cystectomy and intestinal urinary diversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Vasil’chenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Examination of the results of surgical treatment and analysis of the surgical technique and perioperative parameters in a series of radical cystectomy on the basis of its own 15 years of experience in the formation of orthotopic and heterotopic urinary reservoir of the ileum segment by developed and patented techniques in different versions: open radical cystectomy, laparoscopic radical cystectomy and robotassisted radical cystectomy.Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis of 310 radical cystectomy performed from 2000 to 2015, on the occasion of various pathologies of the bladder and prostate, as well as cancers of other organs (uterus, colon with involvement in the process of bladder tumor. Plastics of the bladder was performed from the segment of the terminal ileum. Formation of orthotopic bladder was performed by the method of M.I. Vasilchenko (RF patent for invention № 2337630 “Method of orthotopic bladder plastics” by M.I. Vasilchenko. The ureters are implanted by antireflux procedure. If unable to perform orthotopic bladder plastics recovery and self-urination, patients underwent the formation of heterotopic enteral reservoir with a holding valve.Results. It assesses the functionality and viability of organic shaped orthotopic and heterotopic urinary neocystis in the early and late postoperative periods in different versions. The proposed techniques have a beneficial effect on the improvement of the functional state and stabilization of the upper urinary tract. Analysis of morbidity and mortality was determined according to the classification of surgical complications on the Clavien–Dindo. This approach allowed to identify most of the complications and prevent an underestimation of the main negative results. Estimated oncologic efficacy of minimally invasive interventions laparoscopic radical cystectomy and robot-assisted radical cystectomy not inferior open radical cystectomy.Conclusions. Formation of

  18. An unexpected resident in the ileum detected during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy and intracorporeal Studer pouch formation: Taenia saginata parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Asil, Erem; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2011-02-01

    A case of moving ileal Taenia saginata parasites is presented with demonstrative images. We came across the parasites surprisingly while performing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal Studer pouch urinary diversion. We recommend stool sample evaluation in the preoperative period for possible presence of intestinal parasitic diseases, particularly in patients with bladder cancer who are admitted from areas with an increased incidence of intestinal parasitic diseases, before opening the bowel segments during surgery to perform radical cystectomy and urinary diversion.

  19. Oncological outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients between robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare pathological and oncological outcomes between robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RaLRP and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP among high-risk prostate cancer patient in a tertiary center in Taiwan. Materials and methods: From November 2003 to October 2013, 129 high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving minimally-invasive radical prostatectomy were included. The Kaplan–Meier analysis was used for measuring biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS. Multivariate logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to determine predictors of positive surgical margin and BFS. Results: Among the 129 high-risk prostate cancer patients included, 80 (62% patients received LRP and 49 (38% patients received RaLRP. There was no significant difference of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence rate between RaLRP and LRP group (P = 0.802 and 0.292. Higher pathological T stage predicted an increased likelihood of positive margins (OR = 3.44, 95% CI [1.45, 8.18], P = 0.005. Higher initial PSA level (HR = 2.88, 95% CI [1.04, 7.94], P = 0.041 and positive surgical margin (HR = 2.55, 95% CI [1.20, 5.44], P = 0.015 were poor prognostic factors for BFS. Conclusion: RaLRP can be considered among high-risk prostate cancer in Asian people with comparable oncological outcomes to LRP. Higher pathological T stage was associated with increased likelihood of positive margins, patients with higher iPSA level and positive surgical margin had worsen biochemical recurrence-free survival.

  20. When Partial Nephrectomy is Unsuccessful: Understanding the Reasons for Conversion from Robotic Partial to Radical Nephrectomy at a Tertiary Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Önder; Maurice, Matthew J; Mouracade, Pascal; Malkoç, Ercan; Dagenais, Julien; Nelson, Ryan J; Chavali, Jaya Sai S; Stein, Robert J; Fergany, Amr; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2017-07-01

    We sought to identify the preoperative factors associated with conversion from robotic partial nephrectomy to radical nephrectomy. We report the incidence of this event. Using our institutional review board approved database, we abstracted data on 1,023 robotic partial nephrectomies performed at our center between 2010 and 2015. Standard and converted cases were compared in terms of patients and tumor characteristics, and perioperative, functional and oncologic outcomes. Logistic regression analysis was done to identify predictors of radical conversion. The overall conversion rate was 3.1% (32 of 1,023 cases). The most common reasons for conversion were tumor involvement of hilar structures (8 cases or 25%), failure to achieve negative margins on frozen section (7 or 21.8%), suspicion of advanced disease (5 or 15.6%) and failure to progress (5 or 15.6%). Patients requiring conversion were older and had a higher Charlson score (both p partial nephrectomy cases had similar short-term oncologic outcomes but better renal functional preservation (p partial nephrectomy conversion to radical nephrectomy was 3.1%, including 2.2% of preoperatively anticipated nephrectomy cases. Increasing tumor size and complexity, and poor preoperative renal function are the main predictors of conversion. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined robotic transanal total mesorectal excision (R-taTME) and single-site plus one-port (R-SSPO) technique for ultra-low rectal surgery-initial experience with a new operation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Li-Jen; Ngu, James Chi-Yong; Tong, Yiu-Shun; Chen, Chia-Che

    2017-02-01

    Robot-assisted rectal surgery is gaining popularity, and robotic single-site surgery is also being explored clinically. We report our initial experience with robotic transanal total mesorectal excision (R-taTME) and radical proctectomy using the robotic single-site plus one-port (R-SSPO) technique for low rectal surgery. Between July 2015 and March 2016, 15 consecutive patients with ultra-low rectal lesions underwent R-taTME followed by radical proctectomy using the R-SSPO technique by a single surgeon. The clinical and pathological results were retrospectively analyzed. The median operative time was 473 (range, 335-569) min, and the estimated blood loss was 33 (range, 30-50) mL. The median number of lymph nodes harvested was 12 (range, 8-18). The median distal resection margin was 1.4 (range, 0.4-3.5) cm, and all patients had clear circumferential resection margins. We encountered a left ureteric transection intraoperatively in one patient, and another patient required reoperation for postoperative adhesive intestinal obstruction. There was no 30-day mortality. R-taTME followed by radical proctectomy using the R-SSPO technique for patients with low rectal lesions is technically feasible and safe without compromising oncologic outcomes. However, there were considerable limitations and a steep learning curve using current robotic technology.

  2. In vitro fertilization surrogate pregnancy in a patient who underwent radical hysterectomy followed by ovarian transposition, lower abdominal wall radiotherapy, and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigrad, Stephen; Hacker, Neville F; Kolb, Bradford

    2005-05-01

    To describe an IVF surrogate pregnancy from a patient who had a radical hysterectomy followed by excision of a laparoscopic port site implantation with ovarian transposition followed by abdominal wall irradiation and chemotherapy, which resulted in premature ovarian failure from which there was partial recovery. Case report. Tertiary referral university women's hospital in Sydney, Australia and private reproductive medicine clinic in California. A 34-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopy for pelvic pain, shortly afterward followed by radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, who subsequently developed a laparoscopic port site recurrence, which was excised in association with ovarian transposition before abdominal wall irradiation and chemotherapy. Modified IVF treatment, transabdominal oocyte retrieval, embryo cryopreservation in Australia, and transfer to a surrogate mother in the United States. Pregnancy. Miscarriage in the second cycle and a twin pregnancy in the fourth cycle. This is the first case report of ovarian stimulation and oocyte retrieval performed on transposed ovaries after a patient developed premature ovarian failure after radiotherapy and chemotherapy with subsequent partial ovarian recovery.

  3. The Da Vinci Xi and robotic radical prostatectomy-an evolution in learning and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, S S; Cahill, D

    2017-06-01

    The da Vinci Xi robot has been introduced as the successor to the Si platform. The promise of the Xi is to open the door to new surgical procedures. For robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP)/pelvic surgery, the potential is better vision and longer instruments. How has the Xi impacted on operative and pathological parameters as indicators of surgical performance? This is a comparison of an initial series of 42 RARPs with the Xi system in 2015 with a series using the Si system immediately before Xi uptake in the same calendar year, and an Si series by the same surgeon synchronously as the Xi series using operative time, blood loss, and positive margins as surrogates of surgical performance. Subjectively and objectively, there is a learning curve to Xi uptake in longer operative times but no impact on T2 positive margins which are the most reflective single measure of RARP outcomes. Subjectively, the vision of the Xi is inferior to the Si system, and the integrated diathermy system and automated setup are quirky. All require experience to overcome. There is a learning curve to progress from the Si to Xi da Vinci surgical platforms, but this does not negatively impact the outcome.

  4. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy has lower biochemical recurrence than laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Heui Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the effectiveness and safety of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP versus laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP in the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Existing systematic reviews were updated to investigate the effectiveness and safety of RARP. Electronic databases, including Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library, KoreaMed, Kmbase, and others, were searched through July 2014. The quality of the selected systematic reviews was assessed by using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews (R-Amstar and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Meta-analysis was performed by using Revman 5.2 (Cochrane Community and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 2.0 (CMA; Biostat. Cochrane Q and I2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity. Results: Two systematic reviews and 16 additional studies were selected from a search performed of existing systematic reviews. These included 2 randomized controlled clinical trials and 28 nonrandomized comparative studies. The risk of complications, such as injury to organs by the Clavien-Dindo classification, was lower with RARP than with LRP (relative risk [RR], 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23–0.85; p=0.01. The risk of urinary incontinence was lower (RR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.31–0.60; p<0.000001 and the potency rate was significantly higher with RARP than with LRP (RR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.11–1.70; I2 =78%; p=0.003. Regarding positive surgical margins, no significant difference in risk between the 2 groups was observed; however, the biochemical recurrence rate was lower after RARP than after LRP (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.48–0.73; I2 =21%; p<0.00001. Conclusions: RARP appears to be a safe and effective technique compared with LRP with a lower complication rate, better potency, a higher continence rate, and a decreased rate of biochemical recurrence.

  5. Robotic transthoracic esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntambekar, Shailesh; Kenawadekar, Rahul; Kumar, Sanjay; Joshi, Saurabh; Agarwal, Geetanjali; Reddy, Sunil; Mallik, Jainul

    2015-04-23

    We have initially published our experience with the robotic transthoracic esophagectomy in 32 patients from a single institute. The present paper is the extension of our experience with robotic system and to best of our knowledge this represents the largest series of robotic transthoracic esophagectomy worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the robotic transthoracic esophagectomy for esophageal cancer in a series of patients from a single institute. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted for 83 esophageal cancer patients who underwent robotic esophagectomy at our institute from December 2009 to December 2012. All patients underwent a thorough clinical examination and pre-operative investigations. All patients underwent robotic esophageal mobilization. En-bloc dissection with lymphadenectomy was performed in all cases with preservation of Azygous vein. Relevant data were gathered from medical records. The study population comprised of 50 men and 33 women with mean age of 59.18 years. The mean operative time was 204.94 mins (range 180 to 300). The mean blood loss was 86.75 ml (range 50 to 200). The mean number of lymph node yield was 18. 36 (range 13 to 24). None of the patient required conversion. The mean ICU stay and hospital stay was 1 day (range 1 to 3) and 10.37 days (range 10 to 13), respectively. A total of 16 (19.28%) complication were reported in these patents. Commonly reported complication included dysphagia, pleural effusion and anastomotic leak. No treatment related mortality was observed. After a median follow-up period of 10 months, 66 patients (79.52%) survived with disease free stage. We found robot-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy feasible in cases of esophageal cancer. The procedure allowed precise en-bloc dissection with lymphadenectomy in mediastinum with reduced operative time, blood loss and complications.

  6. Urologic robotic surgery in Korea: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ill Young

    2015-08-01

    Since 2005 when the da Vinci surgical system was approved as a medical device by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare, 51 systems have been installed in 40 institutions as of May 2015. Although robotic surgery is not covered by the national health insurance service in Korea, it has been used in several urologic fields as a less invasive surgery. Since the first robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in 2005, partial nephrectomy, radical cystectomy, pyeloplasty, and other urologic surgeries have been performed. The following should be considered to extend the indications for robotic surgery: training systems including accreditation, operative outcomes from follow-up results, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, the history and current status of robotic surgeries in Korea are presented.

  7. Pelvic lymph node dissection during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: efficacy, limitations, and complications-a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploussard, Guillaume; Briganti, Alberto; de la Taille, Alexandre; Haese, Alexander; Heidenreich, Axel; Menon, Mani; Sulser, Tullio; Tewari, Ashutosh K; Eastham, James A

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) in prostate cancer is the most effective method for detecting lymph node metastases. However, a decline in the rate of PLND during radical prostatectomy (RP) has been noted. This is likely the result of prostate cancer stage migration in the prostate-specific antigen-screening era, and the introduction of minimally invasive approaches such as robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). To assess the efficacy, limitations, and complications of PLND during RARP. A review of the literature was performed using the Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science databases with no restriction of language from January 1990 to December 2012. The literature search used the following terms: prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy, robot-assisted, and lymph node dissection. The median value of nodal yield at PLND during RARP ranged from 3 to 24 nodes. As seen in open and laparoscopic RP series, the lymph node positivity rate increased with the extent of dissection during RARP. Overall, PLND-only related complications are rare. The most frequent complication after PLND is symptomatic pelvic lymphocele, with occurrence ranging from 0% to 8% of cases. The rate of PLND-associated grade 3-4 complications ranged from 0% to 5%. PLND is associated with increased operative time. Available data suggest equivalence of PLND between RARP and other surgical approaches in terms of nodal yield, node positivity, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. PLND during RARP can be performed effectively and safely. The overall number of nodes removed, the likelihood of node positivity, and the types and rates of complications of PLND are similar to pure laparoscopic and open retropubic procedures. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Posterior muscolofascial reconstruction incorporated into urethrovescical anastomosis during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gan, Melanie; Borghesi, Marco; Zattoni, Fabio; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    The rationale of posterior musculofascial plate reconstruction during radical prostatectomy is to shorten the time to reach urinary continence recovery and to reduce the risk of bleeding and anastomosis leakage. We describe our original technique incorporating the posterior muscolofascial reconstruction into urethrovesical anastomosis using robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). For this reconstructive step, we use a 30-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture (V-20 tapered needle). Specifically, the free edge of the posterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia is approximated to the posterior part of the sphincteric apparatus in a running fashion from left to right. The musculature of the urethral wall is incorporated in this first layer of the running suture. This suture is then continued back to the left in a second layer incorporating the anterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia (or prostatovesical muscle), the bladder neck, and again the urethra, this time also with urethral mucosa. The urethrovesical anastomosis is completed using a second running barbed suture (15-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture, V-20 tapered needle). No intraoperative complications were observed during this step of the procedure. Anastomotic leakages were observed only in 2% of cases. Only 12.5% showed urinary incontinence after catheter removal (1-2 pads). At mean follow-up of 9 months, the urinary continence recovery was 95%, and an anastomosis stricture necessitating an endoscopic incision developed in only three (1.5%) patients. Recent systematic reviews of the literature showed only a minimal advantage in favor of posterior musculofascial reconstruction in terms of urinary continence recovery within 1 month after radical prostatectomy. We support the use of this step of RARP because it is simple, reproducible, with a very limited increase in operative time, and with only a slight risk of potential harm to the patient. Moreover, it could improve hemostasis and provide greater support for a

  9. Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?―Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data―

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of ...

  10. Robotic presacral neurectomy - technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Vasilis; Jacob, Kristina; Klauschie, Jennifer; Kho, Rosanne; Magrina, Javier

    2012-03-01

    The feasibility, safety and outcomes of robotic presacral neurectomy were evaluated. A retrospective analysis was performed of 33 patients with midline chronic pelvic pain, who underwent robotic presacral neurectomy. Data were collected during the period March 2004-March 2010. All patients underwent robotic presacral neurectomy and additional robotic procedures. Mean operating time for robotic presacral neurectomy was 5.8 (range 4.4-6.9) min. Mean blood loss, including concomitant procedures, was 39 (range 15-150) ml. Most patients were discharged the same day (60%) and mean hospital stay was 0.39 (range 0-2) days. There were no conversions or intra-operative complications. There were two postoperative complications: one pelvic abscess and one Clostridium difficile colitis. Pain improvement was reported by 73% (22/30) of patients. Robotic presacral neurectomy is safe and feasible, resulting in improvement of pelvic pain in selected patients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  12. Comparison of Perioperative Outcomes of Total Laparoscopic and Robotically Assisted Hysterectomy for Benign Pathology during Introduction of a Robotic Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Sami Kilic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. Prospectively compare outcomes of robotically assisted and laparoscopic hysterectomy in the process of implementing a new robotic program. Design. Prospectively comparative observational nonrandomized study. Design Classification. II-1. Setting. Tertiary caregiver university hospital. Patients. Data collected consecutively 24 months, 34 patients underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy, 25 patients underwent robotic hysterectomy, and 11 patients underwent vaginal hysterectomy at our institution. Interventions. Outcomes of robotically assisted, laparoscopic, and vaginal complex hysterectomies performed by a single surgeon for noncancerous indications. Measurements and Main Results. Operative times were 208.3±59.01 minutes for laparoscopic, 286.2±82.87 minutes for robotic, and 163.5±61.89 minutes for vaginal (<.0001. Estimated blood loss for patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery was 242.7±211.37 cc, 137.4±107.50 cc for robotic surgery, and 243.2±127.52 cc for vaginal surgery (=0.05. The mean length of stay ranged from 1.8 to 2.3 days for the 3 methods. Association was significant for uterine weight (=0.0043 among surgery methods. Conclusion. Robotically assisted hysterectomy is feasible with low morbidity, a shorter hospital stay, and less blood loss. This suggests that robotic assistance facilitates a minimally invasive approach for patients with larger uterine size even during implementing a new robotic program.

  13. Risk of port-site metastases in pelvic cancers after robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, J; Bats, A-S; Bensaïd, C; Douay-Hauser, N; Ngo, C; Lécuru, F

    2015-04-01

    To assess the risk of occurrence of port-site metastases after robotic surgery for pelvic cancer. Retrospective study from June 2007 to March 2013 of patients with gynecologic cancer who underwent robot-assisted surgery. We collected preoperative data, including characteristics of patients and FIGO stage, intraoperative data (surgery performed, number of ports), and postoperative data (occurrence of metastases, occurrence of port-site metastases). 115 patients were included in the study: 61 with endometrial cancer, 50 with cervical cancer and 4 with ovarian cancer. The surgical procedures performed were: hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, para-aortic lymphadenectomy and omentectomy. All surgical procedures required the introduction of 4 ports, 3 for the robot and 1 for the assistant. With a mean follow-up of 504.4 days (507.7 days for endometrial cancer, 479.5 days for cervical cancer, and 511.3 for ovarian cancer), we observed 9 recurrences but no port-site metastasis. No port-site metastasis has occurred in our series. However, larger, prospective and randomized works are needed to formally conclude. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Robotic-assisted versus open radical cystectomy in bladder cancer: A meta-analysis of four randomized controlled trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin-Qiu; Zhao, Zhihong; Liang, Yiwen; Liao, Guixiang

    2018-02-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is increasing annually for treatment of bladder cancer. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the safety and efficacy of RARC and open radical cystectomy (ORC) for bladder cancer. Our meta-analysis searches were conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCT) assessing the two techniques. Four RCT studies were identified, including 239 cases. Our studies indicated that RARC was associated with longer operative time (WMD: 69.69, 95% CI:17.25 to122.12; P= 0.009), lower estimated blood loss (WMD: -299.83, 95% CI:-414.66to -184.99; P<0.00001). The two groups had no significant difference in overall perioperative complications, length of hospital stay, lymph node yield and positive surgical margins. RARC is mini-invasive alternative to ORC for bladder cancer. The advantage of RARC was reduced estimated blood loss. More studies are needed to compare the two techniques. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Brindha; Moon, Daniel; Love, Christopher; Meyer, Denny; Ferguson, Emma; Crowe, Helen; Howard, Nicholas; Mann, Sarah; Wootten, Addie

    2017-12-01

    treatment satisfaction between groups. Higher patient treatment satisfaction was more likely to be reported for couples whose depression scores were more similar. It is important to provide preoperative penile implant counseling and encourage patients to seek postoperative counseling if needed. This is one of the first Australian-based studies comprehensively assessing treatment satisfaction and psychosocial health of men after penile prosthesis surgery after RP. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study, so there is a possibility of recall bias, and causal associations could not be determined. Men in this Australian series who underwent penile prosthesis surgery after RP generally reported good sexual function and treatment satisfaction. Nevertheless, patient and partner mental health influenced their reported experience of the treatment. Pillay B, Moon D, Love C, et al. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy. J Sex Med 2017;14:1612-1620. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Robots conquering local government services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Agger; Andersen, Kim Normann; Sigh, Anne

    2016-01-01

    labour-intensive services, the public administration research community is short on knowledge of the impact on the work processes carried out in public organizations and how staff and clients react toward robots. This case study investigates the implementation and use of robot vacuum cleaners in Danish......The movement of robots from the production line to the service sector provides a potentially radical solution to innovate and transform public service delivery. Although robots are increasingly being adopted in service delivery (e.g., health- and eldercare) to enhance and in some cases substitute...... eldercare, demonstrating how robot vacuums have proven to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in the perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between key stakeholders in eldercare....

  17. The Efficacy and Utilisation of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Does it Change the Surgical Dissection Plan? A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Tavukçu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated the effect of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy operation. Materials and Methods: We prospectively evaluated 30 consecutive patients, 15 of whom had prostate MRI before the operation, and 15 of whom did not. With the findings of MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial technique in the MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA, and Gleason scores (GSs. Surgical margin status was also checked with the final pathology. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy GS, and final pathological GS. MRI changed the initial surgical plan to a nerve-sparing technique in 7 of the 15 patients. Only one patient in the MRI group had a positive surgical margin on bladder neck. MRI was confirmed as the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 93.3% of patients. Conclusion: Preoperative prostate MRI influenced the decision to carry out a nerve-sparing technique in 46% of the patients in our study; however, the change to a nerve-sparing technique did not seem to compromise the surgical margin positivity.

  18. Reverse Stage Shift at a Tertiary Care Center: Escalating Risk in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Power, Nicholas E.; Fine, Samson W.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.; Laudone, Vincent P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate changes in clinical and pathological characteristics of prostate cancer in patients treated surgically at a large tertiary care center in the context of increased use of active surveillance (AS) and minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Materials We performed retrospective review of 6,624 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2000–2010 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Patients were stratified by surgical approach (open, laparoscopic or robotic) and risk categories (low, intermediate, or high). Patients with low-risk disease, without intervention and minimum followup of 6 months were considered to have elected AS. Results AS cases increased from <20 per year between 2000–2004 to ≥100 per year between 2007–2009. Over the same decade MIS cases (laparoscopic or robotic) increased from zero to 63% of all surgical cases. The percentage of patients in intermediate- and high-risk categories increased over time, while the percentage in the low-risk category decreased (OR per year 0.91, 95% CI 0.89, 0.92, p <0.0005). The proportion of surgery patients with Gleason 6 tumors decreased over time (OR per year 0.87, 95% CI 0.85, 0.88; p <0.0005) while pathologic stage and Gleason score increased (p <0.0005). The proportion of low-risk cases decreased across all types of surgery, with the largest decrease in robotic surgery (p <0.0005). Conclusions We observed a reverse stage shift in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy since 2000 despite the introduction and rapid proliferation of MIS. These findings may be due to increased use of AS and institutional focus on treatment of higher-risk disease. PMID:21484780

  19. The evolution of robotic general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E B

    2009-01-01

    Surgical robotics in general surgery has a relatively short but very interesting evolution. Just as minimally invasive and laparoscopic techniques have radically changed general surgery and fractionated it into subspecialization, robotic technology is likely to repeat the process of fractionation even further. Though it appears that robotics is growing more quickly in other specialties, the changes digital platforms are causing in the general surgical arena are likely to permanently alter general surgery. This review examines the evolution of robotics in minimally invasive general surgery looking forward to a time where robotics platforms will be fundamental to elective general surgery. Learning curves and adoption techniques are explored. Foregut, hepatobiliary, endocrine, colorectal, and bariatric surgery will be examined as growth areas for robotics, as well as revealing the current uses of this technology.

  20. The risk of urinary retention following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and its impact on early continence outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnazari, Mansour; Zanaty, Marc; Ajib, Khaled; El-Hakim, Assaad; Zorn, Kevin C

    2017-12-22

    We aimed to evaluate the risk factors of acute urinary retention (AUR) following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), as well as the relationship of AUR with early continence outcomes. The records of 740 consecutive patients who underwent RARP by two experienced surgeons at our institution were retrospectively reviewed from a prospectively collected database. Multiple factors, including age, body mass index (BMI), international prostate symptom score (IPSS), prostate volume, presence of median lobe, nerve preservation status, anastomosis time, and catheter removal time (Day 4 vs. 7), were evaluated as risk factors for AUR using univariate and multivariate analysis. The relation between AUR and early return of continence (one and three months) post-RARP was also evaluated. The incidence of clinically significant vesico-urethral anastomotic (VUA) leak and AUR following catheter removal were 0.9% and 2.2% (17/740), respectively. In men who developed AUR, there was no significant relationship with regards to age, BMI, IPSS, prostatic volume, median lobe, nerve preservation, or anastomosis time; however, the incidence of AUR was significantly higher for men with catheter removal at Day 4 (4.5% [16/351]) vs. Day 7 (0.2% [1/389]) (p=0.004). Moreover, patients with early removal of the catheter (Day 4) who developed AUR had an earlier one-month return of 0-pad continence 87.5% (14/16) compared to patients without AUR 45.6% (153/335), with no significant difference at three months. While AUR is an uncommon complication of RARP, its incidence is much higher than VUA leakage. Further, it is often not well-discussed during patient counselling preoperatively. Moreover, earlier return of urinary continence was observed in patients experiencing AUR following RARP exclusively with catheter removal at Day 4. Future studies are warranted to validate the long-term impact of AUR on continence outcomes.

  1. Robot-assisted urologic surgery in 2010 - Advancements and future outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paurush Babbar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic surgery is a cutting edge and minimally invasive procedure, which has generated a great deal of excitement in the urologic community. While there has been much advancement in this emerging technology, it is safe to say that robotic urologic surgery holds tremendous potential for progress in the near future. Hence, it is paramount that urologists stay up-to-date regarding new developments in the realm of robotics with respect to novel applications, limitations and opportunities for incorporation into their practice. Robot-assisted surgery provides an enhanced 3D view, increased magnification of the surgical field, better manual dexterity, relatively bloodless field, elimination of surgeon′s tremor, reduction in a surgeon′s fatigue and mitigation of scattered light. All these factors translate into greater precision of surgical dissection, which is imperative in providing better intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Pioneering work assessing the feasibility of robotic surgery in urology began in the early 2000′s with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and has since expanded to procedures such as robot-assisted radical cystectomy, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, robot-assisted nephroureterectomy and robot-assisted pyeloplasty. A MEDLINE search was used to identify recent articles (within the last two years and publications of specific importance, which highlighted the recent developments and future direction of robotics. This review will use the aforementioned urologic surgeries as vehicles to evaluate the current status and future role of robotics in the advancement of the field of urology.

  2. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy in contemporary practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef S. Tanagho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic renal surgery is associated with reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, enhanced cosmesis, and more rapid convalescence relative to open renal surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is a minimally invasive, nephron-sparing alternative to laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for the management of small renal masses. While offering similar oncological outcomes to laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, the technical challenges and prolonged learning curve associated with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy limit its wider dissemination. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, although still an evolving procedure with no long-term data, has emerged as a viable alternative to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, with favorable preliminary outcomes. This article provides an overview of the role of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy in the management of renal cell carcinoma. The clinical indications and principles of surgical technique for this procedure are discussed. The oncological, renal functional, and perioperative outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy are also evaluated, as are complication rates.

  3. Health-related quality of life from a prospective randomised clinical trial of robot-assisted laparoscopic vs open radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Jamie C; Punnen, Sanoj; Fitzgerald, John; Svatek, Robert; Parekh, Dipen J

    2014-12-01

    To compare health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) outcomes for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy (RARC) with those of traditional open radical cystectomy (ORC) in a prospective randomised fashion. This was a prospective randomised clinical trial evaluating the HRQoL for ORC vs RARC in consecutive patients from July 2009 to June 2011. We administered the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Vanderbilt Cystectomy Index questionnaire, validated to assess HRQoL, preoperatively and then at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months postoperatively. Scores for each domain and total scores were compared in terms of deviation from preoperative values for both the RARC and the ORC cohorts. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the association between the type of radical cystectomy and HRQoL. At the time of the study, 47 patients had met the inclusion criteria, with 40 patients being randomised for analysis. The cohorts consisted of 20 patients undergoing ORC and 20 undergoing RARC, who were balanced with respect to baseline demographic and clinical features. Univariate analysis showed a return to baseline scores at 3 months postoperatively in all measured domains with no statistically significant difference among the various domains between the RARC and the ORC cohorts. Multivariate analysis showed no difference in HRQoL between the two approaches in any of the various domains, with the exception of a slightly higher physical well-being score in the RARC group at 6 months. There were no significant differences in the HRQoL outcomes between ORC and RARC, with a return of quality of life scores to baseline scores 3 months after radical cystectomy in both cohorts. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  4. Laparoscopy vs robotics in surgical management of endometrial cancer: comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Julien; Bats, Anne-Sophie; Huchon, Cyrille; Bensaïd, Chérazade; Douay-Hauser, Nathalie; Lécuru, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    To compare the rates of intraoperative and postoperative complications of robotic surgery and laparoscopy in the surgical treatment of endometrial cancer. Unicentric retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Tertiary teaching hospital. The study was performed from January 2002 to December 2011 and included patients with endometrial cancer who underwent laparoscopic or robotically assisted laparoscopic surgical treatment. Data collected included preoperative data, tumor characteristics, intraoperative data (route of surgery, surgical procedures, and complications), and postoperative data (early and late complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification, and length of hospital stay). Morbidity was compared between the 2 groups. The study included 146 patients, of whom 106 underwent laparoscopy and 40 underwent robotically assisted surgery. The 2 groups were comparable in terms of demographic and preoperative data. Intraoperative complications occurred in 9.4% of patients who underwent laparoscopy and in none who underwent robotically assisted surgery (p = .06). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of postoperative events. Robotically assisted surgery is not associated with a significant difference in intraoperative and postoperative complications, even when there were no intraoperative complications of robotically assisted surgery. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Individual learning curve for radical robot-assisted prostatectomy based on the example of three professionals working in one clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasner, P I; Pushkar', D Iu; Kolontarev, K B; Kotenkov, D V

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of new surgical technique always requires evaluation of its effectiveness and ease of acquisition. A comparative study of the results of the first three series of successive robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed on at time by three surgeons, was conducted. The series consisted of 40 procedures, and were divided into 4 groups of 10 operations for the analysis. When comparing data, statistically significant improvement of intra- and postoperative performance in each series was revealed, with increase in the number of operations performed, and in each subsequent series compared with the preceding one. We recommend to perform the planned conversion at the first operation. In our study, previous laparoscopic experience did not provide any significant advantages in the acquisition of robot-assisted technology. To characterize the individual learning curve, we recommend the use of the number of operations that the surgeon looked in the life-surgery regimen and/or in which he participated as an assistant before his own surgical activity, as well as the indicator "technical defect". In addition to the term "individual learning curve", we propose to introduce the terms "surgeon's individual training phase", and "clinic's learning curve".

  6. Prediction of Pathological Complete Response Using Endoscopic Findings and Outcomes of Patients Who Underwent Watchful Waiting After Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kazushige; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Nonoperative management for patients with rectal cancer who have achieved a clinical complete response after chemoradiotherapy is becoming increasingly important in recent years. However, the definition of and modality used for patients with clinical complete response differ greatly between institutions, and the role of endoscopic assessment as a nonoperative approach has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the ability of endoscopic assessments to predict pathological regression of rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy and the applicability of these assessments for the watchful waiting approach. This was a retrospective comparative study. This study was conducted at a single referral hospital. A total of 198 patients with rectal cancer underwent preoperative endoscopic assessments after chemoradiotherapy. Of them, 186 patients underwent radical surgery with lymph node dissection. The histopathological findings of resected tissues were compared with the preoperative endoscopic findings. Twelve patients refused radical surgery and chose watchful waiting; their outcomes were compared with the outcomes of patients who underwent radical surgery. The endoscopic criteria correlated well with tumor regression grading. The sensitivity and specificity for a pathological complete response were 65.0% to 87.1% and 39.1% to 78.3%. However, endoscopic assessment could not fully discriminate pathological complete responses, and the outcomes of patients who underwent watchful waiting were considerably poorer than the patients who underwent radical surgery. Eventually, 41.7% of the patients who underwent watchful waiting experienced uncontrollable local failure, and many of these occurrences were observed more than 3 years after chemoradiotherapy. The number of the patients treated with the watchful waiting strategy was limited, and the selection was not randomized. Although endoscopic assessment after chemoradiotherapy correlated with pathological response

  7. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  8. [Anesthesia experiences on laparoscopic nephrectomy with da Vinci S robotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Ling; Lan, Zhixun

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the clinical anesthesia experiences in 20 patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy with da Vinci S robotics.
 Anesthesia data of 20 patients from Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy with da Vinci S robotics from August 2014 to November 2014, were analyzed and summarized. The anesthesia time, operation time, CO(2) pneumoperitoneum time, PaCO(2) and PETCO(2) were recorded.
 All patients were anesthetized and underwent surgery with da Vinci S robotics. The anesthesia time was (220±14) min, the operation time was (187±11) min, and the CO(2) pneumoperitoneum time was (180±13) min. The PaCO(2) and PETCO(2) were significantly elevated at 1.5 h after operation compared with those at the baseline (before pneumoperitoneum) (Pda vinci S robotics. However, the duration of CO(2) pneumoperitoneum is significantly increased compared to that of other surgical procedures, resulting in high airway resistance and acid-base disturbance.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of sexual function outcome in prostate cancer patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung Hyo; Kang, Dong Il; Ha, Yun-Sok; Salmasi, Amirali Hassanzadeh; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2014-02-01

    The recovery of potency following radical prostatectomy is complex and has a very wide range. In this study, we analyzed in detail the precise pattern of recovery of potency following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Prospectively collected database of patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year after RARP were evaluated retrospectively. Of 503 patients identified, 483 patients completed the sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) preoperatively and postoperatively every 3 months for the first 12 months. Overall potency, usage of phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, and return to baseline erectile function were evaluated. Potency was defined as having erection that is sufficient for sexual intercourse more than 50% of attempts, while quality potency was defined as being potent without the use of PDE-5 inhibitors. Preoperatively, the overall potency and quality potency rate were 67.1% and 48.1%, respectively. Postoperatively, the overall potency rate was 61.4%, while the quality potency rate was 37.2%. In multivariate regression analysis, independent predictors of potency recovery were young age (21, the overall potency and quality potency rate were 79.7% and 41.2%, respectively. More importantly, only 21.4% of the men with normal erection preoperatively (SHIM>21) returned to baseline erectile function (SHIM>21) 12 months after surgery. This study indicates that young age (<60), preoperative potency, and bilateral preservation of NVBs were positive predictors of potency recovery following RARP. However, an overwhelming majority of men experience a deterioration in the overall quality of erection after RARP.

  10. Robot-assisted Heller's myotomy for achalasia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altokhais, Tariq; Mandora, Hala; Al-Qahtani, Ayed; Al-Bassam, Abdulrahman

    2016-12-01

    Achalasia is rare in children. Surgical options include open, laparoscopic and robotic approaches. However, Heller's myotomy remains the treatment of choice. This report describes our experience with robot-assisted Heller's myotomy in children and presents a review of the literature. Included in this study are children who underwent robot-assisted Heller's myotomy for esophageal achalasia via the Da Vinci surgical system between 2004 and 2015 at King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The medical records of these patients were reviewed for demographic data, presenting symptoms, diagnostic modalities, operative procedures, complications, outcomes and follow-ups. Six patients were identified. The age of the patients at surgery ranged between 2 and 12 years (mean 7.1 years). The most common presenting symptoms were dysphagia, vomiting and nocturnal cough. Contrast swallow and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy established a diagnosis of esophageal achalasia in all of the patients. Four patients underwent esophageal dilatation 2-5 times before the definitive procedure. All patients underwent successful robot-assisted Heller's myotomy with concomitant partial posterior fundoplication. The postoperative course was uneventful. Five patients had a complete resolution of the symptoms and one patient improved. The follow-up assessments have been consistent and have ranged from 0.5 to 11 years (mean 4.4 years). Robotic-assisted Heller's myotomy for esophageal achalasia in children is safe and effective and is a suitable alternative to open and laparoscopic approaches.

  11. Robotic Assisted Transanal Polypectomies: Is There Any Indication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Ruiz, Marcos; Cagigas Fernández, Carmen; Alonso Martín, Joaquín; Cristobal Poch, Lidia; Manuel Palazuelos, Carlos; Barredo Cañibano, Francisco Javier; Gómez Fleitas, Manuel; Castillo Diego, Julio

    2017-12-01

    Robotic assisted transanal polipectomy may have advantages compared with the conventional transanal minimally invasive surgery technique. We evaluate the safety, feasibility and advantages of this technique. Between February 2014 and October 2015, 9patients underwent robotic transanal polypectomy. We performed a retrospective study in which we analyse prospectively collected data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, perioperative outcomes, pathological report, morbidity and mortality. A total of 5 male and 4 female patients underwent robotic TAMIS. Lesions were 6,22cm from the anal verge. Mean size was 15,8cm 2 . All procedures were performed in the lithotomy position. Closure of the defect was performed in all cases. Mean blood loss was 39,8ml. Mean operative time was 71,9min. No severe postoperative complications or readmissions occured. Median hospital stay was 2,5 days. Robotic TAMIS is useful to treat complex rectal lesions. Our transanal platform allowed a wider range of movements of the robotic arms and to perform all procedures in the lithotomy position. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?--Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of a questionnaire survey for the hospitals with robots and on the Diagnostic Procedures Combination data provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Wealth for those without such equipment. The concentration of the case loads was principally defined as when hospitals with robots had more predominant proportion of cases than those without them in the comparison between case loads prior to instillation of robots (or in the initial year of the study) and those in the final years. The 11 selected areas included 44 hospitals with robots and 156 without them. Concentration of case loads was found in 5 areas. In 4 areas, installation of robots did not have a specific relation to the distribution pattern s of case loads in hospitals with or without the equipment. The remaining 2 areas tended to have a weak but not definite concentration of case loads. In the areas in which installation did not influence case loads the further analysis revealed that their case loads had already been concentrated in the initial year (2010) of the study. Although the current results were found in a single department of the hospital, robotic installation may result in concentration of prostatectomy case loads for such hospitals in some areas. The current results are intriguing when we consider the future roles of acute care hospitals and beds in our country where the number of aged patients having chronic diseases will increase. In conclusion, installation of robotic equipment may result in concentration

  13. Robotic surgical education: a collaborative approach to training postgraduate urologists and endourology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirheydar, Hossein; Jones, Marklyn; Koeneman, Kenneth S; Sweet, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Currently, robotic training for inexperienced, practicing surgeons is primarily done vis-à-vis industry and/or society-sponsored day or weekend courses, with limited proctorship opportunities. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an extended-proctorship program at up to 32 months of follow-up. An extended-proctorship program for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was established at our institution. The curriculum consisted of 3 phases: (1) completing an Intuitive Surgical 2-day robotic training course with company representatives; (2) serving as assistant to a trained proctor on 5 to 6 cases; and (3) performing proctored cases up to 1 year until confidence was achieved. Participants were surveyed and asked to evaluate on a 5-point Likert scale their operative experience in robotics and satisfaction regarding their training. Nine of 9 participants are currently performing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) independently. Graduates of our program have performed 477 RALP cases. The mean number of cases performed within phase 3 was 20.1 (range, 5 to 40) prior to independent practice. The program received a rating of 4.2/5 for effectiveness in teaching robotic surgery skills. Our robotic program, with extended proctoring, has led to an outstanding take-rate for disseminating robotic skills in a metropolitan community.

  14. Robotic assisted gastrectomy compared with open resection: a case-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Riccardo; Vicente, Emilio; Quijano, Yolanda; Ielpo, Benedetto; Duran, Hipolito; Diaz, Eduardo; Fabra, Isabel; Ferri, Valentina

    2018-05-04

    In recent years, increasingly sophisticated tools have allowed for more complex robotic surgery. Robotic gastrectomy, however, is adopted in only a few selected centers. The goals of this study were to examine the adoption of robotic gastrectomy and to compare outcomes between open and robotic gastric resections. This is a case-matched analysis of patients who underwent robotic and open gastric resection performed at Sanchinarro University Hospital, Madrid from November 2011 to February 2017. Patient data were obtained retrospectively. Clinicopathologic characteristics and perioperative and postoperative outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Two groups of demographically similar patients were analyzed: the robotic group (n = 20) and the open surgery group (n = 19). The patient characteristics of the two groups have been compared. Robotic resection resulted in less blood loss, shorter postoperative hospital stay, and a longer operating time. The two groups had similar complication rates. Pathological data were similar for both procedures. Robotic gastrectomy for locally advanced gastric carcinoma is safe, and long-term outcomes are comparable to those patients who underwent open resection. Robotic gastrectomy resulted in a shorter hospital stay, less blood loss and morbidity comparable with the outcomes of open gastrectomy.

  15. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  16. Incidence of positive surgical margins after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: Does the surgeon's experience have an influence on all pathological stages?

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    Villamil, A W; Costabel, J I; Billordo Peres, N; Martínez, P F; Giudice, C R; Damia, O H

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical and surgical features of patients who underwent robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) at our institution, and the impact of the surgeon's experience in the oncological results related to pathological stage. An analysis of 300 RARP consecutively performed by the same urologist was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups of 100 patients in chronological order, according to surgery date. All patients had organ-confined clinical stage. Variables which could impact in positive margins rates were analyzed. Finally, positive surgical margins (PSM) in regard to pathological stage and surgeon's experience were compared and analyzed. No significant differences were found in variables which could impact in PSM rates. The overall PSM rate was 21%, with 28% in the first group, 20% in the second, and 16% in the third (P = .108). Significant lineal decreasing tendency was observed (P = .024). In pT2 patients, the overall PSM rate was 16.6%, with 27%, 13.8%, and 7.3% in each group respectively (P = .009). A significant difference was found between group 1 and group 3 (P = .004). In pT3 patients, the surgeon's experience was not significantly associated with margin reductions with an overall PSM rate of 27.7% (28.2%, 28.6%, and 26.7% in each group respectively). Clinical and surgical features in our patients did not vary over time. We found a significant reduction of PSM related to surgeon's experience in pT2 patients. Contrariwise, the margin status remained stable despite increasing experience in pT3 patients. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Immediate radical trachelectomy versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by conservative surgery for patients with stage IB1 cervical cancer with tumors 2cm or larger: A literature review and analysis of oncological and obstetrical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Rendón, Gabriel J; Vasquez, Monica; Echeverri, Lina; Sanz-Lomana, Carlos Millán; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2015-06-01

    Radical trachelectomy is the treatment of choice in women with early-stage cervical cancer wishing to preserve fertility. Radical trachelectomy can be performed with a vaginal, abdominal, or laparoscopic/robotic approach. Vaginal radical trachelectomy (VRT) is generally not offered to patients with tumors 2cm or larger because of a high recurrence rate. There are no conclusive recommendations regarding the safety of abdominal radical trachelectomy (ART) or laparoscopic radical trachelectomy (LRT) in such patients. Several investigators have used neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with tumors 2 to 4cm to reduce tumor size so that fertility preservation may be offered. However, to our knowledge, no published study has compared outcomes between patients with cervical tumors 2cm or larger who underwent immediate radical trachelectomy and those who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical trachelectomy. We conducted a literature review to compare outcomes with these 2 approaches. Our main endpoints for evaluation were oncological and obstetrical outcomes. The fertility preservation rate was 82.7%, 85.1%, 89%; and 91.1% for ART (tumors larger than >2cm), ART (all sizes), NACT followed by surgery and VRT (all sizes); respectively. The global pregnancy rate was 16.2%, 24% and 30.7% for ART, VRT, and NACT followed by surgery; respectively. The recurrence rate was 3.8%, 4.2%, 6%, 7.6% and 17% for ART (all sizes), VRT (all sizes), ART (tumors>2cm), NACT followed by surgery, and VRT (tumors>2cm). These outcomes must be considered when offering a fertility sparing technique to patients with a tumor larger than 2cm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Catheter-less robotic radical prostatectomy using a custom-made synchronous anastomotic splint and vesical urinary diversion device: report of the initial series and perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Ashutosh; Rao, Sandhya; Mandhani, Anil

    2008-09-01

    To study the feasibility of avoiding a urethral catheter after robotic radical prostatectomy by using suprapubic diversion with a urethral splint, as urethral catheterization is often a source of major discomfort and pain to the patient, and can cause more concern to the patient than the procedure; we present the outcomes of a pilot study. This pilot study involved 30 patients; in group 1 (the study group of 10 patients) we used a custom-made suprapubic catheter which provided a small anastomotic splint, multiple holes for drainage and the ability to retract the splint to give a voiding trial before removing the drainage device. Group 2 was a control group of 20 patients who had standard urethral catheterization with an 18 F Silastic Foley catheter. Demographic, intraoperative and outcome data were measured and analysed. Urethral symptoms were recorded using a specially developed questionnaire. The two groups were comparable in terms of age, serum prostate specific antigen level, body mass index, Gleason scores, tumour stage, operative duration, amount of bleeding, console times, anastomotic leakage and postoperative retention rates. The study group had significantly less penile shaft or tip pain and discomfort during walking or sleeping. No patient in either group had haematuria or clot retention requiring irrigation. Urethral catheter-less robotic radical prostatectomy is feasible. The advantages are decreased penile shaft and tip pain, and decreased patient discomfort and an earlier return of continence.

  19. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and frozen-section analysis efficiently predict upgrading, upstaging, and extraprostatic extension in patients undergoing nerve-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Roberto; Cozzi, Gabriele; Petralia, Giuseppe; Alessi, Sarah; Renne, Giuseppe; Bottero, Danilo; Brescia, Antonio; Cioffi, Antonio; Cordima, Giovanni; Ferro, Matteo; Matei, Deliu Victor; Mazzoleni, Federica; Musi, Gennaro; Mistretta, Francesco Alessandro; Serino, Alessandro; Tringali, Valeria Maria Lucia; Coman, Ioan; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in predicting upgrading, upstaging, and extraprostatic extension in patients with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). MpMRI may reduce positive surgical margins (PSM) and improve nerve-sparing during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for localized prostate cancer PCa.This was a retrospective, monocentric, observational study. We retrieved the records of patients undergoing RARP from January 2012 to December 2013 at our Institution. Inclusion criteria were: PSA <10 ng/mL; clinical stage underwent nerve-sparing RARP. During surgery, the specimen was sent for FSA of the posterolateral aspects. The surgeon, according to the localization scheme provided by the mpMRI, inked the region of the posterolateral aspect of the prostate that had to be submitted to FSA.We evaluated association between clinical features and PSM, upgrading, upstaging, and presence of unfavorable disease.Two hundred fifty-four patients who underwent nerve-sparing RARP were included. PSM rate was 29.13% and 15.75% at FSA and final pathology respectively. Interestingly, the use of FSA reduced PSM rate in pT3 disease (25.81%). Higher PIRADS scores demonstrated to be related to high probability of upgrading and upstaging. This significativity remains even when considering PIRADS 2-3 versus 4 versus 5 and PIRADS 2-3 versus 4-5. Also PSM at FSA were associated with higher probability of upgrading and upstaging.PIRADS score and FSA resulted to be strictly related to grading and staging, thus being able to predict upgrading and/or upstaging at final pathology.

  20. Early Experience with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gee Sim

    2004-10-01

    Conclusions: rLRP is feasible in a practice with a low volume of radical prostatectomies. Significant improvement in perioperative parameters occurs after the first eight cases. This technique confers the benefits of enhanced precision and dexterity for complex laparoscopic work in the pelvic cavity.

  1. Robotic versus laparoscopic resection of liver tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Eren; Akyildiz, Hizir Yakup; Aucejo, Federico; Gunasekaran, Ganesh; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Fung, John

    2010-01-01

    Background There are scant data in the literature regarding the role of robotic liver surgery. The aim of the present study was to develop techniques for robotic liver tumour resection and to draw a comparison with laparoscopic resection. Methods Over a 1-year period, nine patients underwent robotic resection of peripherally located malignant lesions measuring <5 cm. These patients were compared prospectively with 23 patients who underwent laparoscopic resection of similar tumours at the same institution. Statistical analyses were performed using Student's t-test, χ2-test and Kaplan–Meier survival. All data are expressed as mean ± SEM. Results The groups were similar with regards to age, gender and tumour type (P = NS). Tumour size was similar in both groups (robotic −3.2 ± 1.3 cm vs. laparoscopic −2.9 ± 1.3 cm, P = 0.6). Skin-to-skin operative time was 259 ± 28 min in the robotic vs. 234 ± 17 min in the laparoscopic group (P = 0.4). There was no difference between the two groups regarding estimated blood loss (EBL) and resection margin status. Conversion to an open operation was only necessary in one patient in the robotic group. Complications were observed in one patient in the robotic and four patients in the laparoscopic groups. The patients were followed up for a mean of 14 months and disease-free survival (DFS) was equivalent in both groups (P = 0.6). Conclusion The results of this initial study suggest that, for selected liver lesions, a robotic approach provides similar peri-operative outcomes compared with laparoscopic liver resection (LLR). PMID:20887327

  2. Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a step–by-step technique description of this first brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tobias-Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy(RARP is a newly approach that preserve the Retzus structures and provide better recovery of continence and erectile function. In Brazil, this approach has not yet been previously reported. Objective: Our goal is to describe Step-by-Step the Retzus-sparing RARP surgical technique and report our first Brazilian experience. Methods: We present a case of a 60-year-old white man with low risk prostate cancer. Surgical materials were four arms Da Vinci robotic platform system, six transperitoneal portals, two prolene wires and Polymer Clips. This surgical technique was step-by-step described according to Galfano et al. One additional step was added as a modification of Galfano et al. Primary technique description: The closure of the Denovellier fascia. Results: We have operated one patient with this technique. The operative time was 180minutes, console time was135 min, the blood loss was 150ml, none perioperative or postoperative complications was found, hospital stay of 01 day. The anatomopathological classification revealed a pT2aN0M0 specimen with free surgical margins. The patient achieved continence immediately after bladder stent retrieval. Full erection reported after 30 days of surgery. Conclusion: Retzus-sparing RARP approach is feasible and reproducible. However, further comparative studies are necessary to demonstrate potential benefits in continence and sexual outcomes over the standard approaches.

  3. Robotic Buccal Ureteroplasty: a Review of the Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldorf, Benjamin; Lee, Ziho; Kidd, Laura; Kaplan, Joshua; Harris, Andrew; Metro, Michael; Liu, Jeffrey; Eun, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature on buccal mucosal ureteroplasty for ureteral stricture disease, with a specific focus on the application of the robotic platform to buccal ureteroplasty. In our review, we highlight the results of Zhao et al. from the New York University School of Medicine Department of Urology, as well as our own results from Temple University Hospital. Zhao et al. published the first series of four patients who underwent robotic buccal ureteroplasty. Mean stricture length was 3.0 cm, and at a mean follow-up of 15 months, all repairs remained patent. We also describe our results in 10 patients who underwent robotic buccal ureteroplasty at Temple University Hospital. Median stricture length was 3.0 cm, and at a median follow-up of 5 months, all repairs remain patent. Robotic buccal ureteroplasty offers a promising option for repair of complex ureteral strictures.

  4. Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielik, T.; Karovic, M.; Trska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radical trachelectomy is a fertility-sparing procedure with the aim to provide adequate oncological safety to patients with cervical cancer while preserving their fertility. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate, in a series of 3 patients, the feasibility, morbidity, and safety of laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy for early cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: Three non consecutive patients with FIGO stage IA1 and IB1 cervical cancer was evaluated in a period of years 2008 - 2011. The patients underwent a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and radical parametrectomy class II procedure according to the Piver classification. The section of vaginal cuff, trachelectomy, permanent cerclage and isthmo-vaginal anastomosis ware realised by vaginal approach. Results: The median operative time, the median blood loss and the mean number of resected pelvic nodes was comparable with published data. Major intraoperative complications did not occur and no patient required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up time was 33 (38-59) months. One vaginal recurrence occurred in 7 months after primary surgery. The patient was underwent a radicalisation procedure and adjuvant oncologic therapy and now is free of disease. Conclusions: Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy (LAVRT)may be an alternative in fertility-preserving surgery for early cervical cancer. The procedure offers patients potential benefits of minimally invasive surgery with adequate oncological safety, but it should be reserved for oncologic surgeons trained in advanced laparoscopic procedures. (author)

  5. From Leonardo to da Vinci: the history of robot-assisted surgery in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, David R; Vaessen, Christophe; Roupret, Morgan

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Numerous urological procedures can now be performed with robotic assistance. Though not definitely proven to be superior to conventional laparoscopy or traditional open surgery in the setting of a randomised trial, in experienced centres robot-assisted surgery allows for excellent surgical outcomes and is a valuable tool to augment modern surgical practice. Our review highlights the depth of history that underpins the robotic surgical platform we utilise today, whilst also detailing the current place of robot-assisted surgery in urology in 2011. The evolution of robots in general and as platforms to augment surgical practice is an intriguing story that spans cultures, continents and centuries. A timeline from Yan Shi (1023-957 bc), Archytas of Tarentum (400 bc), Aristotle (322 bc), Heron of Alexandria (10-70 ad), Leonardo da Vinci (1495), the Industrial Revolution (1790), 'telepresence' (1950) and to the da Vinci(®) Surgical System (1999), shows the incredible depth of history and development that underpins the modern surgical robot we use to treat our patients. Robot-assisted surgery is now well-established in Urology and although not currently regarded as a 'gold standard' approach for any urological procedure, it is being increasingly used for index operations of the prostate, kidney and bladder. We perceive that robotic evolution will continue infinitely, securing the place of robots in the history of Urological surgery. Herein, we detail the history of robots in general, in surgery and in Urology, highlighting the current place of robot-assisted surgery in radical prostatectomy, partial nephrectomy, pyeloplasty and radical cystectomy. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  6. Optic nerve sheath diameter remains constant during robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Verdonck

    Full Text Available During robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP, a CO2 pneumoperitoneum (CO2PP is applied and the patient is placed in a head-down position. Intracranial pressure (ICP is expected to acutely increase under these conditions. A non-invasive method, the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD measurement, may warn us that the mechanism of protective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shifts becomes exhausted.After obtaining IRB approval and written informed consent, ONSD was measured by ocular ultrasound in 20 ASA I-II patients at various stages of the RALRP procedure: baseline awake, after induction, after applying the CO2PP, during head-down position, after resuming the supine position, in the postoperative anaesthesia care unit, and on day one postoperatively. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP was calculated as the mean arterial (MAP minus central venous pressure (CVP.The ONSD did not change during head-down position, although the CVP increased from 4.2(2.5 mm Hg to 27.6(3.8 mm Hg. The CPP was decreased 70 min after assuming the head-down position until 15 min after resuming the supine position, but remained above 60 mm Hg at all times.Even though ICP has been documented to increase during CO2PP and head-down positioning, we did not find any changes in ONSD during head-down position. These results indicate that intracranial blood volume does not increase up to a point that CSF migration as a compensation mechanism becomes exhausted, suggesting any increases in ICP are likely to be small.

  7. Incidental Prostate Cancer in Patients Undergoing Radical Cystoprostatectomy for Bladder Cancer

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    Mustafa Hiroš

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to verify the incidence of incidental prostate adenocarcinoma in patients who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy for invasive bladder carcinoma. We have retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy for infiltrative bladder tumors in period between 2003 and 2007 year, 94 men with bladder cancer underwent radical cystoprostatectomy at Urology Clinic-University of Sarajevo Clinics Centre. Mean age of patients was 67 years, with age limits ranging between 48 and 79 years. Pathohystological evaluation was used for all specimens from RCP. We found that 9,57% of cystoprostatectomy specimens in patients with bladder cancer also contained incidental prostate cancer. This result was much lower than overall mean frequency of incidentally detected prostate cancer in other series of cystoprostatectomy cases (range, 23%-68%. In conclusion we recommended digital rectal examination (DRE and prostate-specific antigen (PSA test as part of the bladder cancer work up and complete removal of the prostate at cystoprostatectomy to prevent residual prostate cancer.

  8. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

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    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)); Hollema, H. (Dept. of Pathology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged {le} 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB ({le} 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors).

  9. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G.; Hollema, H.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged ≤ 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB (≤ 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors)

  10. Modular Training for Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Where to Begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Catherine; Ahmed, Kamran; Novara, Giacomo; Guru, Khurshid; Mottrie, Alex; Challacombe, Ben; der Poel, Henk Van; Peabody, James; Dasgupta, Prokar

    Effective training is paramount for patient safety. Modular training entails advancing through surgical steps of increasing difficulty. This study aimed to construct a modular training pathway for use in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). It aims to identify the sequence of procedural steps that are learnt before surgeons are able to perform a full procedure without an intervention from mentor. This is a multi-institutional, prospective, observational, longitudinal study. We used a validated training tool (RARP Score). Data regarding surgeons' stage of training and progress were collected for analysis. A modular training pathway was constructed with consensus on the level of difficulty and evaluation of individual steps. We identified and recorded the sequence of steps performed by fellows during their learning curves. We included 15 urology fellows from UK, Europe, and Australia. A total of 15 surgeons were assessed by mentors in 425 RARP cases over 8 months (range: 7-79) across 15 international centers. There were substantial differences in the sequence of RARP steps according to the chronology of the procedure, difficulty level, and the order in which surgeons actually learned steps. Steps were not attempted in chronological order. The greater the difficulty, the later the cohort first undertook the step (p = 0.021). The cohort undertook steps of difficulty level I at median case number 1. Steps of difficulty levels II, III, and IV showed more variation in median case number of the first attempt. We recommend that, in the operating theater, steps be learned in order of increasing difficulty. A new modular training route has been designed. This incorporates the steps of RARP with the following order of priority: difficulty level > median case number of first attempt > most frequently undertaken in surgical training. An evidence-based modular training pathway has been developed that facilitates a safe introduction to RARP for novice surgeons. Copyright

  11. Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy: a robotic or LESS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Carrie E; Ross, Sharona B; Sukharamwala, Prashant B; Sadowitz, Benjamin D; Wood, Thomas W; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The role and application of robotic surgery are debated, particularly given the expansion of laparoscopy, especially laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery. This cohort study was undertaken to delineate differences in outcomes between LESS and robotic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. With Institutional Review Board approval, patients undergoing LESS or robotic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy from September 1, 2012, through December 31, 2014, were prospectively observed, and data were collected. The results are expressed as the median, with the mean ± SD. Thirty-four patients underwent a minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy: 18 with robotic and 16 with LESS surgery. The patients were similar in sex, age, and body mass index. Conversions to open surgery and estimated blood loss were similar. There were two intraoperative complications in the group that underwent the robotic approach. Time spent in the operating room was significantly longer with the robot (297 vs 254 minutes, P = .03), although operative duration (i.e., incision to closure) was not longer (225 vs 190 minutes; P = .15). Of the operations studied, 79% were undertaken for neoplastic processes. Tumor size was 3.5 cm for both approaches; R0 resections were achieved in all patients. Length of stay was similar in the two study groups (5 vs 4 days). There was one 30-day readmission after robotic surgery. Patient outcomes are similar with LESS or robotic distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. Robotic operations require more time in the operating room. Both are safe and efficacious minimally invasive operations that follow similar oncologic principles for similar tumors, and both should be in the surgeon's armamentarium for distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy.

  12. High-Grade Hydronephrosis Predicts Poor Outcomes After Radical Cystectomy in Patients with Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong Suk; Cho, Kang Su; Lee, Young Hoon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Oh, Young Taek; Hong, Sung Joon

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether the presence and severity of preoperative hydronephrosis have prognostic significance in patients who underwent radical cystectomy for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. The medical records of 457 patients who underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer between 1986 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Following the Society for Fetal Urology grading system, patients were divided into low-, and high-grade hydronephrosis groups. Clinicopathologic factors asso...

  13. Intraoperative frozen pathology during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: can ALEXIS™ trocar make it easy and fast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gilberto Laurino; Musi, Gennaro; Mazzoleni, Federica; Matei, Deliu Victor; Brescia, Antonio; Detti, Serena; de Cobelli, Ottavio

    2013-10-01

    To describe the first series of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) using the ALEXIS™ trocar device when removal of the specimen is necessary for intraoperative frozen-section pathology. Consecutive RALP using the ALEXIS were prospectively catalogue. Perioperative data, including preoperative oncologic diagnosis, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), size of incision for umbilical trocar, complications related to trocar, and length of hospital stay, were analyzed. One hundred twenty-eight patients were analyzed. The mean operative time was 216 minutes, mean time to trocar placement was 4 minutes, and mean EBL was 172 mL. The incision size for a trocar was 2-3 cm in 117 patients and 1 incisional hernia was observed. The mean hospital stay was 3 days and mean follow-up was 4 months. The ALEXIS trocar provides an easy and fast intraoperative removal of the specimen for frozen pathology during RALP, even for large prostates. Safe and cosmetic results with a low intraoperative complication rate are acquired with the wound retractor.

  14. Initial experience with ketamine-based analgesia in patients undergoing robotic radical cystectomy and diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsohn, Kenneth; Davis, Tanya D; El-Arabi, Ahmad M; Tlachac, Jonathan; Langenstroer, Peter; O'Connor, R Corey; Guralnick, Michael L; See, William A; Schlosser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We instituted a ketamine-predominant analgesic regimen in the peri- and postoperative periods to limit the effects of narcotic analgesia on bowel function in patients undergoing radical cystectomy. The primary end points of interest were time to return of bowel function, time to discharge, and efficacy of the analgesic regimen. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy (RARC) with urinary diversion by a single surgeon at our institution from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. Patients receiving the opioid-minimizing ketamine protocol were compared to a cohort of patients undergoing RARC with an opioid-predominant analgesic regimen. In total, 15 patients (Group A) were included in the ketamine-predominant regimen and 25 patients (Group B) in the opioid-predominant control group. Three patients (19%) in Group A discontinued the protocol due to ketamine side effects. The mean time to bowel movement and length of stay in Group A versus Group B was 3 versus 6 days (p return of bowel function and length of hospitalization after RARC. Our study has its limitations as a retrospective, single surgeon, single institution study and the non-randomization of patients. Notwithstanding these limitations, this study was not designed to show inferiority of one approach, but instead to show that our protocol is safe and efficacious, warranting further study in a prospective fashion.

  15. Outcomes and cost comparisons after introducing a robotics program for endometrial cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Vaknin, Zvi; Ramana-Kumar, Agnihotram V; Halliday, Darron; Franco, Eduardo L; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of introducing a robotic program on cost and patient outcome. This was a prospective evaluation of clinical outcome and cost after introducing a robotics program for the treatment of endometrial cancer and a retrospective comparison to the entire historical cohort. Consecutive patients with endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgery (n=143) were compared with all consecutive patients who underwent surgery (n=160) before robotics. The rate of minimally invasive surgery increased from 17% performed by laparoscopy to 98% performed by robotics in 2 years. The patient characteristics were comparable in both eras, except for a higher body mass index in the robotics era (median 29.8 compared with 27.6; Probotics had longer operating times (233 compared with 206 minutes), but fewer adverse events (13% compared with 42%; Probotics compared with the historical group (Can$7,644 compared with Can$10,368 [Canadian dollars]; Psurgery, the short-term recurrence rate appeared lower in the robotics group compared with the historic cohort (11 recurrences compared with 19 recurrences; Probotics for endometrial cancer surgery increased the proportion of patients benefitting from minimally invasive surgery, improved short-term outcomes, and resulted in lower hospital costs. II.

  16. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy: key points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical cystectomy remains the golden standard for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Objective: to duplicate with highest accuracy the open radical cystectomy procedure, which we successfully utilized earlier in our clinic, in the of laparoscopic conditions in order to preserve the advantages of minimally invasive procedures and retain the reliability of the tried and tested open surgery.Materials and methods. In the report were included 35 patients (27 men and 8 women with bladder cancer, who underwent laparoscopic radical cystectomy in Volgograd Regional Center of Urology and Nephrology between April 2013 and March 2016. Only the patients who had been submitted to full intracorporal ileal conduits were included.Results. The mean operative time was 378 minutes, the mean blood loss was 285 millilitres, the mean length of hospital stay was 12.4 days, only 20 % of patients required the narcotic anesthetics. The postoperative complication rate was 11.4 %. However, the majority of the patients were successfully treated with minimally invasive procedures. Generally, our results were similar to other reported studies.Conclusion. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy is a safe and efficient modality of treatment of bladder cancer. However, it needs more procedures and longer observation period to establish laparoscopic radical cystectomy as an alternative to open radical cystectomy.

  17. The impact of robotic surgery in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedelman, C A; Abdul-Muhsin, H; Schatloff, O; Palmer, K; Lee, L; Sanchez-Salas, R; Cathelineau, X; Dávila, H; Cavelier, L; Rueda, M; Patel, V

    2013-01-01

    More than a decade ago, robotic surgery was introduced into urology. Since then, the urological community started to look at surgery from a different angle. The present, the future hopes, and the way we looked at our past experience have all changed. Between 2000 and 2011, the published literature was reviewed using the National Library of Medicine database and the following key words: robotic surgery, robot-assisted, and radical prostatectomy. Special emphasis was given to the impact of the robotic surgery in urology. We analyzed the most representative series (finished learning curve) in each one of the robotic approaches regarding perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes. This article looks into the impact of robotics in urology, starting from its background applications before urology, the way it was introduced into urology, its first steps, current status, and future expectations. By narrating this journey, we tried to highlight important modifications that helped robotic surgery make its way to its position today. We looked as well into the dramatic changes that robotic surgery introduced to the field of surgical training and its consequence on its learning curve. Basic surgical principles still apply in Robotics: experience counts, and prolonged practice provides knowledge and skills. In this way, the potential advantages delivered by technology will be better exploited, and this will be reflected in better outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilizing Machine Learning and Automated Performance Metrics to Evaluate Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Performance and Predict Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Andrew J; Chen, Jian; Che, Zhengping; Nilanon, Tanachat; Jarc, Anthony; Titus, Micha; Oh, Paul J; Gill, Inderbir S; Liu, Yan

    2018-05-01

    Surgical performance is critical for clinical outcomes. We present a novel machine learning (ML) method of processing automated performance metrics (APMs) to evaluate surgical performance and predict clinical outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). We trained three ML algorithms utilizing APMs directly from robot system data (training material) and hospital length of stay (LOS; training label) (≤2 days and >2 days) from 78 RARP cases, and selected the algorithm with the best performance. The selected algorithm categorized the cases as "Predicted as expected LOS (pExp-LOS)" and "Predicted as extended LOS (pExt-LOS)." We compared postoperative outcomes of the two groups (Kruskal-Wallis/Fisher's exact tests). The algorithm then predicted individual clinical outcomes, which we compared with actual outcomes (Spearman's correlation/Fisher's exact tests). Finally, we identified five most relevant APMs adopted by the algorithm during predicting. The "Random Forest-50" (RF-50) algorithm had the best performance, reaching 87.2% accuracy in predicting LOS (73 cases as "pExp-LOS" and 5 cases as "pExt-LOS"). The "pExp-LOS" cases outperformed the "pExt-LOS" cases in surgery time (3.7 hours vs 4.6 hours, p = 0.007), LOS (2 days vs 4 days, p = 0.02), and Foley duration (9 days vs 14 days, p = 0.02). Patient outcomes predicted by the algorithm had significant association with the "ground truth" in surgery time (p algorithm in predicting, were largely related to camera manipulation. To our knowledge, ours is the first study to show that APMs and ML algorithms may help assess surgical RARP performance and predict clinical outcomes. With further accrual of clinical data (oncologic and functional data), this process will become increasingly relevant and valuable in surgical assessment and training.

  19. Transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardis, Rachel L; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Mehta, Deepak

    2014-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of performing robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair in the pediatric population. Retrospective chart review at a tertiary academic children's hospital. All patients underwent transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair from March 2011 to June 2013. Demographics, robotic docking time, operative time, and postoperative course and swallowing function were collected and analyzed. Five children, three male and two female, underwent successful transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair for closure of a type I laryngeal cleft. Mean age at time of surgery was 21.6 months (standard deviation 6.1 months; range, 15-29 months). From case 1 to case 5, robotic docking time (18-10 minutes), robotic operative time (102-36 minutes), and total operating room time (173-105 minutes) decreased. There were no complications with time until extubation (range, 2-3 days), length of intensive care unit stay (range, 3-4 days), and total hospital stay (range, 3-5 days) within acceptable range following laryngeal cleft repair. Modified barium swallow (two patients) or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (three patients) was performed postoperatively, with all patients showing complete resolution of penetration and aspiration. In addition, all patients experienced subjective resolution of dysphagia and/or choking with feeds postoperatively. Transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair may offer specific advantages over a traditional endoscopic approach. In our experience, the procedure was well tolerated and associated with definitive surgical cure in all patients. The scope of robotic technology continually expands and should be considered a feasible tool at an institution-based level. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. [Organisation and early outcome after radical prostatectomy in Denmark 2004-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M.; Iversen, P.; Bendixen, A.

    2008-01-01

    .2%. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing rate of radical prostatectomies in Denmark. It is proposed that a national database be established to monitor early and long-term outcomes, including the role of surgical technique (nerve sparing, laparoscopic/robotic surgery, etc.) in order to ensure optimal organisation...

  1. Predictive modelling of 2-year potency outcomes using a novel 90-day erection fullness scale after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Linda M; Osann, Kathryn; Skarecky, Douglas; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2018-03-09

    To introduce a patient-reported erection fullness scale (%fullness) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) as a qualitative adjunct to the five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and as a 90-day predictor of 2-year potency outcomes. Prospective data were collected from 540 men with preoperative IIEF-5 scores of 22-25 who underwent RARP by a single surgeon, and of whom 299 had complete data at all time points up to 2 years. In addition to standard assessment tools (IIEF-5 and erections sufficient for intercourse [ESI]), the men were asked to 'indicate the fullness you are able to achieve in erections compared to before surgery?' (range: 0-100%). The primary outcome was prediction of potency (defined as ESI) at 24 months, based on 90-day %fullness tertile (0-24%, 25-74% and 75-100%). A total of 299 men with complete follow-up were included in the study. Significant predictors of 24-month potency included age, body mass index, pathological stage, nerve-sparing status and %fullness tertiles. When the men (preoperative IIEF-5 score 22-25) were assessed at 90 days after RARP, 181/299 (61%) had erections inadequate for intercourse. If IIEF-5 scores of 1-6 were used, 142/181 men (78%) would be targeted for early intervention. By contrast, if 0-24% fullness was used, 88/181 men (49%) would be targeted. If both the IIEF-5 score and %fullness were used, this would be reduced to 77/181 men (43%). We introduce %fullness as a qualitative adjunct to the IIEF-5 score, and separately as a 90-day predictor of 2-year potency recovery. This initial report is hypothesis-generating, such that the use of %fullness enables the identification of men who are most likely to benefit from early, secondary intervention. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Radical prostatectomy, sparing of the seminal vesicles, and painful orgasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogorovich, Andrea; Nilsson, Andreas E; Tyritzis, Stavros I; Carlsson, Stefan; Jonsson, Martin; Haendler, Leif; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2013-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction has been widely investigated as the major factor responsible for sexual bother in patients after radical prostatectomy (RP); painful orgasm (PO) is one element of this bother, but little is known about its prevalence and its effects on sexual health. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of PO and to identify potential risk factors. A total of 1,411 consecutive patients underwent open (radical retropubic prostatectomy) or robot-assisted laparoscopic RP between 2002 and 2006. The patients were asked to complete a study-specific questionnaire. Of a total of 145 questions, 5 dealt with the orgasmic characteristics. The questionnaire was also administered to a comparison group of 442 persons, matched for age and area of residency. The response rate was 91% (1,288 patients). A total of 143 (11%) patients reported PO. Among the 834 men being able to have an orgasm, the prevalence was 18% vs. 6% in the comparison group (relative risk [RR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-4.5). When analyzed as independent variables, bilateral seminal vesicle (SV)-sparing approach (RR 2.33, 95% CI 1.0-5.3, P = 0.045) and age <60 years were significantly related to the presence of PO (95% CI 0.5-0.9, P = 0.019). After adjustment for age, bilateral SV-sparing still remained a significant predictor for occurrence of PO. We found that PO occurs significantly more often in patients undergoing bilateral SV-sparing RP when compared with age-matched comparison population. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  3. Robotic kidney transplantation with regional hypothermia: a step-by-step description of the Vattikuti Urology Institute-Medanta technique (IDEAL phase 2a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Mani; Sood, Akshay; Bhandari, Mahendra; Kher, Vijay; Ghosh, Prasun; Abaza, Ronney; Jeong, Wooju; Ghani, Khurshid R; Kumar, Ramesh K; Modi, Pranjal; Ahlawat, Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    We recently reported on preclinical and feasibility studies (Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study [IDEAL] phase 0-1) of the development of robotic kidney transplantation (RKT) with regional hypothermia. This paper presents the IDEAL phase 2a studies of technique development. To describe the technique of RKT with regional hypothermia developed at two tertiary care institutions (Vattikuti Urology Institute and Medanta Hospital). We report on the safety profile and early graft function in these patients. This is a prospective study of 50 consecutive patients who underwent live-donor RKT at Medanta Hospital following a 3-yr planning/simulation phase at the Vattikuti Urology Institute. Demographic details, and perioperative and postoperative outcomes are reported for the initial 25 recipients who have completed a minimum 6-mo follow-up. Positioning and port placement were similar to that used for robotic radical prostatectomy. Allograft cooling was achieved by ice slush delivered through a GelPOINT device. The accompanying video details the operative technique. The primary outcome was posttransplant graft function. Secondary outcomes included technical success or failure and complication rates. Fifty patients underwent RKT successfully, 7 in the phase 1 and 43 in the phase 2 stages of the study. For the initial 25 patients, mean console, warm ischemia, arterial, and venous anastomotic times were 135, 2.4, 12, and 13.4 min, respectively. All grafts were cooled to 18-20 °C with no change in core body temperature. All grafts functioned immediately posttransplant and the mean serum creatinine level at discharge was 1.3mg/dl (range: 0.8-3.1mg/dl). No patient developed anastomotic leaks, wound complications, or wound infections. At 6-mo of follow-up, no patient had developed a lymphocele detected on CT scanning. Two patients underwent re-exploration, and one patient died of congestive heart failure (1.5 mo posttransplant). RKT with regional

  4. [Comparison of robotic surgery documentary in gynecological cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a surgical technique recently introduced, with major expansion and acceptance among the medical community is currently performed in over 1,000 hospitals around the world and in the management of gynecological cancer are being developed comprehensive programs for implementation. The objectives of this paper are to review the scientific literature on robotic surgery and its application in gynecological cancer to verify its safety, feasibility and efficacy when compared with laparoscopic surgery or surgery classical major surgical complications, infections are more common in traditional radical surgery compared with laparoscopic or robotic surgery and with these new techniques surgical and staying hospital are lesser than the former however, the disadvantages are the limited number of robot systems, their high cost and applies only in specialized centers that have with equipment and skilled surgeons. In conclusion robotic surgery represents a major scientific breakthrough and surgical management of gynecological cancer with better results to other types of conventional surgery and is likely in the coming years is become its worldwide.

  5. Diffusion of robotics into clinical practice in the United States: process, patient safety, learning curves, and the public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirheydar, Hossein S; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2013-06-01

    Robotic technology disseminated into urological practice without robust comparative effectiveness data. To review the diffusion of robotic surgery into urological practice. We performed a comprehensive literature review focusing on diffusion patterns, patient safety, learning curves, and comparative costs for robotic radical prostatectomy, partial nephrectomy, and radical cystectomy. Robotic urologic surgery diffused in patterns typical of novel technology spreading among practicing surgeons. Robust evidence-based data comparing outcomes of robotic to open surgery were sparse. Although initial Level 3 evidence for robotic prostatectomy observed complication outcomes similar to open prostatectomy, subsequent population-based Level 2 evidence noted an increased prevalence of adverse patient safety events and genitourinary complications among robotic patients during the early years of diffusion. Level 2 evidence indicated comparable to improved patient safety outcomes for robotic compared to open partial nephrectomy and cystectomy. Learning curve recommendations for robotic urologic surgery have drawn exclusively on Level 4 evidence and subjective, non-validated metrics. The minimum number of cases required to achieve competency for robotic prostatectomy has increased to unrealistically high levels. Most comparative cost-analyses have demonstrated that robotic surgery is significantly more expensive than open or laparoscopic surgery. Evidence-based data are limited but suggest an increased prevalence of adverse patient safety events for robotic prostatectomy early in the national diffusion period. Learning curves for robotic urologic surgery are subjective and based on non-validated metrics. The urological community should develop rigorous, evidence-based processes by which future technological innovations may diffuse in an organized and safe manner.

  6. Robotic Assisted Radical Cystectomy with Extracorporeal Urinary Diversion Does Not Show a Benefit over Open Radical Cystectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen Tan

    Full Text Available The number of robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC procedures is increasing despite the lack of Level I evidence showing any advantages over open radical cystectomy (ORC. However, several systematic reviews with meta-analyses including non-randomised studies, suggest an overall benefit for RARC compared to ORC. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs to evaluate the perioperative morbidity and efficacy of RARC compared to ORC in patients with bladder cancer.Literature searches of Medline/Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov databases up to 10th March 2016 were performed. The inclusion criteria for eligible studies were RCTs which compared perioperative outcomes of ORC and RARC for bladder cancer. Primary objective was perioperative and histopathological outcomes of RARC versus ORC while the secondary objective was quality of life assessment (QoL, oncological outcomes and cost analysis.Four RCTs (from 5 articles met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 239 patients all with extracorporeal urinary diversion. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics of RARC and ORC patients were evenly matched. There was no significant difference between groups in perioperative morbidity, length of stay, positive surgical margin, lymph node yield and positive lymph node status. RARC group had significantly lower estimated blood loss (p<0.001 and wound complications (p = 0.03 but required significantly longer operating time (p<0.001. QoL was not measured uniformly across trials and cost analysis was reported in one RCTs. A test for heterogeneity did highlight differences across operating time of trials suggesting that surgeon experience may influence outcomes.This study does not provide evidence to support a benefit for RARC compared to ORC. These results may not have inference for RARC with intracorporeal urinary diversion. Well-designed trials with appropriate endpoints conducted

  7. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery: recent advances in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autorino, Riccardo; Zargar, Homayoun; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize recent developments in the field of urologic robotic surgery. A nonsystematic literature review was performed to retrieve publications related to robotic surgery in urology and evidence-based critical analysis was conducted by focusing on the literature of the past 5 years. The use of the da Vinci Surgical System, a robotic surgical system, has been implemented for the entire spectrum of extirpative and reconstructive laparoscopic kidney procedures. The robotic approach can be applied for a range of adrenal indications as well as for ureteral diseases, including benign and malignant conditions affecting the proximal, mid, and distal ureter. Current evidence suggests that robotic prostatectomy is associated with less blood loss compared with the open surgery. Besides prostate cancer, robotics has been used for simple prostatectomy in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Recent studies suggest that minimally invasive radical cystectomy provides encouraging oncologic outcomes mirroring those reported for open surgery. In recent years, the evolution of robotic surgery has enabled urologic surgeons to perform urinary diversions intracorporeally. Robotic vasectomy reversal and several other robotic andrological applications are being explored. In summary, robotic-assisted surgery is an emerging and safe technology for most urologic operations. The acceptance of robotic prostatectomy during the past decade has paved the way for urologists to explore the entire spectrum of extirpative and reconstructive urologic procedures. Cost remains a significant issue that could be solved by wider dissemination of the technology. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal cancer: a report of thirty cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Li, Dechuan; Chen, Yinbo

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) has gained popularity for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. However, prior complex lower abdominal or pelvic surgery can complicate subsequent EERPE. To date, there have been few reports on patients who underwent EERPE after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal cancer. To present our experience with EERPE in patients after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal carcinoma and introduce a simple and effective way to create an extraperitoneal working space. Thirty patients after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal carcinoma were treated with EERPE for biopsy-proven localized prostate cancer. Operation time, estimated blood loss, conversion to open surgery rate, transfusion rate and transurethral catheter time were recorded. Meanwhile, functional outcome (continence and potency) and oncological outcome were reviewed. The average operative time was 168 min. Mean blood loss was 195 ml. There was no need for conversion to open surgery or transfusion. The catheter was removed on postoperative day (POD) 7.8. After a mean follow-up time of 53.1 months, 3 patients had a prostate-specific antigen level relapse over 0.1 ng/ml. At the follow-up time, 26 patients were completely continent, and 4 needed 1-2 pads/day. Of the 6 patients who underwent neurovascular bundle preservation, none have experienced return of erections at the last follow-up time. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy after radical resection of rectal carcinoma appears promising, with feasibility in experienced hands. The operative data, postoperative urinary incontinence and oncological outcomes appear encouraging, but the rate of erectile dysfunction seems to be disappointing.

  9. Noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitoring by the ClearSight system during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yoko; Yasuo M, Tsutsumi; Oyama, Takuro; Murakami, Chiaki; Kakuta, Nami; Tanaka, Katsuya

    2018-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is commonly performed in the surgical treatment of prostate cancer. However, the steep Trendelenburg position (25) and pneumoperitoneum required for this procedure can sometimes cause hemodynamic changes. Although blood pressure is traditionally monitored invasively during RALRP, the ClearSight system (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) enables a totally noninvasive and simple continuous blood pressure and cardiac output monitoring based on finger arterial pressure pulse contour analysis. We therefore investigated whether noninvasive continuous arterial blood pressure measurements using the ClearSight system were comparable to those obtained invasively in patients undergoing RALRP. Ten patients scheduled for RALRP with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II were included in this study. At each of the seven defined time points, noninvasive and invasive blood pressure measurements were documented and compared in each patient using Bland-Altman analysis. Although the blood pressure measured with the ClearSight system correlated with that measured invasively, a large difference between the values obtained by the two devices was noted. The ClearSight system was unable to detect blood pressure accurately during RALRP, suggesting that blood pressure monitoring using this device alone is not feasible in this small patient population. J. Med. Invest. 65:69-73, February, 2018.

  10. Impact of posterior rhabdosphincter reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: retrospective analysis of time to continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jason R; Shikanov, Sergey; Zorn, Kevin C; Shalhav, Arieh L; Zagaja, Gregory P

    2009-12-01

    Posterior rhabdosphincter (PR) reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) was introduced in an attempt to improve postoperative continence. In the present study, we evaluate time to achieve continence in patients who are undergoing RARP with and without PR reconstruction. A prospective RARP database was searched for most recent cases that were accomplished with PR reconstruction (group 1, n = 69) or with standard technique (group 2, n = 63). We performed the analysis applying two definitions of continence: 0 pads per day or 0-1 security pad per day. Patients were evaluated by telephone interview. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. With PR reconstruction, continence was improved when defined as 0-1 security pad per day (median time of 90 vs 150 days; P = 0.01). This difference did not achieve statistical significance when continence was defined as 0 pads per day (P = 0.12). A statistically significant improvement in continence rate and time to achieve continence is seen in patients who are undergoing PR reconstruction during RARP, with continence defined as 0-1 security/safety pad per day. A larger, prospective and randomized study is needed to better understand the impact of this technique on postoperative continence.

  11. The role of intraoperative ultrasound in small renal mass robotic enucleation

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Gunelli; Massimo Fiori; Cristiano Salaris; Umberto Salomone; Marco Urbinati; Alexia Vici; Teo Zenico; Mauro Bertocco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: As a result of the growing evidence on tumor radical resection in literature, simple enucleation has become one of the best techniques associated to robotic surgery in the treatment of renal neoplasia, as it guarantees minimal invasiveness and the maximum sparing of renal tissue, facilitating the use of reduced or zero ischemia techniques during resection. The use of a robotic ultrasound probe represents a useful tool to detect and define tumor location, especially in poorly exo...

  12. Comparative analysis between clinical outcomes of primary radical resection and second completion radical resection for T2 gallbladder cancer: single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong Yeon; Park, Sang-Jae; Kim, Seong Hoon; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Young-Kyu; Lee, Kwang-Woong

    2010-07-01

    Gallbladder (GB) cancer may be discovered incidentally by histopathologic examination following simple cholecystectomy. Incidental GB cancer > or =T2 or > or =N1 needs a second radical resection. It is a matter of concern whether the prognosis may be worse in patients with T2GB cancer who undergo a second radical resection than in those who undergo primary radical resection. Between March 2001 and March 2009, 21 patients underwent a one-step operation (OSO group), and 17 patients underwent a two-step operation (TSO group) for T2GB cancer. We compared clinicopathologic factors and survival between patients in the OSO group (n = 9) and those in the TSO group (n = 9) with T2N0M0 GB cancer and between patients in the OSO group (n = 12) and those in the TSO group (n = 8) with T2N1M0 GB cancer. Except for patient age, clinicopathologic factors as well as disease-free survival were not significantly different between the OSO group and the TSO group in the aforementioned cancer stages. Patient age was significantly higher in the OSO group than in the TSO group. Second completion radical resection following initial simple cholecystectomy (TSO) provided a survival benefit similar to that of primary radical surgery (OSO) for patients with both T2N0M0 and T2N1M0 GB cancers in our study.

  13. Tailor-made rehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb robots for acute stroke patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Takashi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Saita, Kazuya; Hyakutake, Koichi; Watanabe, Junko; Shiota, Etsuji; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    This article investigated the feasibility of a tailor-made neurorehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb (HAL) robots for acute stroke patients. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent rehabilitation using the HAL robots. The Brunnstrom stage, Barthel index (BI), and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated at baseline and when patients were transferred to a rehabilitation facility. Scores were compared between the multiple-robot rehabilitation and single-robot rehabilitation groups. Nine hemiplegic acute stroke patients (five men and four women; mean age 59.4 ± 12.5 years; four hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using multiple types of HAL robots for 19.4 ± 12.5 days, and 14 patients (six men and eight women; mean age 63.2 ± 13.9 years; nine hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using a single type of HAL robot for 14.9 ± 8.9 days. The multiple-robot rehabilitation group showed significantly better outcomes in the Brunnstrom stage of the upper extremity, BI, and FIM scores. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first pilot study demonstrating the feasibility of rehabilitation using multiple exoskeleton robots. The tailor-made rehabilitation approach may be useful for the treatment of acute stroke.

  14. First year experience of robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery with 153 cases in a general surgery department: indications, technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomulescu, V; Stănciulea, O; Bălescu, I; Vasile, S; Tudor, St; Gheorghe, C; Vasilescu, C; Popescu, I

    2009-01-01

    Robotic surgery was developed in response to the limitations and drawbacks of laparoscopic surgery. Since 1997 when the first robotic procedure was performed various papers pointed the advantages of robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery, this technique is now a reality and it will probably become the surgery of the future. The aim of this paper is to present our preliminary experience with the three-arms "da Vinci S surgical system", to assess the feasibility of this technique in various abdominal and thoracic procedures and to point out the advantages of the robotic approach for each type of procedure. Between 18 January 2008 and 18 January 2009 153 patients (66 men and 87 women; mean age 48,02 years, range 6 to 84 years) underwent robotic-assisted surgical procedures in our institution; we performed 129 abdominal and 24 thoracic procedures, as follows: one cholecystectomy, 14 myotomies with Dor fundoplication, one gastroenteroanastomosis for unresectable antral gastric cancer, one transthoracic esophagectomy, 14 gastrectomies, one polypectomy through gastrotomy, 22 splenectomies,7 partial spleen resections, 22 thymectomy, 6 Nissen fundoplications, one Toupet fundoplication, one choledocho-duodeno-anastomosis, one drainage for pancreatic abscess, one distal pancreatectomy, one hepatic cyst fenestration, 7 hepatic resections, 29 colonic and rectal resections, 5 adrenalectomies, 12 total radical hysterectomies and pelvic lymphadenectomy, 3 hysterectomies with bilateral adnexectomy for uterine fibroma, one unilateral adnexectomy, and 2 cases of cervico-mediastinal goitre resection. 147 procedures were robotics completed , whereas 6 procedures were converted to open surgery due to the extent of the lesion. Average operating room time was 171 minutes (range 60 to 600 minutes, Median length of stay was 8,6 days (range 2 to 48 days). One system malfunctions was registered. Post-operatory complications occurred in 14 cases. There were no deaths. Our preliminary experience

  15. Population-based assessment of racial/ethnic differences in utilization of radical cystectomy for patients diagnosed with bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen B; Huo, Jinhai; Kosarek, Christopher D; Chamie, Karim; Rogers, Selwyn O; Williams, Michele A; Giordano, Sharon H; Kim, Simon P; Kamat, Ashish M

    2017-07-01

    Radical cystectomy is a surgical treatment for recurrent non-muscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancer; however, many patients may not receive this treatment. A total of 27,578 patients diagnosed with clinical stage I-IV bladder cancer from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2013 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database. We used multivariable regression analyses to identify factors predicting the use of radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze survival outcomes. A total of 1,693 (6.1%) patients with bladder cancer underwent radical cystectomy. Most patients (92.4%) who underwent radical cystectomy also underwent pelvic lymph node dissection. When compared with white patients, non-Hispanic blacks were less likely to undergo a radical cystectomy [odds ratio (OR) 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.96, p = 0.019]. Moreover, recent year of surgery 2013 versus 2007 (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.90-2.83, p groups diagnosed with bladder cancer, especially among older, non-Hispanic black patients.

  16. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: a single center experience of 100 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stănciulea, O; Eftimie, M; David, L; Tomulescu, V; Vasilescu, C; Popescu, I

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive techniques have revolutionized the field of general surgery over the few last decades. Despite its advantages, in complex procedures such as rectal surgery, laparoscopy has not achieved a high penetration rate because of its steep learning curve, its relatively high conversion rate and technical challenges. The aim of this study was to present a single center experience with robotic surgery for rectal cancer focusing mainly on early and mid-term postoperative outcome. A series of 100 consecutive patients who underwent robotic rectal surgery between January 2008 and June 2012 was analyzed retrospectively in terms of demographics, pathological data, surgical and oncological outcomes. Seventy-seven patients underwent robotic sphincter-saving resection, and 23 patients underwent robotic abdominoperineal resection. There were 4 conversions. The median operative time for sphincter-saving procedures was 180 min. The median time for robotic abdominoperineal resection was 160 min. The median distal resection margin of the operative specimen was 3 cm. The median number of retrieved lymph nodes was 14. The median hospital stay was 10 days. In-hospital mortality was nil. The overall morbidity was 30%. Four patients presented transitory postoperative urinary dysfunction. Severe erectile dysfunction was reported by 3 patients. The median length of follow-up was 24 months. The 3-year overall survival rate was 90%. Robotic surgery is advantageous for both surgeons (in that it facilitates dissection in a narrow pelvis) and patients (in that it affords a very good quality of life via the preservation of sexual and urinary function in the vast majority of patients and it has low morbidity and good midterm oncological outcomes). In rectal cancer surgery, the robotic approach is a promising alternative and is expected to overcome the low penetration rate of laparoscopy in this field. Celsius.

  17. Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riga, Celia V.; Bicknell, Colin D.; Wallace, Daniel; Hamady, Mohamad; Cheshire, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    To determine the technical feasibility of a novel approach of in-situ fenestration of aortic stent grafts by using a remotely controlled robotic steerable catheter system in the porcine model. A 65-kg pig underwent robot-assisted bilateral antegrade in-situ renal fenestration of an abdominal aortic stent graft with subsequent successful deployment of a bare metal stent into the right renal artery. A 16-mm iliac extension covered stent served as the porcine aortic endograft. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the graft was punctured with a 20-G customized diathermy needle that was introduced and kept in place by the robotic arm. The needle was exchanged for a 4 x 20 mm cutting balloon before successful deployment of the renal stent. Robot-assisted antegrade in-situ fenestration is technically feasible in a large mammalian model. The robotic system enables precise manipulation, stable positioning, and minimum instrumentation of the aorta and its branches while minimizing radiation exposure.

  18. Robotic Liver Resection: A Case-Matched Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingham, T Peter; Leung, Universe; Kuk, Deborah; Gönen, Mithat; D'Angelica, Michael I; Allen, Peter J; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Laudone, Vincent P; Jarnagin, William R; Fong, Yuman

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, increasingly sophisticated tools have allowed for more complex robotic surgery. Robotic hepatectomy, however, is still in its infancy. Our goals were to examine the adoption of robotic hepatectomy and to compare outcomes between open and robotic liver resections. The robotic hepatectomy experience of 64 patients was compared to a modern case-matched series of 64 open hepatectomy patients at the same center. Matching was according to benign/malignant diagnosis and number of segments resected. Patient data were obtained retrospectively. The main outcomes and measures were operative time, estimated blood loss, conversion rate (robotic to open), Pringle maneuver use, single non-anatomic wedge resection rate, resection margin size, complication rates (infectious, hepatic, pulmonary, cardiac), hospital stay length, ICU stay length, readmission rate, and 90-day mortality rate. Sixty-four robotic hepatectomies were performed in 2010-2014. Forty-one percent were segmental and 34 % were wedge resections. There was a 6 % conversion rate, a 3 % 90-day mortality rate, and an 11 % morbidity rate. Compared to 64 matched patients who underwent open hepatectomy (2004-2012), there was a shorter median OR time (p = 0.02), lower median estimated blood loss (p optimization of outcomes and prospective examination of the economic cost of each approach.

  19. Robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty: minimum 1-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty. Laparoscopic pyeloplasty has been shown to have a success rate comparable to that of the open surgical approach. However, the steep learning curve has hindered its acceptance into mainstream urologic practice. The introduction of robotic assistance provides advantages that have the potential to facilitate precise dissection and intracorporeal suturing. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. A four-trocar technique was used. Most patients were discharged home on day 1, with stent removal at 3 weeks. Patency of the ureteropelvic junction was assessed in all patients with mercaptotriglycylglycine Lasix renograms at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, then every 6 months for 1 year, and then yearly. Results: Each patient underwent a successful procedure without open conversion or transfusion. The average estimated blood loss was 40 ml. The operative time averaged 122 minutes (range 60 to 330) overall. Crossing vessels were present in 30% of the patients and were preserved in all cases. The time for the anastomosis averaged 20 minutes (range 10 to 100). Intraoperatively, no complications occurred. Postoperatively, the average hospital stay was 1.1 days. The stents were removed at an average of 20 days (range 14 to 28) postoperatively. The average follow-up was 11.7 months; at the last follow-up visit, each patient was doing well. Of the 50 patients, 48 underwent one or more renograms, demonstrating stable renal function, improved drainage, and no evidence of recurrent obstruction. Conclusions: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty is a feasible technique for ureteropelvic junction reconstruction. The procedure provides a minimally invasive alternative with good short-term results.

  20. Robotic prostatectomy: the anesthetist's view for robotic urological surgeries, a prospective study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menekse Oksar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Although many features of robotic prostatectomy are similar to those of conventional laparoscopic urological procedures (such as laparoscopic prostatectomy, the procedure is associated with some drawbacks, which include limited intravenous access, relatively long operating time, deep Trendelenburg position, and high intra-abdominal pressure. The primary aim was to describe respiratory and hemodynamic challenges and the complications related to high intra-abdominal pressure and the deep Trendelenburg position in robotic prostatectomy patients. The secondary aim was to reveal safe discharge criteria from the operating room. Methods: Fifty-three patients who underwent robotic prostatectomy between December 2009 and January 2011 were prospectively enrolled. Main outcome measures were non-invasive monitoring, invasive monitoring and blood gas analysis performed at supine (T0, Trendelenburg (T1, Trendelenburg + pneumoperitoneum (T2, Trendelenburg-before desufflation (T3, Trendelenburg (after desufflation (T4, and supine (T5 positions. Results: Fifty-three robotic prostatectomy patients were included in the study. The main clinical challenge in our study group was the choice of ventilation strategy to manage respiratory acidosis, which is detected through end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure and blood gas analysis. Furthermore, the mean arterial pressure remained unchanged, the heart rate decreased significantly and required intervention. The central venous pressure values were also above the normal limits. Conclusion: Respiratory acidosis and "upper airway obstruction-like" clinical symptoms were the main challenges associated with robotic prostatectomy procedures during this study.

  1. [Usefullness of the Da Vinci robot in urologic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iselin, C; Fateri, F; Caviezel, A; Schwartz, J; Hauser, J

    2007-12-05

    A telemanipulator for laparoscopic instruments is now available in the world of surgical robotics. This device has three distincts advantages over traditional laparoscopic surgery: it improves precision because of the many degrees of freedom of its instruments, and it offers 3-D vision so as better ergonomics for the surgeon. These characteristics are most useful for procedures that require delicate suturing in a focused operative field which may be difficult to reach. The Da Vinci robot has found its place in 2 domains of laparoscopic urologic surgery: radical prostatectomy and ureteral surgery. The cost of the robot, so as the price of its maintenance and instruments is high. This increases healthcare costs in comparison to open surgery, however not dramatically since patients stay less time in hospital and go back to work earlier.

  2. Does Prior Laparoscopic and Open Surgery Experience Have Any Impact on Learning Curve in Transition to Robotic Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt Adayener

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been 15 years since the Food And Drug Administration approved the Da Vinci® robotic surgery system. Robotic applications are being used extensively in urology, particularly in radical prostatectomy. Like all high-tech products, this system also has a high cost and a steep learning curve, therefore, preventing it from becoming widespread. There are various studies on the effect of open surgery or laparoscopy experience on the learning curve of robotic surgery. Analyzing these interactions well will provide valuable information on making the training period of robotic system more efficient.

  3. Robotic assisted versus pure laparoscopic surgery of the adrenal glands: a case-control study comparing surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Luca; Tartaglia, Dario; Bronzoni, Jessica; Palmeri, Matteo; Guadagni, Simone; Di Franco, Gregorio; Gennai, Andrea; Bianchini, Matteo; Bastiani, Luca; Moglia, Andrea; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Fommei, Enza; Pietrabissa, Andrea; Di Candio, Giulio; Mosca, Franco

    2016-11-01

    The role of the da Vinci Robotic System ® in adrenal gland surgery is not yet well defined. The goal of this study was to compare robotic-assisted surgery with pure laparoscopic surgery in a single center. One hundred and 16 patients underwent minimally invasive adrenalectomies in our department between June 1994 and December 2014, 41 of whom were treated with a robotic-assisted approach (robotic adrenalectomy, RA). Patients who underwent RA were matched according to BMI, age, gender, and nodule dimensions, and compared with 41 patients who had undergone laparoscopic adrenalectomies (LA). Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t test for independent samples, and the relationship between the operative time and other covariates were evaluated with a multivariable linear regression model. P surgery (p surgery.

  4. Radical vs. Conservative Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst: A 10- Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghaemi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatic hydatid cyst is caused by echinococcosis granulosis. It is a major health problem in endemic areas. The modern treatment of hydatid cysts of the liver varies from surgical intervention to percutaneous drainage or medical therapy. A high rate of complications following percutaneous drainage, and ineffectiveness of medical therapy have shown not to be the definitive treatments for the disease. Thus, surgery is still the best choice for the treatment of hydatid cyst of the liver. Surgical treatment methods can be divided into radical and conservative approaches. There is controversy regarding efficacy of the two surgical methods. In this study, we aimed to present a retrospective evaluation of the two surgical methods in patients treated for the hepatic hydatid cyst. Methods: This retrospective study reviewed medical records of 135 patients who underwent surgery for hepatic hydatid cyst from 1997 to 2007. Surgery comprised conservative methods (evacuation of the cyst content and excision of the inner cyst layers and radical methods (total excision of the cyst and removal of its outer layer. Results: One hundred thirty five patients underwent liver surgery. Conservative surgery was performed for 71 (53%, whereas, the remaining 64 patients (47% underwent radical surgery. Postoperative complications were 28% and 19%, respectively. Recurrence of the cyst in the conservative and radical surgery groups was noted to be 12.5 and 1.5%, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was shorter in the radical surgery group (5 vs. 15 days. Conclusion: Radical surgery may be the preferred treatment for the hepatic hydatid cyst because of its low rate of postoperative complications and recurrence, as well as short hospital stay. Selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on the size, number, and location of the cyst(s, and presence of cystobiliary communications, and the availability of an experienced surgeon.

  5. Robotic technology in surgery: current status in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Declan G; Hall, Rohan; Tong, Raymond; Goel, Rajiv; Costello, Anthony J

    2008-12-01

    There is increasing patient and surgeon interest in robotic-assisted surgery, particularly with the proliferation of da Vinci surgical systems (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) throughout the world. There is much debate over the usefulness and cost-effectiveness of these systems. The currently available robotic surgical technology is described. Published data relating to the da Vinci system are reviewed and the current status of surgical robotics within Australia and New Zealand is assessed. The first da Vinci system in Australia and New Zealand was installed in 2003. Four systems had been installed by 2006 and seven systems are currently in use. Most of these are based in private hospitals. Technical advantages of this system include 3-D vision, enhanced dexterity and improved ergonomics when compared with standard laparoscopic surgery. Most procedures currently carried out are urological, with cardiac, gynaecological and general surgeons also using this system. The number of patients undergoing robotic-assisted surgery in Australia and New Zealand has increased fivefold in the past 4 years. The most common procedure carried out is robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Published data suggest that robotic-assisted surgery is feasible and safe although the installation and recurring costs remain high. There is increasing acceptance of robotic-assisted surgery, especially for urological procedures. The da Vinci surgical system is becoming more widely available in Australia and New Zealand. Other surgical specialties will probably use this technology. Significant costs are associated with robotic technology and it is not yet widely available to public patients.

  6. Clinical outcome of radical prostatectomy for stage C prostate cancer. Comparison with other treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Osamu; Meguro, Norio; Saiki, Shigeru; Kinouchi, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Masao; Usami, Michiyuki; Kotake, Toshihiko

    1997-01-01

    Of the 69 patients with clinical stage C prostate cancer under 75 years old and with good performance status between 1986 and 1995, 29 underwent radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy, 21 underwent radiation therapy combined with endocrine therapy and remaining 19 patients were treated by endocrine therapy alone. The median follow-up was 44 months (range 4 to 122). Radical prostatectomy resulted in progression-free rates of 79% and 61% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Progression-free rates were lower in patients with lymph node metastasis or positive surgical margins. In patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor, radical prostatectomy resulted in a progression-free rate of 100% at 5 years. However, in patients with clinical stage T4a or poorly differentiated tumor, radiation therapy resulted in a better progression-free rate than radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor will benefit from radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy and that radiation therapy will be effective for advanced diseases. (author)

  7. Virtual modeling of robot-assisted manipulations in abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelavichus, Stanislav V; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Shirokov, Vadim S; Kubyshkin, Valeriy A; Kriger, Andrey G; Kondratyev, Evgeny V; Zakharova, Olga P

    2012-06-27

    To determine the effectiveness of using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) data in preoperative planning of robot-assisted surgery. Fourteen patients indicated for surgery underwent MDCT using 64 and 256-slice MDCT. Before the examination, a specially constructed navigation net was placed on the patient's anterior abdominal wall. Processing of MDCT data was performed on a Brilliance Workspace 4 (Philips). Virtual vectors that imitate robotic and assistant ports were placed on the anterior abdominal wall of the 3D model of the patient, considering the individual anatomy of the patient and the technical capabilities of robotic arms. Sites for location of the ports were directed by projection on the roentgen-positive tags of the navigation net. There were no complications observed during surgery or in the post-operative period. We were able to reduce robotic arm interference during surgery. The surgical area was optimal for robotic and assistant manipulators without any need for reinstallation of the trocars. This method allows modeling of the main steps in robot-assisted intervention, optimizing operation of the manipulator and lowering the risk of injuries to internal organs.

  8. Human capital gains associated with robotic assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty in children compared to open pyeloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, James W; Kim, Steve S; Dorey, Frederick; De Filippo, Roger E; Chang, Andy Y; Hardy, Brian E; Koh, Chester J

    2011-10-01

    Robotic assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty is an emerging, minimally invasive alternative to open pyeloplasty in children for ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The procedure is associated with smaller incisions and shorter hospital stays. To our knowledge previous outcome analyses have not included human capital calculations, especially regarding loss of parental workdays. We compared perioperative factors in patients who underwent robotic assisted laparoscopic and open pyeloplasty at a single institution, especially in regard to human capital changes, in an institutional cost analysis. A total of 44 patients 2 years old or older from a single institution underwent robotic assisted (37) or open (7) pyeloplasty from 2008 to 2010. We retrospectively reviewed the charts to collect demographic and perioperative data. The human capital approach was used to calculate parental productivity losses. Patients who underwent robotic assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty had a significantly shorter average hospital length of stay (1.6 vs 2.8 days, p human capital gains, eg decreased lost parental wages, and lower hospitalization expenses. Future comparative outcome analyses in children should include financial factors such as human capital loss, which can be especially important for families with young children. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS. We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise.

  10. A comparison of quality outcome measures in patients having a hysterectomy for benign disease: robotic vs. non-robotic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Martin A; Berger, Elizabeth A; McFetridge, Jeffrey T; Shubella, Jocelyn; Gosciniak, Gabrielle; Wejkszner, Taylor; Kainz, Gregory F; Patriarco, Jeremy; Thomas, M Bijoy; Boulay, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To measure procedure-related hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for patients who have a hysterectomy for benign disease. Secondary outcome quality measures evaluated were cost, estimated blood loss, length of stay and sum of costs associated with readmissions. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Academic community hospital. Patients who underwent hysterectomy to treat benign disease from January 2008 to December 2012. Patients were grouped according to route of hysterectomy: robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy (robotic), laparoscopic hysterectomy (laparoscopic), abdominal hysterectomy (open via laparotomy), and vaginal hysterectomy (vaginal). Inclusion criteria were met by 2554 patients: 601 in the robotic group, 427 in the laparoscopic group, 1194 in the abdominal group, and 332 in the vaginal group. Readmission rates in the robotic cohort were significantly less (probotic cohorts: Robotic (1%), laparoscopic (2.5%), open (3.5%), vaginal (2.4%). Estimated blood loss, length of stay, and sum of readmission costs were also significantly less in the robotic cohort (probotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy have a significantly lower chance of readmission robotics cohort also experienced a shorter length of stay, less estimated blood loss, and a cost savings associated with readmissions when compared to non-robotic approaches. Prospective registries describing quality outcomes, total sum of costs including 30 days follow-up, as well as patient-related quality of life benefits are recommended to confirm these findings and determine which surgical route offers the highest patient and societal value. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Perioperative complications of radical cystectomy after induction chemoradiotherapy in bladder-sparing protocol against muscle-invasive bladder cancer. A single institutional retrospective comparative study with primary radical cystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Aki; Koga, Fumitaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Masuda, Hitoshi; Saito, Kazutaka; Numao, Noboru; Sakura, Mizuaki; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare rates of early morbidity after radical cystectomy in patients treated with or without induction chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using a standardized reporting methodology. All 193 consecutive patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer between 1989 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Induction chemoradiotherapy consists of radiation at 40 Gy to the small pelvis and two cycles of concurrent cisplatin at 20 mg/day for 5 days. Deaths within 90 days after radical cystectomy and complications arising within 30 days were recorded and graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Grades 1-2 were considered minor; Grades 3-5 were considered major. Eighty-seven patients underwent radical cystectomy following chemoradiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy group) while the remaining 106 primarily underwent radical cystectomy (no chemoradiotherapy group). No Grade 4-5 complication was observed. Overall, 118 patients (61%) experienced 36 major and 122 minor complications. There was no significant difference in the incidence of overall complications between the chemoradiotherapy and no chemoradiotherapy groups (67 vs. 57%). Overall urinary anastomosis-related complications and major gastrointestinal complications, most of which were Grade 3 ileus, were more frequent in the chemoradiotherapy group than the no chemoradiotherapy group (11 vs. 2%, P=0.007; and 14 vs. 4%, P=0.02; respectively). Multivariate analysis identified induction chemoradiotherapy as an independent risk factor for overall urinary anastomosis-related complications (relative risk 6.0, P=0.01) but not for major gastrointestinal complications. Induction chemoradiotherapy at 40 Gy in bladder-sparing protocols against MIBC is unlikely to increase the rate of severe complications of radical cystectomy. (author)

  12. Differences in recurrent prolapse at 1 year after total vs supracervical hysterectomy and robotic sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Erinn M; Siff, Lauren; Osmundsen, Blake; Geller, Elizabeth; Matthews, Catherine A

    2015-04-01

    Optimal management of the cervix at the time of hysterectomy and sacrocolpopexy for primary uterovaginal prolapse is unknown. Our hypothesis was that recurrent prolapse at 1 year would be more likely after a supracervical robotic hysterectomy (SRH) compared with a total robotic hysterectomy (TRH) at the time of robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSCP) for uterovaginal prolapse. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 83 women who underwent hysterectomy with RSCP over a 24-month period (40 with TRH and 43 with SRH). At 1 year post-procedure, subjects completed validated questionnaires regarding pelvic floor symptoms, sexual function, and global satisfaction, and underwent a pelvic examination to identify mesh exposure and evaluate pelvic floor support. Demographics of the two groups were similar, except for a higher mean body mass index in the TRH group (31.9 TRH vs 25.8 SRH kg/m(2), p measure of success was used (30 out of 40 [75 %] TRH vs 29 out of 43 [67.4 %] SRH, p = 0.45). Women who underwent an SRH were 2.8 times more likely to have a recurrent prolapse, ≥ stage II, at 1 year, compared with those who underwent a TRH, but when composite assessment scores were used there was no difference between the groups.

  13. Oncological Outcomes After Robotic Proctectomy for Rectal Cancer: Analysis of a Prospective Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammour, Tarik; Malakorn, Songphol; Bednarski, Brian K; Kaur, Harmeet; Shin, Ui Sup; Messick, Craig; You, Yi-Qian Nancy; Chang, George J

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the oncological outcomes of robotic total mesorectal excision (TME) at an NCI designated cancer center. The effectiveness of laparoscopic TME could not be established, but the robotic-assisted approach may hold some promise, with improved visualization and ergonomics for pelvic dissection. Oncological outcome data is presently lacking. Patients who underwent total mesorectal excision or tumor-specific mesorectal excision for rectal cancer between April 2009 and April 2016 via a robotic approach were identified from a prospective single-institution database. The circumferential resection margin (CRM), distal resection margin, and TME completeness rates were determined. Kaplan-Meier analysis of disease-free survival and overall survival was performed for all patients treated with curative intent. A total of 276 patients underwent robotic proctectomy during the study period. Robotic surgery was performed initially by 1 surgeon with 3 additional surgeons progressively transitioning from open to robotic during the study period with annual increase in the total number of cases performed robotically. Seven patients had involved circumferential resection margins (2.5%), and there were no positive distal or proximal resection margins. One hundred eighty-six patients had TME quality assessed, and only 1 patient (0.5%) had an incomplete TME. Eighty-three patients were followed up for a minimum of 3 years, with a local recurrence rate of 2.4%, and a distant recurrence rate of 16.9%. Five-year disease-free survival on Kaplan-Meier analysis was 82%, and 5-year overall survival was 87%. Robotic proctectomy for rectal cancer can be performed with good short and medium term oncological outcomes in selected patients.

  14. Surgical outcomes of robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery using the da Vinci Surgical System: a multi-center pilot Phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Shunsuke; Nishizawa, Yuji; Ochiai, Hiroki; Tsukada, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Shida, Dai; Ito, Masaaki; Kanemitsu, Yukihide

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a multi-center pilot Phase II study to examine the safety of robotic rectal cancer surgery performed using the da Vinci Surgical System during the introduction period of robotic rectal surgery at two institutes based on surgical outcomes. This study was conducted with a prospective, multi-center, single-arm, open-label design to assess the safety and feasibility of robotic surgery for rectal cancer (da Vinci Surgical System). The primary endpoint was the rate of adverse events during and after robotic surgery. The secondary endpoint was the completion rate of robotic surgery. Between April 2014 and July 2016, 50 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 10 (20%) had rectosigmoid cancer, 17 (34%) had upper rectal cancer, and 23 (46%) had lower rectal cancer; six underwent high anterior resection, 32 underwent low anterior resection, 11 underwent intersphincteric resection, and one underwent abdominoperineal resection. Pathological stages were Stage 0 in 1 patient, Stage I in 28 patients, Stage II in 7 patients and Stage III in 14 patients. Pathologically complete resection was achieved in all patients. There was no intraoperative organ damage or postoperative mortality. Eight (16%) patients developed complications of all grades, of which 2 (4%) were Grade 3 or higher, including anastomotic leakage (2%) and conversion to open surgery (2%). The present study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of robotic rectal cancer surgery, as reflected by low morbidity and low conversion rates, during the introduction period. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on complications of minimally invasive radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizée, D; Salas, R S; Barret, E; Galiano, M; Di Trapani, E; Montorsi, F; Cathelineau, X

    2017-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC) before minimally invasive radical cystectomy (MIRC) is considered a standard of care in muscle-invasive bladder cancer or recurrent high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. To evaluate the impact of NC on morbidity and mortality after MIRC. We prospectively evaluated 135 patients who underwent MIRC (laparoscopic: n=100; robotic: n=35) between 2007 and 2013 with ≥90 days of follow-up (median age: 66 year). Complications were analyzed and graded according to the Clavien Dindo classification system. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the impact of NC on postoperative complications. Kaplan-Meier methods with the log-rank test were used for cancer-specific survival probabilities and differences between the 2groups (MIRC with and without NC). Sixty-two of 135 patients received NC. A total of 118 patients (87.4%) developed 179 complications, chiefly infectious (48.0%) or gastrointestinal (21.2%), ≤90 days after surgery; 3 patients died bladder cancer who had NC versus no NC. We did not find any significant differences in terms of early or late complications, length of stay, or reintervention. The oncologic outcomes regarding NC were encouraging. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. A Comparison of Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy in Patients With Primary Hyperaldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Jennifer; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Jin, Judy; Shin, Joyce; Siperstein, Allan; Berber, Eren

    2017-10-01

    Over the last decade, robotic approaches have been described for removing adrenal tumors. Although there are reports comparing robotic and laparoscopic techniques in general, there are limited data on outcomes in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (PHA). The aim of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of robotic adrenalectomy (RA) versus laparoscopic adrenalectomy (LA) for PHA. The records of 20 patients who underwent RA for PHA were compared with 16 patients who underwent LA between 2000 and 2014. Data were retrospectively reviewed from a prospectively maintained, IRB-approved adrenal database. Statistical analysis was performed using t test and the Fisher exact analysis. Continuous variables are reported as mean±SEM. Demographic and clinical parameters were similar between the groups. There were no conversions to open in either group. Estimated blood loss, length of stay, and complication rates were comparable. Operative time was shorter in the robotic versus laparoscopic group (130±8.94 vs. 159±11.1 min, P=0.0487). In follow-up, the improvement in patients' blood pressure after adrenalectomy, as assessed by the reduction in the number of antihypertensive medications, was similar between the 2 groups. However, 1 patient in the RA and 1 patient in the LA group were not cured, as determined by postoperative aldosterone:renin levels. The biochemical cure rate between the groups was similar (P=0.529). To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing robotic versus laparoscopic resection of PHA. Our results show that the robotic approach was similar to laparoscopic regarding safety and efficacy. Operative time was shorter with the robotic approach, which could be related to more efficient dissection with wristed instrumentation.

  17. Application of robotics in general surgery: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ninh T; Hinojosa, Marcelo W; Finley, David; Stevens, Melinda; Paya, Mahbod

    2004-10-01

    Robotic surgery was recently approved for clinical use in general abdominal surgery. The aim of this study was to review our experience with the da Vinci surgical system during laparoscopic general surgical procedures. Eighteen patients underwent robotically assisted laparoscopic abdominal surgery between June 2002 and March 2003. Main outcome measures were operative time, room setup time, robotic arm-positioning and surgical time, blood loss, conversion to laparoscopy, length of stay, and morbidity. The types of robotically assisted laparoscopic procedures were excision of gastric leiomyoma (n = 1), Heller myotomy (n = 1), cholecystectomy (n = 2), gastric banding (n = 2), Nissen fundoplication (n = 4), and gastric bypass (n = 8). The mean room setup time was 63 +/- 14 minutes, and the mean robotic arm-positioning time was 16 +/- 7 minutes. Conversion to laparoscopy occurred in two (11%) of 18 cases because of equipment difficulty (n = 1) and technical difficulty (n = 1). Estimated blood loss was 91 +/- 71 mL. The mean operative time was 156 +/- 42 minutes, and the robotic operative time was 27% of the total operative time. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.2 +/- 1.5 days. There was one postoperative wound infection and one anastomotic stricture. Robotically assisted laparoscopic abdominal surgery is feasible and safe; however, the theoretical advantages of the da Vinci surgical system were not clinically apparent.

  18. Pancreatic enucleation using the da Vinci robotic surgical system: a report of 26 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yusheng; Peng, Chenghong; Shen, Baiyong; Deng, Xiaxing; Jin, Jiabin; Wu, Zhichong; Zhan, Qian; Li, Hongwei

    2016-12-01

    As a tissue-sparing procedure, pancreatic enucleation has become an alternative for benign or borderline pancreatic tumours; it has been proved to be safe and feasible. To date, a large sample size of robotic pancreatic enucleation has not been reported. This study aimed to discuss the clinical evaluation and postoperative complications after robotic pancreatic enucleation and compare it with open surgery. Patients who underwent robotic or open pancreatic enucleation during December 2010-December 2014 at Shanghai Ruijin Hospital, affiliated with the Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine in China, were included. Clinical data were collected and analysed. Patients were divided into an open group and a robotic group: 26 patients underwent robotic pancreatic enucleation, of whom 13 patients were female. The mean age was 51.7 years, the operation time was 125.7 ± 58.8 min, blood loss was 49.4 ± 33.4 ml and mean tumour size was 18.8 ± 7.9 mm; 17 patients underwent open pancreatic enucleation, of whom 11 were female. The mean age was 54.6 ± 17.2 min, blood loss was 198.5 ± 70.7 ml and mean tumour size was 3.5 ± 1.9 cm. Pathology included insulinomas, intrapancreatic mucinous neoplasmas (IPMNs), pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumours (PNETs), solid pseudopapillary tumours (SPTs) and serous cystadenomas (SCAs). Robotic pancreatic enucleations were associated with less trauma, shorter operation time, less blood loss and faster wound recovery compared with open pancreatic enucleation. Pancreatic fistulas (PFs) were the main complication that occurred in the robotic group; infection also occurred in the open group. All patients recovered after effective drainage and the use of somatostatin. The mean follow-up time was 25 months. No recurrence was discovered, and one patient in the open group suffered endocrine insufficiency. Robotic pancreatic enucleation is a safe and effective surgical procedure for pancreatic benign and borderline tumours. It produces less

  19. Laparoscopic hand-assisted versus robotic-assisted laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: experience of 103 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Umashankkar; Ecker, Brett L; Choudhury, Rashikh; Dempsey, Daniel T; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has become a stand-alone procedure in the treatment of morbid obesity. There are very few reports on the use of robotic approach in sleeve gastrectomy. The purpose of this retrospective study is to report our early experience of robotic-assisted laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (RALSG) using a proctored training model with comparison to an institutional cohort of patients who underwent laparoscopic hand-assisted sleeve gastrectomy (LASG). University hospital. The study included 108 patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy either via the laparoscopic-assisted or robot-assisted approach during the study period. Of these 108 patients, 62 underwent LASG and 46 underwent RALSG. The console surgeon in the RALSG is a clinical year 4 (CY4) surgery resident. All CY4 surgery residents received targeted simulation training before their rotation. The console surgeon is proctored by the primary surgeon with assistance as needed by the second surgeon. The patients in the robotic and laparoscopic cohorts did not have a statistical difference in their demographic characteristics, preoperative co-morbidities, or complications. The mean operating time did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts (121 min versus 110 min, P = .07). Patient follow-up in the LSG and RALSG were 91% and 90% at 3 months, 62% and 64% at 6 months, and 60% and 55% at 1 year, respectively. The mean percentage estimated weight loss (EWL%) at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year was greater in the robotic group but not statistically significant (27 versus 22 at 3 mo [P = .05] and 39 versus 34 at 6 mo [P = .025], 57 versus 48 at 1 yr [P = .09]). There was no mortality in either group. Early results of our experience with RALSG indicate low perioperative complication rates and comparable weight loss with LASG. The concept of a stepwise education model needs further validation with larger studies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc

  20. Comparing robotic, laparoscopic and open cystectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Fonseka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing outcomes between Open Radical Cystectomy (ORC, Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy (LRC and Robot-assisted Radical Cystectomy (RARC. RARC is to be compared to LRC and ORC and LRC compared to ORC. Material and methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted, collating studies comparing RARC, LRC and ORC. Surgical and oncological outcome data were extracted and a meta-analysis was performed. Results: Twenty-four studies were selected with total of 2,104 cases analyzed. RARC had a longer operative time (OPT compared to LRC with no statistical difference between length of stay (LOS and estimated blood loss (EBL. RARC had a significantly shorter LOS, reduced EBL, lower complication rate and longer OPT compared to ORC. There were no significant differences regarding lymph node yield (LNY and positive surgical margins (PSM. LRC had a reduced EBL, shorter LOS and increased OPT compared to ORC. There was no significant difference regarding LNY. Conclusion: RARC is comparable to LRC with better surgical results than ORC. LRC has better surgical outcomes than ORC. With the unique technological features of the robotic surgical system and increasing trend of intra-corporeal reconstruction it is likely that RARC will become the surgical option of choice.

  1. Robotic surgery in Italy national survey (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio; Pansadoro, Vito

    2013-03-01

    Robotic surgery in Italy has become a clinical reality that is gaining increasing acceptance. As of 2011 after the United States, Italy together with Germany is the country with the largest number of active Robotic centers, 46, and da Vinci Robots installed, with at least 116 operators already trained. The number of interventions performed in Italy in 2011 exceeded 6,000 and in 2010 were 4,784, with prevalence for urology, general surgery and gynecology, however these interventions have also begun to be applied in other fields such as cervicofacial, cardiothoracic and pediatric surgery. In Italy Robotic centers are mostly located in Northern Italy, while in the South there are only a few centers, and four regions are lacking altogether. Of the 46 centers which were started in 1999, the vast majority is still operational and almost half handle over 200 cases a year. The quality of the work is also especially high with large diffusion of radical prostatectomy in urology and liver resection and colic in general surgery. The method is very well accepted among operators, over 80 %, and among patients, over 95 %. From the analysis of world literature and a survey carried out in Italy, Robotic surgery, which at the moment could be better defined as telesurgery, represents a significant advantage for operators and a consistent gain for the patient. However, it still has important limits such as high cost and non-structured training of operators.

  2. [Robots in general surgery: present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvani, Carlos; Horgan, Santiago

    2005-09-01

    Robotic surgery is an emerging technology. We began to use this technique in 2000, after it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Our preliminary experience was satisfactory. We report 4 years' experience of using this technique in our institution. Between August 2000 and December 2004, 399 patients underwent robotic surgery using the Da Vinci system. We performed 110 gastric bypass procedures, 30 Lap band, 59 Heller myotomies, 12 Nissen fundoplications, 6 epiphrenic diverticula, 18 total esophagectomies, 3 esophageal leiomyoma resections, 1 pyloroplasty, 2 gastrojejunostomies, 2 transduodenal sphincteroplasties, 10 adrenalectomies and 145 living-related donor nephrectomies. Operating times for fundoplications and Lap band were longer. After the learning curve, the operating times and morbidity of the remaining procedures were considerably reduced. Robot-assisted surgery allows advanced laparoscopic procedures to be performed with enhanced results given that it reduces the learning curve as measured by operating time and morbidity.

  3. Robotic Versus Video-assisted Lobectomy/Segmentectomy for Lung Cancer: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hengrui; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Difei; Zhang, Jianrong; Zhang, Yiyin; Tang, Shiyan; He, Jianxing

    2017-06-16

    : Objective: To compare the safety/efficacy of the robotic-assisted lobectomy/segmentectomy (RAL/S) with the video-assisted lobectomy/segmentectomy (VAL/S) for radical lung cancer resection. It remains uncertain whether the newly developed RAL/S is comparable with the VAL/S. A comprehensive search of online databases was performed. Perioperative outcomes were synthesized. Cumulative meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the temporal trend of pooled outcomes. Specific subgroups (propensity score matching studies, pure lobectomy studies) were examined. Analysis of 14 studies including a total of 7438 patients was performed. RAL/S was performed on 3239 patients, whereas the other 4199 patients underwent VAL/S. The 30-day mortality [0.7% vs 1.1%; odds ratio (OR) 0.53, P = 0.045] and conversion rate to open surgery (10.3% vs 11.9%; OR 0.57, P < 0.001) were significantly lower in patients who underwent RAL/S than VAL/S. Meanwhile, the postoperative complications (27.5% vs 28.2%; OR 0.95, P = 0.431), operation time [176.63 vs 162.74 min; standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.30, P = 0.086], duration of hospitalization (4.90 vs 5.23 days; SMD -0.08, P = 0.292), days to tube removal (4.10 vs 3.53 days; SMD 0.25, P = 0.120), retrieved lymph node (11.96 vs 10.67; SMD 0.46, P = 0.381), and retrieved lymph node station (4.98 vs 4.32; SMD 0.83, P = 0.261) were similar between the 2 groups. The cumulative meta-analyses suggested that the relative effects between 2 groups have already stabilized. All outcomes of subgroup and overall analyses were similar. This up-to-date meta-analysis confirms that RAL/S is a feasible and safe alternative to VAL/S for radical resection of lung cancer. Future studies should focus on the long-term benefits and cost effectiveness of RAL/S compared with VAL/S.

  4. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Saverio; Nozza, Arrigo; Del Pezzo, Chiara; Mereu, Liliana

    2014-09-01

    To examine the feasibility of performing pelvic lymphadenectomy with robotic single site approach. Recent papers described the feasibility of robotic-single site hysterectomy [1-3] for benign and malign pathologies but only with the development of new single site 5mm instruments as the bipolar forceps, robotic single site platform can be safely utilized also for lymphadenectomy. A 65 year-old, multiparous patient with a body mass index of 22.5 and diagnosed with well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the endometrium underwent a robotic single-site peritoneal washing, total hysterectomy, bilateral adnexectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. The procedure was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) through a single 2,5 cm umbilical incision, with a multi-channel system and two single site robotic 5mm instruments. A 3-dimensional, HD 8.5mm endoscope and a 5mm accessory instrument were also utilized. Type I lymphonodes dissection for external iliac and obturator regions was performed [4]. Total operative time was 210 min; incision, trocar placement and docking time occurring in 12 min. Total console time was 183 min, estimated blood loss was 50 ml, no intra-operative or post-operative complications occurred. Hospital discharge occurred on post operative day 2 and total number of lymphnodes removed was 33. Difficulties in term of instrument's clashing and awkward motions have been encountered. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy using bipolar forceps and monopolar hook is feasible. New developments are needed to improve surgical ergonomics and additional studies should be performed to explore possible benefits of this procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Da Vinci robot-assisted system for thymectomy: experience of 55 patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yi; Hao, Li; Demin, Li; Guohua, Dong; Hua, Jing; Yi, Shen

    2014-09-01

    Da Vinci robot-assisted thymectomy has been used in the past several years in China, however, practical experience in performing this approach in China remains limited. Thus, the study aimed to evaluate the experience of da Vinci robot-assisted thymectomy in China. From June 2010 to December 2012, 55 patients with diseases of the thymus underwent thymectomy using the da Vinci surgical HD robotic system. The clinical data of the da Vinci robot-assisted thymectomies were compared with the data of video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomies in the same period. All da Vinci robot operations were successful. This is a retrospective analysis which demonstrated that compared with video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy in the same period, the clinical outcomes of da Vinci robot-assisted thymectomy were not significantly different. The da Vinci robot-assisted thymectomy is a safe, minimally invasive, and convenient operation, and shows promise for general thoracic surgery in China. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Robot-assisted procedures in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedictis, Alessandro; Trezza, Andrea; Carai, Andrea; Genovese, Elisabetta; Procaccini, Emidio; Messina, Raffaella; Randi, Franco; Cossu, Silvia; Esposito, Giacomo; Palma, Paolo; Amante, Paolina; Rizzi, Michele; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE During the last 3 decades, robotic technology has rapidly spread across several surgical fields due to the continuous evolution of its versatility, stability, dexterity, and haptic properties. Neurosurgery pioneered the development of robotics, with the aim of improving the quality of several procedures requiring a high degree of accuracy and safety. Moreover, robot-guided approaches are of special interest in pediatric patients, who often have altered anatomy and challenging relationships between the diseased and eloquent structures. Nevertheless, the use of robots has been rarely reported in children. In this work, the authors describe their experience using the ROSA device (Robotized Stereotactic Assistant) in the neurosurgical management of a pediatric population. METHODS Between 2011 and 2016, 116 children underwent ROSA-assisted procedures for a variety of diseases (epilepsy, brain tumors, intra- or extraventricular and tumor cysts, obstructive hydrocephalus, and movement and behavioral disorders). Each patient received accurate preoperative planning of optimal trajectories, intraoperative frameless registration, surgical treatment using specific instruments held by the robotic arm, and postoperative CT or MR imaging. RESULTS The authors performed 128 consecutive surgeries, including implantation of 386 electrodes for stereo-electroencephalography (36 procedures), neuroendoscopy (42 procedures), stereotactic biopsy (26 procedures), pallidotomy (12 procedures), shunt placement (6 procedures), deep brain stimulation procedures (3 procedures), and stereotactic cyst aspiration (3 procedures). For each procedure, the authors analyzed and discussed accuracy, timing, and complications. CONCLUSIONS To the best their knowledge, the authors present the largest reported series of pediatric neurosurgical cases assisted by robotic support. The ROSA system provided improved safety and feasibility of minimally invasive approaches, thus optimizing the surgical

  7. Adoption of robotics in a general surgery residency program: at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, J Hunter; Michaels, Alex D; Mullen, Matthew G; Yount, Kenan W; Meneveau, Max O; Smith, Philip W; Friel, Charles M; Schirmer, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Robotic technology is increasingly being utilized by general surgeons. However, the impact of introducing robotics to surgical residency has not been examined. This study aims to assess the financial costs and training impact of introducing robotics at an academic general surgery residency program. All patients who underwent laparoscopic or robotic cholecystectomy, ventral hernia repair (VHR), and inguinal hernia repair (IHR) at our institution from 2011-2015 were identified. The effect of robotic surgery on laparoscopic case volume was assessed with linear regression analysis. Resident participation, operative time, hospital costs, and patient charges were also evaluated. We identified 2260 laparoscopic and 139 robotic operations. As the volume of robotic cases increased, the number of laparoscopic cases steadily decreased. Residents participated in all laparoscopic cases and 70% of robotic cases but operated from the robot console in only 21% of cases. Mean operative time was increased for robotic cholecystectomy (+22%), IHR (+55%), and VHR (+61%). Financial analysis revealed higher median hospital costs per case for robotic cholecystectomy (+$411), IHR (+$887), and VHR (+$1124) as well as substantial associated fixed costs. Introduction of robotic surgery had considerable negative impact on laparoscopic case volume and significantly decreased resident participation. Increased operative time and hospital costs are substantial. An institution must be cognizant of these effects when considering implementing robotics in departments with a general surgery residency program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRobots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngeal tumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction is new but essential for oropharyngeal defects that result from robotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction of head and neck defects to exemplify the necessity for robotic reconstruction.MethodsWe investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgery and free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012, 5 cases were performed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstruction methods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time were investigated.ResultsAmong five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and one was an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and one flap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flap insetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured robotic instrument. The total operation time was 1,041.0 minutes (range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, and complications including flap necrosis, hematoma, and wound dehiscence did not occur.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates the clinically applicable use of robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insetting the flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditional mandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methods and is accepted as the most up-to-date method.

  9. Robot-Assisted Training Early After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenrath, Felix; Markendorf, Susanne; Brauchlin, Andreas E; Seifert, Burkhardt; Wilhelm, Markus J; Czerny, Martin; Riener, Robert; Falk, Volkmar; Schmied, Christian M

    2015-07-01

    To assess feasibility and safety of a robot-assisted gait therapy with the Lokomat® system in patients early after open heart surgery. Within days after open heart surgery 10 patients were subjected to postoperative Lokomat® training (Intervention group, IG) whereas 20 patients served as controls undergoing standard postoperative physiotherapy (Control group, CG). All patients underwent six-minute walk test and evaluation of the muscular strength of the lower limbs by measuring quadriceps peak force. The primary safety end-point was freedom from any device-related wound healing disturbance. Patients underwent clinical follow-up after one month. Both training methods resulted in an improvement of walking distance (IG [median, interquartile range, p-value]: +119 m, 70-201 m, p = 0.005; CG: 105 m, 57-152.5m, p force (IG left: +5 N, 3.8 7 N, p = 0.005; IG right: +3.5 N, 1.5-8.8 N, p = 0.011; CG left: +5.5 N, 4-9 N, p training were comparable to early postoperative standard in hospital training (median changes in walking distance in percent, p = 0.81; median changes in quadriceps peak force in percent, left: p = 0.97, right p = 0.61). No deep sternal wound infection or any adverse event occurred in the robot-assisted training group. Robot-assisted gait therapy with the Lokomat® system is feasible and safe in patients early after median sternotomy. Results with robot-assisted training were comparable to standard in hospital training. An adapted and combined aerobic and resistance training intervention with augmented feedback may result in benefits in walking distance and lower limb muscle strength (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT 02146196). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Arm reduced robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy with transvaginal cuff closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodur, Serkan; Dede, Murat; Fidan, Ulas; Firatligil, Burcin F; Ulubay, Mustafa; Ozturk, Mustafa; Yenen, Mufit C

    2017-09-01

    The use of robotics for benign etiology in gynecology has not proven to be more beneficial when compared to traditional laparoscopy. The major concern regarding robotic hysterectomy stems from its high cost. To evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of one-arm reduced robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy as a cost-effective surgical option for total robotic hysterectomy. A sample population of 54 women who underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for benign gynecologic indications was evaluated, and two groups were identified: (1) the two-armed robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery group (n = 38 patients), and (2) the three-armed robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery group (n = 16 patients). An increased cost was observed when three-armed robotic surgery was employed for benign gynecologic surgery (p < 0.001). The cost reduction observed in the study group was primarily derived from one robotic arm reduction and vaginal closure of the cuff. This cost reduction was achieved without an increase in complication rates or undesirable postoperative outcomes. An estimated profit between $399.5 and $421.5 was made for each patient depending on the suture material chosen for cuff closure. Two-armed surgery resulted in an 18.6% reduction in procedure-specific costs for robotic hysterectomy. Two-armed robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy appears to be a cost-effective solution for robotic gynecologic surgery. This surgical solution can be performed as effectively as classical three-armed robotic hysterectomies for benign indications without the risk of increased surgical-related morbidities. This approach has the potential to be a widely preferred surgical approach in medical communities where cost reduction is one of the primary determinants of surgery type.

  11. A pilot study of robotic-assisted exercise for hand weakness after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Joel; Bishop, Joel; Gillen, Glen; Helbok, Raimund

    2011-01-01

    Upper limb paresis is a major source of disability in stroke survivors, and robotic aided exercise therapy is a promising approach to enhance motor abilities. Few devices have been available to provide robotic therapy to the fingers and hand. We report an open-label pilot study of 12 individuals with chronic moderate hemiparesis after stroke who underwent a six-week training program using a hand robotic device. Participants received a total of 18 hours of robotic therapy. Improvements were found in multiple measures of motor performance, including the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer, the Motor Activity Log, the Manual Ability Measure-36, and the Jebsen Hand Function Test. All subjects tolerated the treatment well and no complications were observed. We conclude that robotic therapy for hand paresis after stroke is safe and feasible, and that further studies of efficacy are justified by these preliminary results. © 2011 IEEE

  12. A Case Series of Patients Who Underwent Laparoscopic Extraperitoneal Radical Prostatectomy with the Simultaneous Implant of a Penile Prosthesis: Focus on Penile Length Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Purpose There are many grey areas in the field of penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy (RP). The preservation of the full dimensions of the penis is an important consideration for improving patients' compliance for the treatment. We present the first case series of patients treated by laparoscopic extraperitoneal RP and simultaneous penile prosthesis implantation (PPI) in order to preserve the full length of the penis and to improve patients' satisfaction. Materials and Methods From June 2013 to June 2014, 10 patients underwent simultaneous PPI (with an AMS InhibiZone prosthesis) and RP. Patients were evaluated by means of urological visits, questionnaires, and objective measurements before surgery, at discharge from the hospital, on postoperative days 21 to 28, each 3 months for the first year, and each 6 months thereafter. The main outcome measures were biochemical recurrence-free rate, penile length, and quality of life. Results Ten patients (mean age of 61 years; completed the study follow-up period (median, 32.2 months). No difference was found between the time of surgery and the 2-year follow-up evaluation in terms of penile length. The pre-surgery 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) median score was 97. Patients were satisfied with their penile implants, and couples' level of sexual satisfaction was rated median 8. The median postoperative SF-36 score was 99 at 3 months follow-up. Conclusions Laparoscopic extraperitoneal RP surgery with simultaneous PPI placement seems to be an interesting possibility to propose to motivated patients for preserving the length of the penis and improving their satisfaction. PMID:29623695

  13. Oncological outcomes of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cancer Resultados oncológicos da nefrectomia radical laparoscópica no tratamento do carcinoma renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose R. Colombo Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report the 5-year oncological outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cancer compared to a cohort of patients undergoing open radical nephrectomy. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 88 patients undergoing radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma prior to January 2000. Of these, 45 patients underwent laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, and 43 patients underwent open radical nephrectomy. Inclusion criteria comprised clinically organ-confined tumors of 15 cm or less in size without concomitant lymphadenopathy or vena cava thrombus. Oncological follow-up data were obtained from charts, radiological reports, and phone calls to patients or their families, and were calculated from the date of surgery to the date of last appointment with physician or date of death. RESULTS: All laparoscopic procedures were completed without open conversion. On comparing the laparoscopic radical nephrectomy and open radical nephrectomy groups, mean tumor size was 5. 8 vs 6.2 cm (P = . 44, mean blood loss was 183 vs 461 mL (P = . 004, and mean operative time was 2.8 vs 3.7 hrs (P OBJETIVO: Relatar os resultados oncológicos após 5 anos de seguimento em pacientes submetidos a nefrectomia radical laparoscópica para tratamento do câncer renal, comparando esses com os resultados obtidos com um grupo de pacientes submetidos a nefrectomia radical aberta. MÉTODOS: Foram analisadas retrospectivamente as informações obtidas de 88 pacientes submetidos a nefrectomia radical para o tratamento do carcinoma renal realizadas previamente a Janeiro de 2000. Destes pacientes, 45 foram tratados com nefrectomia radical laparoscópica e 43 com nefrectomia radical aberta. Foram incluídos pacientes com tumores localizados com tamanho máximo de 15 cm, sem adenopatia ou sinal de envolvimento de veia renal na avaliação radiologica pré-operatória. As informações sobre o seguimento dos pacientes foram obtidas a partir de

  14. Does robotic gait training improve balance in Parkinson's disease? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Melotti, Camilla; Origano, Francesca; Waldner, Andreas; Gimigliano, Raffaele; Smania, Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Treadmill training (with or without robotic assistance) has been reported to improve balance skills in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, its effectiveness on postural instability has been evaluated mainly in patients with mild to moderate PD (Hoehn & Yahr stage ≤3). Patients with more severe disease may benefit from robot-assisted gait training performed by the Gait-Trainer GT1, as a harness supports them with their feet placed on motor-driven footplates. The aim of this study was to determine whether robot-assisted gait training could have a positive influence on postural stability in patients with PD at Hoehn & Yahr stage 3-4. Thirty-four patients with PD at Hoehn & Yahr stage 3-4 were randomly assigned into two groups. All patients received twelve, 40-min treatment sessions, three days/week, for four consecutive weeks. The Robotic Training group (n = 17) underwent robot-assisted gait training, while the Physical Therapy group (n = 17) underwent a training program not specifically aimed at improving postural stability. Patients were evaluated before, immediately after and 1-month post-treatment. Primary outcomes were: Berg Balance scale; Nutt's rating. A significant improvement was found after treatment on the Berg Balance Scale and the Nutt's rating in favor of the Robotic Training group (Berg: 43.44 ± 2.73; Nutt: 1.38 ± 0.50) compared to the Physical Therapy group (Berg: 37.27 ± 5.68; Nutt: 2.07 ± 0.59). All improvements were maintained at the 1-month follow-up evaluation. Robot-assisted gait training may improve postural instability in patients with PD at Hoehn & Yahr stage 3-4. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Laws on Robots, Laws by Robots, Laws in Robots : Regulating Robot Behaviour by Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenes, R.E.; Lucivero, F.

    2015-01-01

    Speculation about robot morality is almost as old as the concept of a robot itself. Asimov’s three laws of robotics provide an early and well-discussed example of moral rules robots should observe. Despite the widespread influence of the three laws of robotics and their role in shaping visions of

  16. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Telis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. As new focal therapies become more popular in treatment of prostate cancer, failure cases requiring salvage therapy with either surgical or other techniques are being reported. Objective. To report the options in treatment of prostate cancer after recurrence or failure of the primary treatment modality. Methods. We report a salvage robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP for prostate cancer recurrence following high intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU in the United States. Results. A 67-year-old man who underwent HIFU treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma 2 years prior was presented with a rising prostate specific antigen of 6.1 ng/mL to our clinic. A biopsy proven recurrent disease in the area of previous treatment documented the failure of treatment. The patient elected to undergo a salvage RALP. The operation time was 159 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1 with no complications. The catheter was removed on post-op day 10. The patient reserved sexual function and urinary continence. The PSA levels on 6 months’ follow-up are undetectable. Conclusions. Salvage RALP is an effective and safe treatment choice for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following failed HIFU treatment if operated by an experienced surgeon.

  17. Predictors of Incisional Hernia after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Chennamsetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To explore the long term incidence and predictors of incisional hernia in patients that had RARP. Methods. All patients who underwent RARP between 2003 and 2012 were mailed a survey reviewing hernia type, location, and repair. Results. Of 577 patients, 48 (8.3% had a hernia at an incisional site (35 men had umbilical, diagnosed at (median 1.2 years after RARP (mean follow-up of 5.05 years. No statistically significant differences were found in preoperative diabetes, smoking, pathological stage, age, intraoperative/postoperative complications, operative time, blood loss, BMI, and drain type between patients with and without incisional hernias. Incisional hernia patients had larger median prostate weight (45 versus 38 grams; P=0.001 and a higher proportion had prior laparoscopic cholecystectomy (12.5% (6/48 versus 4.6% (22/480; P=0.033. Overall, 4% (23/577 of patients underwent surgical repair of 24 incisional hernias, 22 umbilical and 2 other port site hernias. Conclusion. Incisional hernia is a known complication of RARP and may be associated with a larger prostate weight and history of prior laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There is concern about the underreporting of incisional hernia after RARP, as it is a complication often requiring surgical revision and is of significance for patient counseling before surgery.

  18. Robotic-assisted transoral removal of a bilateral floor of mouth ranulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromeyer Frederick W

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe the management of bilateral oral ranulas with the use of the da Vinci Si Surgical System and discuss advantages and disadvantages over traditional transoral resection. Study Design Case Report and Review of Literature. Results A 47 year old woman presented to our service with an obvious right floor of mouth swelling. Clinical evaluation and computerized tomography scan confirmed a large floor of mouth ranula on the right and an incidental asymptomatic early ranula of the left sublingual gland. After obtaining an informed consent, the patient underwent a right transoral robotic-assisted transoral excision of the ranula and sublingual gland with identification and dissection of the submandibular duct and lingual nerve. The patient had an excellent outcome with no evidence of lingual nerve paresis and a return to oral intake on the first postoperative day. Subsequently, the patient underwent an elective transoral robotic-assisted excision of the incidental ranula on the left sublingual gland. Conclusion We describe the first robotic-assisted excision of bilateral oral ranulas in current literature. The use of the da Vinci system provides excellent visualization, magnification, and dexterity for transoral surgical management of ranulas with preservation of the lingual nerve and Wharton's duct with good functional outcomes. However, the use of the robotic system for anterior floor of mouth surgery in terms of improved surgical outcomes as compared to traditional transoral surgery, long-term recurrence rates, and cost effectiveness needs further validation.

  19. Effect of patient choice and hospital competition on service configuration and technology adoption within cancer surgery: a national, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Lewis, Daniel; Mason, Malcolm; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard; van der Meulen, Jan

    2017-11-01

    There is a scarcity of evidence about the role of patient choice and hospital competition policies on surgical cancer services. Previous evidence has shown that patients are prepared to bypass their nearest cancer centre to receive surgery at more distant centres that better meet their needs. In this national, population-based study we investigated the effect of patient mobility and hospital competition on service configuration and technology adoption in the National Health Service (NHS) in England, using prostate cancer surgery as a model. We mapped all patients in England who underwent radical prostatectomy between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 31, 2014, according to place of residence and treatment location. For each radical prostatectomy centre we analysed the effect of hospital competition (measured by use of a spatial competition index [SCI], with a score of 0 indicating weakest competition and 1 indicating strongest competition) and the effect of being an established robotic radical prostatectomy centre at the start of 2010 on net gains or losses of patients (difference between number of patients treated in a centre and number expected based on their residence), and the likelihood of closing their radical prostatectomy service. Between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 31, 2014, 19 256 patients underwent radical prostatectomy at an NHS provider in England. Of the 65 radical prostatectomy centres open at the start of the study period, 23 (35%) had a statistically significant net gain of patients during 2010-14. Ten (40%) of these 23 were established robotic centres. 37 (57%) of the 65 centres had a significant net loss of patients, of which two (5%) were established robotic centres and ten (27%) closed their radical prostatectomy service during the study period. Radical prostatectomy centres that closed were more likely to be located in areas with stronger competition (highest SCI quartile [0·87-0·92]; p=0·0081) than in areas with weaker competition. No robotic surgery centre

  20. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Samani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. According to the importance of the embodiment of robots in the sense of presence, the influence of robots in communication culture is anticipated. The sustainability of robotics culture based on diversity for cultural communities for various acceptance modalities is explored in order to anticipate the creation of different attributes of culture between robots and humans in the future.

  1. Friendly network robotics; Friendly network robotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This paper summarizes the research results on the friendly network robotics in fiscal 1996. This research assumes an android robot as an ultimate robot and the future robot system utilizing computer network technology. The robot aiming at human daily work activities in factories or under extreme environments is required to work under usual human work environments. The human robot with similar size, shape and functions to human being is desirable. Such robot having a head with two eyes, two ears and mouth can hold a conversation with human being, can walk with two legs by autonomous adaptive control, and has a behavior intelligence. Remote operation of such robot is also possible through high-speed computer network. As a key technology to use this robot under coexistence with human being, establishment of human coexistent robotics was studied. As network based robotics, use of robots connected with computer networks was also studied. In addition, the R-cube (R{sup 3}) plan (realtime remote control robot technology) was proposed. 82 refs., 86 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Robotic Laparoendoscopic Single-site Retroperitioneal Renal Surgery: Initial Investigation of a Purpose-built Single-port Surgical System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Matthew J; Ramirez, Daniel; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2017-04-01

    Robotic single-site retroperitoneal renal surgery has the potential to minimize the morbidity of standard transperitoneal and multiport approaches. Traditionally, technological limitations of non-purpose-built robotic platforms have hindered the application of this approach. To assess the feasibility of retroperitoneal renal surgery using a new purpose-built robotic single-port surgical system. This was a preclinical study using three male cadavers to assess the feasibility of the da Vinci SP1098 surgical system for robotic laparoendoscopic single-site (R-LESS) retroperitoneal renal surgery. We used the SP1098 to perform retroperitoneal R-LESS radical nephrectomy (n=1) and bilateral partial nephrectomy (n=4) on the anterior and posterior surfaces of the kidney. Improvements unique to this system include enhanced optics and intelligent instrument arm control. Access was obtained 2cm anterior and inferior to the tip of the 12th rib using a novel 2.5-cm robotic single-port system that accommodates three double-jointed articulating robotic instruments, an articulating camera, and an assistant port. The primary outcome was the technical feasibility of the procedures, as measured by the need for conversion to standard techniques, intraoperative complications, and operative times. All cases were completed without the need for conversion. There were no intraoperative complications. The operative time was 100min for radical nephrectomy, and the mean operative time was 91.8±18.5min for partial nephrectomy. Limitations include the preclinical model, the small sample size, and the lack of a control group. Single-site retroperitoneal renal surgery is feasible using the latest-generation SP1098 robotic platform. While the potential of the SP1098 appears promising, further study is needed for clinical evaluation of this investigational technology. In an experimental model, we used a new robotic system to successfully perform major surgery on the kidney through a single small

  3. Outcomes in patients undergoing robotic reconstructive uterovaginal anastomosis of congenital cervical and vaginal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Yisong; Hua, Keqin

    2017-09-01

    To introduce our experience of robotic surgery of reconstructive uterovaginal anastomosis and operative outcomes in congenital cervical and vaginal atresia patients. Clinical observation and follow-up of four patients with congenital cervical and vaginal atresia who underwent robotic reconstruction of cervix and vagina by SIS (small intestinal submucosa, SIS) graft. Average patient age was 13.8 ± 2.2. Patients complained of severe periodic abdominal pain. Diagnosis was made according to clinical characteristics, physical examination, MRI and classified by ESHRE/ESGE system. All patients underwent reconstruction of cervix and vagina by uterovaginal anastomosis by SIS graft. Average operation time was 232.5 ± 89.2 min, average blood loss was 225.0 ± 95.7 mL. After surgery, all patients have regular menstruation without pain. Average follow up was 12 months, average vagina length was 8.9 ± 0.3 cm, average vagina width was 2.9 ± 0.1 cm. Robotic assisted reconstruction of cervix and vagina is feasible from our experience, enlarged cases and additional studies are required. © 2017 The Authors The International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Robotic fabrication in architecture, art and design 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Robotic automation has become ubiquitous in the modern manufacturing landscape, spanning an overwhelming range of processes and applications-- from small scale force-controlled grinding operations for orthopedic joints to large scale composite manufacturing of aircraft fuselages. Smart factories, seamlessly linked via industrial networks and sensing, have revolutionized mass production, allowing for intelligent, adaptive manufacturing processes across a broad spectrum of industries. Against this background, an emerging group of researchers, designers, and fabricators have begun to apply robotic technology in the pursuit of architecture, art, and design, implementing them in a range of processes and scales. Coupled with computational design tools the technology is no longer relegated to the repetitive production of the assembly line, and is instead being employed for the mass-customization of non-standard components. This radical shift in protocol has been enabled by the development of new design to production...

  5. Robot vision for nuclear advanced robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Ryoichi; Okano, Hideharu; Kuno, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Shimada, Hideo; Okada, Satoshi; Kawamura, Astuo

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes Robot Vision and Operation System for Nuclear Advanced Robot. This Robot Vision consists of robot position detection, obstacle detection and object recognition. With these vision techniques, a mobile robot can make a path and move autonomously along the planned path. The authors implemented the above robot vision system on the 'Advanced Robot for Nuclear Power Plant' and tested in an environment mocked up as nuclear power plant facilities. Since the operation system for this robot consists of operator's console and a large stereo monitor, this system can be easily operated by one person. Experimental tests were made using the Advanced Robot (nuclear robot). Results indicate that the proposed operation system is very useful, and can be operate by only person. (author)

  6. Robotic repair of retrocaval ureter: A case series | Nayak | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and methods: This is a prospective case series of five consecutive patients who underwent robotic retrocaval ureter repair at our institute from August 2006 to September 2009. Pre-operative imaging included intravenous urogram, contrast enhanced CT scan and diuretic renography. All cases were done through a ...

  7. No differences in short-term morbidity and mortality after robot-assisted laparoscopic versus laparoscopic resection for colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helvind, Neel Maria; Eriksen, Jens Ravn; Mogensen, Anders Skibsted

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Robot-assisted laparoscopy has been reported to be a safe and feasible alternative to traditional laparoscopy. The aim of this study was to compare short-term results in patients with colonic cancer who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic colonic resection (RC) or laparoscopic colonic...... journals. Biochemical markers [C-reactive protein (CRP), hemoglobin, white blood cell count, and thrombocyte count] were recorded before surgery and for the first 3 days after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 101 patients underwent RC and 162 patients underwent LC. There were no significant differences...... in the rate of conversion to open surgery, number of permanent enterostomies, number of intraoperative complications, level of postoperative cellular stress response, number of postoperative complications, length of postoperative hospital stay, or 30-day mortality between the two groups...

  8. Robot-Assisted Middle Pancreatectomy for Elderly Patients: Our Initial Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Wang, Xinjing; Huo, Zhen; Wen, Chenlei; Wu, Zhichong; Zhan, Qian; Jin, Jiabin; Cheng, Dongfeng; Chen, Hao; Deng, Xiaxing; Shen, Baiyong; Peng, Chenghong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications, safety, feasibility, and short- and long-term outcomes for elderly patients who underwent robot-assisted middle pancreatectomies (MPs). Material/Methods Ten patients (≥60 years) underwent robot-assisted middle pancreatectomies from 2012 to 2015. The perioperative data, including tumor size, operating time, rate of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF), postoperative morbidity, and other parameters, were analyzed. We collected and analyzed the follow-up information. Results The mean age of patients was 64.30 years (range, 60–73 years). The average tumor size was 2.61 cm. The 10 cases were all benign or low-grade malignant lesions. The mean operating time was 175.00 min. The mean blood loss was 113.00 ml with no blood transfusion needed. Postoperative fistulas developed in 5 patients; there were 2 Grade A fistulas and 3 grade B fistulas. There were 3 patients who underwent postoperative complications, including 2 Grade 1 or 2 complications and 1 Grade 3 complication. No reoperation and postoperative mortality occurred. The mean hospital stay was 19.91 days. After a median follow-up of 23 months, new onset of diabetes mellitus developed in 1 patient and none suffered from deterioration of previously diagnosed diabetes or exocrine insufficiency, and no tumor recurrence happened. Conclusions Robot-assisted middle pancreatectomy was safe and feasible for elderly people. It had low risk of exocrine or endocrine dysfunction and benefited patients’ long-term outcomes. Incidence of POPF was relatively high but we could prevent it from resulting in bad outcomes by scientific perioperative care and systemic treatment. PMID:26395335

  9. Initial experience with robotic pancreatic surgery in Singapore: single institution experience with 30 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Brian K P; Low, Tze-Yi; Lee, Ser-Yee; Chan, Chung-Yip; Chung, Alexander Y F; Ooi, London L P J

    2018-05-24

    Presently, the worldwide experience with robotic pancreatic surgery (RPS) is increasing although widespread adoption remains limited. In this study, we report our initial experience with RPS. This is a retrospective review of a single institution prospective database of 72 consecutive robotic hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries performed between 2013 and 2017. Of these, 30 patients who underwent RPS were included in this study of which 25 were performed by a single surgeon. The most common procedure was robotic distal pancreatectomy (RDP) which was performed in 20 patients. This included eight subtotal pancreatectomies, two extended pancreatecto-splenectomies (en bloc gastric resection) and 10 spleen-saving-RDP. Splenic preservation was successful in 10/11 attempted spleen-saving-RDP. Eight patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomies (five hybrid with open reconstruction), one patient underwent a modified Puestow procedure and one enucleation of uncinate tumour. Four patients had extended resections including two RDP with gastric resection and two pancreaticoduodenectomies with vascular resection. There was one (3.3%) open conversion and seven (23.3%) major (>Grade II) morbidities. Overall, there were four (13.3%) clinically significant (Grade B) pancreatic fistulas of which three required percutaneous drainage. These occurred after three RDP and one robotic enucleation. There was one reoperation for port-site hernia and no 30-day/in-hospital mortalities. The median post-operative stay was 6.5 (range: 3-36) days and there were six (20%) 30-day readmissions. Our initial experience showed that RPS can be adopted safely with a low open conversion rate for a wide variety of procedures including pancreaticoduodenectomy. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. Robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) procedures in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoglu, Orhan; Sagiroglu, Julide; Atak, Ibrahim; Kilic, Ali; Eren, Tunc; Caliskan, Mujgan; Bas, Gurhan

    2016-09-01

    Robotics was introduced in clinical practice more than two decades ago, and it has gained remarkable popularity for a wide variety of laparoscopic procedures. We report our results of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) in the most commonly applied general surgical procedures. Ninety seven patients underwent RALS from 2009 to 2012. Indications for RALS were cholelithiasis, gastric carcinoma, splenic tumors, colorectal carcinoma, benign colorectal diseases, non-toxic nodular goiter and incisional hernia. Records of patients were analyzed for demographic features, intraoperative and postoperative complications and conversion to open surgery. Forty six female and 51 male patients were operated and mean age was 58,4 (range: 25-88). Ninety three out of 97 procedures (96%) were completed robotically, 4 were converted to open surgery and there were 15 postoperative complications. There was no mortality. Wide variety of procedures of general surgery can be managed safely and effectively by RALS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  12. Congenital craniopharyngioma treated by radical surgery: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageji, Teruyoshi; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kotani, Yumiko; Kaji, Tsuyoshi; Bando, Yoshimi; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Nakajima, Kohei; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2017-02-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are 5-10 % of all pediatric tumors, but are seldomly encountered in the perinatal period. Only seven instances of a truly antenatal diagnosis of a congenital craniopharyngioma that subsequently underwent radical surgery have been reported. We present the case of a patient who received the diagnosis of a suprasellar tumor during the prenatal period and received radical surgery. We report a case of a neonatal craniopharyngioma treated surgically. The pregnancy progressed uneventfully until a routine ultrasound at 37 weeks of gestation showed a 15 × 15 mm high echoic mass in the center of the fetal head. Neonatal Gd-enhanced T1-weighted MRI at 5 days of life showed a homogenously enhanced mass (16×22×15 mm) in the sellar and suprasellar lesion. As the tumor showed rapid growth at the 3rd month of life, the patient underwent a surgical treatment and the mass was totally removed. Three years later, the physical and mental development of the patient was normal, and Gd-MRI studies showed no tumor recurrence. The present case is the eighth case of a truly antenatal diagnosis of a craniopharyngioma that underwent successful radical surgery. Craniopharyngioma is a benign tumor and thought to be a slow growing tumor in childhood. The results of radical surgery were very poor, and the mortality and morbidity rates were high in the previous reports due to the huge size of tumor at operation. The present case demonstrated the rapid growth in short interval of Gd-MRI. This is the first report of tumor kinetics of congenital craniopharyngioma with previous reports. The calculated tumor doubling time in our case was 37 days.

  13. Prophylactic belladonna suppositories on anesthetic recovery after robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavonetto, Federica; Lamborn, David R; McCaffrey, Joan M; Schroeder, Darrell R; Gettman, Mattew T; Sprung, Juraj; Weingarten, Toby N

    2013-06-01

    Two prospective trials have demonstrated prophylactic antimuscarinics following prostatectomy reduce pain from bladder spasms. Our practice adopted the routine administration of prophylactic belladonna and opium (B&O) suppositories to patients undergoing robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). The aim of this study is to determine if this change in clinical practice was associated with improvement of postoperative outcomes. The medical records of 202 patients that underwent RALP surgery who were or were not administered prophylactic B&O suppositories in the immediate postoperative period were abstracted for duration of anesthesia recovery, pain and analgesic use. Patient and surgical characteristics between groups were similar except B&O group were slightly older (p = 0.04) and administered less opioid analgesics (p = 0.05). There was no difference between groups in the duration of phase I recovery from anesthesia (p = 0.96). Multivariable adjustments for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and surgical duration were made, and again it was found that suppository administration had no association with phase I recovery times (p = 0.94). The use of antimuscarinic medication for bladder spams in the B&O group was less during phase I recovery (p suppositories at the immediate conclusion of RALP surgery was not associated with improvements of the postoperative course.

  14. Robotic right middle lobectomy with a subxiphoid utility port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Shruti; Nardini, Marco; Papoulidis, Pavlos; Dunning, Joel

    2018-06-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old man with Stage IIa pulmonary adenocarcinoma, for which he underwent a robotic right middle lobectomy. A 4-armed, 5-port approach was used. Four intercostal ports were created above the ninth rib using the Cerfolio's technique. The subxiphoid port was created in the midline, 5 cm down from the xiphisternum. The robot offers higher image quality, depth perception and improved articulation of the instruments, allowing for more accurate dissection and stitching. The usage of a subxiphoid utility port reduces the clashing between instruments, offers a good angle for stapling and provides a direct view of the instruments entering into the chest. Specimen removal through the subxiphoid port may reduce postoperative pain and enhance patient recovery. The use of the subxiphoid approach as a utility port for robotic surgery is promising and may be a suitable replacement for the traditional utility port.

  15. Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, E. P.; Iurevich, E. I.

    The history and the current status of robotics are reviewed, as are the design, operation, and principal applications of industrial robots. Attention is given to programmable robots, robots with adaptive control and elements of artificial intelligence, and remotely controlled robots. The applications of robots discussed include mechanical engineering, cargo handling during transportation and storage, mining, and metallurgy. The future prospects of robotics are briefly outlined.

  16. Financial Impact of the Robotic Approach in Liver Surgery: A Comparative Study of Clinical Outcomes and Costs Between the Robotic and Open Technique in a Single Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalaki, Despoina; Gonzalez-Heredia, Raquel; Brown, Marc; Bianco, Francesco M; Tzvetanov, Ivo; Davis, Myriam; Kim, Jihun; Benedetti, Enrico; Giulianotti, Pier C

    2017-04-01

    One of the perceived major drawbacks of minimally invasive techniques has always been its cost. This is especially true for the robotic approach and is one of the main reasons that has prevented its wider acceptance among hospitals and surgeons. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes and economic impact of robotic and open liver surgery in a single institution. Sixty-eight robotic and 55 open hepatectomies were performed at our institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Demographics, perioperative data, and postoperative outcomes were collected and compared between the two groups. An independent company performed the financial analysis. The economic parameters comprised direct variable costs, direct fixed costs, and indirect costs. Mean estimated blood loss was significantly less in the robotic group (438 versus 727.8 mL; P = .038). Overall morbidity was significantly lower in the robotic group (22% versus 40%; P = .047). Clavien III/IV complications were also lower, with 4.4% in the robotic versus 16.3% in the open group (P = .043). The length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) was shorter for patients who underwent a robotic procedure (2.1 versus 3.3 days; P = .004). The average total cost, including readmissions, was $37,518 for robotic surgery and $41,948 for open technique. Robotic liver resections had less overall morbidity, ICU, and hospital stay. This translates into decreased average costs for robotic surgery. These procedures are financially comparable to open resections and do not represent a financial burden to the hospital.

  17. Radical fashion and radical fashion innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Benedetto, Di A.C.

    2010-01-01

    This is a study of the related concepts of radical fashion and radical fashion innovation. Radical fashions are defined here as those that may never enter the market at all, and exist primarily on runway shows, in exhibitions and in publicity; by contrast, radical fashion innovations may be very

  18. Development of a Three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System with Magnetic Resonance Angiography and a Three-dimensional Printer for Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomoto, Wataru; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Mitsuie, Chiemi; Yamada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toru; Yamano, Toshiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Kotoura, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2018-01-02

    We sought to develop a surgical navigation system using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a three-dimensional (3D) printer for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Six patients with pathologically proven localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), consisting of T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), reconstructed by volume rendering, was followed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA performed with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) during intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol. Images of arterial and venous phases were acquired over approximately 210 seconds. Selected images were sent to a workstation for generation of 3D volume-rendered images and standard triangulated language (STL) files for 3D print construction. The neurovascular bundles (NVBs) were found in sequence on non-contrast images. Accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) were found in all cases in the arterial phase of contrast enhancement but were ill-defined on non-contrast enhanced MRA. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA helped to detect APAs, suggesting that this 3D system using MRI will be useful in RARP.

  19. Robotic-assisted vesicovaginal fistula repair using an extravesical approach without interposition grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin; Wu, Maria Y; MacMillan, J Barry

    2018-03-01

    Post-hysterectomy vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) is rare. In addition to conventional abdominal and vaginal approaches, robotic-assisted VVF repairs have recently been described. We present a case of an extravesical, robotic-assisted VVF repair, without placement of an interposition graft performed in a Canadian teaching center. A 51-year-old woman presented with urinary incontinence 5 days after laparoscopic hysterectomy. Computed tomography cystogram, cystoscopy, and methylene blue dye test, confirmed a VVF above the bladder trigone. The patient underwent a robotic-assisted VVF repair 3 months after presentation, without complication. An abdominal, extravesical approach was used. Operative time was 116 min and repeat CT cystogram showed no evidence of persistent. We have demonstrated that a VVF repair, using a robotic-assisted, extravesical approach without interposition graft placement, can be safe, less invasive and have a successful outcome at 1 year of follow-up.

  20. Robotic partial nephrectomy for renal cell carcinomas with venous tumor thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Ronney; Angell, Jordan

    2013-06-01

    To describe the first report of robotic partial nephrectomies (RPNs) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumor thrombus (VTT). Partial nephrectomy for RCC extending into the renal vein has been described in limited fashion, but such a complex procedure has not previously been reported in minimally-invasive fashion. We demonstrate the feasibility of robotic nephron-sparing surgery despite vein thrombi and the results of the initial four highly-selected patients to have undergone this novel procedure. Two patients underwent RPN for RCC with VTT involving intraparenchymal vein branches, and 2 others had VTT involving the main renal vein. Mean patient age was 65 years (range 50-74 years). Mean tumor size was 7.75 cm (range 4.3-12.8 cm) with mean RENAL (radius, exophytic/endophytic, nearness to collecting system, anterior/posterior, and location) nephrometry score of 9.75 (range 8-12). Mean warm ischemia time was 24.2 minutes (range 19-27 minutes) and mean estimated blood loss was 168.8 mL (range 100-300 mL). No patients required transfusion, and there were no intraoperative complications. No patients required conversion to open or standard laparoscopic surgery. All 4 patients were discharged home on the first postoperative day. A single postoperative complication occurred in 1 patient who was readmitted with an ileus that resolved spontaneously. All patients had negative surgical margins. Two patients developed metastatic disease on surveillance imaging. RPN in patients with VTT is safe and feasible in selected patients. Given the risk of metastatic disease in patients with pathologic stage T3a RCC, the role of nephron sparing requires further evaluation such that radical nephrectomy remains the standard of care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Robot 2015 : Second Iberian Robotics Conference : Advances in Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, António; Lima, Pedro; Montano, Luis; Muñoz-Martinez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This book contains a selection of papers accepted for presentation and discussion at ROBOT 2015: Second Iberian Robotics Conference, held in Lisbon, Portugal, November 19th-21th, 2015. ROBOT 2015 is part of a series of conferences that are a joint organization of SPR – “Sociedade Portuguesa de Robótica/ Portuguese Society for Robotics”, SEIDROB – Sociedad Española para la Investigación y Desarrollo de la Robótica/ Spanish Society for Research and Development in Robotics and CEA-GTRob – Grupo Temático de Robótica/ Robotics Thematic Group. The conference organization had also the collaboration of several universities and research institutes, including: University of Minho, University of Porto, University of Lisbon, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, University of Aveiro, University of Zaragoza, University of Malaga, LIACC, INESC-TEC and LARSyS. Robot 2015 was focussed on the Robotics scientific and technological activities in the Iberian Peninsula, although open to research and delegates from other...

  2. Influence of facial feedback during a cooperative human-robot task in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Laura; Khoramshahi, Mahdi; Salesse, Robin N; Bortolon, Catherine; Słowiński, Piotr; Zhai, Chao; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Di Bernardo, Mario; Capdevielle, Delphine; Marin, Ludovic; Schmidt, Richard C; Bardy, Benoit G; Billard, Aude; Raffard, Stéphane

    2017-11-03

    Rapid progress in the area of humanoid robots offers tremendous possibilities for investigating and improving social competences in people with social deficits, but remains yet unexplored in schizophrenia. In this study, we examined the influence of social feedbacks elicited by a humanoid robot on motor coordination during a human-robot interaction. Twenty-two schizophrenia patients and twenty-two matched healthy controls underwent a collaborative motor synchrony task with the iCub humanoid robot. Results revealed that positive social feedback had a facilitatory effect on motor coordination in the control participants compared to non-social positive feedback. This facilitatory effect was not present in schizophrenia patients, whose social-motor coordination was similarly impaired in social and non-social feedback conditions. Furthermore, patients' cognitive flexibility impairment and antipsychotic dosing were negatively correlated with patients' ability to synchronize hand movements with iCub. Overall, our findings reveal that patients have marked difficulties to exploit facial social cues elicited by a humanoid robot to modulate their motor coordination during human-robot interaction, partly accounted for by cognitive deficits and medication. This study opens new perspectives for comprehension of social deficits in this mental disorder.

  3. Impact of robotics on the outcome of elderly patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoue, Vincent; Zeng, Xing; Lau, Susie; Press, Joshua Z; Abitbol, Jeremie; Gotlieb, Raphael; How, Jeffrey; Wang, Yifan; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of introducing a robotics program on clinical outcome of elderly patients with endometrial cancer. Evaluation and comparison of peri-operative morbidity and disease-free interval in 163 consecutive elderly patients (≥70years) with endometrial cancer undergoing staging procedure with traditional open surgery compared to robotic surgery. All consecutive patients ≥70years of age with endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgery (n=113) were compared with all consecutive patients ≥70years of age (n=50) before the introduction of a robotic program in December 2007. Baseline patient characteristics were similar in both eras. Patients undergoing robotic surgery had longer mean operating times (244 compared with 217minutes, p=0.009) but fewer minor adverse events (17% compared with 60%, probotics cohort had less estimated mean blood loss (75 vs 334mL, probotics program for the treatment of endometrial cancer in the elderly has significant benefits, including lower minor complication rate, less operative blood loss and shorter hospitalization without compromising 2-year disease-free survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hooman Samani; Elham Saadatian; Natalie Pang; Doros Polydorou; Owen Noel Newton Fernando; Ryohei Nakatsu; Jeffrey Tzu Kwan Valino Koh

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. Ac...

  5. Impact of robotic surgery on sexual and urinary functions after fully robotic nerve-sparing total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Fabrizio; Valvo, Manuela; Ghezzi, Tiago Leal; Zuccaro, Massimiliano; Cenciarelli, Sabina; Trovato, Cristina; Sonzogni, Angelica; Biffi, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Urinary and sexual dysfunctions are recognized complications of rectal cancer surgery. Their incidence after robotic surgery is as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of robotic surgery for rectal cancer on sexual and urinary functions in male and female patients. From April 2008 to December 2010, 74 patients undergoing fully robotic resection for rectal cancer were prospectively included in the study. Urinary and sexual dysfunctions affecting quality of life were assessed with specific self-administered questionnaires in all patients undergoing robotic total mesorectal excision (RTME). Results were calculated with validated scoring systems and statistically analyzed. The analyses of the questionnaires completed by the 74 patients who underwent RTME showed that sexual function and general sexual satisfaction decreased significantly 1 month after intervention: 19.1 ± 8.7 versus 11.9 ± 10.2 (P surgery, the values were comparable to those measured before surgery. Concerning urinary function, the grade of incontinence measured 1 year after the intervention was unchanged for both sexes. RTME allows for preservation of urinary and sexual functions. This is probably due to the superior movements of the wristed instruments that facilitate fine dissection, coupled with a stable and magnified view that helps in recognizing the inferior hypogastric plexus.

  6. Health care cost consequences of using robot technology for hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin Rosenkilde; Hyldgård, Vibe Bolvig; Jensen, Pernille Tine

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the costs attributable to robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy from a broad healthcare sector perspective in a register-based longitudinal study. The population in this study were 7670 consecutive women undergoing hysterectomy between January 2006...... and August 2013 in public hospitals in Denmark. The interventions in the study were total and radical hysterectomy performed robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy (RALH), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH), or open abdominal hysterectomy (OAH). Service use in the healthcare sector was evaluated 1...... year before to 1 year after the surgery. Tariffs of the activity-based remuneration system and the diagnosis-related grouping case-mix system were used for valuation of primary and secondary care, respectively. Costs attributable to RALH were estimated using a difference-in-difference analytical...

  7. Cognitive training for technical and non-technical skills in robotic surgery: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raison, Nicholas; Ahmed, Kamran; Abe, Takashige; Brunckhorst, Oliver; Novara, Giacomo; Buffi, Nicolò; McIlhenny, Craig; van der Poel, Henk; van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Gavazzi, Andrea; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2018-05-07

    To investigate the effectiveness of motor imagery (MI) for technical skill and non-technical skill (NTS) training in minimally invasive surgery (MIS). A single-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was conducted at the Vattikuti Institute of Robotic Surgery, King's College London. Novice surgeons were recruited by open invitation in 2015. After basic robotic skills training, participants underwent simple randomisation to either MI training or standard training. All participants completed a robotic urethrovesical anastomosis task within a simulated operating room. In addition to the technical task, participants were required to manage three scripted NTS scenarios. Assessment was performed by five blinded expert surgeons and a NTS expert using validated tools for evaluating technical skills [Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills (GEARS)] and NTS [Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS)]. Quality of MI was assessed using a revised Movement Imagery Questionnaire (MIQ). In all, 33 participants underwent MI training and 29 underwent standard training. Interrater reliability was high, Krippendorff's α = 0.85. After MI training, the mean (sd) GEARS score was significantly higher than after standard training, at 13.1 (3.25) vs 11.4 (2.97) (P = 0.03). There was no difference in mean NOTSS scores, at 25.8 vs 26.4 (P = 0.77). MI training was successful with significantly higher imagery scores than standard training (mean MIQ score 5.1 vs 4.5, P = 0.04). Motor imagery is an effective training tool for improving technical skill in MIS even in novice participants. No beneficial effect for NTS was found. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Robot Actors, Robot Dramaturgies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth

    This paper considers the use of tele-operated robots in live performance. Robots and performance have long been linked, from the working androids and automata staged in popular exhibitions during the nineteenth century and the robots featured at Cybernetic Serendipity (1968) and the World Expo...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of open versus laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy and urinary diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Pascal; Gill, Inderbir S

    2011-09-01

    To provide insight into the recently published cost comparisons in the context of open, laparoscopic, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy and to demonstrate the complexity of such economic analyses. Most economic evaluations are from a hospital perspective and summarize short-term perioperative therapeutic costs. However, the contributing factors (e.g. study design, included variables, robotic amortization plan, supply contract, surgical volume, surgeons' experience, etc.) vary substantially between the institutions. In addition, a real cost-effective analysis considering cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained is not feasible because of the lack of long-term oncologic and functional outcome data with the robotic procedure. On the basis of a modeled cost analysis using results from published series, robotic-assisted cystectomy was - with few exceptions - found to be more expensive when compared with the open approach. Immediate costs are affected most by operative time, followed by length of hospital stay, robotic supply, case volume, robotic cost, and transfusion rate. Any complication substantially impacts overall costs. Economic cost evaluations are complex analyses influenced by numerous factors that hardly allow an interinstitutional comparison. Robotic-assisted cystectomy is constantly refined with many institutions being somewhere on their learning curve. Transparent reports of oncologic and functional outcome data from centers of expertise applying standardized methods will help to properly analyze the real long-term benefits of robotic surgery and successor technologies and prevent us from becoming slaves of successful marketing strategies.

  10. Comparative biomarker expression and RNA integrity in biospecimens derived from radical retropubic and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, Carmela; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Jindal, Shalini; Dodd, Thomas J; Cohen, Penelope A; Marshall, Villis R; Sutherland, Peter D; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Kench, James G; Dong, Ying; Wang, Hong; Clements, Judith A; Risbridger, Gail P; Sutherland, Robert L; Tilley, Wayne D; Horsfall, David J

    2010-07-01

    Knowledge of preanalytic conditions that biospecimens are subjected to is critically important because novel surgical procedures, tissue sampling, handling, and storage might affect biomarker expression or invalidate tissue samples as analytes for some technologies. We investigated differences in RNA quality, gene expression by quantitative real-time PCR, and immunoreactive protein expression of selected prostate cancer biomarkers between tissues from retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Sections of tissue microarray of 23 RALP and 22 RRP samples were stained with antibodies to androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as intersite controls, and 14 other candidate biomarkers of research interest to three laboratories within the Australian Prostate Cancer BioResource tissue banking network. Quantitative real-time PCR was done for AR, PSA (KLK3), KLK2, KLK4, and HIF1A on RNA extracted from five RALP and five RRP frozen tissue cores. No histologic differences were observed between RALP and RRP tissue. Biomarker staining grouped these samples into those with increased (PSA, CK8/18, CKHMW, KLK4), decreased (KLK2, KLK14), or no change in expression (AR, ghrelin, Ki67, PCNA, VEGF-C, PAR2, YB1, p63, versican, and chondroitin 0-sulfate) in RALP compared with RRP tissue. No difference in RNA quality or gene expression was detected between RALP and RRP tissue. Changes in biomarker expression between RALP and RRP tissue exist at the immunoreactive protein level, but the etiology is unclear. Future studies should account for changes in biomarker expression when using RALP tissues, and mixed cohorts of RALP and RRP tissue should be avoided.

  11. Surgical treatment of metachronous metastases in different organs following radical nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. N. de Jesus

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC is a neoplasia resistant to radio and chemotherapy, with surgical treatment being the procedure that is recognized for its curative treatment. This case report demonstrates the success of an aggressive surgical treatment for consecutive and late metachronous metastases following radical nephrectomy. CASE REPORT: Asymptomatic 50-year old man. During a routine examination, an incidental mass was found by renal ultrasonography. He underwent right radical nephrectomy due to RCCC in June 1992. During the follow-up metastases were evidenced in cerebellum on the seventh year, and in left lung and pancreas on the eighth year following the radical nephrectomy, with all of them successfully treated by surgical excision. COMMENTS: The surgical excision of consecutive and late metachronous metastases in different organs arising from RCCC is feasible, being a good therapeutic alternative in selected cases.

  12. Anesthesiologic Effects of Transperitoneal Versus Extraperitoneal Approach During Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results of a Prospective Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Dal Moro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjectives:To compare the effects of CO2 insufflation on hemodynamics and oxygen levels and on acid-base level during Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy (RARP with transperitoneal (TP versus extra-peritoneal (EP accesses.Materials and Methods:Sixty-two patients were randomly assigned to TP (32 and EP (30 to RARP. Pre-operation data were collected for all patients. Hemodynamic, respiratory and blood acid-base parameters were measured at the moment of induction of anesthesia (T0, after starting CO2 insuffation (T1, and at 60 (T2 and 120 minutes (T3 after insufflation. In all cases, the abdominal pressure was set at 15 mmHg. Complications were reported according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Student's two–t-test, with a significance level set at pResults:The demographic characteristics of the patients in both groups were statistically comparable. Analysis of intra-operative anesthesiologic parameters showed that partial CO2 pressure during EP was significantly higher than during TP, with a consequent decrease in arterial pH. Other parameters analysed were similar in the two groups. Postoperative complications were comparable between groups. The most important limitations of this study were the small size of the patient groups and the impossibility of maintaining standard abdominal pressure throughout the operational phases, despite attempts to regulate it.Conclusions:This prospective randomized study demonstrates that, from the anesthesiologic viewpoint, during RARP the TP approach is preferable to EP, because of lower CO2 reabsorption and risk of acidosis.

  13. Is Ethics of Robotics about Robots? Philosophy of Robotics Beyond Realism and Individualilsm.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2011-01-01

    If we are doing ethics of robotics, what exactly is the object of our inquiry? This paper challenges 'individualist' robot ontology and 'individualist' social philosophy of robots. It is argued that ethics of robotics should not study and evaluate robotics exclusively in terms of individual

  14. Exploratorium: Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic robotics. It explains how to make a vibrating robotic bug and features articles on robots. Contents include: (1) "Where Robot Mice and Robot Men Run Round in Robot Towns" (Ray Bradbury); (2) "Robots at Work" (Jake Widman); (3) "Make a Vibrating Robotic Bug" (Modesto Tamez); (4) "The Robot…

  15. Robotic kidney transplantation with regional hypothermia: evolution of a novel procedure utilizing the IDEAL guidelines (IDEAL phase 0 and 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Mani; Abaza, Ronney; Sood, Akshay; Ahlawat, Rajesh; Ghani, Khurshid R; Jeong, Wooju; Kher, Vijay; Kumar, Ramesh K; Bhandari, Mahendra

    2014-05-01

    Surgical innovation is essential for progress of surgical science, but its implementation comes with potential harms during the learning phase. The Balliol Collaboration has recommended a set of guidelines (Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study [IDEAL]) that permit innovation while minimizing complications. To utilize the IDEAL model of surgical innovation in the development of a novel surgical technique, robotic kidney transplantation (RKT) with regional hypothermia, and describe the process of discovery and development. Phase 0 (simulation) studies included the establishment of techniques for pelvic cooling, graft placement in a robotic prostatectomy model, and simulation of the RKT procedure in a cadaveric model. Phase 1 (innovation) studies began in January 2013 and involved treatment of a highly selective small group of patients (n=7), using the principles utilized in the phase 0 studies, at a tertiary referral center. IDEAL model implementation in the development of RKT with regional hypothermia. For phase 0 studies, the outcomes evaluated included pelvic and body temperature measurements, and technical feasibility assessment. The primary outcome during phase 1 was post-transplant graft function. Other outcomes measured were operative and ischemic times, perioperative complications, and intracorporeal graft surface temperature. Phase 0 (simulation phase): Pelvic cooling to 15-20(o)C was achieved reproducibly. Using the surgical approach developed for robotic radical prostatectomy, vascular and ureterovesical anastomoses could be done without redocking the robot. Phase 1 (innovation phase): All patients underwent live-donor RKT in the lithotomy position. All grafts functioned immediately. Mean console, anastomotic, and warm ischemia times were 154 min, 29 min, and 2 min, respectively. One patient was re-explored on postoperative day 1. Adherence to the IDEAL guidelines put forth by the Balliol Collaboration provided a practical

  16. Postoperative rhabdomyolysis following robotic renal and adrenal surgery: a cautionary tale of compounding risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Russell S; Gerke, Travis; Mason, James B; Sorensen, Matthew D; Joseph, Jason P; Dahm, Philipp; Su, Li-Ming

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at reviewing a contemporary series of patients who underwent robotic renal and adrenal surgery by a single surgeon at a tertiary referral academic medical center over a 6-year period, specifically focusing on the unique and serious complication of post-operative rhabdomyolysis of the dependent lower extremity. The cases of 315 consecutive patients who underwent robotic upper tract surgery over a 6-year period from August 2008 to June 2014 using a standardized patient positioning were reviewed and analyzed for patient characteristics and surgical variables that may be associated with the development of post-operative rhabdomyolysis. The incidence of post-operative rhabdomyolysis in our series was 3/315 (0.95%). All three affected patients had undergone robotic nephroureterectomy. Those patients who developed rhabdomyolysis had significantly higher mean Body Mass Index, Charlson Comorbidity Index, and median length of stay than those who did not. The mean OR time in the rhabdomyolysis group was noted to be 52 min longer than the non-rhabdomyolysis group, though this value did not reach statistical significance. Given the trends of increasing obesity in the United States and abroad as well as the continued rise in robotic upper tract urologic surgeries, urologists need to be increasingly vigilant for recognizing the risk factors and early treatment of the unique complication of post-operative rhabdomyolysis.

  17. Clinical validation of robot simulation of toothbrushing - comparative plaque removal efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical validation of laboratory toothbrushing tests has important advantages. It was, therefore, the aim to demonstrate correlation of tooth cleaning efficiency of a new robot brushing simulation technique with clinical plaque removal. Methods Clinical programme: 27 subjects received dental cleaning prior to 3-day-plaque-regrowth-interval. Plaque was stained, photographically documented and scored using planimetrical index. Subjects brushed teeth 33–47 with three techniques (horizontal, rotating, vertical), each for 20s buccally and for 20s orally in 3 consecutive intervals. The force was calibrated, the brushing technique was video supported. Two different brushes were randomly assigned to the subject. Robot programme: Clinical brushing programmes were transfered to a 6-axis-robot. Artificial teeth 33–47 were covered with plaque-simulating substrate. All brushing techniques were repeated 7 times, results were scored according to clinical planimetry. All data underwent statistical analysis by t-test, U-test and multivariate analysis. Results The individual clinical cleaning patterns are well reproduced by the robot programmes. Differences in plaque removal are statistically significant for the two brushes, reproduced in clinical and robot data. Multivariate analysis confirms the higher cleaning efficiency for anterior teeth and for the buccal sites. Conclusions The robot tooth brushing simulation programme showed good correlation with clinically standardized tooth brushing. This new robot brushing simulation programme can be used for rapid, reproducible laboratory testing of tooth cleaning. PMID:24996973

  18. Robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheide, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    This article reviews some of the technical areas and history associated with robotics, provides information relative to the formation of a Robotics Industry Committee within the Industry Applications Society (IAS), and describes how all activities relating to robotics will be coordinated within the IEEE. Industrial robots are being used for material handling, processes such as coating and arc welding, and some mechanical and electronics assembly. An industrial robot is defined as a programmable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move material, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for a variety of tasks. The initial focus of the Robotics Industry Committee will be on the application of robotics systems to the various industries that are represented within the IAS

  19. MODULAR MANIPULATOR FOR ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisinger, Joseph W. Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    ARM Automation, Inc. is developing a FR-amework of modular actuators that can address the DOE's wide range of robotics needs. The objective of this effort is to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology by constructing a manipulator FR-om these actuators within a glovebox for Automated Plutonium Processing (APP). At the end of the project, the system of actuators was used to construct several different manipulator configurations, which accommodate common glovebox tasks such as repackaging. The modular nature and quickconnects of this system simplify installation into ''hot'' boxes and any potential modifications or repair therein. This work focused on the development of self-contained robotic actuator modules including the embedded electronic controls for the purpose of building a manipulator system. Both of the actuators developed under this project contain the control electronics, sensors, motor, gear train, wiring, system communications and mechanical interfaces of a complete robotics servo device. Test actuators and accompanying DISC(trademark)s underwent validation testing at The University of Texas at Austin and ARM Automation, Inc. following final design and fabrication. The system also included custom links, an umbilical cord, an open architecture PC-based system controller, and operational software that permitted integration into a completely functional robotic manipulator system. The open architecture on which this system is based avoids proprietary interfaces and communication protocols which only serve to limit the capabilities and flexibility of automation equipment. The system was integrated and tested in the contractor's facility for intended performance and operations. The manipulator was tested using the full-scale equipment and process mock-ups. The project produced a practical and operational system including a quantitative evaluation of its performance and cost

  20. Robotic distal pancreatectomy versus conventional laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy: a comparative study for short-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Eric C H; Tang, Chung Ngai

    2015-09-01

    Robotic system has been increasingly used in pancreatectomy. However, the effectiveness of this method remains uncertain. This study compared the surgical outcomes between robot-assisted laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and conventional laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. During a 15-year period, 35 patients underwent minimally invasive approach of distal pancreatectomy in our center. Seventeen of these patients had robot-assisted laparoscopic approach, and the remaining 18 had conventional laparoscopic approach. Their operative parameters and perioperative outcomes were analyzed retrospectively in a prospective database. The mean operating time in the robotic group (221.4 min) was significantly longer than that in the laparoscopic group (173.6 min) (P = 0.026). Both robotic and conventional laparoscopic groups presented no significant difference in spleen-preservation rate (52.9% vs. 38.9%) (P = 0.505), operative blood loss (100.3 ml vs. 268.3 ml) (P = 0.29), overall morbidity rate (47.1% vs. 38.9%) (P = 0.73), and post-operative hospital stay (11.4 days vs. 14.2 days) (P = 0.46). Both groups also showed no perioperative mortality. Similar outcomes were observed in robotic distal pancreatectomy and conventional laparoscopic approach. However, robotic approach tended to have the advantages of less blood loss and shorter hospital stay. Further studies are necessary to determine the clinical position of robotic distal pancreatectomy.

  1. Towards Versatile Robots Through Open Heterogeneous Modular Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyder, Andreas

    arises, a new robot can be assembled rapidly from the existing modules, in contrast to conventional robots, which require a time consuming and expensive development process. In this thesis we define a modular robot to be a robot consisting of dynamically reconfigurable modules. The goal of this thesis......Robots are important tools in our everyday life. Both in industry and at the consumer level they serve the purpose of increasing our scope and extending our capabilities. Modular robots take the next step, allowing us to easily create and build various robots from a set of modules. If a problem...... is to increase the versatility and practical usability of modular robots by introducing new conceptual designs. Until now modular robots have been based on a pre-specified set of modules, and thus, their functionality is limited. We propose an open heterogeneous design concept, which allows a modular robot...

  2. Comparison of Robotic Pyeloplasty and Standard Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty in Infants: A Bi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neheman, Amos; Kord, Eyal; Zisman, Amnon; Darawsha, Abd Elhalim; Noh, Paul H

    2018-04-01

    To compare outcomes between robotic pyeloplasty (RP) and standard laparoscopic pyeloplasty (LP) in the infant population for the treatment of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all children under 1 year of age who underwent RP or LP at two different medical centers between October 2009 and February 2016. Patient demographics, perioperative data, complications, and results were reviewed. Thirteen patients underwent standard LP, and 21 patients underwent RP during the study period. Median age and median weight at time of operation for the whole cohort were 6.1 months and 7.9 kg. Surgery success rates were similar with 95% and 92% in RP and LP, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in operating time between the 2 groups, with a median time of 156 minutes in RP (range 125-249) and 192 minutes (range 98-229) in standard LP (P = .35). Median length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the robotic group with a median stay of 1 day (range 1-3) and 7 days (range 7-12) in the standard LP group.(P comparable complication rate between the 2 groups, 30.8% for LP and 23.8% for RP (P = .65). The minimally invasive dismembered pyeloplasty is safe and effective in the infant population and produces high success rates. The results, complication rates, and operative time were comparable between the two surgical methods while the standard LP demonstrated longer hospital stay. Both the robotic approach and the LP can be successfully utilized for the benefit of infants with UPJ obstruction.

  3. Prognostic role of mesenteric lymph nodes involvement in patients undergoing posterior pelvic exenteration during radical or supra-radical surgery for advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Roberto; Capozzi, Vito Andrea; Sozzi, Giulio; Volpi, Lavinia; Ceni, Valentina; Melpignano, Mauro; Giordano, Giovanna; Marchesi, Federico; Monica, Michela; Di Serio, Maurizio; Riccò, Matteo; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the prognostic role and the practical implication of mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) involvements in advanced ovarian cancer (AOC). A total of 429 patients with AOC underwent surgery between December 2007 and May 2017. We included in the study 83 patients who had primary (PDS) or interval debulking surgery (IDS) for AOC with bowel resection. Numbers, characteristics and surgical implication of MLN involvement were considered. Eighty-three patients were submitted to bowel resection during cytoreduction for AOC. Sixty-seven patients (80.7%) underwent primary debulking surgery (PDS). Sixteen patients (19.3%) experienced interval debulking surgery (IDS). 43 cases (51.8%) showed MLN involvement. A statistic correlation between positive MLN and pelvic lymph nodes (PLN) (p = 0.084), aortic lymph nodes (ALN) (p = 0.008) and bowel infiltration deeper than serosa (p = 0.043) was found. A longer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival was observed in case of negative MLN in the first 20 months of follow-up. No statistical differences between positive and negative MLN in terms of operative complication, morbidity, Ca-125, type of surgery (radical vs supra-radical), length and site of bowel resection, residual disease and site of recurrence were observed. An important correlation between positive MLN, ALN and PLN was detected; these results suggest a lymphatic spread of epithelial AOC similar to that of primary bowel cancer. The absence of residual disease after surgery is an independent prognostic factor; to achieve this result should be recommended a radical bowel resection during debulking surgery for AOC with bowel involvement.

  4. Stilbene dimer radical cations in the radiolyses of stilbenes and 1,2,3,4-tetraphenylcyclobutanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tojo, Sachiko; Morishima, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Akito; Majima, Tetsuro; Takamuku, Setsuo

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of the stilbene radical cation formed by pulse radiolysis or γ-radiolyses is explained based on neutralization as well as the formation of a π-type stilbene dimer radical cation (π-St 2 +· ), converting to the σ-type St 2 +· (σ-St 2 +· ). The r-1, c-2, t-3, t-4-tetraphenylcyclobutane radical cation generated in a rigid matrix at 77 K which converted to σ-St 2 +· upon warming. Both r-1, c-2, t-3, t-4- and r-1, t-2, c-3, t-4-tetraphenylcyclobutane radical cations underwent photochemical cycloreversion to π-St 2 +· upon irradiation at wavelengths longer than 390 nm at 77 K, and converted to σ-St 2 +· upon warming. It is suggested that π-St 2 +· has overlapping arrangements of π-electrons, while σ-St 2 +· has radical and cation centers on the 1- and 4-positions of the C 4 linkage. (author)

  5. Radical Abdominal Trachelectomy for IB1 Cervical Cancer at 17 Weeks of Gestation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Aoki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. With regard to the therapy for early invasive cervical carcinoma during pregnancy, radical trachelectomy is also a treatment of choice, along with its advantages and disadvantages. Case Report. A 28-year-old woman, para 1-0-0-1, was diagnosed with FIGO stage IB1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix at 12 weeks of gestation. The patient underwent radical abdominal trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy at 17 weeks of gestation. Her pregnancy was successfully maintained after the surgery. The patient underwent a planned cesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. A healthy baby girl weighing 2970 g was born with an Apgar score of 8/9. The mother and child in overall good health were discharged. Ten months after the delivery, there was no clinical evidence of recurrence. Conclusions. We believe that it is appropriate to perform radical abdominal trachelectomy in the early second trimester with preserving uterine arteries, although it is a technically challenging approach. It may be possible that radical abdominal trachelectomy during pregnancy can help women avoid the triple losses of a desired pregnancy, fertility, and motherhood.

  6. Lessons learned over a decade of pediatric robotic ureteral reimplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minki Baek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The da Vinci robotic system has improved surgeon dexterity, ergonomics, and visualization to allow for a minimally invasive option for complex reconstructive procedures in children. Over the past decade, robot-assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation (RALUR has become a viable minimally invasive surgical option for pediatric vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. However, higher-thanexpected complication rates and suboptimal reflux resolution rates at some centers have also been reported. The heterogeneity of surgical outcomes may arise from the inherent and underestimated complexity of the RALUR procedure that may justify its reclassification as a complex reconstructive procedure and especially for robotic surgeons early in their learning curve. Currently, no consensus exists on the role of RALUR for the surgical management of VUR. High success rates and low major complication rates are the expected norm for the current gold standard surgical option of open ureteral reimplantation. Similar to how robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery has gradually replaced open surgery as the most utilized option for prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients, RALUR may become a higher utilized surgical option in children with VUR if the adoption of standardized surgical techniques that have been associated with optimal outcomes can be adopted during the second decade of RALUR. A future standard of RALUR for children with VUR whose parents seek a minimally invasive surgical option can arise if widespread achievement of high success rates and low major complication rates can be obtained, similar to the replacement of open surgery with robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostectomy as the new strandard for men with prostate cancer.

  7. Perioperative risk assessment in robotic general surgery: lessons learned from 884 cases at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Nicolas C; Addeo, Pietro; Bianco, Francesco M; Gorodner, Veronica; Ayloo, Subhashini M; Elli, Enrique F; Oberholzer, José; Benedetti, Enrico; Giulianotti, Pier C

    2012-08-01

    To assess factors associated with morbidity and mortality following the use of robotics in general surgery. Case series. University of Illinois at Chicago. Eight hundred eighty-four consecutive patients who underwent a robotic procedure in our institution between April 2007 and July 2010. Perioperative morbidity and mortality. During the study period, 884 patients underwent a robotic procedure. The conversion rate was 2%, the mortality rate was 0.5%, and the overall postoperative morbidity rate was 16.7%. The reoperation rate was 2.4%. Mean length of stay was 4.5 days (range, 0.2-113 days). In univariate analysis, several factors were associated with increased morbidity and included either patient-related (cardiovascular and renal comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥ 3, body mass index [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared] surgery, malignant disease, body mass index of less than 30, hypertension, and transfusion were factors significantly associated with a higher risk for complications. American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or greater, age 70 years or older, cardiovascular comorbidity, and blood loss of 500 mL or more were also associated with increased risk for mortality. Use of the robotic approach for general surgery can be achieved safely with low morbidity and mortality. Several risk factors have been identified as independent causes for higher morbidity and mortality. These can be used to identify patients at risk before and during the surgery and, in the future, to develop a scoring system for the use of robotic general surgery

  8. Prospective analysis of completely stentless robot-assisted pyeloplasty in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Pasquale; Lambert, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Robot-assisted pyeloplasty (RAP) is emerging as an effective tool for treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) in the pediatric population. Typically stents are utilized for RAP and removed four weeks after the procedure. We present our prospective experience with stentless RAP. Twenty children between the ages of 12 and 113 months (mean age 56 months) underwent transperitoneal RAP for UPJO utilizing the DaVinci surgical system. Outcome measures included operative time, length of hospital stay, and resolution of obstruction by ultrasonography, magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and/or diuretic radionuclide imaging (DRI). All patients successfully underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty without conversion to pure laparoscopy or open procedure. Mean operative time was 124.7 min with a mean console time of 82.3 min. The mean hospital stay was 18 h. Of the 20 patients, 13/20 (65%) had resolution or improvement in the degree of hydronephrosis. The other patients had no evidence of obstruction based upon follow-up MRU or DRI. Stentless RAP is a safe and effective option for surgical treatment of UPJO. A larger prospective long-term cohort is needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of the stentless approach.

  9. Socially intelligent robots: dimensions of human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautenhahn, Kerstin

    2007-04-29

    Social intelligence in robots has a quite recent history in artificial intelligence and robotics. However, it has become increasingly apparent that social and interactive skills are necessary requirements in many application areas and contexts where robots need to interact and collaborate with other robots or humans. Research on human-robot interaction (HRI) poses many challenges regarding the nature of interactivity and 'social behaviour' in robot and humans. The first part of this paper addresses dimensions of HRI, discussing requirements on social skills for robots and introducing the conceptual space of HRI studies. In order to illustrate these concepts, two examples of HRI research are presented. First, research is surveyed which investigates the development of a cognitive robot companion. The aim of this work is to develop social rules for robot behaviour (a 'robotiquette') that is comfortable and acceptable to humans. Second, robots are discussed as possible educational or therapeutic toys for children with autism. The concept of interactive emergence in human-child interactions is highlighted. Different types of play among children are discussed in the light of their potential investigation in human-robot experiments. The paper concludes by examining different paradigms regarding 'social relationships' of robots and people interacting with them.

  10. High-Grade Hydronephrosis Predicts Poor Outcomes After Radical Cystectomy in Patients with Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Suk; Cho, Kang Su; Lee, Young Hoon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Oh, Young Taek

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether the presence and severity of preoperative hydronephrosis have prognostic significance in patients who underwent radical cystectomy for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. The medical records of 457 patients who underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer between 1986 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Following the Society for Fetal Urology grading system, patients were divided into low-, and high-grade hydronephrosis groups. Clinicopathologic factors associated with preoperative hydronephrosis and survival were evaluated. Of a total of 406 patients, unilateral hydronephrosis was found in 74 (18.2%), bilateral hydronephrosis in 11 (2.7%), and no hydronephoris in 321 (79.1%). Low-grade hydronephrosis was found in 57 (12.2%) patients and high-grade hydronephrosis in 28 (6%). Preoperative hydronephrosis was related to higher pT stage and lymph node invasion. In univariate analysis, the presence of hydronephrosis, hydronephrosis grade, age, pT and pN stage, tumor grade, surgical margin, number of retrieved nodes, carcinoma in situ, and lymphovascular invasion were significant prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, bilateral hydronephrosis and high-grade hydronephrosis remained significant predictors for decreased survival. The presence of preoperative hydronephrosis, and high-grade hydronephrosis are significant prognostic factors in patients with bladder cancer after radical cystectomy. PMID:20191034

  11. Blood Transfusion Requirement and Not Preoperative Anemia Are Associated with Perioperative Complications Following Intracorporeal Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W; Khetrapal, Pramit; Tan, Mae-Yen; Tan, Melanie El; Sridhar, Ashwin; Cervi, Elizabeth; Rodney, Simon; Busuttil, Gerald; Nathan, Senthil; Hines, John; Shaw, Greg; Mohammed, Anna; Baker, Hilary; Briggs, Timothy P; Klein, Andrew; Richards, Toby; Kelly, John D

    2017-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of preoperative anemia and the impact of preoperative anemia and blood transfusion requirement on 30- and 90-day complications in a cohort of patients undergoing robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (iRARC). IRARC was performed on 166 patients between June 2011 and March 2016. Prospective data were collected for patient demographics, clinical and pathologic characteristics, perioperative variables, transfusion requirements, and hospital length of stay. Thirty- and 90-day complications were classified according to the modified Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Clavien-Dindo system. Preoperative anemia was common (43.4%) and greatest in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (48.6%) (p blood transfusion (p = 0.001). Blood transfusion required in 20.4% of patients with intraoperative and postoperative blood transfusion rate was 10.2% and 13.9%, respectively. The 30-day all complication rate and 30-day major complication rate were 55.4% and 15.7%, respectively, while 90-day all complication rate and 90-day major complication rate were 65.7% and 19.3%, respectively. Intraoperative blood transfusion was not associated with increased complications, but postoperative blood transfusion requirement was independently associated with perioperative morbidity: all 30-day complications (p = 0.003), all 90-day complications (p = 0.009), and 90-day major complications (p = 0.004). The presence of preoperative anemia in patients undergoing iRARC is not associated with increased surgical risk, although preoperative anemic patients were significantly more likely to require blood transfusion. Blood transfusion requirement and specifically postoperative blood transfusion are independently associated with perioperative morbidity and are an important factor for the optimization of postoperative outcomes.

  12. Robotic tilt table reduces the occurrence of orthostatic hypotension over time in vegetative states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveggia, Giovanni; Ragusa, Ivana; Trani, Vincenzo; Cuva, Daniele; Angeretti, Cristina; Fontanella, Marco; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Borboni, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of verticalization with or without combined movement of the lower limbs in patients in a vegetative state or a minimally conscious state. In particular, we aimed to study whether, in the group with combined movement, there was better tolerance to verticalization. This was a randomized trial conducted in a neurorehabilitation hospital. Twelve patients with vegetative state and minimally conscious state 3-18 months after acute acquired brain injuries were included. Patients were randomized into A and B treatment groups. Study group A underwent verticalization with a tilt table at 65° and movimentation of the lower limbs with a robotic system for 30 min three times a week for 24 sessions. Control group B underwent the same rehabilitation treatment, with a robotic verticalization system, but an inactive lower-limb movement system. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were determined. Robotic movement of the lower limbs can reduce the occurrence of orthostatic hypotension in hemodynamically unstable patients. Despite the small number of patients involved (only eight patients completed the trial), our results indicate that blood pressures and heart rate can be stabilized better (with) by treatment with passive leg movements in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  13. A prospective comparison of postoperative pain and quality of life in robotic assisted vs conventional laparoscopic gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmeister, Jenna R; Pua, Tarah L; Boyd, Leslie R; Blank, Stephanie V; Curtin, John P; Pothuri, Bhavana

    2015-02-01

    We sought to compare robotic vs laparoscopic surgery in regards to patient reported postoperative pain and quality of life. This was a prospective study of patients who presented for treatment of a new gynecologic disease requiring minimally invasive surgical intervention. All subjects were asked to take the validated Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form at 3 time points to assess pain and its effect on quality of life. Statistical analyses were performed using Pearson x(2) and Student's t test. One hundred eleven were included in the analysis of which 56 patients underwent robotic assisted surgery and 55 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. There was no difference in postoperative pain between conventional laparoscopy and robotic assisted surgery for gynecologic procedures. There was a statistically significant difference found at the delayed postoperative period when evaluating interference of sleep, favoring laparoscopy (ROB 2.0 vs LSC 1.0; P = .03). There were no differences found between the robotic and laparoscopic groups of patients receiving narcotics (56 vs 53, P = .24, respectively), route of administration of narcotics (47 vs 45, P > .99, respectively), or administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications (27 vs 21, P = .33, respectively). Our results demonstrate no difference in postoperative pain between conventional laparoscopy and robotic assisted surgery for gynecologic procedures. Furthermore, pain did not appear to interfere consistently with any daily activity of living. Interference of sleep needs to be further evaluated after controlling for bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Robot engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seul

    2006-02-15

    This book deals with robot engineering, giving descriptions of robot's history, current tendency of robot field, work and characteristic of industrial robot, essential merit and vector, application of matrix, analysis of basic vector, expression of Denavit-Hartenberg, robot kinematics such as forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, cases of MATLAB program, and motion kinematics, robot kinetics like moment of inertia, centrifugal force and coriolis power, and Euler-Lagrangian equation course plan, SIMULINK position control of robots.

  15. Robot engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seul

    2006-02-01

    This book deals with robot engineering, giving descriptions of robot's history, current tendency of robot field, work and characteristic of industrial robot, essential merit and vector, application of matrix, analysis of basic vector, expression of Denavit-Hartenberg, robot kinematics such as forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, cases of MATLAB program, and motion kinematics, robot kinetics like moment of inertia, centrifugal force and coriolis power, and Euler-Lagrangian equation course plan, SIMULINK position control of robots.

  16. Robotic Colorectal Resection With and Without the Use of the New Da Vinci Table Motion: A Case-Matched Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, Matteo; Gianardi, Desirée; Guadagni, Simone; Di Franco, Gregorio; Bastiani, Luca; Furbetta, Niccolò; Simoncini, Tommaso; Zirafa, Cristina; Melfi, Franca; Buccianti, Piero; Moglia, Andrea; Cuschieri, Alfred; Mosca, Franco; Morelli, Luca

    2018-06-01

    The da Vinci Table Motion (dVTM) is a new device that enables patients to be repositioned with instruments in place within the abdomen, and without undocking the robot. The present study was designed to compare operative and short-term outcomes of patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery with the da Vinci Xi system, with or without use of the dVTM. Ten patients underwent robotic colorectal resection for cancer with the use of dVTM (Xi-dVTM group) between May 2015 and October 2015 at our center. The intraoperative and short-term clinical outcome were compared, using a case-control methodology (propensity scores approach to create 1:2 matched pairs), with a similar group of patients who underwent robotic colorectal surgery for cancer without the use of the dVTM device (Xi-only group). Overall robotic operative time was shorter in the Xi-dVTM group ( P = .04). Operations were executed fully robotic in all Xi-dVTM cases, while 2 cases of the Xi-only group required conversion to open surgery because of bulky tumors and difficult exposure. Postoperative medical complications were higher in the Xi-only group ( P = .024). In this preliminary experience, the use of the new dVTM with the da Vinci Xi in colorectal surgery, by overcoming the limitations of the fixed positions of the patient, enhanced the workflow and resulted in improved exposure of the operative field. Further studies with a greater number of patients are needed to confirm these benefits of the dVTM-da Vinci Xi robotically assisted colorectal surgery.

  17. Orgasm-associated urinary incontinence and sexual life after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas E; Carlsson, Stefan; Johansson, Eva; Jonsson, Martin N; Adding, Christofer; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2011-09-01

    Involuntary release of urine during sexual climax, orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, occurs frequently after radical prostatectomy. We know little about its prevalence and its effect on sexual satisfaction. To determine the prevalence of orgasm-associated incontinence after radical prostatectomy and its effect on sexual satisfaction. Consecutive series, follow-up at one point in calendar time of men having undergone radical prostatectomy (open surgery or robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery) at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, 2002-2006. Of the 1,411 eligible men, 1,288 (91%) men completed a study-specific questionnaire. Prevalence rate of orgasm-associated incontinence. Of the 1,288 men providing information, 691 were sexually active. Altogether, 268 men reported orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, of whom 230 (86%) were otherwise continent. When comparing them with the 422 not reporting the symptom but being sexually active, we found a prevalence ratio (with 95% confidence interval) of 1.5 (1.2-1.8) for not being able to satisfy the partner, 2.1 (1.1-3.5) for avoiding sexual activity because of fear of failing, 1.5 (1.1-2.1) for low orgasmic satisfaction, and 1.4 (1.2-1.7) for having sexual intercourse infrequently. Prevalence ratios increase in prostate-cancer survivors with a higher frequency of orgasm-associated urinary incontinence. We found orgasm-associated urinary incontinence to occur among a fifth of prostate cancer survivors having undergone radical prostatectomy, most of whom are continent when not engaged in sexual activity. The symptom was associated with several aspects of sexual life. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  18. Calibration of Robot Reference Frames for Enhanced Robot Positioning Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Frank Shaopeng

    2008-01-01

    This chapter discussed the importance and methods of conducting robot workcell calibration for enhancing the accuracy of the robot TCP positions in industrial robot applications. It shows that the robot frame transformations define the robot geometric parameters such as joint position variables, link dimensions, and joint offsets in an industrial robot system. The D-H representation allows the robot designer to model the robot motion geometry with the four standard D-H parameters. The robot k...

  19. Gleason Score Correlation Between Prostate Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Öztürk

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second cause of cancer-related mortality. Prostate biopsy and the Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. Several studies have investigated the correlation between biopsy scores and radical prostatectomy specimen scores. We also evaluated the correlation of Gleason scores of these specimens in our patient series. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 468 men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy between 2008 and 2017. Patients’ age, prostate-specific antigen levels at diagnosis, and prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason scores were recorded. Upgrading and downgrading were defined as increase or decrease of Gleason score of radical prostate specimen compared to Gleason score of prostate biopsy. Results: A total of 442 men diagnosed with prostate cancer were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 62.62±6.26 years (44-84 years and mean prostate specific antigen level was 9.01±6.84 ng/mL (1.09-49 ng/mL. Prostate biopsy Gleason score was 7 in 27 (6.1% men. Radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason score was 7 in 62 (14% men. Gleason correlation was highest in the 240 patients (71.6% with score <7 and was lowest in the 31 (38.75% patients with score =7. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the discordance rate between Gleason scores of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens was 35.7%.

  20. MODULAR MANIPULATOR FOR ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph W. Geisinger, Ph.D.

    2001-07-31

    ARM Automation, Inc. is developing a framework of modular actuators that can address the DOE's wide range of robotics needs. The objective of this effort is to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology by constructing a manipulator from these actuators within a glovebox for Automated Plutonium Processing (APP). At the end of the project, the system of actuators was used to construct several different manipulator configurations, which accommodate common glovebox tasks such as repackaging. The modular nature and quickconnects of this system simplify installation into ''hot'' boxes and any potential modifications or repair therein. This work focused on the development of self-contained robotic actuator modules including the embedded electronic controls for the purpose of building a manipulator system. Both of the actuators developed under this project contain the control electronics, sensors, motor, gear train, wiring, system communications and mechanical interfaces of a complete robotics servo device. Test actuators and accompanying DISC{trademark}s underwent validation testing at The University of Texas at Austin and ARM Automation, Inc. following final design and fabrication. The system also included custom links, an umbilical cord, an open architecture PC-based system controller, and operational software that permitted integration into a completely functional robotic manipulator system. The open architecture on which this system is based avoids proprietary interfaces and communication protocols which only serve to limit the capabilities and flexibility of automation equipment. The system was integrated and tested in the contractor's facility for intended performance and operations. The manipulator was tested using the full-scale equipment and process mock-ups. The project produced a practical and operational system including a quantitative evaluation of its performance and cost.

  1. Retention of fundamental surgical skills learned in robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Irene H; Mukherjee, Mukul; Shah, Bhavin C; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2012-12-01

    Evaluation of the learning curve for robotic surgery has shown reduced errors and decreased task completion and training times compared with regular laparoscopic surgery. However, most training evaluations of robotic surgery have only addressed short-term retention after the completion of training. Our goal was to investigate the amount of surgical skills retained after 3 months of training with the da Vinci™ Surgical System. Seven medical students without any surgical experience were recruited. Participants were trained with a 4-day training program of robotic surgical skills and underwent a series of retention tests at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months post-training. Data analysis included time to task completion, speed, distance traveled, and movement curvature by the instrument tip. Performance of the participants was graded using the modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) for robotic surgery. Participants filled out a survey after each training session by answering a set of questions. Time to task completion and the movement curvature was decreased from pre- to post-training and the performance was retained at all the corresponding retention periods: 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months. The modified OSATS showed improvement from pre-test to post-test and this improvement was maintained during all the retention periods. Participants increased in self-confidence and mastery in performing robotic surgical tasks after training. Our novel comprehensive training program improved robot-assisted surgical performance and learning. All trainees retained their fundamental surgical skills for 3 months after receiving the training program.

  2. A nonconjugated radical polymer glass with high electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Yongho; Agarkar, Varad; Sung, Seung Hyun; Savoie, Brett M.; Boudouris, Bryan W.

    2018-03-01

    Solid-state conducting polymers usually have highly conjugated macromolecular backbones and require intentional doping in order to achieve high electrical conductivities. Conversely, single-component, charge-neutral macromolecules could be synthetically simpler and have improved processibility and ambient stability. We show that poly(4-glycidyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), a nonconjugated radical polymer with a subambient glass transition temperature, underwent rapid solid-state charge transfer reactions and had an electrical conductivity of up to 28 siemens per meter over channel lengths up to 0.6 micrometers. The charge transport through the radical polymer film was enabled with thermal annealing at 80°C, which allowed for the formation of a percolating network of open-shell sites in electronic communication with one another. The electrical conductivity was not enhanced by intentional doping, and thin films of this material showed high optical transparency.

  3. Ultrasensitive prostate specific antigen assay following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy--an outcome measure for defining the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, R; Gommersall, L; Zeif, J; Hayne, D; Shah, Z H; Doherty, A

    2009-07-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) performed laparoscopically is a popular treatment with curative intent for organ-confined prostate cancer. After surgery, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels drop to low levels which can be measured with ultrasensitive assays. This has been described in the literature for open RRP but not for laparoscopic RRP. This paper describes PSA changes in the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. To use ultrasensitive PSA (uPSA) assays to measure a PSA nadir in patients having laparoscopic radical prostatectomy below levels recorded by standard assays. The aim was to use uPSA nadir at 3 months' post-prostatectomy as an early surrogate end-point of oncological outcome. In so doing, laparoscopic oncological outcomes could then be compared with published results from other open radical prostatectomy series with similar end-points. Furthermore, this end-point could be used in the assessment of the surgeon's learning curve. Prospective, comprehensive, demographic, clinical, biochemical and operative data were collected from all patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP. We present data from the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. uPSA was measured every 3 months post surgery. Median follow-up was 29 months (minimum 3 months). The likelihood of reaching a uPSA of bench-marking performance. With experience, a surgeon can achieve in excess of an 80% chance of obtaining a uPSA nadir of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months after laparoscopic RRP for a British population. This is equivalent to most published open series.

  4. Evaluating tactile feedback in robotic surgery for potential clinical application using an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wottawa, Christopher R; Genovese, Bradley; Nowroozi, Bryan N; Hart, Steven D; Bisley, James W; Grundfest, Warren S; Dutson, Erik P

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate (1) grasping forces with the application of a tactile feedback system in vivo and (2) the incidence of tissue damage incurred during robotic tissue manipulation. Robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of surgical specialties, particularly radical prostatectomy. This innovative surgical tool offers advantages over traditional laparoscopic techniques, such as improved wrist-like maneuverability, stereoscopic video displays, and scaling of surgical gestures to increase precision. A widely cited disadvantage associated with robotic systems is the absence of tactile feedback. Nineteen subjects were categorized into two groups: 5 experts (six or more robotic cases) and 14 novices (five cases or less). The subjects used the da Vinci with integrated tactile feedback to run porcine bowel in the following conditions: (T1: deactivated tactile feedback; T2: activated tactile feedback; and T3: deactivated tactile feedback). The grasping force, incidence of tissue damage, and the correlation of grasping force and tissue damage were analyzed. Tissue damage was evaluated both grossly and histologically by a pathologist blinded to the sample. Tactile feedback resulted in significantly decreased grasping forces for both experts and novices (P system was deactivated (P > 0.05 in all subjects). The in vivo application of integrated tactile feedback in the robotic system demonstrates significantly reduced grasping forces, resulting in significantly less tissue damage. This tactile feedback system may improve surgical outcomes and broaden the use of robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery.

  5. Late-onset incontinence in a cohort of radical prostatectomy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naselli, A.; Introini, C.; Andreatta, R.; Puppo, P.; Simone, G.; Papalia, R.; Gallucci, M.

    2011-01-01

    A cohort of 235 subjects, who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1994 to 2002, completely continent at the 2-year follow up and with the last follow-up visit in 2009, was examined to assess incidence and risk factors of late-onset incontinence. Median follow up was 100 months, range 84-176. At the last follow-up visit, 209 (89%) maintained continence, and 26 (11%) became incontinent. Specifically 14 out of 26 (6%) used one pad and 12 (5%) used two or more pads daily. Incidence of age ≥65 years at radical prostatectomy was greater in the subgroup who developed late incontinence, 109/209 (52%) vs 19/26 (73%). Incidence of adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy, of hormonal manipulation and of extraprostatic disease was similar in the two subgroups. Univariate and multivariate analysis did not disclose any difference. Late-onset incontinence is to be expected in about 10% of subjects who became completely continent after radical prostatectomy. The cause is likely to be related to ageing. Patients should be informed about the long-term risk of becoming incontinent. (author)

  6. Generic robot architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses for a generic robot architecture providing a framework that is easily portable to a variety of robot platforms and is configured to provide hardware abstractions, abstractions for generic robot attributes, environment abstractions, and robot behaviors. The generic robot architecture includes a hardware abstraction level and a robot abstraction level. The hardware abstraction level is configured for developing hardware abstractions that define, monitor, and control hardware modules available on a robot platform. The robot abstraction level is configured for defining robot attributes and provides a software framework for building robot behaviors from the robot attributes. Each of the robot attributes includes hardware information from at least one hardware abstraction. In addition, each robot attribute is configured to substantially isolate the robot behaviors from the at least one hardware abstraction.

  7. Molecular Robots Obeying Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminka, Gal A; Spokoini-Stern, Rachel; Amir, Yaniv; Agmon, Noa; Bachelet, Ido

    2017-01-01

    Asimov's three laws of robotics, which were shaped in the literary work of Isaac Asimov (1920-1992) and others, define a crucial code of behavior that fictional autonomous robots must obey as a condition for their integration into human society. While, general implementation of these laws in robots is widely considered impractical, limited-scope versions have been demonstrated and have proven useful in spurring scientific debate on aspects of safety and autonomy in robots and intelligent systems. In this work, we use Asimov's laws to examine these notions in molecular robots fabricated from DNA origami. We successfully programmed these robots to obey, by means of interactions between individual robots in a large population, an appropriately scoped variant of Asimov's laws, and even emulate the key scenario from Asimov's story "Runaround," in which a fictional robot gets into trouble despite adhering to the laws. Our findings show that abstract, complex notions can be encoded and implemented at the molecular scale, when we understand robots on this scale on the basis of their interactions.

  8. Colias: An Autonomous Micro Robot for Swarm Robotic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Arvin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Robotic swarms that take inspiration from nature are becoming a fascinating topic for multi-robot researchers. The aim is to control a large number of simple robots in order to solve common complex tasks. Due to the hardware complexities and cost of robot platforms, current research in swarm robotics is mostly performed by simulation software. The simulation of large numbers of these robots in robotic swarm applications is extremely complex and often inaccurate due to the poor modelling of external conditions. In this paper, we present the design of a low-cost, open-platform, autonomous micro-robot (Colias for robotic swarm applications. Colias employs a circular platform with a diameter of 4 cm. It has a maximum speed of 35 cm/s which enables it to be used in swarm scenarios very quickly over large arenas. Long-range infrared modules with an adjustable output power allow the robot to communicate with its direct neighbours at a range of 0.5 cm to 2 m. Colias has been designed as a complete platform with supporting software development tools for robotics education and research. It has been tested in both individual and swarm scenarios, and the observed results demonstrate its feasibility for use as a micro-sized mobile robot and as a low-cost platform for robot swarm applications.

  9. 'Trifecta' outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy in solitary kidney: a Vattikuti Collective Quality Initiative (VCQI) database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sohrab; Abaza, Ronney; Adshead, James M; Ahlawat, Rajesh K; Challacombe, Benjamin J; Dasgupta, Prokar; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Moon, Daniel A; Yuvaraja, Thyavihally B; Capitanio, Umberto; Larcher, Alessandro; Porpiglia, Francesco; Porter, James R; Mottrie, Alexander; Bhandari, Mahendra; Rogers, Craig

    2018-01-01

    To analyse the outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) in patients with a solitary kidney in a large multi-institutional database. In all, 2755 patients in the Vattikuti Collective Quality Initiative database underwent RAPN by 22 surgeons at 14 centres in nine countries. Of these patients, 74 underwent RAPN with a solitary kidney between 2007 and 2016. We retrospectively analysed the functional and oncological outcomes of these 74 patients. A 'trifecta' of outcomes was assessed, with trifecta defined as a warm ischaemia time (WIT) of negative surgical margins, and no complications intraoperatively or within 3 months of RAPN. All 74 patients underwent RAPN successfully with one conversion to radical nephrectomy. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) operative time was 180 (142-230) min. Early unclamping was used in 11 (14.9%) patients and zero ischaemia was used in 12 (16.2%). Trifecta outcomes were achieved in 38 of 66 patients (57.6%). The median (IQR) WIT was 15.5 (8.75-20.0) min for the entire cohort. The overall complication rate was 24.1% and the rate of Clavien-Dindo grade ≤II complications was 16.3%. Positive surgical margins were present in four cases (5.4%). The median (IQR) follow-up was 10.5 (2.12-24.0) months. The median drop in estimated glomerular filtration rate at 3 months was 7.0 mL/min/1.72 m 2 (11.01%). Our findings suggest that RAPN is a safe and effective treatment option for select renal tumours in solitary kidneys in terms of a trifecta of negative surgical margins, WIT of <20 min, and low operative and perioperative morbidity. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Completely Isolated Retroperitoneal Enteric Duplication Cyst with Adenocarcinoma Transformation Managed with Robotic Radical Nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Faraj, Kassem; Edwards, Luke; Gupta, Alia; Seifman, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Enteric duplication cysts are congenital malformations that typically affect children in infancy, but can also affect adults. Rarely, these cysts can be complicated by malignancy. We present the first case of retroperitoneal duplication cyst that was complicated by malignancy transformation and managed by robot-assisted excision. Case presentation: A 64-year-old female with a history of a left-sided renal cyst presented with a 4-month history of abdominal pain and fatigue...

  11. Starting a robotic program in general thoracic surgery: why, how, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Bryant, Ayesha S; Minnich, Douglas J

    2011-06-01

    We report our experience in starting a robotic program in thoracic surgery. We retrospectively reviewed our experience in starting a robotic program in general thoracic surgery on a consecutive series of patients. Between February 2009 and September 2010, 150 patients underwent robotic operations. Types of procedures were lobectomy in 62, thymectomy in 30, and benign esophageal procedures in 6. No thymectomy or esophageal procedures required conversion. One conversion was needed for suspected bleeding for a mediastinal mass. Twelve patients were converted for lobectomy (none for bleeding, 1 in the last 24). Median operative time for robotic thymectomy was 119 minutes, and median length of stay was 1 day. The median time for robotic lobectomy was 185 minutes, and median length of stay was 2 days. There were no operative deaths. Morbidity occurred in 23 patients (15%). All patients with cancer had R0 resections and resection of all visible mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. Robotic surgery is safe and oncologically sound. It requires training of the entire operating room team. The learning curve is steep, involving port placement, availability of the proper instrumentation, use of the correct robotic arms, and proper patient positioning. The robot provides an ideal surgical approach for thymectomy and other mediastinal tumors. Its advantage over thoracoscopy for pulmonary resection is unproven; however, we believe complete thoracic lymph node dissection and teaching is easier. Importantly, defined credentialing for surgeons and cost analysis studies are needed. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of Laryngoceles by Transoral Robotic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Fatma Tülin; Güneş, Selçuk; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Yiğider, Ayşe Pelin; Kaya, Kamil Hakan

    2016-06-01

    Laryngoceles are air-filled sacs which communicate with the laryngeal lumen. When filled with mucus or pus, they are called laryngomucoceles and laryngopyoceles, respectively. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is a new and remarkable technique that expands its usefullness in otorhinolaryngology. Conventional treatments for laryngoceles were previously performed using external approaches, with aesthetically unfavorable and less function-sparing results. Transoral laser microsurgical approaches for laryngoceles were seldom reported. It is aimed to present authors' clinical experience on laryngocele management with TORS which is a rather new technique. A retrospective patient serial. Patients were evaluated for demographic data, type of lesion, reasons for hospital admittance, complaint duration, and previous surgery. Robotic surgery panel including anesthesia time, duration of surgery, need for tracheotomy, postoperative care, follow-up, and recurrence rates were also summarized. Six men (mean age 51.7 years; range 41-62) with laryngoceles underwent successful TORS. Dyspnea and hoarseness were the main complaints. Two patients had undergone previous laryngeal surgery due to laryngeal cancer, with no recurrence of malignancy at admittance for laryngocele. Three had simple laryngocele, 2 had laryngomucocele, and 1 had laryngopyocele. No laryngoceles recurred and no complication such as dysphonia or prolonged dysphagia occurred. Transoral robotic surgery was found superior in safety, technical feasibility and curative effectiveness, when compared with classical methods, especially due to absence of skin incisions. Surgical modalities for laryngocele excision should be directed toward a curative target including cosmetic and functional success, technical achievability, and surgically curative methods. Transoral robotic surgery provided all these features.

  13. Micro intelligence robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yon Ho

    1991-07-01

    This book gives descriptions of micro robot about conception of robots and micro robot, match rules of conference of micro robots, search methods of mazes, and future and prospect of robots. It also explains making and design of 8 beat robot like making technique, software, sensor board circuit, and stepping motor catalog, speedy 3, Mr. Black and Mr. White, making and design of 16 beat robot, such as micro robot artist, Jerry 2 and magic art of shortening distances algorithm of robot simulation.

  14. Modelling of industrial robot in LabView Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, W.; Cwikła, G.; Foit, K.; Gwiazda, A.; Monica, Z.; Sekala, A.

    2017-08-01

    Currently can find many models of industrial systems including robots. These models differ from each other not only by the accuracy representation parameters, but the representation range. For example, CAD models describe the geometry of the robot and some even designate a mass parameters as mass, center of gravity, moment of inertia, etc. These models are used in the design of robotic lines and sockets. Also systems for off-line programming use these models and many of them can be exported to CAD. It is important to note that models for off-line programming describe not only the geometry but contain the information necessary to create a program for the robot. Exports from CAD to off-line programming system requires additional information. These models are used for static determination of reachability points, and testing collision. It’s enough to generate a program for the robot, and even check the interaction of elements of the production line, or robotic cell. Mathematical models allow robots to study the properties of kinematic and dynamic of robot movement. In these models the geometry is not so important, so are used only selected parameters such as the length of the robot arm, the center of gravity, moment of inertia. These parameters are introduced into the equations of motion of the robot and motion parameters are determined.

  15. Towards Sociable Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Trung Dung

    This thesis studies aspects of self-sufficient energy (energy autonomy) for truly autonomous robots and towards sociable robots. Over sixty years of history of robotics through three developmental ages containing single robot, multi-robot systems, and social (sociable) robots, the main objective...... of roboticists mostly focuses on how to make a robotic system function autonomously and further, socially. However, such approaches mostly emphasize behavioural autonomy, rather than energy autonomy which is the key factor for not only any living machine, but for life on the earth. Consequently, self......-sufficient energy is one of the challenges for not only single robot or multi-robot systems, but also social and sociable robots. This thesis is to deal with energy autonomy for multi-robot systems through energy sharing (trophallaxis) in which each robot is equipped with two capabilities: self-refueling energy...

  16. Biomass feeds vegetarian robot; Biomassa voedt vegetarische robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Brandt, M. [Office for Science and Technology, Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Washington (United States)

    2009-09-15

    This brief article addresses the EATR robot (Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot) that was developed by Cyclone Power and uses biomass as primary source of energy for propulsion. [Dutch] Een kort artikel over de door Cyclone Power ontwikkelde EATR-robot (Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot) die voor de voortdrijving biomassa gebruikt als primaire energiebron.

  17. Robot Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Anja; Grindsted Nielsen, Sally; Jochum, Elizabeth Ann

    Robots are increasingly used in health care settings, e.g., as homecare assistants and personal companions. One challenge for personal robots in the home is acceptance. We describe an innovative approach to influencing the acceptance of care robots using theatrical performance. Live performance...... is a useful testbed for developing and evaluating what makes robots expressive; it is also a useful platform for designing robot behaviors and dialogue that result in believable characters. Therefore theatre is a valuable testbed for studying human-robot interaction (HRI). We investigate how audiences...... perceive social robots interacting with humans in a future care scenario through a scripted performance. We discuss our methods and initial findings, and outline future work....

  18. Soft Robotics Week

    CERN Document Server

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Iida, Fumiya; Cianchetti, Matteo; Margheri, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive, timely snapshot of current research, technologies and applications of soft robotics. The different chapters, written by international experts across multiple fields of soft robotics, cover innovative systems and technologies for soft robot legged locomotion, soft robot manipulation, underwater soft robotics, biomimetic soft robotic platforms, plant-inspired soft robots, flying soft robots, soft robotics in surgery, as well as methods for their modeling and control. Based on the results of the second edition of the Soft Robotics Week, held on April 25 – 30, 2016, in Livorno, Italy, the book reports on the major research lines and novel technologies presented and discussed during the event.

  19. Towards Versatile Robots Through Open Heterogeneous Modular Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Lyder, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Robots are important tools in our everyday life. Both in industry and at the consumer level they serve the purpose of increasing our scope and extending our capabilities. Modular robots take the next step, allowing us to easily create and build various robots from a set of modules. If a problem arises, a new robot can be assembled rapidly from the existing modules, in contrast to conventional robots, which require a time consuming and expensive development process. In this thesis we define a ...

  20. Robotic architectures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mtshali, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development of mobile robotic systems, a robotic architecture plays a crucial role in interconnecting all the sub-systems and controlling the system. The design of robotic architectures for mobile autonomous robots is a challenging...

  1. Development and validation of surgical training tool: cystectomy assessment and surgical evaluation (CASE) for robot-assisted radical cystectomy for men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Ahmed A; Sexton, Kevin J; May, Paul R; Meng, Maxwell V; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Eun, Daniel D; Daneshmand, Siamak; Bochner, Bernard H; Peabody, James O; Abaza, Ronney; Skinner, Eila C; Hautmann, Richard E; Guru, Khurshid A

    2018-04-13

    We aimed to develop a structured scoring tool: cystectomy assessment and surgical evaluation (CASE) that objectively measures and quantifies performance during robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) for men. A multinational 10-surgeon expert panel collaborated towards development and validation of CASE. The critical steps of RARC in men were deconstructed into nine key domains, each assessed by five anchors. Content validation was done utilizing the Delphi methodology. Each anchor was assessed in terms of context, score concordance, and clarity. The content validity index (CVI) was calculated for each aspect. A CVI ≥ 0.75 represented consensus, and this statement was removed from the next round. This process was repeated until consensus was achieved for all statements. CASE was used to assess de-identified videos of RARC to determine reliability and construct validity. Linearly weighted percent agreement was used to assess inter-rater reliability (IRR). A logit model for odds ratio (OR) was used to assess construct validation. The expert panel reached consensus on CASE after four rounds. The final eight domains of the CASE included: pelvic lymph node dissection, development of the peri-ureteral space, lateral pelvic space, anterior rectal space, control of the vascular pedicle, anterior vesical space, control of the dorsal venous complex, and apical dissection. IRR > 0.6 was achieved for all eight domains. Experts outperformed trainees across all domains. We developed and validated a reliable structured, procedure-specific tool for objective evaluation of surgical performance during RARC. CASE may help differentiate novice from expert performances.

  2. Prospective study of robotic partial nephrectomy for renal cancer in Japan: Comparison with a historical control undergoing laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazushi; Teishima, Jun; Takenaka, Atsushi; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Hattori, Kazunori; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Horie, Shigeo; Yoshino, Yasushi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of robotic partial nephrectomy compared with those of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for T1 renal tumors in Japanese centers. Patients with a T1 renal tumor who underwent robotic partial nephrectomy were eligible for inclusion in the present study. The primary end-point consisted of three components: a negative surgical margin, no conversion to open or laparoscopic surgery and a warm ischemia time ≤25 min. We compared data from these patients with the data from a retrospective study of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy carried out in Japan. A total of 108 patients were registered in the present study; 105 underwent robotic partial nephrectomy. The proportion of patients who met the primary end-point was 91.3% (95% confidence interval 84.1-95.9%), which was significantly higher than 23.3% in the historical data. Major complications were seen in 19 patients (18.1%). The mean change in the estimated glomerular filtration rate in the operated kidney, 180 days postoperatively, was -10.8 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (95% confidence interval -12.3-9.4%). Robotic partial nephrectomy for patients with a T1 renal tumor is a safe, feasible and more effective operative method compared with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. It can be anticipated that robotic partial nephrectomy will become more widely used in Japan in the future. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. Soft Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M

    2018-04-09

    This description of "soft robotics" is not intended to be a conventional review, in the sense of a comprehensive technical summary of a developing field. Rather, its objective is to describe soft robotics as a new field-one that offers opportunities to chemists and materials scientists who like to make "things" and to work with macroscopic objects that move and exert force. It will give one (personal) view of what soft actuators and robots are, and how this class of soft devices fits into the more highly developed field of conventional "hard" robotics. It will also suggest how and why soft robotics is more than simply a minor technical "tweak" on hard robotics and propose a unique role for chemistry, and materials science, in this field. Soft robotics is, at its core, intellectually and technologically different from hard robotics, both because it has different objectives and uses and because it relies on the properties of materials to assume many of the roles played by sensors, actuators, and controllers in hard robotics. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. [Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy for preservation of fertility in early cervical cancer. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla Ortiz, David; Montalvo-Esquivel, Gonzalo; Chanona-Vilchis, José Gregorio; Herrera Gómez, Ángel; Ñamendys Silva, Silvio Antonio; Pareja Franco, Luis René

    2016-01-01

    Radical hysterectomy is the standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer. However, for women who wish to preserve fertility, radical trachelectomy is a safe and viable option. To present the first case of laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in the National Cancer Institute, and published in Mexico. Patient, 34 years old, gravid 1, caesarean 1, stage IB1 cervical cancer, squamous, wishing to preserve fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Operation time was 330minutes, and the estimated blood loss was 100ml. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology reported a tumour of 15mm with infiltration of 7mm, surgical margins without injury, and pelvic nodes without tumour. After a 12 month follow-up, the patient is having regular periods, but has not yet tried to get pregnant. No evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy is a safe alternative in young patients who wish to preserve fertility with early stage cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  6. Transitioning from video-assisted thoracic surgical lobectomy to robotics for lung cancer: are there outcomes advantages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin E; Korst, Robert J; Kletsman, Elaine; Rutledge, John R

    2014-02-01

    To determine if there are advantages to transitioning to robotics by a surgeon who is already proficient in performing video-assisted thoracic surgical (VATS) lobectomy. A single surgeon proficient in VATS lobectomy initiated a robotic lobectomy program, and a retrospective review was conducted of his patients undergoing minimally invasive lobectomy (robotics or VATS) for lung cancer between 2011 and 2012. Data collected included patient/tumor characteristics, morbidity, mortality, operative times, and length of hospital stay. Over a 24-month period, a total of 69 patients underwent minimally invasive lobectomy (35 robotic, 34 VATS). Patients in each group were similar in age and clinical stage. Robotic upper lobectomy operative times were longer than VATS (172 vs 134 minutes; P = .001), with no significant difference in lower lobectomies noted (140 vs 123 minutes; P = .1). Median length of stay was 3 days in both groups, and the median number of lymph nodes harvested was 18 (robotic) versus 16 (VATS; P = .42). Morbidity and mortality for robotic versus VATS were 11% versus 18% (P = .46) and 0% versus 3% (P = .49), respectively. There does not seem to be a significant advantage for an established VATS lobectomy surgeon to transition to robotics based on clinical outcomes. The learning curve for robotic upper lobectomies seems to be more significant than that for lower lobectomies. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resident education in robotic-assisted vertical sleeve gastrectomy: outcomes and cost-analysis of 411 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Brett L; Maduka, Richard; Ramdon, Andre; Dempsey, Daniel T; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Williams, Noel N

    2016-02-01

    Robotic technology is increasingly prevalent in bariatric surgery, yet there are national deficiencies in exposure of surgical residents to robotic techniques. The purpose of this study is to accurately characterize the perioperative outcomes of a resident teaching model using the robotic-assisted sleeve gastrectomy. University Hospital. We identified 411 consecutive patients who underwent robotic sleeve gastrectomy at our institution from a prospectively maintained administrative database. Perioperative morbidity, operative time, and supply cost of the procedure were analyzed. Mean operative time was 96.4±24.9 minutes; mean robot usage time was 63.9 minutes (range 30.0-122.0 min). Ninety-day morbidities included reoperation (0.72%), major bleeding complications (0.48%), staple line leak (0.24%), stricture (0.97%), need for blood transfusion (3.86%), surgical site infection (1.69%), deep vein thrombosis (0.48%), and pulmonary embolism (0.48%). Mortality was nil. The resident cohort achieved operative time plateaus after five consecutive cases. Subset analysis for fiscal year 2014 demonstrated significantly increased supply cost for robotic sleeve gastrectomy compared with its laparoscopic equivalent. Robotic-assisted sleeve gastrectomy can be instituted as a model for resident robotic education with rates of morbidity and operative times equivalent to historical laparoscopic controls. The robot's enhanced ergonomics and its opportunity for resident education must be weighed against its increased supply cost. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical outcomes in endometrial cancer care when the standard of care shifts from open surgery to robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Zhun Wei; Yong, Eu Leong; Low, Jeffrey Jen Hui; Ng, Joseph Soon Yau

    2012-06-01

    In Singapore, the standard of care for endometrial cancer staging remains laparotomy. Since the introduction of gynecologic robotic surgery, there have been more data comparing robotic surgery to laparoscopy in the management of endometrial cancer. This study reviewed clinical outcomes in endometrial cancer in a program that moved from laparotomy to robotic surgery. A retrospective review was performed on 124 consecutive endometrial cancer patients. Preoperative data and postoperative outcomes of 34 patients undergoing robotic surgical staging were compared with 90 patients who underwent open endometrial cancer staging during the same period and in the year before the introduction of robotics. There were no significant differences in the mean age, body mass index, rates of diabetes, hypertension, previous surgery, parity, medical conditions, size of specimens, histologic type, or stage of cancer between the robotic and the open surgery groups. The first 20 robotic-assisted cases had a mean (SD) operative time of 196 (60) minutes, and the next 14 cases had a mean time of 124 (64) minutes comparable to that for open surgery. The mean number of lymph nodes retrieved during robot-assisted staging was smaller than open laparotomy in the first 20 cases but not significantly different for the subsequent 14 cases. Robot-assisted surgery was associated with lower intraoperative blood loss (110 [24] vs 250 [83] mL, P robot-assisted endometrial cancer staging after a relatively small number of cases.

  9. Exploiting Child-Robot Aesthetic Interaction for a Social Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Kim, Dae-Won; Kang, Bo-Yeong

    2012-01-01

    A social robot interacts and communicates with humans by using the embodied knowledge gained from interactions with its social environment. In recent years, emotion has emerged as a popular concept for designing social robots. Several studies on social robots reported an increase in robot sociability through emotional imitative interactions between the robot and humans. In this paper conventional emotional interactions are extended by exploiting the aesthetic theories that the sociability of ...

  10. Evolutionary robotics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In evolutionary robotics, a suitable robot control system is developed automatically through evolution due to the interactions between the robot and its environment. It is a complicated task, as the robot and the environment constitute a highly dynamical system. Several methods have been tried by various investigators to ...

  11. Interactive Exploration Robots: Human-Robotic Collaboration and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terry

    2017-01-01

    For decades, NASA has employed different operational approaches for human and robotic missions. Human spaceflight missions to the Moon and in low Earth orbit have relied upon near-continuous communication with minimal time delays. During these missions, astronauts and mission control communicate interactively to perform tasks and resolve problems in real-time. In contrast, deep-space robotic missions are designed for operations in the presence of significant communication delay - from tens of minutes to hours. Consequently, robotic missions typically employ meticulously scripted and validated command sequences that are intermittently uplinked to the robot for independent execution over long periods. Over the next few years, however, we will see increasing use of robots that blend these two operational approaches. These interactive exploration robots will be remotely operated by humans on Earth or from a spacecraft. These robots will be used to support astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS), to conduct new missions to the Moon, and potentially to enable remote exploration of planetary surfaces in real-time. In this talk, I will discuss the technical challenges associated with building and operating robots in this manner, along with lessons learned from research conducted with the ISS and in the field.

  12. Biochemical failure after radical external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Satoshi; Imada, Hajime; Kato, Fumio; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Ohguri, Takayuki; Nakano, Keita; Korogi, Yukunori

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biochemical failures after radical external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A total of 143 patients with prostate cancer (5 cases in stage A2, 95 in stage B and 43 in stage C; 18 in low risk group, 37 in intermediate risk group, 67 in high risk group and 21 in unknown group) were included in this study. Patients of stage A2 and B underwent external irradiation of 46 Gy to the prostate gland and seminal vesicle and additional 20 Gy to the prostate gland, while patients of stage C underwent external irradiation of 66 Gy to the prostate gland and seminal vesicle including 46 Gy to the pelvis. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was done in 66 cases, and long-term hormonal therapy in 75 cases; two cases were treated with radiation therapy alone. The 3-year relapse free survival rates by stage A2, B and C were 100%, 96.7% and 88.1%, respectively. The 3-year relapse free survival rates by low, intermediate and high risk groups were 100%, 92.3% and 89.7%, respectively. Biochemical failure was noted in nine cases during the average observation term of 32.2 months; in this group the median of prostate specific antigen (PSA) value was 2.6 ng/ml, the doubling time was 8.6 months, and the term of biochemical failure was 33.2 months. Six of eight cases with biochemical failure were the neoadjuvant hormonal therapy group, but biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) curve showed no significant difference between neoadjuvant and long-term hormonal groups. It is supposed that unnecessary hormonal therapies were performed based on the nonspecific diagnosis of biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy in our group of patients. A precise criterion of biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is necessary. (author)

  13. ROBOT-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC PROSTATECTOMY: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Nesterov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retropubic radical prostatectomy (RPE is now the gold standard of treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. However, robot-assisted RPE procedures using the da Vinci system are finding increasing acceptance.Materials and methods. The authors conducted a prospective study of 60 robot-assisted prostatectomies made at the Clinic of Urology, N.I. Pirogov National Medical Surgical Center, in the period January 2009 to December 2010.Results. The duration of an operation averaged 230 min; the average amount of blood loss was 200 ml. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 2,7 days. That of urinary catheterization was 8.5 days. A normal postoperative course was noted in most cases (88,4 %. Seven patients were found to have 8 (13,3 % mild and moderate complications. A pathohistological study revealed a positive surgical margin of resection in 21,7 % of the patients, extracapsular tumor growth in 21,7 %, and seminal vesicle invasion in 23,3 %. Tumor-affected regional lymph nodes were detected in 1 (1,7 % patient. In our observed series, 82 and 93 % of the subjects completely retained urine after 6 and 12 moths, respectively. Throughout the follow-up, erectile function recovered in 7 of the 15 patients undergoing a nerve-sparing surgical procedure.Conclusion. Postoperative results in our series of interventions are comparable to those obtained in the studies by Russian and foreign colleagues at the early stage of mastering this procedure. By considering a few observations, it is today difficult to say that our study is valid in the context of evidence-based medicine. Estimation of the benefits of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy calls for long-term multicenter randomized trials.

  14. How does the robot affect outcomes? A retrospective review of open, laparoscopic, and robotic Heller myotomy for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaligram, Abhijit; Unnirevi, Jayaraj; Simorov, Anton; Kothari, Vishal M; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2012-04-01

    Robotic techniques are routinely used in urological and gynecological procedures; however, their role in general surgical procedures is limited. A robotic technique has been successfully adopted for a minimally invasive Heller myotomy procedure for achalasia. This study aims to compare perioperative outcomes following open, laparoscopic, and robotic Heller myotomy. This study is a multicenter, retrospective analysis utilizing a large administrative database. The University Health System Consortium (UHC) is an alliance between academic medical centers and affiliate hospitals. The UHC database was accessed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes and analyzed. 2,683 patients with achalasia underwent Heller myotomy between October 2007 and June 2011. Myotomy was performed by open surgery (OM) in 418 patients, by laparoscopic approach (LM) in 2,116, and by robotic approach (RM) in 149. Comparison between LM and RM groups demonstrated no significant difference in mortality (0.14 vs. 0.0%; P = 1), morbidity (5.19 vs. 4.02%; P = 0.7), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (6.62 vs. 3.36%; P = 0.12), length of stay (LOS) (2.70 ± 3.87 days vs. 2.42 ± 2.69 days; P = 0.34), or 30-day readmission (1.41 vs. 2.84%; P = 0.27). However, hospital costs were significantly lower for the LM group (US $7,441 ± 7,897 vs. US $9,415 ± 5,515; P = 0.0028). Comparison between OM and RM demonstrated significant lower morbidity (9.08 vs. 4.02%; P = 0.02), ICU admission rate (14.01 vs. 3.36%, P = 0.0002), and LOS (4.42 ± 5.25 days vs. 2.42 ± 2.69 days; P = 0.0001). The perioperative outcomes are superior in LM and RM groups when compared with OM. The outcomes for the LM and RM group are comparable, with the robotic group having slightly improved results, although with increased costs. We conclude that robotic surgery is equivalent in safety and efficacy to laparoscopic Heller myotomy, and feel that the increased cost should come down as

  15. Retention of laparoscopic and robotic skills among medical students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Megan S; Thomaier, Lauren; Abernethy, Melinda G; Chen, Chi Chiung Grace

    2017-08-01

    Although simulation training beneficially contributes to traditional surgical training, there are less objective data on simulation skills retention. To investigate the retention of laparoscopic and robotic skills after simulation training. We present the second stage of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial in which 40 simulation-naïve medical students were randomly assigned to practice peg transfer tasks on either laparoscopic (N = 20, Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery, Venture Technologies Inc., Waltham, MA) or robotic (N = 20, dV-Trainer, Mimic, Seattle, WA) platforms. In the first stage, two expert surgeons evaluated participants on both tasks before (Stage 1: Baseline) and immediately after training (Stage 1: Post-training) using a modified validated global rating scale of laparoscopic and robotic operative performance. In Stage 2, participants were evaluated on both tasks 11-20 weeks after training. Of the 40 students who participated in Stage 1, 23 (11 laparoscopic and 12 robotic) underwent repeat evaluation. During Stage 2, there were no significant differences between groups in objective or subjective measures for the laparoscopic task. Laparoscopic-trained participants' performances on the laparoscopic task were improved during Stage 2 compared to baseline measured by time to task completion, but not by the modified global rating scale. During the robotic task, the robotic-trained group demonstrated superior economy of motion (p = .017), Tissue Handling (p = .020), and fewer errors (p = .018) compared to the laparoscopic-trained group. Robotic skills acquisition from baseline with no significant deterioration as measured by modified global rating scale scores was observed among robotic-trained participants during Stage 2. Robotic skills acquired through simulation appear to be better maintained than laparoscopic simulation skills. This study is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02370407).

  16. Temporal trends and predictors of pelvic lymph node dissection in open or minimally invasive radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifer, Andrew H; Elkin, Elena B; Lowrance, William T; Denton, Brian; Jacks, Lindsay; Yee, David S; Coleman, Jonathan A; Laudone, Vincent P; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-09-01

    Pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) is an important component of prostate cancer staging and treatment, especially for surgical patients who have high-risk tumor features. It is not clear how the shift from open radical prostatectomy (ORP) to minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) has affected the use of PLND. The objectives of this study were to identify predictors of PLND and to assess the impact of surgical technique in a contemporary, population-based cohort. In Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry data linked with Medicare claims, the authors identified men who underwent ORP or MIRP for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2007. The impact of surgical approach on PLND was evaluated, and interactions were examined between surgical procedure, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and Gleason score with the analysis controlled for patient and tumor characteristics. Of 6608 men who underwent ORP or MIRP, 70% (n = 4600) underwent PLND. The use of PLND declined over time both overall and within subgroups defined by procedure type. PLND was 5 times more likely in men who underwent ORP than in men who underwent MIRP when the analysis was controlled for patient and tumor characteristics. Elevated PSA and biopsy Gleason score, but not clinical stage, were associated with a greater odds of PLND in both the ORP group and the MIRP group. However, the magnitude of the association between these factors and PLND was significantly greater for patients in the ORP group. PLND was less common among men who underwent MIRP, independent of tumor risk factors. A decline in PLND rates was not fully explained by an increase in MIRP. The authors concluded that these trends may signal a surgical approach-dependent disparity in prostate cancer staging and therapy. Cancer 2011 © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  17. ROBOT LITERACY AN APPROACH FOR SHARING SOCIETY WITH INTELLIGENT ROBOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetsugu Suto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept of media education called “robot literacy” is proposed. Here, robot literacy refers to the means of forming an appropriate relationship with intelligent robots. It can be considered a kind of media literacy. People who were born after the Internet age can be considered “digital natives” who have new morals and values and behave differently than previous generations in Internet societies. This can cause various problems among different generations. Thus, the necessity of media literacy education is increasing. Internet technologies, as well as robotics technologies are growing rapidly, and people who are born after the “home robot age,” whom the author calls “robot natives,” will be expected to have a certain degree of “robot literacy.” In this paper, the concept of robot literacy is defined and an approach to robot literacy education is discussed.

  18. Surgical Outcomes After Open, Laparoscopic, and Robotic Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Yoon; Roh, Kun Ho; Kim, You-Na; Cho, Minah; Lim, Seung Hyun; Son, Taeil; Hyung, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyoung-Il

    2017-07-01

    In contrast to the significant advantages of laparoscopic versus open gastrectomy, robotic gastrectomy has shown little benefit over laparoscopic gastrectomy. This study aimed to compare multi-dimensional aspects of surgical outcomes after open, laparoscopic, and robotic gastrectomy. Data from 915 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy by one surgeon between March 2009 and May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Perioperative parameters were analyzed for short-term outcomes. Surgical success was defined as the absence of conversion to open surgery, major complications, readmission, positive resection margin, or fewer than 16 retrieved lymph nodes. This study investigated 241 patients undergoing open gastrectomy, 511 patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy, and 173 patients undergoing robotic gastrectomy. For each approach, the respective incidences were as follows: conversion to open surgery (not applicable, 0.4%, and 0%; p = 0.444), in-hospital major complications (5.8, 2.7, and 1.2%; p = 0.020), delayed complications requiring readmission (2.9, 2.0, and 1.2%; p = 0.453), positive resection margin (1.7, 0, and 0%; p = 0.003), and inadequate number of retrieved lymph nodes (0.4, 4.1, and 1.7%; p = 0.010). Compared with open and laparoscopic surgery, robotic gastrectomy had the highest surgical success rate (90, 90.8, and 96.0%). Learning-curve analysis of success using cumulative sum plots showed success with the robotic approach from the start. Multivariate analyses identified age, sex, and gastrectomy extent as significant independent parameters affecting surgical success. Surgical approach was not a contributing factor. Open, laparoscopic, and robotic gastrectomy exhibited different incidences and causes of surgical failure. Robotic gastrectomy produced the best surgical outcomes, although the approach method itself was not an independent factor for success.

  19. Robotic buildings(s)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic building to be in the last decade prototypically implemented. In this context, robotic building implies both physically built robotic environments and robotically

  20. Risk of incisional hernia after minimally invasive and open radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Sigrid V; Ehdaie, Behfar; Atoria, Coral L; Elkin, Elena B; Eastham, James A

    2013-11-01

    The number of radical prostatectomies has increased. Many urologists have shifted from the open surgical approach to minimally invasive techniques. It is not clear whether the risk of post-prostatectomy incisional hernia varies by surgical approach. In the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data set we identified men 66 years old or older who were treated with minimally invasive or open radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer diagnosed from 2003 to 2007. The main study outcome was incisional hernia repair, as identified in Medicare claims after prostatectomy. We also examined the frequency of umbilical, inguinal and other hernia repairs. We identified 3,199 and 6,795 patients who underwent minimally invasive and open radical prostatectomy, respectively. The frequency of incisional hernia repair was 5.3% at a median 3.1-year followup in the minimally invasive group and 1.9% at a 4.4-year median followup in the open group, corresponding to an incidence rate of 16.1 and 4.5/1,000 person-years, respectively. Compared to the open technique, the minimally invasive procedure was associated with more than a threefold increased risk of incisional hernia repair when controlling for patient and disease characteristics (adjusted HR 3.39, 95% CI 2.63-4.38, p<0.0001). Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy was associated with an attenuated but increased risk of any hernia repair compared with open radical prostatectomy (adjusted HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.29-1.70, p<0.0001). Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy was associated with a significantly increased risk of incisional hernia compared with open radical prostatectomy. This is a potentially remediable complication of prostate cancer surgery that warrants increased vigilance with respect to surgical technique. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cloud Robotics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Koken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud robotics is a rapidly evolving field that allows robots to offload computation-intensive and storage-intensive jobs into the cloud. Robots are limited in terms of computational capacity, memory and storage. Cloud provides unlimited computation power, memory, storage and especially collaboration opportunity. Cloud-enabled robots are divided into two categories as standalone and networked robots. This article surveys cloud robotic platforms, standalone and networked robotic works such as grasping, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM and monitoring.

  2. Distributed Robotics Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Distributed robotics takes many forms, for instance, multirobots, modular robots, and self-reconfigurable robots. The understanding and development of such advanced robotic systems demand extensive knowledge in engineering and computer science. In this paper, we describe the concept of a distribu......Distributed robotics takes many forms, for instance, multirobots, modular robots, and self-reconfigurable robots. The understanding and development of such advanced robotic systems demand extensive knowledge in engineering and computer science. In this paper, we describe the concept...... to be changed, related to multirobot control and human-robot interaction control from virtual to physical representation. The proposed system is valuable for bringing a vast number of issues into education – such as parallel programming, distribution, communication protocols, master dependency, connectivity...

  3. Clinicopathologic features of incidental prostatic adenocarcinoma in radical cystoprostatectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuruskan Hakan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to review all features of incidentally discovered prostate adenocarcinoma in patients undergoing radical cystoprostatectomy for bladder cancer. Methods The medical charts of 300 male patients who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy for bladder cancer between 1997 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 62 (range 51-75 years. Results Prostate adenocarcinoma was present in 60 (20% of 300 specimens. All were acinar adenocarcinoma. Of these, 40 (66.7% were located in peripheral zone, 20 (33.3% had pT2a tumor, 12 (20% had pT2b tumor, 22(36.7% had pT2c and, 6 (10% had pT3a tumor. Gleason score was 6 or less in 48 (80% patients. Surgical margins were negative in 54 (90% patients, and tumor volume was less than 0.5 cc in 23 (38.3% patients. Of the 60 incidentally detected cases of prostate adenocarcinoma 40 (66.7% were considered clinically significant. Conclusion Incidentally detected prostate adenocarcinoma is frequently observed in radical cystoprostatectomy specimens. The majority are clinically significant.

  4. Robot Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Lenarcic, Jadran; Stanišić, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the area of robot mechanisms, primarily considering industrial manipulators and humanoid arms. The book is intended for both teaching and self-study. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of kinematic analysis and the design of robot mechanisms. The coverage of topics is untypical. The focus is on robot kinematics. The book creates a balance between theoretical and practical aspects in the development and application of robot mechanisms, and includes the latest achievements and trends in robot science and technology.

  5. Robots de servicio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Aracil

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El término Robots de Servicio apareció a finales de los años 80 como una necesidad de desarrollar máquinas y sistemas capaces de trabajar en entornos diferentes a los fabriles. Los Robots de Servicio tenían que poder trabajar en entornos noestructurados, en condiciones ambientales cambiantes y con una estrecha interacción con los humanos. En 1995 fue creado por la IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, el Technical Committee on Service Robots, y este comité definió en el año 2000 las áreas de aplicación de los Robots de Servicios, que se pueden dividir en dos grandes grupos: 1 sectores productivos no manufactureros tales como edificación, agricultura, naval, minería, medicina, etc. y 2 sectores de servicios propiamente dichos: asistencia personal, limpieza, vigilancia, educación, entretenimiento, etc. En este trabajo se hace una breve revisión de los principales conceptos y aplicaciones de los robots de servicio. Palabras clave: Robots de servicio, robots autónomos, robots de exteriores, robots de educación y entretenimiento, robots caminantes y escaladores, robots humanoides

  6. Robot-assisted laparoscopic versus open partial nephrectomy in patients with chronic kidney disease: A propensity score-matched comparative analysis of surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Tachibana, Hidekazu; Iizuka, Junpei; Omae, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-07-01

    To compare surgical outcomes between robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and open partial nephrectomy in patients with chronic kidney disease. Of 550 patients who underwent partial nephrectomy between 2012 and 2015, 163 patients with T1-2 renal tumors who had an estimated glomerular filtration rate between 30 and 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , and underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy or open partial nephrectomy were retrospectively analyzed. To minimize selection bias between the two surgical methods, patient variables were adjusted by 1:1 propensity score matching. The present study included 75 patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and 88 undergoing open partial nephrectomy. After propensity score matching, 40 patients were included in each operative group. The mean preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate was 49 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . The mean ischemia time was 21 min in robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (warm ischemia) and 35 min in open partial nephrectomy (cold ischemia). Preservation of the estimated glomerular filtration rate 3-6 months postoperatively was not significantly different between robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and open partial nephrectomy (92% vs 91%, P = 0.9348). Estimated blood loss was significantly lower in the robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy group than in the open partial nephrectomy group (104 vs 185 mL, P = 0.0025). The postoperative length of hospital stay was shorter in the robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy group than in the open partial nephrectomy group (P negative surgical margin status were not significantly different between the two groups. In our experience, robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and open partial nephrectomy provide similar outcomes in terms of functional preservation and perioperative complications among patients with chronic kidney disease. However, a lower estimated blood loss and

  7. Filigree Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Evers, Henrik Leander; Clausen Nørgaard, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Filigree Robotics experiments with the combination of traditional ceramic craft with robotic fabrication in order to generate a new narrative of fine three-dimensional ceramic ornament for architecture.......Filigree Robotics experiments with the combination of traditional ceramic craft with robotic fabrication in order to generate a new narrative of fine three-dimensional ceramic ornament for architecture....

  8. Hydraulic bilateral construction robot; Yuatsushiki bilateral kensetsu robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehata, K.; Mori, N. [Kayaba Industry Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-05-15

    Concerning a hydraulic bilateral construction robot, its system constitution, structures and functions of important components, and the results of some tests are explained, and the researches conducted at Gifu University are described. The construction robot in this report is a servo controlled system of a version developed from the mini-shovel now available in the market. It is equipped, in addition to an electrohydraulic servo control system, with various sensors for detecting the robot attitude, vibration, and load state, and with a camera for visualizing the surrounding landscape. It is also provided with a bilateral joy stick which is a remote control actuator capable of working sensation feedback and with a rocking unit that creates robot movements of rolling, pitching, and heaving. The construction robot discussed here, with output increased and response faster thanks to the employment of a hydraulic driving system for the aim of building a robot system superior in performance to the conventional model designed primarily for heavy duty, proves after tests to be a highly sophisticated remotely controlled robot control system. (NEDO)

  9. Robotics education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, O.

    1984-01-01

    Robotics education courses are rapidly spreading throughout the nation's colleges and universities. Engineering schools are offering robotics courses as part of their mechanical or manufacturing engineering degree program. Two year colleges are developing an Associate Degree in robotics. In addition to regular courses, colleges are offering seminars in robotics and related fields. These seminars draw excellent participation at costs running up to $200 per day for each participant. The last one drew 275 people from Texas to Virginia. Seminars are also offered by trade associations, private consulting firms, and robot vendors. IBM, for example, has the Robotic Assembly Institute in Boca Raton and charges about $1,000 per week for course. This is basically for owners of IBM robots. Education (and training) can be as short as one day or as long as two years. Here is the educational pattern that is developing now

  10. Increased recombination of CH3 radicals on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodetsky, A.E.; Zalavutdinov, R.Kh.; Zakharov, A.P.; Vnukov, S.P.; Varshavskaya, I.G.; Makhankov, A.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Federici, G.

    2005-01-01

    By using a so-called 'stream technique', which consists of flowing gas in laminar regime along a quartz tube, we determine that CH 3 radicals are completely removed from the pumped mixture (CH 4 /C X H Y /H 2 /H/CH 3 ) after several hundred collisions with the inner surface of a stainless steel insert (T = 380-470 K). The methyl sticking coefficient decreased to ∼10 -6 and the recombination coefficient increased up to ∼0.01 at impingement with the metal surface. After passing through the heated zone no hydrocarbon deposition occurred at 300 K. However, unsaturated hydrocarbons, which formed in discharge zone and appeared as a result of interaction of radicals with stainless steel, condensed in a liquid phase at a temperature of ∼130 K and partial pressure of 0.01-0.1 Pa. Liquid films underwent partial polymerization and formed island deposits, which were stable at 300 K

  11. Kinetic determinations of accurate relative oxidation potentials of amines with reactive radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Ian R; Wosinska, Zofia M; Farid, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Accurate oxidation potentials for organic compounds are critical for the evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of their radical cations. Except when using a specialized apparatus, electrochemical oxidation of molecules with reactive radical cations is usually an irreversible process, providing peak potentials, E(p), rather than thermodynamically meaningful oxidation potentials, E(ox). In a previous study on amines with radical cations that underwent rapid decarboxylation, we estimated E(ox) by correcting the E(p) from cyclic voltammetry with rate constants for decarboxylation obtained using laser flash photolysis. Here we use redox equilibration experiments to determine accurate relative oxidation potentials for the same amines. We also describe an extension of these experiments to show how relative oxidation potentials can be obtained in the absence of equilibrium, from a complete kinetic analysis of the reversible redox kinetics. The results provide support for the previous cyclic voltammetry/laser flash photolysis method for determining oxidation potentials.

  12. Robotic transverse colectomy for mid-transverse colon cancer: surgical techniques and oncologic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung Uk; Park, Yoonah; Lee, Kang Young; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2015-06-01

    Robot-assisted surgery for colon cancer has been reported in many studies, most of which worked on right and/or sigmoid colectomy. The aim of this study was to report our experience of robotic transverse colectomy with an intracorporeal anastomosis, provide details of the surgical technique, and present the theoretical benefits of the procedure. This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data of robotic surgery for colorectal cancer performed by a single surgeon between May 2007 and February 2011. Out of 162 consecutive cases, we identified three robotic transverse colectomies, using a hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomosis. Two males and one female underwent transverse colectomies for malignant or premalignant disease. The mean docking time, time spent using the robot, and total operative time were 5, 268, and 307 min, respectively. There were no conversions to open or conventional laparoscopic technique. The mean length of specimen and number of lymph nodes retrieved were 14.1 cm and 6.7, respectively. One patient suffered from a wound seroma and recovered with conservative management. The mean hospital stay was 8.7 days. After a median follow-up of 72 months, there were no local or systemic recurrences. Robotic transverse colectomy seems to be a safe and feasible technique. It may minimize the necessity of mobilizing both colonic flexures, with facilitated intracorporeal hand-sewn anastomosis. However, further prospective studies with a larger number of patients are required to draw firm conclusions.

  13. Hydroxyl-radical-induced oxidation of cyclic dipeptides: Reactions of free peptide radicals and their peroxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieden, O.J.

    1989-01-01

    In the course of this study investigations were carried out into the reactions of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms with cyclic dipeptides as well as the subsequent reactions of peptide radicals and their peroxyl radicals in aqueous solution. The radiolysis products formed in the absence and presence of oxygen or transient metal complexes were characterized and determined on a quantitative basis. The linking of information from product analyses to the kinetic data for transient species obtained by time-resolving UV/VIS and conductivity measurements (pulse radiolysis) as well as computer-assisted simulations of individual events during the reaction permitted an evaluation of the mechanisms underlying the various processes and an identification of interim products with short life-times, which did or did not belong to the group of radicals. Through the characterization of key reactions of radicals and peroxyl radicals of this substance class a major advance has been made towards a better understanding of the role of radicals in the peptide compound and the mechanisms involved in indirect radiation effects on long-chain peptides and proteins. (orig.) [de

  14. Robotic resections in hepatobiliary oncology - initial experience with Xi da Vinci system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, M; Patkar, S; Tamhankar, A; Garg, S; Bhandare, M; Goel, M

    2017-01-01

    Minimal invasive surgery has proven its advantages over open surgeries in the perioperative period. Food and Drug Administration approved da Vinci robot in 2000. The latest version, da Vinci Xi system has a mobile tower-based robot with several modifications to improve the functionality, versatility, and operative ease. None of the centers have reported exclusively on hepatobiliary oncology using the da Vinci Xi system. We report our initial experience. To study the feasibility, advantages, and discuss the operative technique of da Vinci Xi system in hepatobiliary oncology. Data were analyzed retrospectively from a prospectively maintained database from June 2015 to October 2016. Twenty-five patients with suspected or proven hepatobiliary malignancies were operated. Total robotic technique using da Vinci Xi system was used. Demographic details and perioperative outcomes were noted. Of the 25 surgeries, 14 patients had a suspected gallbladder malignancy, 11 patients had primary or metastatic liver tumor. Median age was 53 years. The average duration of surgery was 225 min with a median blood loss 150 ml. The median postoperative stay was 4 days. The median nodal yield for radical cholecystectomy was seven. Five patients required conversion. Two of these developed postoperative morbidity. Robotic surgery for hepatobiliary oncology is feasible and can be performed safely in experienced hands. Increasing experience in this field may equal or even prove advantageous over conventional or laparoscopic approach in future. A cautious approach with judicious patient selection is the key to establishing robotic surgery as a standard surgical approach.

  15. A radical approach to radical innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInnovation pays. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google – nearly every one of today’s most successful companies has a talent for developing radical new ideas. But how best to encourage radical initiative taking from employees, and does their previous success or failure at it play a role?

  16. Lingual Thyroid Excision with Transoral Robotic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Ersoy Callıoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic thyroid gland may be detected at any place between foramen caecaum and normal thyroid localization due to inadequacy of the embryological migration of the thyroid gland. It has a prevalence varying between 1/10.000 and 1/100000 in the community. Usually follow-up without treatment is preferred except for obstructive symptoms, bleeding, and suspicion of malignity. Main symptoms are dysphagia, dysphonia, bleeding, dyspnea, and obstructive sleep apnea. In symptomatic cases, the first described method in surgical treatment is open approach since it is a region difficult to have access to. However, this approach has an increased risk of morbidity and postoperative complications. Transoral robotic surgery, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure, has advantages such as larger three-dimensional point of view and ease of manipulation due to robotic instruments. In this report, a case at the age of 49 who presented to our clinic with obstructive symptoms increasing within the last year and was found to have lingual thyroid and underwent excision of ectopic thyroid tissue by da Vinci surgical system is presented.

  17. Robot Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Putnam, Lance Jonathan

    This paper considers art-based research practice in robotics through a discussion of our course and relevant research projects in autonomous art. The undergraduate course integrates basic concepts of computer science, robotic art, live performance and aesthetic theory. Through practice...... in robotics research (such as aesthetics, culture and perception), we believe robot aesthetics is an important area for research in contemporary aesthetics....

  18. Cystoscopic temporary ureteral catheterization during radical vaginal and abdominal trachelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Sonoda, Yukio; Black, Destin; Chi, Dennis S; Barakat, Richard R

    2006-11-01

    To describe the role of temporary retrograde ureteral catheterization at the time of fertility-sparing radical vaginal or abdominal trachelectomy in women with early-stage cervical cancer. We analyzed a prospectively maintained database of all patients with cervical cancer who were explored for radical vaginal or abdominal trachelectomy at our institution. Cystourethroscopy and ureteral catheterization were performed prior to the vaginal or abdominal operation in all patients, except two pediatric ones. Temporary bilateral retrograde ureteral catheters were planned for all patients as part of our routine procedure to facilitate identification of the distal ureters. 5Fr whistle-tip or open-ended catheters were used and usually advanced to approximately 20 cm. Catheters were removed at the end of the operation in all cases. All catheters were inserted by a gynecologic oncology fellow or attending. Between 11/01 and 12/05, 40 patients were taken to the operating room for planned fertility-sparing radical vaginal or abdominal trachelectomy. We previously reported on two pediatric patients; they are excluded from this report. The median age for adult patients was 32 years (mean, 31.6; range, 23-40). International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage included IB1 (26), IA2 (6), and IA1 with lymphovascular invasion (6). Thirty-four patients underwent radical vaginal trachelectomy and four underwent a radical abdominal trachelectomy. Two (5%) of 38 patients required immediate completion radical hysterectomy due to extensive endocervical disease (one in the vaginal group and one in the abdominal group). Bilateral ureteral catheters were inserted successfully in 37 (97%) of 38 patients and facilitated identification of the distal ureter during the dissection. In one case, the right ureteral orifice could not be successfully catheterized, and the case was completed with unilateral catheterization. The estimated time to perform this part of the operation was

  19. Robotic surgery twice performed in the treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma with deep jaundice: delayed right hemihepatectomy following the right-hepatic vascular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenyu; Liu, Quanda; Chen, Junzhou; Duan, Weihong; Dong, Maosheng; Mu, Peiyuan; Cheng, Di; Che, Honglei; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoya; Zhou, Ningxin

    2014-10-01

    To explore and find a new method to treat hilar cholangiocarcinoma with deep jaundice assisted by Da Vinci robot. A hilar cholangiocarcinoma patient of type Bismuch-Corlette IIIa was found with deep jaundice (total bilirubin: 635 µmol/L). On the first admission, we performed Da Vinci robotic surgery including drainage of left hepatic duct, dissection of right hepatic vessels (right portal vein and right hepatic artery), and placement of right-hepatic vascular control device. Three weeks later on the second admission when the jaundice disappeared we occluded right-hepatic vascular discontinuously for 6 days and then sustained later. On the third admission after 3 weeks of right-hepatic vascular control, the right hemihepatectomy was performed by Da Vinci robot for the second time. The future liver remnant after the right-hepatic vascular control increased from 35% to 47%. The volume of left lobe increased by 368 mL. When the total bilirubin and liver function were all normal, right hemihepatectomy was performed by Da Vinci robot 10 weeks after the first operation. The removal of atrophic right hepatic lobe with tumor in bile duct was found with no pathologic cancer remaining in the margin. The patient was followed up at our outpatient clinic every 3 months and no tumor recurrence occurs by now (1 y). Under the Da Vinci robotic surgical system, a programmed treatment can be achieved: first, the hepatic vessels were controlled gradually together with biliary drainage, which results in liver's partial atrophy and compensatory hypertrophy in the other part. Then a radical hepatectomy could be achieved. Such programmed hepatectomy provides a new treatment for patients of hilar cholangiocarcinoma with deep jaundice who have the possibility of radical heptolobectomy.

  20. Robots: l'embarras de richesses [:survey of robots available

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meieran, H.; Brittain, K.; Sturkey, R.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of robots available for use in the nuclear industry is presented. Two new categories of mobile robots have been introduced since the last survey (April 1987): pipe crawlers and underwater robots. The number of robots available has risen to double what it was two years ago and four times what it was in 1986. (U.K.)

  1. Surgical complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy: A single institutional experience of seven years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj K Goyal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the surgical complications of open retropubic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: Fifty-nine cases of localized prostate cancer underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy in our department in the last seven years. Standard technique of open retropubic radical prostatectomy as described by Walsh was used. During follow-up cancer control and quality of life indices (potency and urinary continence were noted. Result: Postoperative recovery of all patients except one was excellent. This patient required cardio-respiratory support and nine units of blood transfusion. Forty-nine out of 52 patients were continent, two had stress incontinence and one was totally incontinent at one year. Bladder neck contracture was present in eight out of 52 patients at one year. Forty-five patients were impotent at one year with or without oral tablet sildenafil. Cancer control was present in 45 out of 52 cases. Seven cases had biochemical failure at one year. Conclusion: Though retropubic radical prostatectomy is the standard treatment for early prostate cancer it is not without complications. It has a steep learning curve. More number of cases and refinement in technique is required to achieve world-class results.

  2. Robots Social Embodiment in Autonomous Mobile Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Duffy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at demonstrating the inherent advantages of embracing a strong notion of social embodiment in designing a real-world robot control architecture with explicit ?intelligent? social behaviour between a collective of robots. It develops the current thinking on embodiment beyond the physical by demonstrating the importance of social embodiment. A social framework develops the fundamental social attributes found when more than one robot co-inhabit a physical space. The social metaphors of identity, character, stereotypes and roles are presented and implemented within a real-world social robot paradigm in order to facilitate the realisation of explicit social goals.

  3. Self-localization for an autonomous mobile robot based on an omni-directional vision system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shu-Yin; Lin, Kuang-Yu; Chia, Tsorng-Lin

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we designed an autonomous mobile robot based on the rules of the Federation of International Robotsoccer Association (FIRA) RoboSot category, integrating the techniques of computer vision, real-time image processing, dynamic target tracking, wireless communication, self-localization, motion control, path planning, and control strategy to achieve the contest goal. The self-localization scheme of the mobile robot is based on the algorithms featured in the images from its omni-directional vision system. In previous works, we used the image colors of the field goals as reference points, combining either dual-circle or trilateration positioning of the reference points to achieve selflocalization of the autonomous mobile robot. However, because the image of the game field is easily affected by ambient light, positioning systems exclusively based on color model algorithms cause errors. To reduce environmental effects and achieve the self-localization of the robot, the proposed algorithm is applied in assessing the corners of field lines by using an omni-directional vision system. Particularly in the mid-size league of the RobotCup soccer competition, selflocalization algorithms based on extracting white lines from the soccer field have become increasingly popular. Moreover, white lines are less influenced by light than are the color model of the goals. Therefore, we propose an algorithm that transforms the omni-directional image into an unwrapped transformed image, enhancing the extraction features. The process is described as follows: First, radical scan-lines were used to process omni-directional images, reducing the computational load and improving system efficiency. The lines were radically arranged around the center of the omni-directional camera image, resulting in a shorter computational time compared with the traditional Cartesian coordinate system. However, the omni-directional image is a distorted image, which makes it difficult to recognize the

  4. Robotic surgery in complicated gynecologic diseases: experience of Tri-Service General Hospital in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shun-Jen; Lin, Chi-Kung; Fu, Pei-Te; Liu, Yung-Liang; Sun, Cheng-Chian; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Yu, Mu-Hsien; Lai, Hung-Cheng

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been the trend in various specialties and continues to evolve as new technology develops. The development of robotic surgery in gynecology remains in its infancy. The present study reports the first descriptive series of robotic surgery in complicated gynecologic diseases in Taiwan. From March 2009 to February 2011, the records of patients undergoing robotic surgery using the da Vinci Surgical System were reviewed for patient demographics, indications, operative time, hospital stay, conversion to laparotomy, and complications. Sixty cases were reviewed in the present study. Forty-nine patients had benign gynecologic diseases, and 11 patients had malignancies. These robot-assisted laparoscopic procedures include nine hysterectomy, 15 subtotal hysterectomy, 13 myomectomy, eight staging operation, two radical hysterectomy, five ovarian cystectomy, one bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and myomectomy, two resections of deep pelvic endometriosis, one pelvic adhesiolysis, three sacrocolpopexy and one tuboplasty. Thirty-three patients had prior pelvic surgery, and one had a history of pelvic radiotherapy. Adhesiolysis was necessary in 38 patients to complete the whole operation. Robotic myomectomy was easily accomplished in patients with huge uterus or multiple myomas. The suturing of myometrium or cervical stump after ligation of the uterine arteries minimized the blood loss. In addition, it was much easier to dissect severe pelvic adhesions. The dissection of para-aortic lymph nodes can be easily accomplished. All these surgeries were performed smoothly without ureteral, bladder or bowel injury. The present analyses include various complicated gynecologic conditions, which make the estimation of the effectiveness of robotic surgery in each situation individually not appropriate. However, our experiences do show that robotic surgery is feasible and safe for patients with complicated gynecologic diseases. Copyright © 2012. Published by

  5. Quality of life in advanced maxillary sinus cancer after radical versus conservative maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liting; Liu, Dan; Guo, Qiyun; Shen, Bin

    2013-07-01

    A study of patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer who underwent radical or conservative maxillectomy was performed to show the differences between the 2 groups in patients' survival rate and quality of life (QOL). A total of 61 advanced maxillary sinus cancer patients from Weifang People's Hospital in China were traced: 27 radical maxillectomy and 34 conservative maxillectomy. Survival rate was compared between the 2 groups. Quality of life assessments were performed at the time of preoperation as well as 6, 12, and 18 months after the operation. Measures included the University of Washington-QOL scale (UW-QOL) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The UW-QOL scale scores of the composite score, appearance, activity, recreation, swallowing, speech, and chewing in the conservative surgical group were much higher than those in the radical surgical group. However, there is no big difference in total survival rate between these 2 groups. Also, no significant difference can be seen in the scores of pain, employment, and shoulder between the 2 groups. At the 6-month follow-up, the radical maxillectomy had more effects on anxiety than the conservative maxillectomy, while they are almost equally effective on depression. The 12-month and 18-month follow-ups showed that the radical maxillectomy made a greater impact on both anxiety and depression than the conservative maxillectomy. Conservative maxillectomy is more effective than radical maxillectomy to preserve the QOL of patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer.

  6. Radicalization In Pakistan And The Spread Of Radical Islam In Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahir ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is pertinent to mention that radicalism is not intrinsic to Islam and radical interpretations of the religion or for that matter may occur within any way of life and religion Saikal 2003 and yet the question remains as to why Muslims in certain geographical regions have more radical approaches towards their religion and also that what are the causes of such radicalization. Becoming a radical Muslim is not even a matter of a day nor is it a sudden process. There are several reasons behind making a person radical peaceful angry smiling or tolerant. For knowing the reason behind radicalization or radicals persons one has to understand the causes. Tracing these causes is one of the ways to eliminate such behavior. The first step in the elimination of the radical sentiments in a person is to develop peace in his personality Fair Malhotra amp Shapiro 2010. The chapter which has been addressed here is going to shed light on the roots and symptoms of the radicalism. There will be a brief discussion on how the roots of radicalism can be traced and can be eliminated. The assessment and discussion will be conducted on the parameters of the economy media politics and theology from social cultural point of view. According to the analysis of Ahrari 2000 political factor is one of the major and direct factors which have resulted in causing of the radicalism. These factors however intertwine with one another. Radical actions cannot take place only because of the political factors.

  7. Robotic intelligence kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-11-17

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes a robot intelligence kernel (RIK) that includes a multi-level architecture and a dynamic autonomy structure. The multi-level architecture includes a robot behavior level for defining robot behaviors, that incorporate robot attributes and a cognitive level for defining conduct modules that blend an adaptive interaction between predefined decision functions and the robot behaviors. The dynamic autonomy structure is configured for modifying a transaction capacity between an operator intervention and a robot initiative and may include multiple levels with at least a teleoperation mode configured to maximize the operator intervention and minimize the robot initiative and an autonomous mode configured to minimize the operator intervention and maximize the robot initiative. Within the RIK at least the cognitive level includes the dynamic autonomy structure.

  8. Robotic Enucleation for Benign or Borderline Tumours of the Pancreas: A Retrospective Analysis and Comparison from a High-Volume Centre in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jia-Bin; Qin, Kai; Li, Hua; Wu, Zhi-Chong; Zhan, Qian; Deng, Xia-Xing; Chen, Hao; Shen, Bai-Yong; Peng, Cheng-Hong; Li, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    Enucleation is increasingly performed for benign or borderline tumours of the pancreas because it is a parenchyma-sparing and less invasive procedure compared to conventional pancreatectomy, which reduces the risk of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. This study retrospectively evaluated and compared the pre-, intra-, and post-operative clinical characteristics after open and robotic approaches for pancreatic enucleation. Fifty-six cases of enucleation for benign or borderline tumours of the pancreas treated from March 2010 to July 2015 were identified by a retrospective search. These included 25 patients who underwent an open approach and 31 patients who underwent a robotic approach. The clinical characteristics were extracted and compared. The two groups had a similar location and pathology of the tumour. The robotic group had a significantly shorter operation time and significantly less blood loss than the open group. The rates of clinical pancreatic fistula (PF) formation and major complications were similar. The robotic approach could be applied for a tumour on the right side of the pancreas without increasing the incidence of clinical PF or other major complications. The patients with clinical PF had a significantly shorter distance between the lesion and the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Robotic enucleation appears to be a feasible and safe approach for benign or borderline tumours of the pancreas and was associated with similarly favourable surgical outcomes as the open approach. Identifying and avoiding the MPD is an important step during enucleation.

  9. Low Pressure Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy With the AirSeal System at OLV Hospital: Results From a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Falce, Sabrina; Novara, Giacomo; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Umari, Paolo; De Naeyer, Geert; D'Hondt, Frederiek; Beresian, Jean; Carette, Rik; Penicka, Martin; Mo, Yujiing; Vandenbroucke, Geert; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2017-12-01

    Limited studies examined effects of pneumoperiotneum during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and with AirSeal. The aim of this study was to assess the effect on hemodynamics of a lower pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) with AirSeal, during RARP in steep Trendelenburg 45° (ST). This is an institutional review board-approved, prospective, interventional, single-center study including patients treated with RARP at OLV Hospital by one extremely experienced surgeon (July 2015-February 2016). Intraoperative monitoring included: arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, systemic vascular resistance, intrathoracic pressure, airways pressures, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic areas/volumes and ejection fraction, by transesophageal echocardiography, an esophageal catheter, and FloTrac/Vigileo system. Measurements were performed after induction of anesthesia with patient in horizontal (T0), 5 minutes after 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (TP), 5 minutes after ST (TT1) and every 30 minutes thereafter until the end of surgery (TH). Parameters modification at the prespecified times was assessed by Wilcoxon and Friedman tests, as appropriate. All analyses were performed by SPSS v. 23.0. A total of 53 consecutive patients were enrolled. The mean patients age was 62.6 ± 6.9 years. Comorbidity was relatively limited (51% with Charlson Comorbidity Index as low as 0). Despite the ST, working always at 8 mmHg with AirSeal, only central venous pressure and mean airways pressure showed a statistically significant variation during the operative time. Although other significant hemodynamic/respiratory changes were observed adding pneumoperitoneum and then ST, all variables remained always within limits safely manageable by anesthesiologists. The combination of ST, lower pressure pneumoperitoneum and extreme surgeon's experience enables to safely perform RARP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An Intelligent Robot Programing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Yong

    2012-01-15

    This book introduces an intelligent robot programing with background of the begging, introduction of VPL, and SPL, building of environment for robot platform, starting of robot programing, design of simulation environment, robot autonomy drive control programing, simulation graphic. Such as SPL graphic programing graphical image and graphical shapes, and graphical method application, application of procedure for robot control, robot multiprogramming, robot bumper sensor programing, robot LRF sencor programing and robot color sensor programing.

  11. An Intelligent Robot Programing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong Yong

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces an intelligent robot programing with background of the begging, introduction of VPL, and SPL, building of environment for robot platform, starting of robot programing, design of simulation environment, robot autonomy drive control programing, simulation graphic. Such as SPL graphic programing graphical image and graphical shapes, and graphical method application, application of procedure for robot control, robot multiprogramming, robot bumper sensor programing, robot LRF sencor programing and robot color sensor programing.

  12. Neuro-robotics from brain machine interfaces to rehabilitation robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiadis

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-robotics is one of the most multidisciplinary fields of the last decades, fusing information and knowledge from neuroscience, engineering and computer science. This book focuses on the results from the strategic alliance between Neuroscience and Robotics that help the scientific community to better understand the brain as well as design robotic devices and algorithms for interfacing humans and robots. The first part of the book introduces the idea of neuro-robotics, by presenting state-of-the-art bio-inspired devices. The second part of the book focuses on human-machine interfaces for pe

  13. Assessing the Impact of Surgeon Experience on Urinary Continence Recovery After Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results of Four High-Volume Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Nicola; Di Trapani, Ettore; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Umari, Paolo; Buffi, Nicolò Maria; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Mottrie, Alexander; Gaboardi, Franco; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno

    2017-09-01

    To test the impact of surgeon experience on urinary continence (UC) recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). The study included 1477 consecutive patients treated with RARP by four surgeons between 2006 and 2014. UC recovery was defined as being completely dry over a 24-hour period at follow-up. Surgeon experience was coded as the total number of RARP performed by the surgeon before the patient's operation. Multivariable analysis tested the association between surgeon experience and UC recovery. Covariates consisted of patient age, Charlson comorbidity index, preoperative International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function domain (IIEF-EF), nerve-sparing surgery (none vs unilateral vs bilateral), and preoperative risk groups (low- vs intermediate- vs high risk). The number of cases performed by each surgeon was 541, 413, 411, and 112, respectively. Median follow-up was 24 months (inter-quartile range: 18, 40). The UC recovery rate at 1 year after surgery was 82%. At multivariable analyses, surgeon experience represented an independent predictor of UC recovery (hazard ratio: 1.02, p < 0.001). The surgical learning curve was similar among surgeons, moving linearly from ∼60% of UC rate at the initial cases to almost 90% after more than 400 procedures. In patients undergoing RARP, surgeon experience is a significant predictor of UC recovery. The surgical learning curve of UC recovery does not reach a plateau even after more than 100 cases, suggesting a continuous improvement of the surgical technique. These findings deserve attention for patient counseling and future comparative studies evaluating functional outcomes after RARP.

  14. Cloud Robotics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Mester, Gyula

    2015-01-01

    Cloud Robotics was born from the merger of service robotics and cloud technologies. It allows robots to benefit from the powerful computational, storage, and communications resources of modern data centres. Cloud robotics allows robots to take advantage of the rapid increase in data transfer rates to offload tasks without hard real time requirements. Cloud Robotics has rapidly gained momentum with initiatives by companies such as Google, Willow Garage and Gostai as well as more than a dozen a...

  15. Space Robotics Challenge

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Robotics Challenge seeks to infuse robot autonomy from the best and brightest research groups in the robotics community into NASA robots for future...

  16. Are Sex Robots as Bad as Killing Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In 2015 the Campaign Against Sex Robots was launched to draw attention to the technological production of new kinds of objects: sex robots of women and children. The campaign was launched shortly after the Future of Life Institute published an online petition: “Autonomous Weapons: An Open Letter From AI and Robotics Researchers” which was signed by leading luminaries in the field of AI and Robotics. In response to the Campaign, an academic at Oxford University opened an ethics thread “Are sex...

  17. Multi-robot control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  18. Ambulatory movements, team dynamics and interactions during robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nabeeha; Hussein, Ahmed A; Cavuoto, Lora; Sharif, Mohamed; Allers, Jenna C; Hinata, Nobuyuki; Ahmad, Basel; Kozlowski, Justen D; Hashmi, Zishan; Bisantz, Ann; Guru, Khurshid A

    2016-07-01

    To analyse ambulatory movements and team dynamics during robot-assisted surgery (RAS), and to investigate whether congestion of the physical space associated with robotic technology led to workflow challenges or predisposed to errors and adverse events. With institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed 10 recorded robot-assisted radical prostatectomies in a single operating room (OR). The OR was divided into eight zones, and all movements were tracked and described in terms of start and end zones, duration, personnel and purpose. Movements were further classified into avoidable (can be eliminated/improved) and unavoidable (necessary for completion of the procedure). The mean operating time was 166 min, of which ambulation constituted 27 min (16%). A total of 2 896 ambulatory movements were identified (mean: 290 ambulatory movements/procedure). Most of the movements were procedure-related (31%), and were performed by the circulating nurse. We identified 11 main pathways in the OR; the heaviest traffic was between the circulating nurse zone, transit zone and supply-1 zone. A total of 50% of ambulatory movements were found to be avoidable. More than half of the movements during RAS can be eliminated with an improved OR setting. More studies are needed to design an evidence-based OR layout that enhances access, workflow and patient safety. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Robotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorino, P; Altwegg, J M

    1985-05-01

    This article, which is aimed at the general reader, examines latest developments in, and the role of, modern robotics. The 7 main sections are sub-divided into 27 papers presented by 30 authors. The sections are as follows: 1) The role of robotics, 2) Robotics in the business world and what it can offer, 3) Study and development, 4) Utilisation, 5) Wages, 6) Conditions for success, and 7) Technological dynamics.

  20. FPGA for Robotic Applications: from Android/Humanoid Robots to Artificial Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tole Sutikno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches on home robots have been increasing enormously. There has always existed a continuous research effort on problems of anthropomorphic robots which is now called humanoid robots. Currently, robotics has evolved to the point that different branches have reached a remarkable level of maturity, that neural network and fuzzy logic are the main artificial intelligence as intelligent control on the robotics. Despite all this progress, while aiming at accomplishing work-tasks originally charged only to humans, robotic science has perhaps quite naturally turned into the attempt to create artificial men. It is true that artificial men or android humanoid robots open certainly very broad prospects. This “robot” may be viewed as a personal helper, and it will be called a home-robot, or personal robot. This is main reason why the two special sections are issued in the TELKOMNIKA sequentially.

  1. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a better survival than the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas Røder, Martin; Brasso, Klaus; Drimer Berg, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    underwent radical prostatectomy. Patients were followed prospectively per protocol. No patients were lost to follow-up. Overall and cause-specific survival were described using Kaplan-Meier plots. Standardized relative survival and mortality ratio were calculated based on expected survival in the age......INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to investigate standardised relative survival and mortality ratio for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer at our institution. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between 1995 and 2010, a total of 1,350 consecutive patients......-matched Danish population using the methods and macros described by Dickmann. The country-specific population mortality rates used for calculation of the expected survival were based on data from The Human Mortality Database. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 3.4 years (range: 0-14.3 years). A total of 59 (4...

  2. Teaching Joint-Level Robot Programming with a New Robotics Software Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gonzalez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rising popularity of robotics in our modern world there is an increase in the number of engineering programs that offer the basic Introduction to Robotics course. This common introductory robotics course generally covers the fundamental theory of robotics including robot kinematics, dynamics, differential movements, trajectory planning and basic computer vision algorithms commonly used in the field of robotics. Joint programming, the task of writing a program that directly controls the robot’s joint motors, is an activity that involves robot kinematics, dynamics, and trajectory planning. In this paper, we introduce a new educational robotics tool developed for teaching joint programming. The tool allows the student to write a program in a modified C language that controls the movement of the arm by controlling the velocity of each joint motor. This is a very important activity in the robotics course and leads the student to gain knowledge of how to build a robotic arm controller. Sample assignments are presented for different levels of difficulty.

  3. The role of robotic partial cystectomy in a patient with metastatic primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine James

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of urachal adenocarcinoma (UA of the urinary bladder has typically been with radical cystectomy (RC but more conservative approaches are gaining popularity. Here we present the case of a female patient with metastatic primary bladder UA who was treated with robotic partial cystectomy (RPC and adjuvant chemotherapy; she is alive with no evidence of disease recurrence or metastatic disease at 5 years. This case provides some of the longest follow-up after RPC to date thereby demonstrating that RPC is a safe and oncologically viable treatment for selected patients even several years after definitive treatment. Patients undergoing RPC benefit from the reduced morbidity associated with this less radical treatment whilst enjoying similarly successful oncological outcomes to RC.   

  4. Hand-assisted hybrid laparoscopic-robotic total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch--anal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Luca; Guadagni, Simone; Mariniello, Maria Donatella; Furbetta, Niccolò; Pisano, Roberta; D'Isidoro, Cristiano; Caprili, Giovanni; Marciano, Emanuele; Di Candio, Giulio; Boggi, Ugo; Mosca, Franco

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have reported minimally invasive total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). We herein report a novel hand-assisted hybrid laparoscopic-robotic technique for patients with FAP and UC. Between February 2010 and March 2014, six patients underwent hand-assisted hybrid laparoscopic-robotic total proctocolectomy with IPAA. The abdominal colectomy was performed laparoscopically with hand assistance through a transverse suprapubic incision, also used to fashion the ileal pouch. The proctectomy was carried out with the da Vinci Surgical System. The IPAA was hand-sewn through a trans-anal approach. The procedure was complemented by a temporary diverting loop ileostomy. The mean hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS) time was 154.6 (±12.8) min whereas the mean robotic time was 93.6 (±8.1) min. In all cases, a nerve-sparing proctectomy was performed, and no conversion to traditional laparotomy was required. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 13.2 (±7.4) days. No anastomotic leakage was observed. To date, no autonomic neurological disorders have been observed with a mean of 5.8 (±1.3) bowel movements per day. The hand-assisted hybrid laparoscopic-robotic approach to total proctocolectomy with IPAA has not been previously described. Our report shows the feasibility of this hybrid approach, which surpasses most of the limitations of pure laparoscopic and robotic techniques. Further experience is necessary to refine the technique and fully assess its potential advantages.

  5. Timing of Multimodal Robot Behaviors during Human-Robot Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Christian; Fischer, Kerstin; Suvei, Stefan-Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we address issues of timing between robot behaviors in multimodal human-robot interaction. In particular, we study what effects sequential order and simultaneity of robot arm and body movement and verbal behavior have on the fluency of interactions. In a study with the Care-O-bot, ...... output plays a special role because participants carry their expectations from human verbal interaction into the interactions with robots....

  6. Risk of biochemical recurrence and positive surgical margins in patients with pT2 prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with positive surgical margins (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BR) in organ confined tumors (pT2) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: Between 1995 and 2011, 1,649 patients underwent RP...

  7. Robotic surgery in supermorbidly obese patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Jean-Marie; Goodheart, Michael J; McDonald, Megan; Hansen, Jean; Reyes, Henry D; Button, Anna; Bender, David

    2015-07-01

    Morbid obesity is a known risk factor for the development of endometrial cancer. Several studies have demonstrated the overall feasibility of robotic-assisted surgical staging for endometrial cancer as well as the benefits of robotics compared with laparotomy. However, there have been few reports that have evaluated robotic surgery for endometrial cancer in the supermorbidly obese population (body mass index [BMI], ≥50 kg/m(2)). We sought to evaluate safety, feasibility, and outcomes for supermorbidly obese patients who undergo robotic surgery for endometrial cancer, compared with patients with lower body mass indices. We performed a retrospective chart review of 168 patients with suspected early-stage endometrial adenocarcinoma who underwent robotic surgery for the management of their disease. Analysis of variance and univariate logistic regression were used to compare patient characteristics and surgical variables across all body weights. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine the impact of body weight on recurrence-free and overall survival. The mean BMI of our cohort was 40.9 kg/m(2). Median follow up was 31 months. Fifty-six patients, 30% of which had grade 2 or 3 tumors, were supermorbidly obese with a BMI of ≥50 kg/m(2) (mean, 56.3 kg/m(2)). A comparison between the supermorbidly obese and lower-weight patients demonstrated no differences in terms of length of hospital stay, blood loss, complication rates, numbers of pelvic and paraaortic lymph nodes retrieved, or recurrence and survival. There was a correlation between BMI and conversion to an open procedure, in which the odds of conversion increased with increasing BMI (P = .02). Offering robotic surgery to supermorbidly obese patients with endometrial cancer is a safe and feasible surgical management option. When compared with patients with a lower BMI, the supermorbidly obese patient had a similar outcome, length of hospital stay, blood loss, complications, and numbers of lymph

  8. Robotics Potential Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Lucero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This problem was to calculate the path a robot would take to navigate an obstacle field and get to its goal. Three obstacles were given as negative potential fields which the robot avoided, and a goal was given a positive potential field that attracted the robot. The robot decided each step based on its distance, angle, and influence from every object. After each step, the robot recalculated and determined its next step until it reached its goal. The robot's calculations and steps were simulated with Microsoft Excel.

  9. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  10. Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy in Men Receiving Prior Pelvic Radiation for Non-Prostate Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Wedmid, Alexei; Sandhu, Jaspreet S.; Eastham, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Morbidity associated with salvage radical prostatectomy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary radiotherapy is well documented, but little is known about the impact on surgical difficulty and outcomes for radical prostatectomy in men who have had prior pelvic radiotherapy for non-prostate malignancies. We report functional outcomes of 9 patients treated at our institution. Materials and Methods From 1993 to 2007, 9 patients underwent radical prostatectomy following external beam radiotherapy for testicular seminoma (6), anorectal cancer (2), and colon cancer (1). Clinical information was obtained from a prospective prostate cancer database. Results Radical prostatectomy was completed without identifiable injury to adjacent structures in all 9 patients. Four patients had significant pelvic fibrosis, 3 required bilateral neurovascular bundle resection. Neurovascular bundle preservation was performed in the remaining 6 patients, 4 with good preoperative erectile function. However, no patient recovered erectile function postoperatively at a median follow-up time of 75 months (range 12 to 172). Of preoperatively continent men, 57% required ≤1 pad daily and 43% were completely dry, achieving complete urinary control at a median follow-up time of 7.5 months (range 2 to 20). Two patients developed anastomotic stricture, one being associated with concomitant ureteral stricture. Conclusions Radical prostatectomy after pelvic radiotherapy for non-prostate malignancies was not associated with increased intraoperative morbidity. However, rates of anastomotic stricture, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence appear to be higher than those observed after radical prostatectomy in men with no prior radiotherapy and comparable to those seen in the salvage radical prostatectomy setting. PMID:19239447

  11. Systematic Review of Studies Reporting Positive Surgical Margins After Bladder Neck Sparing Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellangino, Mariangela; Verrill, Clare; Leslie, Tom; Bell, Richard W; Hamdy, Freddie C; Lamb, Alastair D

    2017-11-07

    Bladder neck preservation (BNP) during radical prostatectomy (RP) has been proposed as a method to improve early recovery of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. However, there is concern over a possible increase in the risk of positive surgical margins and prostate cancer recurrence rate. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported improved early recovery and overall long-term urinary continence without compromising oncologic control. The aim of our study was to perform a critical review of the literature to assess the impact on bladder neck and base margins after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. We carried out a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Scopus and Cochrane library databases in May 2017 using medical subject headings and free-text protocol according to PRISMA guidelines. We used the following search terms: bladder neck preservation, prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy and surgical margins. Studies focusing on positive surgical margins (PSM) in bladder neck sparing RP pertinent to the objective of this review were included. Overall, we found 15 relevant studies reporting overall and site-specific positive surgical margins rate after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. This included two RCTs, seven prospective comparative studies, two retrospective comparative studies and four case series. All studies were published between 1993 and 2015 with sample sizes ranging between 50 and 1067. Surgical approaches included open, laparoscopic and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The overall and base-specific PSM rates ranged between 7-36% and 0-16.3%, respectively. Mean base PSM was 4.9% in those patients where bladder neck sparing was performed, but only 1.85% in those without sparing. Bladder neck preservation during radical prostatectomy may increase base-positive margins. Further studies are needed to better investigate the impact of this technique on oncological outcomes. A future paradigm could

  12. Healthcare Robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Riek, Laurel D.

    2017-01-01

    Robots have the potential to be a game changer in healthcare: improving health and well-being, filling care gaps, supporting care givers, and aiding health care workers. However, before robots are able to be widely deployed, it is crucial that both the research and industrial communities work together to establish a strong evidence-base for healthcare robotics, and surmount likely adoption barriers. This article presents a broad contextualization of robots in healthcare by identifying key sta...

  13. Evolution of upper limb kinematics four years after subacute robot-assisted rehabilitation in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pila, Ophélie; Duret, Christophe; Gracies, Jean-Michel; Francisco, Gerard E; Bayle, Nicolas; Hutin, Émilie

    2018-04-25

    To assess functional status and robot-based kinematic measures four years after subacute robot-assisted rehabilitation in hemiparesis. Twenty-two patients with stroke-induced hemiparesis underwent a ≥3-month upper limb combined program of robot-assisted and occupational therapy from two months post-stroke, and received community-based therapy after discharge. Four years later, 19 (86%) participated in this follow-up study. Assessments 2, 5 and 54 months post-stroke included Fugl-Meyer (FM), Modified Frenchay Scale (MFS, at Month 54) and robot-based kinematic measures of targeting tasks in three directions, north, paretic and non-paretic: distance covered, velocity, accuracy (root mean square (RMS) error from straight line) and smoothness (number of velocity peaks; upward changes in accuracy and smoothness represent worsening). Analysis was stratified by FM score at two months: ≥17 (Group 1) or Kinematic changes (three directions pooled) were: distance -1[-17;2]% (ns); velocity, -8[-32;28]% (ns); accuracy, +6[-13;98]% (ns); smoothness, +44[-6;126]% (p robot-assisted upper limb training during subacute post-stroke phase, movement kinematics deteriorated despite community-based therapy, especially in more severely impaired patients. EudraCT 2016-005121-36. Registration: 2016-12-20. Date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial: 2009-11-24.

  14. RIPE [robot independent programming environment]: A robot independent programming environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.J.; Lennox, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Remote manual operations in radiation environments are typically performed very slowly. Sensor-based computer-controlled robots hold great promise for increasing the speed and safety of remote operations; however, the programming of robotic systems has proven to be expensive and difficult. Generalized approaches to robot programming that reuse available software modules and employ programming languages which are independent of the specific robotic and sensory devices being used are needed to speed software development and increase overall system reliability. This paper discusses the robot independent programming environment (RIPE) developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The RIPE is an object-oriented approach to robot system architectures; it is a software environment that facilitates rapid design and implementation of complex robot systems for diverse applications. An architecture based on hierarchies of distributed multiprocessors provides the computing platform for a layered programming structure that models applications using software objects. These objects are designed to support model-based automated programming of robotic and machining devices, real-time sensor-based control, error handling, and robust communication

  15. Evolutionary Developmental Robotics: Improving Morphology and Control of Physical Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujovic, Vuk; Rosendo, Andre; Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms have previously been applied to the design of morphology and control of robots. The design space for such tasks can be very complex, which can prevent evolution from efficiently discovering fit solutions. In this article we introduce an evolutionary-developmental (evo-devo) experiment with real-world robots. It allows robots to grow their leg size to simulate ontogenetic morphological changes, and this is the first time that such an experiment has been performed in the physical world. To test diverse robot morphologies, robot legs of variable shapes were generated during the evolutionary process and autonomously built using additive fabrication. We present two cases with evo-devo experiments and one with evolution, and we hypothesize that the addition of a developmental stage can be used within robotics to improve performance. Moreover, our results show that a nonlinear system-environment interaction exists, which explains the nontrivial locomotion patterns observed. In the future, robots will be present in our daily lives, and this work introduces for the first time physical robots that evolve and grow while interacting with the environment.

  16. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  17. Perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted gastric sleeve resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Joselyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the major advantages for patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery as compared to an open surgical procedure is the improved recovery profile and decreased opioid requirements in the perioperative period. There are no definitive studies comparing the analgesic requirements in patients undergoing two different types of minimally invasive procedure. This study retrospectively compares the perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted, laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection. Materials and Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, the medication administration records of all severely obese patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection were retrospectively reviewed. Intra-operative analgesic and adjuvant medications administered, postoperative analgesic requirements, and visual analog pain scores were compared between those undergoing a laparoscopic procedure versus a robotic-assisted procedure. Results: This study cohort included a total of 28 patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection surgery with 14 patients in the laparoscopic group and 14 patients in the robotic-assisted group. Intra-operative adjuvant administration of both intravenous acetaminophen and ketorolac was similar in both groups. Patients in the robotic-assisted group required significantly less opioid during the intra-operative period as compared to patients in the laparoscopic group (0.15 ± 0.08 mg/kg vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 mg/kg morphine, P = 0.024. Cumulative opioid requirements for the first 72 postoperative h were similar in both the groups (0.64 ± 0.25 vs. 0.68 ± 0.27 mg/kg morphine, P = NS. No difference was noted in the postoperative pain scores. Conclusion: Although intraoperative opioid administration was lower in the robotic-assisted group, the postoperative opioid requirements, and the postoperative pain scores were similar in both groups.

  18. Recent advances in robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beni, G.; Hackwood, S.

    1984-01-01

    Featuring 10 contributions, this volume offers a state-of-the-art report on robotic science and technology. It covers robots in modern industry, robotic control to help the disabled, kinematics and dynamics, six-legged walking robots, a vector analysis of robot manipulators, tactile sensing in robots, and more

  19. Prognostic impact of preoperative statin use after radical nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ju Hyun; Jeong, In Gab; Park, Jong Yeon; You, Dalsan; Hong, Bumsik; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    The objective was to investigate the impact of statin use on prognosis after radical nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). A retrospective review of medical records identified 277 patients who underwent radical nephroureterectomy for primary UTUC at Asan Medical Center between January 2006 and December 2011. Information on preoperative statin use was obtained from patient charts in an electronic database. We assessed the impact of statin use on recurrence-free survival (RFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Of these 277 patients, 62 (22.4%) were taking statin medications. Compared to the statin nonusers, the statin users were older, had a higher body mass index, and had higher rates of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The 5-year RFS rates of statin users and nonusers were 78.5% and 72.5%, respectively (p=0.528); the 5-year CSS rates were 85.6% and 77.7%, respectively (p=0.516); and the 5-year OS rates were 74.5% and 71.4%, respectively (p=0.945). In the multivariate analysis, statin use was not an independent prognostic factor for RFS (hazard ratio, 0.47; p=0.056), CSS (hazard ratio, 0.46; p=0.093), or OS (hazard ratio, 0.59; p=0.144) in patients who underwent radical nephroureterectomy for UTUC. Statin use was not associated with improved RFS, CSS, or OS in the sample population of patients with UTUC.

  20. Put Your Robot In, Put Your Robot Out: Sequencing through Programming Robots in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakoff, Elizabeth R.; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of programming robots on sequencing ability in early childhood. Thirty-four children (ages 4.5-6.5 years) participated in computer programming activities with a developmentally appropriate tool, CHERP, specifically designed to program a robot's behaviors. The children learned to build and program robots over three…

  1. Multimodal hybrid imaging agents for sentinel node mapping as a means to (re)connect nuclear medicine to advances made in robot-assisted surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KleinJan, Gijs H. [Leiden University Medical Hospital, Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, Nynke S. van den [Leiden University Medical Hospital, Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Jeroen de [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wit, Esther M.; Poel, Henk G. van der [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Thygessen, Helene [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vegt, Erik [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Fijs W.B. van [Leiden University Medical Hospital, Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-07-15

    Radical prostatectomy and complementary extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) and non-sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) at risk of containing metastases are increasingly being performed using high-tech robot-assisted approaches. Although this technological evolution has clear advantages, the physical nature of robotic systems limits the integrated use of routine radioguided surgery technologies. Hence, engineering effort in robotics are focused on the integration of fluorescence guidance technologies. Using the hybrid SN tracer indocyanine green-{sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid (radioactive and fluorescent), for the first time in combination with a robot-integrated laparoscope, we investigated whether the robot-assisted approach affects the accuracy of fluorescence detection of SNs identified preoperatively using nuclear medicine. The study included 55 patients (Briganti nomogram-based risk >5 % on LN metastases) scheduled for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, SN biopsy and ePLND. Following indocyanine green-{sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid injection, preoperative nuclear imaging (lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT) was used to locate the SN(s). The fluorescence laparoscope was used intraoperatively to identify the SN(s) with standard fluorescence settings (in 50 patients) and with customized settings (in 5 patients). The number and location of the SNs, the radioactive, fluorescence (both in vivo and ex vivo) and tumour status of the resected SNs/LNs, and postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. Combined, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging identified 212 SNs (median 4 per patient). Intraoperative fluorescence imaging using standard fluorescence settings visualized 80.4 % (148/184 SNs; 50 patients; ex vivo 97.8 %). This increased to 85.7 % (12/14 SNs; 5 patients; ex vivo 100 %) with customized fluorescence settings. SPECT/CT images provided guidance towards the residual SNs. Ex vivo all removed SNs were radioactive. SNs

  2. Multimodal hybrid imaging agents for sentinel node mapping as a means to (re)connect nuclear medicine to advances made in robot-assisted surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KleinJan, Gijs H.; Berg, Nynke S. van den; Jong, Jeroen de; Wit, Esther M.; Poel, Henk G. van der; Thygessen, Helene; Vegt, Erik; Leeuwen, Fijs W.B. van

    2016-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy and complementary extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) and non-sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) at risk of containing metastases are increasingly being performed using high-tech robot-assisted approaches. Although this technological evolution has clear advantages, the physical nature of robotic systems limits the integrated use of routine radioguided surgery technologies. Hence, engineering effort in robotics are focused on the integration of fluorescence guidance technologies. Using the hybrid SN tracer indocyanine green- 99m Tc-nanocolloid (radioactive and fluorescent), for the first time in combination with a robot-integrated laparoscope, we investigated whether the robot-assisted approach affects the accuracy of fluorescence detection of SNs identified preoperatively using nuclear medicine. The study included 55 patients (Briganti nomogram-based risk >5 % on LN metastases) scheduled for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, SN biopsy and ePLND. Following indocyanine green- 99m Tc-nanocolloid injection, preoperative nuclear imaging (lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT) was used to locate the SN(s). The fluorescence laparoscope was used intraoperatively to identify the SN(s) with standard fluorescence settings (in 50 patients) and with customized settings (in 5 patients). The number and location of the SNs, the radioactive, fluorescence (both in vivo and ex vivo) and tumour status of the resected SNs/LNs, and postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. Combined, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging identified 212 SNs (median 4 per patient). Intraoperative fluorescence imaging using standard fluorescence settings visualized 80.4 % (148/184 SNs; 50 patients; ex vivo 97.8 %). This increased to 85.7 % (12/14 SNs; 5 patients; ex vivo 100 %) with customized fluorescence settings. SPECT/CT images provided guidance towards the residual SNs. Ex vivo all removed SNs were radioactive. SNs were

  3. Comparison of Biochemical Recurrence-Free Survival after Radical Prostatectomy Triggered by Grade Reclassification during Active Surveillance and in Men Newly Diagnosed with Similar Grade Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Clarissa P; Landis, Patricia; Carter, H Ballentine; Epstein, Jonathan I; Mamawala, Mufaddal

    2017-09-01

    We compared biochemical recurrence between men on active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy triggered by grade reclassification and men diagnosed with similar grade disease treated with immediate radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the records of men who underwent surgery from 1995 to 2015 at our institution. We identified 4 groups, including 94 and 56 men on active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy following reclassification to Gleason 7 (3 + 4) or greater (grade groups 2 or greater) and Gleason 7 (3 + 4) (grade group 2), and 3,504 and 1,979 in the immediate prostatectomy group diagnosed with grade group 2 or greater and 2, respectively. Biochemical recurrence was assessed by Kaplan-Meir analysis and a multivariable Cox model. Men on active surveillance had a lower incidence of biochemical recurrence than men in the immediate radical prostatectomy groups for biopsy grade groups 2 or greater and 2 (each p <0.05). One, 5 and 10-year biochemical recurrence-free survival for men in the active surveillance group vs the immediate radical prostatectomy group was 97.9% vs 85.5%, 76.6% vs 65.1% and 69.0% vs 54.2% in biopsy grade groups 2 or greater (p = 0.009) and 96.4% vs 91.2%, 89.6% vs 74.0% and 89.6% vs 63.9%, respectively, in biopsy grade group 2 (p = 0.071). For biopsy grade groups 2 or greater there was no significant difference in the risk of biochemical recurrence between the groups after adjusting for age, biopsy extent of cancer and prostate specific antigen density. Patients on active surveillance reclassified to grade groups 2 or greater are at no greater risk for treatment failure than men newly diagnosed with similar grades. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Robot Interaction for Hybrid Collision Avoidance System for Indoor Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Ghandour

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel approach for collision avoidance for indoor mobile robots based on human-robot interaction is realized. The main contribution of this work is a new technique for collision avoidance by engaging the human and the robot in generating new collision-free paths. In mobile robotics, collision avoidance is critical for the success of the robots in implementing their tasks, especially when the robots navigate in crowded and dynamic environments, which include humans. Traditional collision avoidance methods deal with the human as a dynamic obstacle, without taking into consideration that the human will also try to avoid the robot, and this causes the people and the robot to get confused, especially in crowded social places such as restaurants, hospitals, and laboratories. To avoid such scenarios, a reactive-supervised collision avoidance system for mobile robots based on human-robot interaction is implemented. In this method, both the robot and the human will collaborate in generating the collision avoidance via interaction. The person will notify the robot about the avoidance direction via interaction, and the robot will search for the optimal collision-free path on the selected direction. In case that no people interacted with the robot, it will select the navigation path autonomously and select the path that is closest to the goal location. The humans will interact with the robot using gesture recognition and Kinect sensor. To build the gesture recognition system, two models were used to classify these gestures, the first model is Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN, and the second model is Support Vector Machine (SVM. Furthermore, a novel collision avoidance system for avoiding the obstacles is implemented and integrated with the HRI system. The system is tested on H20 robot from DrRobot Company (Canada and a set of experiments were implemented to report the performance of the system in interacting with the human and avoiding

  5. Robotic Y-V Plasty for Recalcitrant Bladder Neck Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granieri, Michael A; Weinberg, Aaron C; Sun, Jeffrey Y; Stifleman, Michael; Zhao, Lee

    2018-07-01

    To demonstrate the technique and the outcomes of robot assisted Y-V plasty bladder neck reconstruction (RYVBNR). We present our technique for treatment of recalcitrant bladder neck contracture (BNC) in 7 patients who underwent RYVBNR at our institution between March 2016 and September 2017. Indication for the procedure was incomplete emptying, recurrent urinary tract infections, and dysuria. On follow-up, patients were assessed for clinical success by absence of infections, symptoms, and cystoscopic evaluation. Robotic assisted dissection is performed to open the space of Retzius and mobilize the bladder. The cystoscope is passed to the level of the BNC, and Firefly technology is used to localize the BNC. The BNC is incised anteriorly, and a V-shaped bladder flap is advanced into the BNC in a Y-V plasty fashion. We place a perioperative closed suction drain, which is removed before discharge, and a 22 Fr catheter, which that will be removed in the office at approximately 2 weeks. Six men developed recalcitrant BNCs and 1 developed a recalcitrant vesicourethral anastomotic stenosis. All patients had previously undergone an endoscopic procedure. Median time for last attempt at endoscopic management to robot-assisted bladder neck repair was 4.7 months. The average number of prior attempts at endoscopic management was 2. All patients underwent RYVBNR without conversion to open surgery. The median operative time was 240 minutes, estimated blood loss was 67 mL, and length of stay was 1 day. There were no intraoperative complications. Catheters were removed in the office at a median time of 15 days. At a median follow-up of 8 months, all cases were successful with no evidence of recurrence. Only 2 patients had persistent urinary incontinence at 1 pad per day. RYVBNR with a Y-V plasty is a feasible and effective technique for managing a difficult reconstructive problem. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Robot-assisted arm assessments in spinal cord injured patients: a consideration of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Keller

    Full Text Available Robotic assistance is increasingly used in neurological rehabilitation for enhanced training. Furthermore, therapy robots have the potential for accurate assessment of motor function in order to diagnose the patient status, to measure therapy progress or to feedback the movement performance to the patient and therapist in real time. We investigated whether a set of robot-based assessments that encompasses kinematic, kinetic and timing metrics is applicable, safe, reliable and comparable to clinical metrics for measurement of arm motor function. Twenty-four healthy subjects and five patients after spinal cord injury underwent robot-based assessments using the exoskeleton robot ARMin. Five different tasks were performed with aid of a visual display. Ten kinematic, kinetic and timing assessment parameters were extracted on joint- and end-effector level (active and passive range of motion, cubic reaching volume, movement time, distance-path ratio, precision, smoothness, reaction time, joint torques and joint stiffness. For cubic volume, joint torques and the range of motion for most joints, good inter- and intra-rater reliability were found whereas precision, movement time, distance-path ratio and smoothness showed weak to moderate reliability. A comparison with clinical scores revealed good correlations between robot-based joint torques and the Manual Muscle Test. Reaction time and distance-path ratio showed good correlation with the "Graded and Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility and Prehension" (GRASSP and the Van Lieshout Test (VLT for movements towards a predefined position in the center of the frontal plane. In conclusion, the therapy robot ARMin provides a comprehensive set of assessments that are applicable and safe. The first results with spinal cord injured patients and healthy subjects suggest that the measurements are widely reliable and comparable to clinical scales for arm motor function. The methods applied and results can

  7. Robots and lattice automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The book gives a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art research and engineering in theory and application of Lattice Automata in design and control of autonomous Robots. Automata and robots share the same notional meaning. Automata (originated from the latinization of the Greek word “αυτόματον”) as self-operating autonomous machines invented from ancient years can be easily considered the first steps of robotic-like efforts. Automata are mathematical models of Robots and also they are integral parts of robotic control systems. A Lattice Automaton is a regular array or a collective of finite state machines, or automata. The Automata update their states by the same rules depending on states of their immediate neighbours. In the context of this book, Lattice Automata are used in developing modular reconfigurable robotic systems, path planning and map exploration for robots, as robot controllers, synchronisation of robot collectives, robot vision, parallel robotic actuators. All chapters are...

  8. Robot vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Almost all industrial robots use internal sensors such as shaft encoders which measure rotary position, or tachometers which measure velocity, to control their motions. Most controllers also provide interface capabilities so that signals from conveyors, machine tools, and the robot itself may be used to accomplish a task. However, advanced external sensors, such as visual sensors, can provide a much greater degree of adaptability for robot control as well as add automatic inspection capabilities to the industrial robot. Visual and other sensors are now being used in fundamental operations such as material processing with immediate inspection, material handling with adaption, arc welding, and complex assembly tasks. A new industry of robot vision has emerged. The application of these systems is an area of great potential

  9. Multi-Locomotion Robotic Systems New Concepts of Bio-inspired Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, Toshio; Sekiyama, Kosuke; Aoyama, Tadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, multiple attention have been paid on a robot working in the human living environment, such as in the field of medical, welfare, entertainment and so on. Various types of researches are being conducted actively in a variety of fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive engineering, sensor- technology, interfaces and motion control. In the future, it is expected to realize super high functional human-like robot by integrating technologies in various fields including these types of researches. The book represents new developments and advances in the field of bio-inspired robotics research introducing the state of the art, the idea of multi-locomotion robotic system to implement the diversity of animal motion. It covers theoretical and computational aspects of Passive Dynamic Autonomous Control (PDAC), robot motion control, multi legged walking and climbing as well as brachiation focusing concrete robot systems, components and applications. In addition, gorilla type robot systems are described as...

  10. Outpatient laparoscopic nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy: A feasibility study and analysis of perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Echeverri, Lina; Echeverri, Francisco; Sanz-Lomana, Carlos Millán; Ramirez, Pedro T; Pareja, Rene

    2016-11-01

    The goal of our study was to report on the feasibility of outpatient laparoscopic radical hysterectomy in patients with early-stage cervical cancer. We included all patients who underwent a laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at the Instituto de Cancerología - Las Americas in Medellin, Colombia, between January 2013 and July 2015. The control group was a similar cohort of patients who were admitted after their surgery. Seventy-six patients were included [outpatient (31) and admitted (45)]. There were no statistically significant differences between groups regarding age, clinical stage, histology, nodal count, need of adjuvant treatment, visual pain scores at discharge or follow up time. All patients underwent a transversus abdominis plane block. The median operative time was 150min (range, 105-240) in the outpatient group vs. 170min (range, 97-300) in the admitted group (p=0.023). The median estimated blood loss was 50ml (range, 20-150) in the outpatient group vs. 120ml (range, 20-1000) in the admitted group (p=0.001). All patients were able to void spontaneously and tolerate a diet before discharge. In patients who were admitted, the median hospital stay was 1day, (range; 1-6), and 39 (87%) were discharged at postoperative day 1. There were 6 postoperative complications, 3 in each group. There were no recurrences in the follow-up period in the outpatient group, and there were 3 (6.6%) recurrences in the admitted group. Outpatient laparoscopic radical hysterectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in a developing country in well-selected patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Robot Wars: US Empire and geopolitics in the robotic age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ian GR

    2017-01-01

    How will the robot age transform warfare? What geopolitical futures are being imagined by the US military? This article constructs a robotic futurology to examine these crucial questions. Its central concern is how robots – driven by leaps in artificial intelligence and swarming – are rewiring the spaces and logics of US empire, warfare, and geopolitics. The article begins by building a more-than-human geopolitics to de-center the role of humans in conflict and foreground a worldly understanding of robots. The article then analyzes the idea of US empire, before speculating upon how and why robots are materializing new forms of proxy war. A three-part examination of the shifting spaces of US empire then follows: (1) Swarm Wars explores the implications of miniaturized drone swarming; (2) Roboworld investigates how robots are changing US military basing strategy and producing new topological spaces of violence; and (3) The Autogenic Battle-Site reveals how autonomous robots will produce emergent, technologically event-ful sites of security and violence – revolutionizing the battlespace. The conclusion reflects on the rise of a robotic US empire and its consequences for democracy. PMID:29081605

  12. Robotic vision system for random bin picking with dual-arm robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sangseung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Random bin picking is one of the most challenging industrial robotics applications available. It constitutes a complicated interaction between the vision system, robot, and control system. For a packaging operation requiring a pick-and-place task, the robot system utilized should be able to perform certain functions for recognizing the applicable target object from randomized objects in a bin. In this paper, we introduce a robotic vision system for bin picking using industrial dual-arm robots. The proposed system recognizes the best object from randomized target candidates based on stereo vision, and estimates the position and orientation of the object. It then sends the result to the robot control system. The system was developed for use in the packaging process of cell phone accessories using dual-arm robots.

  13. Modular Robotic Wearable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    In this concept paper we trace the contours and define a new approach to robotic systems, composed of interactive robotic modules which are somehow worn on the body. We label such a field as Modular Robotic Wearable (MRW). We describe how, by using modular robotics for creating wearable....... Finally, by focusing on the intersection of the combination modular robotic systems, wearability, and bodymind we attempt to explore the theoretical characteristics of such approach and exploit the possible playware application fields....

  14. Marine Robot Autonomy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Autonomy for Marine Robots provides a timely and insightful overview of intelligent autonomy in marine robots. A brief history of this emerging field is provided, along with a discussion of the challenges unique to the underwater environment and their impact on the level of intelligent autonomy required.  Topics covered at length examine advanced frameworks, path-planning, fault tolerance, machine learning, and cooperation as relevant to marine robots that need intelligent autonomy.  This book also: Discusses and offers solutions for the unique challenges presented by more complex missions and the dynamic underwater environment when operating autonomous marine robots Includes case studies that demonstrate intelligent autonomy in marine robots to perform underwater simultaneous localization and mapping  Autonomy for Marine Robots is an ideal book for researchers and engineers interested in the field of marine robots.      

  15. Conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Hayakawa, N.; Kuriyama, I.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of alkyl radicals, the conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals and the trapping of allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene have been studied by electron spin resonance (e.s.r.). It has been suggested that in the crystal core alkyl radicals react with trans-vinylene double bonds and are converted into trans-vinylene allyl radicals; at the crystal surface, alkyl radicals react with vinyl end groups and are converted into allyl radicals with vinyl end groups. The decay of radical pairs and the formation of trans-vinylene double bonds are discussed. (author)

  16. Industrial Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  17. Social Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social robotics is a cutting edge research area gathering researchers and stakeholders from various disciplines and organizations. The transformational potential that these machines, in the form of, for example, caregiving, entertainment or partner robots, pose to our societies and to us as indiv......Social robotics is a cutting edge research area gathering researchers and stakeholders from various disciplines and organizations. The transformational potential that these machines, in the form of, for example, caregiving, entertainment or partner robots, pose to our societies and to us...... as individuals seems to be limited by our technical limitations and phantasy alone. This collection contributes to the field of social robotics by exploring its boundaries from a philosophically informed standpoint. It constructively outlines central potentials and challenges and thereby also provides a stable...

  18. Non-manufacturing applications of robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauchez, P.

    2000-12-01

    This book presents the different non-manufacturing sectors of activity where robotics can have useful or necessary applications: underwater robotics, agriculture robotics, road work robotics, nuclear robotics, medical-surgery robotics, aids to disabled people, entertainment robotics. Service robotics has been voluntarily excluded because this developing sector is not mature yet. (J.S.)

  19. Robotic assisted surgery in pediatric gynecology: promising innovation in mini invasive surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Ghassan; Calcaterra, Valeria; Scorletti, Federico; Romano, Piero; Goruppi, Ilaria; Mencherini, Simonetta; Avolio, Luigi; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    Robotic assisted surgery is not yet widely applied in the pediatric field. We report our initial experience regarding the feasibility, safety, benefits, and limitations of robot-assisted surgery in pediatric gynecological patients. Descriptive, retrospective report of experience with pediatric gynecological patients over a period of 12 months. Department of Pediatric Surgery, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation. Children and adolescents, with a surgical diagnosis of ovarian and/or tubal lesions. Robot assembly time and operative time, days of hospitalization, time to cessation of pain medication, complication rate, conversion rate to laparoscopic procedure and trocar insertion strategy. Six children and adolescents (2.4-15 yrs), weighing 12-55 kg, underwent robotic assisted surgery for adnexal pathologies: 2 for ovarian cystectomy, 2 for oophorectomy, 1 for right oophorectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy for gonadal disgenesis, 1 for exploration for suspected pelvic malformation. Mean operative time was 117.5 ± 34.9 minutes. Conversion to laparatomy was not necessary in any of the cases. No intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Initial results indicate that robotic assisted surgery is safely applicable in the pediatric gynecological population, although it is still premature to conclude that it provides better clinical outcomes than traditional laparoscopic surgery. Randomized, prospective, comparative studies will help characterize the advantages and disadvantages of this new technology in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Physician social networks and variation in rates of complications after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan Pollack, Craig; Wang, Hao; Bekelman, Justin E; Weissman, Gary; Epstein, Andrew J; Liao, Kaijun; Dugoff, Eva H; Armstrong, Katrina

    2014-07-01

    Variation in care within and across geographic areas remains poorly understood. The goal of this article was to examine whether physician social networks-as defined by shared patients-are associated with rates of complications after radical prostatectomy. In five cities, we constructed networks of physicians on the basis of their shared patients in 2004-2005 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data. From these networks, we identified subgroups of urologists who most frequently shared patients with one another. Among men with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy, we used multilevel analysis with generalized linear mixed-effect models to examine whether physician network structure-along with specific characteristics of the network subgroups-was associated with rates of 30-day and late urinary complications, and long-term incontinence after accounting for patient-level sociodemographic, clinical factors, and urologist patient volume. Networks included 2677 men in five cities who underwent radical prostatectomy. The unadjusted rate of 30-day surgical complications varied across network subgroups from an 18.8 percentage-point difference in the rate of complications across network subgroups in city 1 to a 26.9 percentage-point difference in city 5. Large differences in unadjusted rates of late urinary complications and long-term incontinence across subgroups were similarly found. Network subgroup characteristics-average urologist centrality and patient racial composition-were significantly associated with rates of surgical complications. Analysis of physician networks using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data provides insight into observed variation in rates of complications for localized prostate cancer. If validated, such approaches may be used to target future quality improvement interventions. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier

  1. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  2. Advanced robot locomotion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  3. Voiding dysfunction after abdominal radical hysterectomy. Comparison between patients with and without adjuvant irradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Tomohiro; Yamauchi, Tamio; Kageyama, Susumu; Tsuzuki, Masahiro; Kawakami, Satoru; Yonese, Junji; Kawai, Tsuneo

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated 59 patients with voiding dysfunction after abdominal radical hysterectomy for uterine cancer. Of 59 patients, 45 underwent the surgery alone, and the other 14 underwent surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Irradiation (mean dose, 60 Gy) was performed in bilateral commoni iliac regions excluding the bladder. In principle, the indwelling urethral catheter was removed 4 days after operation. All patients were followed up at the gynecologocal department until the onset of the voiding dysfunction. The mean interval between operation and the onset of voiding dysfunction was significantly longer (P<0.01) in the group treated by surgery alone (7.9 years) than in the group treated by surgery in combination with radiotherapy (3.8 year). Voiding dysfunction developed earlier as the age at the time of operation was higher. No differences were observed in the volume of residual urine, the detrusor function, or the incidence of urinary tract infection between the two groups. These results suggest that aged patients develop voiding dysfunction earlier after radical hysterectomy than young patients, and postoperative radiotherapy shortens the interval between operation and the onset of postoperative voiding dysfunction. (author)

  4. Metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization and radical polyaddition for precision polymer synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, M; Satoh, K [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kamigaito, M, E-mail: kamigait@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.j

    2009-08-01

    The metal-catalyzed radical addition reaction can be evolved into two different polymerization mechanisms, i.e.; chain- and step-growth polymerizations, while both the polymerizations are based on the same metal-catalyzed radical formation reaction. The former is a widely employed metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization or atom transfer radical polymerization of common vinyl monomers, and the latter is a novel metal-catalyzed radical polyaddition of designed monomer with an unconjugated C=C double bond and a reactive C-Cl bond in one molecule. The simultaneous ruthenium-catalyzed living radical polymerization of methyl acrylate and radical polyaddition of 3-butenyl 2-chloropropionate was achieved with Ru(Cp*)Cl(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2} to afford the controlled polymers, in which the homopolymer segments with the controlled chain length were connected by the ester linkage.

  5. Scaling Robotic Displays: Displays and Techniques for Dismounted Movement with Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    you are performing the low crawl 4.25 5.00 Drive the robot while you are negotiating the hill 6.00 5.00 Drive the robot while you are climbing the... stairs 4.67 5.00 Drive the robot while you are walking 5.70 5.27 HMD It was fairly doable. 1 When you’re looking through the lens, it’s not...Scaling Robotic Displays: Displays and Techniques for Dismounted Movement with Robots by Elizabeth S. Redden, Rodger A. Pettitt

  6. Robotic radiotherapy for prostate cancer with CyberKnife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Benezery, K.; Bondiau, P.Y.; Marcie, S.; Gerard, J.P.; Chamorey, E.

    2007-01-01

    After 3D conformal radiation therapy without and with modulated intensity, image-guided radiation therapy represents a new technological step. Should prostate cancer treatment using radiotherapy with the CyberKnife robotic system be considered as a new treatment and then investigated through classical clinical research procedure rather than a technical improvement of an already validated treatment? After a general presentation of the CyberKnife, the authors focused on prostate cancer treatment assuming that, according to dosimetric and biological considerations, the treatment by robotic system appears comparable to high dose rate brachytherapy. For prostate cancer treatment are discussed: biological rational for hypo fractionated treatment, high dose rate brachytherapy boost and interest of dose escalation. A comparison is presented between CyberKnife and other validated treatment for prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy, 3D conformal radiation therapy and low and high dose rate brachytherapy). In summary, CyberKnife treatment could be considered as a technical improvement of an already validated treatment in order to deliver a prostate boost after pelvic or peri-prostatic area irradiation. However, the clinical, biological and economical results must be precisely analyzed and could be assessed in the frame of a National Observatory based on shared therapeutic program. (authors)

  7. Accuracy of S2 Alar-Iliac Screw Placement Under Robotic Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laratta, Joseph L; Shillingford, Jamal N; Lombardi, Joseph M; Alrabaa, Rami G; Benkli, Barlas; Fischer, Charla; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lehman, Ronald A

    Case series. To determine the safety and feasibility of S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screw placement under robotic guidance. Similar to standard iliac fixation, S2AI screws aid in achieving fixation across the sacropelvic junction and decreasing S1 screw strain. Fortunately, the S2AI technique minimizes prominent instrumentation and the need for offset connectors to the fusion construct. Herein, we present an analysis of the largest series of robotic-guided S2AI screws in the literature without any significant author conflicts of interest with the robotics industry. Twenty-three consecutive patients who underwent spinopelvic fixation with 46 S2AI screws under robotic guidance were analyzed from 2015 to 2016. Screws were placed by two senior spine surgeons, along with various fellow or resident surgical assistants, using a proprietary robotic guidance system (Renaissance; Mazor Robotics Ltd., Caesara, Israel). Screw position and accuracy was assessed on intraoperative CT O-arm scans and analyzed using three-dimensional interactive viewing and manipulation of the images. The average caudal angle in the sagittal plane was 31.0° ± 10.0°. The average horizontal angle in the axial plane using the posterior superior iliac spine as a reference was 42.8° ± 6.6°. The average S1 screw to S2AI screw angle was 11.3° ± 9.9°. Two violations of the iliac cortex were noted, with an average breach distance of 7.9 ± 4.8 mm. One breach was posterior (2.2%) and one was anterior (2.2%). The overall robotic S2AI screw accuracy rate was 95.7%. There were no intraoperative neurologic, vascular, or visceral complications related to the placement of the S2AI screws. Spinopelvic fixation achieved using a bone-mounted miniature robotic-guided S2AI screw insertion technique is safe and reliable. Despite two breaches, no complications related to the placement of the S2AI screws occurred in this series. Level IV, therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier

  8. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  9. Next generation light robotic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael

    2017-01-01

    -assisted surgery imbibes surgeons with superhuman abilities and gives the expression “surgical precision” a whole new meaning. Still in its infancy, much remains to be done to improve human-robot collaboration both in realizing robots that can operate safely with humans and in training personnel that can work......Conventional robotics provides machines and robots that can replace and surpass human performance in repetitive, difficult, and even dangerous tasks at industrial assembly lines, hazardous environments, or even at remote planets. A new class of robotic systems no longer aims to replace humans...... with so-called automatons but, rather, to create robots that can work alongside human operators. These new robots are intended to collaborate with humans—extending their abilities—from assisting workers on the factory floor to rehabilitating patients in their homes. In medical robotics, robot...

  10. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Knaepen

    Full Text Available In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support. Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning.

  11. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Swinnen, Eva; Fernandez Tellez, Helio; Michielsen, Marc; Kerckhofs, Eric; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support). Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force) and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning.

  12. Roles and Self-Reconfigurable Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvinge, Nicolai; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Christensen, David Johan

    2007-01-01

    A self-reconfigurable robot is a robotic device that can change its own shape. Self-reconfigurable robots are commonly built from multiple identical modules that can manipulate each other to change the shape of the robot. The robot can also perform tasks such as locomotion without changing shape......., significantly simplifying the task of programming self-reconfigurable robots. Our language fully supports programming the ATRON self-reconfigurable robot, and has been used to implement several controllers running both on the physical modules and in simulation.......A self-reconfigurable robot is a robotic device that can change its own shape. Self-reconfigurable robots are commonly built from multiple identical modules that can manipulate each other to change the shape of the robot. The robot can also perform tasks such as locomotion without changing shape....... Programming a modular, self-reconfigurable robot is however a complicated task: the robot is essentially a real-time, distributed embedded system, where control and communication paths often are tightly coupled to the current physical configuration of the robot. To facilitate the task of programming modular...

  13. Robot Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Ess, Charles Melvin; Bhroin, Niamh Ni

    The world's first robot teacher, Saya, was introduced to a classroom in Japan in 2009. Saya, had the appearance of a young female teacher. She could express six basic emotions, take the register and shout orders like 'be quiet' (The Guardian, 2009). Since 2009, humanoid robot technologies have...... developed. It is now suggested that robot teachers may become regular features in educational settings, and may even 'take over' from human teachers in ten to fifteen years (cf. Amundsen, 2017 online; Gohd, 2017 online). Designed to look and act like a particular kind of human; robot teachers mediate human...... existence and roles, while also aiming to support education through sophisticated, automated, human-like interaction. Our paper explores the design and existential implications of ARTIE, a robot teacher at Oxford Brookes University (2017, online). Drawing on an initial empirical exploration we propose...

  14. Accelerating Robot Development through Integral Analysis of Human-Robot Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijmans, T.; Kanda, T.; Bartneck, C.; Ishiguro, H.; Hagita, N.

    2007-01-01

    The development of interactive robots is a complicated process, involving a plethora of psychological, technical, and contextual influences. To design a robot capable of operating "intelligently" in everyday situations, one needs a profound understanding of human-robot interaction (HRI). We propose

  15. Effectiveness of intervention with a perioperative multidisciplinary support team for radical esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yuji; Iwaya, Takeshi; Endo, Fumitaka; Shioi, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Motoi; Takahara, Takeshi; Otsuka, Koki; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Koeda, Keisuke; Mizuno, Masaru; Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kenji; Sasaki, Akira

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention by a perioperative multidisciplinary support team for radical esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 85 consecutive patients with esophageal cancer who underwent radical esophagectomy via right thoracotomy or thoracoscopic surgery with gastric tube reconstruction. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the non-intervention group (group N) from May 2011 to September 2012, 31 patients in the perioperative rehabilitation group (group R) from October 2012 to April 2014, and 33 patients in the multidisciplinary support team group (group S) from May 2014 to September 2015. Morbidity rates were 38, 45.2, and 42.4% for groups N, R, and S, respectively. Although there were no significant differences in the incidence of pneumonia among the groups, the durations of fever and C-reactive protein positivity were shorter in group S. Moreover, postoperative oral intake commenced earlier [5.9 (5-8) days] and postoperative hospital stay was shorter [19.6 (13-29) days] for group S. The intervention by a perioperative multidisciplinary support team for radical esophagectomy was effective in preventing the progression and prolongation of pneumonia as well as earlier ambulation, oral feeding, and shortening of postoperative hospitalization.

  16. The impact of precise robotic lesion length measurement on stent length selection: ramifications for stent savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Paul T; Kruse, Kevin R; Kroll, Christopher R; Patterson, Janet Y; Esposito, Michele J

    2015-09-01

    Coronary stent deployment outcomes can be negatively impacted by inaccurate lesion measurement and inappropriate stent length selection (SLS). We compared visual estimate of these parameters to those provided by the CorPath 200® Robotic PCI System. Sixty consecutive patients who underwent coronary stent placement utilizing the CorPath System were evaluated. The treating physician assessed orthogonal images and provided visual estimates of lesion length and SLS. The robotic system was then used for the same measures. SLS was considered to be accurate when visual estimate and robotic measures were in agreement. Visual estimate SLSs were considered to be "short" or "long" if they were below or above the robotic-selected stents, respectively. Only 35% (21/60) of visually estimated lesions resulted in accurate SLS, whereas 33% (20/60) and 32% (19/60) of the visually estimated SLSs were long and short, respectively. In 5 cases (8.3%), 1 less stent was placed based on the robotic lesion measurement being shorter than the visual estimate. Visual estimate assessment of lesion length and SLS is highly variable with 65% of the cases being inaccurately measured when compared to objective measures obtained from the robotic system. The 32% of the cases where lesions were visually estimated to be short represents cases that often require the use of extra stents after the full lesion is not covered by 1 stent [longitudinal geographic miss (LGM)]. Further, these data showed that the use of the robotic system prevented the use of extra stents in 8.3% of the cases. Measurement of lesions with robotic PCI may reduce measurement errors, need for extra stents, and LGM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Micro Robotics Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our research is focused on the challenges of engineering robotic systems down to sub-millimeter size scales. We work both on small mobile robots (robotic insects for...

  18. Propensity Score-Matched Analysis of Clinical and Financial Outcomes After Robotic and Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazrou, Ahmed M; Baser, Onur; Kiran, Ravi P

    2018-06-01

    The study aims to evaluate the clinical and financial outcomes of the use of robotic when compared to laparoscopic colorectal surgery and any changes in these over time. From the Premier Perspective database, patients who underwent elective laparoscopic and robotic colorectal resections from 2012 to 2014 were included. Laparoscopic colorectal resections were propensity score matched to robotic cases for patient, disease, procedure, surgeon specialty, and hospital type and volume. The two groups were compared for conversion, hospital stay, 30-day post-discharge readmission, mortality, and complications. Direct, cumulative, and total (including 30-day post-discharge) costs were evaluated. Clinical and financial outcomes were also separately assessed for each of the included years. Of 36,701 patients, 32,783 (89.3%) had laparoscopic colorectal resection and 3918 (10.7%) had robotic colorectal resection; 4438 procedures (2219 in each group) were propensity score matched. For the entire period, conversion to open approach (4.7 vs. 3.7%, p = 0.1) and hospital stay (mean days [SD] 6 [5.3] vs. 5 [4.6], p = 0.2) were comparable between robotic and laparoscopic procedures. Surgical and medical complications were also the same for the two groups. However, the robotic approach was associated with lower readmission (6.3 vs. 4.8%, p = 0.04). Wound or abdominal infection (4.7 vs. 2.3%, p = 0.01) and respiratory complications (7.4 vs. 4.7%, p = 0.02) were significantly lower for the robotic group in the final year of inclusion, 2014. Direct, cumulative, and total (including 30-day post-discharge) costs were significantly higher for robotic surgery. The difference in costs between the two approaches reduced over time (direct cost difference: 2012, $2698 vs. 2013, $2235 vs. 2014, $1402). Robotic colorectal surgery can be performed with comparable clinical outcomes to laparoscopy. With greater use of the technology, some further recovery benefits may be evident

  19. Robot fish bio-inspired fishlike underwater robots

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Alvarado, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive coverage on robot fish including design, modeling and optimization, control, autonomous control and applications. It gathers contributions by the leading researchers in the area. Readers will find the book very useful for designing and building robot fish, not only in theory but also in practice. Moreover, the book discusses various important issues for future research and development, including design methodology, control methodology, and autonomous control strategy. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students in the fields of robotics, ocean engineering and related areas.

  20. Robotics in endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibansky, David; Rothstein, Richard I

    2012-09-01

    The increasing complexity of intralumenal and emerging translumenal endoscopic procedures has created an opportunity to apply robotics in endoscopy. Computer-assisted or direct-drive robotic technology allows the triangulation of flexible tools through telemanipulation. The creation of new flexible operative platforms, along with other emerging technology such as nanobots and steerable capsules, can be transformational for endoscopic procedures. In this review, we cover some background information on the use of robotics in surgery and endoscopy, and review the emerging literature on platforms, capsules, and mini-robotic units. The development of techniques in advanced intralumenal endoscopy (endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection) and translumenal endoscopic procedures (NOTES) has generated a number of novel platforms, flexible tools, and devices that can apply robotic principles to endoscopy. The development of a fully flexible endoscopic surgical toolkit will enable increasingly advanced procedures to be performed through natural orifices. The application of platforms and new flexible tools to the areas of advanced endoscopy and NOTES heralds the opportunity to employ useful robotic technology. Following the examples of the utility of robotics from the field of laparoscopic surgery, we can anticipate the emerging role of robotic technology in endoscopy.

  1. NERVE SPARING« RADICAL HYSTERECTOMY – PREVENTION OF POST-OPERATIVE URINARY TRACT DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Barbič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical hysterectomy is performed on woman with cervical cancer or endometrial cancer that has spread to the cervix. Aims. To find whether our modified radical hysterectomy represents nerve sparing. Methods. In 28 patients, modified radical hysterectomy was applied (study group and the width of the parametria and vaginal cuff were measured. Using a point-counting technique, nerve areal density was determined in cross sections of resected parametria at 0.5 cm (A, 1 cm (B, and 1.5 cm (C from the cervix. The results were compared with 26 control patients who underwent classic radical hysterectomy. In the study group urodynamic measurements were performed after operation, and correlations with histologic data were calculated. The survival rates and adjuvant treatment were compared between the groups. Results. Adjuvant treatment was given to 53.57 % in the study and 65.38 % of patients in the control group (P > 0.3. The survival rate after 3 years was 92.85 % in the study and 84.61 % in the control group after more than 5 years. The width of the resected parametria was smaller in the study (mean: right 15.50 mm, left 15.71 mm compared with the control group (mean: right 22.69 mm; P < 0.013; left 22.96 mm; P < 0.011. The nerve areal density in the lateral part of the right parametrium (C right 6.2 % was lower in the study than in the control group (C right 9.7 %; P < 0.01. There were several correlations between parametrial width, nerve areal density and urodynamic parameters. Conclusions. Modified radical hysterectomy is less radical, and apparently also nerve sparing. It does not influence survival rates and does not impair the urinary tract function.

  2. Implementation and Reconfiguration of Robot Operating System on Human Follower Transporter Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addythia Saphala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Robotic Operation System (ROS is an im- portant platform to develop robot applications. One area of applications is for development of a Human Follower Transporter Robot (HFTR, which  can  be  considered  as a custom mobile robot utilizing differential driver steering method and equipped with Kinect sensor. This study discusses the development of the robot navigation system by implementing Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM.

  3. Presentation robot Advee

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejsa, Jiří; Věchet, Stanislav; Hrbáček, J.; Ripel, T.; Ondroušek, V.; Hrbáček, R.; Schreiber, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, 5/6 (2012), s. 307-322 ISSN 1802-1484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : mobile robot * human - robot interface * localization Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robot ics

  4. Robotic surgery update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, G; Elli, F; Horgan, S

    2004-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques have revolutionized the field of surgery. Telesurgical manipulators (robots) and new information technologies strive to improve upon currently available minimally invasive techniques and create new possibilities. A retrospective review of all robotic cases at a single academic medical center from August 2000 until November 2002 was conducted. A comprehensive literature evaluation on robotic surgical technology was also performed. Robotic technology is safely and effectively being applied at our institution. Robotic and information technologies have improved upon minimally invasive surgical techniques and created new opportunities not attainable in open surgery. Robotic technology offers many benefits over traditional minimal access techniques and has been proven safe and effective. Further research is needed to better define the optimal application of this technology. Credentialing and educational requirements also need to be delineated.

  5. Robot-laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akeel, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    A robot-laser system is described for providing a laser beam at a desired location, the system comprising: a laser beam source; a robot including a plurality of movable parts including a hollow robot arm having a central axis along which the laser source directs the laser beam; at least one mirror for reflecting the laser beam from the source to the desired location, the mirror being mounted within the robot arm to move therewith and relative thereto to about a transverse axis that extends angularly to the central axis of the robot arm; and an automatic programmable control system for automatically moving the mirror about the transverse axis relative to and in synchronization with movement of the robot arm to thereby direct the laser beam to the desired location as the arm is moved

  6. Effects of Robot Facial Characteristics and Gender in Persuasive Human-Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimi S. Ghazali

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in social robotics makes it relevant to examine the potential of robots as persuasive agents and, more specifically, to examine how robot characteristics influence the way people experience such interactions and comply with the persuasive attempts by robots. The purpose of this research is to identify how the (ostensible gender and the facial characteristics of a robot influence the extent to which people trust it and the psychological reactance they experience from its persuasive attempts. This paper reports a laboratory study where SociBot™, a robot capable of displaying different faces and dynamic social cues, delivered persuasive messages to participants while playing a game. In-game choice behavior was logged, and trust and reactance toward the advisor were measured using questionnaires. Results show that a robotic advisor with upturned eyebrows and lips (features that people tend to trust more in humans is more persuasive, evokes more trust, and less psychological reactance compared to one displaying eyebrows pointing down and lips curled downwards at the edges (facial characteristics typically not trusted in humans. Gender of the robot did not affect trust, but participants experienced higher psychological reactance when interacting with a robot of the opposite gender. Remarkably, mediation analysis showed that liking of the robot fully mediates the influence of facial characteristics on trusting beliefs and psychological reactance. Also, psychological reactance was a strong and reliable predictor of trusting beliefs but not of trusting behavior. These results suggest robots that are intended to influence human behavior should be designed to have facial characteristics we trust in humans and could be personalized to have the same gender as the user. Furthermore, personalization and adaptation techniques designed to make people like the robot more may help ensure they will also trust the robot.

  7. Robotic seeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Fountas, Spyros; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural robotics has received attention for approximately 20 years, but today there are only a few examples of the application of robots in agricultural practice. The lack of uptake may be (at least partly) because in many cases there is either no compelling economic benefit......, or there is a benefit but it is not recognized. The aim of this chapter is to quantify the economic benefits from the application of agricultural robots under a specific condition where such a benefit is assumed to exist, namely the case of early seeding and re-seeding in sugar beet. With some predefined assumptions...... with regard to speed, capacity and seed mapping, we found that among these two technical systems both early seeding with a small robot and re-seeding using a robot for a smaller part of the field appear to be financially viable solutions in sugar beet production....

  8. An Adaptive Robot Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Svenstrup, Mikael; Dalgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe an adaptive robot game, which motivates elderly people to do a regular amount of physical exercise while playing. One of the advantages of robot based games is that the initiative to play can be taken autonomously by the robot. In this case, the goal is to im......The goal of this paper is to describe an adaptive robot game, which motivates elderly people to do a regular amount of physical exercise while playing. One of the advantages of robot based games is that the initiative to play can be taken autonomously by the robot. In this case, the goal...... is to improve the mental and physical state of the user by playing a physical game with the robot. Ideally, a robot game should be simple to learn but difficult to master, providing an appropriate degree of challenge for players with different skills. In order to achieve that, the robot should be able to adapt...

  9. Facilitating Programming of Vision-Equipped Robots through Robotic Skills and Projection Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard

    The field of collaborative industrial robots is currently developing fast both in the industry and in the scientific community. Companies such as Rethink Robotics and Universal Robots are redefining the concept of an industrial robot and entire new markets and use cases are becoming relevant for ...

  10. [Transanal laparoscopic radical resection with telescopic anastomosis for low rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyong; Chen, Gang; Du, Junfeng; Chen, Guang; Wei, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; Yuan, Qiang; Sun, Liang; Bai, Xue; Zuo, Fuyi; Yu, Bo; Dong, Xing; Ji, Xiqing

    2015-06-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and clinical outcome of laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis or with colostomy by stapler through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. From January 2010 to September 2014, 37 patients underwent laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. The tumors were 4-7 cm above the anal verge. On preoperative assessment, 26 cases were T1N0M0 and 11 were T2N0M0. For all cases, successful surgery was performed. In telescopic anastomosis group, the mean operative time was (178±21) min, with average blood loss of (76±11) ml and (13±7) lymph nodes harvested. Return of bowel function was (3.0±1.2) d and the hospital stay was (12.0±4.2) d without postoperative complications. Patients were followed up for 3-45 months. Twelve months after surgery, 94.6%(35/37) patients achieved anal function Kirwan grade 1, indicating that their anal function returned to normal. Laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis or colostomy by stapler through transanal resection without abdominal incisions is safe and feasible. Satisfactory clinical outcome can be achieved mini-invasively.

  11. Evolution of robotic arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of surgical robotics is in the development of the robotic arm. This is a thorough review of the literature on the nature and development of this device with emphasis on surgical applications. We have reviewed the published literature and classified robotic arms by their application: show, industrial application, medical application, etc. There is a definite trend in the manufacture of robotic arms toward more dextrous devices, more degrees-of-freedom, and capabilities beyond the human arm. da Vinci designed the first sophisticated robotic arm in 1495 with four degrees-of-freedom and an analog on-board controller supplying power and programmability. von Kemplen's chess-playing automaton left arm was quite sophisticated. Unimate introduced the first industrial robotic arm in 1961, it has subsequently evolved into the PUMA arm. In 1963 the Rancho arm was designed; Minsky's Tentacle arm appeared in 1968, Scheinman's Stanford arm in 1969, and MIT's Silver arm in 1974. Aird became the first cyborg human with a robotic arm in 1993. In 2000 Miguel Nicolalis redefined possible man-machine capacity in his work on cerebral implantation in owl-monkeys directly interfacing with robotic arms both locally and at a distance. The robotic arm is the end-effector of robotic systems and currently is the hallmark feature of the da Vinci Surgical System making its entrance into surgical application. But, despite the potential advantages of this computer-controlled master-slave system, robotic arms have definite limitations. Ongoing work in robotics has many potential solutions to the drawbacks of current robotic surgical systems.

  12. Advanced mechanics in robotic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nava Rodríguez, Nestor Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Illustrates original and ambitious mechanical designs and techniques for the development of new robot prototypes Includes numerous figures, tables and flow charts Discusses relevant applications in robotics fields such as humanoid robots, robotic hands, mobile robots, parallel manipulators and human-centred robots

  13. Design and Implementation of Fire Extinguisher Robot with Robotic Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Abdul Waris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot is a device, which performs human task or behave like a human-being. It needs expertise skills and complex programming to design. For designing a fire fighter robot, many sensors and motors were used. User firstly send robot to an affected area, to get live image of the field with the help of mobile camera via Wi-Fi using IP camera application to laptop. If any signs of fire shown in image, user direct robot in that particular direction for confirmation. Fire sensor and temperature sensor detects and measures the reading, after confirmation robot sprinkle water on affected field. During extinguish process if any obstacle comes in between the prototype and the affected area the ultrasonic sensor detects the obstacle, in response the robotic arm moves to pick and place that obstacle to another location for clearing the path. Meanwhile if any poisonous gas is present, the gas sensor detects and indicates by making alarm.

  14. The Tactile Ethics of Soft Robotics: Designing Wisely for Human-Robot Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Thomas; Scheutz, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Soft robots promise an exciting design trajectory in the field of robotics and human-robot interaction (HRI), promising more adaptive, resilient movement within environments as well as a safer, more sensitive interface for the objects or agents the robot encounters. In particular, tactile HRI is a critical dimension for designers to consider, especially given the onrush of assistive and companion robots into our society. In this article, we propose to surface an important set of ethical challenges for the field of soft robotics to meet. Tactile HRI strongly suggests that soft-bodied robots balance tactile engagement against emotional manipulation, model intimacy on the bonding with a tool not with a person, and deflect users from personally and socially destructive behavior the soft bodies and surfaces could normally entice.

  15. Evaluation of perioperative complications and outcomes of robot-assisted radical nephroureterectomy and bladder cuff excision in a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Che Tai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For patients with localized upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC, radical nephroureterectomy with ipsilateral bladder cuff excision (RNU + BCE is the standard treatment. In recent years, robot-assisted RNU with BCE (RaRNU + BCE has been another choice of surgical intervention. This article was aimed to analyze the efficacy and perioperative outcomes regarding RaRNU + BCE through a single institutional experience. Patients and Methods: From March 2012 to November 2015, a total of 54 patients with UTUC were treated with RaRNU + BCE at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. We collected demographic data, histopathological reports, perioperative complications, and oncologic outcomes. Results: A total of 54 patients were included in our study. The mean age was 71.9 ± 9.9 (range 48–88 and the mean body mass index was 23.5 ± 2.9 (range: 16.4–30.8. The mean operating time was 314 min (RaRNU: 133.9 ± 41.4 min and RaBCE: 72.9 ± 25.7 min. The mean first docking time was 26.8 ± 7.7 min and the mean second docking time was 16.5 ± 6.7 min. The mean EBL was 87.7 ml. Pathological stage distribution was 22.2%, 27.8%, 13.0%, 31.5%, and 5.6% in pTa, pT1, pT2, pT3, and pT4, respectively. Complications occurred in 7 cases (13%, with 4 Grade I and 3 Grade II by Clavien-Dindo classification. Positive tumor involvement at bladder cuff was noted in three patients, and the bladder recurrence rate was 29.6%. Local recurrence, lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis were all noted for two patients, respectively. The cancer-specific and overall survival rate was 98.1% and 96.3%. Conclusions: Our experience showed that RaRNU + BCE is a technically feasible and safe procedure for selected patients with UTUC.

  16. Robot-Assisted Excision of a Pararectal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Patient with Previous Ileal Neobladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ploumidis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with surgical resection remaining the cornerstone of therapy. Pararectal lesions are considered to be technically difficult and pose in some cases a challenge. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first robotic-assisted pararectal GIST excision. A 43-year-old man was referred to our center with pararectal GIST recurrence, despite treatment with targeted therapy. Eleven years ago, he underwent extensive abdominal surgery including cystoprostatectomy with ileal neobladder diversion due to GIST resection in the rectoprostatic space. Robot-assisted surgical resection was successfully performed without the need for temporary colostomy. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and the pathology report confirmed a GIST recurrence with negative surgical margins and pelvic lymph nodes free of any tumor. Robotic-assisted pelvic surgery can be extended to incorporate excision of pararectal GISTs, as a safe, less invasive surgical alternative with promising oncological results and minimal injury to adjacent structures.

  17. Robotic longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis: Comparison of clinical outcomes and cost to the open approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirks, Russell C; Lorimer, Patrick D; Fruscione, Michael; Cochran, Allyson; Baker, Erin H; Iannitti, David A; Vrochides, Dionisios; Martinie, John B

    2017-09-01

    This study compares clinical and cost outcomes of robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) and open longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ) for chronic pancreatitis. Clinical and cost data were retrospectively compared between open and RAL LPJ performed at a single center from 2008-2015. Twenty-six patients underwent LPJ: 19 open and 7 RAL. Two robot-assisted cases converted to open were included in the open group for analysis. Patients undergoing RAL LPJ had less intraoperative blood loss, a shorter surgical length of stay, and lower medication costs. Operation supply cost was higher in the RAL group. No difference in hospitalization cost was found. Versus the open approach, RAL LPJ performed for chronic pancreatitis shortens hospitalization and reduces medication costs; hospitalization costs are equivalent. A higher operative cost for RAL LPJ is mitigated by a shorter hospitalization. Decreased morbidity and healthcare resource economy support use of the robotic approach for LPJ when appropriate. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Robot-assisted general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazey, Jeffrey W; Melvin, W Scott

    2004-06-01

    With the initiation of laparoscopic techniques in general surgery, we have seen a significant expansion of minimally invasive techniques in the last 16 years. More recently, robotic-assisted laparoscopy has moved into the general surgeon's armamentarium to address some of the shortcomings of laparoscopic surgery. AESOP (Computer Motion, Goleta, CA) addressed the issue of visualization as a robotic camera holder. With the introduction of the ZEUS robotic surgical system (Computer Motion), the ability to remotely operate laparoscopic instruments became a reality. US Food and Drug Administration approval in July 2000 of the da Vinci robotic surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) further defined the ability of a robotic-assist device to address limitations in laparoscopy. This includes a significant improvement in instrument dexterity, dampening of natural hand tremors, three-dimensional visualization, ergonomics, and camera stability. As experience with robotic technology increased and its applications to advanced laparoscopic procedures have become more understood, more procedures have been performed with robotic assistance. Numerous studies have shown equivalent or improved patient outcomes when robotic-assist devices are used. Initially, robotic-assisted laparoscopic cholecystectomy was deemed safe, and now robotics has been shown to be safe in foregut procedures, including Nissen fundoplication, Heller myotomy, gastric banding procedures, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. These techniques have been extrapolated to solid-organ procedures (splenectomy, adrenalectomy, and pancreatic surgery) as well as robotic-assisted laparoscopic colectomy. In this chapter, we review the evolution of robotic technology and its applications in general surgical procedures.

  19. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy in contemporary practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanagho, Youssef S.; Bhayani, Sam B.; Figenshau, Robert S., E-mail: tanaghoy@wudosis.wustl.edu [Division of Urologic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Laparoscopic renal surgery is associated with reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, enhanced cosmesis, and more rapid convalescence relative to open renal surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) is a minimally invasive, nephron-sparing alternative to laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (RN) for the management of small renal masses. While offering similar oncological outcomes to laparoscopic RN, the technical challenges and prolonged learning curve associated with LPN limit its wider dissemination. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN), although still an evolving procedure with no long-term data, has emerged as a viable alternative to LPN, with favorable preliminary outcomes. This article provides an overview of the role of RAPN in the management of renal cell carcinoma. The clinical indications and principles of surgical technique for this procedure are discussed. The oncological, renal functional, and perioperative outcomes of RAPN are also evaluated, as are complication rates.

  20. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy in contemporary practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanagho, Youssef S.; Bhayani, Sam B.; Figenshau, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic renal surgery is associated with reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, enhanced cosmesis, and more rapid convalescence relative to open renal surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) is a minimally invasive, nephron-sparing alternative to laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (RN) for the management of small renal masses. While offering similar oncological outcomes to laparoscopic RN, the technical challenges and prolonged learning curve associated with LPN limit its wider dissemination. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN), although still an evolving procedure with no long-term data, has emerged as a viable alternative to LPN, with favorable preliminary outcomes. This article provides an overview of the role of RAPN in the management of renal cell carcinoma. The clinical indications and principles of surgical technique for this procedure are discussed. The oncological, renal functional, and perioperative outcomes of RAPN are also evaluated, as are complication rates.

  1. Grasping in Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Grasping in Robotics contains original contributions in the field of grasping in robotics with a broad multidisciplinary approach. This gives the possibility of addressing all the major issues related to robotized grasping, including milestones in grasping through the centuries, mechanical design issues, control issues, modelling achievements and issues, formulations and software for simulation purposes, sensors and vision integration, applications in industrial field and non-conventional applications (including service robotics and agriculture).   The contributors to this book are experts in their own diverse and wide ranging fields. This multidisciplinary approach can help make Grasping in Robotics of interest to a very wide audience. In particular, it can be a useful reference book for researchers, students and users in the wide field of grasping in robotics from many different disciplines including mechanical design, hardware design, control design, user interfaces, modelling, simulation, sensors and hum...

  2. Designing Emotionally Expressive Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiourti, Christiana; Weiss, Astrid; Wac, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Socially assistive agents, be it virtual avatars or robots, need to engage in social interactions with humans and express their internal emotional states, goals, and desires. In this work, we conducted a comparative study to investigate how humans perceive emotional cues expressed by humanoid...... robots through five communication modalities (face, head, body, voice, locomotion) and examined whether the degree of a robot's human-like embodiment affects this perception. In an online survey, we asked people to identify emotions communicated by Pepper -a highly human-like robot and Hobbit – a robot...... for robots....

  3. Return to work following robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy: A single-center cohort study to compare duration of sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mechow, Stefanie; Graefen, Markus; Haese, Alexander; Tennstedt, Pierre; Pehrke, Dirk; Friedersdorff, Frank; Beyer, Burkhard

    2018-06-01

    To compare the duration of sick leave in patients with localized prostate cancer after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic RP (ORP) at a German high-volume prostate cancer center. The data of 1,415 patients treated with RP at Martini Klinik, Prostate Cancer Center between 2012 and 2016 were, retrospectively, analyzed. Information on employment status, monthly revenues and days of work missed due to sickness were assessed via online questionnaire. Additional data were retrieved from our institutional database. Medians and interquartile ranges (IQR) were reported for continuous data. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to compare both surgical techniques for return to work time after RP. Median time elapsed between surgery and return to work comprised 42 days in patients undergoing RARP (IQR: 21-70) and ORP (IQR: 28-84, P = 0.05). In Cox regression analysis, surgical approach showed no impact on return to work time (RARP vs. ORP hazard ratio = 1, 95% CI: 0.91-1.16, P = 0.69). Return to work time was significantly associated with employment status, physical workload and monthly income (all PLimitation of this study is the nonrandomized design in a single-center. As the surgical approach did not show any influence on the number of days missed from work in patients undergoing RP, no superiority of either RARP or ORP could be identified for return to work time in a German cohort. Both surgical approaches are safe options usually allowing the patients to resume normal activities including work after an appropriate convalescence period. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... How radical change in public policy has occurred in the past is then documented. We find examples of radical change by chance, radical change by consensus, radical change by learning, and radical change by entrepreneurial design...

  5. Fundamentals of soft robot locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisti, M; Picardi, G; Laschi, C

    2017-05-01

    Soft robotics and its related technologies enable robot abilities in several robotics domains including, but not exclusively related to, manipulation, manufacturing, human-robot interaction and locomotion. Although field applications have emerged for soft manipulation and human-robot interaction, mobile soft robots appear to remain in the research stage, involving the somehow conflictual goals of having a deformable body and exerting forces on the environment to achieve locomotion. This paper aims to provide a reference guide for researchers approaching mobile soft robotics, to describe the underlying principles of soft robot locomotion with its pros and cons, and to envisage applications and further developments for mobile soft robotics. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Acceptance, Prevalence and Indications for Robot-Assisted Laparoscopy - Results of a Survey Among Urologists in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imkamp, Florian; Herrmann, Thomas R W; Tolkach, Yuri; Dziuba, Sebastian; Stolzenburg, Jens U; Rassweiler, Jens; Sulser, Tullio; Zimmermann, Uwe; Merseburger, Axel S; Kuczyk, Markus A; Burchardt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopy (RAL) is being widely accepted in the field of urology as a replacement for conventional laparoscopy (CL). Nevertheless, the process of its integration in clinical routines has been rather spontaneous. To determine the prevalence of robotic systems (RS) in urological clinics in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, the acceptance of RAL among urologists as a replacement for CL and its current use for 25 different urological indications. To elucidate the practice patterns of RAL, a survey at hospitals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland was conducted. All surgically active urology departments in Germany (303), Austria (37) and Switzerland (84) received a questionnaire with questions related to the one-year period prior to the survey. The response rate was 63%. Among the participants, 43% were universities, 45% were tertiary care centres, and 8% were secondary care hospitals. A total of 60 RS (Germany 35, Austria 8, Switzerland 17) were available, and the majority (68%) were operated under public ownership. The perception of RAL and the anticipated superiority of RAL significantly differed between robotic and non-robotic surgeons. For only two urologic indications were more than 50% of the procedures performed using RAL: pyeloplasty (58%) and transperitoneal radical prostatectomy (75%). On average, 35% of robotic surgeons and only 14% of non-robotic surgeons anticipated RAL superiority in some of the 25 indications. This survey provides a detailed insight into RAL implementation in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. RAL is currently limited to a few urological indications with a small number of high-volume robotic centres. These results might suggest that a saturation of clinics using RS has been achieved but that the existing robotic capacities are being utilized ineffectively. The possible reasons for this finding are discussed, and certain strategies to solve these problems are offered. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Advancing the Strategic Messages Affecting Robot Trust Effect: The Dynamic of User- and Robot-Generated Content on Human-Robot Trust and Interaction Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuhua Jake; Lee, Seungcheol Austin

    2016-09-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) will soon transform and shift the communication landscape such that people exchange messages with robots. However, successful HRI requires people to trust robots, and, in turn, the trust affects the interaction. Although prior research has examined the determinants of human-robot trust (HRT) during HRI, no research has examined the messages that people received before interacting with robots and their effect on HRT. We conceptualize these messages as SMART (Strategic Messages Affecting Robot Trust). Moreover, we posit that SMART can ultimately affect actual HRI outcomes (i.e., robot evaluations, robot credibility, participant mood) by affording the persuasive influences from user-generated content (UGC) on participatory Web sites. In Study 1, participants were assigned to one of two conditions (UGC/control) in an original experiment of HRT. Compared with the control (descriptive information only), results showed that UGC moderated the correlation between HRT and interaction outcomes in a positive direction (average Δr = +0.39) for robots as media and robots as tools. In Study 2, we explored the effect of robot-generated content but did not find similar moderation effects. These findings point to an important empirical potential to employ SMART in future robot deployment.

  8. The role of intraoperative ultrasound in small renal mass robotic enucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Gunelli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As a result of the growing evidence on tumor radical resection in literature, simple enucleation has become one of the best techniques associated to robotic surgery in the treatment of renal neoplasia, as it guarantees minimal invasiveness and the maximum sparing of renal tissue, facilitating the use of reduced or zero ischemia techniques during resection. The use of a robotic ultrasound probe represents a useful tool to detect and define tumor location, especially in poorly exophytic small renal mass. Materials and methods: A total of 22 robotic enucleations were performed on < 3 cm renal neoplasias (PADUA score 18 Pz 6/7 e 4 Pz 8 using a 12-5 MHz robotic ultrasound probe (BK Drop-In 8826. Results: Once kidney had been isolated from the adipose capsule at the site of the neoplasia (2, the exact position of the lesion could be easily identified in all cases (22/22, even for mostly endophytic lesions, thanks to the insertion of the ultrasound probe through the assistant port. Images were produced and visualized by the surgeon using the TilePro feature of the DaVinci surgical system for producing a picture-in-picture image on the console screen. The margins of resection were then marked with cautery, thus allowing for speedy anatomical dissection. This reduced the time of ischemia to 8 min (6-13 and facilitated the enucleation technique when performed without clamping the renal peduncle (6/22. No complications due to the use of the ultrasound probe were observed. Conclusions: The use of an intraoperative robotic ultrasound probe has allowed for easier identification of small, mostly endophytic neoplasias, better anatomical approach, shorter ischemic time, reduced risk of pseudocapsule rupture during dissection, and easier enucleation in cases performed without clamping. It is noteworthy that the use of intraoperative ultrasound probe allows mental reconstruction of the tumor through an accurate 3D vision of the hidden field during

  9. The role of intraoperative ultrasound in small renal mass robotic enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunelli, Roberta; Fiori, Massimo; Salaris, Cristiano; Salomone, Umberto; Urbinati, Marco; Vici, Alexia; Zenico, Teo; Bertocco, Mauro

    2016-12-30

    As a result of the growing evidence on tumor radical resection in literature, simple enucleation has become one of the best techniques associated to robotic surgery in the treatment of renal neoplasia, as it guarantees minimal invasiveness and the maximum sparing of renal tissue, facilitating the use of reduced or zero ischemia techniques during resection. The use of a robotic ultrasound probe represents a useful tool to detect and define tumor location, especially in poorly exophytic small renal mass. A total of 22 robotic enucleations were performed on < 3 cm renal neoplasias (PADUA score 18 Pz 6/7 e 4 Pz 8) using a 12-5 MHz robotic ultrasound probe (BK Drop-In 8826). Once kidney had been isolated from the adipose capsule at the site of the neoplasia (2), the exact position of the lesion could be easily identified in all cases (22/22), even for mostly endophytic lesions, thanks to the insertion of the ultrasound probe through the assistant port. Images were produced and visualized by the surgeon using the TilePro feature of the DaVinci surgical system for producing a picture-in-picture image on the console screen. The margins of resection were then marked with cautery, thus allowing for speedy anatomical dissection. This reduced the time of ischemia to 8 min (6-13) and facilitated the enucleation technique when performed without clamping the renal peduncle (6/22). No complications due to the use of the ultrasound probe were observed. The use of an intraoperative robotic ultrasound probe has allowed for easier identification of small, mostly endophytic neoplasias, better anatomical approach, shorter ischemic time, reduced risk of pseudocapsule rupture during dissection, and easier enucleation in cases performed without clamping. It is noteworthy that the use of intraoperative ultrasound probe allows mental reconstruction of the tumor through an accurate 3D vision of the hidden field during surgical dissection.

  10. Robotic and endoscopic transaxillary thyroidectomies may be cost prohibitive when compared to standard cervical thyroidectomy: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Jennifer C; Lee, Cho Rok; Brunaud, Laurent; Kleiman, David A; Chung, Woong Youn; Fahey, Thomas J; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a cost analysis of the standard cervical, gasless transaxillary endoscopic, and gasless transaxillary robotic thyroidectomy approaches based on medical costs in the United States. A retrospective review of 140 patients who underwent standard cervical, transaxillary endoscopic, or transaxillary robotic thyroidectomy at 2 tertiary centers was conducted. The cost model included operating room charges, anesthesia fee, consumables cost, equipment depreciation, and maintenance cost. Sensitivity analyses assessed individual cost variables. The mean operative times for the standard cervical, transaxillary endoscopic, and transaxillary robotic approaches were 121 ± 18.9, 185 ± 26.0, and 166 ± 29.4 minutes, respectively. The total cost for the standard cervical, transaxillary endoscopic, and transaxillary robotic approaches were $9,028 ± $891, $12,505 ± $1,222, and $13,670 ± $1,384, respectively. Transaxillary approaches were significantly more expensive than the standard cervical technique (standard cervical/transaxillary endoscopic, P cost when transaxillary endoscopic operative time decreased to 111 minutes and transaxillary robotic operative time decreased to 68 minutes. Increasing the case load did not resolve the cost difference. Transaxillary endoscopic and transaxillary robotic thyroidectomies are significantly more expensive than the standard cervical approach. Decreasing operative times reduces this cost difference. The greater expense may be prohibitive in countries with a flat reimbursement schedule. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Next-generation robotic surgery--from the aspect of surgical robots developed by industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadate, Ryu; Arata, Jumpei; Hashizume, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    At present, much of the research conducted worldwide focuses on extending the ability of surgical robots. One approach is to extend robotic dexterity. For instance, accessibility and dexterity of the surgical instruments remains the largest issue for reduced port surgery such as single port surgery or natural orifice surgery. To solve this problem, a great deal of research is currently conducted in the field of robotics. Enhancing the surgeon's perception is an approach that uses advanced sensor technology. The real-time data acquired through the robotic system combined with the data stored in the robot (such as the robot's location) provide a major advantage. This paper aims at introducing state-of-the-art products and pre-market products in this technological advancement, namely the robotic challenge in extending dexterity and hopefully providing the path to robotic surgery in the near future.

  12. Humanlike Robots - The Upcoming Revolution in Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2009-01-01

    Humans have always sought to imitate the human appearance, functions and intelligence. Human-like robots, which for many years have been a science fiction, are increasingly becoming an engineering reality resulting from the many advances in biologically inspired technologies. These biomimetic technologies include artificial intelligence, artificial vision and hearing as well as artificial muscles, also known as electroactive polymers (EAP). Robots, such as the vacuum cleaner Rumba and the robotic lawnmower, that don't have human shape, are already finding growing use in homes worldwide. As opposed to other human-made machines and devices, this technology raises also various questions and concerns and they need to be addressed as the technology advances. These include the need to prevent accidents, deliberate harm, or their use in crime. In this paper the state-of-the-art of the ultimate goal of biomimetics, the development of humanlike robots, the potentials and the challenges are reviewed.

  13. Humanlike robots: the upcoming revolution in robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2009-08-01

    Humans have always sought to imitate the human appearance, functions and intelligence. Human-like robots, which for many years have been a science fiction, are increasingly becoming an engineering reality resulting from the many advances in biologically inspired technologies. These biomimetic technologies include artificial intelligence, artificial vision and hearing as well as artificial muscles, also known as electroactive polymers (EAP). Robots, such as the vacuum cleaner Rumba and the robotic lawnmower, that don't have human shape, are already finding growing use in homes worldwide. As opposed to other human-made machines and devices, this technology raises also various questions and concerns and they need to be addressed as the technology advances. These include the need to prevent accidents, deliberate harm, or their use in crime. In this paper the state-of-the-art of the ultimate goal of biomimetics, the development of humanlike robots, the potentials and the challenges are reviewed.

  14. Inverse kinematic solution for near-simple robots and its application to robot calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Samad A.; Roston, Gerald P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper provides an inverse kinematic solution for a class of robot manipulators called near-simple manipulators. The kinematics of these manipulators differ from those of simple-robots by small parameter variations. Although most robots are by design simple, in practice, due to manufacturing tolerances, every robot is near-simple. The method in this paper gives an approximate inverse kinematics solution for real time applications based on the nominal solution for these robots. The validity of the results are tested both by a simulation study and by applying the algorithm to a PUMA robot.

  15. Fate of free radicals generated during one-electron reductions of 4-alkyl-1,4-peroxyquinols by cytochrome P-450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumibe, N.P.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Free radicals resulting from the one-electron reduction and subsequent homolytic cleavage of oxygen-oxygen bonds by heme proteins are likely to be responsible for some aspects of the toxicity of organic hydroperoxides. In the present work, effects of the 4-alkyl substituent of 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-alkyl-4-hydroperoxycytohexa-2,5-dienones on radical production were investigated with microsomal cytochrome P-450 from rat liver. Quinoxy radicals from homolysis of the peroxyquinols underwent β-scission to produce a quinone and an alkyl radical, and this process occurred with increasing frequency as the stability of the alkyl radical increased. The fate of benzyl and 2-phenylethyl radicals generated from the appropriately substituted peroxyquinols was investigated also. The former was converted to benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, and toluene and the latter to 2-phenylethanol, phenylacetaldehyde, ethylbenzene, styrene, and benzaldehyde. Oxygen-18 labeling studies demonstrate that 80-85% of the benzyl alcohol incorporated oxygen from the hydroperoxide and the balance from molecular oxygen. This indicates that the predominant reaction pathway involved recombination between the benzyl radical and the iron-bound hydroxyl radical of the P-450 intermediate complex. By contrast, about 50% of 2-phenylethanol from the 2-phenylethyl radical incorporated oxygen from water and the balance from O 2 . Two alternative mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of 2-phenylethanol that contained oxygen from water and the concurrent formation of styrene: (a) oxygen exchange of the P-450 intermediate with water, followed by hydrogen abstraction and radical recombination reactions with the P-450 complex, or (b) oxidation of the radical to the 2-phenylethyl cation followed by proton elimination and hydration

  16. Fish and robots swimming together: attraction towards the robot demands biomimetic locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Stefano; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2012-08-07

    The integration of biomimetic robots in a fish school may enable a better understanding of collective behaviour, offering a new experimental method to test group feedback in response to behavioural modulations of its 'engineered' member. Here, we analyse a robotic fish and individual golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) swimming together in a water tunnel at different flow velocities. We determine the positional preference of fish with respect to the robot, and we study the flow structure using a digital particle image velocimetry system. We find that biomimetic locomotion is a determinant of fish preference as fish are more attracted towards the robot when its tail is beating rather than when it is statically immersed in the water as a 'dummy'. At specific conditions, the fish hold station behind the robot, which may be due to the hydrodynamic advantage obtained by swimming in the robot's wake. This work makes a compelling case for the need of biomimetic locomotion in promoting robot-animal interactions and it strengthens the hypothesis that biomimetic robots can be used to study and modulate collective animal behaviour.

  17. Micro robot bible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jin Yeong

    2000-08-01

    This book deals with micro robot, which tells of summary of robots like entertainment robots and definition of robots, introduction of micro mouse about history, composition and rules, summary of micro controller with its history, appearance and composition, introduction of stepping motor about types, structure, basic characteristics, and driving ways, summary of sensor section, power, understanding of 80C196KC micro controller, basic driving program searching a maze algorithm, smooth turn and making of tracer line.

  18. Micro robot bible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin Yeong

    2000-08-15

    This book deals with micro robot, which tells of summary of robots like entertainment robots and definition of robots, introduction of micro mouse about history, composition and rules, summary of micro controller with its history, appearance and composition, introduction of stepping motor about types, structure, basic characteristics, and driving ways, summary of sensor section, power, understanding of 80C196KC micro controller, basic driving program searching a maze algorithm, smooth turn and making of tracer line.

  19. Robots at Work

    OpenAIRE

    Graetz, Georg; Michaels, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Despite ubiquitous discussions of robots' potential impact, there is almost no systematic empirical evidence on their economic effects. In this paper we analyze for the first time the economic impact of industrial robots, using new data on a panel of industries in 17 countries from 1993-2007. We find that industrial robots increased both labor productivity and value added. Our panel identification is robust to numerous controls, and we find similar results instrumenting increased robot use wi...

  20. To Err Is Robot: How Humans Assess and Act toward an Erroneous Social Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Mirnig

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a user study for which we purposefully programmed faulty behavior into a robot’s routine. It was our aim to explore if participants rate the faulty robot different from an error-free robot and which reactions people show in interaction with a faulty robot. The study was based on our previous research on robot errors where we detected typical error situations and the resulting social signals of our participants during social human–robot interaction. In contrast to our previous work, where we studied video material in which robot errors occurred unintentionally, in the herein reported user study, we purposefully elicited robot errors to further explore the human interaction partners’ social signals following a robot error. Our participants interacted with a human-like NAO, and the robot either performed faulty or free from error. First, the robot asked the participants a set of predefined questions and then it asked them to complete a couple of LEGO building tasks. After the interaction, we asked the participants to rate the robot’s anthropomorphism, likability, and perceived intelligence. We also interviewed the participants on their opinion about the interaction. Additionally, we video-coded the social signals the participants showed during their interaction with the robot as well as the answers they provided the robot with. Our results show that participants liked the faulty robot significantly better than the robot that interacted flawlessly. We did not find significant differences in people’s ratings of the robot’s anthropomorphism and perceived intelligence. The qualitative data confirmed the questionnaire results in showing that although the participants recognized the robot’s mistakes, they did not necessarily reject the erroneous robot. The annotations of the video data further showed that gaze shifts (e.g., from an object to the robot or vice versa and laughter are typical reactions to unexpected robot behavior

  1. ROILA : RObot Interaction LAnguage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubin, O.

    2011-01-01

    The number of robots in our society is increasing rapidly. The number of service robots that interact with everyday people already outnumbers industrial robots. The easiest way to communicate with these service robots, such as Roomba or Nao, would be natural speech. However, the limitations

  2. The games radicals play : special issue on free radicals and radical ions

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, J.C.; Williams, F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry and Physics have aptly been described as “most excellent children of Intellect and Art” [1]. Both these “children” engage with many playthings, and molecules rank as one of their first favorites, especially radicals, which are amongst the most lively and exciting. Checking out radicals dancing to the music of entropy round their potential energy ballrooms is surely both entertaining and enlightening. Radicals’ old favorite convolutions are noteworthy, but the new styles, modes and a...

  3. Erector spinae plane block for radical mastectomy: A new indication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, M; Costa, D; Brazão, I

    2018-02-01

    The erector spinae plane block is a technique recently described by Forero et al. in September 2016. It has applications in the control of chronic pain with neuropathic component of the chest wall, and for pain control in thoracoscopic surgery. In this article, we describe the use of this technique as part of a multimodal analgesic approach in a 40-year-old woman, who underwent radical mastectomy due to breast cancer. By performing this block before anesthetic induction, we have achieved an opioid sparing effect, avoiding a possible immunomodulatory effect, although not yet proven in humans. During hospitalization, the patient reported no pain (0/10 in numeric scale), without resorting to rescue analgesia. The easy, fast and safe execution of erector spinae plane block makes it a promising technique in the context of surgical pain during radical mastectomy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Time resolved resonance Raman spectra of anilino radical and aniline radical cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.; Schuler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    We report, in this paper, submicrosecond time resolved resonance Raman spectra of anilino radical and its radical cation as observed in pulse radiolytic studies of the oxidation of aniline in aqueous solution. By excitation in resonance with the broad and weak electronic transition of anilino radical at 400 nm (ε--1250 M -1 cm -1 ) we have observed, for the first time, the vibrational features of this radical. The Wilson ν 8 /sub a/ ring stretching mode at 1560 cm -1 is most strongly resonance enhanced. The ν 7 /sub a/ CN stretching band at 1505 cm -1 , which is shifted to higher frequency by 231 cm -1 with respect to aniline, is also prominent. The frequency of this latter mode indicates that the CN bond in the radical has considerable double bond character. The Raman spectrum of aniline radical cation, excited in resonance with the --425 nm electronic absorption (ε--4000 M -1 cm -1 ), shows features which are similar to phenoxyl radical. Most of the observed frequencies of this radical in solution are in good agreement with vibrational energies determined by recent laser photoelectron spectroscopic studies in the vapor phase. The bands most strongly enhanced in the resonance Raman spectrum are, however, weak in the photoelectron spectrum. While the vibrational frequencies observed for anilino radical and its isoelectronic cation are quite similar, the resonance enhancement patterns are very different. In particular the ν 14 b 2 mode of anilino radical observed at 1324 cm -1 is highly resonance enhanced because of strong vibronic coupling between the 400 nm 2 A 2 -- 2 B 1 and the higher 2 B 1 -- 2 B 1 electronic transitions

  5. Evidence for robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Ravikiran; Nathwani, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Robots have been successfully used in commercial industry and have enabled humans to perform tasks which are repetitive, dangerous and requiring extreme force. Their role has evolved and now includes many aspects of surgery to improve safety and precision. Orthopaedic surgery is largely performed on bones which are rigid immobile structures which can easily be performed by robots with great precision. Robots have been designed for use in orthopaedic surgery including joint arthroplasty and spine surgery. Experimental studies have been published evaluating the role of robots in arthroscopy and trauma surgery. In this article, we will review the incorporation of robots in orthopaedic surgery looking into the evidence in their use. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  6. Patient body image, self-esteem, and cosmetic results of minimally invasive robotic cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İyigün, Taner; Kaya, Mehmet; Gülbeyaz, Sevil Özgül; Fıstıkçı, Nurhan; Uyanık, Gözde; Yılmaz, Bilge; Onan, Burak; Erkanlı, Korhan

    2017-03-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures reveal the quality of surgical care from the patient's perspective. We aimed to compare body image, self-esteem, hospital anxiety and depression, and cosmetic outcomes by using validated tools between patients undergoing robot-assisted surgery and those undergoing conventional open surgery. This single-center, multidisciplinary, randomized, prospective study of 62 patients who underwent cardiac surgery was conducted at Hospital from May 2013 to January 2015. The patients were divided into two groups: the robotic group (n = 33) and the open group (n = 29). The study employed five different tools to assess body image, self-esteem, and overall patient-rated scar satisfaction. There were statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of self-esteem scores (p = 0.038), body image scores (p = 0.026), overall Observer Scar Assessment Scale (p = 0.013), and overall Patient Scar Assessment Scale (p = 0.036) scores in favor of the robotic group during the postoperative period. Robot-assisted surgery protected the patient's body image and self-esteem, while conventional open surgery decreased these levels but without causing pathologies. Preoperative depression and anxiety level was reduced by both robot-assisted surgery and conventional open surgery. The groups did not significantly differ on Patient Satisfaction Scores and depression/anxiety scores. The results of this study clearly demonstrated that a minimally invasive approach using robotic-assisted surgery has advantages in terms of body image, self-esteem, and cosmetic outcomes over the conventional approach in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radical Nephrectomy for Primary Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma Near the Kidney has a Beneficial Effect on Disease-Free Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhu, Jinsoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Lee, Kyo Won; Park, Hyojun; Park, Jae Berm; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Sung Joo

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the clinical impact of radical nephrectomy on retroperitoneal liposarcoma near the kidney. Data of patients who underwent surgery for unilateral primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma near the kidney were retrospectively collected. Patients were divided into four groups according to whether they underwent nephrectomy and combined resection of other organs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate disease-free survival and overall survival. Multivariable Cox analysis was used to analyze factors related to disease-free survival and overall survival. Nephrectomy (HR = 0.260, CI = 0.078-0.873, p = 0.029) had a beneficial effect on disease-free survival, while interaction model of nephrectomy*other organ resection (HR = 4.655, CI = 1.767-12.263, p = 0.002) showed poor disease-free survival. Other organ resection was not related to disease-free survival (HR = 1.543, CI = 0.146-16.251, p = 0.718). Operation method (p = 0.007) and FNCLCC grade (p free survival. While combined organ resection without nephrectomy group (HR = 1.604, CI = 0.167-15.370, p = 0.682) and radical nephrectomy with combined organ resection group (HR = 1.309, CI = 0.448-3.825, p = 0.622) did not show significant difference in disease-free survival from the mass excision only group, radical nephrectomy without combined organ resection group (HR = 0.279, CI = 0.078-0.991, p = 0.048) showed superior disease-free survival. Radical nephrectomy of unilateral primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma near the kidney has a beneficial effect on disease-free survival.

  8. Message Encryption in Robot Operating System: Collateral Effects of Hardening Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rodríguez-Lera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In human–robot interaction situations, robot sensors collect huge amounts of data from the environment in order to characterize the situation. Some of the gathered data ought to be treated as private, such as medical data (i.e., medication guidelines, personal, and safety information (i.e., images of children, home habits, alarm codes, etc.. However, most robotic software development frameworks are not designed for securely managing this information. This paper analyzes the scenario of hardening one of the most widely used robotic middlewares, Robot Operating System (ROS. The study investigates a robot’s performance when ciphering the messages interchanged between ROS nodes under the publish/subscribe paradigm. In particular, this research focuses on the nodes that manage cameras and LIDAR sensors, which are two of the most extended sensing solutions in mobile robotics, and analyzes the collateral effects on the robot’s achievement under different computing capabilities and encryption algorithms (3DES, AES, and Blowfish to robot performance. The findings present empirical evidence that simple encryption algorithms are lightweight enough to provide cyber-security even in low-powered robots when carefully designed and implemented. Nevertheless, these techniques come with a number of serious drawbacks regarding robot autonomy and performance if they are applied randomly. To avoid these issues, we define a taxonomy that links the type of ROS message, computational units, and the encryption methods. As a result, we present a model to select the optimal options for hardening a mobile robot using ROS.

  9. 1st Iberian Robotics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Sanfeliu, Alberto; Ferre, Manuel; ROBOT2013; Advances in robotics

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the ROBOT 2013: FIRST IBERIAN ROBOTICS CONFERENCE and it can be said that included both state of the art and more practical presentations dealing with implementation problems, support technologies and future applications. A growing interest in Assistive Robotics, Agricultural Robotics, Field Robotics, Grasping and Dexterous Manipulation, Humanoid Robots, Intelligent Systems and Robotics, Marine Robotics, has been demonstrated by the very relevant number of contributions. Moreover, ROBOT2013 incorporates a special session on Legal and Ethical Aspects in Robotics that is becoming a topic of key relevance. This Conference was held in Madrid (28-29 November 2013), organised by the Sociedad Española para la Investigación y Desarrollo en Robótica (SEIDROB) and by the Centre for Automation and Robotics - CAR (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC)), along with the co-operation of Grupo Temático de Robótica CEA-GT...

  10. Multimodal hybrid imaging agents for sentinel node mapping as a means to (re)connect nuclear medicine to advances made in robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KleinJan, Gijs H; van den Berg, Nynke S; de Jong, Jeroen; Wit, Esther M; Thygessen, Helene; Vegt, Erik; van der Poel, Henk G; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2016-07-01

    Radical prostatectomy and complementary extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) and non-sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) at risk of containing metastases are increasingly being performed using high-tech robot-assisted approaches. Although this technological evolution has clear advantages, the physical nature of robotic systems limits the integrated use of routine radioguided surgery technologies. Hence, engineering effort in robotics are focused on the integration of fluorescence guidance technologies. Using the hybrid SN tracer indocyanine green-(99m)Tc-nanocolloid (radioactive and fluorescent), for the first time in combination with a robot-integrated laparoscope, we investigated whether the robot-assisted approach affects the accuracy of fluorescence detection of SNs identified preoperatively using nuclear medicine. The study included 55 patients (Briganti nomogram-based risk >5 % on LN metastases) scheduled for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, SN biopsy and ePLND. Following indocyanine green-(99m)Tc-nanocolloid injection, preoperative nuclear imaging (lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT) was used to locate the SN(s). The fluorescence laparoscope was used intraoperatively to identify the SN(s) with standard fluorescence settings (in 50 patients) and with customized settings (in 5 patients). The number and location of the SNs, the radioactive, fluorescence (both in vivo and ex vivo) and tumour status of the resected SNs/LNs, and postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. Combined, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging identified 212 SNs (median 4 per patient). Intraoperative fluorescence imaging using standard fluorescence settings visualized 80.4 % (148/184 SNs; 50 patients; ex vivo 97.8 %). This increased to 85.7 % (12/14 SNs; 5 patients; ex vivo 100 %) with customized fluorescence settings. SPECT/CT images provided guidance towards the residual SNs. Ex vivo all removed SNs were radioactive. SNs

  11. Springer handbook of robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Khatib, Oussama

    2016-01-01

    The second edition of this handbook provides a state-of-the-art cover view on the various aspects in the rapidly developing field of robotics. Reaching for the human frontier, robotics is vigorously engaged in the growing challenges of new emerging domains. Interacting, exploring, and working with humans, the new generation of robots will increasingly touch people and their lives. The credible prospect of practical robots among humans is the result of the scientific endeavour of a half a century of robotic developments that established robotics as a modern scientific discipline. The ongoing vibrant expansion and strong growth of the field during the last decade has fueled this second edition of the Springer Handbook of Robotics. The first edition of the handbook soon became a landmark in robotics publishing and won the American Association of Publishers PROSE Award for Excellence in Physical Sciences & Mathematics as well as the organization’s Award for Engineering & Technology. The second edition o...

  12. Innovations in robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew; Rivera, Marcelino

    2016-05-01

    Developments in robotic surgery have continued to advance care throughout the field of urology. The purpose of this review is to evaluate innovations in robotic surgery over the past 18 months. The release of the da Vinci Xi system heralded an improvement on the Si system with improved docking, the ability to further manipulate robotic arms without clashing, and an autofocus universal endoscope. Robotic simulation continues to evolve with improvements in simulation training design to include augmented reality in robotic surgical education. Robotic-assisted laparoendoscopic single-site surgery continues to evolve with improvements on technique that allow for tackling previously complex pathologic surgical anatomy including urologic oncology and reconstruction. Last, innovations of new surgical platforms with robotic systems to improve surgeon ergonomics and efficiency in ureteral and renal surgery are being applied in the clinical setting. Urologic surgery continues to be at the forefront of the revolution of robotic surgery with advancements in not only existing technology but also creation of entirely novel surgical systems.

  13. Robotic-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery for Gynecologic and Urologic Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    increase the risk for cervical cancer are multiple sexual partners, early sexual activity, infection with the human papillomavirus, and cigarette smoking, whereas barrier-type of contraception as a risk factor decreases the risk of cervical cancer. Prostate cancer is ranked first in men in Canada in terms of the number of new cases among all male cancers (25,500 of 89,300 or 28.6%). The impact on men who develop prostate cancer is substantial given the potential for erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. Prostate cancer arises within the prostate gland, which resides in the male reproductive system and near the bladder. Radical retropubic prostatectomy is the gold standard treatment for localized prostate cancer. Prostate cancer affects men above 60 years of age. Other risk factors include a family history of prostate cancer, being of African descent, being obese, consuming a diet high in fat, physical inactivity, and working with cadium. The Da Vinci Surgical System The Da Vinci Surgical System is a robotic device. There are four main components to the system: 1) the surgeon’s console, where the surgeon sits and views a magnified three-dimensional image of the surgical field; 2) patient side-cart, which sits beside the patient and consists of three instrument arms and one endoscope arm; 3) detachable instruments (endowrist instruments and intuitive masters), which simulate fine motor human movements. The hand movements of the surgeon’s hands at the surgeon’s console are translated into smaller ones by the robotic device and are acted out by the attached instruments; 4) three-dimensional vision system: the camera unit or endoscope arm. The main advantages of use of the robotic device are: 1) the precision of the instrument and improved dexterity due to the use of “wristed” instruments; 2) three-dimensional imaging, with improved ability to locate blood vessels, nerves and tissues; 3) the surgeon’s console, which reduces fatigue accompanied with

  14. Faster-than-real-time robot simulation for plan development and robot safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, C.D. III; Dalton, R.; Ogles, J.; Tulenko, J.S.; Zhou, X.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Florida, in cooperation with the Universities of Texas, Tennessee, and Michigan and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is developing an advanced robotic system for the US Department of Energy under the University Program for Robotics for Advanced Reactors. As part of this program, the University of Florida has been pursuing the development of a faster-than-real-time robotic simulation program for planning and control of mobile robotic operations to ensure the efficient and safe operation of mobile robots in nuclear power plants and other hazardous environments

  15. Soft-Material Robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L; Nurzaman, SG; Iida, Fumiya

    2017-01-01

    There has been a boost of research activities in robotics using soft materials in the past ten years. It is expected that the use and control of soft materials can help realize robotic systems that are safer, cheaper, and more adaptable than the level that the conventional rigid-material robots can achieve. Contrary to a number of existing review and position papers on soft-material robotics, which mostly present case studies and/or discuss trends and challenges, the review focuses on the fun...

  16. AssistMe robot, an assistance robotic platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Alexan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a full size assistance robot. Its main purpose it to assist a person and eventually avoid a life threatening situation. Its implementation revolves around a chipKIT Arduino board that interconnects a robotic base controller with a 7 inch TABLET PC and various sensors. Due to the Android and Arduino combination, the robot can interact with the person and provide an easy development platform for future improvement and feature adding. The TABLET PC is Webcam, WIFI and Bluetooth enabled, offering a versatile platform that is able to process data and in the same time provide the user a friendly interface.

  17. Socially Impaired Robots: Human Social Disorders and Robots' Socio-Emotional Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Jonathan; Williams, Mary-Anne; Johnston, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Social robots need intelligence in order to safely coexist and interact with humans. Robots without functional abilities in understanding others and unable to empathise might be a societal risk and they may lead to a society of socially impaired robots. In this work we provide a survey of three relevant human social disorders, namely autism, psychopathy and schizophrenia, as a means to gain a better understanding of social robots' future capability requirements. We provide evidence supporting...

  18. Educational Robotics as Mindtools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikropoulos, Tassos A.; Bellou, Ioanna

    2013-01-01

    Although there are many studies on the constructionist use of educational robotics, they have certain limitations. Some of them refer to robotics education, rather than educational robotics. Others follow a constructionist approach, but give emphasis only to design skills, creativity and collaboration. Some studies use robotics as an educational…

  19. Robotic resection of the liver caudate lobe: technical description and initial consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Marco Vito; Glagolieva, Anastasiia; Guarrasi, Domenico

    2018-03-01

    Firstly described in 2002, the robotic liver surgery has not spread widely due to its high cost and the lack of a standardized training program. Still being considered as a 'development in progress' technique, it has however a potential to overcome the traditional limitations of the laparoscopic approach in liver interventions. We analyzed the postoperative outcomes of 10 patients who had undergone robotic partial resection of the caudate lobe (Spiegel lobe) from March 2014 to May 2016 in order to evaluate the advantages of robotic technique in hands of a young surgeon. The mean operative time was 258min (150-522) and the estimated blood loss 137ml (50-359), in none of the cases a blood transfusion was required. No patient underwent a conversion to open surgery; the overall morbidity was 2/10 (20%) and all the complications occurred (biliary fistula and pleural effusion) did not require a surgical revision. At histological examination, the mean tumour size was 2.63cm and we achieved R0-resection rate of 100%. The 90-day mortality rate was null. The 1-year overall and disease free-survival rates were 100% and 80%, respectively. Despite several concerns regarding the cost-effectiveness, a fully robotic partial resection of caudate lobe is an advantageous, implementable technique providing promising short-term postoperative outcomes with acceptable benefit-risk profile. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Robot friendship: Can a robot be a friend?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmeche, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Friendship is used here as a conceptual vehicle for framing questions about the distinctiveness of human cognition in relation to natural systems such as other animal species and to artificial systems such as robots. By exploring this very common form of a human interpersonal relationship......, the author indicates that even though it is difficult to say something generally true about friendship among humans, distinct forms of friendship as practiced and distinct notions of friendship have been investigated in the social and human sciences and in biology. A more general conceptualization...... of friendship as a triadic relation analogous to the sign relation is suggested. Based on this the author asks how one may conceive of robot-robot and robot-human friendships; and how an interdisciplinary perspective upon that relation can contribute to analyse levels of embodied cognition in natural...

  1. Multi-robot caravanning

    KAUST Repository

    Denny, Jory

    2013-11-01

    We study multi-robot caravanning, which is loosely defined as the problem of a heterogeneous team of robots visiting specific areas of an environment (waypoints) as a group. After formally defining this problem, we propose a novel solution that requires minimal communication and scales with the number of waypoints and robots. Our approach restricts explicit communication and coordination to occur only when robots reach waypoints, and relies on implicit coordination when moving between a given pair of