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Sample records for understanding tumor heterogeneity

  1. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

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    Search Menu Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Instagram LinkedIn Brain Tumor Information | News & Blog Our Mission Our History Mission Leadership & Staff Financials Careers News & Blog Contact Us Donate Now Our Impact Our Impact Recent News News & ...

  2. Understanding Brain Tumors

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    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  3. Maintaining Tumor Heterogeneity in Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts.

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    Cassidy, John W; Caldas, Carlos; Bruna, Alejandra

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical models often fail to capture the diverse heterogeneity of human malignancies and as such lack clinical predictive power. Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) have emerged as a powerful technology: capable of retaining the molecular heterogeneity of their originating sample. However, heterogeneity within a tumor is governed by both cell-autonomous (e.g., genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity) and non-cell-autonomous (e.g., stromal heterogeneity) drivers. Although PDXs can largely recapitulate the polygenomic architecture of human tumors, they do not fully account for heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment. Hence, these models have substantial utility in basic and translational research in cancer biology; however, study of stromal or immune drivers of malignant progression may be limited. Similarly, PDX models offer the ability to conduct patient-specific in vivo and ex vivo drug screens, but stromal contributions to treatment responses may be under-represented. This review discusses the sources and consequences of intratumor heterogeneity and how these are recapitulated in the PDX model. Limitations of the current generation of PDXs are discussed and strategies to improve several aspects of the model with respect to preserving heterogeneity are proposed. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

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    Felix Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1 single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase, and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems. Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients.

  5. Overcoming tumor heterogeneity in the molecular diagnosis of urological cancers.

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    Donovan, Michael J; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of tumor heterogeneity and impact on treatment response is still in its infancy, presenting significant challenges to the molecular pathologist, treating physician and ultimately for the patient. Given that tumor recurrence due to treatment resistance is the most common cause of cancer death, there remains a critical unmet need to change the current paradigm. The mechanisms which underlie tumor heterogeneity can be broadly divided into genomic instability and non-mutational processes, including stochastic variations in cellular responses, modulation by tumor microenvironment and or phenotypic/ functional plasticity relating to cancer stem cells. We believe that these biological mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and emphasize the need for more suitable methodologies to exploit the spatiotemporal patterns of intratumoral heterogeneity using novel approaches such as quantitative tissue-based biomarker assessment and systemic fluid analytics. Generating a comprehensive patient-centric phenotypic disease profile should generate a 'codex' which can be employed to change the current treatment decision process.

  6. Characterization of Heterogeneous Prostate Tumors in Targeted Pten Knockout Mice.

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    Hanneke Korsten

    Full Text Available Previously, we generated a preclinical mouse prostate tumor model based on PSA-Cre driven inactivation of Pten. In this model homogeneous hyperplastic prostates (4-5m developed at older age (>10m into tumors. Here, we describe the molecular and histological characterization of the tumors in order to better understand the processes that are associated with prostate tumorigenesis in this targeted mouse Pten knockout model. The morphologies of the tumors that developed were very heterogeneous. Different histopathological growth patterns could be identified, including intraductal carcinoma (IDC, adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, all strongly positive for the epithelial cell marker Cytokeratin (CK, and carcinosarcomas, which were negative for CK. IDC pattern was already detected in prostates of 7-8 month old mice, indicating that it could be a precursor stage. At more than 10 months IDC and carcinosarcoma were most frequently observed. Gene expression profiling discriminated essentially two molecular subtypes, denoted tumor class 1 (TC1 and tumor class 2 (TC2. TC1 tumors were characterized by high expression of epithelial markers like Cytokeratin 8 and E-Cadherin whereas TC2 tumors showed high expression of mesenchyme/stroma markers such as Snail and Fibronectin. These molecular subtypes corresponded with histological growth patterns: where TC1 tumors mainly represented adenocarcinoma/intraductal carcinoma, in TC2 tumors carcinosarcoma was the dominant growth pattern. Further molecular characterization of the prostate tumors revealed an increased expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response. Moreover, functional markers for senescence, proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis were higher expressed in tumors compared to hyperplasia. The highest expression of proliferation and angiogenesis markers was detected in TC2 tumors. Our data clearly showed that in the genetically well-defined PSA-Cre;Pten-loxP/loxP prostate tumor

  7. Reporting tumor molecular heterogeneity in histopathological diagnosis.

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    Andrea Mafficini

    Full Text Available Detection of molecular tumor heterogeneity has become of paramount importance with the advent of targeted therapies. Analysis for detection should be comprehensive, timely and based on routinely available tumor samples.To evaluate the diagnostic potential of targeted multigene next-generation sequencing (TM-NGS in characterizing gastrointestinal cancer molecular heterogeneity.35 gastrointestinal tract tumors, five of each intestinal type gastric carcinomas, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, ampulla of Vater carcinomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, cholangiocarcinomas, pancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumors were assessed for mutations in 46 cancer-associated genes, using Ion Torrent semiconductor-based TM-NGS. One ampulla of Vater carcinoma cell line and one hepatic carcinosarcoma served to assess assay sensitivity. TP53, PIK3CA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations were validated by conventional Sanger sequencing.TM-NGS yielded overlapping results on matched fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues, with a mutation detection limit of 1% for fresh-frozen high molecular weight DNA and 2% for FFPE partially degraded DNA. At least one somatic mutation was observed in all tumors tested; multiple alterations were detected in 20/35 (57% tumors. Seven cancers displayed significant differences in allelic frequencies for distinct mutations, indicating the presence of intratumor molecular heterogeneity; this was confirmed on selected samples by immunohistochemistry of p53 and Smad4, showing concordance with mutational analysis.TM-NGS is able to detect and quantitate multiple gene alterations from limited amounts of DNA, moving one step closer to a next-generation histopathologic diagnosis that integrates morphologic, immunophenotypic, and multigene mutational analysis on routinely processed tissues, essential for personalized cancer therapy.

  8. Understanding as Integration of Heterogeneous Representations

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    Martínez, Sergio F.

    2014-03-01

    The search for understanding is a major aim of science. Traditionally, understanding has been undervalued in the philosophy of science because of its psychological underpinnings; nowadays, however, it is widely recognized that epistemology cannot be divorced from psychology as sharp as traditional epistemology required. This eliminates the main obstacle to give scientific understanding due attention in philosophy of science. My aim in this paper is to describe an account of scientific understanding as an emergent feature of our mastering of different (causal) explanatory frameworks that takes place through the mastering of scientific practices. Different practices lead to different kinds of representations. Such representations are often heterogeneous. The integration of such representations constitute understanding.

  9. Heterogeneity in the multiple myeloma tumor clone

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    Guikema, JEJ; Hovenga, S; Vellenga, E; Bos, NA

    Multiple Myeloma ( MM) is a plasma cell malignancy which is characterized by a very heterogeneous disease outcome. Heterogeneity in plasma cell characteristics, including morphology, maturation status, immunophenotype and genetic abnormalities partly account for the variable disease outcome.

  10. Heterogeneity in the multiple myeloma tumor clone

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    Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Vellenga, Edo; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy which is characterized by a very heterogeneous disease outcome. Heterogeneity in plasma cell characteristics, including morphology, maturation status, immunophenotype and genetic abnormalities partly account for the variable disease outcome. Although

  11. Genomic Heterogeneity of Breast Tumor Pathogenesis

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    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Shriver, Craig D.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological grade is a useful prognostic factor for stratifying breast cancer patients into favorable (low-grade, well-differentiated tumors) and less favorable (high-grade, poorly-differentiated tumors) outcome groups. Under the current system of tumor grading, however, a large proportion of tumors are characterized as intermediate-grade, making determination of optimal treatments difficult. In an effort to increase objectivity in the pathological assessment of tumor grade, differences in chromosomal alterations and gene expression patterns have been characterized in low-grade, intermediate-grade, and high-grade disease. In this review, we outline molecular data supporting a linear model of progression from low-grade to high-grade carcinomas, as well as contradicting genetic data suggesting that low-grade and high-grade tumors develop independently. While debate regarding specific pathways of development continues, molecular data suggest that intermediate-grade tumors do not comprise an independent disease subtype, but represent clinical and molecular hybrids between low-grade and high-grade tumors. Finally, we discuss the clinical implications associated with different pathways of development, including a new clinical test to assign grade and guide treatment options. PMID:20689613

  12. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

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    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

  13. Understanding the Executive Functioning Heterogeneity in Schizophrenia

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    Raffard, Stephane; Bayard, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by heterogeneous brain abnormalities involving cerebral regions implied in the executive functioning. The dysexecutive syndrome is one of the most prominent and functionally cognitive features of schizophrenia. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what extend executive deficits are heterogeneous in schizophrenia…

  14. Understanding Heterogeneous Preferences of Cooperative Members

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    Kalogeras, N.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Lans, van der I.A.; Garcia, P.; Dijk, van G.

    2009-01-01

    We study the heterogeneity in the preference structure of cooperative members. Using conjoint analysis the utility that members attach to intra-organizational and strategic attributes of their cooperative is elicited. Recognizing that members are not homogenous, a concomitant finitemixture

  15. Estimation of tumor heterogeneity using CGH array data

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    Li Shengting

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is a commonly-used approach to detect DNA copy number variation in whole genome-wide screens. Several statistical methods have been proposed to define genomic segments with different copy numbers in cancer tumors. However, most tumors are heterogeneous and show variation in DNA copy numbers across tumor cells. The challenge is to reveal the copy number profiles of the subpopulations in a tumor and to estimate the percentage of each subpopulation. Results We describe a relation between experimental data and exact DNA copy number and develop a statistical method to reveal the heterogeneity of tumors containing a mixture of different-stage cells. Furthermore, we validate the method on simulated data and apply the method to 29 pairs of breast primary tumors and their matched lymph node metastases. Conclusion We demonstrate a new method for CGH array analysis that allows a tumor sample to be classified according to its heterogeneity. The method gives an interpretable series of copy number profiles, one for each major subpopulation in a tumor. The profiles facilitate identification of copy number alterations in cancer development.

  16. A population genetics perspective on the determinants of intra-tumor heterogeneity.

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    Hu, Zheng; Sun, Ruping; Curtis, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Cancer results from the acquisition of somatic alterations in a microevolutionary process that typically occurs over many years, much of which is occult. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics that are operative at different stages of progression in individual tumors might inform the earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Although these processes cannot be directly observed, the resultant spatiotemporal patterns of genetic variation amongst tumor cells encode their evolutionary histories. Such intra-tumor heterogeneity is pervasive not only at the genomic level, but also at the transcriptomic, phenotypic, and cellular levels. Given the implications for precision medicine, the accurate quantification of heterogeneity within and between tumors has become a major focus of current research. In this review, we provide a population genetics perspective on the determinants of intra-tumor heterogeneity and approaches to quantify genetic diversity. We summarize evidence for different modes of evolution based on recent cancer genome sequencing studies and discuss emerging evolutionary strategies to therapeutically exploit tumor heterogeneity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Evolutionary principles - heterogeneity in cancer?, edited by Dr. Robert A. Gatenby. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Are tumor-to-tumor differences in oxygenation responsible for the heterogeneity in the response of tumors to therapy

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    Rockwell, S.; Moulder, J.E.; Martin, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    Individual tumors from the same transplanted tumor line often show very different responses to the same treatments, even when the tumors are implanted into similar sites in similar hosts and studied at the same time. The cause of this heterogeneity is unknown; either tumor or host factors could be responsible. Solid tumors contain large numbers of viable hypoxic cells, which are resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy and limit the response of tumors to intensive treatments. To determine whether differences in the proportion of hypoxic cells in the tumors produce the observed variability in therapeutic sensitivity, the authors compared the radiation responses of normally-aerated tumors and tumors made artificially hypoxic. If large tumor-to-tumor differences in oxygenation exist, data from normally-aerated tumors should be more variable than data from hypoxic tumors (which should all be brought to uniform hypoxia and uniform radioresistance). Analysis of data from several tumor systems revealed the variability in the radiation responses of hypoxic tumors to be at least as great as that for aerobic tumors. Thus, factors other than differences in oxygenation must produce the heterogeneity in tumor radiation response

  18. Heterogeneity in induced thermal resistance of rat tumor cell clones

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    Tomasovic, S.P.; Rosenblatt, P.L.; Heitzman, D.

    1983-01-01

    Four 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma clones were examined for their survival response to heating under conditions that induced transient thermal resistance (thermotolerance). Clones MTC and MTF7 were isolated from the subcutaneous locally growing tumor, whereas clones MTLn2 and MTLn3 were derived from spontaneous lung metastases. There was heterogeneity among these clones in thermotolerance induced by either fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating, but the order of sensitivity was not necessarily the same. The clones developed thermal resistance at different rates and to different degrees within the same time intervals. There was heterogeneity between clones isolated from within either the primary site or metastatic lesions. However, clones derived from metastatic foci did not intrinsically acquire more or less thermotolerance to fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating than did clones from the primary tumor. Further, there was no apparent relationship between any phenotypic properties that conferred more or less thermotolerance in vitro and any phenotypic properties that conferred enhanced metastatic success of these same clones by spontaneous (subcutaneous) or experimental (intravenous) routes in vivo. These tumor clones also differ in their karyotype, metastatic potential, cell surface features, sensitivity to x-irradiation and drugs, and ability to repair sublethal radiation damage. These results provide further credence to the concept that inherent heterogeneity within tumors may be as important in therapeutic success as other known modifiers of outcome such as site and treatment heterogeneity

  19. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior

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    Milcah C. Scott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2 for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of

  20. Intra-Tumor Genetic Heterogeneity in Wilms Tumor: Clonal Evolution and Clinical Implications

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    George D. Cresswell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of pediatric solid tumors is poorly understood. There is conflicting evidence of intra-tumor genetic homogeneity vs. heterogeneity (ITGH in a small number of studies in pediatric solid tumors. A number of copy number aberrations (CNA are proposed as prognostic biomarkers to stratify patients, for example 1q+ in Wilms tumor (WT; current clinical trials use only one sample per tumor to profile this genetic biomarker. We multisampled 20 WT cases and assessed genome-wide allele-specific CNA and loss of heterozygosity, and inferred tumor evolution, using Illumina CytoSNP12v2.1 arrays, a custom analysis pipeline, and the MEDICC algorithm. We found remarkable diversity of ITGH and evolutionary trajectories in WT. 1q+ is heterogeneous in the majority of tumors with this change, with variable evolutionary timing. We estimate that at least three samples per tumor are needed to detect >95% of cases with 1q+. In contrast, somatic 11p15 LOH is uniformly an early event in WT development. We find evidence of two separate tumor origins in unilateral disease with divergent histology, and in bilateral WT. We also show subclonal changes related to differential response to chemotherapy. Rational trial design to include biomarkers in risk stratification requires tumor multisampling and reliable delineation of ITGH and tumor evolution.

  1. Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Does Morphological Diversity Reflect Tumor Heterogeneity?

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    Rito, Miguel; Fonseca, Isabel

    2017-09-21

    Salivary gland tumor classification encompasses a vast list of benign and malignant neoplasms. Their morphological diversity is recognized not only between different entities but also within individual tumors. Tumor categories as described by the World Health Organization reflect, in part, a true genetic heterogeneity (e.g., translocations involving CRTC1 and CRTC3-MAML2 genes in mucoepidermoid carcinoma and MYB-NFIB fusion in adenoid cystic carcinoma). Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma shows diversity in its histological appearance, but recurrent rearrangements on PLAG1 and HMGA2 are common to its benign precursor. More recently, new categories have been defined, like secretory carcinoma with the t(12;15) (p13;q25) ETV6-NTRK3 translocation and clear-cell carcinoma with EWSR1-ATF1 fusion. Recent studies on cribriform adenocarcinoma of minor salivary gland origin and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma point to a correlation with their morphological features. All of these advances show that the search of a histogenetic and genetic basis for salivary gland tumors is helping to clarify morphological categories and unraveling new ones. Nevertheless, currently morphology is still the hallmark of tumor classification and the gold standard. The therapeutic options for advanced tumors remain very limited but the discovery of translocation-generated gene fusions and increased knowledge of the genomic information of salivary gland tumors is creating opportunities for the development of specific targeted therapies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Transcriptome sequencing in prostate cancer identifies inter-tumor heterogeneity

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    Janet Mendonca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the dearth of gene mutations in prostate cancer, [1] ,[2] it is likely that genomic rearrangements play a significant role in the evolution of prostate cancer. However, in the search for recurrent genomic alterations, "private alterations" have received less attention. Such alterations may provide insights into the evolution, behavior, and clinical outcome of an individual tumor. In a recent report in "Genome Biology" Wyatt et al. [3] defines unique alterations in a cohort of high-risk prostate cancer patient with a lethal phenotype. Utilizing a transcriptome sequencing approach they observe high inter-tumor heterogeneity; however, the genes altered distill into three distinct cancer-relevant pathways. Their analysis reveals the presence of several non-ETS fusions, which may contribute to the phenotype of individual tumors, and have significance for disease progression.

  3. Mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance

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    Greene, James

    In this dissertation we develop mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the major causes of the failure of cancer treatment. Furthermore, recent experimental evidence suggests that drug resistance is a complex biological phenomena, with many influences that interact nonlinearly. Here we study the influence of such heterogeneity on treatment outcomes, both in general frameworks and under specific mechanisms. We begin by developing a mathematical framework for describing multi-drug resistance to cancer. Heterogeneity is reflected by a continuous parameter, which can either describe a single resistance mechanism (such as the expression of P-gp in the cellular membrane) or can account for the cumulative effect of several mechanisms and factors. The model is written as a system of integro-differential equations, structured by the continuous "trait," and includes density effects as well as mutations. We study the limiting behavior of the model, both analytically and numerically, and apply it to study treatment protocols. We next study a specific mechanism of tumor heterogeneity and its influence on cell growth: the cell-cycle. We derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations, when the number of cells is large. The model is closely tied to experimental data of cell growth, and includes a novel implementation of

  4. Tumor-specific chromosome mis-segregation controls cancer plasticity by maintaining tumor heterogeneity.

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    Yuanjie Hu

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy with chromosome instability is a cancer hallmark. We studied chromosome 7 (Chr7 copy number variation (CNV in gliomas and in primary cultures derived from them. We found tumor heterogeneity with cells having Chr7-CNV commonly occurs in gliomas, with a higher percentage of cells in high-grade gliomas carrying more than 2 copies of Chr7, as compared to low-grade gliomas. Interestingly, all Chr7-aneuploid cell types in the parental culture of established glioma cell lines reappeared in single-cell-derived subcultures. We then characterized the biology of three syngeneic glioma cultures dominated by different Chr7-aneuploid cell types. We found phenotypic divergence for cells following Chr7 mis-segregation, which benefited overall tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Mathematical modeling suggested the involvement of chromosome instability and interactions among cell subpopulations in restoring the optimal equilibrium of tumor cell types. Both our experimental data and mathematical modeling demonstrated that the complexity of tumor heterogeneity could be enhanced by the existence of chromosomes with structural abnormality, in addition to their mis-segregations. Overall, our findings show, for the first time, the involvement of chromosome instability in maintaining tumor heterogeneity, which underlies the enhanced growth, persistence and treatment resistance of cancers.

  5. Tumor heterogeneity is an active process maintained by a mutant EGFR-induced cytokine circuit in glioblastoma.

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    Inda, Maria-del-Mar; Bonavia, Rudy; Mukasa, Akitake; Narita, Yoshitaka; Sah, Dinah W Y; Vandenberg, Scott; Brennan, Cameron; Johns, Terrance G; Bachoo, Robert; Hadwiger, Philipp; Tan, Pamela; Depinho, Ronald A; Cavenee, Webster; Furnari, Frank

    2010-08-15

    Human solid tumors frequently have pronounced heterogeneity of both neoplastic and normal cells on the histological, genetic, and gene expression levels. While current efforts are focused on understanding heterotypic interactions between tumor cells and surrounding normal cells, much less is known about the interactions between and among heterogeneous tumor cells within a neoplasm. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) amplification and mutation (EGFRvIII/DeltaEGFR) are signature pathogenetic events that are invariably expressed in a heterogeneous manner. Strikingly, despite its greater biological activity than wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR), individual GBM tumors expressing both amplified receptors typically express wtEGFR in far greater abundance than the DeltaEGFR lesion. We hypothesized that the minor DeltaEGFR-expressing subpopulation enhances tumorigenicity of the entire tumor cell population, and thereby maintains heterogeneity of expression of the two receptor forms in different cells. Using mixtures of glioma cells as well as immortalized murine astrocytes, we demonstrate that a paracrine mechanism driven by DeltaEGFR is the primary means for recruiting wtEGFR-expressing cells into accelerated proliferation in vivo. We determined that human glioma tissues, glioma cell lines, glioma stem cells, and immortalized mouse Ink4a/Arf(-/-) astrocytes that express DeltaEGFR each also express IL-6 and/or leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) cytokines. These cytokines activate gp130, which in turn activates wtEGFR in neighboring cells, leading to enhanced rates of tumor growth. Ablating IL-6, LIF, or gp130 uncouples this cellular cross-talk, and potently attenuates tumor growth enhancement. These findings support the view that a minor tumor cell population can potently drive accelerated growth of the entire tumor mass, and thereby actively maintain tumor cell heterogeneity within a tumor mass. Such interactions between genetically

  6. A system for tumor heterogeneity evaluation and diagnosis based on tumor markers measured routinely in the laboratory.

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    Hui, Liu; Rixv, Liu; Xiuying, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop an efficient and reliable approach to estimate tumor heterogeneity and improve tumor diagnosis using multiple tumor markers measured routinely in the clinical laboratory. A total of 161 patients with different cancers were recruited as the cancer group, and 91 patients with non-oncological conditions were required as the non-oncological disease group. The control group comprised 90 randomly selected healthy subjects. AFP, CEA, CYFRA, CA125, CA153, CA199, CA724, and NSE levels were measured in all these subjects with a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The tumor marker with the maximum S/CO value (sample test value:cutoff value for discriminating individuals with and without tumors) was considered as a specific tumor marker (STM) for an individual. Tumor heterogeneity index (THI)=N/P (N: number of STMs; P: percentage of individuals with STMs in a certain tumor population) was used to quantify tumor heterogeneity: high THI indicated high tumor heterogeneity. The tumor marker index (TMI), TMI = STM×(number of positive tumor markers+1), was used for diagnosis. The THIs of lung, gastric, and liver cancers were 8.33, 9.63, and 5.2, respectively, while the ROC-areas under the curve for TMI were 0.862, 0.809, and 0.966. In this study, we developed a novel index for tumor heterogeneity based on the expression of various routinely evaluated serum tumor markers. Development of an evaluation system for tumor heterogeneity on the basis of this index could provide an effective diagnostic tool for some cancers. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

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    Albritton, Jacob L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies. PMID:28067628

  8. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

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    Jacob L. Albritton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies.

  9. The Many Faces of Primary Aldosteronism and Cushing Syndrome: A Reflection of Adrenocortical Tumor Heterogeneity.

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    Mete, Ozgur; Duan, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, morphological, and molecular features. Recent discoveries of specific genotype-phenotype correlations in adrenal cortical adenomas have transformed our understanding of their respective endocrine syndromes. Indeed, a proportion of patients with primary aldosteronism are now known to harbor adrenal cortical adenomas with heterogeneous molecular alterations ( KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 , and CACNA1D ) involving the calcium/calmodulin kinase signaling pathway. Several lines of evidence suggest that KCNJ5 -mutant aldosterone-producing adenomas have distinct clinicopathological phenotype compared to those harboring ATP1A1, ATP2B3 , and CACNA1D mutations. Benign adrenal cortical tumors presenting with Cushing syndrome often have diverse mutations ( PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A , and PDE8B ) involving the cyclic AMP signaling pathway. In addition to cortisol-producing adenomas, bilateral micronodular adrenocortical disease and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH) have also expanded the spectrum of benign neoplasms causing adrenal Cushing disease. The recent discovery of inactivating ARMC5 germline mutations in PBMAH has challenged the old belief that this disorder is mainly a sporadic disease. Emerging evidence suggests that PBMAH harbors multiple distinct clonal proliferations, reflecting the heterogeneous genomic landscape of this disease. Although most solitary adrenal cortical tumors are sporadic, there is an increasing recognition that inherited susceptibility syndromes may also play a role in their pathogenesis. This review highlights the molecular and morphological heterogeneity of benign adrenal cortical neoplasms, reflected in the diverse presentations of primary aldosteronism and adrenal Cushing syndrome.

  10. The Many Faces of Primary Aldosteronism and Cushing Syndrome: A Reflection of Adrenocortical Tumor Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Mete

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal cortical tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, morphological, and molecular features. Recent discoveries of specific genotype–phenotype correlations in adrenal cortical adenomas have transformed our understanding of their respective endocrine syndromes. Indeed, a proportion of patients with primary aldosteronism are now known to harbor adrenal cortical adenomas with heterogeneous molecular alterations (KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D involving the calcium/calmodulin kinase signaling pathway. Several lines of evidence suggest that KCNJ5-mutant aldosterone-producing adenomas have distinct clinicopathological phenotype compared to those harboring ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D mutations. Benign adrenal cortical tumors presenting with Cushing syndrome often have diverse mutations (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, and PDE8B involving the cyclic AMP signaling pathway. In addition to cortisol-producing adenomas, bilateral micronodular adrenocortical disease and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH have also expanded the spectrum of benign neoplasms causing adrenal Cushing disease. The recent discovery of inactivating ARMC5 germline mutations in PBMAH has challenged the old belief that this disorder is mainly a sporadic disease. Emerging evidence suggests that PBMAH harbors multiple distinct clonal proliferations, reflecting the heterogeneous genomic landscape of this disease. Although most solitary adrenal cortical tumors are sporadic, there is an increasing recognition that inherited susceptibility syndromes may also play a role in their pathogenesis. This review highlights the molecular and morphological heterogeneity of benign adrenal cortical neoplasms, reflected in the diverse presentations of primary aldosteronism and adrenal Cushing syndrome.

  11. Tumor cell heterogeneity: impact on mechanisms of therapeutic drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Mary E.; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of these studies was to determine whether chemotherapy-resistant tumor cell sublines derived from a single starting cell population with identical treatment protocols, have the same mechanism of resistance. Methods and Materials: Twelve cyclophosphamide-resistant sublines were derived from KHT-iv murine sarcoma cells by repeated exposures to 2, 4, or 8 μg/ml doses of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-OOHCP). To investigate possible mechanisms of resistance, glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity were determined. In addition, studies with the GSH depletor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and the ALDH inhibitor diethylamino-benzaldehyde (DEAB) were undertaken. Results: Resistant factors to 4-OOHCP, assessed at 10% clonogenic cell survival, ranged from 1.5-7.0 for the various cell lines. Crossresistance to melphalan and adriamycin also were commonly observed. Increased GSH levels, GST activity and ALDH activity were detected in the sublines but not all exhibited the same pattern of biochemical alterations. The response to GSH and ALDH inhibitors also varied among the sublines; the resistance being reversible in some cell lines but not others. Conclusion: The present results indicate that when resistant sublines are derived simultaneously from the same starting cell population, the observed mechanisms of resistance may not be the same in each of the variants. These findings support the hypothesis that preexisting cellular heterogeneity may affect mechanisms of acquired resistance

  12. From Chemotherapy to Combined Targeted Therapeutics: In Vitro and in Vivo Models to Decipher Intra-tumor Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Gambara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in next-generation sequencing and other omics technologies capable to map cell fate provide increasing evidence on the crucial role of intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH for cancer progression. The different facets of ITH, from genomic to microenvironmental heterogeneity and the hierarchical cellular architecture originating from the cancer stem cell compartment, contribute to the range of tumor phenotypes. Decoding these complex data resulting from the analysis of tumor tissue complexity poses a challenge for developing novel therapeutic strategies that can counteract tumor evolution and cellular plasticity. To achieve this aim, the development of in vitro and in vivo cancer models that resemble the complexity of ITH is crucial in understanding the interplay of cells and their (microenvironment and, consequently, in testing the efficacy of new targeted treatments and novel strategies of tailoring combinations of treatments to the individual composition of the tumor. This challenging approach may be an important cornerstone in overcoming the development of pharmaco-resistances during multiple lines of treatment. In this paper, we report the latest advances in patient-derived 3D (PD3D cell cultures and patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX as in vitro and in vivo models that can retain the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of the tumor tissue.

  13. Spatial intratumoral heterogeneity of proliferation in immunohistochemical images of solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valous, Nektarios A.; Lahrmann, Bernd; Halama, Niels; Grabe, Niels; Bergmann, Frank; Jäger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The interactions of neoplastic cells with each other and the microenvironment are complex. To understand intratumoral heterogeneity, subtle differences should be quantified. Main factors contributing to heterogeneity include the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, action of microenvironment, mechanisms of intercellular transfer of genetic information, and differential mechanisms of modifications of genetic material/proteins. This may reflect on the expression of biomarkers in the context of prognosis/stratification. Hence, a rigorous approach for assessing the spatial intratumoral heterogeneity of histological biomarker expression with accuracy and reproducibility is required, since patterns in immunohistochemical images can be challenging to identify and describe. Methods: A quantitative method that is useful for characterizing complex irregular structures is lacunarity; it is a multiscale technique that exhaustively samples the image, while the decay of its index as a function of window size follows characteristic patterns for different spatial arrangements. In histological images, lacunarity provides a useful measure for the spatial organization of a biomarker when a sampling scheme is employed and relevant features are computed. The proposed approach quantifies the segmented proliferative cells and not the textural content of the histological slide, thus providing a more realistic measure of heterogeneity within the sample space of the tumor region. The aim is to investigate in whole sections of primary pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs), using whole-slide imaging and image analysis, the spatial intratumoral heterogeneity of Ki-67 immunostains. Unsupervised learning is employed to verify that the approach can partition the tissue sections according to distributional heterogeneity. Results: The architectural complexity of histological images has shown that single measurements are often insufficient. Inhomogeneity of distribution depends

  14. Ki67 Heterogeneity in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancers: Which Tumor Type Has the Most Heterogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himuro, Takanori; Horimoto, Yoshiya; Arakawa, Atsushi; Tanabe, Masahiko; Saito, Mitsue

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneity of Ki67 expression, often seen in breast cancer, can make evaluation of the expression of this marker difficult and give rise to confusion when considering adjuvant treatments for patients. Herein, we investigated estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers to reveal the tumor characteristics associated with Ki67 heterogeneity. Surgical specimens from 85 invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type and 13 invasive lobular carcinomas were examined. We first calculated the differences between Ki67 expression in a hot spot and those in 4 random fields on the same slide. We then evaluated Ki67 heterogeneity within the tumor, based on these differences. Among clinicopathological factors, solid-tubular carcinoma, an architectural growth pattern subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma, correlated with high Ki67 heterogeneity (P Ki67 expression. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer has limited impact on transcriptomic-based molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Rantalainen, Mattias; Stålhammar, Gustav; Lövrot, John; Ullah, Ikram; Alkodsi, Amjad; Ma, Ran; Wedlund, Lena; Lindberg, Johan; Frisell, Jan; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2017-11-29

    Transcriptomic profiling of breast tumors provides opportunity for subtyping and molecular-based patient stratification. In diagnostic applications the specimen profiled should be representative of the expression profile of the whole tumor and ideally capture properties of the most aggressive part of the tumor. However, breast cancers commonly exhibit intra-tumor heterogeneity at molecular, genomic and in phenotypic level, which can arise during tumor evolution. Currently it is not established to what extent a random sampling approach may influence molecular breast cancer diagnostics. In this study we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify gene expression in 43 pieces (2-5 pieces per tumor) from 12 breast tumors (Cohort 1). We determined molecular subtype and transcriptomic grade for all tumor pieces and analysed to what extent pieces originating from the same tumors are concordant or discordant with each other. Additionally, we validated our finding in an independent cohort consisting of 19 pieces (2-6 pieces per tumor) from 6 breast tumors (Cohort 2) profiled using microarray technique. Exome sequencing was also performed on this cohort, to investigate the extent of intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity versus the intra-tumor molecular subtype classifications. Molecular subtyping was consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors and transcriptomic grade assignments were consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors as well. Molecular subtype predictions revealed consistent subtypes in four out of six patients in this cohort 2. Interestingly, we observed extensive intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity in these tumor pieces but not in their molecular subtype classifications. Our results suggest that macroscopic intra-tumoral transcriptomic heterogeneity is limited and unlikely to have an impact on molecular diagnostics for most patients.

  16. Diagnostic value of metabolic heterogeneity as a reliable parameter for differentiating malignant parotid gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Seong-Jang; Pak, Kyoungjune

    2016-06-01

    Exact classifying between malignant and benign tumors in the parotid gland is important because the cancer has relatively poor prognosis. There have been several studies that F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) can differentiate between malignant and benign parotid gland tumors. However, the role of FDG PET is still controversial because many benign parotid gland tumors, such as Warthin's tumor and pleomorphic adenoma, show high FDG uptake. We hypothesized that metabolic heterogeneity would differentiate malignant parotid tumors because tumoral heterogeneity is an important characteristic in the malignancies. From January 2010 to April 2015, we retrospectively reviewed the 46 patients who showed FDG uptake at the parotid gland. To differentiate malignant parotid gland tumors, we obtained maximum SUV and mean SUV. Metabolic tumor volume and total lesion glycolysis were measured as metabolic volumetric parameters. We also included heterogeneity parameters of FDG PET such as heterogeneity factor (HF) and the coefficient of variation for all patients. There was significant difference of HF between malignant (-0.30 ± 0.25; range -0.937 to -0.084) and benign parotid gland tumors (-0.06 ± 0.05; range -0.291 to -0.012; p parotid gland tumors (p = 0.002). Our results suggest that HF can be utilized as a reliable and non-invasive method for differentiation of malignant and benign parotid gland tumors.

  17. Multisite tumor sampling enhances the detection of intratumor heterogeneity at all different temporal stages of tumor evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erramuzpe, Asier; Cortés, Jesús M; López, José I

    2018-02-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) is an inherent process of tumor development that has received much attention in previous years, as it has become a major obstacle for the success of targeted therapies. ITH is also temporally unpredictable across tumor evolution, which makes its precise characterization even more problematic since detection success depends on the precise temporal snapshot at which ITH is analyzed. New and more efficient strategies for tumor sampling are needed to overcome these difficulties which currently rely entirely on the pathologist's interpretation. Recently, we showed that a new strategy, the multisite tumor sampling, works better than the routine sampling protocol for the ITH detection when the tumor time evolution was not taken into consideration. Here, we extend this work and compare the ITH detections of multisite tumor sampling and routine sampling protocols across tumor time evolution, and in particular, we provide in silico analyses of both strategies at early and late temporal stages for four different models of tumor evolution (linear, branched, neutral, and punctuated). Our results indicate that multisite tumor sampling outperforms routine protocols in detecting ITH at all different temporal stages of tumor evolution. We conclude that multisite tumor sampling is more advantageous than routine protocols in detecting intratumor heterogeneity.

  18. Understanding Tumor Dormancy as a Means of Secondary Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0300 TITLE: Understanding Tumor Dormancy as a Means of Secondary Prevention PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory...CONTRACT NUMBER Understanding Tumor Dormancy as a Means of Secondary Prevention 5b. GRANT NUMBER BW81XWH-12-1-0300 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...was stably in remission. Once our understanding of this is more complete, it is hoped that we can devise strategies for secondary prevention . This

  19. Sepsis: Multiple Abnormalities, Heterogeneous Responses, and Evolving Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Kendra N.; Osuchowski, Marcin F.; Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Stepien, David; Valentine, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis represents the host's systemic inflammatory response to a severe infection. It causes substantial human morbidity resulting in hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Despite decades of intense research, the basic mechanisms still remain elusive. In either experimental animal models of sepsis or human patients, there are substantial physiological changes, many of which may result in subsequent organ injury. Variations in age, gender, and medical comorbidities including diabetes and renal failure create additional complexity that influence the outcomes in septic patients. Specific system-based alterations, such as the coagulopathy observed in sepsis, offer both potential insight and possible therapeutic targets. Intracellular stress induces changes in the endoplasmic reticulum yielding misfolded proteins that contribute to the underlying pathophysiological changes. With these multiple changes it is difficult to precisely classify an individual's response in sepsis as proinflammatory or immunosuppressed. This heterogeneity also may explain why most therapeutic interventions have not improved survival. Given the complexity of sepsis, biomarkers and mathematical models offer potential guidance once they have been carefully validated. This review discusses each of these important factors to provide a framework for understanding the complex and current challenges of managing the septic patient. Clinical trial failures and the therapeutic interventions that have proven successful are also discussed. PMID:23899564

  20. Heterogeneity of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic intervention: insights from MR angiography and DCE-MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlian Zhu

    Full Text Available Solid tumor vasculature is highly heterogeneous, which presents challenges to antiangiogenic intervention as well as the evaluation of its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the spatial tumor vascular changes due to bevacizumab/paclitaxel therapy using a combination approach of MR angiography and DCE-MRI method.Tumor vasculature of MCF-7 breast tumor mouse xenografts was studied by a combination of MR angiography and DCE-MRI with albumin-Gd-DTPA. Tumor macroscopic vasculature was extracted from the early enhanced images. Tumor microvascular parameters were obtained from the pharmacokinetic modeling of the DCE-MRI data. A spatial analysis of the microvascular parameters based on the macroscopic vasculature was used to evaluate the changes of the heterogeneous vasculature induced by a 12 day bevacizumab/paclitaxel treatment in mice bearing MCF-7 breast tumor.Macroscopic vessels that feed the tumors were not affected by the bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination therapy. A higher portion of the tumors was within close proximity of these macroscopic vessels after the treatment, concomitant with tumor growth retardation. There was a significant decrease in microvascular permeability and vascular volume in the tumor regions near these vessels.Bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination therapy did not block the blood supply to the MCF-7 breast tumor. Such finding is consistent with the modest survival benefits of adding bevacizumab to current treatment regimens for some types of cancers.

  1. Primary and metastatic tumor dormancy as a result of population heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina

    2016-08-23

    Existence of tumor dormancy, or cancer without disease, is supported both by autopsy studies that indicate presence of microscopic tumors in men and women who die of trauma (primary dormancy), and by long periods of latency between excision of primary tumors and disease recurrence (metastatic dormancy). Within dormant tumors, two general mechanisms underlying the dynamics are recognized, namely, the population existing at limited carrying capacity (tumor mass dormancy), and solitary cell dormancy, characterized by long periods of quiescence marked by cell cycle arrest. Here we focus on mechanisms that precede the avascular tumor reaching its carrying capacity, and propose that dynamics consistent with tumor dormancy and subsequent escape from it can be accounted for with simple models that take into account population heterogeneity. We evaluate parametrically heterogeneous Malthusian, logistic and Allee growth models and show that 1) time to escape from tumor dormancy is driven by the initial distribution of cell clones in the population and 2) escape from dormancy is accompanied by a large increase in variance, as well as the expected value of fitness-determining parameters. Based on our results, we propose that parametrically heterogeneous logistic model would be most likely to account for primary tumor dormancy, while distributed Allee model would be most appropriate for metastatic dormancy. We conclude with a discussion of dormancy as a stage within a larger context of cancer as a systemic disease. This article was reviewed by Heiko Enderling and Marek Kimmel.

  2. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue.

  3. Understanding heterogeneity of social preferences for fire prevention management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varela, Elsa; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Soliño, Mario

    2014-01-01

    of analysing preference heterogeneity. A random parameter logit model revealed large heterogeneity and preference for traditional heavy machinery, maintaining linear unshaded fuel breaks at a high density. A latent class model showed that this may be reflected by a third of the population preferring lighter...... machinery and shaded irregular fuel breaks; a quarter of the population not treating the budget constraint as limiting, another quarter only being worried about the area burnt and the remaining group being against everything. Finally, a discrete mixture model revealed extreme preference patterns...

  4. MAD Bayes for Tumor Heterogeneity - Feature Allocation with Exponential Family Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanxun; Müller, Peter; Yuan, Yuan; Gulukota, Kamalakar; Ji, Yuan

    2015-03-01

    We propose small-variance asymptotic approximations for inference on tumor heterogeneity (TH) using next-generation sequencing data. Understanding TH is an important and open research problem in biology. The lack of appropriate statistical inference is a critical gap in existing methods that the proposed approach aims to fill. We build on a hierarchical model with an exponential family likelihood and a feature allocation prior. The proposed implementation of posterior inference generalizes similar small-variance approximations proposed by Kulis and Jordan (2012) and Broderick et.al (2012b) for inference with Dirichlet process mixture and Indian buffet process prior models under normal sampling. We show that the new algorithm can successfully recover latent structures of different haplotypes and subclones and is magnitudes faster than available Markov chain Monte Carlo samplers. The latter are practically infeasible for high-dimensional genomics data. The proposed approach is scalable, easy to implement and benefits from the exibility of Bayesian nonparametric models. More importantly, it provides a useful tool for applied scientists to estimate cell subtypes in tumor samples. R code is available on http://www.ma.utexas.edu/users/yxu/.

  5. Genetic and Functional Heterogeneity of Tumors in Neurofibromatosis 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    PRMD1 mutations were confirmed to be present and somatic in origin in both tumors. As a follow up to this analysis, we have now extracted DNA from an...1.24 4.27 TM6SF1 ENSG00000136404 8.95 2.10 4.26 METTL7A ENSG00000185432 7.89 1.85 4.26 CYP27A1 ENSG00000135929 10.02 2.35 4.26 CDH5 ENSG00000179776 9.85

  6. Heterogeneous Roles and Heterogeneous Practices: Understanding the Adoption and Uses of Nonprofit Performance Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerd, Adam; Moulton, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the performance of nonprofit organizations has been of growing importance for the last several decades. Although there is much good that can come out of self-improvement, there is substantial heterogeneity within the sector that calls into question the usefulness of "across the board" evaluation tools. In this article, the authors…

  7. Tumor Heterogeneity in Colorectal Cancer: What Do We Know So Far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaert, Xavier; Vanstapel, Arno; Verbeek, Sanne

    2018-02-07

    Colorectal cancer is not one disease but rather a collection of neoplastic diseases. Due to heterogeneity in the disease biology, therapy response, and prognosis, extensive disease stratification is required. Therefore, TNM stage, microsatellite status, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and other parameters are assessed in the pathology report to indicate the extent and prognosis of the disease. The mutation status of KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS is also investigated in a metastatic context to predict the response to anti-EGFR therapy. Recently, 4 distinct molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer have been described that have both prognostic and therapeutic relevance. In addition, characterization of the inflammatory infiltrate revealed major differences in the amount and location of inflammatory cells in distinct colorectal tumor types. Together, all of these parameters help to stratify patients into different therapeutic and prognostic subgroups. However, this stratification is not unambiguous since tumors often display intratumoral heterogeneity, whereby several subpopulations within one tumor show differences in morphology, inflammatory infiltrate, mutational status, or gene expression profile. This article gives an overview of all of the current known data with regard to tumor heterogeneity at both inter- and intratumoral levels. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Quantification of heterogeneity as a biomarker in tumor imaging: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Alic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many techniques are proposed for the quantification of tumor heterogeneity as an imaging biomarker for differentiation between tumor types, tumor grading, response monitoring and outcome prediction. However, in clinical practice these methods are barely used. This study evaluates the reported performance of the described methods and identifies barriers to their implementation in clinical practice. METHODOLOGY: The Ovid, Embase, and Cochrane Central databases were searched up to 20 September 2013. Heterogeneity analysis methods were classified into four categories, i.e., non-spatial methods (NSM, spatial grey level methods (SGLM, fractal analysis (FA methods, and filters and transforms (F&T. The performance of the different methods was compared. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the 7351 potentially relevant publications, 209 were included. Of these studies, 58% reported the use of NSM, 49% SGLM, 10% FA, and 28% F&T. Differentiation between tumor types, tumor grading and/or outcome prediction was the goal in 87% of the studies. Overall, the reported area under the curve (AUC ranged from 0.5 to 1 (median 0.87. No relation was found between the performance and the quantification methods used, or between the performance and the imaging modality. A negative correlation was found between the tumor-feature ratio and the AUC, which is presumably caused by overfitting in small datasets. Cross-validation was reported in 63% of the classification studies. Retrospective analyses were conducted in 57% of the studies without a clear description. CONCLUSIONS: In a research setting, heterogeneity quantification methods can differentiate between tumor types, grade tumors, and predict outcome and monitor treatment effects. To translate these methods to clinical practice, more prospective studies are required that use external datasets for validation: these datasets should be made available to the community to facilitate the development of new and improved

  9. Genomic profiling of malignant phyllodes tumors reveals aberrations in FGFR1 and PI-3 kinase/RAS signaling pathways and provides insights into intratumoral heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Yang; Joseph, Nancy M; Ravindranathan, Ajay; Stohr, Bradley A; Greenland, Nancy Y; Vohra, Poonam; Hosfield, Elizabeth; Yeh, Iwei; Talevich, Eric; Onodera, Courtney; Van Ziffle, Jessica A; Grenert, James P; Bastian, Boris C; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Krings, Gregor

    2016-09-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast are poorly understood rare neoplasms with potential for aggressive behavior. Few efficacious treatment options exist for progressed or metastatic disease. The molecular features of malignant phyllodes tumors are poorly defined, and a deeper understanding of the genetics of these tumors may shed light on pathogenesis and progression and potentially identify novel treatment approaches. We sequenced 510 cancer-related genes in 10 malignant phyllodes tumors, including 5 tumors with liposarcomatous differentiation and 1 with myxoid chondrosarcoma-like differentiation. Intratumoral heterogeneity was assessed by sequencing two separate areas in 7 tumors, including non-heterologous and heterologous components of tumors with heterologous differentiation. Activating hotspot mutations in FGFR1 were identified in 2 tumors. Additional recurrently mutated genes included TERT promoter (6/10), TP53 (4/10), PIK3CA (3/10), MED12 (3/10), SETD2 (2/10) and KMT2D (2/10). Together, genomic aberrations in FGFR/EGFR PI-3 kinase and RAS pathways were identified in 8 (80%) tumors and included mutually exclusive and potentially actionable activating FGFR1, PIK3CA and BRAF V600E mutations, inactivating TSC2 mutation, EGFR amplification and PTEN loss. Seven (70%) malignant phyllodes tumors harbored TERT aberrations (six promoter mutations, one amplification). For comparison, TERT promoter mutations were identified by Sanger sequencing in 33% borderline (n=12) and no (0%, n=8) benign phyllodes tumors (P=0.391 and P=0.013 vs malignant tumors, respectively). Genetic features specific to liposarcoma, including CDK4/MDM2 amplification, were not identified. Copy number analysis revealed intratumoral heterogeneity and evidence for divergent tumor evolution in malignant phyllodes tumors with and without heterologous differentiation. Tumors with liposarcomatous differentiation revealed more chromosomal aberrations in non-heterologous components compared with

  10. Correlation of intra-tumor 18F-FDG uptake heterogeneity indices with perfusion CT derived parameters in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Tixier

    Full Text Available Thirty patients with proven colorectal cancer prospectively underwent integrated 18F-FDG PET/DCE-CT to assess the metabolic-flow phenotype. Both CT blood flow parametric maps and PET images were analyzed. Correlations between PET heterogeneity and perfusion CT were assessed by Spearman's rank correlation analysis.Blood flow visualization provided by DCE-CT images was significantly correlated with 18F-FDG PET metabolically active tumor volume as well as with uptake heterogeneity for patients with stage III/IV tumors (|ρ|:0.66 to 0.78; p-value<0.02.The positive correlation found with tumor blood flow indicates that intra-tumor heterogeneity of 18F-FDG PET accumulation reflects to some extent tracer distribution and consequently indicates that 18F-FDG PET intra-tumor heterogeneity may be associated with physiological processes such as tumor vascularization.

  11. Dual-patterned immunofiltration (DIF) device for the rapid efficient negative selection of heterogeneous circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Jiyoon; Kang, Yoon-Tae; Kim, Young Jun; Cho, Young-Ho; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Hojoong; Moon, Byung-In; Kim, Ho Gak

    2016-11-29

    The analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is an emerging field for estimating the metastatic relapse and tumor burden of cancer patients. However, the isolation of CTCs is still challenging due to their ambiguity, rarity, and heterogeneity. Here, we present an anti-CD45 antibody based dual-patterned immunofiltration (DIF) device for the enrichment of heterogeneous CTC subtypes by effective elimination of leukocytes. Our uniquely designed dual-patterned layers significantly enhance the binding chance between immuno-patterns and leukocytes due to the fluidic whirling and the increased binding sites, thus achieving superior negative selection in terms of high-throughput and high purity. From the experiments using lung cancer cells, 97.07 ± 2.79% of leukocytes were eliminated with less than 10% loss of cancerous cells at the flow rate of 1 mL h -1 . To verify the device as a potential diagnostic tool, CTCs were collected from 11 cancer patients' blood and an average of 283.3 CTC-like cells were identified while less than 1 CTC-like cells were found from healthy donors. The samples were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry and the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to identify their heterogeneous characteristics. These remarkable results demonstrate that the present device could help to understand the unknown properties or undiscovered roles of CTCs with a non-biased view.

  12. Splice Expression Variation Analysis (SEVA) for Inter-tumor Heterogeneity of Gene Isoform Usage in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Bahman; Guo, Theresa; Considine, Michael; Florea, Liliana; Kagohara, Luciane T; Stein-O'Brien, Genevieve L; Kelley, Dylan; Flam, Emily; Zambo, Kristina D; Ha, Patrick K; Geman, Donald; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A; Gaykalova, Daria A; Favorov, Alexander V; Fertig, Elana J

    2018-01-12

    Current bioinformatics methods to detect changes in gene isoform usage in distinct phenotypes compare the relative expected isoform usage in phenotypes. These statistics model differences in isoform usage in normal tissues, which have stable regulation of gene splicing. Pathological conditions, such as cancer, can have broken regulation of splicing that increases the heterogeneity of the expression of splice variants. Inferring events with such differential heterogeneity in gene isoform usage requires new statistical approaches. We introduce Splice Expression Variability Analysis (SEVA) to model increased heterogeneity of splice variant usage between conditions (e.g., tumor and normal samples). SEVA uses a rank-based multivariate statistic that compares the variability of junction expression profiles within one condition to the variability within another. Simulated data show that SEVA is unique in modeling heterogeneity of gene isoform usage, and benchmark SEVA's performance against EBSeq, DiffSplice, and rMATS that model differential isoform usage instead of heterogeneity. We confirm the accuracy of SEVA in identifying known splice variants in head and neck cancer and perform cross-study validation of novel splice variants. A novel comparison of splice variant heterogeneity between subtypes of head and neck cancer demonstrated unanticipated similarity between the heterogeneity of gene isoform usage in HPV-positive and HPV-negative subtypes and anticipated increased heterogeneity among HPV-negative samples with mutations in genes that regulate the splice variant machinery. These results show that SEVA accurately models differential heterogeneity of gene isoform usage from RNA-seq data. SEVA is implemented in the R/Bioconductor package GSReg. bahman@jhu.edu, ejfertig@jhmi.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Genetic diversity in normal cell populations is the earliest stage of oncogenesis leading to intra-tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory L Howk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Random mutations and epigenetic alterations provide a rich substrate for microevolutionary phenomena to occur in proliferating epithelial tissues. Genetic diversity resulting from random mutations in normal cells is critically important for understanding the genetic basis of oncogenesis. However, evaluation of the cell-specific role of individual (epi-genetic alterations in living tissues is extremely difficult from a direct experimental perspective. We have developed a theoretical model for uterine epithelial cell proliferation. Computational simulations have shown that a base-line mutation rate of two mutations per cell division is sufficient to explain sporadic endometrial cancer as a rare evolutionary consequence with an incidence similar to that reported in SEER data. Simulation of the entire oncogenic process has allowed us to analyze the features of the tumor initiating cells and their clonal expansion. Analysis of the malignant features of individual cancer cells, such as de-differentiation status, proliferation potential, and immortalization status, permits a mathematical characterization of malignancy and a comparison of intra-tumor heterogeneity between individual tumors. We found, under the conditions specified, that cancer stem cells account for approximately 7% of the total cancer cell population. Taken together, our mathematical modeling describes the genetic diversity and evolution in a normal cell population at the early stages of oncogenesis and characterizes intra-tumor heterogeneity. This model has explored the role of accumulation of a large number of genetic alterations in oncogenesis as an alternative to traditional biological approaches emphasizing the driving role of a small number of genetic mutations, and this accumulation, along with environmental factors, has a significant impact on the growth advantage of and selection pressure on individual cancer cells and the resulting tumor composition and progression.

  14. Heterogeneity of tumor chemosensitivity in ovarian epithelial cancer revealed using the adenosine triphosphate-tumor chemosensitivity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Hongxia

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, primarily due to the heterogeneity in chemosensitivity among patients. In the present study, this heterogeneity was evaluated in ovarian epithelial cancer (OEC) using an in vitro adenosine triphosphate tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA). Specimens were collected from 80 patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery. Viable ovarian cancer cells obtained from malignant tissues were tested for sensitivity to paclitaxel (PTX), carboplatin (CBP), topotecan (TPT), gemcitabine (GEM), docetaxel (TXT), etoposide, bleomycin and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide using ATP-TCA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the clinical chemotherapy sensitivity of OEC were 88.6, 77.8, 83 and 84.8%, respectively. PTX demonstrated the highest sensitivity of all agents tested (82.5% in all specimens, 85.7% in recurrent specimens), followed by CBP (58.8 and 60.7%, respectively). The sensitivities to PTX and docetaxel (PIII) or low-differentiated specimens, respectively. The present study indicated that ATP-TCA is an effective method for guiding the choice of chemotherapy drugs. Notable heterogeneity of chemosensitivity was observed in the OEC specimens.

  15. Heterogeneity of tumor chemosensitivity in ovarian epithelial cancer revealed using the adenosine triphosphate-tumor chemosensitivity assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, JIN; LI, HONGXIA

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, primarily due to the heterogeneity in chemosensitivity among patients. In the present study, this heterogeneity was evaluated in ovarian epithelial cancer (OEC) using an in vitro adenosine triphosphate tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA). Specimens were collected from 80 patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery. Viable ovarian cancer cells obtained from malignant tissues were tested for sensitivity to paclitaxel (PTX), carboplatin (CBP), topotecan (TPT), gemcitabine (GEM), docetaxel (TXT), etoposide, bleomycin and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide using ATP-TCA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the clinical chemotherapy sensitivity of OEC were 88.6, 77.8, 83 and 84.8%, respectively. PTX demonstrated the highest sensitivity of all agents tested (82.5% in all specimens, 85.7% in recurrent specimens), followed by CBP (58.8 and 60.7%, respectively). The sensitivities to PTX and docetaxel (P<0.001) were correlated, in addition to those of CBP, TPT and GEM (P<0.001). Early-stage (I/II) and high- to mildly-differentiated OEC specimens revealed a lower chemosensitivity than advanced-stage (III) or low-differentiated specimens, respectively. The present study indicated that ATP-TCA is an effective method for guiding the choice of chemotherapy drugs. Notable heterogeneity of chemosensitivity was observed in the OEC specimens. PMID:26137074

  16. A Biobank of Breast Cancer Explants with Preserved Intra-tumor Heterogeneity to Screen Anticancer Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Alejandra; Rueda, Oscar M; Greenwood, Wendy; Batra, Ankita Sati; Callari, Maurizio; Batra, Rajbir Nath; Pogrebniak, Katherine; Sandoval, Jose; Cassidy, John W; Tufegdzic-Vidakovic, Ana; Sammut, Stephen-John; Jones, Linda; Provenzano, Elena; Baird, Richard; Eirew, Peter; Hadfield, James; Eldridge, Matthew; McLaren-Douglas, Anne; Barthorpe, Andrew; Lightfoot, Howard; O'Connor, Mark J; Gray, Joe; Cortes, Javier; Baselga, Jose; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Welm, Alana L; Aparicio, Samuel; Serra, Violeta; Garnett, Mathew J; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-09-22

    The inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity of breast cancer needs to be adequately captured in pre-clinical models. We have created a large collection of breast cancer patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTXs), in which the morphological and molecular characteristics of the originating tumor are preserved through passaging in the mouse. An integrated platform combining in vivo maintenance of these PDTXs along with short-term cultures of PDTX-derived tumor cells (PDTCs) was optimized. Remarkably, the intra-tumor genomic clonal architecture present in the originating breast cancers was mostly preserved upon serial passaging in xenografts and in short-term cultured PDTCs. We assessed drug responses in PDTCs on a high-throughput platform and validated several ex vivo responses in vivo. The biobank represents a powerful resource for pre-clinical breast cancer pharmacogenomic studies (http://caldaslab.cruk.cam.ac.uk/bcape), including identification of biomarkers of response or resistance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Heterogeneous drug penetrance of veliparib and carboplatin measured in triple negative breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelink, Imke H; Prideaux, Brendan; Krings, Gregor; Wilmes, Lisa; Lee, Pei Rong Evelyn; Bo, Pan; Hann, Byron; Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Heditsian, Diane; Swigart-Brown, Lamorna; Jones, Ella F; Magnitsky, Sergey; Keizer, Ron J; de Vries, Niels; Rosing, Hilde; Pawlowska, Nela; Thomas, Scott; Dhawan, Mallika; Aggarwal, Rahul; Munster, Pamela N; Esserman, Laura J; Ruan, Weiming; Wu, Alan H B; Yee, Douglas; Dartois, Véronique; Savic, Radojka M; Wolf, Denise M; van 't Veer, Laura

    2017-09-11

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi), coupled to a DNA damaging agent is a promising approach to treating triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, not all patients respond; we hypothesize that non-response in some patients may be due to insufficient drug penetration. As a first step to testing this hypothesis, we quantified and visualized veliparib and carboplatin penetration in mouse xenograft TNBCs and patient blood samples. MDA-MB-231, HCC70 or MDA-MB-436 human TNBC cells were implanted in 41 beige SCID mice. Low dose (20 mg/kg) or high dose (60 mg/kg) veliparib was given three times daily for three days, with carboplatin (60 mg/kg) administered twice. In addition, blood samples were analyzed from 19 patients from a phase 1 study of carboplatin + PARPi talazoparib. Veliparib and carboplatin was quantified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Veliparib tissue penetration was visualized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) and platinum adducts (covalent nuclear DNA-binding) were quantified using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Pharmacokinetic modeling and Pearson's correlation were used to explore associations between concentrations in plasma, tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Veliparib penetration in xenograft tumors was highly heterogeneous between and within tumors. Only 35% (CI 95% 26-44%), 74% (40-97%) and 46% (9-37%) of veliparib observed in plasma penetrated into MDA-MB-231, HCC70 and MDA-MB-436 cell-based xenografts, respectively. Within tumors, penetration heterogeneity was larger with the 60 mg/kg compared to the 20 mg/kg dose (RSD 155% versus 255%, P = 0.001). These tumor concentrations were predicted similar to clinical dosing levels, but predicted tumor concentrations were below half maximal concentration values as threshold of response. Xenograft veliparib concentrations correlated positively with platinum adduct

  18. Preliminary study of tumor heterogeneity in imaging predicts two year survival in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasree Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most lethal cancers in the United States with a five-year survival rate of 7.2% for all stages. Although surgical resection is the only curative treatment, currently we are unable to differentiate between resectable patients with occult metastatic disease from those with potentially curable disease. Identification of patients with poor prognosis via early classification would help in initial management including the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy or radiation, or in the choice of postoperative adjuvant therapy. PDAC ranges in appearance from homogeneously isoattenuating masses to heterogeneously hypovascular tumors on CT images; hence, we hypothesize that heterogeneity reflects underlying differences at the histologic or genetic level and will therefore correlate with patient outcome. We quantify heterogeneity of PDAC with texture analysis to predict 2-year survival. Using fuzzy minimum-redundancy maximum-relevance feature selection and a naive Bayes classifier, the proposed features achieve an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.90 and accuracy (Ac of 82.86% with the leave-one-image-out technique and an AUC of 0.80 and Ac of 75.0% with three-fold cross-validation. We conclude that texture analysis can be used to quantify heterogeneity in CT images to accurately predict 2-year survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. From these data, we infer differences in the biological evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes measurable in imaging and identify opportunities for optimized patient selection for therapy.

  19. Understanding Heterogeneity and Permeability of Brain Metastases in Murine Models of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Through Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Implications for Detection and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Murrell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Brain metastases due to breast cancer are increasing, and the prognosis is poor. Lack of effective therapy is attributed to heterogeneity of breast cancers and their resulting metastases, as well as impermeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB, which hinders delivery of therapeutics to the brain. This work investigates three experimental models of HER2+ breast cancer brain metastasis to better understand the inherent heterogeneity of the disease. We use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to quantify brain metastatic growth and explore its relationship with BBB permeability. DESIGN: Brain metastases due to breast cancer cells (SUM190-BR3, JIMT-1-BR3, or MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 were imaged at 3 T using balanced steady-state free precession and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin echo sequences. The histology and immunohistochemistry corresponding to MRI were also analyzed. RESULTS: There were differences in metastatic tumor appearance by MRI, histology, and immunohistochemistry (Ki67, CD31, CD105 across the three models. The mean volume of an MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 tumor was significantly larger compared to other models (F2,12 = 5.845, P < .05; interestingly, this model also had a significantly higher proportion of Gd-impermeable tumors (F2,12 = 22.18, P < .0001. Ki67 staining indicated that Gd-impermeable tumors had significantly more proliferative nuclei compared to Gd-permeable tumors (t[24] = 2.389, P < .05 in the MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 model. CD31 and CD105 staining suggested no difference in new vasculature patterns between permeable and impermeable tumors in any model. CONCLUSION: Significant heterogeneity is present in these models of brain metastases from HER2+ breast cancer. Understanding this heterogeneity, especially as it relates to BBB permeability, is important for improvement in brain metastasis detection and treatment delivery.

  20. [Mesh structure of two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype heterogeneity in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Jin-Kang; Hu, Cheng-Ping; Zhou, Mo-Ling; Xia, Yu; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the structural characteristics and clinical significance of two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TMAP) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirty surgical specimens of NSCLC were collected. The sections of the tumor tissues corresponding to the slice of CT perfusion imaging were selected to construct the 2D-TMAP expression. Spearman correlation analysis was used to examine the relation between the 2D-TMAP expression and the clinicopathological features of NSCLC. A heterogeneity was noted in the 2D-TMAP expression of NSCLC. The microvascular density (MVD) in the area surrounding the tumor was higher than that in the central area, but the difference was not statistically significant. The density of the microvessels without intact lumen was significantly greater in the surrounding area than in the central area (P=0.030). The total MVD was not correlated to tumor differentiation (r=0.042, P=0.831). The density of the microvessels without intact lumen in the surrounding area was positively correlated to degree of tumor differentiation and lymph node metastasis (r=0.528 and 0.533, P=0.041 and 0.028, respectively), and also to the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), ephrinB2, EphB4, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (r=0.504, 0.549, 0.549, and 0.370; P=0.005, 0.002, 0.002, and 0.048, respectively). The degree of tumor differentiation was positively correlated to PCNA and VEGF expression (r=0.604 and 0.370, P=0.001 and 0.048, respectively), but inversely to the integrity of microvascular basement membrane (r=-0.531, P=0.033). The 2D-TMAP suggests the overall state of the micro-environment for tumor growth. The 2D-TMAP of NSCLC regulates angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation through a mesh-like structure, and better understanding of the characteristics and possible mechanism of 2D-TMAP expression can be of great clinical importance.

  1. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  2. Hierarchical non-negative matrix factorization to characterize brain tumor heterogeneity using multi-parametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauwen, Nicolas; Sima, Diana M; Van Cauter, Sofie; Veraart, Jelle; Leemans, Alexander; Maes, Frederik; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2015-12-01

    Tissue characterization in brain tumors and, in particular, in high-grade gliomas is challenging as a result of the co-existence of several intra-tumoral tissue types within the same region and the high spatial heterogeneity. This study presents a method for the detection of the relevant tumor substructures (i.e. viable tumor, necrosis and edema), which could be of added value for the diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of individual patients. Twenty-four patients with glioma [10 low-grade gliomas (LGGs), 14 high-grade gliomas (HGGs)] underwent a multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) scheme, including conventional MRI (cMRI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) and short-TE (1)H MRSI. MP-MRI parameters were derived: T2, T1 + contrast, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), mean kurtosis (MK) and the principal metabolites lipids (Lip), lactate (Lac), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total choline (Cho), etc. Hierarchical non-negative matrix factorization (hNMF) was applied to the MP-MRI parameters, providing tissue characterization on a patient-by-patient and voxel-by-voxel basis. Tissue-specific patterns were obtained and the spatial distribution of each tissue type was visualized by means of abundance maps. Dice scores were calculated by comparing tissue segmentation derived from hNMF with the manual segmentation by a radiologist. Correlation coefficients were calculated between each pathologic tissue source and the average feature vector within the corresponding tissue region. For the patients with HGG, mean Dice scores of 78%, 85% and 83% were obtained for viable tumor, the tumor core and the complete tumor region. The mean correlation coefficients were 0.91 for tumor, 0.97 for necrosis and 0.96 for edema. For the patients with LGG, a mean Dice score of 85% and mean correlation coefficient of 0.95 were found for the tumor region. hNMF was

  3. Bridging Models and Business: Understanding heterogeneity in hidden drivers of customer purchase behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Korkmaz (Evsen)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Recent years have seen many advances in quantitative models in the marketing literature. Even though these advances enable model building for a better understanding of customer purchase behavior and customer heterogeneity such that firms develop optimal targeting and

  4. An assessment of computational methods for estimating purity and clonality using genomic data derived from heterogeneous tumor tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; De, Subhajyoti

    2015-03-01

    Solid tumor samples typically contain multiple distinct clonal populations of cancer cells, and also stromal and immune cell contamination. A majority of the cancer genomics and transcriptomics studies do not explicitly consider genetic heterogeneity and impurity, and draw inferences based on mixed populations of cells. Deconvolution of genomic data from heterogeneous samples provides a powerful tool to address this limitation. We discuss several computational tools, which enable deconvolution of genomic and transcriptomic data from heterogeneous samples. We also performed a systematic comparative assessment of these tools. If properly used, these tools have potentials to complement single-cell genomics and immunoFISH analyses, and provide novel insights into tumor heterogeneity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Development and Evaluation of an Open-Source Software Package “CGITA” for Quantifying Tumor Heterogeneity with Molecular Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Dean Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The quantification of tumor heterogeneity with molecular images, by analyzing the local or global variation in the spatial arrangements of pixel intensity with texture analysis, possesses a great clinical potential for treatment planning and prognosis. To address the lack of available software for computing the tumor heterogeneity on the public domain, we develop a software package, namely, Chang-Gung Image Texture Analysis (CGITA toolbox, and provide it to the research community as a free, open-source project. Methods. With a user-friendly graphical interface, CGITA provides users with an easy way to compute more than seventy heterogeneity indices. To test and demonstrate the usefulness of CGITA, we used a small cohort of eighteen locally advanced oral cavity (ORC cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapies. Results. In our case study of ORC data, we found that more than ten of the current implemented heterogeneity indices outperformed SUVmean for outcome prediction in the ROC analysis with a higher area under curve (AUC. Heterogeneity indices provide a better area under the curve up to 0.9 than the SUVmean and TLG (0.6 and 0.52, resp.. Conclusions. CGITA is a free and open-source software package to quantify tumor heterogeneity from molecular images. CGITA is available for free for academic use at http://code.google.com/p/cgita.

  6. Intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity in a vemurafenib-resistant melanoma patient and derived xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kristel; Krijgsman, Oscar; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Shahrabi, Aida; Weeber, Fleur; Song, Ji-Ying; Kuilman, Thomas; Vis, Daniel J; Wessels, Lodewyk F; Voest, Emile E; Schumacher, Ton Nm; Blank, Christian U; Adams, David J; Haanen, John B; Peeper, Daniel S

    2015-09-01

    The development of targeted inhibitors, like vemurafenib, has greatly improved the clinical outcome of BRAF(V600E) metastatic melanoma. However, resistance to such compounds represents a formidable problem. Using whole-exome sequencing and functional analyses, we have investigated the nature and pleiotropy of vemurafenib resistance in a melanoma patient carrying multiple drug-resistant metastases. Resistance was caused by a plethora of mechanisms, all of which reactivated the MAPK pathway. In addition to three independent amplifications and an aberrant form of BRAF(V600E), we identified a new activating insertion in MEK1. This MEK1(T55delins) (RT) mutation could be traced back to a fraction of the pre-treatment lesion and not only provided protection against vemurafenib but also promoted local invasion of transplanted melanomas. Analysis of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) from therapy-refractory metastases revealed that multiple resistance mechanisms were present within one metastasis. This heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumorally, caused an incomplete capture in the PDX of the resistance mechanisms observed in the patient. In conclusion, vemurafenib resistance in a single patient can be established through distinct events, which may be preexisting. Furthermore, our results indicate that PDX may not harbor the full genetic heterogeneity seen in the patient's melanoma. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  7. Spontaneous Formation of Tumorigenic Hybrids between Breast Cancer and Multipotent Stromal Cells Is a Source of Tumor Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow–derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids be...

  8. Meeting the challenge of homogenous boron targeting of heterogeneous tumors for effective boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heber, Elisa M.; Trivillin, Veronica A.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Rebagliati, J. Raul; Batistoni, Daniel; Kreimann, Erica L.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Nigg, David W.; Gonzalez, Beatriz N.

    2006-01-01

    BNCT is a tumor cell targeted radiation therapy. Inadequately boron targeted tumor populations jeopardize tumor control. Meeting the to date unresolved challenge of homogeneous targeting of heterogeneous tumors with effective boron carriers would contribute to therapeutic efficacy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the degree of variation in boron content delivered by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-10 (Na 2 10 B 10 H 10 ) and the combined administration of (BPA+GB-10) in different portions of tumor, precancerous tissue around tumor and normal pouch tissue in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Boron content was evaluated by ICP-AES. The degree of homogeneity in boron targeting was assessed in terms of the coefficient of variation ([S.D./Mean]x100) of boron values. Statistical analysis of the results was performed by one-way ANOVA and the least significant difference test. GB-10 and GB-10 plus BPA achieved respectively a statistically significant 1.8-fold and 3.3-fold increase in targeting homogeneity over BPA. The combined boron compound administration protocol contributes to homogeneous targeting of heterogeneous tumors and would increase therapeutic efficacy of BNCT by exposing all tumor populations to neutron capture reactions in boron. (author)

  9. Ovarian Cancers: Genetic Abnormalities, Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2018-01-01

    Four main histological subtypes of ovarian cancer exist: serous (the most frequent), endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell; in each subtype, low and high grade. The large majority of ovarian cancers are diagnosed as high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCas). TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in HGS-OvCas; about 50% of these tumors displayed defective homologous recombination due to germline and somatic BRCA mutations, epigenetic inactivation of BRCA and abnormalities of DNA repair genes; somatic copy number alterations are frequent in these tumors and some of them are associated with prognosis; defective NOTCH, RAS/MEK, PI3K and FOXM1 pathway signaling is frequent. Other histological subtypes were characterized by a different mutational spectrum: LGS-OvCas have increased frequency of BRAF and RAS mutations; mucinous cancers have mutation in ARID1A, PIK3CA, PTEN, CTNNB1 and RAS. Intensive research was focused to characterize ovarian cancer stem cells, based on positivity for some markers, including CD133, CD44, CD117, CD24, EpCAM, LY6A, ALDH1. Ovarian cancer cells have an intrinsic plasticity, thus explaining that in a single tumor more than one cell subpopulation, may exhibit tumor-initiating capacity. The improvements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of ovarian cancers should lead to more efficacious treatments. PMID:29389895

  10. Multi-Parametric MRI and Texture Analysis to Visualize Spatial Histologic Heterogeneity and Tumor Extent in Glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leland S Hu

    Full Text Available Genetic profiling represents the future of neuro-oncology but suffers from inadequate biopsies in heterogeneous tumors like Glioblastoma (GBM. Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI targets enhancing core (ENH but yields adequate tumor in only ~60% of cases. Further, CE-MRI poorly localizes infiltrative tumor within surrounding non-enhancing parenchyma, or brain-around-tumor (BAT, despite the importance of characterizing this tumor segment, which universally recurs. In this study, we use multiple texture analysis and machine learning (ML algorithms to analyze multi-parametric MRI, and produce new images indicating tumor-rich targets in GBM.We recruited primary GBM patients undergoing image-guided biopsies and acquired pre-operative MRI: CE-MRI, Dynamic-Susceptibility-weighted-Contrast-enhanced-MRI, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Following image coregistration and region of interest placement at biopsy locations, we compared MRI metrics and regional texture with histologic diagnoses of high- vs low-tumor content (≥80% vs <80% tumor nuclei for corresponding samples. In a training set, we used three texture analysis algorithms and three ML methods to identify MRI-texture features that optimized model accuracy to distinguish tumor content. We confirmed model accuracy in a separate validation set.We collected 82 biopsies from 18 GBMs throughout ENH and BAT. The MRI-based model achieved 85% cross-validated accuracy to diagnose high- vs low-tumor in the training set (60 biopsies, 11 patients. The model achieved 81.8% accuracy in the validation set (22 biopsies, 7 patients.Multi-parametric MRI and texture analysis can help characterize and visualize GBM's spatial histologic heterogeneity to identify regional tumor-rich biopsy targets.

  11. Nanoroughened adhesion-based capture of circulating tumor cells with heterogeneous expression and metastatic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Weiqiang; Allen, Steven G.; Reka, Ajaya Kumar; Qian, Weiyi; Han, Shuo; Zhao, Jianing; Bao, Liwei; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Fu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have shown prognostic relevance in many cancer types. However, the majority of current CTC capture methods rely on positive selection techniques that require a priori knowledge about the surface protein expression of disseminated CTCs, which are known to be a dynamic population. We developed a microfluidic CTC capture chip that incorporated a nanoroughened glass substrate for capturing CTCs from blood samples. Our CTC capture chip utilized the differential adhesion preference of cancer cells to nanoroughened etched glass surfaces as compared to normal blood cells and thus did not depend on the physical size or surface protein expression of CTCs. The microfluidic CTC capture chip was able to achieve a superior capture yield for both epithelial cell adhesion molecule positive (EpCAM+) and EpCAM- cancer cells in blood samples. Additionally, the microfluidic CTC chip captured CTCs undergoing transforming growth factor beta-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (TGF-β-induced EMT) with dynamically down-regulated EpCAM expression. In a mouse model of human breast cancer using EpCAM positive and negative cell lines, the number of CTCs captured correlated positively with the size of the primary tumor and was independent of their EpCAM expression. Furthermore, in a syngeneic mouse model of lung cancer using cell lines with differential metastasis capability, CTCs were captured from all mice with detectable primary tumors independent of the cell lines’ metastatic ability. The microfluidic CTC capture chip using a novel nanoroughened glass substrate is broadly applicable to capturing heterogeneous CTC populations of clinical interest independent of their surface marker expression and metastatic propensity. We were able to capture CTCs from a non-metastatic lung cancer model, demonstrating the potential of the chip to collect the entirety of CTC populations including subgroups of distinct biological and phenotypical properties. Further

  12. Heterogeneity of a labeled tumor surface protein from a murine lung carcinoma demonstrated by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisinger, R.W. (Univ. of Tennessee, Oak Ridge); Kennel, S.J.

    1981-03-01

    Heterogeneity of a tumor surface protein (designated TSP-180) has been demonstrated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Line 1 carcinoma cells derived from a spontaneous alveolar carcinoma of BALB/c mice were labeled externally with /sup 125/I by use of lactoperoxidase or metabolically with (/sup 3/H)-leucine before cell proteins were solubilized with Triton X-100 detergent. Immunoprecipitates prepared with heterologous antisera allowed comparison of two-dimensional patterns of line 1 surface proteins labeled with /sup 125/I or /sup 3/H. The isoelectric point of /sup 125/I-labeled TSP-180 was heterogeneous and varied between 6.1 and 6.3. Treatment with neuraminidase shifted the pI values to between 5.9 and 6.1 and reduced, but did not eliminate, the banding heterogeneity. These data show that charge heterogeneity due to sialization, as well as other factors, exists in TSP-180.

  13. Improving Understanding of Spatial Heterogeneity in Mountain Ecohydrology with Multispectral Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, O.; Molotch, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    Mountain regions are a critical component of the hydrologic system. These regions are extremely heterogeneous, with dramatic topographic, climatic, ecologic and hydrologic variations occurring over very short distances. This heterogeneity makes understanding changes in these environments difficult. Commonly used satellite data are often too coarse to resolve processes at appropriate scales and point measurements are typically unrepresentative of the wider region. The rapid rise of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) offers a potential solution to the scale-related inadequacies of satellite and ground-based observing systems. Using UAS, spatially distributed datasets can be collected at high resolution (i.e. cm), on demand, and can therefore facilitate improved understanding of mountain ecohydrology. We deployed a custom built multispectral - visible (RGB), near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) - UAS at a weekly interval over the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research (NWT LTER) saddle catchment at 3500masl in the Colorado Rockies. This system was used to map surface water pathways, land cover and topography, and quantify ecohydrologic variables including, snow depth, vegetation productivity and surface soil moisture at 5-50cm resolution across an 80ha study area. This presentation will discuss the techniques, methods and merits of using UAS derived multispectral data for ecohydrologic research in mountain regions. We will also present preliminary findings from our survey time series at NWT LTER and a discussion of the potential insights that these datasets can provide. Key questions to be addressed are: 1) how does spatial variability in snow depth impact soil moisture and vegetation productivity, 2) how can UAS help us to identify ecohydrologic `hotspots' and `hot moments' across heterogeneous landscapes.

  14. TU-CD-303-05: Unveiling Tumor Heterogeneity by Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeraj, R. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  15. TU-CD-303-05: Unveiling Tumor Heterogeneity by Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  16. Using discrete choice experiments to understand preferences for quality of life. Variance-scale heterogeneity matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Terry Nicholas; Louviere, Jordan J; Peters, Tim J; Coast, Joanna

    2010-06-01

    Health services researchers are increasingly using discrete choice experiments (DCEs) to model a latent variable, be it health, health-related quality of life or utility. Unfortunately it is not widely recognised that failure to model variance heterogeneity correctly leads to bias in the point estimates. This paper compares variance heterogeneity latent class models with traditional multinomial logistic (MNL) regression models. Using the ICECAP-O quality of life instrument which was designed to provide a set of preference-based general quality of life tariffs for the UK population aged 65+, it demonstrates that there is both mean and variance heterogeneity in preferences for quality of life, which covariate-adjusted MNL is incapable of separating. Two policy-relevant mean groups were found: one group that particularly disliked impairments to independence was dominated by females living alone (typically widows). Males who live alone (often widowers) did not display a preference for independence, but instead showed a strong aversion to social isolation, as did older people (of either sex) who lived with a spouse. Approximately 6-10% of respondents can be classified into a third group that often misunderstood the task. Having a qualification of any type and higher quality of life was associated with smaller random component variances. This illustrates how better understanding of random utility theory enables richer inferences to be drawn from discrete choice experiments. The methods have relevance for all health studies using discrete choice tasks to make inferences about a latent scale, particular QALY valuation exercises that use DCEs, best-worst scaling and ranking tasks. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mapping quorum sensing onto neural networks to understand collective decision making in heterogeneous microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Boedicker, James Q.

    2017-08-01

    Microbial communities frequently communicate via quorum sensing (QS), where cells produce, secrete, and respond to a threshold level of an autoinducer (AI) molecule, thereby modulating gene expression. However, the biology of QS remains incompletely understood in heterogeneous communities, where variant bacterial strains possess distinct QS systems that produce chemically unique AIs. AI molecules bind to ‘cognate’ receptors, but also to ‘non-cognate’ receptors found in other strains, resulting in inter-strain crosstalk. Understanding these interactions is a prerequisite for deciphering the consequences of crosstalk in real ecosystems, where multiple AIs are regularly present in the same environment. As a step towards this goal, we map crosstalk in a heterogeneous community of variant QS strains onto an artificial neural network model. This formulation allows us to systematically analyze how crosstalk regulates the community’s capacity for flexible decision making, as quantified by the Boltzmann entropy of all QS gene expression states of the system. In a mean-field limit of complete cross-inhibition between variant strains, the model is exactly solvable, allowing for an analytical formula for the number of variants that maximize capacity as a function of signal kinetics and activation parameters. An analysis of previous experimental results on the Staphylococcus aureus two-component Agr system indicates that the observed combination of variant numbers, gene expression rates and threshold concentrations lies near this critical regime of parameter space where capacity peaks. The results are suggestive of a potential evolutionary driving force for diversification in certain QS systems.

  18. Dissecting the Heterogeneity of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Going Far Beyond the Needle in the Haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Bulfoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTC defined as expressing both epithelial cell adhesion molecule and cytokeratins (EpCAM+/CK+ can predict prognosis and response to therapy in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer, its clinical utility (i.e., the ability to improve patient outcome by guiding therapy has not yet been proven in clinical trials. Therefore, scientists are now focusing on the molecular characterization of CTC as a way to explore its possible use as a “surrogate” of tumor tissues to non-invasively assess the genomic landscape of the cancer and its evolution during treatment. Additionally, evidences confirm the existence of CTC in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT characterized by a variable loss of epithelial markers. Since the EMT process can originate cells with enhanced invasiveness, stemness and drug-resistance, the enumeration and characterization of this population, perhaps the one truly responsible of tumor recurrence and progression, could be more clinically useful. For these reasons, several devices able to capture CTC independently from the expression of epithelial markers have been developed. In this review, we will describe the types of heterogeneity so far identified and the key role played by the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in driving CTC heterogeneity. The clinical relevance of detecting CTC-heterogeneity will be discussed as well.

  19. Targeted high throughput sequencing in clinical cancer Settings: formaldehyde fixed-paraffin embedded (FFPE tumor tissues, input amount and tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer Georg

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massively parallel sequencing technologies have brought an enormous increase in sequencing throughput. However, these technologies need to be further improved with regard to reproducibility and applicability to clinical samples and settings. Methods Using identification of genetic variations in prostate cancer as an example we address three crucial challenges in the field of targeted re-sequencing: Small nucleotide variation (SNV detection in samples of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue material, minimal amount of input sample and sampling in view of tissue heterogeneity. Results We show that FFPE tissue material can supplement for fresh frozen tissues for the detection of SNVs and that solution-based enrichment experiments can be accomplished with small amounts of DNA with only minimal effects on enrichment uniformity and data variance. Finally, we address the question whether the heterogeneity of a tumor is reflected by different genetic alterations, e.g. different foci of a tumor display different genomic patterns. We show that the tumor heterogeneity plays an important role for the detection of copy number variations. Conclusions The application of high throughput sequencing technologies in cancer genomics opens up a new dimension for the identification of disease mechanisms. In particular the ability to use small amounts of FFPE samples available from surgical tumor resections and histopathological examinations facilitates the collection of precious tissue materials. However, care needs to be taken in regard to the locations of the biopsies, which can have an influence on the prediction of copy number variations. Bearing these technological challenges in mind will significantly improve many large-scale sequencing studies and will - in the long term - result in a more reliable prediction of individual cancer therapies.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of dividing tumor cells detects intratumor heterogeneity linked to cell proliferation in a brain tumor model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Endaya, B.; Lam, P.Y.P.; Meedeniya, A.C.B.; Neužil, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2016), s. 126-137 ISSN 1574-7891 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Intratumor heterogeneity * Click chemistry * Proliferation * Gene profiling Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 5.314, year: 2016

  1. Assessment of Tumor Heterogeneity, as Evidenced by Gene Expression Profiles, Pathway Activation, and Gene Copy Number, in Patients with Multifocal Invasive Lobular Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Nadine; Advani, Pooja P.; Serie, Daniel J.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Necela, Brian M.; Axenfeld, Bianca C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Feathers, Ryan W.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Crook, Julia E.; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) comprises approximately ~10–20% of breast cancers. In general, multifocal/multicentric (MF/MC) breast cancer has been associated with an increased rate of regional lymph node metastases. Tumor heterogeneity between foci represents a largely unstudied source of genomic variation in those rare patients with MF/MC ILC. Methods We characterized gene expression and copy number in 2 or more foci from 11 patients with MF/MC ILC (all ER+, HER2-) and adjacent normal tissue. RNA and DNA were extracted from 3x1.5mm cores from all foci. Gene expression (730 genes) and copy number (80 genes) were measured using Nanostring PanCancer and Cancer CNV panels. Linear mixed models were employed to compare expression in tumor versus normal samples from the same patient, and to assess heterogeneity (variability) in expression among multiple ILC within an individual. Results 35 and 34 genes were upregulated (FC>2) and down-regulated (FC<0.5) respectively in ILC tumor relative to adjacent normal tissue, q<0.05. 9/34 down-regulated genes (FIGF, RELN, PROM1, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2, KIT) had changes larger than CDH1, a hallmark of ILC. Copy number changes in these patients were relatively few but consistent across foci within each patient. Amplification of three genes (CCND1, FADD, ORAOV1) at 11q13.3 was present in 2/11 patients in both foci. We observed significant evidence of within-patient between-foci variability (heterogeneity) in gene expression for 466 genes (p<0.05 with FDR 8%), including CDH1, FIGF, RELN, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2 and KIT. Conclusions There was substantial variation in gene expression between ILC foci within patients, including known markers of ILC, suggesting an additional level of complexity that should be addressed. PMID:27078887

  2. 1842676957299765Latent class cluster analysis to understand heterogeneity in prostate cancer treatment utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghani Salimah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men with prostate cancer are often challenged to choose between conservative management and a range of available treatment options each carrying varying risks and benefits. The trade-offs are between an improved life-expectancy with treatment accompanied by important risks such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Previous studies of preference elicitation for prostate cancer treatment have found considerable heterogeneity in individuals' preferences for health states given similar treatments and clinical risks. Methods Using latent class mixture model (LCA, we first sought to understand if there are unique patterns of heterogeneity or subgroups of individuals based on their prostate cancer treatment utilities (calculated time trade-off utilities for various health states and if such unique subgroups exist, what demographic and urological variables may predict membership in these subgroups. Results The sample (N = 244 included men with prostate cancer (n = 188 and men at-risk for disease (n = 56. The sample was predominantly white (77%, with mean age of 60 years (SD ± 9.5. Most (85.9% were married or living with a significant other. Using LCA, a three class solution yielded the best model evidenced by the smallest Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC, substantial reduction in BIC from a 2-class solution, and Lo-Mendell-Rubin significance of < .001. The three identified clusters were named high-traders (n = 31, low-traders (n = 116, and no-traders (n = 97. High-traders were more likely to trade survival time associated with treatment to avoid potential risks of treatment. Low-traders were less likely to trade survival time and accepted risks of treatment. The no-traders were likely to make no trade-offs in any direction favouring the status quo. There was significant difference among the clusters in the importance of sexual activity (Pearson's χ2 = 16.55, P = 0.002; Goodman and Kruskal tau = 0.039, P < 0.001. In

  3. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, Caecilia S., E-mail: caecilia.reiner@usz.ch; Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}, therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  4. Polar solvent modification of x ray induced potentially lethal damage in heterogeneous human colon tumor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arundel, C.M.; Leith, J.T.; Dexter, D.L.; Glicksman, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Two subpopulations of tumor cells (clones A and D) obtained from a human colon adenocarcinoma were examined for their sensitivities to x-irradiation as unfed, early plateau phase cultures. Both the single dose survival curves and the kinetics of potentially lethal damage recovery (PLDR) were determined for the two tumor lines. Also, possible modification of PLDR by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), which has previously been shown to enhance the radiosensitivity of exponentially growing tumor cells, was investigated by adding DMF (0.8% v/v) to plateau phase cultures immediately after irradiation, and determining effects on the extent of PLDR. For non-DMF treated cells, the survival curve parameters of the diploid (clone D) and aneuploid (clone A) lines were very similar. Using initial survival levels of 3.5% (clone D) or 5.5% (clone A) to investigate PLDR, it was found that the increase in survival for clone D was 2.2, while the SFR for clone A was 1.6. DMF did not change either the kinetics or extent of PLDR in these two tumor lines when added to cultures immediately after irradiation. These results indicate that significant heterogeneity in PLDR exists between these closely related tumor subpopulations

  5. Characterization of Tumor Heterogeneity by Texture Analysis in 18F-FDG PET images: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso, M.; Martino, M.E.; Rodriguez, E.A.; Landaeta, L.C.; Carreras, J.L.; Calvo, F.A.; Desco, M.; Pascau, J.; Muñoz-Barrutia, M.

    2016-07-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is often used in clinic for cancer diagnosis, staging, therapy planning and monitoring. Alternative features to the classical semi-quantitative variables have been recently proposed to study the heterogeneity of tumors. The method to extract such characteristics is texture analysis, which quantifies variations of uptake distribution within the lesions. Methods: Fifty-three head and neck and twelve rectal cancer patients were included in the analysis. A workflow in an open-source software, 3D slicer, was designed and expert clinicians were trained on its use, sixty six features were calculated including metabolic and texture parameters. Statistical analysis and dimensionality reduction techniques were performed on the data. Results: After observing a high correlation between variables, dimensions were reduced to five and three independent components for head and neck and rectal cancer cohort, respectively. Conclusion: Tumor heterogeneity parameters could be expressing important information about tumor and cancer disease, information that could be used to assess disease staging, patients’ prognosis, therapy plan and survival. (Author)

  6. Hybrid method for fast Monte Carlo simulation of diffuse reflectance from a multilayered tissue model with tumor-like heterogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan

    2012-01-01

    We present a hybrid method that combines a multilayered scaling method and a perturbation method to speed up the Monte Carlo simulation of diffuse reflectance from a multilayered tissue model with finite-size tumor-like heterogeneities. The proposed method consists of two steps. In the first step, a set of photon trajectory information generated from a baseline Monte Carlo simulation is utilized to scale the exit weight and exit distance of survival photons for the multilayered tissue model. In the second step, another set of photon trajectory information, including the locations of all collision events from the baseline simulation and the scaling result obtained from the first step, is employed by the perturbation Monte Carlo method to estimate diffuse reflectance from the multilayered tissue model with tumor-like heterogeneities. Our method is demonstrated to shorten simulation time by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, this hybrid method works for a larger range of probe configurations and tumor models than the scaling method or the perturbation method alone.

  7. Intratumor heterogeneity of morphometric and stereologic variables in primary ovarian tumors and their omental metastatic deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhuis, M.; Scheepstra, C.; Buist, M. R.; van Diest, P. J.; Baak, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    To compare quantitative pathologic variables assessed in primary ovarian tumors and metastatic tumor deposits in the omentum and compare their prognostic value. In 29 cases of advanced ovarian cancer the mean nuclear area (MNA), volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (vv), volume percentage epithelium

  8. Trunk mutational events present minimal intra- and inter-tumoral heterogeneity in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla, Sara; Sia, Daniela; Harrington, Andrew N; Zhang, Zhongyang; Cabellos, Laia; Cornella, Helena; Moeini, Agrin; Camprecios, Genis; Leow, Wei-Qiang; Fiel, Maria Isabel; Hao, Ke; Bassaganyas, Laia; Mahajan, Milind; Thung, Swan N; Villanueva, Augusto; Florman, Sander; Schwartz, Myron E; Llovet, Josep M

    2017-12-01

    According to the clonal model of tumor evolution, trunk alterations arise at early stages and are ubiquitous. Through the characterization of early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis, we aimed to identify trunk alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and study their intra- and inter-tumor distribution in advanced lesions. A total of 151 samples representing the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis were analyzed by targeted-sequencing and a single nucleotide polymorphism array. Genes altered in early lesions (31 dysplastic nodules [DNs] and 38 small HCCs [sHCC]) were defined as trunk. Their distribution was explored in: a) different regions of large tumors (43 regions, 21 tumors), and b) different nodules of the same patient (39 tumors, 17 patients). Multinodular lesions were classified as intrahepatic metastases (IMs) or synchronous tumors based on chromosomal aberrations. TERT promoter mutations (10.5%) and broad copy-number aberrations in chromosomes 1 and 8 (3-7%) were identified as trunk gatekeepers in DNs and were maintained in sHCCs. Trunk drivers identified in sHCCs included TP53 (23%) and CTNNB1 (11%) mutations, and focal amplifications or deletions in known drivers (6%). Overall, TERT, TP53 and CTNNB1 mutations were the most frequent trunk events and at least one was present in 51% of sHCCs. Around 90% of mutations in these genes were ubiquitous among different regions of large tumors. In multinodular HCCs, 35% of patients harbored IMs; 85% of mutations in TERT, TP53 and/or CTNNB1 were retained in primary and metastatic tumors. Trunk events in early stages (TERT, TP53, CTNNB1 mutations) were ubiquitous across different regions of the same tumor and between primary and metastatic nodules in >85% of cases. This concept supports the knowledge that single biopsies would suffice to capture trunk mutations in HCC. Trunk alterations arise at early stages of cancer and are shared among all malignant cells of the tumor. In order to identify trunk alterations

  9. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-del-Mar Inda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  10. Glioblastoma multiforme: a look inside its heterogeneous nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria-Del-Mar; Bonavia, Rudy; Seoane, Joan

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  11. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inda, Maria-del-Mar, E-mail: mminda@vhio.net; Bonavia, Rudy [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Catalan Institution of Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Barcelona 08035 (Spain)

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  12. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  13. Functional heterogeneity of cancer-associated fibroblasts from human colon tumors shows specific prognostic gene expression signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Mercedes; Islam, Abul B M M K; Herrera, Alberto; Martín, Paloma; García, Vanesa; Silva, Javier; Garcia, Jose M; Salas, Clara; Casal, Ignacio; de Herreros, Antonio García; Bonilla, Félix; Peña, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) actively participate in reciprocal communication with tumor cells and with other cell types in the microenvironment, contributing to a tumor-permissive neighborhood and promoting tumor progression. The aim of this study is the characterization of how CAFs from primary human colon tumors promote migration of colon cancer cells. Primary CAF cultures from 15 primary human colon tumors were established. Their enrichment in CAFs was evaluated by the expression of various epithelial and myofibroblast specific markers. Coculture assays of primary CAFs with different colon tumor cells were performed to evaluate promigratory CAF-derived effects on cancer cells. Gene expression profiles were developed to further investigate CAF characteristics. Coculture assays showed significant differences in fibroblast-derived paracrine promigratory effects on cancer cells. Moreover, the association between CAFs' promigratory effects on cancer cells and classic fibroblast activation or stemness markers was observed. CAF gene expression profiles were analyzed by microarray to identify deregulated genes in different promigratory CAFs. The gene expression signature, derived from the most protumorogenic CAFs, was identified. Interestingly, this "CAF signature" showed a remarkable prognostic value for the clinical outcome of patients with colon cancer. Moreover, this prognostic value was validated in an independent series of 142 patients with colon cancer, by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), with a set of four genes included in the "CAF signature." In summary, these studies show for the first time the heterogeneity of primary CAFs' effect on colon cancer cell migration. A CAF gene expression signature able to classify patients with colon cancer into high- and low-risk groups was identified.

  14. Intra-tumoral Heterogeneity of KRAS and BRAF Mutation Status in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer (aCRC and Cost-Effectiveness of Multiple Sample Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D. Richman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available KRAS mutation status is established as a predictive biomarker of benefit from anti-EGFr therapies. Mutations are normally assessed using DNA extracted from one formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumor block. We assessed heterogeneity of KRAS and BRAF mutation status intra-tumorally (multiple blocks from the same primary tumor. We also investigated the utility and efficiency of genotyping a ‘DNA cocktail’ prepared from multiple blocks. We studied 68 consenting patients in two randomized clinical trials. DNA was extracted, from ≥2 primary tumor FFPE blocks per patient. DNA was genotyped by pyrosequencing for KRAS codons 12, 13 and 61 and BRAF codon 600. In patients with heterogeneous mutation status, DNA cocktails were prepared and genotyped. Among 69 primary tumors in 68 patients, 7 (10.1% showed intratumoral heterogeneity; 5 (7.2% at KRAS codons 12, 13 and 2 (2.9% at BRAF codon 600. In patients displaying heterogeneity, the relevant KRAS or BRAF mutation was also identified in ‘DNA cocktail’ samples when including DNA from mutant and wild-type blocks. Heterogeneity is uncommon but not insignificant. Testing DNA from a single block will wrongly assign wild-type status to 10% patients. Testing more than one block, or preferably preparation of a ‘DNA cocktail’ from two or more tumor blocks, improves mutation detection at minimal extra cost.

  15. Interfaces in Heterogeneous Catalysts: Advancing Mechanistic Understanding through Atomic-Scale Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenpei; Hood, Zachary D; Chi, Miaofang

    2017-04-18

    interfaces and providing deeper insight for fine-tuning and optimizing catalyst properties. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has long been a primary characterization technique used for studying nanomaterials because of its exceptional imaging resolution and simultaneous chemical analysis. Over the past decade, advances in STEM, that is, the commercialization of both aberration correctors and monochromators, have significantly improved the spatial and energy resolution. Imaging atomic structures with subangstrom resolution and identifying chemical species with single-atom sensitivity are now routine for STEM. These advancements have greatly benefitted catalytic research. For example, the roles of lattice strain and surface elemental distribution and their effect on catalytic stability and reactivity have been well documented in bimetallic catalysts. In addition, three-dimensional atomic structures revealed by STEM tomography have been integrated in theoretical modeling for predictive catalyst NP design. Recent developments in stable electronic and mechanical devices have opened opportunities to monitor the evolution of catalysts in operando under synthesis and reaction conditions; high-speed direct electron detectors have achieved sub-millisecond time resolutions and allow for rapid structural and chemical changes to be captured. Investigations of catalysts using these latest microscopy techniques have provided new insights into atomic-level catalytic mechanisms. Further integration of new microscopy methods is expected to provide multidimensional descriptions of interfaces under relevant synthesis and reaction conditions. In this Account, we discuss recent insights on understanding catalyst activity, selectivity, and stability using advanced STEM techniques, with an emphasis on how critical interfaces dictate the performance of precious metal-based heterogeneous catalysts. The role of extended interfacial structures, including those between core and shell

  16. Mediator complex subunit 12 exon 2 mutation analysis in different subtypes of smooth muscle tumors confirms genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Marieke A; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Szuhai, Károly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2013-08-01

    Recently, heterozygous mutations in exon 2 of the mediator complex subunit 12 gene have been described in 50% to 70% of uterine leiomyomas; the recurrent nature of these mutations suggests an important role in their pathogenesis. Mediator complex subunit 12 is involved in regulation of transcription and Wnt signaling. So far, little is known about the pathogenesis of the different subtypes of extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. We performed mutation analysis of mediator complex subunit 12 and immunohistochemistry for β-catenin, using 69 tumors of 64 patients including 19 uterine leiomyomas, 6 abdominal leiomyomas, 9 angioleiomyomas, 5 piloleiomyomas, and 7 uterine and 23 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas. In line with previous observations, 58% of uterine leiomyomas carried a mediator complex subunit 12 mutation. However, all other extrauterine leiomyomas were negative with the exception of 1 abdominal leiomyoma with a likely primary uterine origin. Of the 30 leiomyosarcomas, only 1 uterine tumor harbored a mutation. A new observation is the identification of 3 tumors with a homozygous mutation; a monosomy X or interstitial deletion was excluded. β-Catenin immunohistochemistry showed nuclear positivity in only 55% of the mediator complex subunit 12-mutated uterine leiomyomas, suggesting the involvement of pathways other than canonical Wnt signaling in tumorigenesis. Interestingly, 80% of mediator complex subunit 12 wild-type sporadic piloleiomyomas displayed nuclear β-catenin positivity, indicating its involvement in this leiomyoma subtype. The lack of mediator complex subunit 12 mutations in extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas indicates that these tumors arise through a different pathway, emphasizing the genetic heterogeneity of smooth muscle tumors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor spatial heterogeneity in myxoid-containing soft tissue using texture analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Su Kim

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the tumor spatial heterogeneity in myxoid-containing soft-tissue tumors (STTs using texture analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI. A total of 40 patients with myxoid-containing STTs (23 benign and 17 malignant were included in this study. The region of interest (ROI was manually drawn on the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map. For texture analysis, the global (mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis, regional (intensity variability and size-zone variability, and local features (energy, entropy, correlation, contrast, homogeneity, variance, and maximum probability were extracted from the ADC map. Student's t-test was used to test the difference between group means. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was performed with adjustments for age, sex, and tumor volume. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was performed to compare diagnostic performances. Malignant myxoid-containing STTs had significantly higher kurtosis (P = 0.040, energy (P = 0.034, correlation (P<0.001, and homogeneity (P = 0.003, but significantly lower contrast (P<0.001 and variance (P = 0.001 compared with benign myxoid-containing STTs. Contrast showed the highest area under the curve (AUC = 0.923, P<0.001, sensitivity (94.12%, and specificity (86.96%. Our results reveal the potential utility of texture analysis of ADC maps for differentiating benign and malignant myxoid-containing STTs.

  18. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Jerome A.; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities. PMID:27775567

  19. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome A. Staal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  20. A Novel Framework for Automated Segmentation and Labeling of Homogeneous Versus Heterogeneous Lung Tumors in [18F]FDG-PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufi, Motahare; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Geramifar, Parham; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    Determination of intra-tumor high-uptake area using 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is an important consideration for dose painting in radiation treatment applications. The aim of our study was to develop a framework towards automated segmentation and labeling of homogeneous vs. heterogeneous tumors in clinical lung [ 18 F]FDG-PET with the capability of intra-tumor high-uptake region delineation. We utilized and extended a fuzzy random walk PET tumor segmentation algorithm to delineate intra-tumor high-uptake areas. Tumor textural feature (TF) analysis was used to find a relationship between tumor type and TF values. Segmentation accuracy was evaluated quantitatively utilizing 70 clinical [ 18 F]FDG-PET lung images of patients with a total of 150 solid tumors. For volumetric analysis, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and Hausdorff distance (HD) measures were extracted with respect to gold-standard manual segmentation. A multi-linear regression model was also proposed for automated tumor labeling based on TFs, including cross-validation analysis. Two-tailed t test analysis of TFs between homogeneous and heterogeneous tumors revealed significant statistical difference for size-zone variability (SZV), intensity variability (IV), zone percentage (ZP), proposed parameters II and III, entropy and tumor volume (p segmentation, the results showed significant (p segmentation. We proposed and demonstrated an automatic framework for significantly improved segmentation and labeling of homogeneous vs. heterogeneous tumors in lung [ 18 F]FDG-PET images.

  1. CD44 isoforms are heterogeneously expressed in breast cancer and correlate with tumor subtypes and cancer stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Eleonor; Lövgren, Kristina; Fernö, Mårten; Grabau, Dorthe; Borg, Åke; Hegardt, Cecilia; Honeth, Gabriella; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Saal, Lao H; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia; Ringnér, Markus; Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Jönsson, Göran; Holm, Karolina

    2011-01-01

    The CD44 cell adhesion molecule is aberrantly expressed in many breast tumors and has been implicated in the metastatic process as well as in the putative cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment. We aimed to investigate potential associations between alternatively spliced isoforms of CD44 and CSCs as well as to various breast cancer biomarkers and molecular subtypes. We used q-RT-PCR and exon-exon spanning assays to analyze the expression of four alternatively spliced CD44 isoforms as well as the total expression of CD44 in 187 breast tumors and 13 cell lines. ALDH1 protein expression was determined by IHC on TMA. Breast cancer cell lines showed a heterogeneous expression pattern of the CD44 isoforms, which shifted considerably when cells were grown as mammospheres. Tumors characterized as positive for the CD44 + /CD24 - phenotype by immunohistochemistry were associated to all isoforms except the CD44 standard (CD44S) isoform, which lacks all variant exons. Conversely, tumors with strong expression of the CSC marker ALDH1 had elevated expression of CD44S. A high expression of the CD44v2-v10 isoform, which retain all variant exons, was correlated to positive steroid receptor status, low proliferation and luminal A subtype. The CD44v3-v10 isoform showed similar correlations, while high expression of CD44v8-v10 was correlated to positive EGFR, negative/low HER2 status and basal-like subtype. High expression of CD44S was associated with strong HER2 staining and also a subgroup of basal-like tumors. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of CD44 isoform expression data divided tumors into four main clusters, which showed significant correlations to molecular subtypes and differences in 10-year overall survival. We demonstrate that individual CD44 isoforms can be associated to different breast cancer subtypes and clinical markers such as HER2, ER and PgR, which suggests involvement of CD44 splice variants in specific oncogenic signaling pathways. Efforts to link CD44 to

  2. The Impact of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions on Human Breast Tumor Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    pathways associated with poor outcome in TN tumors, we will uncover mechanisms for co‐ evolution, biomarkers and potential  therapeutic   targets.   Our...position  the  tumor  microenvironment  for  therapeutic   intervention.    This  project  also  promises  the  "next  generation"  of  signatures...500  including  matched  samples  and  reduction  mammoplasties )  tissue  samples  obtained  from  surgeries  conducted at the McGill University

  3. Quantitative computed tomographic descriptors associate tumor shape complexity and intratumor heterogeneity with prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olya Grove

    Full Text Available Two CT features were developed to quantitatively describe lung adenocarcinomas by scoring tumor shape complexity (feature 1: convexity and intratumor density variation (feature 2: entropy ratio in routinely obtained diagnostic CT scans. The developed quantitative features were analyzed in two independent cohorts (cohort 1: n = 61; cohort 2: n = 47 of patients diagnosed with primary lung adenocarcinoma, retrospectively curated to include imaging and clinical data. Preoperative chest CTs were segmented semi-automatically. Segmented tumor regions were further subdivided into core and boundary sub-regions, to quantify intensity variations across the tumor. Reproducibility of the features was evaluated in an independent test-retest dataset of 32 patients. The proposed metrics showed high degree of reproducibility in a repeated experiment (concordance, CCC≥0.897; dynamic range, DR≥0.92. Association with overall survival was evaluated by Cox proportional hazard regression, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and the log-rank test. Both features were associated with overall survival (convexity: p = 0.008; entropy ratio: p = 0.04 in Cohort 1 but not in Cohort 2 (convexity: p = 0.7; entropy ratio: p = 0.8. In both cohorts, these features were found to be descriptive and demonstrated the link between imaging characteristics and patient survival in lung adenocarcinoma.

  4. Understanding and exploiting nanoscale surface heterogeneity for particle and cell manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalasin, Surachate

    This thesis explores the impact of surface heterogeneities on colloidal interactions and translates concepts to biointerfacial systems, for instance, microfluidic and biomedical devices. The thesis advances a model system, originally put forth by Kozlova: Tunable electrostatic surface heterogeneity is produced by adsorbing small amounts of cationic polyelectrolyte on a silica flat. The resulting positive electrostatic patches possess a density that is tuned from a saturated carpet down to average spacings on the order of a few hundred nanometers. At these length-scales, multiple adhesive elements (from tens to thousands) are present in the area of contact between a particle and a surface, a distinguishing feature of the thesis. Much of the literature addressing surface "heterogeneity" engineers surfaces with micron-scale features, almost always larger than the contact area between a particle and a second surface. With a nanoscale heterogeneity model, this thesis reports and quantitatively explains particle interaction behavior not typical of homogeneous interfaces. This includes (1) an adhesion threshold, a minimum average surface density of cationic patches needed for particle capture, (previously observed by Kozlova); (2) a crossover, from salt-destabilized to salt-stabilized interactions between heterogeneous surfaces with net-negative charge; (3) a shift of the adhesion threshold with shear, reducing adhesion; (4) a crossover from shear-enhanced to shear-hindered particle adhesion; (5) a range of surface compositions and processing parameters that sustain particle rolling; and (6) conditions where particles arrest immediately on contact. Through variations in ionic strength and particle size, the particle-surface contact area is systematically varied relative to the heterogeneity lengthscale. This provides a semi-quantitative explanation for the shifting of the adhesion threshold, in terms of the statistical probability of a particle being able to find a

  5. Functional traits of trees on and off termite mounds: Understanding the origin of biotically-driven heterogeneity in savannas

    OpenAIRE

    van der Plas, F.; Howison, R.; Reinders, J.; Fokkema, W.; Olff, H.

    2013-01-01

    Questions In African savannas, Macrotermes termites contribute to small-scale heterogeneity by constructing large mounds. Operating as islands of high nutrient and water availability and low fire frequency, these mounds support distinct, diverse communities of trees that have been shown to be highly attractive to browsers. However, the distinct traits of tree species on termite mounds have hardly been studied, even though this may help to understand processes determining (1) their characteris...

  6. A multiscale dataset for understanding complex eco-hydrological processes in a heterogeneous oasis system

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xin; Liu, Shaomin; Xiao, Qin; Ma, Mingguo; Jin, Rui; Che, Tao; Wang, Weizhen; Hu, Xiaoli; Xu, Ziwei; Wen, Jianguang; Wang, Liangxu

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a multiscale dataset obtained from Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) in an oasis-desert area in 2012. Upscaling of eco-hydrological processes on a heterogeneous surface is a grand challenge. Progress in this field is hindered by the poor availability of multiscale observations. HiWATER is an experiment designed to address this challenge through instrumentation on hierarchically nested scales to obtain multiscale and multidisciplinary data. The HiWAT...

  7. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dengwang [Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Wang, Qinfen [Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, H; Chen, J [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.59595±0.00855, 0.6439±0.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.60115±0.00635, 0.64435±0.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity

  8. Spontaneous formation of tumorigenic hybrids between breast cancer and multipotent stromal cells is a source of tumor heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow-derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma-like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer-mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC-breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Realizations of highly heterogeneous collagen networks via stochastic reconstruction for micromechanical analysis of tumor cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hanqing; Liang, Long; Chen, Guo; Liu, Liyu; Liu, Ruchuan; Jiao, Yang

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collective cell migration in a collagen-based extracellular matrix (ECM) is among one of the most significant topics in developmental biology, cancer progression, tissue regeneration, and immune response. Recent studies have suggested that collagen-fiber mediated force transmission in cellularized ECM plays an important role in stress homeostasis and regulation of collective cellular behaviors. Motivated by the recent in vitro observation that oriented collagen can significantly enhance the penetration of migrating breast cancer cells into dense Matrigel which mimics the intravasation process in vivo [Han et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 11208 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1610347113], we devise a procedure for generating realizations of highly heterogeneous 3D collagen networks with prescribed microstructural statistics via stochastic optimization. Specifically, a collagen network is represented via the graph (node-bond) model and the microstructural statistics considered include the cross-link (node) density, valence distribution, fiber (bond) length distribution, as well as fiber orientation distribution. An optimization problem is formulated in which the objective function is defined as the squared difference between a set of target microstructural statistics and the corresponding statistics for the simulated network. Simulated annealing is employed to solve the optimization problem by evolving an initial network via random perturbations to generate realizations of homogeneous networks with randomly oriented fibers, homogeneous networks with aligned fibers, heterogeneous networks with a continuous variation of fiber orientation along a prescribed direction, as well as a binary system containing a collagen region with aligned fibers and a dense Matrigel region with randomly oriented fibers. The generation and propagation of active forces in the simulated networks due to polarized contraction of an embedded ellipsoidal cell and a small group

  10. Understanding Heterogeneity in Clinical Cohorts Using Normative Models: Beyond Case-Control Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquand, Andre F; Rezek, Iead; Buitelaar, Jan; Beckmann, Christian F

    2016-10-01

    Despite many successes, the case-control approach is problematic in biomedical science. It introduces an artificial symmetry whereby all clinical groups (e.g., patients and control subjects) are assumed to be well defined, when biologically they are often highly heterogeneous. By definition, it also precludes inference over the validity of the diagnostic labels. In response, the National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria proposes to map relationships between symptom dimensions and broad behavioral and biological domains, cutting across diagnostic categories. However, to date, Research Domain Criteria have prompted few methods to meaningfully stratify clinical cohorts. We introduce normative modeling for parsing heterogeneity in clinical cohorts, while allowing predictions at an individual subject level. This approach aims to map variation within the cohort and is distinct from, and complementary to, existing approaches that address heterogeneity by employing clustering techniques to fractionate cohorts. To demonstrate this approach, we mapped the relationship between trait impulsivity and reward-related brain activity in a large healthy cohort (N = 491). We identify participants who are outliers within this distribution and show that the degree of deviation (outlier magnitude) relates to specific attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms (hyperactivity, but not inattention) on the basis of individualized patterns of abnormality. Normative modeling provides a natural framework to study disorders at the individual participant level without dichotomizing the cohort. Instead, disease can be considered as an extreme of the normal range or as-possibly idiosyncratic-deviation from normal functioning. It also enables inferences over the degree to which behavioral variables, including diagnostic labels, map onto biology. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Living with heterogeneities in bioreactors: understanding the effects of environmental gradients on cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Alvaro R; Galindo, Enrique; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2006-11-01

    The presence of spatial gradients in fundamental culture parameters, such as dissolved gases, pH, concentration of substrates, and shear rate, among others, is an important problem that frequently occurs in large-scale bioreactors. This problem is caused by a deficient mixing that results from limitations inherent to traditional scale-up methods and practical constraints during large-scale bioreactor design and operation. When cultured in a heterogeneous environment, cells are continuously exposed to fluctuating conditions as they travel through the various zones of a bioreactor. Such fluctuations can affect cell metabolism, yields, and quality of the products of interest. In this review, the theoretical analyses that predict the existence of environmental gradients in bioreactors and their experimental confirmation are reviewed. The origins of gradients in common culture parameters and their effects on various organisms of biotechnological importance are discussed. In particular, studies based on the scale-down methodology, a convenient tool for assessing the effect of environmental heterogeneities, are surveyed.

  12. Intra-tumor heterogeneity of microRNA-92a, microRNA-375 and microRNA-424 in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Rikke Karlin; Novotny, Guy Wayne; Klarskov, Louise Laurberg

    2016-01-01

    Various microRNAs (miRNAs) have been investigated in order to improve diagnostics and risk assessment in colorectal cancer (CRC). To clarify the potential of miRNA profiling in CRC, knowledge of intra-tumor heterogeneity in expression levels is crucial. The study aim was to estimate the intra-tum...

  13. Understanding Heterogeneity in Price Elasticities in the Demand for Alcohol for Older Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyagari, Padmaja; Deb, Partha; Fletcher, Jason; Gallo, William; Sindelar, Jody L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper estimates the price elasticity of demand for alcohol using Health and Retirement Study data. To account for unobserved heterogeneity in price responsiveness, we use finite mixture models. We recover two latent groups, one is significantly responsive to price, but the other is unresponsive. The group with greater responsiveness is disadvantaged in multiple domains, including health, financial resources, education and perhaps even planning abilities. These results have policy implications. The unresponsive group drinks more heavily, suggesting that a higher tax would fail to curb the negative alcohol-related externalities. In contrast, the more disadvantaged group is more responsive to price, thus suffering greater deadweight loss, yet this group consumes fewer drinks per day and might be less likely to impose negative externalities. PMID:22162113

  14. Understanding heterogeneity in price elasticities in the demand for alcohol for older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyagari, Padmaja; Deb, Partha; Fletcher, Jason; Gallo, William; Sindelar, Jody L

    2013-01-01

    This paper estimates the price elasticity of demand for alcohol using Health and Retirement Study data. To account for unobserved heterogeneity in price responsiveness, we use finite mixture models. We recover two latent groups, one is significantly responsive to price, but the other is unresponsive. The group with greater responsiveness is disadvantaged in multiple domains, including health, financial resources, education and perhaps even planning abilities. These results have policy implications. The unresponsive group drinks more heavily, suggesting that a higher tax would fail to curb the negative alcohol-related externalities. In contrast, the more disadvantaged group is more responsive to price, thus suffering greater deadweight loss, yet this group consumes fewer drinks per day and might be less likely to impose negative externalities. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Novel HSP90 inhibitor, IPI-493, is highly effective in human gastrostrointestinal stromal tumor xenografts carrying heterogeneous KIT mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Giuseppe; Sciot, Raf; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Faa, Gavino; Normant, Emmanuel; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Schöffski, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    KIT activity is crucial for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Imatinib (IMA) and sunitinib (SUN) are very effective KIT-inhibitors in patients with advanced GIST but have no curative potential. We evaluated the efficacy of the novel HSP90 inhibitor IPI-493 alone, or in combination with IMA or SUN in GIST xenografts with KIT mutations. Nude mice (n = 98) were grafted bilaterally with human GIST carrying KIT exon 11 (GIST-PSW), KIT exon 9 (GIST-BOE), or double, KIT imatinib-sensitive exon 11 and imatinib-resistant exon 17 mutations (GIST-48). Mice were divided into six treatment groups and dosed orally for 15 days as follows: (i) control group, sterile water; (ii) IMA alone; (iii) SUN alone; (iv) IPI-493 alone; (v) IPI-493+IMA; and (vi) IPI-493+SUN. Treatment with IPI-493 resulted in tumor growth stabilization, variable proliferation arrest, induction of apoptosis and necrosis, and downregulation of KIT and its signaling cascade, especially in the GIST-BOE model. Significant reduction of vessel density was observed with IPI-493 treatment, and was equal to SUN treatment in GIST-PSW and GIST-BOE xenografts. IPI-493 treatment effects were enhanced in combination with TKIs, especially with IPI-493+SUN. In our hands, IPI-493 showed dose-dependent liver damages. When administered as a single agent in a xenograft model, the HSP90 inhibitor IPI-493 has consistent antitumor activity and induces KIT downregulation in GISTs with heterogeneous KIT mutations. IPI-493 synergizes with TKIs that are commonly used for the treatment of advanced or IMA-resistant GIST. The antitumor response of IPI-493 is particularly enhanced in combination with SUN. ©2011 AACR.

  16. Understanding the Role of Built Environment in Reducing Vehicle Miles Traveled Accounting for Spatial Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing concerns over climate change and transportation energy consumption have sparked research into the influences of urban form and land use patterns on motorized travel, notably vehicle miles traveled (VMT. However, empirical studies provide mixed evidence of the influence of the built environment on travel. In particular, the role of density after controlling for the confounding factors (e.g., land use mix, average block size, and distance from CBD still remains unclear. The object of this study is twofold. First, this research provides additional insights into the effects of built environment factors on the work-related VMT, considering urban form measurements at both the home location and workplace simultaneously. Second, a cross-classified multilevel model using Bayesian approach is applied to account for the spatial heterogeneity across spatial units. Using Washington DC as our study area, the home-based work tour in the AM peak hours is used as the analysis unit. Estimation results confirmed the important role that the built environment at both home and workplace plays in affecting work-related VMT. In particular, the results reveal that densities at the workplace have more important roles than that at home location. These findings confirm that urban planning and city design should be part of the solution in stabilizing global climate and energy consumption.

  17. Understanding heterogeneity among elderly consumers: an evaluation of segmentation approaches in the functional food market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Lotte D T; van Kleef, Ellen; de Wijk, René A; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2014-06-01

    It is beneficial for both the public health community and the food industry to meet nutritional needs of elderly consumers through product formats that they want. The heterogeneity of the elderly market poses a challenge, however, and calls for market segmentation. Although many researchers have proposed ways to segment the elderly consumer population, the elderly food market has received surprisingly little attention in this respect. Therefore, the present paper reviewed eight potential segmentation bases on their appropriateness in the context of functional foods aimed at the elderly: cognitive age, life course, time perspective, demographics, general food beliefs, food choice motives, product attributes and benefits sought, and past purchase. Each of the segmentation bases had strengths as well as weaknesses regarding seven evaluation criteria. Given that both product design and communication are useful tools to increase the appeal of functional foods, we argue that elderly consumers in this market may best be segmented using a preference-based segmentation base that is predictive of behaviour (for example, attributes and benefits sought), combined with a characteristics-based segmentation base that describes consumer characteristics (for example, demographics). In the end, the effectiveness of (combinations of) segmentation bases for elderly consumers in the functional food market remains an empirical matter. We hope that the present review stimulates further empirical research that substantiates the ideas presented in this paper.

  18. A multiscale dataset for understanding complex eco-hydrological processes in a heterogeneous oasis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Liu, Shaomin; Xiao, Qin; Ma, Mingguo; Jin, Rui; Che, Tao; Wang, Weizhen; Hu, Xiaoli; Xu, Ziwei; Wen, Jianguang; Wang, Liangxu

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a multiscale dataset obtained from Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) in an oasis-desert area in 2012. Upscaling of eco-hydrological processes on a heterogeneous surface is a grand challenge. Progress in this field is hindered by the poor availability of multiscale observations. HiWATER is an experiment designed to address this challenge through instrumentation on hierarchically nested scales to obtain multiscale and multidisciplinary data. The HiWATER observation system consists of a flux observation matrix of eddy covariance towers, large aperture scintillometers, and automatic meteorological stations; an eco-hydrological sensor network of soil moisture and leaf area index; hyper-resolution airborne remote sensing using LiDAR, imaging spectrometer, multi-angle thermal imager, and L-band microwave radiometer; and synchronical ground measurements of vegetation dynamics, and photosynthesis processes. All observational data were carefully quality controlled throughout sensor calibration, data collection, data processing, and datasets generation. The data are freely available at figshare and the Cold and Arid Regions Science Data Centre. The data should be useful for elucidating multiscale eco-hydrological processes and developing upscaling methods.

  19. Post-Institutionalized Chinese and Eastern European Children: Heterogeneity in the Development of Emotion Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camras, Linda A.; Perlman, Susan B.; Fries, Alison B. Wismer; Pollak, Seth D.

    2006-01-01

    Post-institutionalized Chinese and Eastern European children participated in two emotion understanding tasks. In one task, children selected facial expressions corresponding to four emotion labels (happy, sad, angry, scared). The second task required children to match facial expressions to stories describing situations for these emotions. While…

  20. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy

  1. Intratumoral Heterogeneous F 18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Corresponds with Glucose Transporter 1 and Ki-67 Expression in a Case of Krukenberg Tumor: Localization of Intratumoral Hypermetabolic Focus by Fused PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Hyung Jun; Kim, Youg il; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Seung Hyup; Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The expression of glucose transporters (Glut 1, Glut 3), Hexokinase II, and Ki-67 has been proposed to explain intratumoral heterogeneous F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. We report a case of Krukenberg tumor with intratumoral heterogeneous FDG uptake which corresponded well with the expression tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was helpful for localizing the metabolically active area in the tumor specimen. This report elucidates the relationship between the intratumoral heterogeneous FDG uptake and biologic heterogeneity, and shows the usefulness of PET/MR in research on intratumoral heterogeneity.

  2. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  3. New concepts in understanding evolution of desmoid tumors: MR imaging of 30 lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, J.E. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Schepper, A.M. de [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Beuckeleer, L. de [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Marck, E. van [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Aparisi, F. [MR Center, Clinica Virgen del Consuelo, Valencia (Spain); Bloem, J.L. [Department of Radiology, Academisch Ziekenhuis, Leiden (Netherlands); Erkorkmaz, Z. [Tuembeden MR-BT-Lab, Istanbul (Turkey); Brijs, S. [Department of Radiology, H. Hart Ziekenhuis, Roeselare (Belgium)

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the appearance and the natural evolution of desmoid tumors on MR imaging, given histologic correlation. The MR images of 30 desmoids (20 primary and 10 recurrent) in 26 patients were scored for a multiplicity of morphological parameters, signal intensity (SI) on different pulse sequences, and behavior after contrast administration. Natural evolution was evaluated in 2 primary and 3 recurrent lesions, and correlated with evolution on histologic specimens. Desmoid tumors are mostly found in muscles of shoulder and hip girdle and are often fusiform with partially ill-defined margins. Rare subcutaneous desmoids have a more stellar morphology. Variable amounts of low-SI areas are present on all sequences. On T1-weighted images (T1-WI), most lesions are near homogeneous and isointense to muscle, whereas on T2-WI they are more heterogeneous with an overall SI equal to or slightly lower than fat. Histologic correlation reveals that SI on T2-WI cannot be explained solely by cellularity. After initial growth, spontaneous evolution of desmoids is characterized by shrinking and an increase in low-SI areas on T2-WI. While distal lesions shrink, the more recent lesions in asynchronous multicentric desmoids have a tendency to develop proximally in the same limb, and should not be confused with recurrences. Fast growth, extracompartmental spread, and bone involvement are often seen in recurrences. Follow-up MR imaging of desmoids indicates natural regression of desmoids and more aggressive behavior of recurrences, which may justify a more conservative therapeutic approach. (orig.). With 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-06-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes.

  5. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes. PMID:28660882

  6. SU-F-J-89: Assessment of Delivered Dose in Understanding HCC Tumor Progression Following SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, M; Cazoulat, G; Polan, D; Schipper, M; Lawrence, T; Feng, M; Brock, K [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: It is well documented that the delivered dose to patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) is often different from the planned dose due to geometric variability and uncertainties in patient positioning. Recent work suggests that accumulated dose to the GTV is a better predictor of progression compared to the minimum planned dose to the PTV. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if deviations from the planned dose can contributed to tumor progression. Methods: From 2010 to 2014 an in-house Phase II clinical trial of adaptive stereotactic body RT was completed. Of the 90 patients enrolled, 7 patients had a local recurrence defined on contrast enhanced CT or MR imaging 3–21 months after completion of RT. Retrospective dose accumulation was performed using a biomechanical model-based deformable image registration algorithm (DIR) to accumulate the dose based on the kV CBCT acquired prior to each fraction for soft tissue alignment of the patient. The DIR algorithm was previously validated for geometric accuracy in the liver (target registration error = 2.0 mm) and dose accumulation in a homogeneous image, similar to a liver CBCT (gamma index = 91%). Following dose accumulation, the minimum dose to 0.5 cc of the GTV was compared between the planned and accumulated dose. Work is ongoing to evaluate the tumor control probability based on the planned and accumulated dose. Results: DIR and dose accumulation was performed on all fractions for 6 patients with local recurrence. The difference in minimum dose to 0.5 cc of the GTV ranged from −0.3–2.3 Gy over 3–5 fractions. One patient had a potentially significant difference in minimum dose of 2.3 Gy. Conclusion: Dose accumulation can reveal tumor underdosage, improving our ability to understand recurrence and tumor progression patterns, and could aid in adaptive re-planning during therapy to correct for this. This work was supported in part by NIH P01CA059827.

  7. Future Challenges in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Understanding Catalysts under Dynamic Reaction Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalz, Kai F; Kraehnert, Ralph; Dvoyashkin, Muslim; Dittmeyer, Roland; Gläser, Roger; Krewer, Ulrike; Reuter, Karsten; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2017-01-09

    In the future, (electro-)chemical catalysts will have to be more tolerant towards a varying supply of energy and raw materials. This is mainly due to the fluctuating nature of renewable energies. For example, power-to-chemical processes require a shift from steady-state operation towards operation under dynamic reaction conditions. This brings along a number of demands for the design of both catalysts and reactors, because it is well-known that the structure of catalysts is very dynamic. However, in-depth studies of catalysts and catalytic reactors under such transient conditions have only started recently. This requires studies and advances in the fields of 1) operando spectroscopy including time-resolved methods, 2) theory with predictive quality, 3) kinetic modelling, 4) design of catalysts by appropriate preparation concepts, and 5) novel/modular reactor designs. An intensive exchange between these scientific disciplines will enable a substantial gain of fundamental knowledge which is urgently required. This concept article highlights recent developments, challenges, and future directions for understanding catalysts under dynamic reaction conditions.

  8. Heterogeneity index evaluated by slope of linear regression on 18F-FDG PET/CT as a prognostic marker for predicting tumor recurrence in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-il; Kim, Yong Joong; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kang, Keon Wook

    2017-01-01

    18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has been investigated as a method to predict pancreatic cancer recurrence after pancreatic surgery. We evaluated the recently introduced heterogeneity indices of 18 F-FDG PET/CT used for predicting pancreatic cancer recurrence after surgery and compared them with current clinicopathologic and 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters. A total of 93 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (M:F = 60:33, mean age = 64.2 ± 9.1 years) who underwent preoperative 18 F-FDG PET/CT following pancreatic surgery were retrospectively enrolled. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were measured on each 18 F-FDG PET/CT, as metabolic parameters. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were examined as volumetric parameters. The coefficient of variance (heterogeneity index-1; SUVmean divided by the standard deviation) and linear regression slopes (heterogeneity index-2) of the MTV, according to SUV thresholds of 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0, were evaluated as heterogeneity indices. Predictive values of clinicopathologic and 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices were compared in terms of pancreatic cancer recurrence. Seventy patients (75.3%) showed recurrence after pancreatic cancer surgery (mean recurrence = 9.4 ± 8.4 months). Comparing the recurrence and no recurrence patients, all of the 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices demonstrated significant differences. In univariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.013), TLG (P = 0.007), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.027) were significant. Among the clinicopathologic parameters, CA19-9 (P = 0.025) and venous invasion (P = 0.002) were selected as significant parameters. In multivariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.005), TLG (P = 0.004), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.016) with venous invasion (P < 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively) demonstrated significant results

  9. Homogeneous pancreatic cancer spheroids mimic growth pattern of circulating tumor cell clusters and macrometastases: displaying heterogeneity and crater-like structure on inner layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Ou, Bao-Chi; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Yin, Shuai; Lu, Ai-Guo; Oechsle, Eva; Thasler, Wolfgang E

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer 3D in vitro models including multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), single cell-derived tumor spheroid (SCTS), tissue-derived tumor spheroid, and organotypic models provided powerful platforms to mimic in vivo tumor. Recent work supports that circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters are more efficient in metastasis seeding than single CTCs. The purpose of this study is to establish 3D culture models which can mimic single CTC, monoclonal CTC clusters, and the expansion of macrometastases. Seven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines were used to establish MCTS and SCTS using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. Spheroid immunofluorescence staining, spheroid formation assay, immunoblotting, and literature review were performed to investigate molecular biomarkers and the morphological characteristics of pancreatic tumor spheroids. Single cells experienced different growth patterns to form SCTS, like signet ring-like cells, blastula-like structures, and solid core spheroids. However, golf ball-like hollow spheroids could also be detected, especially when DanG and Capan-1 cells were cultivated with fibroblast-conditioned medium (p cell lines could also establish tumor spheroid with hanging drop plates by adding methylated cellulose. Tumor spheroids derived from pancreatic cancer cell line DanG possessed asymmetrically distributed proliferation center, immune-checkpoint properties. ß-catenin, Ki-67, and F-actin were active surrounding the crater-like structure distributing on the inner layer of viable rim cover of the spheroids, which was relevant to well-differentiated tumor cells. It is possible to establish 3D CTC cluster models from homogenous PDA cell lines using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. PDA cell line displays its own intrinsic properties or heterogeneity. The mechanism of formation of the crater-like structure as well as golf ball-like structure needs further exploration.

  10. Molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma: potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Renee Parker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas, (grade 4 astrocytomas, are aggressive primary brain tumors characterized by histopathological heterogeneity. High resolution sequencing technologies have shown that these tumors also feature significant inter-tumoral molecular heterogeneity. Molecular subtyping of these tumors has revealed several predictive and prognostic biomarkers. However, intra-tumoral heterogeneity may undermine the use of single biopsy analysis for determining tumor genotype and has implications for potential targeted therapies. The clinical relevance and theories of tumoral molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma are discussed.

  11. Bidirectional interconversion of stem and non-stem cancer cell populations: A reassessment of theoretical models for tumor heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Neerven, Sanne M.; Tieken, Mathijs; Vermeulen, Louis; Bijlsma, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Resolving the origin of intratumor heterogeneity has proven to be one of the central challenges in cancer research during recent years. Two theoretical models explaining the emergence of intratumor heterogeneity have come to dominate cancer biology literature: the clonal evolution model and the

  12. A methodology for comprehensive breast cancer Ki67 labeling index with intra-tumor heterogeneity appraisal based on hexagonal tiling of digital image analysis data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancoulaine, Benoit; Laurinaviciene, Aida; Herlin, Paulette; Besusparis, Justinas; Meskauskas, Raimundas; Baltrusaityte, Indra; Iqbal, Yasir; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2015-10-19

    Digital image analysis (DIA) enables higher accuracy, reproducibility, and capacity to enumerate cell populations by immunohistochemistry; however, the most unique benefits may be obtained by evaluating the spatial distribution and intra-tissue variance of markers. The proliferative activity of breast cancer tissue, estimated by the Ki67 labeling index (Ki67 LI), is a prognostic and predictive biomarker requiring robust measurement methodologies. We performed DIA on whole-slide images (WSI) of 302 surgically removed Ki67-stained breast cancer specimens; the tumour classifier algorithm was used to automatically detect tumour tissue but was not trained to distinguish between invasive and non-invasive carcinoma cells. The WSI DIA-generated data were subsampled by hexagonal tiling (HexT). Distribution and texture parameters were compared to conventional WSI DIA and pathology report data. Factor analysis of the data set, including total numbers of tumor cells, the Ki67 LI and Ki67 distribution, and texture indicators, extracted 4 factors, identified as entropy, proliferation, bimodality, and cellularity. The factor scores were further utilized in cluster analysis, outlining subcategories of heterogeneous tumors with predominant entropy, bimodality, or both at different levels of proliferative activity. The methodology also allowed the visualization of Ki67 LI heterogeneity in tumors and the automated detection and quantitative evaluation of Ki67 hotspots, based on the upper quintile of the HexT data, conceptualized as the "Pareto hotspot". We conclude that systematic subsampling of DIA-generated data into HexT enables comprehensive Ki67 LI analysis that reflects aspects of intra-tumor heterogeneity and may serve as a methodology to improve digital immunohistochemistry in general.

  13. Intermediate-Scale Experimental Study to Improve Fundamental Understanding of Attenuation Capacity for Leaking CO2 in Heterogeneous Shallow Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plampin, Michael R.; Porter, Mark L.; Pawar, Rajesh J.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2017-12-01

    To assess the risks of Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS), it is crucial to understand the fundamental physicochemical processes that may occur if and when stored CO2 leaks upward from a deep storage reservoir into the shallow subsurface. Intermediate-scale experiments allow for improved understanding of the multiphase evolution processes that control CO2 migration behavior in the subsurface, because the boundary conditions, initial conditions, and porous media parameters can be better controlled and monitored in the laboratory than in field settings. For this study, a large experimental test bed was designed to mimic a cross section of a shallow aquifer with layered geologic heterogeneity. As water with aqueous CO2 was injected into the system to mimic a CO2-charged water leakage scenario, the spatiotemporal evolution of the multiphase CO2 plume was monitored. Similar experiments were performed with two different sand combinations to assess the relative effects of different types of geologic facies transitions on the CO2 evolution processes. Significant CO2 attenuation was observed in both scenarios, but by fundamentally different mechanisms. When the porous media layers had very different permeabilities, attenuation was caused by local accumulation (structural trapping) and slow redissolution of gas phase CO2. When the permeability difference between the layers was relatively small, on the other hand, gas phase continually evolved over widespread areas near the leading edge of the aqueous plume, which also attenuated CO2 migration. This improved process understanding will aid in the development of models that could be used for effective risk assessment and monitoring programs for GCS projects.

  14. Recapitulation of tumor heterogeneity and molecular signatures in a 3D brain cancer model with decreased sensitivity to histone deacetylase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J Smith

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Physiologically relevant pre-clinical ex vivo models recapitulating CNS tumor micro-environmental complexity will aid development of biologically-targeted agents. We present comprehensive characterization of tumor aggregates generated using the 3D Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS. METHODS: CNS cancer cell lines were grown in conventional 2D cultures and the RCCS and comparison with a cohort of 53 pediatric high grade gliomas conducted by genome wide gene expression and microRNA arrays, coupled with immunohistochemistry, ex vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and drug sensitivity evaluation using the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat. RESULTS: Macroscopic RCCS aggregates recapitulated the heterogeneous morphology of brain tumors with a distinct proliferating rim, necrotic core and oxygen tension gradient. Gene expression and microRNA analyses revealed significant differences with 3D expression intermediate to 2D cultures and primary brain tumors. Metabolic profiling revealed differential profiles, with an increase in tumor specific metabolites in 3D. To evaluate the potential of the RCCS as a drug testing tool, we determined the efficacy of Vorinostat against aggregates of U87 and KNS42 glioblastoma cells. Both lines demonstrated markedly reduced sensitivity when assaying in 3D culture conditions compared to classical 2D drug screen approaches. CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive characterization demonstrates that 3D RCCS culture of high grade brain tumor cells has profound effects on the genetic, epigenetic and metabolic profiles of cultured cells, with these cells residing as an intermediate phenotype between that of 2D cultures and primary tumors. There is a discrepancy between 2D culture and tumor molecular profiles, and RCCS partially re-capitulates tissue specific features, allowing drug testing in a more relevant ex vivo system.

  15. Giant Cell Tumor with Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Shows Heterogeneous Metabolic Pattern on18F-FDG PET/CT: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on 18 F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. 18 F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on 18 F-FDG PET/CT.

  16. Giant cell tumor with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst shows heterogeneous metabolic pattern on {sup 18}F-FDG PET.CT: A case reort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Yoon, Yeon Hong [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Huasun (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Park, Jin Gyoon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. 18F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT.

  17. Does work on obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders contribute to understanding the heterogeneity of obsessive-compulsive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2006-05-01

    There is a growing literature on the concept of an obsessive-compulsive spectrum of disorders. Here, we consider the different dimensions on which obsessive-compulsive spectrum (OCSDs) lie, and focus on how the concepts from this literature may help understand the heterogeneity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A computerized literature search (MEDLINE: 1964-2005) was used to collect studies addressing different dimensions on which the OCSDs lie. Against this backdrop, we report on a cluster analysis of OCSDs within OCD. OCSDs may lie on several different dimensions. Our cluster analysis found that in OCD there were 3 clusters of OCD spectrum symptoms: (1) "Reward deficiency" (including trichotillomania, pathological gambling, hypersexual disorder and Tourette's disorder), (2) "Impulsivity" (including compulsive shopping, kleptomania, eating disorders, self-injury and intermittent explosive disorder), and (3) "Somatic" (including body dysmorphic disorder and hypochondriasis). It is unlikely that OC symptoms and disorders fall on any single phenomenological dimension; instead, multiple different constructs may be required to map this nosological space. Although there is evidence for the validity of some of the relevant dimensions, additional work is required to delineate more fully the endophenotypes that underlie OC symptoms and disorders.

  18. CLImAT-HET: detecting subclonal copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in heterogeneous tumor samples from whole-genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenhua; Li, Ao; Wang, Minghui

    2017-03-15

    Copy number alterations (CNA) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) represent a large proportion of genetic structural variations of cancer genomes. These aberrations are continuously accumulated during the procedure of clonal evolution and patterned by phylogenetic branching. This invariably results in the emergence of multiple cell populations with distinct complement of mutational landscapes in tumor sample. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technology, inference of subclonal populations has become one of the focused interests in cancer-associated studies, and is usually based on the assessment of combinations of somatic single-nucleotide variations (SNV), CNA and LOH. However, cancer samples often have several inherent issues, such as contamination of normal stroma, tumor aneuploidy and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Addressing these critical issues is imperative for accurate profiling of clonal architecture. We present CLImAT-HET, a computational method designed for capturing clonal diversity in the CNA/LOH dimensions by taking into account the intra-tumor heterogeneity issue, in the case where a reference or matched normal sample is absent. The algorithm quantitatively represents the clonal identification problem using a factorial hidden Markov model, and takes an integrated analysis of read counts and allele frequency data. It is able to infer subclonal CNA and LOH events as well as the fraction of cells harboring each event. The results on simulated datasets indicate that CLImAT-HET has high power to identify CNA/LOH segments, it achieves an average accuracy of 0.87. It can also accurately infer proportion of each clonal population with an overall Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99 and a mean absolute error of 0.02. CLImAT-HET shows significant advantages when compared with other existing methods. Application of CLImAT-HET to 5 primary triple negative breast cancer samples demonstrates its ability to capture clonal diversity in the CAN

  19. Influence of intra-tumoral heterogeneity on the evaluation of BCL2, E-cadherin, EGFR, EMMPRIN, and Ki-67 expression in tissue microarrays from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramm, Trine; Kyndi, Marianne; Sørensen, Flemming B

    2018-01-01

    -tumoral heterogeneity as well as inter-observer variability on the evaluation of various IHC markers with potential prognostic impact in breast cancer (BCL2, E-cadherin, EGFR, EMMPRIN and Ki-67). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From each of 27 breast cancer patients, two tumor-containing paraffin blocks were chosen. Intra...... was found. EMMPRIN and Ki-67 showed a more heterogeneous expression with moderate to substantial intra-block agreements. For both stainings, there was a moderate inter-block agreement that improved slightly for EMMPRIN, when using WS instead of TMA cores. Inter-observer agreements were found to be almost...... perfect for BCL2, E-cadherin and EGFR (WS: κ > 0.82, TMAs: κ > 0.90), substantial for EMMPRIN (κ > 0.63), but only fair to moderate for Ki-67 (WS: κ = 0.54, TMAs: κ = 0.33). CONCLUSIONS: BCL2, E-cadherin and EGFR were found to be homogeneously expressed, whereas EMMPRIN and Ki-67 showed a more pronounced...

  20. SU-E-J-249: Characterization of Gynecological Tumor Heterogeneity Using Texture Analysis in the Context of An 18F-FDG PET Adaptive Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrocki, J [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, J; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, NC (United States); Das, S [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a method to examine gynecological tumor heterogeneity using texture analysis in the context of an adaptive PET protocol in order to establish if texture metrics from baseline PET-CT predict tumor response better than SUV metrics alone as well as determine texture features correlating with tumor response during radiation therapy. Methods: This IRB approved protocol included 29 women with node positive gynecological cancers visible on FDG-PET treated with EBRT to the PET positive nodes. A baseline and intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained. Tumor outcome was determined based on RECIST on posttreatment PET-CT. Primary GTVs were segmented using 40% threshold and a semi-automatic gradient-based contouring tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). SUV histogram features, Metabolic Volume (MV), and Total Lesion Glycolysis (TLG) were calculated. Four 3D texture matrices describing local and regional relationships between voxel intensities in the GTV were generated: co-occurrence, run length, size zone, and neighborhood difference. From these, 39 texture features were calculated. Prognostic power of baseline features derived from gradientbased and threshold GTVs were determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Receiver Operating Characteristics and logistic regression was performed using JMP (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) to find probabilities of predicting response. Changes in features during treatment were determined using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Of the 29 patients, there were 16 complete responders, 7 partial responders, and 6 non-responders. Comparing CR/PR vs. NR for gradient-based GTVs, 7 texture values, TLG, and SUV kurtosis had a p < 0.05. Threshold GTVs yielded 4 texture features and TLG with p < 0.05. From baseline to intra-treatment, 14 texture features, SUVmean, SUVmax, MV, and TLG changed with p < 0.05. Conclusion: Texture analysis of PET imaged gynecological tumors is an effective method for early prognosis and should

  1. Heterogeneity of disease classified as stage III in Wilms tumor: a report from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Filippo; Gandola, Lorenza; D'Angelo, Paolo; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Bianchi, Maurizio; Provenzi, Massimo; Indolfi, Paolo; Pession, Andrea; Nantron, Marilina; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Marchianò, Alfonso; Catania, Serena; Fossati Bellani, Franca; Piva, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% ± 4% and 92% ± 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% ± 7%, as opposed to 98% ± 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% ± 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of radiation damage in two tumor subpopulations obtained from a heterogeneous human colon carcinoma as a function of growth state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arundel, C.M.; Leith, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have defined changes in intrinsic x-ray (100 kVp) radiation sensitivity that occur when human tumor cells are grown either exponentially, or as plateau (both fed and unfed) phase cultures in vitro. Two subpopulations of a human colon carcinoma were studied (clones A and D), and values for single hit, multitarget inactivation were obtained. For clone A the n, D/sub o/ (Gy), and D/sub q/ (Gy) values for exponential cells were 8.2, 1.06, and 2.23. For clone D, these values were 5.8, 1.08, and 2.23. For fed plateau phase cultures the clone A values were 18.4, 0.86, and 2.52, while for fed clone D cells these values were 16.1, 0.80, and 2.24. For unfed plateau phase cultures the clone A values were 28.5, 0.71, and 2.40, while for unfed clone D cells these values were 15.5, 0.76, and 2.10. These data indicate that the major change in intrinsic radiation sensitivity of these heterogeneous tumor subpopulations is the increase in the number of lesions per unit dose produced in plateau phase cells. Complete studies of repair of potentially lethal damage in these 2 tumor lines are being done to fully define radiation responses in plateau phase cultures

  3. Functional traits of trees on and off termite mounds : Understanding the origin of biotically-driven heterogeneity in savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, F.; Howison, R.; Reinders, J.; Fokkema, W.; Olff, H.

    Questions In African savannas, Macrotermes termites contribute to small-scale heterogeneity by constructing large mounds. Operating as islands of high nutrient and water availability and low fire frequency, these mounds support distinct, diverse communities of trees that have been shown to be highly

  4. Understanding the effect of single-fracture heterogeneity from single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Martin; Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Niemi, Auli

    2013-12-01

    The single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer test is a method used to estimate the tracer retardation properties of a fracture or fracture zone. The effects of single-fracture aperture heterogeneity on SWIW-test tracer breakthrough curves are examined by numerical modelling. The effects of the matrix diffusion and sorption are accounted for by using a particle tracking method through the addition of a time delay added to the advective transport time. For a given diffusion and sorption property ( P m) value and for a heterogeneous fracture, the peak concentration is larger compared to a homogeneous fracture. The cumulative breakthrough curve for a heterogeneous fracture is similar to that for a homogeneous fracture and a less sorptive/diffusive tracer. It is demonstrated that the fracture area that meets the flowing water, the specific flow-wetted surface (sFWS) of the fracture, can be determined by matching the observed breakthrough curve for a heterogeneous fracture to that for a homogeneous fracture with an equivalent property parameter. SWIW tests are also simulated with a regional pressure gradient present. The results point to the possibility of distinguishing the effect of the regional pressure gradient from that of diffusion through the use of multiple tracers with different P m values.

  5. Understanding Treatment Disconnect and Mortality Trends in Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Tumor Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Marc C; Egleston, Brian; Hollingsworth, John M; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Miller, David C; Morgan, Todd M; Kim, Simon P; Malhotra, Aseem; Handorf, Elizabeth; Wong, Yu-Ning; Uzzo, Robert G; Kutikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The paradoxical rise in overall and cancer-specific mortality despite increased detection and treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is termed "treatment disconnect." We reassess this phenomenon by evaluating impact of missing data and rising incidence on mortality trends. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, we identified patients with RCC diagnosis from 1973 to 2011. We estimated mortality rates by tumor size after accounting for lags from diagnosis to death using multiple imputations for missing data from 1983. Mortality rates were estimated irrespective of tumor size after adjustment for prior cumulative incidence using ridge regression. A total of 78,891 patients met inclusion criteria. Of 70,212 patients diagnosed since 1983, 10.4% had missing data. Significant attenuation in cancer-specific mortality was noted from 1983 to 2011 when comparing observed with imputed rates: Δobs0.05 versus Δimp0.10 (P=0.001, 7 cm tumors). Holding incidence of RCC constant to 2011 rates, temporal increase in overall mortality for all patients was attenuated (Pmortality trends. These findings were supported by assessment of mortality to incidence ratio trends. Missing data and rising incidence may contribute substantially to the "treatment disconnect" phenomenon when examining mortality rates in RCC using tumor registry data. Caution is advised when basing clinical and policy decisions on these data.

  6. Recent advances in understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of pediatric germ cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Christiane Hammershaimb; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Brok, Jesper S

    2014-01-01

    transcription factors OCT-3/4, NANOG, and AP-2γ in germinomas/seminomas/dysgerminomas is consistent with retaining a germ cell phenotype. Teratomas, in contrast, develop through a pathway of aberrant somatic differentiation of immature germ cells, and the yolk sac tumors and choriocarcinomas result from...

  7. New Functional Signatures for Understanding Melanoma Biology from Tumor Cell Lineage-Specific Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Rambow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular signatures specific to particular tumor types are required to design treatments for resistant tumors. However, it remains unclear whether tumors and corresponding cell lines used for drug development share such signatures. We developed similarity core analysis (SCA, a universal and unsupervised computational framework for extracting core molecular features common to tumors and cell lines. We applied SCA to mRNA/miRNA expression data from various sources, comparing melanoma cell lines and metastases. The signature obtained was associated with phenotypic characteristics in vitro, and the core genes CAPN3 and TRIM63 were implicated in melanoma cell migration/invasion. About 90% of the melanoma signature genes belong to an intrinsic network of transcription factors governing neural development (TFAP2A, DLX2, ALX1, MITF, PAX3, SOX10, LEF1, and GAS7 and miRNAs (211-5p, 221-3p, and 10a-5p. The SCA signature effectively discriminated between two subpopulations of melanoma patients differing in overall survival, and classified MEKi/BRAFi-resistant and -sensitive melanoma cell lines.

  8. Heterogeneity maintenance in glioblastoma: a social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavia, Rudy; Inda, Maria-del-Mar; Cavenee, Webster K; Furnari, Frank B

    2011-06-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common intracranial tumor in adults, is characterized by extensive heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. This insidious feature arises inevitably in almost all cancers and has great significance for the general outcome of the malignancy, because it confounds our understanding of the disease and also intrinsically contributes to the tumor's aggressiveness and poses an obstacle to the design of effective therapies. The classic view that heterogeneity arises as the result of a tumor's "genetic chaos" and the more contemporary cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis tend to identify a single cell population as the therapeutic target: the prevailing clone over time in the first case and the CSC in the latter. However, there is growing evidence that the different tumor cell populations may not be simple bystanders. Rather, they can establish a complex network of interactions between each other and with the tumor microenvironment that eventually strengthens tumor growth and increases chances to escape therapy. These differing but complementary ideas about the origin and maintenance of tumor heterogeneity and its importance in GBM are reviewed here.

  9. Understanding Collagen Organization in Breast Tumors to Predict and Prevent Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    steps of this work, and it is also appended to this document. In that manuscript we first demonstrate that E0771 breast cancer cells do not produce...this grant, and it is appended to this document: Burke R, Madden K, Perry S, Zettel M, Brown E. (2011) Tumor-associated macrophages and stromal...monocytic cell line, THP-1. J Biol Chem 1996, 271:27936-27941. 17. Dschietzig T, Bartsch C, Greinwald M, Baumann G, Stangl K: The pregnancy hormone

  10. Towards Lipidomics of Low-Abundant Species for Exploring Tumor Heterogeneity Guided by High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Cimino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have evidenced the main role of lipids in physiological and also pathological processes such as cancer, diabetes or neurodegenerative diseases. The identification and the in situ localization of specific low-abundant lipid species involved in cancer biology are still challenging for both fundamental studies and lipid marker discovery. In this paper, we report the identification and the localization of specific isobaric minor phospholipids in human breast cancer xenografts by FTICR MALDI imaging supported by histochemistry. These potential candidates can be further confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS after extraction from the region of interest defined by MALDI imaging. Finally, this study highlights the importance of characterizing the heterogeneous distribution of low-abundant lipid species, relevant in complex histological samples for biological purposes.

  11. Heterogeneity in 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced modifications in energetics and radiation responses of human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwarkanath, Bilikere S.; Zolzer, Frido; Chandana, Sudhir; Bauch, Thomas; Adhikari, Jawahar S.; Muller, Wolfgang U.; Streffer, Christian; Jain, Viney

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The glucose analog and glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), has been shown to differentially enhance the radiation damage in tumor cells by inhibiting the postirradiation repair processes. The present study was undertaken to examine the relationship between 2-DG-induced modification of energy metabolism and cellular radioresponses and to identify the most relevant parameter(s) for predicting the tumor response to the combined treatment of radiation + 2-DG. Methods and Materials: Six human tumor cell lines (glioma: BMG-1 and U-87, squamous cell carcinoma: 4451 and 4197, and melanoma: MeWo and Be-11) were investigated. Cells were exposed to 2 Gy of Co-60 γ-rays or 250 kVP X-rays and maintained under liquid-holding conditions 2-4 h to facilitate repair. 2-DG (5 mM, equimolar with glucose) that was added at the time of irradiation was present during the liquid holding. Glucose utilization, lactate production (enzymatic assays), and adenine nucleotides (high performance liquid chromatography and capillary isotachophoresis) were investigated as parameters of energy metabolism. Induction and repair of DNA damage (comet assay), cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation), and cell death (macrocolony assay) were analyzed as parameters of radiation response. Results: The glucose consumption and lactate production of glioma cell lines (BMG-1 and U-87) were nearly 2-fold higher than the squamous carcinoma cell lines (4197 and 4451). The ATP content varied from 3.0 to 6.5 femto moles/cell among these lines, whereas the energy charge (0.86-0.90) did not show much variation. Presence of 2-DG inhibited the rate of glucose usage and glycolysis by 30-40% in glioma cell lines and by 15-20% in squamous carcinoma lines, while ATP levels reduced by nearly 40% in all the four cell lines. ATP:ADP ratios decreased to a greater extent (∼40%) in glioma cells than in squamous carcinoma 4451 and MeWo cells; in contrast, presence of 2-DG reduced ADP:AMP ratios by 3-fold in

  12. Tumor cell heterogeneity in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC: phenotypical and functional differences associated with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT and DNA methylation changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krohn

    Full Text Available Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC is a specific subtype of lung cancer presenting as highly metastatic disease with extremely poor prognosis. Despite responding initially well to chemo- or radiotherapy, SCLC almost invariably relapses and develops resistance to chemotherapy. This is suspected to be related to tumor cell subpopulations with different characteristics resembling stem cells. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT is known to play a key role in metastatic processes and in developing drug resistance. This is also true for NSCLC, but there is very little information on EMT processes in SCLC so far. SCLC, in contrast to NSCLC cell lines, grow mainly in floating cell clusters and a minor part as adherent cells. We compared these morphologically different subpopulations of SCLC cell lines for EMT and epigenetic features, detecting significant differences in the adherent subpopulations with high levels of mesenchymal markers such as Vimentin and Fibronectin and very low levels of epithelial markers like E-cadherin and Zona Occludens 1. In addition, expression of EMT-related transcription factors such as Snail/Snai1, Slug/Snai2, and Zeb1, DNA methylation patterns of the EMT hallmark genes, functional responses like migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteases secretion, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drug treatment all differed significantly between the sublines. This phenotypic variability might reflect tumor cell heterogeneity and EMT during metastasis in vivo, accompanied by the development of refractory disease in relapse. We propose that epigenetic regulation plays a key role during phenotypical and functional changes in tumor cells and might therefore provide new treatment options for SCLC patients.

  13. Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kris Ann P; Harris, Anne K; Schneider, Dominik T; Young, Robert H; Brown, Jubilee; Gershenson, David M; Dehner, Louis P; Hill, D Ashley; Messinger, Yoav H; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-10-01

    Ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors are clinically significant heterogeneous tumors that include several pathologic types. These tumors are often found in adolescents and young adults and can present with hormonal manifestations as well as signs and symptoms of a pelvic mass. Serum tumor markers may assist in preoperative diagnosis and surveillance. Several subtypes are associated with genetic predisposition, including those observed in patients with Peutz-Jegher syndrome. Recent studies have elucidated the relationship between Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors and DICER1 mutations. When classified as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ia, most subtypes may be treated with surgery alone. Higher stage or recurrent tumors have variable prognoses that range from a usually rapid course in poorly differentiated Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor to an often prolonged course in adult granulosa cell tumors. New understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors may pave the way for novel therapeutics.

  14. A single-center experience and review of the literature: 64 cases of phyllodes tumors to better understand risk factors and disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightner, Amy L; Shurell, Elizabeth; Dawson, Nicole; Omidvar, Yasaman; Foster, Nova

    2015-03-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare fibroepithelial tumors that are characterized as benign, borderline, or malignant based on cellular characteristics such as stromal overgrowth and number of mitoses. Currently, there is a lack of consensus on risk factors and management of patients with phyllodes tumors, which has led to variation in treatment patterns as well as patient outcomes across many institutions. This study seeks to understand the clinicopathologic features, risk factors for local and metastatic recurrence, and clinical outcomes of patients with phyllodes tumors to better define optimal treatment patterns.

  15. Canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling in cancer stem cells and their niches: Cellular heterogeneity, omics reprogramming, targeted therapy and tumor plasticity (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the potential for self-renewal, differentiation and de-differentiation, undergo epigenetic, epithelial-mesenchymal, immunological and metabolic reprogramming to adapt to the tumor microenvironment and survive host defense or therapeutic insults. Intra-tumor heterogeneity and cancer-cell plasticity give rise to therapeutic resistance and recurrence through clonal replacement and reactivation of dormant CSCs, respectively. WNT signaling cascades cross-talk with the FGF, Notch, Hedgehog and TGFβ/BMP signaling cascades and regulate expression of functional CSC markers, such as CD44, CD133 (PROM1), EPCAM and LGR5 (GPR49). Aberrant canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling in human malignancies, including breast, colorectal, gastric, lung, ovary, pancreatic, prostate and uterine cancers, leukemia and melanoma, are involved in CSC survival, bulk-tumor expansion and invasion/metastasis. WNT signaling-targeted therapeutics, such as anti-FZD1/2/5/7/8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (vantictumab), anti-LGR5 antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) (mAb-mc-vc-PAB-MMAE), anti-PTK7 ADC (PF-06647020), anti-ROR1 mAb (cirmtuzumab), anti-RSPO3 mAb (rosmantuzumab), small-molecule porcupine inhibitors (ETC-159, WNT-C59 and WNT974), tankyrase inhibitors (AZ1366, G007-LK, NVP-TNKS656 and XAV939) and β-catenin inhibitors (BC2059, CWP232228, ICG-001 and PRI-724), are in clinical trials or preclinical studies for the treatment of patients with WNT-driven cancers. WNT signaling-targeted therapeutics are applicable for combination therapy with BCR-ABL, EGFR, FLT3, KIT or RET inhibitors to treat a subset of tyrosine kinase-driven cancers because WNT and tyrosine kinase signaling cascades converge to β-catenin for the maintenance and expansion of CSCs. WNT signaling-targeted therapeutics might also be applicable for combination therapy with immune checkpoint blockers, such as atezolizumab, avelumab, durvalumab, ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, to treat cancers

  16. Advancing current approaches to disease management evaluation: capitalizing on heterogeneity to understand what works and for whom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elissen, Arianne M J; Adams, John L; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Duimel-Peeters, Inge G P; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Linden, Ariel; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2013-03-14

    Evaluating large-scale disease management interventions implemented in actual health care settings is a complex undertaking for which universally accepted methods do not exist. Fundamental issues, such as a lack of control patients and limited generalizability, hamper the use of the 'gold-standard' randomized controlled trial, while methodological shortcomings restrict the value of observational designs. Advancing methods for disease management evaluation in practice is pivotal to learn more about the impact of population-wide approaches. Methods must account for the presence of heterogeneity in effects, which necessitates a more granular assessment of outcomes. This paper introduces multilevel regression methods as valuable techniques to evaluate 'real-world' disease management approaches in a manner that produces meaningful findings for everyday practice. In a worked example, these methods are applied to retrospectively gathered routine health care data covering a cohort of 105,056 diabetes patients who receive disease management for type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands. Multivariable, multilevel regression models are fitted to identify trends in clinical outcomes and correct for differences in characteristics of patients (age, disease duration, health status, diabetes complications, smoking status) and the intervention (measurement frequency and range, length of follow-up). After a median one year follow-up, the Dutch disease management approach was associated with small average improvements in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein, while a slight deterioration occurred in glycated hemoglobin. Differential findings suggest that patients with poorly controlled diabetes tend to benefit most from disease management in terms of improved clinical measures. Additionally, a greater measurement frequency was associated with better outcomes, while longer length of follow-up was accompanied by less positive results. Despite concerted efforts to adjust

  17. Tumor heterogeneity measured on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography combined with plasma Epstein-Barr Virus load predicts prognosis in patients with primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Chang, Kai-Ping; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Plasma Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA concentrations predict prognosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Recent evidence also indicates that intratumor heterogeneity on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) scans is predictive of treatment outcomes in different solid malignancies. Here, we sought to investigate the prognostic value of heterogeneity parameters in patients with primary NPC. Retrospective cohort study. We examined 101 patients with primary NPC who underwent pretreatment 18 F-FDG PET/computed tomography. Circulating levels of EBV DNA were measured in all participants. The following PET heterogeneity parameters were collected: histogram-based heterogeneity parameters, second-order texture features (uniformity, contrast, entropy, homogeneity, dissimilarity, inverse difference moment), and higher-order (coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity, strength) texture features. The median follow-up time was 5.14 years. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG), tumor heterogeneity measured by histogram-based parameter skewness, and the majority of second-order or higher-order texture features were significantly associated with overall survival (OS) and/or recurrence-free survival (RFS). In multivariate analysis, age (P =.005), EBV DNA load (P = .0002), and uniformity (P = .001) independently predicted OS. Only skewness retained the independent prognostic significance for RFS. Tumor stage, standardized uptake value, or TLG did not show an independent association with survival endpoints. The combination of uniformity, EBV DNA load, and age resulted in a more reliable prognostic stratification (P < .001). Tumor heterogeneity is superior to traditional PET parameters for predicting outcomes in primary NPC. The combination of uniformity with EBV DNA load can improve prognostic stratification in this clinical entity. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:E22-E28, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Heterogeneity index evaluated by slope of linear regression on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as a prognostic marker for predicting tumor recurrence in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong-il [CHA University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joong [Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has been investigated as a method to predict pancreatic cancer recurrence after pancreatic surgery. We evaluated the recently introduced heterogeneity indices of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT used for predicting pancreatic cancer recurrence after surgery and compared them with current clinicopathologic and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters. A total of 93 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (M:F = 60:33, mean age = 64.2 ± 9.1 years) who underwent preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT following pancreatic surgery were retrospectively enrolled. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were measured on each {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, as metabolic parameters. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were examined as volumetric parameters. The coefficient of variance (heterogeneity index-1; SUVmean divided by the standard deviation) and linear regression slopes (heterogeneity index-2) of the MTV, according to SUV thresholds of 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0, were evaluated as heterogeneity indices. Predictive values of clinicopathologic and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices were compared in terms of pancreatic cancer recurrence. Seventy patients (75.3%) showed recurrence after pancreatic cancer surgery (mean recurrence = 9.4 ± 8.4 months). Comparing the recurrence and no recurrence patients, all of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices demonstrated significant differences. In univariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.013), TLG (P = 0.007), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.027) were significant. Among the clinicopathologic parameters, CA19-9 (P = 0.025) and venous invasion (P = 0.002) were selected as significant parameters. In multivariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.005), TLG (P = 0.004), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.016) with venous invasion (P < 0.001, 0.001, and 0

  19. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    occurred in spatially distinct microenvironments of primary tumors. We show how machine-learning analysis can classify heterogeneous microenvironments in vivo to enable prediction of motility phenotypes and tumor cell fate. The ability to predict the locations of tumor cell behavior leading to metastasis in breast cancer models may lead towards understanding the heterogeneity of response to treatment.

  20. High Resolution Definition of Subsurface Heterogeneity for Understanding the Biodynamics of Natural Field Systems: Advancing the Ability for Scaling to Field Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, Ernest L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    1999-01-01

    This research is an integrated project which uses physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect bioremediation. In the this effort data from controlled laboratory and in situ experiments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) site were used to determine the dominant physical characteristics (lithologic, structural, and hydrologic) that can be imaged in situ and correlated with flow and transport properties. Emphasis was placed on identifying fundamental scales of variation of physical parameters that control transport behavior relative to subsurface microbial dynamics that could be used to develop a predictive model. A key hypothesis of the work was that nutrient flux and transport properties are key factors in controlling microbial dynamics, and that geophysical techniques could be used to identify the critical physical properties and scales controlling transport. This hypothesis was essentially validated. The goal was not only to develop and apply methods to monitor the spatial and temporal distribution of the bioremediation in fractured sites such as TAN, but also to develop methods applicable to a wider range of DOE sites. The outcome has been an improved understanding of the relationship between physical, chemical and microbial processes in heterogeneous environments, thus applicable to the design and monitoring of bioremediation strategies for a variety of environments. In this EMSP work we demonstrated that high resolution geophysical methods have considerable resolving power, especially when linked with modern advanced processing and interpretation. In terms of basic science, in addition to providing innovative methods for monitoring bioremediation, the work also provided a strong motivation for developing and extending high resolution geophysical methods

  1. A divide-and-conquer strategy in tumor sampling enhances detection of intratumor heterogeneity in routine pathology: A modeling approach in clear cell renal cell carcinoma [version 2; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José I. Lopez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH is an inherent process in cancer development which follows for most of the cases a branched pattern of evolution, with different cell clones evolving independently in space and time across different areas of the same tumor. The determination of ITH (in both spatial and temporal domains is nowadays critical to enhance patient treatment and prognosis. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC provides a good example of ITH. Sometimes the tumor is too big to be totally analyzed for ITH detection and pathologists decide which parts must be sampled for the analysis. For such a purpose, pathologists follow internationally accepted protocols. In light of the latest findings, however, current sampling protocols seem to be insufficient for detecting ITH with significant reliability. The arrival of new targeted therapies, some of them providing promising alternatives to improve patient survival, pushes the pathologist to obtain a truly representative sampling of tumor diversity in routine practice. How large this sampling must be and how this must be performed are unanswered questions so far.  Here we present a very simple method for tumor sampling that enhances ITH detection without increasing costs. This method follows a divide-and-conquer (DAC strategy, that is, rather than sampling a small number of large-size tumor-pieces as the routine protocol (RP advises, we suggest sampling many small-size pieces along the tumor. We performed a computational modeling approach to show that the usefulness of the DAC strategy is twofold: first, we show that DAC outperforms RP with similar laboratory costs, and second, DAC is capable of performing similar to total tumor sampling (TTS but, very remarkably, at a much lower cost. We thus provide new light to push forward a shift in the paradigm about how pathologists should sample tumors for achieving efficient ITH detection.

  2. Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Rowan, Andrew J.; Horswell, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intratumor heterogeneity may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and hinder personalized-medicine strategies that depend on results from single tumor-biopsy samples.METHODSTo examine intratumor heterogeneity, we performed exome sequencing, chromosome aberration analysis, and ploidy ...

  3. Markers of fibroblast-rich tumor stroma and perivascular cells in serous ovarian cancer : Inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity and impact on survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corvigno, Sara; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Mezheyeuski, Artur; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Nijman, Hans W.; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Ostman, Arne; Dahlstrand, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra-patient variations in tumor microenvironment of serous ovarian cancer are largely unexplored. We aimed to explore potential co-regulation of tumor stroma characteristics, analyze their concordance in primary and metastatic lesions, and study their impact on survival. A tissue

  4. Towards inverse modeling of intratumor heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutovsky, Branislav; Horvath, Denis

    2015-08-01

    Development of resistance limits efficiency of present anticancer therapies and preventing it remains a big challenge in cancer research. It is accepted, at the intuitive level, that resistance emerges as a consequence of the heterogeneity of cancer cells at the molecular, genetic and cellular levels. Produced by many sources, tumor heterogeneity is extremely complex time dependent statistical characteristics which may be quantified by measures defined in many different ways, most of them coming from statistical mechanics. In this paper, we apply the Markovian framework to relate population heterogeneity to the statistics of the environment. As, from an evolutionary viewpoint, therapy corresponds to a purposeful modi- fication of the cells' fitness landscape, we assume that understanding general relationship between the spatiotemporal statistics of a tumor microenvironment and intratumor heterogeneity will allow to conceive the therapy as an inverse problem and to solve it by optimization techniques. To account for the inherent stochasticity of biological processes at cellular scale, the generalized distancebased concept was applied to express distances between probabilistically described cell states and environmental conditions, respectively.

  5. Deconstructing the mammal species richness pattern in Europe - towards and understanding of the relative importance of climate, biogeographic history, habitat heterogeneity and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløjgaard, Camilla; Normand, Signe; Skov, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Aim  We deconstructed the mammal species richness pattern in Europe to assess the importance of large-scale gradients in current macroclimate relative to biogeographic history, habitat heterogeneity and human influence (HHH variables) as richness determinants for total species, and for widespread...... variables (history, habitat heterogeneity and human influence) proved important predictors of species richness, but also difficult to disentangle. Notably, biogeographic history, in particular peninsular dynamics, is an important determinant of widespread and endemic species richness....

  6. Understanding PSA and its derivatives in prediction of tumor volume: Addressing health disparities in prostate cancer risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinea, Felix M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Epstein, Jonathan I; Kwon, Deukwoo; Smith, Paul Taylor; Pollack, Alan; Cote, Richard J; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2017-03-28

    To address health disparities in risk stratification of U.S. Hispanic/Latino men by characterizing influences of prostate weight, body mass index, and race/ethnicity on the correlation of PSA derivatives with Gleason score 6 (Grade Group 1) tumor volume in a diverse cohort. Using published PSA density and PSA mass density cutoff values, men with higher body mass indices and prostate weights were less likely to have a tumor volume PSA derivatives when predicting for tumor volume. In receiver operator characteristic analysis, area under the curve values for all PSA derivatives varied across race/ethnicity with lower optimal cutoff values for Hispanic/Latino (PSA=2.79, PSA density=0.06, PSA mass=0.37, PSA mass density=0.011) and Non-Hispanic Black (PSA=3.75, PSA density=0.07, PSA mass=0.46, PSA mass density=0.008) compared to Non-Hispanic White men (PSA=4.20, PSA density=0.11 PSA mass=0.53, PSA mass density=0.014). We retrospectively analyzed 589 patients with low-risk prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy. Pre-operative PSA, patient height, body weight, and prostate weight were used to calculate all PSA derivatives. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for each PSA derivative per racial/ethnic group to establish optimal cutoff values predicting for tumor volume ≥0.5 cm3. Increasing prostate weight and body mass index negatively influence PSA derivatives for predicting tumor volume. PSA derivatives' ability to predict tumor volume varies significantly across race/ethnicity. Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic Black men have lower optimal cutoff values for all PSA derivatives, which may impact risk assessment for prostate cancer.

  7. Cellular heterogeneity in vertical growth phase melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laga, Alvaro C; Murphy, George F

    2010-12-01

    Melanoma growing as a tumorigenic nodule is one of the most virulent neoplasms to which the flesh is heir. At a considerably small tumor size, it incurs significant risk for widespread metastatic dissemination. There are no effective means of surgical intervention, chemical therapy, or immunologic therapy for advanced and metastatic melanoma. To review the literature and highlight recent cardinal advances in the understanding of melanoma vertical growth, with specific emphasis on how its recognition and characterization may be applied to diagnostic practice and development of novel investigative approaches. Literature review, archival material, personal experience, and research collaborators. The study of tumorigenic melanoma, both in primary lesions and in metastases, is the key to the eventual eradication of this highly virulent neoplasm that may disseminate widely when only occupying the volume of a grain of rice. Morphology often provides the first insight into structure and function. A growing database using meticulous and inclusive criteria to define tumor stem cells in the context of clinically relevant models now indicates that the key to melanoma heterogeneity may reside in a small subpopulation with the ability to self-renew and form tumors despite most cells present being significantly less virulent. Hopefully, from these insights into melanoma tumor progression from radial growth phase to heterogeneous and tumorigenic vertical growth phase will come additional answers to how smart therapies may be developed that specifically target those vertical growth phase cells that most pertain to patient survival.

  8. Heterogeneity of ductular reactions in adult rat and human liver revealed by novel expression of deleted in malignant brain tumor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H.C.; Holmskov, U.; Santoni-Rugiu, E.

    2002-01-01

    DNA library screening approach, we identified 48 enriched, nonredundant gene products associated with liver injury and oval cell proliferation in the adult rat liver. Of these, only two, namely alpha-fetoprotein and a novel transcript with high homology to human DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1...

  9. Understanding the Heterogeneity of BPD Symptoms through Latent Class Analysis: Initial Results and Clinical Correlates among Inner-City Substance Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Levy, Roy; Gratz, Kim L.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the heterogeneity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms in a sample of 382 inner-city, predominantly African American male substance users through the use of latent class analysis. A 4-class model was statistically preferred, with 1 class interpreted to be a baseline class, 1 class interpreted to be a…

  10. III. Cellular ultrastructures in situ as key to understanding tumor energy metabolism: biological significance of the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkiewicz, Halina; Oh, Phil; Schnitzer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the universality of metabolic pathways, malignant cells were found to have their metabolism reprogrammed to generate energy by glycolysis even under normal oxygen concentrations (the Warburg effect). Therefore, the pathway energetically 18 times less efficient than oxidative phosphorylation was implicated to match increased energy requirements of growing tumors. The paradox was explained by an abnormally high rate of glucose uptake, assuming unlimited availability of substrates for tumor growth in vivo. However, ultrastructural analysis of tumor vasculature morphogenesis showed that the growing tissue regions did not have continuous blood supply and intermittently depended on autophagy for survival. Erythrogenic autophagy, and resulting ATP generation by glycolysis, appeared critical to initiating vasculature formation where it was missing. This study focused on ultrastructural features that reflected metabolic switch from aerobic to anaerobic. Morphological differences between and within different types of cells were evident in tissue sections. In cells undergoing nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion into erythrosomes (erythrogenesis), gradual changes led to replacing mitochondria with peroxisomes, through an intermediate form connected to endoplasmic reticulum. Those findings related to the issue of peroxisome biogenesis and to the phenomenon of hemogenic endothelium. Mitochondria were compacted also during mitosis. In vivo, cells that lost and others that retained capability to use oxygen coexisted side-by-side; both types were important for vasculature morphogenesis and tissue growth. Once passable, the new vasculature segment could deliver external oxygen and nutrients. Nutritional and redox status of microenvironment had similar effect on metabolism of malignant and non-malignant cells demonstrating the necessity to maintain structure-energy equivalence in all living cells. The role of glycolysis in initiating vasculature formation, and in progression of

  11. Utilization of a hybrid finite-element based registration method to quantify heterogeneous tumor response for adaptive treatment for lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Hoda; Zhang, Hong; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Lu, Wei; Ajlouni, Munther I.; Jin, Jian-Yue; (Spring Kong, Feng-Ming; Chetty, Indrin J.; Zhong, Hualiang

    2018-03-01

    Tumor response to radiation treatment (RT) can be evaluated from changes in metabolic activity between two positron emission tomography (PET) images. Activity changes at individual voxels in pre-treatment PET images (PET1), however, cannot be derived until their associated PET-CT (CT1) images are appropriately registered to during-treatment PET-CT (CT2) images. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using deformable image registration (DIR) techniques to quantify radiation-induced metabolic changes on PET images. Five patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with adaptive radiotherapy were considered. PET-CTs were acquired two weeks before RT and 18 fractions after the start of RT. DIR was performed from CT1 to CT2 using B-Spline and diffeomorphic Demons algorithms. The resultant displacements in the tumor region were then corrected using a hybrid finite element method (FEM). Bitmap masks generated from gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in PET1 were deformed using the four different displacement vector fields (DVFs). The conservation of total lesion glycolysis (TLG) in GTVs was used as a criterion to evaluate the quality of these registrations. The deformed masks were united to form a large mask which was then partitioned into multiple layers from center to border. The averages of SUV changes over all the layers were 1.0  ±  1.3, 1.0  ±  1.2, 0.8  ±  1.3, 1.1  ±  1.5 for the B-Spline, B-Spline  +  FEM, Demons and Demons  +  FEM algorithms, respectively. TLG changes before and after mapping using B-Spline, Demons, hybrid-B-Spline, and hybrid-Demons registrations were 20.2%, 28.3%, 8.7%, and 2.2% on average, respectively. Compared to image intensity-based DIR algorithms, the hybrid FEM modeling technique is better in preserving TLG and could be useful for evaluation of tumor response for patients with regressing tumors.

  12. Simultaneous assessment of cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid IVIM and DK MR imaging: initial experience with brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Chau [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Oncology, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Yang, Shun-Chung; Chen, Ya-Fang; My, Pei-Chi [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Tseng, Han-Min [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Taipei (China)

    2017-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of simultaneously assessing cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid diffusion-kurtosis (DK) and intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) MR imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers and 30 patients with histologically proven brain tumours (25 WHO grade II-IV gliomas and five metastases) were recruited. On a 3-T system, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with six b-values ranging from 0 to 1,700 s/mm{sup 2}. Nonlinear least-squares fitting was employed to extract diffusion coefficient (D), diffusion kurtosis coefficient (K, a measure of the degree of non-Gaussian and heterogeneous diffusion) and intravascular volume fraction (f, a measure proportional to cerebral blood volume). Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed to assess the ability of D/K/f in differentiating contrast-enhanced tumour from peritumoral oedema and normal-appearing white matter. Based on our imaging setting (baseline signal-to-noise ratio = 32-128), coefficient of variation was 14-20 % for K, ∝6 % for D and 26-44 % for f. The indexes were able to differentiate contrast-enhanced tumour (Wilks' λ = 0.026, p < 10{sup -3}), and performance was greatest with K, followed by f and D. Hybrid DK IVIM imaging is capable of simultaneously measuring cerebral perfusion and diffusion indexes that together may improve brain tumour diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Evidence of genetic instability in tumors and normal nearby tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Geraci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comprehensive analyses have recently been performed on many human cancer tissues, leading to the identification of a number of mutated genes but providing no information on the variety of mutations present in each of them. This information is of interest to understand the possible origin of gene mutations that cause tumors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have analyzed the sequence heterogeneity of the transcripts of the human HPRT and G6PD single copy genes that are not considered tumor markers. Analyses have been performed on different colon cancers and on the nearby histologically normal tissues of two male patients. Several copies of each cDNA, which were produced by cloning the RT-PCR-amplified fragments of the specific mRNA, have been sequenced. Similar analyses have been performed on blood samples of two ostensibly healthy males as reference controls. The sequence heterogeneity of the HPRT and G6PD genes was also determined on DNA from tumor tissues. The employed analytical approach revealed the presence of low-frequency mutations not detectable by other procedures. The results show that genetic heterogeneity is detectable in HPRT and G6PD transcripts in both tumors and nearby healthy tissues of the two studied colon tumors. Similar frequencies of mutations are observed in patient genomic DNA, indicating that mutations have a somatic origin. HPRT transcripts show genetic heterogeneity also in healthy individuals, in agreement with previous results on human T-cells, while G6PD transcript heterogeneity is a characteristic of the patient tissues. Interestingly, data on TP53 show little, if any, heterogeneity in the same tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show that genetic heterogeneity is a peculiarity not only of cancer cells but also of the normal tissue where a tumor arises.

  14. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illangasekare, Tissa [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Trevisan, Luca [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Agartan, Elif [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mori, Hiroko [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Vargas-Johnson, Javier [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Cihan, Abdullah [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Quanlin [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  15. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    cell loss due to irradiation, the log-kill model, therefore, predicts that incomplete treatment of a kinetically heterogeneous tumor will yield a more proliferative tumor. The probability of tumor control in such a simulation may be obtained from the nadir in tumor cell number. If the nadir is not sufficiently low to yield a high probability of tumor control, then the tumor will re-grow. Since tumors in each sub-population are assumed lost at the same rate, cells comprising the sub-population with the shortest potential doubling time will re-grow the fastest, yielding a recurrent tumor that is more proliferative. A number of assumptions and simplifications are both implicitly and explicitly made in converting absorbed dose to tumor control probability. The modeling analyses described above must, therefore, be viewed in terms of understanding and evaluating different treatment approaches with the goal of treatment optimization rather than outcome prediction

  16. Individualized Physical 3-dimensional Kidney Tumor Models Constructed From 3-dimensional Printers Result in Improved Trainee Anatomic Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoedler, Margaret; Feibus, Allison H; Lange, Andrew; Maddox, Michael M; Ledet, Elisa; Thomas, Raju; Silberstein, Jonathan L

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3-dimensionally (3D) printed physical renal models with enhancing masses on medical trainee characterization, localization, and understanding of renal malignancy. Proprietary software was used to import standard computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional imaging into 3D printers to create physical models of renal units with enhancing renal lesions in situ. Six different models were printed from a transparent plastic resin; the normal parenchyma was printed in a clear, translucent plastic, with a red hue delineating the suspicious renal lesion. Medical students, who had completed their first year of training, were given an overview and tasked with completion of RENAL nephrometry scores, separately using CT imaging and 3D models. Trainees were also asked to complete a questionnaire about their experience. Variability between trainees was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and kappa statistics were used to compare the trainee to experts. Overall trainee nephrometry score accuracy was significantly improved with the 3D model vs CT scan (P <.01). Furthermore, 3 of the 4 components of the nephrometry score (radius, nearness to collecting system, and location) showed significant improvement (P <.001) using the models. There was also more consistent agreement among trainees when using the 3D models compared with CT scans to assess the nephrometry score (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.28 for CT scan vs 0.72 for 3D models). Qualitative evaluation with questionnaires filled out by the trainees further confirmed that the 3D models improved their ability to understand and conceptualize the renal mass. Physical 3D models using readily available printing techniques improve trainees' understanding and characterization of individual patients' enhancing renal lesions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  18. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Garg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/controllers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  19. Microenvironmental Heterogeneity Parallels Breast Cancer Progression: A Histology-Genomic Integration Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Natrajan

    2016-02-01

    study to couple unbiased measures of microenvironmental heterogeneity with genomic alterations to predict breast cancer clinical outcome. We propose a clinically relevant role of microenvironmental heterogeneity for advanced breast tumors, and highlight that ecological statistics can be translated into medical advances for identifying a new type of biomarker and, furthermore, for understanding the synergistic interplay of microenvironmental heterogeneity with genomic alterations in cancer cells.

  20. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  1. Penetration into Granular Earth Materials (Topic H): A Multi-scale Physics-Based Approach Towards Developing a Greater Understanding of Dynamically Loaded Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    computational techniques can be explored. For the continuum analysis several candidate models have been investigated, namely the P-alpha and P- lambda ...3. COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATIONS ................................................................................................................. 14 3.1... computational techniques to gain better understanding of important phenomenology (grain-on-grain interactions, dynamic force chains, etc.) associated

  2. Integrating landscape system and meta-ecosystem frameworks to advance the understanding of ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes: An analysis on the carbon fluxes in the Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of Wisconsin and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiakuan

    2018-01-01

    The successful integration of ecosystem ecology with landscape ecology would be conducive to understanding how landscapes function. There have been several attempts at this, with two main approaches: (1) an ecosystem-based approach, such as the meta-ecosystem framework and (2) a landscape-based approach, such as the landscape system framework. These two frameworks are currently disconnected. To integrate these two frameworks, we introduce a protocol, and then demonstrate application of the protocol using a case study. The protocol includes four steps: 1) delineating landscape systems; 2) classifying landscape systems; 3) adjusting landscape systems to meta-ecosystems and 4) integrating landscape system and meta-ecosystem frameworks through meta-ecosystems. The case study is the analyzing of the carbon fluxes in the Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of Wisconsin and Michigan using this protocol. The application of this protocol revealed that one could follow this protocol to construct a meta-ecosystem and analyze it using the integrative framework of landscape system and meta-ecosystem frameworks. That is, one could (1) appropriately describe and analyze the spatial heterogeneity of the meta-ecosystem; (2) understand the emergent properties arising from spatial coupling of local ecosystems in the meta-ecosystem. In conclusion, this protocol is a useful approach for integrating the meta-ecosystem framework and the landscape system framework, which advances the describing and analyzing of the spatial heterogeneity and ecosystem function of interconnected ecosystems. PMID:29415066

  3. Integrating landscape system and meta-ecosystem frameworks to advance the understanding of ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes: An analysis on the carbon fluxes in the Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of Wisconsin and Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haile; Chen, Jiakuan

    2018-01-01

    The successful integration of ecosystem ecology with landscape ecology would be conducive to understanding how landscapes function. There have been several attempts at this, with two main approaches: (1) an ecosystem-based approach, such as the meta-ecosystem framework and (2) a landscape-based approach, such as the landscape system framework. These two frameworks are currently disconnected. To integrate these two frameworks, we introduce a protocol, and then demonstrate application of the protocol using a case study. The protocol includes four steps: 1) delineating landscape systems; 2) classifying landscape systems; 3) adjusting landscape systems to meta-ecosystems and 4) integrating landscape system and meta-ecosystem frameworks through meta-ecosystems. The case study is the analyzing of the carbon fluxes in the Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of Wisconsin and Michigan using this protocol. The application of this protocol revealed that one could follow this protocol to construct a meta-ecosystem and analyze it using the integrative framework of landscape system and meta-ecosystem frameworks. That is, one could (1) appropriately describe and analyze the spatial heterogeneity of the meta-ecosystem; (2) understand the emergent properties arising from spatial coupling of local ecosystems in the meta-ecosystem. In conclusion, this protocol is a useful approach for integrating the meta-ecosystem framework and the landscape system framework, which advances the describing and analyzing of the spatial heterogeneity and ecosystem function of interconnected ecosystems.

  4. Circulating tumor DNA detection (liquid biopsy: prospects in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zhukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern research techniques allows tumor studying in almost any level: protein expression, structural changes of DNA, RNA, epigenetic changes, activity of signaling pathways, microenvironment, interaction with the immune system, etc. However, tumor samples are obtained as 100 years ago – by tumor biopsy prior to treatment. Based on available data about intratumoral heterogeneity and tumor changes during treatment, it may be one of the factors braking to obtain required information of tumor biology. According to study, the analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA allows to hope to overcome the key limitations of routine biopsy. One of the key benefits of ctDNA analysis is the ability to a more comprehensive tumor investigation, while maintaining a high level of specificity, almost as well as a routine biopsy. Detection sensitivity of ctDNA continues to increase due to the development of new technology. The study of ctDNA may lead to breakthrough results in understanding of tumors molecular heterogeneity, development of resistance to anticancer therapy and ways to overcome it, screening and a number of other key areas of modern oncology.

  5. Applying unmixing to gene expression data for tumor phylogeny inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shackney Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While in principle a seemingly infinite variety of combinations of mutations could result in tumor development, in practice it appears that most human cancers fall into a relatively small number of "sub-types," each characterized a roughly equivalent sequence of mutations by which it progresses in different patients. There is currently great interest in identifying the common sub-types and applying them to the development of diagnostics or therapeutics. Phylogenetic methods have shown great promise for inferring common patterns of tumor progression, but suffer from limits of the technologies available for assaying differences between and within tumors. One approach to tumor phylogenetics uses differences between single cells within tumors, gaining valuable information about intra-tumor heterogeneity but allowing only a few markers per cell. An alternative approach uses tissue-wide measures of whole tumors to provide a detailed picture of averaged tumor state but at the cost of losing information about intra-tumor heterogeneity. Results The present work applies "unmixing" methods, which separate complex data sets into combinations of simpler components, to attempt to gain advantages of both tissue-wide and single-cell approaches to cancer phylogenetics. We develop an unmixing method to infer recurring cell states from microarray measurements of tumor populations and use the inferred mixtures of states in individual tumors to identify possible evolutionary relationships among tumor cells. Validation on simulated data shows the method can accurately separate small numbers of cell states and infer phylogenetic relationships among them. Application to a lung cancer dataset shows that the method can identify cell states corresponding to common lung tumor types and suggest possible evolutionary relationships among them that show good correspondence with our current understanding of lung tumor development. Conclusions Unmixing

  6. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  7. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch s...

  8. Cancer-associated fibroblasts as another polarized cell type of the tumor microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eAugsten

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor- or cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs are one of the most abundant stromal cell types in different carcinomas and comprise a heterogeneous cell population. Classically, CAFs are assigned with pro-tumorigenic effects stimulating tumor growth and progression. More recent studies demonstrated also tumor-inhibitory effects of CAFs suggesting that tumor-residing fibroblasts exhibit a similar degree of plasticity as other stromal cell types. Reciprocal interactions with the tumor milieu and different sources of origin are emerging as two important factors underlying CAF heterogeneity. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of CAF biology and proposes to expand the term of cellular ´polarization´, previously introduced to describe different activation states of various immune cells, onto CAFs to reflect their phenotypic diversity.

  9. Understanding the socioeconomic heterogeneity in healthcare in US counties: the effect of population density, education and poverty on H1N1 pandemic mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnambalam, L; Samavedham, L; Lee, H R; Ho, C S

    2012-05-01

    The recent outbreak of H1N1 has provided the scientific community with a sad but timely opportunity to understand the influence of socioeconomic determinants on H1N1 pandemic mortality. To this end, we have used data collected from 341 US counties to model H1N1 deaths/1000 using 12 socioeconomic predictors to discover why certain counties reported fewer H1N1 deaths compared to other counties. These predictors were then used to build a decision tree. The decision tree developed was then used to predict H1N1 mortality for the whole of the USA. Our estimate of 7667 H1N1 deaths are in accord with the lower bound of the CDC estimate of 8870 deaths. In addition to the H1N1 death estimates, we have listed possible counties to be targeted for health-related interventions. The respective state/county authorities can use these results as the basis to target and optimize the distribution of public health resources.

  10. Mixed odontogenic tumor: Ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etit Demet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous disease derived from epithelial, mesenchymal and/or ectomesenchymal elements. Ameloblastoma is the best known and the most frequent form of odontogenic tumors. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, known as Pindborg tumor, is locally invasive lesion which has a characteristic amiloid deposition. Here a case of a peripheral ameloblastoma associated with CEOT is presented with clinical and morphological features.

  11. Tumor progression: analysis of the instability of the metastatic phenotype, sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The major complications for tumor therapy are 1) tumor spread (metastasis); 2) the mixed nature of tumors (heterogeneity); and 3) the capacity of tumors to evolve (progress). To study these tumor characteristics, the rat 13762NF mammary adenocarcinoma was cloned and studied for metastatic properties and sensitivities to therapy (chemotherapy, radiation and hyperthermia). The cell clones were heterogeneous and no correlation between metastatic potential and therapeutic sensitivities was observed. Further, these phenotypes were unstable during pasage in vitro; yet, the changes were clone dependent and reproducible using different cryoprotected cell stocks. To understand the phenotypic instability, subclones were isolated from low and high passage cell clones. The results demonstrated that 1) tumor cells are heterogeneous for multiple phenotypes; 2) tumor cells are unstable for multiple phenotypes; 3) the magnitude, direction and time of occurrence of phenotypic drift is clone dependent; 4) the sensitivity of cell clones to ionizing radiation (γ or heat) and chemotherapy agents is independent of their metastatic potential; 5) shifts in metastatic potential and sensitivity to therapy may occur simultaneously but are not linked; and 6) tumor cells independently diverge to form several subpopulations with unique phenotypic profiles

  12. Heterogeneity in Cancer Metabolism: New Concepts in an Old Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentric, Géraldine; Mieulet, Virginie; Mechta-Grigoriou, Fatima

    2017-03-20

    In the last years, metabolic reprogramming, fluctuations in bioenergetic fuels, and modulation of oxidative stress became new key hallmarks of tumor development. In cancer, elevated glucose uptake and high glycolytic rate, as a source of adenosine triphosphate, constitute a growth advantage for tumors. This represents the universally known Warburg effect, which gave rise to one major clinical application for detecting cancer cells using glucose analogs: the positron emission tomography scan imaging. Recent Advances: Glucose utilization and carbon sources in tumors are much more heterogeneous than initially thought. Indeed, new studies emerged and revealed a dual capacity of tumor cells for glycolytic and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) metabolism. OXPHOS metabolism, which relies predominantly on mitochondrial respiration, exhibits fine-tuned regulation of respiratory chain complexes and enhanced antioxidant response or detoxification capacity. OXPHOS-dependent cancer cells use alternative oxidizable substrates, such as glutamine and fatty acids. The diversity of carbon substrates fueling neoplastic cells is indicative of metabolic heterogeneity, even within tumors sharing the same clinical diagnosis. Metabolic switch supports cancer cell stemness and their bioenergy-consuming functions, such as proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Moreover, reactive oxygen species-induced mitochondrial metabolism and nutrient availability are important for interaction with tumor microenvironment components. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and immune cells participate in the metabolic interplay with neoplastic cells. They collectively adapt in a dynamic manner to the metabolic needs of cancer cells, thus participating in tumorigenesis and resistance to treatments. Characterizing the reciprocal metabolic interplay between stromal, immune, and neoplastic cells will provide a better understanding of treatment resistance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 462-485.

  13. Circulating Tumor Cells and Circulating Tumor DNA Provide New Insights into Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Zhu, Yayun; Yuan, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a rather dismal prognosis mainly due to high malignance of tumor biology. Up to now, the relevant researches on pancreatic cancer lag behind seriously partly due to the obstacles for tissue biopsy, which handicaps the understanding of molecular and genetic features of pancreatic cancer. In the last two decades, liquid biopsy, including circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), is promising to provide new insights into the biological and clinical characteristics of malignant tumors. Both CTCs and ctDNA provide an opportunity for studying tumor heterogeneity, drug resistance, and metastatic mechanism for pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, they can also play important roles in detecting early-stage tumors, providing prognostic information, monitoring tumor progression and guiding treatment regimens. In this review, we will introduce the latest findings on biological features and clinical applications of both CTCs and ctDNA in pancreatic cancer. In a word, CTCs and ctDNA are promising to promote precision medicine in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  15. Snail heterogeneity in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldumbide, Laura; Erramuzpe, Asier; Guarch, Rosa; Pulido, Rafael; Cortés, Jesús M; López, José I

    2016-03-08

    Intratumor heterogeneity may be responsible of the unpredictable aggressive clinical behavior that some clear cell renal cell carcinomas display. This clinical uncertainty may be caused by insufficient sampling, leaving out of histological analysis foci of high grade tumor areas. Although molecular approaches are providing important information on renal intratumor heterogeneity, a focus on this topic from the practicing pathologist' perspective is still pending. Four distant tumor areas of 40 organ-confined clear cell renal cell carcinomas were selected for histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Tumor size, cell type (clear/granular), Fuhrman's grade, Staging, as well as immunostaining with Snail, ZEB1, Twist, Vimentin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, PTEN, p-Akt, p110α, and SETD2, were analyzed for intratumor heterogeneity using a classification and regression tree algorithm. Cell type and Fuhrman's grade were heterogeneous in 12.5 and 60 % of the tumors, respectively. If cell type was homogeneous (clear cell) then the tumors were low-grade in 88.57 % of cases. Immunostaining heterogeneity was significant in the series and oscillated between 15 % for p110α and 80 % for Snail. When Snail immunostaining was homogeneous the tumor was histologically homogeneous in 100 % of cases. If Snail was heterogeneous, the tumor was heterogeneous in 75 % of the cases. Average tumor diameter was 4.3 cm. Tumors larger than 3.7 cm were heterogeneous for Vimentin immunostaining in 72.5 % of cases. Tumors displaying negative immunostaining for both ZEB1 and Twist were low grade in 100 % of the cases. Intratumor heterogeneity is a common event in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which can be monitored by immunohistochemistry in routine practice. Snail seems to be particularly useful in the identification of intratumor heterogeneity. The suitability of current sampling protocols in renal cancer is discussed.

  16. Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Rowan, Andrew J.; Horswell, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intratumor heterogeneity may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and hinder personalized-medicine strategies that depend on results from single tumor-biopsy samples.METHODSTo examine intratumor heterogeneity, we performed exome sequencing, chromosome aberration analysis, and ploidy...... and 4EBP phosphorylation in vivo and constitutive activation of mTOR kinase activity in vitro. Mutational intratumor heterogeneity was seen for multiple tumor-suppressor genes converging on loss of function; SETD2, PTEN, and KDM5C underwent multiple distinct and spatially separated inactivating...... mutations within a single tumor, suggesting convergent phenotypic evolution. Gene-expression signatures of good and poor prognosis were detected in different regions of the same tumor. Allelic composition and ploidy profiling analysis revealed extensive intratumor heterogeneity, with 26 of 30 tumor samples...

  17. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  18. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near-surface NO{sub x} concentrations by a factor of 2-5. These results suggest the importance of using the more accurate hybrid dynamical method in the estimates of both aerosol forcing and tropospheric ozone chemistry.

  19. Improved prediction of breast cancer outcome by identifying heterogeneous biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghwan; Park, Sanghyun; Yoon, Youngmi; Ahn, Jaegyoon

    2017-11-15

    Identification of genes that can be used to predict prognosis in patients with cancer is important in that it can lead to improved therapy, and can also promote our understanding of tumor progression on the molecular level. One of the common but fundamental problems that render identification of prognostic genes and prediction of cancer outcomes difficult is the heterogeneity of patient samples. To reduce the effect of sample heterogeneity, we clustered data samples using K-means algorithm and applied modified PageRank to functional interaction (FI) networks weighted using gene expression values of samples in each cluster. Hub genes among resulting prioritized genes were selected as biomarkers to predict the prognosis of samples. This process outperformed traditional feature selection methods as well as several network-based prognostic gene selection methods when applied to Random Forest. We were able to find many cluster-specific prognostic genes for each dataset. Functional study showed that distinct biological processes were enriched in each cluster, which seems to reflect different aspect of tumor progression or oncogenesis among distinct patient groups. Taken together, these results provide support for the hypothesis that our approach can effectively identify heterogeneous prognostic genes, and these are complementary to each other, improving prediction accuracy. https://github.com/mathcom/CPR. jgahn@inu.ac.kr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Heterogeneic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this article is the relation between time and transcultural space in literary history. The argument is that the concept of anachronism can help us understand the complexity of temporality and that the analysis of transcultural exchanges between European and Latin American art...

  1. Microfluidic Biopsy Trapping Device for the Real-Time Monitoring of Tumor Microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Babetski Holton

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is composed of cellular and stromal components such as tumor cells, mesenchymal cells, immune cells, cancer associated fibroblasts and the supporting extracellular matrix. The tumor microenvironment provides crucial support for growth and progression of tumor cells and affects tumor response to therapeutic interventions. To better understand tumor biology and to develop effective cancer therapeutic agents it is important to develop preclinical platforms that can faithfully recapitulate the tumor microenvironment and the complex interaction between the tumor and its surrounding stromal elements. Drug studies performed in vitro with conventional two-dimensional cancer cell line models do not optimally represent clinical drug response as they lack true tumor heterogeneity and are often performed in static culture conditions lacking stromal tumor components that significantly influence the metabolic activity and proliferation of cells. Recent microfluidic approaches aim to overcome such obstacles with the use of cell lines derived in artificial three-dimensional supportive gels or micro-chambers. However, absence of a true tumor microenvironment and full interstitial flow, leads to less than optimal evaluation of tumor response to drug treatment. Here we report a continuous perfusion microfluidic device coupled with microscopy and image analysis for the assessment of drug effects on intact fresh tumor tissue. We have demonstrated that fine needle aspirate biopsies obtained from patient-derived xenograft models of adenocarcinoma of the lung can successfully be analyzed for their response to ex vivo drug treatment within this biopsy trapping microfluidic device, wherein a protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine, was used to assess tumor cell death as a proof of principle. This approach has the potential to study tumor tissue within its intact microenvironment to better understand tumor response to drug treatments and

  2. Tumor dormancy and frailty models: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancoita, Paola M V; Valberg, Morten; Demicheli, Romano; Biganzoli, Elia; Di Serio, Clelia

    2017-03-01

    Frailty models are here proposed in the tumor dormancy framework, in order to account for possible unobservable dependence mechanisms in cancer studies where a non-negligible proportion of cancer patients relapses years or decades after surgical removal of the primary tumor. Relapses do not seem to follow a memory-less process, since their timing distribution leads to multimodal hazards. From a biomedical perspective, this behavior may be explained by tumor dormancy, i.e., for some patients microscopic tumor foci may remain asymptomatic for a prolonged time interval and, when they escape from dormancy, micrometastatic growth results in a clinical disease appearance. The activation of the growth phase at different metastatic states would explain the occurrence of metastatic recurrences and mortality at different times (multimodal hazard). We propose a new frailty model which includes in the risk function a random source of heterogeneity (frailty variable) affecting the components of the hazard function. Thus, the individual hazard rate results as the product of a random frailty variable and the sum of basic hazard rates. In tumor dormancy, the basic hazard rates correspond to micrometastatic developments starting from different initial states. The frailty variable represents the heterogeneity among patients with respect to relapse, which might be related to unknown mechanisms that regulate tumor dormancy. We use our model to estimate the overall survival in a large breast cancer dataset, showing how this improves the understanding of the underlying biological process. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  3. Metabolic regulation of glioma stem-like cells in the tumor micro-environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tom M; Yu, John S

    2017-11-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as one of the most interesting old ideas being revisited from a new perspective. In the early 20th century Otto Warburg declared metabolism the prime cause in a disease of many secondary causes, and this statement seems more prescient in view of modern expositions into the true nature of tumor evolution. As the complexity of tumor heterogeneity becomes more clear from a genetic perspective, it is important to consider the inevitably heterogeneous metabolic components of the tumor and the tumor microenvironment. High grade gliomas remain one of the most difficult to treat solid tumors, due in part to the highly vascularized nature of the tumor and the maintenance of more resistant stem-like subpopulations within the tumor. Maintenance of glioma stem cells (GSCs) requires specific alterations within the cells and the greater tumor microenvironment with regards to signaling and metabolism. Specific niches within gliomas help foster the survival of stem-like sub-populations of cells with high tumorigenicity and high metabolic plasticity. Understanding these maintenance pathways and the metabolic dependencies within the niche may highlight potential avenues of addressing tumor resistance and recurrence in glioma patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Uterine mesenchymal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil A Sangle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine mesenchymal tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that can frequently be diagnostically challenging. Differentiation between the benign and malignant counterparts of mesenchymal tumors is significant due to differences in clinical outcome, and the role of the surgical pathologist in making this distinction (especially in the difficult cases cannot be underestimated. Although immunohistochemical stains are supportive toward establishing a final diagnosis, the morphologic features trump all the other ancillary techniques for this group of neoplasms. This review therefore emphasizes the key morphologic features required to diagnose and distinguish uterine mesenchymal tumors from their mimics, with a brief description of the relevant immunohistochemical features.

  5. Parallel evolution of tumor subclones mimics diversity between tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco

    2013-01-01

    are not present ubiquitously in late stage ccRCC and are likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumor progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumors may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations...... and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumors reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumor sampling bias and impact upon tumor progression and clinical outcome....

  6. Mediastinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymoma - mediastinal; Lymphoma - mediastinal ... mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum. They are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas, germ cell tumors, or thymomas. These tumors are ...

  7. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... of a presumed logic of competition within EU law, whereas the second part focuses on particular legal logics. In this respect, the so-called ‘real link criterion’ (determining the access to transnational social rights for certain groups of unemployed people) is given special attention. What is particularly...

  8. [Molecular heterogeneity of malignant pleural mesotheliomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchant, Robin; Montagne, François; Jaurand, Marie-Claude; Jean, Didier

    2018-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is predominantly an occupational cancer, most often linked to asbestos exposure. Malignant pleural mesothelioma prognosis is poor with a short survival median, due to the aggressiveness of tumor cells and the weak efficiency of conventional anti-cancer therapies. Clinical, histological, and molecular data suggest tumor heterogeneity between patients as it was also shown for other cancer types. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new therapies that take into account this heterogeneity and the molecular characteristics of malignant pleural mesothelioma, in particular by identifying new anti-cancer drugs targeting the molecular specificities of each malignant pleural mesothelioma. Malignant pleural mesothelioma is characterized by numerous molecular alterations at the chromosomal, genetic and epigenetic levels. Molecular classification based on gene expression profile has firstly defined two tumor groups, C1 and C2, and more recently, four groups. By integrating genetic and transcriptomic analysis, a C2 LN tumor subgroup of the C2 group has been identified and characterized. In addition to tumor heterogeneity between patients, intra-tumor heterogeneity is supported by several evidences. Most therapeutic strategies that take into account the tumor molecular characteristics have focused on targeted therapies based on mutated genes. A more appropriate strategy would be to consider better-defined tumor groups on the basis of several molecular alterations types as it has been proposed for the C2 LN subgroup. A robust definition of homogeneous tumor groups sharing common molecular characteristics is necessary for the development of effective precision medicine for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  10. A Targetable EGFR-Dependent Tumor-Initiating Program in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Savage

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Therapies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have variable and unpredictable responses in breast cancer. Screening triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, we identify a subset responsive to EGFR inhibition by gefitinib, which displays heterogeneous expression of wild-type EGFR. Deep single-cell RNA sequencing of 3,500 cells from an exceptional responder identified subpopulations displaying distinct biological features, where elevated EGFR expression was significantly enriched in a mesenchymal/stem-like cellular cluster. Sorted EGFRhi subpopulations exhibited enhanced stem-like features, including ALDH activity, sphere-forming efficiency, and tumorigenic and metastatic potential. EGFRhi cells gave rise to EGFRhi and EGFRlo cells in primary and metastatic tumors, demonstrating an EGFR-dependent expansion and hierarchical state transition. Similar tumorigenic EGFRhi subpopulations were identified in independent PDXs, where heterogeneous EGFR expression correlated with gefitinib sensitivity. This provides new understanding for an EGFR-dependent hierarchy in TNBC and for patient stratification for therapeutic intervention. : Savage et al. demonstrate that sensitivity to EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib, in triple-negative breast cancer is paradoxically associated with EGFR heterogeneity. Using single-cell RNA sequencing in conjunction with functional assays, they identify TNBC tumors in which EGFR expression identifies cells with tumor-initiating capacity whose proliferative expansion is sensitive to EGFR inhibition. Keywords: breast cancer, tumor heterogeneity, patient-derived xenograft, single-cell RNA sequencing, EGFR inhibition, therapeutic response, tumor-initiating cell, cell hierarchy, BRCA1 mutation

  11. Towards inverse modeling of intratumor heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Brutovsky Branislav; Horvath Denis

    2015-01-01

    Development of resistance limits efficiency of present anticancer therapies and preventing it remains a big challenge in cancer research. It is accepted, at the intuitive level, that resistance emerges as a consequence of the heterogeneity of cancer cells at the molecular, genetic and cellular levels. Produced by many sources, tumor heterogeneity is extremely complex time dependent statistical characteristics which may be quantified by measures defined in many differen...

  12. Towards Inverse Modeling of Intratumoral Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Brutovsky, Branislav; Horvath, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Development of resistance limits efficiency of present anticancer therapies and preventing it remains big challenge in cancer research. It is accepted, at intuitive level, that the resistance emerges as a consequence of cancer cells heterogeneity at molecular, genetic and cellular levels. Produced by many sources, tumor heterogeneity is extremely complex time dependent statistical characteristics which may be quantified by the measures defined in many different ways, most of them coming from ...

  13. Investigating intra-tumor heterogeneity and expression gradients of miR-21, miR-92a and miR-200c and their potential of predicting lymph node metastases in early colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Rikke Karlin; Novotny, Guy Wayne; Klarskov, Louise Laurberg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction miR-21, miR-92a and miR-200c are regulators of pathways involved in migration, intravasation and metastasis, and their tumor expression levels have been proposed as potential prognostic markers in colorectal cancer (CRC). In two parallel cohorts we examine intra-tumor expression leve...

  14. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  15. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Ok; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Mie Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk [Kang Nam General Hospital, Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeung Sook [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor.

  16. Non-Coding Transcript Heterogeneity in Mesothelioma: Insights from Asbestos-Exposed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Rehrauer, Hubert

    2018-04-11

    Mesothelioma is an aggressive, rapidly fatal cancer and a better understanding of its molecular heterogeneity may help with making more efficient therapeutic strategies. Non-coding RNAs represent a larger part of the transcriptome but their contribution to diseases is not fully understood yet. We used recently obtained RNA-seq data from asbestos-exposed mice and performed data mining of publicly available datasets in order to evaluate how non-coding RNA contribute to mesothelioma heterogeneity. Nine non-coding RNAs are specifically elevated in mesothelioma tumors and contribute to human mesothelioma heterogeneity. Because some of them have known oncogenic properties, this study supports the concept of non-coding RNAs as cancer progenitor genes.

  17. Living with a Brain Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Act Living with a Brain Tumor Understanding Emotions Talking About Your Brain Tumor Involving Family and Friends Returning To Work Physical Intimacy Health Insurance Options Financial & Medical Assistance ...

  18. Tumor Biology and Microenvironment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research in this area seeks to understand the role of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in driving cancer initiation, progression, maintenance and recurrence.

  19. Cancer Stem Cells and stress induced evolution - understanding the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dr S Bapat

    2015-11-08

    Nov 8, 2015 ... Most therapies fail to consider differential drug sensitivities of various cells in a tumor. (Tumor Cell Heterogeneity). • Drug refractory behaviour of tumor cells may arise due to either –. - Intrinsic drug resistance mechanisms (Molecular Heterogeneity). - Cell dormancy / reversible quiescence (Cancer stem ...

  20. Towards an Organizational Economics of Heterogeneous Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul

    The notion of “capability” has long been influential in management research as an approach to address firm-level heterogeneity and heterogeneity in competitive outcomes. I discuss how recent advances in economics may allow for a more rigorous understanding and measurement of capability that take...... organizational practices into account. However, economists may also learn from work on capabilities in management research....

  1. Towards an Organizational Economics of Heterogeneous Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul

    The notion of “capability” has long been influential in management research as an approach to address firm-level heterogeneity and heterogeneity in competitive outcomes. I discuss how recent advances in economics may allow for a more rigorous understanding and measurement of capability that take...

  2. Tracing Dynamics and Clonal Heterogeneity of Cbx7-Induced Leukemic Stem Cells by Cellular Barcoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Klauke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate monitoring of tumor dynamics and leukemic stem cell (LSC heterogeneity is important for the development of personalized cancer therapies. In this study, we experimentally induced distinct types of leukemia in mice by enforced expression of Cbx7. Simultaneous cellular barcoding allowed for thorough analysis of leukemias at the clonal level and revealed high and unpredictable tumor complexity. Multiple LSC clones with distinct leukemic properties coexisted. Some of these clones remained dormant but bore leukemic potential, as they progressed to full-blown leukemia after challenge. LSC clones could retain multilineage differentiation capacities, where one clone induced phenotypically distinct leukemias. Beyond a detailed insight into CBX7-driven leukemic biology, our model is of general relevance for the understanding of tumor dynamics and clonal evolution.

  3. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...... signaling plays a fundamental role during development. Recent findings have shown that Notch signaling is dysregulated, and contributes to the malignant potential of these tumors. Growing evidence point towards an important role for cancer stem cells in the initiation and maintenance of glioma...

  4. [Review on landscape heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yutao; Yu, Xinxiao; Guang, Wenbin

    2002-04-01

    On the base of precedent studies, the occurring mechanism, classification, measurement methods, and the important role of landscape heterogeneity in landscape ecology were reviewed. The inner and outer uncertain factors result in landscape heterogeneity. Landscape heterogeneity has close relations with landscape stability, landscape design, architecture, management and disturbance, scale and ecological diversity in ecology. Complexity of landscape heterogeneity research, non-system of measurement indices and methods, difficulties and limitations of landscape heterogeneity modelling were all discussed respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the theory and methods of ecological complexity should be used to improve landscape heterogeneity research.

  5. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet

    2011-01-01

    for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10(-3)) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling......A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer......10483813 (r(2)= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11...

  6. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer As...

  7. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  8. Intravital imaging of plasticity during tumor growth and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, Anoek

    2015-01-01

    Most tumors consist of a heterogeneous mixture of genetically and epigenetically distinct tumor cells. In addition, tumors display regional differences in the tumor microenvironment comprising non-transformed cell types such as immune cells and non-cellular factors including growth factors and the

  9. Immunophenotype Heterogeneity in Nasal Glomangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Handra-Luca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasal glomangiopericytoma is rare. The immunophenotype is heterogeneous, more frequently smooth-muscle-actin and CD34-positive. We report expression patterns for several vascular-related proteins such as CD99, CD146, Bcl2, and WT1 as well as for treatment-related proteins such as mTOR and EGFR in a nasal glomangiopericytoma. The patient (woman, 86 years presented with a left nasal tumefaction. The resected specimen (1.5-cm showed a glomangiopericytoma. Tumor cells expressed smooth-muscle-actin, CD31, CD34, and progesterone receptor. They also expressed the vascular-cell-related proteins Bcl2, CD99, CD146, and WT1, as well as mTOR and EGFR. Nasal glomangiopericytomas show immunohistochemical heterogeneity for vascular-related markers, suggesting a possible extensive pericytic differentiation. The expression of potential targets for drug treatments such as mTOR and EGFR may impact on the clinical follow-up of these tumors occurring at advanced ages, which may require complex surgery.

  10. SU-E-T-304: Dosimetric Comparison of Cavernous Sinus Tumors: Heterogeneity Corrected Pencil Beam (PB-Hete) Vs. X-Ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) Algorithms for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions calculated using PB-hete vs. XVMC algorithms for SRT treatments of cavernous sinus tumors. Methods: Using PB-hete SRT, five patients with cavernous sinus tumors received the prescription dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions for planning target volume PTV(V100%)=95%. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on T1/T2 MRI-CT-fused images. PTV (range 2.1–84.3cc, mean=21.7cc) was generated using a 5mm uniform-margin around GTV. PB-hete SRT plans included a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/static beams delivered by Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and a 6MV-SRS(1000 MU/min) beam. Plans were re-optimized using XVMC algorithm with identical beam geometry and MLC positions. Comparison of plan specific PTV(V99%), maximal, mean, isocenter doses, and total monitor units(MUs) were evaluated. Maximal dose to OARs such as brainstem, optic-pathway, spinal cord, and lenses as well as normal tissue volume receiving 12Gy(V12) were compared between two algorithms. All analysis was performed using two-tailed paired t-tests of an upper-bound p-value of <0.05. Results: Using either algorithm, no dosimetrically significant differences in PTV coverage (PTVV99%,maximal, mean, isocenter doses) and total number of MUs were observed (all p-values >0.05, mean ratios within 2%). However, maximal doses to optic-chiasm and nerves were significantly under-predicted using PB-hete (p=0.04). Maximal brainstem, spinal cord, lens dose and V12 were all comparable between two algorithms, with exception of one patient with the largest PTV who exhibited 11% higher V12 with XVMC. Conclusion: Unlike lung tumors, XVMC and PB-hete treatment plans provided similar PTV coverage for cavernous sinus tumors. Majority of OARs doses were comparable between two algorithms, except for small structures such as optic chiasm/nerves which could potentially receive higher doses when using XVMC algorithm. Special attention may need to be paid on a case

  11. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet

    2011-01-01

    Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs......10483813 (r(2)= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11...

  12. Genomic profiling of multiple sequentially acquired tumor metastatic sites from an “exceptional responder” lung adenocarcinoma patient reveals extensive genomic heterogeneity and novel somatic variants driving treatment response. | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas et al. describe an “exceptional responder” lung adenocarcinoma patient who survived with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma for 7 years while undergoing single or combination ERBB2-directed therapies. Whole-genome, whole-exome, and high-coverage ion-torrent targeted sequencing were used to demonstrate extreme genomic heterogeneity between the lung and lymph node metastatic sites with only ∼1% similarity of somatic alterations between the lung and lymph node sites. However, one novel translocation, PLAG1-ACTA2, was present in both sites, and in all biopsies and autopsy samples.

  13. Current concepts in non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor soft tissue sarcomas: A primer for radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baheti, Akahay D. [Dept. of Radiology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Tirumani, Harika [Dept. of Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock (United States); O' Neill, Alibhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P. [Dept. of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose classification and management continues to evolve with better understanding of their biologic behavior. The 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) has revised their classification based on new immunohistochemical and cytogenetic data. In this article, we will provide a brief overview of the revised WHO classification of soft tissue tumors, discuss in detail the radiology and management of the two most common adult non-GIST STS, namely liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma, and review some of the emerging histology-driven targeted therapies in non-GIST STS, focusing on the role of the radiologist.

  14. Location of tumor affects local and distant immune cell type and number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Jonathan A; Khattar, Vinayak; Ashton, Reading; Lee, Carnellia; Siegal, Gene P; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2017-03-01

    Tumors comprise heterogeneous populations of cells, including immune infiltrates that polarize during growth and metastasis. Our preclinical studies on breast cancer (BCa) identified functional differences in myeloid-derived suppressor cells based on tumor microenvironment (TME), prompting variations in host immune response to tumor growth, and dissemination based on tissue type. In order to understand if such variations existed among other immune cells, and if such alteration occurs in response to tumor growth at the primary site or due to bone dissemination, we characterized immune cells, examining localized growth and in the tibia. In addition, immune cells from the spleen were examined from animals of both tumor locations by flow cytometry. The study demonstrates that location of tumor, and not simply the tumor itself, has a definitive role in regulating immune effectors. Among all immune cells characterized, macrophages were decreased and myeloid dendritic cell were increased in both tumor locations. This difference was more evident in subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, spleens from mice with subcutaneous tumors contained greater increases in both macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells than in mice with bone tumors. Furthermore, in subcutaneous tumors there was an increase in CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell numbers, which was also observed in their spleens. These data indicate that alterations in tumor-reactive immune cells are more pronounced at the primary site, and exert a similar change at the major secondary lymphoid organ than in the bone TME. These findings could provide translational insight into designing therapeutic strategies that account for location of metastatic foci.

  15. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  16. Fundamental concepts in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Norskov, Jens K; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This book is based on a graduate course and suitable as a primer for any newcomer to the field, this book is a detailed introduction to the experimental and computational methods that are used to study how solid surfaces act as catalysts.   Features include:First comprehensive description of modern theory of heterogeneous catalysisBasis for understanding and designing experiments in the field   Allows reader to understand catalyst design principlesIntroduction to important elements of energy transformation technologyTest driven at Stanford University over several semesters

  17. FOXP3+ Treg as a therapeutic target for promoting anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2018-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) characterized by expression of FOXP3 and strong immunosuppressive activity play a key role in regulating homeostasis in health and disease. Areas covered: Human Treg are highly diverse phenotypically and functionally. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), Treg are reprogrammed by the tumor, acquiring an activated phenotype and enhanced suppressor functions. No unique phenotypic markers for Treg accumulating in human tumors exist. Treg are heterogeneous and use numerous mechanisms to mediate suppression, which either silences anti-tumor immune surveillance or prevents tissue damage by activated T cells. Treg plasticity in the TME endows them with dual functionality. Treg frequency in tumors associates either with poor or improved survival. Treg responses to immune checkpoint inhibition (ICI) differ from the restorative effects ICIs induce in other immune cells. Therapies used to silence Treg, including ICIs, are only partly successful. Treg persistence and resistance to depletion are critical for maintaining homeostasis. Expert opinion: Treg emerge as a heterogeneous subset of immunosuppressive T cells, which usually, but not always, favor tumor progression. Treg are also engaged in non-immune activities that benefit the host. Therapeutic silencing of Treg in cancer requires a deeper understanding of Treg activities in human health and disease.

  18. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents.

  19. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  20. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described

  1. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described.

  2. Extracellular Vesicle Heterogeneity: Subpopulations, Isolation Techniques, and Diverse Functions in Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Willms

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cells release membrane enclosed nano-sized vesicles termed extracellular vesicles (EVs that function as mediators of intercellular communication by transferring biological information between cells. Tumor-derived EVs have emerged as important mediators in cancer development and progression, mainly through transfer of their bioactive content which can include oncoproteins, oncogenes, chemokine receptors, as well as soluble factors, transcripts of proteins and miRNAs involved in angiogenesis or inflammation. This transfer has been shown to influence the metastatic behavior of primary tumors. Moreover, tumor-derived EVs have been shown to influence distant cellular niches, establishing favorable microenvironments that support growth of disseminated cancer cells upon their arrival at these pre-metastatic niches. It is generally accepted that cells release a number of major EV populations with distinct biophysical properties and biological functions. Exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies are EV populations most widely studied and characterized. They are discriminated based primarily on their intracellular origin. However, increasing evidence suggests that even within these EV populations various subpopulations may exist. This heterogeneity introduces an extra level of complexity in the study of EV biology and function. For example, EV subpopulations could have unique roles in the intricate biological processes underlying cancer biology. Here, we discuss current knowledge regarding the role of subpopulations of EVs in cancer development and progression and highlight the relevance of EV heterogeneity. The position of tetraspanins and integrins therein will be highlighted. Since addressing EV heterogeneity has become essential for the EV field, current and novel techniques for isolating EV subpopulations will also be discussed. Further dissection of EV heterogeneity will advance our understanding of the critical roles of EVs in health and

  3. Adrenocortical tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Ribeiro

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACT are rare. In the USA, only about 25 new cases occur each year. In Southern Brazil, however, approximately 10 times that many cases are diagnosed each year. Most cases occur in the contiguous states of São Paulo and Paraná. The cause of this higher rate has not been identified. Familial genetic predisposition to cancer (p53 mutations and selected genetic syndromes (Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have been associated with childhood ACT in general but not with the Brazilian counterpart. Most of the affected children are young girls with classic endocrine syndromes (virilizing and/or Cushing. Levels of urinary 17-ketosteroids and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, which are abnormal in approximately 90% of the cases, provide the pivotal clue to a diagnosis of ACT. Typical imaging findings of pediatric ACT consist of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor containing calcifications with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage. The pathologic classification of pediatric ACT is troublesome. Even an experienced pathologist can find it difficult to differentiate carcinoma from adenoma. Surgery is the single most important procedure in the successful treatment of ACT. The role of chemotherapy in the management of childhood ACT has not been established although occasional tumors are responsive to mitotane or cisplatin-containing regimens. Because of the heterogeneity and rarity of the disease, prognostic factors have been difficult to establish in pediatric ACT. Patients with incomplete tumor resection or with metastatic disease at diagnosis have a dismal prognosis. In patients with localized and completely resected tumors, the size of the tumor has predictive value. Patients with large tumors have a much higher relapse rate than those with small tumors.

  4. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  5. Mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported

  6. DESIGN AND HETEROGENEOUS ENGINEERING:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian; Binder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    theory of ‘following traces’, ‘heterogeneous engineering’ and ‘programs and anti-programs’ will be useful for the study of designers, but their potential has not been fully explored. Thorough investigation of texts of design work as well as an empirical case from a rubber valve plant in Denmark leads us......This paper seeks a vocabulary to study designers at work. The paper draws on STS studies of scientists and laboratories. A number of studies are explored in order to identify different points of attention in studies of science and in studies of design. It is argued that the notions in actor network...... to the notions of “mind”. Designing is argued to be successful when it takes place as mindful interrelating between numbers of entities of different kinds. The subjectivity and “biographical trajectory” of the designer are argued to be of particular interest in order to understand design work. The notion of mind...

  7. Perlecan and tumor angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with thr...... have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention....

  8. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  9. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  11. Relative Expression of Vitamin D Hydroxylases, CYP27B1 and CYP24A1, and of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Heterogeneity of Human Colorectal Cancer in Relation to Age, Gender, Tumor Location, and Malignancy: Results from Factor and Cluster Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozek, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.brozek@gmx.at; Manhardt, Teresa; Kállay, Enikö; Peterlik, Meinrad; Cross, Heide S. [Department of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-26

    Previous studies on the significance of vitamin D insufficiency and chronic inflammation in colorectal cancer development clearly indicated that maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the large intestinal epithelium requires balanced interaction of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} and prostaglandin cellular signaling networks. The present study addresses the question how colorectal cancer pathogenesis depends on alterations of activities of vitamin D hydroxylases, i.e., CYP27B1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase and CYP24A1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase, and inflammation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Data from 105 cancer patients on CYP27B1, VDR, CYP24A1, and COX-2 mRNA expression in relation to tumor grade, anatomical location, gender and age were fit into a multivariate model of exploratory factor analysis. Nearly identical results were obtained by the principal factor and the maximum likelihood method, and these were confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis: Within the eight mutually dependent variables studied four independent constellations were found that identify different features of colorectal cancer pathogenesis: (i) Escape of COX-2 activity from restraints by the CYP27B1/VDR system can initiate cancer growth anywhere in the colorectum regardless of age and gender; (ii) variations in COX-2 expression are mainly responsible for differences in cancer incidence in relation to tumor location; (iii) advancing age has a strong gender-specific influence on cancer incidence; (iv) progression from well differentiated to undifferentiated cancer is solely associated with a rise in CYP24A1 expression.

  12. Relative Expression of Vitamin D Hydroxylases, CYP27B1 and CYP24A1, and of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Heterogeneity of Human Colorectal Cancer in Relation to Age, Gender, Tumor Location, and Malignancy: Results from Factor and Cluster Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozek, Wolfgang; Manhardt, Teresa; Kállay, Enikö; Peterlik, Meinrad; Cross, Heide S.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on the significance of vitamin D insufficiency and chronic inflammation in colorectal cancer development clearly indicated that maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the large intestinal epithelium requires balanced interaction of 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 and prostaglandin cellular signaling networks. The present study addresses the question how colorectal cancer pathogenesis depends on alterations of activities of vitamin D hydroxylases, i.e., CYP27B1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase and CYP24A1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase, and inflammation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Data from 105 cancer patients on CYP27B1, VDR, CYP24A1, and COX-2 mRNA expression in relation to tumor grade, anatomical location, gender and age were fit into a multivariate model of exploratory factor analysis. Nearly identical results were obtained by the principal factor and the maximum likelihood method, and these were confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis: Within the eight mutually dependent variables studied four independent constellations were found that identify different features of colorectal cancer pathogenesis: (i) Escape of COX-2 activity from restraints by the CYP27B1/VDR system can initiate cancer growth anywhere in the colorectum regardless of age and gender; (ii) variations in COX-2 expression are mainly responsible for differences in cancer incidence in relation to tumor location; (iii) advancing age has a strong gender-specific influence on cancer incidence; (iv) progression from well differentiated to undifferentiated cancer is solely associated with a rise in CYP24A1 expression

  13. How many molecular subtypes? Implications of the unique tumor principle in personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward

    2012-07-01

    Cancers are complex multifactorial diseases. For centuries, conventional organ-based classification system (i.e., breast cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, and so on) has been utilized. Recently, molecular diagnostics has become an essential component in clinical decision-making. However, tumor evolution and behavior cannot accurately be predicted, despite numerous research studies reporting promising tumor biomarkers. To advance molecular diagnostics, a better understanding of intratumor and intertumor heterogeneity is essential. Tumor cells interact with the extracellular matrix and host non-neoplastic cells in the tumor microenvironment, which is influenced by genomic variation, hormones, and dietary, lifestyle and environmental exposures, implicated by molecular pathological epidemiology. Essentially, each tumor possesses its own unique characteristics in terms of molecular make-up, tumor microenvironment and interactomes within and between neoplastic and host cells. Starting from the unique tumor concept and paradigm, we can better classify tumors by molecular methods, and move closer toward personalized cancer medicine and prevention.

  14. Turnover rate of hypoxic cells in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, A.S.E.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and both the amount and duration of tumor hypoxia has been shown to influence the effect of radiation treatment negatively. It is important to understand the dynamic processes within the hypoxic cell population in non-treated tumors, and the effect of different treatment modalities on the kinetics of hypoxic cells to be able to design optimal combined modality treatments. The turnover rate of hypoxic cells was analyzed in three different solid tumor models with a double bio-reductive hypoxic marker assay with sequential injection of the two hypoxic markers. Previously it was shown that this assay could be used to detect both a decrease and an increase of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature with high spatial resolution. In this study the first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times relative to tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. The hypoxic cell turnover rate was calculated as the loss of pimonidazole positive cells relative to CCI-103F. The murine C38 line had the fastest hypoxic turnover rate of 60% /24h and the human xenograft line SCCNij3 had the slowest hypoxic turnover rate of 30% /24 h. The hypoxic turnover rate was most heterogeneous in the SCCNij3 line that even contained viable groups of cells that had been hypoxic for at least 5 days. The human xenograft line MEC82 fell in between with a hypoxic turnover rate of 50% /24 h. The hypoxic cell turnover was related to the potential tumor volume doubling time (Tpot) with a Tpot of 26h in C38 and 103h in SCCNij3. The dynamics of hypoxic cells, quantified with a double hypoxic marker method, showed large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rate and were related to Tpot

  15. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...... signaling plays a fundamental role during development. Recent findings have shown that Notch signaling is dysregulated, and contributes to the malignant potential of these tumors. Growing evidence point towards an important role for cancer stem cells in the initiation and maintenance of glioma...... and medulloblastoma. In this chapter we will cover the present findings of Notch signaling in human glioma and medulloblastoma and try to create an overall picture of its relevance in the pathogenesis of these tumors....

  16. Cancer Stem Cells and stress induced evolution - understanding the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dr S Bapat

    2015-11-08

    Nov 8, 2015 ... (Tumor Cell Heterogeneity). • Drug refractory behaviour of tumor cells may arise due to either –. - Intrinsic drug resistance mechanisms (Molecular Heterogeneity). - Cell dormancy / reversible quiescence (Cancer stem cells - CSCs). Post-therapy minimal residual disease – drug recalcitrance. Regeneration.

  17. Heterogeneous network architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    and it is discussed that it is advantageous to heterogeneous networks and illustrated by a number of examples. Modeling and simulation is a well-known way of doing performance evaluation. An approach to event-driven simulation of communication networks is presented and mixed complexity modeling, which can simplify......Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...... is flexibility. This thesis investigates such heterogeneous network architectures and how to make them flexible. A survey of algorithms for network design is presented, and it is described how using heuristics can increase the speed. A hierarchical, MPLS based network architecture is described...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qiuhong; Xu, Ray Z.; Shkarin, Pavel; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Lee-French, Carol H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2004-01-01

    Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and ...

  19. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  20. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  1. Optical metabolic imaging quantifies heterogeneous cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of cancers can contribute to tumor aggressiveness, invasion, and resistance to therapy. Fluorescence imaging occupies a unique niche to investigate tumor heterogeneity due to its high resolution and molecular specificity. Here, heterogeneous populations are identified and quantified by combined optical metabolic imaging and subpopulation analysis (OMI-SPA). OMI probes the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic enzymes in cells to provide images of cellular metabolism, and SPA models cell populations as mixed Gaussian distributions to identify cell subpopulations. In this study, OMI-SPA is characterized by simulation experiments and validated with cell experiments. To generate heterogeneous populations, two breast cancer cell lines, SKBr3 and MDA-MB-231, were co-cultured at varying proportions. OMI-SPA correctly identifies two populations with minimal mean and proportion error using the optical redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of NAD(P)H divided by the intensity of FAD), mean NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime, and OMI index. Simulation experiments characterized the relationships between sample size, data standard deviation, and subpopulation mean separation distance required for OMI-SPA to identify subpopulations. PMID:25780745

  2. Structure of Intratumor Heterogeneity: Is Cancer Hedging Its Bets?

    OpenAIRE

    Brutovsky, B.; Horvath, D.

    2013-01-01

    Development of resistance limits transferability of most anticancer therapies into curative treatment and understanding mechanisms beyond it remains a big challenge. Many high resolution experimental observations show enormous intratumor heterogeneity at molecular, genetic and cellular levels which is made responsible for emerging resistance to therapy. Therefore, researchers search techniques to influence development of intratumor heterogeneity, which requires understanding its role within t...

  3. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  4. Odontogenic tumors: where are we in 2017 ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Wright

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors are a heterogeneous group of lesions of diverse clinical behavior and histopathologic types, ranging from hamartomatous lesions to malignancy. Because odontogenic tumors arise from the tissues which make our teeth, they are unique to the jaws, and by extension almost unique to dentistry. Odontogenic tumors, as in normal odontogenesis, are capable of inductive interactions between odontogenic ectomesenchyme and epithelium, and the classification of odontogenic tumors is essentially based on this interaction. The last update of these tumors was published in early 2017. According to this classification, benign odontogenic tumors are classified as follows: Epithelial, mesenchymal (ectomesenchymal, or mixed depending on which component of the tooth germ gives rise to the neoplasm. Malignant odontogenic tumors are quite rare and named similarly according to whether the epithelial or mesenchymal or both components is malignant. The goal of this review is to discuss the updated changes to odontogenic tumors and to review the more common types with clinical and radiological illustrations.

  5. Biological stoichiometry in tumor micro-environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    Full Text Available Tumors can be viewed as evolving ecological systems, in which heterogeneous populations of cancer cells compete with each other and somatic cells for space and nutrients within the ecosystem of the human body. According to the growth rate hypothesis (GRH, increased phosphorus availability in an ecosystem, such as the tumor micro-environment, may promote selection within the tumor for a more proliferative and thus potentially more malignant phenotype. The applicability of the GRH to tumor growth is evaluated using a mathematical model, which suggests that limiting phosphorus availability might promote intercellular competition within a tumor, and thereby delay disease progression. It is also shown that a tumor can respond differently to changes in its micro-environment depending on the initial distribution of clones within the tumor, regardless of its initial size. This suggests that composition of the tumor as a whole needs to be evaluated in order to maximize the efficacy of therapy.

  6. BRAF and NRAS mutations are heterogeneous and not mutually exclusive in nodular melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappetta, Caterina; Proietti, Ilaria; Soccodato, Valentina; Puggioni, Chiara; Zaralli, Roberto; Pacini, Luca; Porta, Natale; Skroza, Nevena; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Potenza, Concetta; Della Rocca, Carlo; Di Cristofano, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of RAF inhibit the MAPK pathway that plays an important role in the development and progression of those melanoma carrying the V600E BRAF mutation, but there's a subset of such patients who do not respond to the therapy. Various mechanisms of drug resistance have been proposed which include the clonal heterogeneity of the tumor. We have studied a population of nodular melanoma to investigate the intratumor and intertumor heterogeneity by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) analysis. Our results showed that BRAF and NRAS mutations were detected in 47% and 33% of nodular melanoma, respectively, and that there is a discrepancy in mutational pattern of tumoral sample because in the 36% of patients a different mutation, in at least 1 area of the tumor, was found by LCM analysis, giving evidence of the presence of different clonal cells populations. Moreover, we found that mutations in BRAF and NRAS are not mutually exclusive because they were simultaneously present in the same tumor specimens and we observed that when the 2 different mutations were present one is a high-frequency mutation and the other is a low-frequency mutation. This was more evident in lymphonodal metastasis that resulted from wild type to mutational analysis, but showed different mutations following LCM analysis. Therefore, we believed that, when primary tumoral sample results negative to mutational analysis, if it is possible, metastases should be investigated to verify the presence of mutations. Generally, it should be searched for other mutations, in addition to BRAF V600E, so as to better understand the mechanism of drug resistance.

  7. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  8. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Salama

    Full Text Available General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects.

  9. Inference of Cell Mechanics in Heterogeneous Epithelial Tissue Based on Multivariate Clone Shape Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Alice; Umetsu, Daiki; Kuranaga, Erina; Fujimoto, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Cell populations in multicellular organisms show genetic and non-genetic heterogeneity, even in undifferentiated tissues of multipotent cells during development and tumorigenesis. The heterogeneity causes difference of mechanical properties, such as, cell bond tension or adhesion, at the cell–cell interface, which determine the shape of clonal population boundaries via cell sorting or mixing. The boundary shape could alter the degree of cell–cell contacts and thus influence the physiological consequences of sorting or mixing at the boundary (e.g., tumor suppression or progression), suggesting that the cell mechanics could help clarify the physiology of heterogeneous tissues. While precise inference of mechanical tension loaded at each cell–cell contacts has been extensively developed, there has been little progress on how to distinguish the population-boundary geometry and identify the cause of geometry in heterogeneous tissues. We developed a pipeline by combining multivariate analysis of clone shape with tissue mechanical simulations. We examined clones with four different genotypes within Drosophila wing imaginal discs: wild-type, tartan (trn) overexpression, hibris (hbs) overexpression, and Eph RNAi. Although the clones were previously known to exhibit smoothed or convoluted morphologies, their mechanical properties were unknown. By applying a multivariate analysis to multiple criteria used to quantify the clone shapes based on individual cell shapes, we found the optimal criteria to distinguish not only among the four genotypes, but also non-genetic heterogeneity from genetic one. The efficient segregation of clone shape enabled us to quantitatively compare experimental data with tissue mechanical simulations. As a result, we identified the mechanical basis contributed to clone shape of distinct genotypes. The present pipeline will promote the understanding of the functions of mechanical interactions in heterogeneous tissue in a non-invasive manner. PMID

  10. Tumor vaccines:

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Mojca; Ihan, Alojz

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regirrcents. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tccmor aaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which imrrtune tol...

  11. Heterogeneous catalysis at nanoscale for energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Franklin (Feng); Kamat, Prashant V

    2015-01-01

    This book presents both the fundamentals concepts and latest achievements of a field that is growing in importance since it represents a possible solution for global energy problems.  It focuses on an atomic-level understanding of heterogeneous catalysis involved in important energy conversion processes. It presents a concise picture for the entire area of heterogeneous catalysis with vision at the atomic- and nano- scales, from synthesis, ex-situ and in-situ characterization, catalytic activity and selectivity, to mechanistic understanding based on experimental exploration and theoretical si

  12. Implications of Heterogeneity in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay de Mel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy in the world. Despite improvement in outcome, the disease is still incurable for most patients. However, not all myeloma are the same. With the same treatment, some patients can have very long survival whereas others can have very short survival. This suggests that there is underlying heterogeneity in myeloma. Studies over the years have revealed multiple layers of heterogeneity. First, clinical parameters such as age and tumor burden could significantly affect outcome. At the genetic level, there are also significant heterogeneity ranging for chromosome numbers, genetic translocations, and genetic mutations. At the clonal level, there appears to be significant clonal heterogeneity with multiple clones coexisting in the same patient. At the cell differentiation level, there appears to be a hierarchy of clonally related cells that have different clonogenic potential and sensitivity to therapies. These levels of complexities present challenges in terms of treatment and prognostication as well as monitoring of treatment. However, if we can clearly delineate and dissect this heterogeneity, we may also be presented with unique opportunities for precision and personalized treatment of myeloma. Some proof of concepts of such approaches has been demonstrated.

  13. The PCa Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Zhang, Jian; Macoska, Jill A; Keller, Evan T

    2011-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a very complex niche that consists of multiple cell types, supportive matrix and soluble factors. Cells in the TME consist of both host cells that are present at tumor site at the onset of tumor growth and cells that are recruited in either response to tumor- or host-derived factors. PCa (PCa) thrives on crosstalk between tumor cells and the TME. Crosstalk results in an orchestrated evolution of both the tumor and microenvironment as the tumor progresses. The TME reacts to PCa-produced soluble factors as well as direct interaction with PCa cells. In return, the TME produces soluble factors, structural support and direct contact interactions that influence the establishment and progression of PCa. In this review, we focus on the host side of the equation to provide a foundation for understanding how different aspects of the TME contribute to PCa progression. We discuss immune effector cells, specialized niches, such as the vascular and bone marrow, and several key protein factors that mediate host effects on PCa. This discussion highlights the concept that the TME offers a potentially very fertile target for PCa therapy.

  14. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  15. Tumor uptake of intravenously administered radiolabeled antibodies in ovarian carcinoma patients in relation to antigen expression and other tumor characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; Molthoff, C. F.; Roos, J. C.; den Hollander, W.; Brinkhuis, M.; Baak, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    To study factors that possibly influence the heterogeneous tumor uptake of radiolabeled antibodies, tissues from 34 ovarian-carcinoma patients were obtained 2 to 8 days after i.v. injection with radiolabeled murine OV-TL3 or chimeric MOv18 (cMOv18). The tumor uptake and the ratio of tumor to normal

  16. Neurobiological heterogeneity in ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, P.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder clinically. Symptoms take many forms, from subtle but pervasive attention problems or dreaminess up to disruptive and unpredictable behavior. Interestingly, early neuroscientific work on ADHD assumed either a

  17. Breast cancer as heterogeneous disease: contributing factors and carcinogenesis mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Abernethy, Amy P; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-01

    The observed bimodal patterns of breast cancer incidence in the U.S. suggested that breast cancer may be viewed as more than one biological entity. We studied the factors potentially contributing to this phenomenon, specifically focusing on how disease heterogeneity could be linked to breast carcinogenesis mechanisms. Using empirical analyses and population-based biologically motivated modeling, age-specific patterns of incidence of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas from the SEER registry (1990-2003) were analyzed for heterogeneity and characteristics of carcinogenesis, stratified by race, stage, grade, and estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR) receptor status. The heterogeneity of breast carcinoma age patterns decreased after stratification by grade, especially for grade I and III tumors. Stratification by ER/PR status further reduced the heterogeneity, especially for ER(+)/PR(-) and ER(-)/(-) tumors; however, the residual heterogeneity was still observed. The number of rate-limiting events of carcinogenesis and the latency of ductal and lobular carcinomas differed, decreasing from grade I to III, with poorly differentiated tumors associated with the least number of carcinogenesis stages and the shortest latency. Tumor grades play important role in bimodal incidence of breast carcinoma and have distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Race and cancer subtype could play modifying role. ER/PR status contributes to the observed heterogeneity, but is subdominant to tumor grade. Further studies on sources of "remaining" heterogeneity of population with breast cancer (such as genetic/epigenetic characteristics) are necessary. The results of this study could suggest stratification rather than unification of breast cancer prevention strategies, risk assessment, and treatment.

  18. Flavivirus structural heterogeneity: implications for cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Félix A; Stiasny, Karin; Heinz, Franz X

    2017-06-01

    The explosive spread of Zika virus is the most recent example of the threat imposed to human health by flaviviruses. High-resolution structures are available for several of these arthropod-borne viruses, revealing alternative icosahedral organizations of immature and mature virions. Incomplete proteolytic maturation, however, results in a cloud of highly heterogeneous mosaic particles. This heterogeneity is further expanded by a dynamic behavior of the viral envelope glycoproteins. The ensemble of heterogeneous and dynamic infectious particles circulating in infected hosts offers a range of alternative possible receptor interaction sites at their surfaces, potentially contributing to the broad flavivirus host-range and variation in tissue tropism. The potential synergy between heterogeneous particles in the circulating cloud thus provides an additional dimension to understand the unanticipated properties of Zika virus in its recent outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cryospectrophotometric determination of tumor intravascular oxyhemoglobin saturations: dependence on vascular geometry and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B M; Rofstad, E K; Degner, F L; Sutherland, R M

    1988-12-21

    To delineate the complex relationships between overall tumor oxygenation and vascular configuration, intravascular oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation distributions were measured with cryospectrophotometric techniques. Four factors related to vascular morphometry and tumor growth were evaluated: a) vessel diameter, b) distance of vessel from the tumor surface, c) tumor volume, and d) vascular density. To measure intertumor heterogeneity, two murine sarcomas (RIF-1 and KHT) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenografts (OWI and MLS) were utilized. In contrast to skeletal muscle, a preponderance of very low HbO2 saturations was observed for both large and small tumors of all lines. Saturations up to about 90% were also generally present, however, even in very large tumors. Variations in vascular configuration were predominantly tumor-line dependent rather than due to inherent characteristics of the host vasculature, and widely disparate HbO2 distributions were found for alternate lines implanted in identical host mice. Although peripheral saturations remained fairly constant with tumor growth, HbO2 values were markedly lower for vessels nearer the tumor center and further decreased with increasing tumor volume. HbO2 saturations did not change substantially with increasing vascular density (except for KHT tumors), although density did decrease with increasing distance from tumor surface. Combined effects of vessel diameter, tumor volume, and vessel location on HbO2 saturations were complex and varied markedly with both tumor line and vessel class. For specific classes, HbO2 distributions correlated closely with radiobiological hypoxic fractions, i.e., for tumor lines in which hypoxic fraction increased substantially with tumor volume, corresponding HbO2 values decreased, while for lines in which hypoxic fraction remained constant, HbO2 values also were unchanged. Although these trends may also be a function of differing oxygen consumption rates between tumor lines

  20. Primary omental Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirahara Nobutsune

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report herein a rare case of primary omental gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST. Case presentation A 65 year-old man was referred to our hospital with a huge abdominal mass occupying the entire left upper abdomen as shown by sonography. On computed tomography (CT, this appeared as a heterogeneous low-density mass with faint enhancement. Abdominal angiography revealed that the right gastroepiploic artery supplied the tumor. With such an indication of gastric GIST, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma or mesothelioma laparotomy was performed and revealed that this large mass measured 20 × 17 × 6 cm, arising from the greater omentum. It was completely resected. Histopathologically, it was composed of proliferating spindle and epithelioid cells with an interlacing bundle pattern. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for myeloid stem cell antigen (CD34, weakly positive for c-KIT (CD117 and slightly positive for neuron-specific enolase (NSE, but negative for cytokeratin (CK, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA and S-100 protein. A mutation was identified in the platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA juxtamembrane domain (exon 12, codon561 and the tumor was diagnosed as an omental GIST. The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient is treated by Glevec® and is alive well with no sign of relapse. Conclusion Our case demonstrated a weak immunohistochemical expression of c-kit (CD117 and a point mutation in PDGFRA exon 12 resulting in an Asp for Val561 substitution. Imatinib therapy as an adjuvant to complete resection has been carried out safely. Because of the rarity of primary omental GISTs, it is inevitable to analyze accumulating data from case reports for a better and more detailed understanding of primary omental GISTs.

  1. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  2. Carcinoid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to other parts of the body. Doctors don't know what causes the mutations that can lead to carcinoid tumors. But they know that carcinoid tumors develop in neuroendocrine cells. Neuroendocrine cells are found in various organs throughout the body. They perform some nerve cell ...

  3. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  4. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  5. Nonclassical Kinetics of Clonal yet Heterogeneous Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Jun; Song, Sanggeun; Jeong, In-Chun; Koh, Hye Ran; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Sung, Jaeyoung

    2017-07-06

    Enzyme-to-enzyme variation in the catalytic rate is ubiquitous among single enzymes created from the same genetic information, which persists over the lifetimes of living cells. Despite advances in single-enzyme technologies, the lack of an enzyme reaction model accounting for the heterogeneous activity of single enzymes has hindered a quantitative understanding of the nonclassical stochastic outcome of single enzyme systems. Here we present a new statistical kinetics and exactly solvable models for clonal yet heterogeneous enzymes with possibly nonergodic state dynamics and state-dependent reactivity, which enable a quantitative understanding of modern single-enzyme experimental results for the mean and fluctuation in the number of product molecules created by single enzymes. We also propose a new experimental measure of the heterogeneity and nonergodicity for a system of enzymes.

  6. Spatial organization and correlations of cell nuclei in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    Full Text Available Accepting the hypothesis that cancers are self-organizing, opportunistic systems, it is crucial to understand the collective behavior of cancer cells in their tumorous heterogeneous environment. In the present paper, we ask the following basic question: Is this self-organization of tumor evolution reflected in the manner in which malignant cells are spatially distributed in their heterogeneous environment? We employ a variety of nontrivial statistical microstructural descriptors that arise in the theory of heterogeneous media to characterize the spatial distributions of the nuclei of both benign brain white matter cells and brain glioma cells as obtained from histological images. These descriptors, which include the pair correlation function, structure factor and various nearest neighbor functions, quantify how pairs of cell nuclei are correlated in space in various ways. We map the centroids of the cell nuclei into point distributions to show that while commonly used local spatial statistics (e.g., cell areas and number of neighboring cells cannot clearly distinguish spatial correlations in distributions of normal and abnormal cell nuclei, their salient structural features are captured very well by the aforementioned microstructural descriptors. We show that the tumorous cells pack more densely than normal cells and exhibit stronger effective repulsions between any pair of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that brain gliomas are organized in a collective way rather than randomly on intermediate and large length scales. The existence of nontrivial spatial correlations between the abnormal cells strongly supports the view that cancer is not an unorganized collection of malignant cells but rather a complex emergent integrated system.

  7. Spatial organization and correlations of cell nuclei in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Berman, Hal; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Accepting the hypothesis that cancers are self-organizing, opportunistic systems, it is crucial to understand the collective behavior of cancer cells in their tumorous heterogeneous environment. In the present paper, we ask the following basic question: Is this self-organization of tumor evolution reflected in the manner in which malignant cells are spatially distributed in their heterogeneous environment? We employ a variety of nontrivial statistical microstructural descriptors that arise in the theory of heterogeneous media to characterize the spatial distributions of the nuclei of both benign brain white matter cells and brain glioma cells as obtained from histological images. These descriptors, which include the pair correlation function, structure factor and various nearest neighbor functions, quantify how pairs of cell nuclei are correlated in space in various ways. We map the centroids of the cell nuclei into point distributions to show that while commonly used local spatial statistics (e.g., cell areas and number of neighboring cells) cannot clearly distinguish spatial correlations in distributions of normal and abnormal cell nuclei, their salient structural features are captured very well by the aforementioned microstructural descriptors. We show that the tumorous cells pack more densely than normal cells and exhibit stronger effective repulsions between any pair of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that brain gliomas are organized in a collective way rather than randomly on intermediate and large length scales. The existence of nontrivial spatial correlations between the abnormal cells strongly supports the view that cancer is not an unorganized collection of malignant cells but rather a complex emergent integrated system.

  8. Intracranial tumors in pediatric patients; Intrakranielle Tumoren im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Saarland, Homburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Hagen, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Every year, 400 children suffer from a brain tumor. These are the most frequent solid tumors in the pediatric patient. They represent a very heterogenic group of tumors with different clinical symptoms, pathology, therapy and prognosis. Imaging modalities such as CT and MRI are important for the diagnosis and follow-up after therapy. Brain tumors in children are responsible for 15-20% of all brain tumors. Tumors of the central nervous system are the second most common tumors after leukemia. Infra- and supratentorial tumors occur in equal number, however, there are differences in the age of occurrence: supratentorial tumors occur more often within the first 2-3 years of life, whereas infratentorial tumors reach there peak between 4 and 10 years. After the tenth year, infra- and supratentorial tumors occur with equal frequency. (orig.)

  9. Peculiarities in the CT findings of germ cell tumors in various tumor localizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazoe, Makoto; Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    1991-01-01

    The CT findings of 17 germ cell tumors were studied in relation to the locations of the tumor, the pathological diagnoses, and the tumor markers (AFP and HCG). Generally, the CT findings of germ cell tumors depended on the pathological diagnoses more strongly than on the location of the tumors. On plain CT of 7 germ cell tumors in the pineal region, all of them demonstrated heterogeneous findings. Hydrocephalus was seen in 6 cases (86%) and calcification in 6 cases (86%) of the germ cell tumors in the pineal region. Calcification and hydrocephalus that appeared more often than in other regions were characteristic of germ cell tumors of the pineal region. The germ cell tumors in the basal ganglia had a slightly homogenous high density, with small cysts and calcification in most of them on plain CT. On enhanced CT, the tumors were moderately enhanced in all cases located in the basal ganglia. Four cases of germ cell tumors located in the basal ganglia revealed the dilatation of lateral ventricle due to hemispheric atrophy in the tumor side. The germ cell tumors showing an increase in the tumor markers such as AFP and HCG, which were usually malignant germ cell tumors, were strongly enhanced on enhanced CT. (author)

  10. Prospective study of neuropsychological sequelae in children with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordeaux, J.D.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Copeland, D.R.; Fletcher, J.M.; Francis, D.J.; van Eys, J.

    1988-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the primary modalities of treatment for pediatric brain tumors. Despite the widespread use of these treatments, little is known of their acute effects (within one year posttreatment) on neuropsychological functions. An understanding of acute treatment effects may provide valuable feedback to neurosurgeons and a baseline against which delayed sequelae may be evaluated. This study compares pre- and posttherapy neuropsychological test performance of pediatric brain tumor patients categorized into two groups on the basis of treatment modalities: surgery (n = 7) and radiotherapy (n = 7). Treatment groups were composed of children aged 56 to 196 months at the time of evaluation with heterogeneous tumor diagnoses and locations. Comparisons of pretherapy findings with normative values using confidence intervals indicated that both groups performed within the average range on most measures. Outstanding deficits at baseline were observed on tests of fine-motor, psychomotor, and timed language skills, and are likely to be attributable to tumor-related effects. Comparisons of pre- versus posttherapy neuropsychological test findings indicated no significant interval changes for either group. Results suggest that surgery and radiotherapy are not associated with acute effects on neuropsychological functions

  11. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  12. Heterogeneity in magnetic complex oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenholz, Elke

    Heterogeneity of quantum materials on the nanoscale can result from the spontaneous formation of regions with distinct atomic, electronic and/or magnetic order, and indicates coexistence of competing quantum phases. In complex oxides, the subtle interplay of lattice, charge, orbital, and spin degrees of freedom gives rise to especially rich phase diagrams. For example, coexisting conducting and insulating phases can occur near metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance can emerge where ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic domains compete, and charge-ordered and superconducting regions are present simultaneously in materials exhibiting high-temperature superconductivity. Additionally, externally applied fields (electric, magnetic, or strain) or other external excitations (light or heat) can tip the energy balance towards one phase, or support heterogeneity and phase coexistence and provide the means to perturb and tailor quantum heterogeneity at the nanoscale. Engineering nanomaterials, with structural, electronic and magnetic characteristics beyond what is found in bulk materials, is possible today through the technique of thin film epitaxy, effectively a method of `spray painting' atoms on single crystalline substrates to create precisely customized layered structures with atomic arrangements defined by the underlying substrate. Charge transfer and spin polarization across interfaces as well as imprinting nanoscale heterogeneity between adjacent layers lead to intriguing and important new phenomena testing our understanding of basic physics and creating new functionalities. Moreover, the abrupt change of orientation of an order parameter between nanoscale domains can lead to unique phases that are localized at domain walls, including conducting domain walls in insulating ferroelectrics, and ferromagnetic domain walls in antiferromagnets. Here we present our recent results on tailoring the electronic anisotropy of multiferroic heterostructures by

  13. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The failure rate dynamics in heterogeneous populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Ji Hwan; Finkelstein, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Most populations encountered in real world are heterogeneous. In reliability applications, the mixture (observed) failure rate, obviously, can be considered as a measure of ‘average’ quality in these populations. However, in addition to this average measure, some variability characteristics for failure rates can be very helpful in describing the time-dependent changes in quality of heterogeneous populations. In this paper, we discuss variance and the coefficient of variation of the corresponding random failure rate as variability measures for items in heterogeneous populations. Furthermore, there is often a risk that items of poor quality are selected for important missions. Therefore, along with the ‘average quality’ of a population, more ‘conservative’ quality measures should be also defined and studied. For this purpose, we propose the percentile and the tail-mixture of the failure rates as the corresponding conservative measures. Some illustrative examples are given. -- Highlights: ► This paper provides the insight on the variability measures in heterogeneous populations. ► The conservative quality measures in heterogeneous populations are defined. ► The utility of these measures is illustrated by meaningful examples. ► This paper provides a better understanding of the dynamics in heterogeneous populations

  15. Engineering Microbial Metabolite Dynamics and Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Alexander C; Hartline, Christopher J; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2017-10-01

    As yields for biological chemical production in microorganisms approach their theoretical maximum, metabolic engineering requires new tools, and approaches for improvements beyond what traditional strategies can achieve. Engineering metabolite dynamics and metabolite heterogeneity is necessary to achieve further improvements in product titers, productivities, and yields. Metabolite dynamics, the ensemble change in metabolite concentration over time, arise from the need for microbes to adapt their metabolism in response to the extracellular environment and are important for controlling growth and productivity in industrial fermentations. Metabolite heterogeneity, the cell-to-cell variation in a metabolite concentration in an isoclonal population, has a significant impact on ensemble productivity. Recent advances in single cell analysis enable a more complete understanding of the processes driving metabolite heterogeneity and reveal metabolic engineering targets. The authors present an overview of the mechanistic origins of metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity, why they are important, their potential effects in chemical production processes, and tools and strategies for engineering metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity. The authors emphasize that the ability to control metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity will bring new avenues of engineering to increase productivity of microbial strains. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Localization and Molecular Characterization of human Breast Cancer Initiating Cells from heterogeneous population of Breast Cancer Mesenchymal Stem cells by mmunofluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potdar P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast Cancer (BC is a heterogeneous disease and arises from breast cancer initiating stem cell population in the tumor and these cells are resistant to cancer therapies. Thus identifying this cell type within the tumor clone is an important area of research to understand the mechanism of breast cancer development. Recently, our laboratory has isolated and characterized Human breast cancer mesenchymal stem cells (hBCMSCs from human breast cancer and showed the heterogeneity of these cells existing in the tumor. Therefore, our present objective is to use this model system to identify, localize and define specific breast cancer initiating cells (BCICs from the heterogeneous population of hBCMSCs cell line developed in our laboratory. Localization of specific cell types can be done by using specific cancer marker antibodies using Immunofluorescence microscopy. In this study we have used FITC labeled specific cancer antibodies i.e. p53, Rb1, Hras, Ki67, EGFR, GST, ETS1 and ATF2 to localize BCICs in this population of cells. Our results have demonstrated that few cells among many of the BC cells gave fluorescence with specific cancer antibody indicating that these cell types are BCICs that may be responsible for supporting the growth of other cell type to form tumors. The Phase Contrast Microscopy clearly showed giant cells with enlarged nucleus and scanty cytoplasm associated with many cytoplasmic granules. It also indicates that these cells are mainly responsible for supporting proliferation of surrounding cells that form a part of the BC tumor. We have further hypothesized that molecular profiling of these tumor cells will open a new avenue of molecular targeted therapies for Breast Cancer patients even at an advanced stage of disease.

  17. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  18. Tumor Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... only a small number of people will test positive for the disease who do not have it—in other words, it will result in very few false-positive results. Although tumor markers are extremely useful in ...

  19. Tumor Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... may require immediate or more aggressive treatment. The importance of tumor grade in planning treatment and determining ...

  20. Tumor biology and cancer therapy – an evolving relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lother Ulrike

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of palliative chemotherapy is to increase survival whilst maintaining maximum quality of life for the individual concerned. Although we are still continuing to explore the optimum use of traditional chemotherapy agents, the introduction of targeted therapies has significantly broadened the therapeutic options. Interestingly, the results from current trials put the underlying biological concept often into a new, less favorable perspective. Recent data suggested that altered pathways underlie cancer, and not just altered genes. Thus, an effective therapeutic agent will sometimes have to target downstream parts of a signaling pathway or physiological effects rather than individual genes. In addition, over the past few years increasing evidence has suggested that solid tumors represent a very heterogeneous group of cells with different susceptibility to cancer therapy. Thus, since therapeutic concepts and pathophysiological understanding are continuously evolving a combination of current concepts in tumor therapy and tumor biology is needed. This review aims to present current problems of cancer therapy by highlighting exemplary results from recent clinical trials with colorectal and pancreatic cancer patients and to discuss the current understanding of the underlying reasons.

  1. Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric CNS embryonal tumors are a collection of heterogeneous lesions (medulloblastoma, and nonmedulloblastoma). Molecular genetic studies are used to classify embryonal tumors, stratify risk, and plan treatment. Get detailed information about tumor biology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of untreated and recurrent CNS embryonal tumors in this summary for clinicians.

  2. CT appearance of testicular yolk sac tumors in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Changxue; Sun Duocheng; Zhan Zhipeng; Li Fuzhang; Zhang Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT appearance of pediatric testicular yolk sac tumor. Methods: Clinical records and CT scans of testicular yolk sac tumor in twelve children were reviewed. Results: The tumors appeared as solid masses on unenhanced CT scan with homogeneous (10) or heterogeneous (2) densities and heterogeneous contrast enhancement (8). The ipsilateral spermatic cord and inguinal lymph nodes were invaded in one patient. Conclusion: CT is a valuable for diagnosing testicular yolk sac tumor in children. AFP measurement can help with definitive pre-operative diagnosis. (authors)

  3. Why does heterogeneity matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.B. Pierce

    2007-01-01

    This is a review of the book "Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes" published in 2005. The authors are G. Lovett, C. Jones, M.G. Turner, and K.C. Weathers. It was published by Springer, New York. The book is a synthesis of the 10th Gary conference held at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York, in 2003.

  4. Heterogeneity and option pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, Simon; Mayshar, Joram

    2000-01-01

    An economy with agents having constant yet heterogeneous degrees of relative risk aversion prices assets as though there were a single decreasing relative risk aversion pricing representative agent. The pricing kernel has fat tails and option prices do not conform to the Black-Scholes formula.

  5. Heterogeneity of Dutch rainfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall data for the Netherlands have been used in this study to investigate aspects of heterogeneity of rainfall, in particular local differences in rainfall levels, time trends in rainfall, and local differences in rainfall trend. The possible effect of urbanization and industrialization on the

  6. Heterogeneous computing in economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziubinski, Matt P.; Grassi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the potential of heterogeneous computing in solving dynamic equilibrium models in economics. We illustrate the power and simplicity of C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism (C++ AMP) recently introduced by Microsoft. Starting from the same exercise as Aldrich et al. (J Econ Dyn...

  7. Heterogeneous Materials I and Heterogeneous Materials II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, K M

    2004-01-01

    In these two volumes the author provides a comprehensive survey of the various mathematically-based models used in the research literature to predict the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of hetereogeneous materials, i.e., materials containing two or more phases such as fibre-reinforced polymers, cast iron and porous ceramic kiln furniture. Volume I covers linear properties such as linear dielectric constant, effective electrical conductivity and elastic moduli, while Volume II covers nonlinear properties, fracture and atomistic and multiscale modelling. Where appropriate, particular attention is paid to the use of fractal geometry and percolation theory in describing the structure and properties of these materials. The books are advanced level texts reflecting the research interests of the author which will be of significant interest to research scientists working at the forefront of the areas covered by the books. Others working more generally in the field of materials science interested in comparing predictions of properties with experimental results may well find the mathematical level quite daunting initially, as it is apparent that the author assumes a level of mathematics consistent with that taught in final year undergraduate and graduate theoretical physics courses. However, for such readers it is well worth persevering because of the in-depth coverage to which the various models are subjected, and also because of the extensive reference lists at the back of both volumes which direct readers to the various source references in the scientific literature. Thus, for the wider materials science scientific community the two volumes will be a valuable library resource. While I would have liked to see more comparison with experimental data on both ideal and 'real' heterogeneous materials than is provided by the author and a discussion of how to model strong nonlinear current--voltage behaviour in systems such as zinc oxide varistors, my overall

  8. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary Breast Carcinomas and Axillary Lymph Node Metastases Assessed by Genomic Fingerprinting Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Toro, Allyson L; Blackburn, Heather L; Decewicz, Alisha; Deyarmin, Brenda; Mamula, Kimberly A; Costantino, Nicholas S; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Darrell L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular heterogeneity within primary breast carcinomas and among axillary lymph node (LN) metastases may impact diagnosis and confound treatment. In this study, we used short tandem repeated sequences to assess genomic heterogeneity and to determine hereditary relationships among primary tumor areas and regional metastases from 30 breast cancer patients. We found that primary carcinomas were genetically heterogeneous and sampling multiple areas was necessary to adequately assess genomic variability. LN metastases appeared to originate at different time periods during disease progression from different sites of the primary tumor and the extent of genomic divergence among regional metastases was associated with a less favorable patient outcome (P = 0.009). In conclusion, metastasis is a complex process influenced by primary tumor heterogeneity and variability in the timing of dissemination. Genomic variation in primary breast tumors and regional metastases may negatively impact clinical diagnostics and contribute to therapeutic resistance. PMID:26279627

  9. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary Breast Carcinomas and Axillary Lymph Node Metastases Assessed by Genomic Fingerprinting Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Ellsworth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular heterogeneity within primary breast carcinomas and among axillary lymph node (LN metastases may impact diagnosis and confound treatment. In this study, we used short tandem repeated sequences to assess genomic heterogeneity and to determine hereditary relationships among primary tumor areas and regional metastases from 30 breast cancer patients. We found that primary carcinomas were genetically heterogeneous and sampling multiple areas was necessary to adequately assess genomic variability. LN metastases appeared to originate at different time periods during disease progression from different sites of the primary tumor and the extent of genomic divergence among regional metastases was associated with a less favorable patient outcome ( P = 0.009. In conclusion, metastasis is a complex process influenced by primary tumor heterogeneity and variability in the timing of dissemination. Genomic variation in primary breast tumors and regional metastases may negatively impact clinical diagnostics and contribute to therapeutic resistance.

  10. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level......, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect...

  11. Heterogeneity in Immune Cell Content in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnema-Luiting, Jorien; Vroman, Heleen; Aerts, Joachim; Cornelissen, Robin

    2018-03-30

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a highly aggressive cancer with limited therapy options and dismal prognosis. In recent years, the role of immune cells within the tumor microenvironment (TME) has become a major area of interest. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of heterogeneity in immune cell content and checkpoint expression in MPM in relation to prognosis and prediction of treatment efficacy. Generally, immune-suppressive cells such as M2 macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells are present within the TME, with extensive heterogeneity in cell numbers. Infiltration of effector cells such as cytotoxic T cells, natural killer cells and T helper cells is commonly found, also with substantial patient to patient heterogeneity. PD-L1 expression also varied greatly (16-65%). The infiltration of immune cells in tumor and associated stroma holds key prognostic and predictive implications. As such, there is a strong rationale for thoroughly mapping the TME to better target therapy in mesothelioma. Researchers should be aware of the extensive possibilities that exist for a tumor to evade the cytotoxic killing from the immune system. Therefore, no "one size fits all" treatment is likely to be found and focus should lie on the heterogeneity of the tumors and TME.

  12. Tumor cell dormancy as an adaptive cell stress response mechanism [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vera-Ramirez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastases are responsible for most cancer-related deaths. The kinetics of tumor relapse is highly heterogeneous, ranging from recurrences shortly after diagnosis to years or even decades after the initial treatment. This subclinical period is known as tumor dormancy, in which residual disease remains in an undetectable state before finally appearing as an overtly proliferative metastasis. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to tumor dormancy, it is still a poorly understood phase of cancer progression, which limits opportunities for the design of successful therapeutic interventions. The influence of the tumor microenvironment at the metastatic site and anti-metastatic immune responses have been shown to play a crucial role in the onset and maintenance of metastatic dormancy. However, there is still a significant gap in our understanding of how dormant cells remain viable in a quiescent state for long periods of time. Here, we review the latest experimental evidence shedding light on the biological processes that enable dormant tumor cells to endure the multiple stresses encountered at the metastatic site.

  13. Endoprosthetic replacement of distal femoral tumors in Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-12

    74%; moderate – 60-69%; fair – 50-59% and poor - <50%. Of the 3 patients evaluated, 2 had a diagnosis of ... presentation of benign bone tumors in this group of black. African patients is heterogeneous, demanding various.

  14. Heterogenous mismatch-repair status in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Veurink, Nynke; Holck, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair proteins is efficient and widely used to identify mismatch repair defective tumors. The tumors typically show uniform and widespread loss of MMR protein staining. We identified and characterized colorectal cancers with alternative......, heterogenous mismatch repair protein staining in order to delineate expression patterns and underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Heterogenous staining patterns that affected at least one of the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified in 14 colorectal cancers. Based on alternative....... CONCLUSIONS: Heterogenous mismatch repair status can be demonstrated in colorectal cancer. Though rare, attention to this phenomenon is recommended since it corresponds to differences in mismatch repair status that are relevant for correct classification. VIRTUAL SLIDES: The virtual slide(s) for this article...

  15. Desmoplastic Tumor Microenvironment and Immunotherapy in Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Dan; Lewinska, Monika; Andersen, Jesper B

    2018-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a dismal disease which often is diagnosed at a late stage where the tumor is locally advanced, metastatic, and, as a result, is associated with low resectability. The heterogeneity of this cancer type is a major reason why the majority of patients fail to respond...... to therapy, and surgery remains their only curative option. Among patients who undergo surgical intervention, such tumors typically recur in 50% of cases within 1year. Thus, CCA is among the most aggressive and chemoresistant malignancies. CCA is characterized by marked tumor reactive stroma, a fibrogenic...... connective tissue which surrounds and infiltrates the tumor epithelium. This desmoplastic environment presents a clinical challenge, limiting drug delivery and supporting the growth of the tumor mass. In this review we attempt to highlight key pathways involved in cell to cell communication between the tumor...

  16. Three-Dimensional Patient-Derived In Vitro Sarcoma Models: Promising Tools for Improving Clinical Tumor Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Gaebler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the development of new targeted therapeutics directed against specific molecular pathways involved in tumor cell proliferation and survival has allowed an essential improvement in carcinoma treatment. Unfortunately, the scenario is different for sarcomas, a group of malignant neoplasms originating from mesenchymal cells, for which the main therapeutic approach still consists in the combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The lack of innovative approaches in sarcoma treatment stems from the high degree of heterogeneity of this tumor type, with more that 70 different histopathological subtypes, and the limited knowledge of the molecular drivers of tumor development and progression. Currently, molecular therapies are available mainly for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a soft-tissue malignancy characterized by an activating mutation of the tyrosine kinase KIT. Since the first application of this approach, a strong effort has been made to understand sarcoma molecular alterations that can be potential targets for therapy. The low incidence combined with the high level of histopathological heterogeneity makes the development of clinical trials for sarcomas very challenging. For this reason, preclinical studies are needed to better understand tumor biology with the aim to develop new targeted therapeutics. Currently, these studies are mainly based on in vitro testing, since cell lines, and in particular patient-derived models, represent a reliable and easy to handle tool for investigation. In the present review, we summarize the most important models currently available in the field, focusing in particular on the three-dimensional spheroid/organoid model. This innovative approach for studying tumor biology better represents tissue architecture and cell–cell as well as cell–microenvironment crosstalk, which are fundamental steps for tumor cell proliferation and survival.

  17. Mediastinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizares, Claudio; Araujo, Ivan; Rodriguez, Amparo; Robles, Wilson; Simba, Catalina

    2005-01-01

    In our practice the mediastinal tumors are infrequent. The mediastinum is the portion of the thoracic cavity that contains numerous organs and structures which makes a crossroad for the diagnostic process. Within which congenital cysts, inflammatory and benign tumors, malignant neoplasms may develop. In the superior compartment are found: thymoma and thymic cysts, germ cell tumors, thyroid lesions, parathyroid adenomas, malignant lymphomas, paragangliomas, hemangiomas, lipomas, and inflammatory lesions such as fibrosing mediastinitis. In the middle portion: pericardial cysts, bronchial cysts, malignant lymphomas. In the posterior region: neurogenic tumors such as Shawnomas, neurofibromas, ganglioneuroblastomas, neuroblastomas, paragangliomas, and gastro enteric cysts. We describe two cases. One of a female patient with a prominent tumor in the anterior compartment of the mediastinum, detected by the x-ray films. Initially a cardiac lesion was excluded by echographic, angiographic studies. The biopsy exhibited a prominent fibrosis that suggested fibrosing mediastinitis (sclerosing). Whoever the immunohistochemical phenotype was positive for lambda chains, determining the diagnosis of lymphoma. The other case is of a young male with a thymoma associated to a pure red cell aplasia, which was the initial clinical symptom. Computerized tomography and thyroid scintigraphy was used. (The author)

  18. Modeling Breast Cancer Intertumor and Intratumor Heterogeneity Using Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Alejandra; Rueda, Oscar M; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that can be stratified in at least 10 different subtypes. We present here a platform for derivation of preclinical models based on patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTXs) that represent these subgroups. These models preserve the transcriptome, methylome, copy-number, and mutational landscape features of the tumor of origin through different passaging. Furthermore, the intratumoral composition of these models is formed by communities of clones very similar to the ones present in the originating tumor. Finally, we show that short-term cultures of cells from these models (PDTX-derived tumor cells, PDTCs) also preserve the molecular features of the tumor and can be used for high-throughput drug testing of single compounds or combinations, with high reproducibility and clinical predictive power. © 2016 Bruna et al; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Operando research in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Groot, Irene

    2017-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging field of techniques for visualizing atomic-scale properties of active catalysts under actual working conditions, i.e. high gas pressures and high temperatures. It explains how to understand these observations in terms of the surface structures and dynamics and their detailed interplay with the gas phase. This provides an important new link between fundamental surface physics and chemistry, and applied catalysis. The book explains the motivation and the necessity of operando studies, and positions these with respect to the more traditional low-pressure investigations on the one hand and the reality of industrial catalysis on the other. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of new experimental and theoretical tools for operando studies of heterogeneous catalysis. The book has a strong emphasis on the new techniques and illustrates how the challenges introduced by the harsh, operando conditions are faced for each of these new tools. Therefore, one can also read th...

  20. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    cancer, cardiovascular disease, and eye disease, and review of results of completed trials. Ann Epidemiol 2000; 10:125-34. 17. Gaziano JM, Glynn RJ...activating mutations in phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K). Second, AMPK activation is suppressed in melanoma cells carrying the most common BRAF mutation...explored in patients with melanoma (87), kidney cancer (85, 86), breast cancer (74), cervical cancer (88), lymphoma (89), ovarian cancer (84, 90, 91), lung

  1. Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Anne-Sofie Wessel; Conradsen, Knut; Larsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) Ki-67 stain is widely used for visualizing cell proliferation. The common method for scoring the proliferation is to manually select and score a hot spot. This method is time-consuming and will often not give reproducible results due to subjective selection of the hotsp...

  2. CNS Tumors in Neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, Jian; Gutmann, David H

    2017-07-20

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) encompasses a group of distinct genetic disorders in which affected children and adults are prone to the development of benign and malignant tumors of the nervous system. The purpose of this review is to discuss the spectrum of CNS tumors arising in individuals with NF type 1 (NF1) and NF type 2 (NF2), their pathogenic etiologies, and the rational treatment options for people with these neoplasms. This article is a review of preclinical and clinical data focused on the treatment of the most common CNS tumors encountered in children and adults with NF1 and NF2. Although children with NF1 are at risk for developing low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway and brainstem, individuals with NF2 typically manifest low-grade tumors affecting the cranial nerves (vestibular schwannomas), meninges (meningiomas), and spinal cord (ependymomas). With the identification of the NF1 and NF2 genes, molecularly targeted therapies are beginning to emerge, as a result of a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying NF1 and NF2 protein function. As we enter into an era of precision oncology, a more comprehensive awareness of the factors that increase the risk of developing CNS cancers in affected individuals, coupled with a greater appreciation of the cellular and molecular determinants that maintain tumor growth, will undoubtedly yield more effective therapies for these cancer predisposition syndromes.

  3. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  4. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  5. Mediastinal germ cell tumors: a radiologic-pathologic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Palladas, P. [Dept. of Radiology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Scordalaki, A. [Dept. of Pathology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Germ cell tumors of the mediastinum are histologically identical to those found in the testes and ovaries. Early diagnosis and treatment improve the survival rate. Imaging studies of teratoma demonstrate a rounded, often lobulated heterogeneous mass containing soft tissue elements with fluid and fat attenuation. Calcification is present in 20-43% of cases. Seminomas are large masses of homogeneous soft tissue attenuation. Malignant nonseminomatous germ cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors with irregular borders due to invasion of adjacent structures. CT shows the location and extent of the tumors as well as intrinsic elements including soft tissue, fat, fluid, and calcification. CT is the modality of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of these tumors. MRI reveals masses of heterogeneous signal intensity, is more sensitive in depicting infiltration of the adjacent structures by fat plane obliteration, and is performed as an ancillary study. (orig.)

  6. Development of synchronous VHL syndrome tumors reveals contingencies and constraints to tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Rosalie; Horswell, Stuart; Rowan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    are contingent upon the nature of 3p loss of heterozygosity occurring early in tumorigenesis. However, despite distinct 3p events, genomic, proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses reveal evidence for convergence upon the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. Four germline tumors in this young patient...... a germline VHL mutation, the evolutionary principles of contingency and convergence in tumor development are complementary. In this small set of patients with early stage VHL-associated tumors, there is reduced mutation burden and limited evidence of intra-tumor heterogeneity....

  7. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nursing, or cause a man to lose his sex drive or lower his sperm count. Pituitary tumors often go undiagnosed because their symptoms resemble those of so many other more common diseases. × Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  8. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  9. Heterogeneous Contributing Factors in MPM Disease Development and Progression: Biological Advances and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolani, Bhairavi; Acevedo, Luis A.; Hoang, Ngoc T.; He, Biao

    2018-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors are remarkably aggressive and most patients only survive for 5–12 months; irrespective of stage; after primary symptoms appear. Compounding matters is that MPM remains unresponsive to conventional standards of care; including radiation and chemotherapy. Currently; instead of relying on molecular signatures and histological typing; MPM treatment options are guided by clinical stage and patient characteristics because the mechanism of carcinogenesis has not been fully elucidated; although about 80% of cases can be linked to asbestos exposure. Several molecular pathways have been implicated in the MPM tumor microenvironment; such as angiogenesis; apoptosis; cell-cycle regulation and several growth factor-related pathways predicted to be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Furthermore, the availability of genomic data has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of MPM. The MPM genomic landscape is dominated by inactivating mutations in several tumor suppressor genes; such as CDKN2A; BAP1 and NF2. Given the complex heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment in MPM; a better understanding of the interplay between stromal; endothelial and immune cells at the molecular level is required; to chaperone the development of improved personalized therapeutics. Many recent advances at the molecular level have been reported and several exciting new treatment options are under investigation. Here; we review the challenges and the most up-to-date biological advances in MPM pertaining to the molecular pathways implicated; progress at the genomic level; immunological progression of this fatal disease; and its link with developmental cell pathways; with an emphasis on prognostic and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:29342862

  10. Delayed enhanced MRI in intraparenchymal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Takahiko; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Toshikazu

    1991-01-01

    Delayed enhanced MRI was performed on 20 intraparenchymal tumors, and these findings were compared with those of early enhanced MRI. Using the spin-echo technique (SE: 400-500/20 msec), early scans were obtained 5 minutes, and delayed scans were obtained 60 minutes, after the intravenous injection of 0.1 nmol of gadolinium-DTPA/Kg. We discussed the changes in the delayed scan with regard to the change in the pattern of enhancement and the boundary of enhancement. In these twenty intraparenchymal tumors, there were three low-grade astrocytomas, two anaplastic astrocytomas, seven glioblastomas, and eight metastatic tumors. The changes in the enhanced pattern showed three types as follows: Type I: heterogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans; Type II: heterogeneous enhancement in early scan and homogeneous enhancement in delayed scan; Type III: homogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans. Most malignant tumors, such as glioblastomas (6/8), anaplastic astrocytomas (2/2), and metastatic tumors (7/8), revealed Type I, although low-grade astrocytomas showed Type II (3/2) and Type III (1/3). The heterogeneous enhancement in delayed scan was found in malignant tumors and in low-grade astrocytoma; even if the early scan revealed heterogeneous enhancement, the delayed scan showed homogeneous enhancement. In the delayed scan, most enhanced boundaries spread out of the boundaries in the early scan. Glioblastomas spread markedly in the delayed scan, although none of the low-grade astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, or metastases revealed marked spreading. We called these marked increases in the delayed scan a 'spreading sign' and thought that this sign was specific to glioblastomas. Recently some authors have emphasized the usefulness of serial scans. Delayed enhanced MRI 60 minutes after the administration of a contrast medium was here found also to be useful for the accurate diagnosis for brain tumors. (author)

  11. Preoperative risk stratification of children with ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenci, Arin L; Levine, Bat-Sheva; Laufer, Marc R; Boyd, Theonia K; Voss, Stephen D; Zurakowski, David; Frazier, A Lindsay; Weldon, Christopher B

    2016-09-01

    The appropriate operative approach to pediatric patients with ovarian tumors must balance real risk of malignancy with maximal preservation of reproductive potential. We evaluate preoperative risk of malignancy in order to more precisely guide treatment, so as to err on the side of ovarian preservation if at all possible. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients undergoing surgical intervention for ovarian tumors at a single institution. The primary endpoint was ovarian malignancy. Of 502 patients who underwent surgery for ovarian tumors, 44 (8.8%) had malignancies. Malignancy rate (95% confidence interval) was low for cystic lesions tumor marker-negative heterogeneous lesions tumor marker-positive heterogeneous lesions (66.7%, 35.4-87.9%) and solid tumors ≥9cm (69.2%, 16.2-40.3%). Intermediate risk tumors included cystic tumors ≥9cm (6.8%, 3.5-20.7%), tumor marker-negative heterogeneous lesions ≥9cm (31.2%, 18.0-48.6%), and solid tumors ovarian-sparing approach, which warrants prospective application and validation. Ultimately, the decision to pursue an oncologic surgery with oophorectomy and staging (as opposed to fertility-preserving surgery) should be made after individualized discussion involving the surgeon, patient, and family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  13. Heterogeneous Active Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Thomas; Klotsa, Daphne

    Active systems are composed of self-propelled (active) particles that locally convert energy into motion and exhibit emergent collective behaviors, such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Most works so far have focused on monodisperse, one-component active systems. However, real systems are heterogeneous, and consist of several active components. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of multi-component active matter systems and report on their emergent behavior. We discuss the phase diagram of dynamic states as well as parameters where we see mixing versus segregation.

  14. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. Imperfect public information increases the gains-to-trade based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs. In an exchange economy, this leads to higher growth in the investors' certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex...... ante risk premium is unaffected by the informativeness of the public information system. Similar results are obtained in a production economy, but the impact on the ex ante cost of capital is dampened compared to the exchange economy due to welfare improving reductions in real investments to smooth...

  15. Use of Educational Assessment for Understanding Pupil Heterogenity in Guatemala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortin Morales, A.

    2017-01-01

    For the last two decades Guatemala has developed an educational assessment system for accountability purposes following a continuous improvement cycle. The system is nowadays led by the Ministry of Education’s Dirección General de Evaluación e Investigación Educativa [General Directorate for

  16. Understanding the Heterogeneity of Entrepreneurship Education: Going beyond Gartner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Colin; Matlay, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to draw attention to the importance of appreciating and using ever-present diversity to achieve increased legitimacy for entrepreneurship education. As such, it aims to draw the reader into a reflective process of discovery as to why entrepreneurship education is important and how such importance can be prolonged.…

  17. Imaging and Therapy of Neuroendocrine Tumors with Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Brabander (Tessa)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractNeuroendocrine tumors are a heterogeneous group of tumors, but they generally express a high number of somatostatin receptors on their cell membranes. This receptor is a target for somatostatin analogs, which can be labeled with radionuclides for both imaging and therapy. In this

  18. Identifying and quantifying heterogeneity in high content analysis: application of heterogeneity indices to drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H Gough

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in biomedical research, drug discovery and diagnostics is understanding how seemingly identical cells can respond differently to perturbagens including drugs for disease treatment. Although heterogeneity has become an accepted characteristic of a population of cells, in drug discovery it is not routinely evaluated or reported. The standard practice for cell-based, high content assays has been to assume a normal distribution and to report a well-to-well average value with a standard deviation. To address this important issue we sought to define a method that could be readily implemented to identify, quantify and characterize heterogeneity in cellular and small organism assays to guide decisions during drug discovery and experimental cell/tissue profiling. Our study revealed that heterogeneity can be effectively identified and quantified with three indices that indicate diversity, non-normality and percent outliers. The indices were evaluated using the induction and inhibition of STAT3 activation in five cell lines where the systems response including sample preparation and instrument performance were well characterized and controlled. These heterogeneity indices provide a standardized method that can easily be integrated into small and large scale screening or profiling projects to guide interpretation of the biology, as well as the development of therapeutics and diagnostics. Understanding the heterogeneity in the response to perturbagens will become a critical factor in designing strategies for the development of therapeutics including targeted polypharmacology.

  19. Exon array analysis reveals neuroblastoma tumors have distinct alternative splicing patterns according to stage and MYCN amplification status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jun S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroblastoma (NB tumors are well known for their pronounced clinical and molecular heterogeneity. The global gene expression and DNA copy number alterations have been shown to have profound differences in tumors of low or high stage and those with or without MYCN amplification. RNA splicing is an important regulatory mechanism of gene expression, and differential RNA splicing may be associated with the clinical behavior of a tumor. Methods In this study, we used exon array profiling to investigate global alternative splicing pattern of 47 neuroblastoma samples in stage 1 and stage 4 with normal or amplified MYCN copy number (stage 1-, 4- and 4+. The ratio of exon-level expression to gene-level expression was used to detect alternative splicing events, while the gene-level expression was applied to characterize whole gene expression change. Results Principal component analysis (PCA demonstrated distinct splicing pattern in three groups of samples. Pairwise comparison identified genes with splicing changes and/or whole gene expression changes in high stage tumors. In stage 4- compared with stage 1- tumors, alternatively spliced candidate genes had little overlap with genes showing whole gene expression changes, and most of them were involved in different biological processes. In contrast, a larger number of genes exhibited either exon-level splicing, gene-level expression or both changes in stage 4+ versus stage 1- tumors. Those biological processes involved in stage 4- tumors were disrupted to a greater extent by both splicing and transcription regulations in stage 4+ tumors. Conclusions Our results demonstrated a significant role of alternative splicing in high stage neuroblastoma, and suggested a MYCN-associated splicing regulation pathway in stage 4+ tumors. The identification of differentially spliced genes and pathways in neuroblastoma tumors of different stages and molecular subtypes may be important to the

  20. Heterogeneous broadband network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Lars

    1995-11-01

    Although the vision for the future Integrated Broadband Communication Network (IBCN) is an all optical network, it is certain that for a long period to come, the network will remain very heterogeneous, with a mixture of different physical media (fiber, coax and twisted pair), transmission systems (PDH, SDH, ADSL) and transport protocols (TCP/IP, AAL/ATM, frame relay). In the current work towards the IBCN, the ATM concept is considered the generic network protocol for both public and private network, with the ability to use different underlying transmission protocols and, through adaptation protocols, provide the appropriate services (old as well as new) to the customer. One of the major difficulties of heterogeneous network is the restriction that is usually given by the lowest common denominator, e.g. in terms of single channel capacity. A possible way to overcome these limitations is by extending the ATM concept with a multilink capability, that allows us to use separate resources as one common. The improved flexibility obtained by this protocol extension further allows a real time optimization of network and call configuration, without any impact on the quality of service seen from the user. This paper describes an example of an ATM based multilink protocol that has been experimentally implemented within the RACE project 'STRATOSPHERIC'. The paper outlines the complexity of introducing an extra network functionality compared with the added value, such as an improved ability to recover an error due to a malfunctioning network component.

  1. Heterogeneity of reactive astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A; Ao, Yan; Sofroniew, Michael V

    2014-04-17

    Astrocytes respond to injury and disease in the central nervous system (CNS) with a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Recent progress demonstrates that reactive astrogliosis is not a simple all-or-none phenomenon, but is a finely gradated continuum of changes that range from reversible alterations in gene expression and cell hypertrophy, to scar formation with permanent tissue rearrangement. There is now compelling evidence that reactive astrocytes exhibit a substantial potential for heterogeneity at multiple levels, including gene expression, cell morphology, topography (distance from lesions), CNS regions, local (among neighboring cells), cell signaling and cell function. Structural and functional changes are regulated in reactive astrocytes by many different potential signaling events that occur in a context dependent manner. It is noteworthy that different stimuli of astrocyte reactivity can lead to similar degrees of GFAP upregulation while causing substantially different changes in transcriptome profiles and cell function. Thus, it is not possible to equate simple and uniform measures such as cell hypertrophy and upregulation of GFAP expression with a single, uniform concept of astrocyte reactivity. Instead, it is necessary to recognize the considerable potential for heterogeneity and determine the functional implications of astrocyte reactivity in a context specific manner as regulated by specific signaling events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectrum of Sinonasal Tumors: A 10-year Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Shirazi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sinonasal tumors are a highly heterogeneous group of tumors that account for less than 1% of all cancers. Precise diagnosis is essential because the natural history, treatment, and prognosis vary for different neoplasms. We reviewed 610 cases of sinonasal lesions to understand this entity better. Methods: A total of 610 sinonasal biopsies/specimens were received over a period of 10 years (2004–14. All the samples were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Special staining for microorganisms and immunohistochemistry were performed where indicated. Results: Benign lesions were 72% with nasal polyp being the most common. Malignant lesions made up 21.2% of lesions with nasopharyngeal carcinoma being the most common while 7.7% cases were inflammatory/non-neoplastic. The most common cause for this was fungal sinusitis. The maxillary sinus was the most frequently involved site in all the lesions (62%. The average age of presentation was 40 years old, and the male to female ratio was 3:1 in those with benign tumors. The average age of presentation in the malignant and inflammatory group were 45 and 43 years, respectively, with an almost equal sex ratio in both categories. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans were done in virtually all cases to assess the extent of the tumor as well as bony destruction. Local recurrence was the most frequent cause of treatment failure. Conclusion: Tumors of the nasal cavity are often grouped with those in the paranasal sinuses. Benign tumors constituted approximately 75% of tumors in our hospital. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common malignancy of this region. These tumors need to be studied closely and accurately because their proximity to vital structures pose significant challenges for their treatment and may be the source of significant patient morbidity.

  3. Beaver dams maintain fish biodiversity by increasing habitat heterogeneity throughout a low-gradient stream network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph M.; Mather, Martha E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between heterogeneity and biodiversity is an active focus of ecological research. Although habitat heterogeneity is conceptually linked to biodiversity, the amount and configuration of heterogeneity that maintains biodiversity within ecosystems is not well understood, especially for an entire stream network.

  4. Optical tomograph optimized for tumor detection inside highly absorbent organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Jérôme; Koenig, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Berger, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a tomograph for small animal fluorescence imaging. The compact and cost-effective system described in this article was designed to address the problem of tumor detection inside highly absorbent heterogeneous organs, such as lungs. To validate the tomograph's ability to detect cancerous nodules inside lungs, in vivo tumor growth was studied on seven cancerous mice bearing murine mammary tumors marked with Alexa Fluor 700. They were successively imaged 10, 12, and 14 days after the primary tumor implantation. The fluorescence maps were compared over this time period. As expected, the reconstructed fluorescence increases with the tumor growth stage.

  5. Malignant Trigeminal Nerve Sheath Tumor and Anaplastic Astrocytoma Collision Tumor with High Proliferative Activity and Tumor Suppressor P53 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Kurdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53 gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa.

  6. A dosimetric model for the heterogeneous delivery of radioactive nanoparticles In vivo: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlee, Andrew B; Attayek, Peter; Midkiff, Bentley; Huang, Leaf

    2017-03-17

    ᅟ: Accurate and quantitative dosimetry for internal radiation therapy can be especially challenging, given the heterogeneity of patient anatomy, tumor anatomy, and source deposition. Internal radiotherapy sources such as nanoparticles and monoclonal antibodies require high resolution imaging to accurately model the heterogeneous distribution of these sources in the tumor. The resolution of nuclear imaging modalities is not high enough to measure the heterogeneity of intratumoral nanoparticle deposition or intratumoral regions, and mathematical models do not represent the actual heterogeneous dose or dose response. To help answer questions at the interface of tumor dosimetry and tumor biology, we have modeled the actual 3-dimensional dose distribution of heterogeneously delivered radioactive nanoparticles in a tumor after systemic injection. 24 h after systemic injection of dually fluorescent and radioactive nanoparticles into a tumor-bearing mouse, the tumor was cut into 342 adjacent sections and imaged to quantify the source distribution in each section. The images were stacked to generate a 3D model of source distribution, and a novel MATLAB code was employed to calculate the dose to cells on a middle section in the tumor using a low step size dose kernel. The average dose calculated by this novel 3D model compared closely with standard ways of calculating average dose, and showed a positive correlation with experimentally determined cytotoxicity in vivo. The high resolution images allowed us to determine that the dose required to initiate radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation was approximately one Gray. The nanoparticle distribution was further used to model the dose distribution of two other radionuclides. The ability of this model to quantify the absorbed dose and dose response in different intratumoral regions allows one to investigate how source deposition in different tumor areas can affect dose and cytotoxicity, as well as how characteristics of the

  7. Using single cell sequencing data to model the evolutionary history of a tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung In; Simon, Richard

    2014-01-24

    The introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has made it possible to detect genomic alterations within tumor cells on a large scale. However, most applications of NGS show the genetic content of mixtures of cells. Recently developed single cell sequencing technology can identify variation within a single cell. Characterization of multiple samples from a tumor using single cell sequencing can potentially provide information on the evolutionary history of that tumor. This may facilitate understanding how key mutations accumulate and evolve in lineages to form a heterogeneous tumor. We provide a computational method to infer an evolutionary mutation tree based on single cell sequencing data. Our approach differs from traditional phylogenetic tree approaches in that our mutation tree directly describes temporal order relationships among mutation sites. Our method also accommodates sequencing errors. Furthermore, we provide a method for estimating the proportion of time from the earliest mutation event of the sample to the most recent common ancestor of the sample of cells. Finally, we discuss current limitations on modeling with single cell sequencing data and possible improvements under those limitations. Inferring the temporal ordering of mutational sites using current single cell sequencing data is a challenge. Our proposed method may help elucidate relationships among key mutations and their role in tumor progression.

  8. The problem: Tumor radioresistance in clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, L.J.; Withers, H.R.; Thames, H.D.; Fletcher, G.H.; M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX)

    1983-01-01

    Tumor radioresistance in clinical radiotherapy implies failure to achieve local-regional disease control with radiation doses producing an acceptable degree of morbidity. Such radioresistance may be due to many different causes (biological and technical) which are reviewed in terms of possible remedial actions. Dose-response relationships for human cancers suggest that, in many sites, tumors are heterogeneous with respect to their cure-limiting characteristics. The case is developed that unless the predominant cure-limiting factor can be predicted, little benefit may be seen in trials of new treatment strategies using heterogeneous tumor populations. The fundamental problem of clinical radioresistance is therefore perceived as the inability to identify predictively its cause in the individual patient

  9. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  10. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  11. Large epidemic thresholds emerge in heterogeneous networks of heterogeneous nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Tang, Ming; Gross, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    One of the famous results of network science states that networks with heterogeneous connectivity are more susceptible to epidemic spreading than their more homogeneous counterparts. In particular, in networks of identical nodes it has been shown that network heterogeneity, i.e. a broad degree distribution, can lower the epidemic threshold at which epidemics can invade the system. Network heterogeneity can thus allow diseases with lower transmission probabilities to persist and spread. However, it has been pointed out that networks in which the properties of nodes are intrinsically heterogeneous can be very resilient to disease spreading. Heterogeneity in structure can enhance or diminish the resilience of networks with heterogeneous nodes, depending on the correlations between the topological and intrinsic properties. Here, we consider a plausible scenario where people have intrinsic differences in susceptibility and adapt their social network structure to the presence of the disease. We show that the resilience of networks with heterogeneous connectivity can surpass those of networks with homogeneous connectivity. For epidemiology, this implies that network heterogeneity should not be studied in isolation, it is instead the heterogeneity of infection risk that determines the likelihood of outbreaks.

  12. Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Michael D; Harui, Airi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating ...

  13. Receiver Heterogeneity Helps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Erika R.; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity amongst devices and desired service are commonly seen as a source of additional challenges for setting up an efficient multi-layer multicast service. In particular, devices requiring only the base layer can become a key bottleneck to the performance for other devices. This paper...... studies the case of a wireless multi-layer multicast setting and shows that the judicious use of network coding allows devices with different computational capabilities to trade-off processing complexity for an improved quality of service. As a consequence, individual devices can determine their required...... effort, while bringing significant advantages to the system as a whole. Network coding is used as a key element to reduce signaling in order to deliver the multicast service. More importantly, our proposed approach focuses on creating some structure in the transmitted stream by allowing inter...

  14. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    The title of my PhD thesis is “Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts”. Three reactions have been investigated: the methanation reaction, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, and the NH3-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO. The experimental work performed in connection with the methanation reaction...... hydrogenation. For both systems a maximum in catalytic activity was found for some of the bimetallic catalysts being superior to the monometallic catalysts. This resulted in volcano curves for all investigated systems. In the Fischer-Tropsch reaction promotion of cobalt catalysts with manganese was studied...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  15. Applied heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Page, A.J.F.

    1988-01-01

    This reference book explains the scientific principles of heterogeneous catalysis while also providing details on the methods used to develop commercially viable catalyst products. A section of the book presents reactor design engineering theory and practices for the profitable application of these catalysts in large-scale industrial processes. A description of the mechanisms and commercial applications of catalysis is followed by a review of catalytic reaction kinetics. There are five chapters on selecting catalyst agents, developing and preparing industrial catalysts, measuring catalyst properties, and analyzing the physico-chemical characteristics of solid catalyst particles. The final chapter reviews the elements of catalytic reactor design, with emphasis on flow regimes vs. reactor types, heat and mass transfer in reactor beds, single- and multi-phase flows, and the effects of thermodynamics and other catalyst properties on the process flow scheme

  16. Imaging of childhood inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, Berna; Ozcan, Hatice Nursun; Omay, Burak; Ozgen, Burce; Haliloglu, Mithat [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Altindag / Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and most commonly involves the lung but occurs in extrapulmonary locations. To present imaging findings in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in children based on a single-centre experience. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MRI findings of children diagnosed with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a single institution. We identified 15 children (range: 1-17 years) with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The tumor was localized to the lung (n = 5), mediastinum (n = 3), trachea (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), abdomen (n = 2) and orbit (n = 3). All the extraorbital tumors were solid masses with homogeneous or heterogeneous enhancement. Four lung tumors and one posterior mediastinal tumor contained calcification. Local recurrence following surgical removal occurred in two children with invasion of the esophagus and of the left atrium in one. Localized masses were seen in all children with orbital tumour. Two of these had episcleritis and perineuritis; one had episcleritis, tendonitis, perineuritis, myositis and dacryoadenitis. The locations and imaging features of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are variable. (orig.)

  17. pH distribution in human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thistlethwaite, A.J.; Leeper, D.B.; Moylan, D.J.; Nerlinger, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    pH distribution in human tumors is being determined to evaluate this parameter as a prognostic indicator of hyperthermia response. pH is measured by a modified glass pH electrode (21g, model MI 408, Microelectrodes, Inc., Londonderry, NH) inserted through an 18g open-ended Angiocath. Eight tumors have been evaluated to date; and of those, 3 were also assayed after the first heat treatment coincident with determination of blood flow. Tumors were between 2-5 cm, of various histologies, and of primary, recurrent, or metastatic origin. 2-4 measurements were made per tumor. Pretreatment readings were between 6.4 and 7.2 pH units. As tumor blood flow increased after 1 hr heating (41.5 - 43 0 ) pH rose 0.1 - 0.3 units. Normal rat muscle yields pH readings of 7.35 - 7.45. Although there was considerable heterogeneity of pH within tumors, accuracy and drift were not a problem. 5-15 min were required for pH stabilization after catheter insertion and <5 min after electrode insertion. A saline wheal was used for anesthesia to preclude modification of pH by anesthetics. Patient tolerance has not been a problems. This study suggests that human tumor tissue has a preponderance of areas more acidic than normal tissue. This may serve to sensitize tumor cells to hyperthermia and provide a prognostic indicator of tumor response

  18. Imaging appearance in papillary endolymphatic sac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qing; Dai Jianping; Luo Lin; Gao Peiyi; Shang Jingwei; Ai Lin; Zhu Mingwang; Li Yong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging findings on CT, MRI, and angiography in patients with papillary, endolymphatic sac tumors (PELSTs) . Methods: CT and MR imaging studies in 5 patients (aged 12 - 41 years) with histopathologically proved papillary endolymphatic sac tumors were retrospectively reviewed, and four of the five also underwent angiograms. CT scans were evaluated for bone erosion and calcification, MR images for signal intensity changes, enhancement patterns, and flow voids, and angiograms for tumor blood supply. Results: All tumors were destructive, containing calcifications centered in the retrolabyrinthine region and showing irregular hone margins on CT. MR imaging appearance varied with lesion size and nature. Three of the five tumors showed a high-signal intensity margin on unenhanced T 1 and T 2 -weighted images, and the margins were more clear with fat-suppress imaging. The others were heterogeneous and contained cystic high-signal intensity area on both T 1 and T 2 weighted images. All the tumors showed irregular low signal intensity within the endolymphatic sac anatomically and flow voids signals. The blood supply arose predominantly from the external carotid artery. Two tumors had additional supply from posterior circulation. Conclusion: Papillary endolymphatic sac tumors are destructive and hypervascular lesions that arise from the retrolabyrinthine region in the temporal hone. These imaging findings combined with the original location may help distinguish PELSTs from other more common arid aggressive temporal bone tumors

  19. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  20. Reversible adaptive plasticity: A mechanism for neuroblastoma cell heterogeneity and chemo-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina eChakrabarti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel form of tumor cell plasticity characterized by reversible adaptive plasticity in murine and human neuroblastoma. Two cellular phenotypes were defined by their ability to exhibit adhered, anchorage dependent (AD or sphere forming, anchorage independent (AI growth. The tumor cells could transition back and forth between the two phenotypes and the transition was dependent on the culture conditions. Both cell phenotypes exhibited stem-like features such as expression of nestin, self-renewal capacity and mesenchymal differentiation potential. The AI tumorspheres were found to be more resistant to chemotherapy and proliferated slower in vitro compared to the AD cells. Identification of specific molecular markers like MAP2, β-catenin and PDGFRβ enabled us to characterize and observe both phenotypes in established mouse tumors. Irrespective of the phenotype originally implanted in mice, tumors grown in vivo show phenotypic heterogeneity in molecular marker signatures and are indistinguishable in growth or histologic appearance. Similar molecular marker heterogeneity was demonstrated in primary human tumor specimens. Chemotherapy or growth factor receptor inhibition slowed tumor growth in mice and promoted initial loss of AD or AI heterogeneity, respectively. Simultaneous targeting of both phenotypes led to further tumor growth delay with emergence of new unique phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells are plastic, dynamic and may optimize their ability to survive by changing their phenotype. Phenotypic switching appears to be an adaptive mechanism to unfavorable selection pressure and could explain the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of neuroblastoma.

  1. Dynamic Changes in Numbers and Properties of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Potential Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Ju-Yu [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chih-Yung [Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei 10629, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core/Taiwan Mouse Clinic, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Jeng-Kai, E-mail: jkjiang@vghtpe.gov.tw [Division of Colon & Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Hung, E-mail: jkjiang@vghtpe.gov.tw [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); VGH Yang-Ming Genome Research Center, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-16

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of different types of early or advanced cancer using immunology-based assays or nucleic acid methods. The detection and quantification of CTCs has significant clinical utility in the prognosis of metastatic breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. CTCs are a heterogeneous population of cells and often different from those of their respective primary tumor. Understanding the biology of CTCs may provide useful predictive information for the selection of the most appropriate treatment. Therefore, CTC detection and characterization could become a valuable tool to refine prognosis and serve as a “real-time biopsy” and has the potential to guide precision cancer therapies, monitor cancer treatment, and investigate the process of metastasis.

  2. Update on rare epithelial ovarian cancers: based on the Rare Ovarian Tumors Young Investigator Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji Yon Agnes; Yanaihara, Nozomu; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Mikami, Yoshiki; Oda, Katsutoshi; Bookman, Michael; Ledermann, Jonathan; Shimada, Muneaki; Kiyokawa, Takako; Kim, Byoung Gie; Matsumura, Noriomi; Kaku, Tsunehisa; Kuroda, Takafumi; Nagayoshi, Yoko; Kawabata, Ayako; Iida, Yasushi; Kim, Jae Weon; Quinn, Michael; Okamoto, Aikou

    2017-07-01

    There has been significant progress in the understanding of the pathology and molecular biology of rare ovarian cancers, which has helped both diagnosis and treatment. This paper provides an update on recent advances in the knowledge and treatment of rare ovarian cancers and identifies gaps that need to be addressed by further clinical research. The topics covered include: low-grade serous, mucinous, and clear cell carcinomas of the ovary. Given the molecular heterogeneity and the histopathological rarity of these ovarian cancers, the importance of designing adequately powered trials or finding statistically innovative ways to approach the treatment of these rare tumors has been emphasized. This paper is based on the Rare Ovarian Tumors Conference for Young Investigators which was presented in Tokyo 2015 prior to the 5th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG). Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  3. Toughening of Heterogeneous Ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtin, W

    1999-01-01

    ... to the overall deformation of the composite. The understanding gained through such predictive models is then useful for optimizing material design and properties for various composite applications and for providing a baseline for studying...

  4. Space Qualified Heterogeneous Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to develop a radiation hardened, monolithic, heterogeneous processor for space imaging and radar systems. High performance processors are needed...

  5. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  6. Clinical and functional implication of the components of somatostatin system in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Martínez, Aura D; Gahete, Manuel D; Pedraza-Arevalo, Sergio; Sánchez-Sánchez, Rafael; Ortega-Salas, Rosa; Serrano-Blanch, Raquel; Luque, Raúl M; Gálvez-Moreno, María A; Castaño, Justo P

    2018-02-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies often presenting with metastasis at diagnosis and whose clinical outcome is difficult to predict. Somatostatin (SST) analogs (SSAs) provide a valuable pharmacological tool to palliate hormonal symptoms, and control progression in some NETs. However, many patients do not respond to SSAs or develop resistance, and there are many uncertainties regarding pathophysiology of SST and its receptors (sst1-sst5) in GEP-NETs. The expression of SST system components in GEP-NETs was determined, compared with that of non-tumor adjacent and normal tissues and correlated with clinical and histological characteristics. Specifically, 58 patients with GEP-NETs and 14 normal samples were included. Cell viability in NET cell lines was determined in response to specific SSAs. Normal samples and non-tumor adjacent tissues presented a similar expression profile, with appreciable expression of sst2 and sst3, and a lower expression of the other receptors. In contrast, cortistatin, sst1, sst4, and sst5 were overexpressed in tumors, while sst3 and sst4 seemed overexpressed in less differentiated tumors. Some SST system components were related to vascular/nerve invasion and metastasis. In vitro, sst1 and sst3 agonists reduced viability in BON-1 cells, while they, similar to octreotide and pasireotide, increased viability in QGP-1 cells. These results provide novel information on SST system pathophysiology in GEP-NETs, including relevant associations with clinical-histological parameters, which might help to better understand the intrinsic heterogeneity of NETs and to identify novel biomarkers and/or targets with potential prognostic and/or therapeutic value for GEP-NETs patients.

  7. Heralding a new paradigm in 3D tumor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Eliza L S; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Yu, Hanry

    2016-11-01

    Numerous studies to date have contributed to a paradigm shift in modeling cancer, moving from the traditional two-dimensional culture system to three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for cancer cell culture. This led to the inception of tumor engineering, which has undergone rapid advances over the years. In line with the recognition that tumors are not merely masses of proliferating cancer cells but rather, highly complex tissues consisting of a dynamic extracellular matrix together with stromal, immune and endothelial cells, significant efforts have been made to better recapitulate the tumor microenvironment in 3D. These approaches include the development of engineered matrices and co-cultures to replicate the complexity of tumor-stroma interactions in vitro. However, the tumor engineering and cancer biology fields have traditionally relied heavily on the use of cancer cell lines as a cell source in tumor modeling. While cancer cell lines have contributed to a wealth of knowledge in cancer biology, the use of this cell source is increasingly perceived as a major contributing factor to the dismal failure rate of oncology drugs in drug development. Backing this notion is the increasing evidence that tumors possess intrinsic heterogeneity, which predominantly homogeneous cancer cell lines poorly reflect. Tumor heterogeneity contributes to therapeutic resistance in patients. To overcome this limitation, cancer cell lines are beginning to be replaced by primary tumor cell sources, in the form of patient-derived xenografts and organoids cultures. Moving forward, we propose that further advances in tumor engineering would require that tumor heterogeneity (tumor variants) be taken into consideration together with tumor complexity (tumor-stroma interactions). In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of what has been achieved in recapitulating tumor complexity, and discuss the importance of incorporating tumor heterogeneity into 3D in vitro tumor models. This

  8. Heterogeneity of an earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, T.; Petrova, A.

    2009-04-01

    The study of magnetic anomaly field structure of the Barents Sea water area along seismic and extended profiles intersecting known fields is carried out. Geomagnetic and density sections down to 40 km depth are constructed. This allowed the estimation of heterogeneities of the Barents Sea water area deep structure. The analysis of geomagnetic and density sections along extended profiles showed the confinedness of oil-and-gas bearing provinces to deep permeable zones characterized by reduced magnetic and density features. Based on the analysis of permeable zones, regional diagnostic features similar to those obtained earlier in oil-and-gas bearing provinces in other regions, for example, in Timan-Pechora, Volga-Urals and Siberian, as well as in the Northern and Norwegian seas water areas, are revealed. The analysis of magnetic and gravity fields over the region area allowed the delineation of weakened zones as intersection areas of weakly magnetic areals with reduced density. Within the Barents Sea water area, permeable areas with lenticular-laminated structure of the upper and lower Earth's crust containing weakly magnetic areals with reduced rock density within the depth range of 8-12 and 15-20 km are revealed. Such ratio of magnetic and density heterogeneities in the Earth's crust is characteristic for zones with proved oil-and-gas content in the European part of the Atlantic Ocean water area. North Kildin field on 1 AR profile is confined to a trough with thick weakly magnetic stratum discontinuously traced to a depth of 6-10 km. At a depth of approximately 15 km, a lens of weakly magnetic and porous formations is observed. Ludlov field in the North Barents trough is confined to a zone of weakly magnetic rocks with reduced density traced to a depth of 8-9 km. Deeper, at Н=15 km, a lenticular areal of weakly magnetic formations with reduced density is observed. The profile transecting the Stockman field shows that it is located in the central part of a permeable

  9. Reduction sensitive nanosystems for tumor targeted imaging and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Yaqin

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines based on biodegradable polymers for tumor imaging and therapy receive more and more attention due to their improved water solibility, bioavailability, and extended blood circulation times. Advanced polymer chemistry combined with a thorough understanding of the tumor microenvironment,

  10. Genetic predisposition and tumor radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budach, W.

    1997-01-01

    Studies on normal tissue radiation sensitivity have demonstrated profound differences of individual sensivities. A number of genetic syndroms associated with abnormal radiation sensitivity have been discribed. Significant differences have also been detected in persons without known genetic disorders. The question arises as to whether tumors orginating from normal tissues with abnormal radiation sensitivity share this abnormal sensitivity and as to whether a general correlation between normal tissue sensitivity and tumor tissue sensitivity can be substantiated. Experimental studies on normal and tumor tissues of SCID- and C3H-mice demonstrated that the 2.7-fold enhanced radiation sensitivity of SCID normal tissues is also found in SCID tumors. Clinical investigations on cervical carcinoma and breast cancer patients revealed higher local tumor control rates in patients with more pronounced acute side effects. A weak trend towards the same relationship was found in head and neck cancer patients. Case reports on unusually severe acute radiation side effects or unexpected tumor remissions as well as few reports on radiotherapy in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients suggest a correlation between normal- and tumor-tissue radiation sensitivity. Studies on fibroblasts and tumor cells from the same patient support this hypothesis in soft tissue sarcoma patients, but do not so for head and neck cancer patients. Tumor cells exhibit a considerably higher variation of radiation sensitivities than normal tissue cells. Experimental and clinical data are compatible with the hypothesis that normal tissue radiation sensitivity predicts for tumor tissue sensitivity. However, in view of the larger heterogeneity of tumor cell radiation sensitivity as compared to normal tissue radiation sensitivity, the development of a clinically useful predictive test for tumor sensitivity based on normal cell sensitivity appears to be unrealistic. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Global specification and validation of embedded systems integrating heterogeneous components

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolescu, G

    2007-01-01

    Offers a deep understanding of concepts and practices behind the composition of heterogeneous componentsIntroduces a systematic approach to build an execution model for systems composed of heterogeneous componentsMixed continuous/discrete and hardware/software systems will be used to illustrate these concepts.Gives a clear vision on the theory and practice of specification and validation of complex modern systemsExamples give the designers solutions applicable in their daily practice.

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  13. Visual Analytics for Heterogeneous Geoscience Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Yu, L.; Zhu, F.; Rilee, M. L.; Kuo, K. S.; Jiang, H.; Yu, H.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscience data obtained from diverse sources have been routinely leveraged by scientists to study various phenomena. The principal data sources include observations and model simulation outputs. These data are characterized by spatiotemporal heterogeneity originated from different instrument design specifications and/or computational model requirements used in data generation processes. Such inherent heterogeneity poses several challenges in exploring and analyzing geoscience data. First, scientists often wish to identify features or patterns co-located among multiple data sources to derive and validate certain hypotheses. Heterogeneous data make it a tedious task to search such features in dissimilar datasets. Second, features of geoscience data are typically multivariate. It is challenging to tackle the high dimensionality of geoscience data and explore the relations among multiple variables in a scalable fashion. Third, there is a lack of transparency in traditional automated approaches, such as feature detection or clustering, in that scientists cannot intuitively interact with their analysis processes and interpret results. To address these issues, we present a new scalable approach that can assist scientists in analyzing voluminous and diverse geoscience data. We expose a high-level query interface that allows users to easily express their customized queries to search features of interest across multiple heterogeneous datasets. For identified features, we develop a visualization interface that enables interactive exploration and analytics in a linked-view manner. Specific visualization techniques such as scatter plots to parallel coordinates are employed in each view to allow users to explore various aspects of features. Different views are linked and refreshed according to user interactions in any individual view. In such a manner, a user can interactively and iteratively gain understanding into the data through a variety of visual analytics operations. We

  14. On Heterogeneous Covert Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindelauf, Roy; Borm, Peter; Hamers, Herbert

    Covert organizations are constantly faced with a tradeoff between secrecy and operational efficiency. Lindelauf, Borm and Hamers [13] developed a theoretical framework to determine optimal homogeneous networks taking the above mentioned considerations explicitly into account. In this paper this framework is put to the test by applying it to the 2002 Jemaah Islamiyah Bali bombing. It is found that most aspects of this covert network can be explained by the theoretical framework. Some interactions however provide a higher risk to the network than others. The theoretical framework on covert networks is extended to accommodate for such heterogeneous interactions. Given a network structure the optimal location of one risky interaction is established. It is shown that the pair of individuals in the organization that should conduct the interaction that presents the highest risk to the organization, is the pair that is the least connected to the remainder of the network. Furthermore, optimal networks given a single risky interaction are approximated and compared. When choosing among a path, star and ring graph it is found that for low order graphs the path graph is best. When increasing the order of graphs under consideration a transition occurs such that the star graph becomes best. It is found that the higher the risk a single interaction presents to the covert network the later this transition from path to star graph occurs.

  15. Heterogeneous burnable poisons:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva, Sergio; Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1989-01-01

    The use of materials possessing high neutron absorption cross-section commonly known as 'burnable poisons' have its origin in BWR reactors with the purpose of improving the efficiency of the first fuel load. Later on, it was extended to PWR to compensate of initial reactivity without infringing the requirement of maintaining a negative moderator coefficient. The present tendency is to increase the use of solid burnable poisons to extend the fuel cycle life and discharge burnup. There are two concepts for the burnable poisons utilization: 1) heterogeneously distributions in the form of rods, plates, etc. and 2) homogeneous dispersions of burnable poisons in the fuel. The purpose of this work is to present the results of sinterability studies, performed on Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C and Al 2 O 3 -Gd 2 O 3 systems. Experiments were carried on pressing at room temperature mixtures of powders containing up to 5 wt % of B 4 C or Gd 2 O 3 in Al 2 O 3 and subsequently sintering at 1750 deg C in reducing atmosphere. Evaluation of density, porosity and microstructures were done and a comparison with previous experiences is shown. (Author) [es

  16. Heterogeneity: multilingualism and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Krumm

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity and multilingualism on the part of individuals are aprerequisite and a constitutive condition of enabling people to live togetherin a world of growing heterogeneity. Foreign language teaching plays animportant part in democratic education because it can be seen as a trainingin respecting otherness and developing an intercultural, non-ethnocentricperception and attitude. This is all the more important because of the neces-sity of integrating children from migrant families into school life.My article argues that language education policy has to take this per-spective into account, i.e., of establishing a planned diversification so thatpupils (and their parents will not feel satisfied with learning English only,but also become motivated to learn languages of their own neighbourhood,such as migrant and minority languages. However, in order to make use ofthe linguistic resources in the classroom, relating it to the democratic impetusof foreign language education, it is necessary to revise existing languagepolicies and to develop a multilingual perspective for all educational institutions.

  17. Heterogeneity in the penumbra

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Zoppo, Gregory J; Sharp, Frank R; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Albers, Gregory W

    2011-01-01

    Original experimental studies in nonhuman primate models of focal ischemia showed flow-related changes in evoked potentials that suggested a circumferential zone of low regional cerebral blood flow with normal K+ homeostasis, around a core of permanent injury in the striatum or the cortex. This became the basis for the definition of the ischemic penumbra. Imaging techniques of the time suggested a homogeneous core of injury, while positing a surrounding ‘penumbral' region that could be salvaged. However, both molecular studies and observations of vascular integrity indicate a more complex and dynamic situation in the ischemic core that also changes with time. The microvascular, cellular, and molecular events in the acute setting are compatible with heterogeneity of the injury within the injury center, which at early time points can be described as multiple ‘mini-cores' associated with multiple ‘mini-penumbras'. These observations suggest the progression of injury from many small foci to a homogeneous defect over time after the onset of ischemia. Recent observations with updated imaging techniques and data processing support these dynamic changes within the core and the penumbra in humans following focal ischemia. PMID:21731034

  18. Heterogeneity of Morquio disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Glössl, J; Grubisic, A; Spranger, J

    1986-04-01

    Further clinical heterogeneity of Morquio disease, mucopolysaccharidosis IV (MPS IV), is delineated by the observation of a 30-year-old man with unusually mild clinical manifestations. He is 156 cm tall, has comparatively mild skeletal abnormalities and fine corneal deposits. Keratosulfaturia is absent. N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate (GalNAc-6-S) sulfatase (E.C. 3.1.6.-) was markedly reduced in his fibroblasts. The residual enzyme activity exhibited a pH profile comparable to that of patients with the "classical" form of the disorder. From our observation and a review of the literature it is concluded that Morquio disease can be divided in several subgroups: besides the severe ("classical") type A there exist an intermediate and a mild form that are also caused by a GalNAc-6-S sulfatase deficiency. A late-onset variant of Morquio disease, which is due to a deficiency of beta-galactosidase, has been classified as type B. In addition, patients with mild manifestation of the disease and normal activities in fibroblasts of GalNAc-6-S sulfatase and beta-galactosidase have been observed (type C). The genetic nature of the broad clinical variability of Morquio disease is incompletely understood: it is partially caused by different enzyme defects. Other factors thought to influence the clinical expression include the pH profile of the residual enzyme activity and an additional neuraminidase defect.

  19. Parsing Heterogeneous Striatal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Nakamura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is an input channel of the basal ganglia and is well known to be involved in reward-based decision making and learning. At the macroscopic level, the striatum has been postulated to contain parallel functional modules, each of which includes neurons that perform similar computations to support selection of appropriate actions for different task contexts. At the single-neuron level, however, recent studies in monkeys and rodents have revealed heterogeneity in neuronal activity even within restricted modules of the striatum. Looking for generality in the complex striatal activity patterns, here we briefly survey several types of striatal activity, focusing on their usefulness for mediating behaviors. In particular, we focus on two types of behavioral tasks: reward-based tasks that use salient sensory cues and manipulate outcomes associated with the cues; and perceptual decision tasks that manipulate the quality of noisy sensory cues and associate all correct decisions with the same outcome. Guided by previous insights on the modular organization and general selection-related functions of the basal ganglia, we relate striatal activity patterns on these tasks to two types of computations: implementation of selection and evaluation. We suggest that a parsing with the selection/evaluation categories encourages a focus on the functional commonalities revealed by studies with different animal models and behavioral tasks, instead of a focus on aspects of striatal activity that may be specific to a particular task setting. We then highlight several questions in the selection-evaluation framework for future explorations.

  20. Critical Role of Aberrant Angiogenesis in the Development of Tumor Hypoxia and Associated Radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Multhoff, Gabriele, E-mail: Gabriele.multhoff@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Straße 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Group “Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology”, Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU), Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Radons, Jürgen [multimmune GmbH, Munich, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Vaupel, Peter [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Straße 22, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2014-04-08

    Newly formed microvessels in most solid tumors show an abnormal morphology and thus do not fulfil the metabolic demands of the growing tumor mass. Due to the chaotic and heterogeneous tumor microcirculation, a hostile tumor microenvironment develops, that is characterized inter alia by local hypoxia, which in turn can stimulate the HIF-system. The latter can lead to tumor progression and may be involved in hypoxia-mediated radioresistance of tumor cells. Herein, cellular and molecular mechanisms in tumor angiogenesis are discussed that, among others, might impact hypoxia-related radioresistance.

  1. CXCL12 MODULATION OF CXCR4 AND CXCR7 ACTIVITY IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA STEM-LIKE CELLS AND REGULATION OF THE TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eWurth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells.Glioblastoma (GBM is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem–like cells (CSCs is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain.GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g. CXCL12 causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4.This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include

  2. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Forgacs

    Full Text Available Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25-30 ml, provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%, and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians.

  3. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgacs, Attila; Pall Jonsson, Hermann; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; D. DiFranco, Matthew; Opposits, Gabor; K. Krizsan, Aron; Garai, Ildiko; Czernin, Johannes; Varga, Jozsef; Tron, Lajos; Balkay, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25–30 ml), provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%), and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians. PMID:27736888

  4. Morphologic classification of ductal breast tumors on ultrasound : differential diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Mi Sook; Chung, Soo Young; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Myoung Hwan; Yoon, In Sook; Koh, Mi Gyoung

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the morphologic differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ductal breast tumors, as seen on US US findings in 29 pathologically proven cases of ductal breast tumor were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were female and their mean age was 42 years. Nineteen tumors were benign and ten were malignant, and all ductal or cystic lesions showed solid masses. According to the location of the mural nodule, we classified the sonographic appearance of these tumors into three types:intraductal, intracystic and amorphic. The intraductal type was divided into three subtypes:incompletely obstructive, completely obstructive and multiple mural nodules. For the intracystic type, too, three subtypes were designated:the intracystic mural nodule (mural cyst), intracystic mural nodule with the duct (mural cyst+duct) and intracystic multiple mural nodules. The amorphic type is defined as an atypical ductal tumor with the mural nodule extending into adjacent parenchyma. The margin of the duct or cyst was smooth in 68.4% of benign, and irregular in 90% of malignant ductal tumors. Internal echogeneity of the duct or cyst usually showed homogeneity in both benign and malignant tumors. 73.7% of tumors connecting the duct were benign and 50% were malignant. In benign tumors, 52.6% of mural nodule had an irregular margin, while in malignant tumors, the corresponding proportion was 100%;both types usually showed heterogeneous hypoechogeneity. Among benign tumors, the most common morphologic type was the intraductal incompletely obstructive subtype (36.8%);among those that were malignant, the amorphic type was most common, accounting for 40% of tumors. No amorphic type was benign and no incompletely obstructive subtype was malignant. When ductal breast tumors are morphologically classified on the basis of sonographic findings, the intraductal incompletely obstructive subtype suggests benignancy, and the amorphic type, malignancy. The morphologic classification of ductal

  5. Six cases of primary vertebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiono, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Abe, Osamu; Takenaka, Eiichi

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) studies of six patients with primary vertebral tumor accompanied with neurological symptoms were reviewed. Every tumor was certified by operation or biopsy. Cases were one osteoblastoma, two osteochondromas, one malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), and two hemangiomas. Osteoblastoma showed high signal intensity on T 1 -weighted images and isosignal intensity on T 2 -weighted images. Those findings were different from Vung's report. The chondral portions within the tumor showed high signal intensity on both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images in cases of osteochondroma. MFH and hemangioma as also showed high signal intensity on both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images. We concluded that MR imaging is useful in depiction of compression of spinal cord or nerve root by the tumor, but the calcification in the tumor cannot be well depicted. It's sometimes difficult to understand the bone destruction by the tumor, or sclerotic change around the tumor only by MR imaging. (author)

  6. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  7. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Considine

    2014-01-01

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties.

  8. Field heterogeneity: some basic issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, J.R.

    1980-04-01

    Present-day soil-water physics enables useful quantitative predictions in the laboratory and in simple field situations. However, difficulties frequently arise for areas of appreciable size in the field. Two types of heterogeneity are distinguished: deterministic and stochastic. The first often demands an extension of established analyses and may involve important phenomena absent from the analogous homogeneous problem. Stochastic heterogeneity may involve many scales and is imperfectly known. The statistical properties may be stationary, but in more complicated cases, randomness may be embedded in (either known or unknown) systematic trends. Some aspects of unsaturated and generally unsteady flow in heterogeneous systems are reviewed: the mathematical nature of the flow equation; the concept of scale-heterogeneity; analytical and quasianalytical solutions. The enormity of the total problem of unsaturated unsteady flow in stochastic heterogeneous systems is illustrated through a dialectic of 8 successive stages of simplification. 37 references.

  9. Accession of Tumor Heterogeneity by Multiplex Transcriptome Profiling of Single Circulating Tumor Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gorges, T.M.; Kuske, A.; Roeck, K.; Mauermann, O.; Mueller, V.; Peine, S.; Verpoort, K.; Novosadová, Vendula; Kubista, Mikael; Riethdorf, S.; Pantel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 11 (2016), s. 1504-1515 ISSN 0009-9147 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-10214S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : BREAST - CANCER PATIENTS * PROSTATE- CANCER * MESSENGER-RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.008, year: 2016

  10. III. Cellular ultrastructures in situ as key to understanding tumor energy metabolism: biological significance of the Warburg effect [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/a0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Witkiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the universality of metabolic pathways, malignant cells were found to have their metabolism reprogrammed to generate energy by glycolysis even under normal oxygen concentrations (the Warburg effect. Therefore, the pathway energetically 18 times less efficient than oxidative phosphorylation was implicated to match increased energy requirements of growing tumors. The paradox was explained by an abnormally high rate of glucose uptake, assuming unlimited availability of substrates for tumor growth in vivo. However, ultrastructural analysis of tumor vasculature morphogenesis showed that the growing tissue regions did not have continuous blood supply and intermittently depended on autophagy for survival. Erythrogenic autophagy, and resulting ATP generation by glycolysis, appeared critical to initiating vasculature formation where it was missing. This study focused on ultrastructural features that reflected metabolic switch from aerobic to anaerobic. Morphological differences between and within different types of cells were evident in tissue sections. In cells undergoing nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion into erythrosomes (erythrogenesis, gradual changes led to replacing mitochondria with peroxisomes, through an intermediate form connected to endoplasmic reticulum. Those findings related to the issue of peroxisome biogenesis and to the phenomenon of hemogenic endothelium. Mitochondria were compacted also during mitosis. In vivo, cells that lost and others that retained capability to use oxygen coexisted side-by-side; both types were important for vasculature morphogenesis and tissue growth. Once passable, the new vasculature segment could deliver external oxygen and nutrients. Nutritional and redox status of microenvironment had similar effect on metabolism of malignant and non-malignant cells demonstrating the necessity to maintain structure-energy equivalence in all living cells. The role of glycolysis in initiating vasculature formation, and in

  11. Cellulose Depolymerization over Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotri, Abhijit; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2018-02-14

    Cellulosic biomass is the largest source of renewable organic carbon on our planet. Cellulose accounts for 40-50 wt % of this lignocellulose, and it is a feedstock for industrially important chemicals and fuels. The first step in cellulose conversion involves its depolymerization to glucose or to its hydrogenated product sorbitol. The hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose by homogeneous mineral acids was the subject of research for almost a century. However, homogeneous acids have significant drawbacks and are neither economical nor environmentally friendly. In 2006, our group reported for the first time the ability of heterogeneous catalysts to depolymerize cellulose through hydrolytic hydrogenation to produce sorbitol. Later, we reported the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose using carbon catalyst containing weakly acidic functional groups. Understanding the reaction between cellulose and heterogeneous catalyst is a challenge as the reaction occurs between a solid substrate and a solid catalyst. In this Account, we describe our efforts for the conversion of cellulose to sorbitol and glucose using heterogeneous catalysts. Sorbitol is produced by sequential hydrolysis and hydrogenation of cellulose in one pot. We reported sorbitol synthesis from cellulose in the presence of supported metal catalysts and H 2 gas. The reducing environment of the reaction prevents byproduct formation, and harsh reaction conditions can be used to achieve sorbitol yield of up to 90%. Glucose is produced by acid catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, a more challenging reaction owing to the tendency of glucose to rapidly decompose in hot water. Sulfonated carbons were first reported as active catalysts for cellulose hydrolysis, but they were hydrothermally unstable under the reaction conditions. We found that carbon catalysts bearing weakly acidic functional groups such as hydroxyl and carboxylic acids are also active. Weakly acidic functional groups are hydrothermally stable, and a soluble

  12. [Tumors of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Loyola, Marco Antonio; Galnares-Olalde, Javier Andrés; Mercado, Moisés

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a considerable morbidity and mortality rate. Recent advances in the underlying oncogenic mechanisms of these tumors have led to new classification systems, which, in turn, allow for a better diagnostic approach and therapeutic planning. Most of these neoplasms occur sporadically and several risk factors have been found to be associated with their development, such as exposure to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic fields and the concomitant presence of conditions like diabetes, hypertension and Parkinson's disease. A relatively minor proportion of primary CNS tumors occur in the context of hereditary syndromes. The purpose of this review is to analyze the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and therapy of CNS tumors with particular emphasis in the putative risk factors mentioned above.

  13. Rejection versus escape: the tumor MHC dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Federico; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Aptsiauri, Natalia

    2017-02-01

    Most tumor cells derive from MHC-I-positive normal counterparts and remain positive at early stages of tumor development. T lymphocytes can infiltrate tumor tissue, recognize and destroy MHC class I (MHC-I)-positive cancer cells ("permissive" phase I). Later, MHC-I-negative tumor cell variants resistant to T-cell killing emerge. During this process, tumors first acquire a heterogeneous MHC-I expression pattern and finally become uniformly MHC-I-negative. This stage (phase II) represents a "non-permissive" encapsulated structure with tumor nodes surrounded by fibrous tissue containing different elements including leukocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, etc. Molecular mechanisms responsible for total or partial MHC-I downregulation play a crucial role in determining and predicting the antigen-presenting capacity of cancer cells. MHC-I downregulation caused by reversible ("soft") lesions can be upregulated by TH1-type cytokines released into the tumor microenvironment in response to different types of immunotherapy. In contrast, when the molecular mechanism of the tumor MHC-I loss is irreversible ("hard") due to a genetic defect in the gene/s coding for MHC-I heavy chains (chromosome 6) or beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) (chromosome 15), malignant cells are unable to upregulate MHC-I, remain undetectable by cytotoxic T-cells, and continue to grow and metastasize. Based on the tumor MHC-I molecular analysis, it might be possible to define MHC-I phenotypes present in cancer patients in order to distinguish between non-responders, partial/short-term responders, and likely durable responders. This highlights the need for designing strategies to enhance tumor MHC-I expression that would allow CTL-mediated tumor rejection.

  14. Alfa-fetoprotein secreting ovarian sex cord-stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum D Jashnani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors are relatively infrequent neoplasms that account for approximately 8% of all primary ovarian tumors. They are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms composed of cells derived from gonadal sex cords (granulosa and Sertoli cells, specialized gonadal stroma (theca and Leydig cells, and fibroblasts. They may show androgenic or estrogenic manifestations. We report such a tumor associated with markedly raised serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP levels in a young female presenting with a mass and defeminising symptoms. Serum AFP levels returned to normal on removal of tumor.

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography depicts small tumor vessels for the evaluation of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yuko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Takaki, Akinobu; Ishida, Etsuji; Ogawa, Tsuneyoshi; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist was performed on 62 consecutive patients (53 with pancreatic cancer, 4 with islet cell tumor, 3 with inflammatory pancreatic tumor, and 2 with metastatic tumor). The vascular and perfusion image phases of the tumors were evaluated and compared with the findings of contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Results: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography showed tumor vessels around and/or in the tumor at the vascular image phase in 79% of pancreatic cancer patients (42/53). At the perfusion image phase, 96% of pancreatic cancers (51/53) were classified as hypo-enhancement type. However, tiny spotty or irregular heterogeneous enhanced lesions were found in 84% of hypo-enhanced pancreatic cancer patients (43/51). The presence of small vessels at the vascular image phase was closely correlated with the presence of these intratumor regional enhanced lesions at the perfusion image phase (κ coefficient = 0.42). The sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (100%) for pancreatic cancer was superior to that of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (91%), but no significant difference was observed between the two (McNemar test: p = 0.063). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist successfully visualizes fine vessels and enhancement in pancreatic tumors, and is useful for evaluating pancreatic tumors

  16. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  17. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  18. DCB - Tumor Metastasis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor metastasis research examines the mechanisms that allow cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and spread to another part of the body. Learn about recent tumor metastasis research studies supported by the Division of Cancer Biology.

  19. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  20. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  1. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...

  2. Brain and Spinal Tumors: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... understand, diagnose, and treat CNS tumors. Several of today’s treatment regimens were experimental therapies only a decade ... up Meeting Now That You Are Funded Small Business Grants Overview Areas of Interest Budget Information Grant ...

  3. Nonlinear lattice waves in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laptyeva, T V; Ivanchenko, M V; Flach, S

    2014-01-01

    We discuss recent advances in the understanding of the dynamics of nonlinear lattice waves in heterogeneous media, which enforce complete wave localization in the linear wave equation limit, especially Anderson localization for random potentials, and Aubry–André localization for quasiperiodic potentials. Additional nonlinear terms in the wave equations can either preserve the phase-coherent localization of waves, or destroy it through nonintegrability and deterministic chaos. Spreading wave packets are observed to show universal features in their dynamics which are related to properties of nonlinear diffusion equations. (topical review)

  4. Hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic life contains hierarchical vesicular architectures (i.e. organelles that are crucial for material production and trafficking, information storage and access, as well as energy production. In order to perform specific tasks, these compartments differ among each other in their membrane composition and their internal cargo and also differ from the cell membrane and the cytosol. Man-made structures that reproduce this nested architecture not only offer a deeper understanding of the functionalities and evolution of organelle-bearing eukaryotic life but also allow the engineering of novel biomimetic technologies. Here, we show the newly developed vesicle-in-water-in-oil emulsion transfer preparation technique to result in giant unilamellar vesicles internally compartmentalized by unilamellar vesicles of different membrane composition and internal cargo, i.e. hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity. The compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles were subsequently isolated by a separation step exploiting the heterogeneity of the membrane composition and the encapsulated cargo. Due to the controlled, efficient, and technically straightforward character of the new preparation technique, this study allows the hierarchical fabrication of compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity and will ease the development of eukaryotic cell mimics that resemble their natural templates as well as the fabrication of novel multi-agent drug delivery systems for combination therapies and complex artificial microreactors.

  5. Heterogeneity of Loss Aversion in Pathological Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kawada, Ryosaku; Tsurumi, Kosuke; Yokoyama, Naoto; Takemura, Ariyoshi; Murao, Takuro; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2016-12-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is characterized by continual repeated gambling behavior despite negative consequences. PG is considered to be a disorder of altered decision-making under risk, and behavioral economics tools were utilized by studies on decision-making under risk. At the same time, PG was suggested to be a heterogeneous disorder in terms of personality traits as well as risk attitude. We aimed to examine the heterogeneity of PG in terms of loss aversion, which means that a loss is subjectively felt to be larger than the same amount of gain. Thirty-one male PG subjects and 26 male healthy control (HC) subjects underwent a behavioral economics task for estimation of loss aversion and personality traits assessment. Although loss aversion in PG subjects was not significantly different from that in HC subjects, distributions of loss aversion differed between PG and HC subjects. HC subjects were uniformly classified into three levels (low, middle, high) of loss aversion, whereas PG subjects were mostly classified into the two extremes, and few PG subjects were classified into the middle range. PG subjects with low and high loss aversion showed a significant difference in anxiety, excitement-seeking and craving intensity. Our study suggested that PG was a heterogeneous disorder in terms of loss aversion. This result might be useful for understanding cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms and the establishment of treatment strategies for PG.

  6. Stromal tumor presents as a large extragastrointestinal mass in the abdominal cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Chung-Kai; Hsu, Chia-Yang; Chan, Che-Chang; Li, Anna; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are nonepithelial neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract and have been increasingly recognized in recent years. In contrast, stromal tumor outside the gastrointestinal tract is not frequently found. Here, we present a 57-year-old male patient who had abdominal fullness for several months. It was caused by a 23-cm heterogeneous tumor mass that was successfully removed from the left upper abdominal cavity. The tumor adhered tightly to adjacent organs but postope...

  7. Circulating tumor DNA to monitor treatment response and detect acquired resistance in patients with metastatic melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Elin S.; Rizos, Helen; Reid, Anna L.; Boyd, Suzanah C.; Pereira, Michelle R.; Lo, Johnny; Tembe, Varsha; Freeman, James; Lee, Jenny H.J.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Siew, Kelvin; Lomma, Chris; Cooper, Adam; Khattak, Muhammad A.; Meniawy, Tarek M.

    2015-01-01

    Repeat tumor biopsies to study genomic changes during therapy are difficult, invasive and data are confounded by tumoral heterogeneity. The analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can provide a non-invasive approach to assess prognosis and the genetic evolution of tumors in response to therapy. Mutation-specific droplet digital PCR was used to measure plasma concentrations of oncogenic BRAF and NRAS variants in 48 patients with advanced metastatic melanoma prior to treatment with targeted t...

  8. TCR Repertoire Intratumor Heterogeneity in Localized Lung Adenocarcinomas: An Association with Predicted Neoantigen Heterogeneity and Postsurgical Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, Alexandre; Gittelman, Rachel; Gao, Jianjun; Zhang, Jiexin; Yusko, Erik C; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Emerson, Ryan; Zhang, Jianhua; Tipton, Christopher; Li, Jun; Quek, Kelly; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Chen, Runzhe; Vence, Luis M; Cascone, Tina; Vignali, Marissa; Fujimoto, Junya; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Parra, Edwin R; Little, Latasha D; Gumbs, Curtis; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Federico, Lorenzo; Haymaker, Cara; Behrens, Carmen; Benzeno, Sharon; Bernatchez, Chantale; Sepesi, Boris; Gibbons, Don L; Wargo, Jennifer A; William, William N; Swisher, Stephen; Heymach, John V; Robins, Harlan; Lee, J Jack; Sharma, Padmanee; Allison, James P; Futreal, P Andrew; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Zhang, Jianjun

    2017-10-01

    Genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) may be associated with postsurgical relapse of localized lung adenocarcinomas. Recently, mutations, through generation of neoantigens, were shown to alter tumor immunogenicity through T-cell responses. Here, we performed sequencing of the T-cell receptor (TCR) in 45 tumor regions from 11 localized lung adenocarcinomas and observed substantial intratumor differences in T-cell density and clonality with the majority of T-cell clones restricted to individual tumor regions. TCR ITH positively correlated with predicted neoantigen ITH, suggesting that spatial differences in the T-cell repertoire may be driven by distinct neoantigens in different tumor regions. Finally, a higher degree of TCR ITH was associated with an increased risk of postsurgical relapse and shorter disease-free survival, suggesting a potential clinical significance of T-cell repertoire heterogeneity. Significance: The present study provides insights into the ITH of the T-cell repertoire in localized lung adenocarcinomas and its potential biological and clinical impact. The results suggest that T-cell repertoire ITH may be tightly associated to genomic ITH and disease relapse. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1088-97. ©2017 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1047 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  10. Communicating why land surface heterogeneity matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tague, C.; Burke, W.; Bart, R. R.; Turpin, E.; Wood, T.; Gordon, D.

    2017-12-01

    As hydrologic scientists, we know that land surface heterogeneity can have nuanced and sometimes dramatic impacts on the water cycle. Land surface characteristics, including the structure and composition of vegetation and soil storage and drainage properties, alter how incoming precipitation is translated into streamflow and evapotranspiration. Land surface heterogeneity can explain why this partitioning of incoming precipitation cannot always be computed by a simple water budget calculation. We also know that land surface characteristics are dynamic - vegetation grows and changes with fire, disease and human actions and these changes will alter the partitioning of water - how much so, however depends itself on other site characteristics - soil water storage and the timing and magnitude of precipitation. This complex impact of space-time dynamics on the water cycle is something we need to effectively communicate to non-experts. For example, we may want to explain why sometimes forest management practices increase water availability but sometimes they don't - or why the impacts of urbanization or fire are location specific. If we do not communicate these dependencies we risk over-simplifying and eroding scientific credibility when observed effects don't match simple generalizations. On the other hand excessive detail can overwhelm and disengage audiences. So how do we help different communities public, private landowners, other scientists, NGOs, governments to better understand the role of space-time heterogeneity. To address this issue, we present some results from ongoing work that looks at the impact of fuel treatment of forest ecohydrology. This work stem from a collaboration between an ecohydrologic modeling team, social-scientists, a visual artist and compute graphics students. We use a coupled model, validated with field measurements, to show why spatial heterogeneity matters for understanding the impact of fuel treatments on the water cycle for the Sierra

  11. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Intratumor Heterogeneity of ALK-Rearrangements and Homogeneity of EGFR-Mutations in Mixed Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zito Marino

    Full Text Available Non Small Cell Lung Cancer is a highly heterogeneous tumor. Histologic intratumor heterogeneity could be 'major', characterized by a single tumor showing two different histologic types, and 'minor', due to at least 2 different growth patterns in the same tumor. Therefore, a morphological heterogeneity could reflect an intratumor molecular heterogeneity. To date, few data are reported in literature about molecular features of the mixed adenocarcinoma. The aim of our study was to assess EGFR-mutations and ALK-rearrangements in different intratumor subtypes and/or growth patterns in a series of mixed adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas.590 Non Small Cell Lung Carcinomas tumor samples were revised in order to select mixed adenocarcinomas with available tumor components. Finally, only 105 mixed adenocarcinomas and 17 adenosquamous carcinomas were included in the study for further analyses. Two TMAs were built selecting the different intratumor histotypes. ALK-rearrangements were detected through FISH and IHC, and EGFR-mutations were detected through IHC and confirmed by RT-PCR.10/122 cases were ALK-rearranged and 7 from those 10 showing an intratumor heterogeneity of the rearrangements. 12/122 cases were EGFR-mutated, uniformly expressing the EGFR-mutated protein in all histologic components.Our data suggests that EGFR-mutations is generally homogeneously expressed. On the contrary, ALK-rearrangement showed an intratumor heterogeneity in both mixed adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas. The intratumor heterogeneity of ALK-rearrangements could lead to a possible impact on the therapeutic responses and the disease outcomes.

  13. Field Heterogeneity: Some Basic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J. R.

    1980-04-01

    Present-day soil-water physics enables useful quantitative predictions in the laboratory and in simple field situations. Difficulties, however, frequently arise for areas of appreciable size in the field. Known and unknown heterogeneities, on many scales, may vitiate predictions based on theory for homogeneous, or very simple heterogeneous, systems. Two types of heterogeneity are distinguished, deterministic and stochastic. The first often demands an extension of established analyses and may involve important phenomena absent from the analogous homogeneous problem. Stochastic heterogeneity may involve many scales and is imperfectly known. The statistical properties may be stationary, but in more complicated cases, randomness may be embedded in (either known or unknown) systematic trends. Some aspects of unsaturated and generally unsteady flow in heterogeneous systems are reviewed: the mathematical nature of the flow equation; the concept of scale-heterogeneity; analytical and quasi-analytical solutions. The enormity of the total problem of unsaturated unsteady flows in stochastic heterogeneous systems is illustrated through a dialectic of eight successive stages of simplification. The concept of the autocorrelation function governing λ, the internal characteristic length, is introduced; and the problem posed in terms involving the distribution and autocorrelation functions of λ, the reduced potential and conductivity functions, and the initial and boundary conditions as the data, from which it is required to establish distribution functions of various descriptors of the flow. The solution to a grossly simplified example of horizontal absorption is presented. Mean apparent sorptivity decreases rapidly to about one fifth of the mean (and about half the minimum) sorptivity of the component soils. Variation about the mean is very great but decreases as absorption proceeds. The example epitomizes the failure of additivity of properties in stochastic heterogeneous

  14. Understanding classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subianto, M.

    2009-01-01

    In practical data analysis, the understandability of models plays an important role in their acceptance. In the data mining literature, however, understandability plays is hardly ever mentioned. If it is mentioned, it is interpreted as meaning that the models have to be simple. In this thesis we

  15. Dynamic heterogeneity and life history variability in the kittiwake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2010-01-01

    1. Understanding the evolution of life histories requires an assessment of the process that generates variation in life histories. Within-population heterogeneity of life histories can be dynamically generated by stochastic variation of reproduction and survival or be generated by individual...... differences that are fixed at birth. 2. We show for the kittiwake that dynamic heterogeneity is a sufficient explanation of observed variation of life histories. 3. The total heterogeneity in life histories has a small contribution from reproductive stage dynamics and a large contribution from survival...... differences. We quantify the diversity in life histories by metrics computed from the generating stochastic process. 4. We show how dynamic heterogeneity can be used as a null model and also how it can lead to positive associations between reproduction and survival across the life span. 5. We believe our...

  16. Embodied understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Western culture has inherited a view of understanding as an intellectual cognitive operation of grasping of concepts and their relations. However, cognitive science research has shown that this received intellectualist conception is substantially out of touch with how humans actually make and experience meaning. The view emerging from the mind sciences recognizes that understanding is profoundly embodied, insofar as our conceptualization and reasoning recruit sensory, motor, and affective patterns and processes to structure our understanding of, and engagement with, our world. A psychologically realistic account of understanding must begin with the patterns of ongoing interaction between an organism and its physical and cultural environments and must include both our emotional responses to changes in our body and environment, and also the actions by which we continuously transform our experience. Consequently, embodied understanding is not merely a conceptual/propositional activity of thought, but rather constitutes our most basic way of being in, and engaging with, our surroundings in a deep visceral manner.

  17. Hypoxia in tumors: pathogenesis-related classification, characterization of hypoxia subtypes, and associated biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of tumors leading to (mal-)adaptive processes, development of aggressive phenotypes and treatment resistance. Based on underlying mechanisms and their duration, two main types of hypoxia have been identified, coexisting with complex spatial and temporal heterogeneities. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations due to enlarged diffusion distances and adverse diffusion geometries (e.g., concurrent vs. countercurrent microvessels, Krogh- vs. Hill-type diffusion geometry) and, to a lesser extent, by hypoxemia (e.g., in anemic patients, HbCO formation in heavy smokers), and a compromised perfusion or flow stop (e.g., due to disturbed Starling forces or intratumor solid stress). Acute hypoxia mainly results from transient disruptions in perfusion (e.g., vascular occlusion by cell aggregates), fluctuating red blood cell fluxes or short-term contractions of the interstitial matrix. In each of these hypoxia subtypes oxygen supply is critically reduced, but perfusion-dependent nutrient supply, waste removal, delivery of anticancer or diagnostic agents, and repair competence can be impaired or may not be affected. This detailed differentiation of tumor hypoxia may impact on our understanding of tumor biology and may aid in the development of novel treatment strategies, tumor detection by imaging and tumor targeting, and is thus of great clinical relevance.

  18. Quantitative Study of Thermal Disturbances Due to Nonuniformly Perfused Tumors in Peripheral Regions of Women’s Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshara Makrariya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mathematical modeling of biothermal processes is widely used to enhance the quantitative understanding of thermoregulation system of human body organs. This quantitative knowledge of thermal information of various human body organs can be used for developing clinical applications. In the past, investigators have studied thermal distribution in hemisphere-shaped human breast in the presence of sphere-shaped tumor. The shape and size of the breast as well as tumor may also affect thermal distribution which can have serious implications in thermography. In this article, a model of thermal disturbances in peripheral regions of ellipsoid-shaped human breast involving ellipse-shaped nonuniformly perfused tumor has been developed for a 2-dimensional steady-state case. The modeling study will provide biomedical scientists vital insights of thermal changes occurring due to the shape and size of breast and tumor which can influence the development of protocols of thermography for diagnosis of tumors in women’s breast. Method: We have incorporated the significant parameters such as blood flow, metabolic activity, and thermal conductivity in the thermal model for normal and malignant tissues. The controlled metabolic activity has been incorporated for normal tissues, and uncontrolled metabolic activity has been incorporated for tumor regions. The peripheral regions of breast are divided into 3 major layers, namely, epidermis, dermis, and subdermal tissues. An ellipse-shaped nonuniformly perfused tumor is assumed to be present in dermal layers. The nonuniformly perfused tumor is divided into 2 natural components, namely, the necrotic core and tumor periphery. The outer surface of the breast is assumed to be exposed to the environment, and the heat loss takes place by conduction, convection, radiation, and evaporation. The finite element approach is used to obtain the solution. The numerical results have been used to study the effect of shape

  19. Molecular characterization of 103 ovarian serous and mucinous tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereczkey, Ildikó; Serester, Orsolya; Dobos, Judit; Gallai, Mónika; Szakács, Orsolya; Szentirmay, Zoltán; Tóth, Erika

    2011-09-01

    The pathogenesis of ovarian carcinomas is heterogeneous, with even the same entities showing great variance. In our study we investigated the mutations of the BRAF, KRAS, and p53 genes in serous and mucinous borderline tumors and in low grade and high grade serous and mucinous tumors. The mutations of BRAF and KRAS genes have been shown in 60% of borderline and low grade (well differentiated) serous and mucinous tumors, but very rarely in high grade (moderately and poorly differentiated) carcinomas. However mutations of p53 are very common in high grade tumors and this indicates a "dualistic" model of ovarian tumorigenesis. A total of 80 serous tumors, including serous borderline, low grade and high grade tumors, and 23 mucinous tumors, including borderline and invasive tumors were analysed for BRAF and KRAS mutations using real time PCR method followed by melting point analysis. P53 mutation was investigated by immunohistochemistry. We assumed mutation of the p53 gene when 100% of tumor cells showed strong nuclear positivity. We observed differences in genetic alterations in the development of the low grade tumors and between low and high grade tumors too. In some bilateral or stage II-III cases we observed differences between the mutation status of the left and right ovarian tumors and between the primary tumor and its implants. In one case in a tumor with micropapillary pattern showing high grade nuclear atypia we could detect mutations in both KRAS and p53 genes. The majority of our mucinous ovarian tumor cases showed a KRAS mutation. We have not found mutations of the BRAF and p53 genes in these cases. We have found as have others, that there is a dualistic pathway of ovarian carcinogenesis. In the majority of cases, low grade epithelial tumors develop in a stepwise manner due to genetic alterations of the members of MAP-kinase pathway; however mutation of the p53 gene is the key event in the development of high grade tumors.

  20. Utilization and incorporation of tumor volume data in staging and prognostication of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Parveen Ahlawat; Sheh Rawat; Anjali Kakria; Manoj Pal; Deepika Chauhan; Ruparna Khurana; Sarthak Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC) are a group of heterogeneous tumors, evident by their diverse behavior and natural history. The largest diameter of tumor measured for T classification may not necessarily reflect the true tumor dimension. There is a need to take into account certain other feature(s) of these tumors other than the maximum single dimension which can reflect the true tumor burden more accurately. Tumor volume has been shown to be a useful and accurate tool burden beca...

  1. Dealing with spatial heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsily, Gh.; Delay, F.; Gonçalvès, J.; Renard, Ph.; Teles, V.; Violette, S.

    2005-03-01

    Heterogeneity can be dealt with by defining homogeneous equivalent properties, known as averaging, or by trying to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markov chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. The conclusion is that future work should be focused on improving the facies models, comparing them, and designing new in situ testing procedures (including geophysics) that would help identify the facies geometry and properties. A world-wide catalog of aquifer facies geometry and properties, which could combine site genesis and description with methods used to assess the system, would be of great value for practical applications. On peut aborder le problème de l'hétérogénéité en s'efforçant de définir une perméabilité équivalente homogène, par prise de moyenne, ou au contraire en décrivant la variation dans l'espace des propriétés des roches à partir des observations géologiques et des mesures locales. Les techniques disponibles pour une telle description sont soit continues, comme l'approche Géostatistique, soit discontinues, comme les modèles de faciès, Booléens, ou bien par Indicatrices ou Gaussiennes Seuillées, ou enfin Markoviens. Ces modèles de faciès sont mieux capables de prendre en compte la connectivité des strates géologiques, telles que les chenaux enfouis à forte perméabilité, ou au contraire les faci

  2. Comprehensive expression profiling of tumor cell lines identifies molecular signatures of melanoma progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byungwoo Ryu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling has revolutionized our ability to molecularly classify primary human tumors and significantly enhanced the development of novel tumor markers and therapies; however, progress in the diagnosis and treatment of melanoma over the past 3 decades has been limited, and there is currently no approved therapy that significantly extends lifespan in patients with advanced disease. Profiling studies of melanoma to date have been inconsistent due to the heterogeneous nature of this malignancy and the limited availability of informative tissue specimens from early stages of disease.In order to gain an improved understanding of the molecular basis of melanoma progression, we have compared gene expression profiles from a series of melanoma cell lines representing discrete stages of malignant progression that recapitulate critical characteristics of the primary lesions from which they were derived. Here we describe the unsupervised hierarchical clustering of profiling data from melanoma cell lines and melanocytes. This clustering identifies two distinctive molecular subclasses of melanoma segregating aggressive metastatic tumor cell lines from less-aggressive primary tumor cell lines. Further analysis of expression signatures associated with melanoma progression using functional annotations categorized these transcripts into three classes of genes: 1 Upregulation of activators of cell cycle progression, DNA replication and repair (CDCA2, NCAPH, NCAPG, NCAPG2, PBK, NUSAP1, BIRC5, ESCO2, HELLS, MELK, GINS1, GINS4, RAD54L, TYMS, and DHFR, 2 Loss of genes associated with cellular adhesion and melanocyte differentiation (CDH3, CDH1, c-KIT, PAX3, CITED1/MSG-1, TYR, MELANA, MC1R, and OCA2, 3 Upregulation of genes associated with resistance to apoptosis (BIRC5/survivin. While these broad classes of transcripts have previously been implicated in the progression of melanoma and other malignancies, the specific genes identified within each class

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sounni, Nor Eddine; Noel, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of the tumor microenvironment as an essential ingredient of cancer malignancy, therapies targeting the host compartment of tumors have begun to be designed and applied in the clinic. The malignant features of cancer cells cannot be manifested without an important interplay between cancer cells and their local environment. The tumor infiltrate composed of immune cells, angiogenic vascular cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, and cancer-associated fibroblastic cells contributes actively to cancer progression. The ability to change these surroundings is an important property by which tumor cells are able to acquire some of the hallmark functions necessary for tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Thus in the clinical setting the targeting of the tumor microenvironment to encapsulate or destroy cancer cells in their local environment has become mandatory. The variety of stromal cells, the complexity of the molecular components of the tumor stroma, and the similarity with normal tissue present huge challenges for therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment. These issues and their interplay are addressed in this review. After a decade of intensive clinical trials targeting cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, more recent investigations have shed light on the important role in cancer progression played by the noncellular stromal compartment composed of the extracellular matrix. A better understanding of how the tumor environment affects cancer progression should provide new targets for the isolation and destruction of cancer cells via interference with the complex crosstalk established between cancer cells, host cells, and their surrounding extracellular matrix. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  4. Understanding semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    1997-01-01

    Understanding natural language is a cognitive, information-driven process. Discussing some of the consequences of this fact, the paper offers a novel look at the semantic effect of lexical nouns and the identification of reference types....

  5. Understanding Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  6. Understanding homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on understanding homelessness. It criticizes approaches that ignore, distort or diminish the humanity of homeless people, or else, add little to our understanding of that humanity. In particular, it rejects what it calls “epidemiological” approaches, which deny the possibility of agency for homeless people, insofar as those approaches view the situation of those people largely as a “social fact”, to be explained in terms of causal variables or “risk factors” ...

  7. Unraveling tumor grading and genomic landscape in lung neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Papotti, Mauro; Rindi, Guido; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-06-01

    Currently, grading in lung neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is inherently defined by the histological classification based on cell features, mitosis count, and necrosis, for which typical carcinoids (TC) are low-grade malignant tumors with long life expectation, atypical carcinoids (AC) intermediate-grade malignant tumors with more aggressive clinical behavior, and large cell NE carcinomas (LCNEC) and small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) high-grade malignant tumors with dismal prognosis. While Ki-67 antigen labeling index, highlighting the proportion of proliferating tumor cells, has largely been used in digestive NETs for assessing prognosis and assisting therapy decisions, the same marker does not play an established role in the diagnosis, grading, and prognosis of lung NETs. Next generation sequencing techniques (NGS), thanks to their astonishing ability to process in a shorter timeframe up to billions of DNA strands, are radically revolutionizing our approach to diagnosis and therapy of tumors, including lung cancer. When applied to single genes, panels of genes, exome, or the whole genome by using either frozen or paraffin tissues, NGS techniques increase our understanding of cancer, thus realizing the bases of precision medicine. Data are emerging that TC and AC are mainly altered in chromatin remodeling genes, whereas LCNEC and SCLC are also mutated in cell cycle checkpoint and cell differentiation regulators. A common denominator to all lung NETs is a deregulation of cell proliferation, which represents a biological rationale for morphologic (mitoses and necrosis) and molecular (Ki-67 antigen) parameters to successfully serve as predictors of tumor behavior (i.e., identification of pathological entities with clinical correlation). It is envisaged that a novel grading system in lung NETs based on the combined assessment of mitoses, necrosis, and Ki-67 LI may offer a better stratification of prognostic classes, realizing a bridge between molecular alterations

  8. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  9. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  10. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  11. Different Array CGH profiles within hereditary breast cancer tumors associated to BRCA1 expression and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Aravena, Andrés; Tapia, Teresa; Rozenblum, Ester; Solís, Luisa; Corvalán, Alejandro; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Munroe, David; Maass, Alejandro; Carvallo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Array CGH analysis of breast tumors has contributed to the identification of different genomic profiles in these tumors. Loss of DNA repair by BRCA1 functional deficiency in breast cancer has been proposed as a relevant contribution to breast cancer progression for tumors with no germline mutation. Identifying the genomic alterations taking place in BRCA1 not expressing tumors will lead us to a better understanding of the cellular functions affected in this heterogeneous disease. Moreover, specific genomic alterations may contribute to the identification of potential therapeutic targets and offer a more personalized treatment to breast cancer patients. Forty seven tumors from hereditary breast cancer cases, previously analyzed for BRCA1 expression, and screened for germline BRCA1 and 2 mutations, were analyzed by Array based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) using Agilent 4x44K arrays. Overall survival was established for tumors in different clusters using Log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Test. Gene lists obtained from aCGH analysis were analyzed for Gene Ontology enrichment using GOrilla and DAVID tools. Genomic profiling of the tumors showed specific alterations associated to BRCA1 or 2 mutation status, and BRCA1 expression in the tumors, affecting relevant cellular processes. Similar cellular functions were found affected in BRCA1 not expressing and BRCA1 or 2 mutated tumors. Hierarchical clustering classified hereditary breast tumors in four major, groups according to the type and amount of genomic alterations, showing one group with a significantly poor overall survival (p = 0.0221). Within this cluster, deletion of PLEKHO1, GDF11, DARC, DAG1 and CD63 may be associated to the worse outcome of the patients. These results support the fact that BRCA1 lack of expression in tumors should be used as a marker for BRCAness and to select these patients for synthetic lethality approaches such as treatment with PARP inhibitors. In addition, the identification of specific

  12. Risk of borderline ovarian tumors among women with benign ovarian tumors: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Sonia; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K

    2018-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that some ovarian cancers can arise from benign and borderline ovarian tumors. However, studies on the association between benign and borderline ovarian tumors are lacking. We studied the overall- and histotype-specific risk of borderline ovarian tumors among women with a benign ovarian tumor. This nationwide cohort study included all Danish women diagnosed with a benign ovarian tumor (n=139,466) during 1978-2012. The cohort was linked to the Danish Pathology Data Bank and standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Women with benign ovarian tumors had increased risks for subsequent borderline ovarian tumors (SIR 1.62, 95% CI 1.43-1.82), and this applied to both serous (SIR 1.69, 95% CI 1.39-2.03) and mucinous (SIR 1.75, 95% CI 1.45-2.10) histotypes of borderline ovarian tumors. The risk for borderline ovarian tumors was primarily increased for women diagnosed with a benign ovarian tumor before 40years of age. The risk remained increased up to 9years after a benign ovarian tumor diagnosis. Finally, the associations did not change markedly when analyzed for the different histotypes of benign (solid and cystic tumors) and borderline (serous and mucinous tumors) ovarian tumors. Women with benign ovarian tumors have a long-term increased risk for borderline ovarian tumors. However, as all associations in this study were only adjusted for age and calendar period of diagnosis, more studies that are able to adjust for additional potential confounding variables are required to further understand these associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A review on tumor immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lalitha Kaja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of immune system to detect and destroy the altered/abnormal cells may inhibit the development of various cancers. The immune system had been proposed as a tactic in sustaining nonneoplastic state and also for the development of immunotherapy against cancer. Although the immune system exerts a protective role, under certain circumstances, it could be damaging in terms of modulating the oncogenic process. The failure of host's immunological responses against tumor growth and dissemination implicated that both immunologic and nonimmunologic factors may work together to affect tumorigenesis. Hence, understanding the aspects pertaining to tumor immunology which deals with the complex interactions between the host's immune system and neoplasm is essential. The current review focuses on the aspects concerned with tumor immunology, steps involved, and cancer immunotherapy as a probable therapeutic tool.

  14. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...

  15. The genetic heterogeneity and mutational burden of engineered melanomas in zebrafish models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jennifer; White, Richard M; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; de Ridder, Jeroen; Capper, Amy; Richardson, Jennifer; Jones, David; Raine, Keiran; Watson, Ian R; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Cheng, Jiqiu; Martincorena, Iñigo; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Mudie, Laura; Moreau, Yves; Marshall, John; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Tarpey, Patrick; Shlien, Adam; Whitmore, Ian; Gamble, Steve; Latimer, Calli; Langdon, Erin; Kaufman, Charles; Dovey, Mike; Taylor, Alison; Menzies, Andy; McLaren, Stuart; O'Meara, Sarah; Butler, Adam; Teague, Jon; Lister, James; Chin, Lynda; Campbell, Peter; Adams, David J; Zon, Leonard I; Patton, E Elizabeth; Stemple, Derek L; Futreal, P Andy

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer. Expression of oncogenic BRAF or NRAS, which are frequently mutated in human melanomas, promote the formation of nevi but are not sufficient for tumorigenesis. Even with germline mutated p53, these engineered melanomas present with variable onset and pathology, implicating additional somatic mutations in a multi-hit tumorigenic process. To decipher the genetics of these melanomas, we sequence the protein coding exons of 53 primary melanomas generated from several BRAF(V600E) or NRAS(Q61K) driven transgenic zebrafish lines. We find that engineered zebrafish melanomas show an overall low mutation burden, which has a strong, inverse association with the number of initiating germline drivers. Although tumors reveal distinct mutation spectrums, they show mostly C > T transitions without UV light exposure, and enrichment of mutations in melanogenesis, p53 and MAPK signaling. Importantly, a recurrent amplification occurring with pre-configured drivers BRAF(V600E) and p53-/- suggests a novel path of BRAF cooperativity through the protein kinase A pathway. This is the first analysis of a melanoma mutational landscape in the absence of UV light, where tumors manifest with remarkably low mutation burden and high heterogeneity. Genotype specific amplification of protein kinase A in cooperation with BRAF and p53 mutation suggests the involvement of melanogenesis in these tumors. This work is important for defining the spectrum of events in BRAF or NRAS driven melanoma in the absence of UV light, and for informed exploitation of models such as transgenic zebrafish to better understand mechanisms leading to human melanoma formation.

  16. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Norio; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  17. Supratentorial tumors; Supratentorielle Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.; Dillmann, K.; Roth, C.; Backens, M.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Saarland, Homburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a routine diagnostic measure for a suspected intracerebral mass. Computed tomography is usually also indicated. Further diagnostic procedures as well as the interpretation of the findings vary depending on the tumor location. This contribution discusses the symptoms and diagnostics for supratentorial tumors separated in relation to their intra- or extracranial location. Supratentorial tumors include astrocytoma, differentiated by their circumscribed and diffuse growth, ganglioglioma, ependyoma, neurocytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), oligodendroglioma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNET), meningoangiomatosis, pineal tumors, hamartoma, lymphoma, craniopharyngeoma and metastases. The supratentorial extracranial tumors include the choroid plexus, colloid cysts, meningeoma, infantile myofibromatosis and lipoma. The most common subforms, especially of astrocytoma, will also be presented. (orig.)

  18. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  19. Dosimetric aspects of radiolabeled antibodies for tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is rapidly attracting interest as a potential new weapon in the arsenal for cancer therapy. This article concentrates on some of the dosimetric aspects affecting the potential success of RIT, and examines factors which influence the choice of a radiolabel for RIT. No radionuclide is likely to give an optimum tumor/nontumor insult for all tumor types; therefore, the concept of matching the source to tumor morphology is introduced. Lists of candidate radionuclides are given, classified according to the type of decay, range, and energy of the emission. The article examines how the choice of radionuclide for radiolabeling the antibody affects the local energy deposition in the tumor. Both the effect of tumor size on the energy absorbed fraction and the problem of antibody binding heterogeneity are discussed. The approach to RIT is to relate the choice of radionuclide to the physical properties of the tumor. 26 references

  20. Multiple brown tumors of the jaws in primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [School of Dentisity, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Brown tumor is usually diagnosed at the terminal stage of hyperparathyroidism. Diagnosis of this tumor is confirmed by endocrinologic investigations along with clinical and radiographic examination. Radiographical differential diagnosis of this tumor includes central giant cell granuloma, aneurysmal bone cyst, metastatic tumor, multiple myeloma, and Paget disease. This report presents a rare case of multiple brown tumors occurring at the maxilla and mandible, which was initially misdiagnosed as central giant cell granuloma. Plain radiographs demonstrated multiple well-defined multilocular radiolucency. CT images showed soft tissue mass with low attenuated lesions, perforation of the lingual cortical plate, and a heterogeneous mass at the right thyroid lobe. These findings were consistent with parathyroid adenoma. The patient had hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and elevated alkaline phosphatase level. Surgical excision of the tumor was performed. No recurrence was observed during a 28-month follow-up.

  1. Targeting Nanomedicine to Brain Tumors: Latest Progress and Achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Root, Moniek; Lowik, Clemens; Mezzanotte, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Targeting nanomedicine to brain tumors is hampered by the heterogeneity of brain tumors and the blood brain barrier. These represent the main reasons of unsuccessful treatments. Nanomedicine based approaches hold promise for improved brain tissue distribution of drugs and delivery of combination therapies. In this review, we describe the recent advancements and latest achievements in the use of nanocarriers, virus and cell-derived nanoparticles for targeted therapy of brain tumors. We provide successful examples of nanomedicine based approaches for direct targeting of receptors expressed in brain tumor cells or modulation of pathways involved in cell survival as well as approaches for indirect targeting of cells in the tumor stroma and immunotherapies. Although the field is at its infancy, clinical trials involving nanomedicine based approaches for brain tumors are ongoing and many others will start in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Aslaug; Rye, Inga H; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and

  3. Pulmonary neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caplin, M E; Baudin, E; Ferolla, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary carcinoids (PCs) are rare tumors. As there is a paucity of randomized studies, this expert consensus document represents an initiative by the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society to provide guidance on their management. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Bibliographical searches were...... carried out in PubMed for the terms 'pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial carcinoid tumors', 'pulmonary carcinoid', 'pulmonary typical/atypical carcinoid', and 'pulmonary carcinoid and diagnosis/treatment/epidemiology/prognosis'. A systematic review...

  4. [Wilms tumor in hemihypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, O; Wemmer, U

    1977-04-07

    The case of a 4-year-old boy with Wilms' tumor and hemihypertrophy is described. Wilms' tumors are frequently associated with congenital malformations of the urinary tract, with aniridia and hemihypertrophy. Hemihypertrophy is a relatively rare malformation (1:14000) in the common population, but in patients with Wilms' tumors its frequency is about 1:49. Besides Wilms' tumors tumors of the adrenal cortex and hepatoblastomas are frequently observed together with hemihypertrophy.

  5. A conceptual translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis: homogeneous-like heterogeneous gold nanoparticle catalyst induced by ceria supporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Xue, Wei; Guan, Bing-Tao; Shi, Fu-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-02-07

    Translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis is a promising solution to green and sustainable development in chemical industry. For this purpose, noble metal nanoparticles represent a new frontier in catalytic transformations. Many challenges remain for researchers to transform noble metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalytic active sites into ionic species of homogeneous catalytic active sites. We report here a successful design on translating homogeneous gold catalysis into a heterogeneous system with a clear understanding of the catalytic pathway. This study initiates a novel concept to immobilize a homogeneous catalyst based on electron transfer between supporting base and supported nanoparticles. Meanwhile, on the basis of theoretical calculation, it has deepened the understanding of the interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and the catalyst support.

  6. Tumors and tumor-like lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesling, S.; Stoevesandt, D.; Knipping, S.

    2007-01-01

    Tumors and tumor-like lesions are rare diseases in the paranasal sinuses. There is a great variety of histological types, but only a small number of morphological patterns on imaging. Histology is an important point in therapeutic planning. In most cases it is obtained by sampling, which is not as difficult in the sinonasal area as in other regions of the body. The main task of imaging is an exact estimation of the extent and spread of a lesion. This article discusses the possibilities and limitations of CT and MRI in the assessment of the dignity and spread of paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions in consideration of necessary therapeutic information. Additionally, an overview of features on imaging of different paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions is given. (orig.)

  7. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welter

    Full Text Available We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total

  8. Heterogeneity in Preferences and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Mette

    This paper discusses the determinants of the retirement decision and the implications of retirement on economic well-being. The main contribution of the paper is to formulate the role of individual heterogeneity explicitly. We argue that individual heterogeneity in 1) productivity of market work...... choices of expenditure, household production and leisure for people in and around retirement. The unobserved individual heterogeneity factor is isolated by comparing cross-sectional evidence and panel data estimates of the effects of retirement on consumption and time allocation. Based on cross......-section data, we can identify a difference in consumption due to retirement status, but when the panel nature of the data is exploited, the effect of retirement on consumption is small and insignificant. Moreover, the analyses point at a large positive effect of retirement on household production. Our results...

  9. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    describes the persistence of reproductive success during the life of an individual. Trajectories of reproductive stage determine survivorship, and we analyse the variance in lifespan within and between trajectories of reproductive stage. We show how stage-structured models can be used to predict realized......Longitudinal data on natural populations have been analysed using multistage models in which survival depends on reproductive stage, and individuals change stages according to a Markov chain. These models are special cases of stage-structured population models. We show that stage-structured models...... generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which...

  10. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...... a number of new theoretical results, which are essential for the empirical application of this type of model to matched employer-employee microdata. First, we o¤er a robust equilibrium concept in which there is a continu- ous dispersion of job productivities and wages. Second, we show that our model can...... be readily solved with continuous exogenous worker heterogene- ity, where high type workers (high outside options and productivity) earn higher wages in high type jobs and are hired at least as frequently to the better job types as low type workers (low outside options and productivity). Third, we...

  11. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    contribute to make a population in a fermenter heterogeneous, resulting in cell-to-cell variation in physiological parameters of the microbial culture. Our study aims at investigating how population heterogeneity and recombinant protein production is affected by environmental gradients in bioreactors....... For this purpose, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, that functions as a protein production reporter, has been developed. A heterologous protein has been tagged with a fluorescent protein providing a way to measure the amount of heterologous protein produced by the cells on single cell level. Gradients...... are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale....

  12. Understanding Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Maple is a powerful symbolic computation system that is widely used in universities around the world. This short introduction gives readers an insight into the rules that control how the system works, and how to understand, fix, and avoid common problems. Topics covered include algebra, calculus, linear algebra, graphics, programming, and procedures. Each chapter contains numerous illustrative examples, using mathematics that does not extend beyond first-year undergraduate material. Maple worksheets containing these examples are available for download from the author's personal website. The book is suitable for new users, but where advanced topics are central to understanding Maple they are tackled head-on. Many concepts which are absent from introductory books and manuals are described in detail. With this book, students, teachers and researchers will gain a solid understanding of Maple and how to use it to solve complex mathematical problems in a simple and efficient way.

  13. DAMP-TLR-cytokine axis dictates the fate of tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Ashok; Selvaraj, Sathishkumar; Sarode, Aditya; Chauhan, Prashant; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Saha, Bhaskar

    2017-10-09

    Random mutations leading to loss of cell cycle control is not a rare occurrence in an organism but the mutated cells are recognized and eliminated preventing the development of a tumor. These potentially tumorigenic cells release damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by toll-like receptors (TLRs) on macrophages and dendritic cells. The initial TLR-DAMP interactions lead to different responses such as altered antigen presentation and cytokine release that directly affect T cell activation and removal of the tumorigenic cells. The indirect effects of TLR-DAMP interaction include chemokine-directed altered T cell trafficking, angiogenesis for both T cell infiltration and tumor cell metastasis, and alteration of intra-tumoral milieu contributing to the development of tumor cells heterogeneity. Thus, the initial TLR-DAMP interaction has a set of local effects that modulate tumor cell growth and heterogeneity and a disseminating set of central effects that dynamically affect T cell trafficking and functions. Herein, we argue that the DAMP-TLR-cytokine axis in the tumor microenvironment serves as the mainstay that orchestrates and regulates the pro- and anti-tumor elements which dynamically interact between themselves eventuating in tumor regression or growth. The knowledge of this TLR-based immuno-surveillance framework is a key to developing a novel immunotherapy against cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Tumor Budding: The Name is EMT. Partial EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan Grigore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor budding is a histological phenomenon encountered in various cancers, whereby individual malignant cells and/or small clusters of malignant cells are seen in the tumor stroma. Postulated to be mirror epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor budding has been associated with poor cancer outcomes. However, the vast heterogeneity in its exact definition, methodology of assessment, and patient stratification need to be resolved before it can be routinely used as a standardized prognostic feature. Here, we discuss the heterogeneity in defining and assessing tumor budding, its clinical significance across multiple cancer types, and its prospective implementation in clinical practice. Next, we review the emerging evidence about partial, rather than complete, epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype at the tumor bud level, and its connection with tumor proliferation, quiescence, and stemness. Finally, based on recent literature, indicating a co-expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in many tumor buds, we posit tumor budding to be a manifestation of this hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype displaying collective cell migration.

  15. Understanding physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Understanding Physics - Second edition is a comprehensive, yet compact, introductory physics textbook aimed at physics undergraduates and also at engineers and other scientists taking a general physics course. Written with today's students in mind, this text covers the core material required by an introductory course in a clear and refreshing way. A second colour is used throughout to enhance learning and understanding. Each topic is introduced from first principles so that the text is suitable for students without a prior background in physics. At the same time the book is designed to enable

  16. Antitumor action of 3-bromopyruvate implicates reorganized tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu, cell cycle arrest and induction of mitochondria-dependent tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saveg; Kujur, Praveen Kumar; Pandey, Shrish Kumar; Goel, Yugal; Maurya, Babu Nandan; Verma, Ashish; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2018-01-15

    Evidences demonstrate that metabolic inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) exerts a potent antitumor action against a wide range of malignancies. However, the effect of 3-BP on progression of the tumors of thymic origin remains unexplored. Although, constituents of tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a pivotal role in regulation of tumor progression, it remains unclear if 3-BP can alter the composition of the crucial tumor growth regulatory components of the external surrounding of tumor cells. Thus, the present investigation attempts to understand the effect of 3-BP administration to a host bearing a progressively growing tumor of thymic origin on tumor growth regulatory soluble, cellular and biophysical components of tumor milieu vis-à-vis understanding its association with tumor progression, accompanying cell cycle events and mode of cell death. Further, the expression of cell survival regulatory molecules and hemodynamic characteristics of the tumor milieu were analysed to decipher mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of 3-BP. Administration of 3-BP to tumor-bearing hosts retarded tumor progression accompanied by induction of tumor cell death, cell cycle arrest, declined metabolism, inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated release of cytochrome c and altered hemodynamics. Moreover, 3-BP reconstituted the external milieu, in concurrence with deregulated glucose and pH homeostasis and increased tumor infiltration by NK cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. Further, 3-BP administration altered the expression of key regulatory molecules involved in glucose uptake, intracellular pH and tumor cell survival. The outcomes of this study will help in optimizing the therapeutic application of 3-BP by targeting crucial tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  18. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gress

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-a, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  19. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinke, Anja, E-mail: sprengea@staff.uni-marburg.de; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Marburg, Baldinger Strasse, Marburg D-35043 (Germany)

    2012-02-08

    Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-α, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  20. Rare, but challenging tumors: NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, D.; Balev, B.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (GEP - NET) are a heterogeneous group of tumors with different locations and many different clinical, histological, and imaging performance. In a part of them a secretion of various organic substances is present. The morbidity of GEP - NET in the EU is growing, and this leads to increase the attention to them. What you will learn: Imaging methods used for localization and staging of GEP - NET, characteristics of the study’s protocols; Classification of GEP - NET; Demonstration of typical and atypical imaging features of GEP - NET in patients registered at the NET Center at University Hospital ‘St. Marina’, Varna; Features of metastatic NET, The role of imaging in the evaluation of treatment response and follow-up of the patients. Discussion: The image semiotics analysis is based on 19 cases of GEP - NET registered NET Center at University Hospital ‘St. Marina’. The main imaging method is multidetector CT (MDCT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI ) has advantages in the evaluation of liver lesions and the local prevalence of anorectal tumors. In patients with advanced disease and liver lesions the assessment of skeletal involvement (MRI/ nuclear medical method) is mandatory. The majority of GEP - NET have not any specific imaging findings. Therefore it is extremely important proper planning and conducting of the study (MDCT and MR enterography; accurate assessment phase of scanning, positive and negative contrast). Conclusion: GEP - NET is a major diagnostic challenge due to the absence of typical imaging characteristics and often an overlap with those of the tumors of different origin can be observed. Therefore, a good knowledge of clinical and imaging changes occurring at different locations is needed. MDCT is the basis for the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of these neoplasms

  1. Cancer Stem Cells, Tumor Dormancy, And Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvi ePatel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells can persist undetectably for an extended period of time in primary tumors and in disseminated cancer cells. Very little is known about why and how these tumors persist for extended periods of time and then evolve to malignancy. The discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs in human tumors challenges our current understanding of tumor recurrence, drug resistance, and metastasis, and opens up new research directions on how cancer cells are capable of switching from dormancy to malignancy. Although overlapping molecules and pathways have been reported to regulate the stem-like phenotype of CSCs and metastasis, accumulated evidence has suggested additional clonal diversity within the stem-like cancer cell subpopulation. This review will describe the current hypothesis linking CSCs and metastasis and summarize mechanisms important for metastatic CSCs to re-initiate tumors in the secondary sites. A better understanding of CSCs’ contribution to clinical tumor dormancy and metastasis will provide new therapeutic revenues to eradicate metastatic tumors and significantly reduce the mortality of cancer patients.

  2. Dynamic fracture of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, M.G.; Liu, C.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.; Bennett, J.G.; Haberman, K.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to investigate the fundamental aspects of the process of dynamic fracture propagation in heterogeneous materials. The work focused on three important, but poorly understood, aspects of dynamic fracture for materials with a heterogeneous microstructure. These were: the appropriateness of using a single-parameter asymptotic analysis to describe dynamic crack-tip deformation fields, the temperature rises at the tip and on the flanks of a running crack, and the constitutive modeling of damage initiation and accumulation.

  3. Majority rule on heterogeneous networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambiotte, R

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the majority rule (MR) applied on heterogeneous networks. When the underlying topology is homogeneous, the system is shown to exhibit a transition from an ordered regime to a disordered regime when the noise is increased. When the network exhibits modular structures, in contrast, the system may also exhibit an asymmetric regime, where the nodes in each community reach an opposite average opinion. Finally, the node degree heterogeneity is shown to play an important role by displacing the location of the order-disorder transition and by making the system exhibit non-equipartition of the average spin

  4. Microenvironmental Regulation of Tumor Angiogenesis: Biological and Engineering Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infanger, David W.; Pathi, Siddharth P.; Fischbach, Claudia

    Tumor angiogenesis is fundamental to tumor growth and metastasis, and antiangiogenic therapies have been developed to target this process. However, the clinical success of these treatments has been limited, which may be due, in part, to an incomplete understanding of cell-microenvironment interactions and their role in tumor angiogenesis. Traditionally, two-dimensional (2D) culture approaches have been used to study tumor progression in vitro, but these systems fail to faithfully recreate tumor microenvironmental conditions contributing to tumor angiogenesis in vivo. By integrating cancer biology with tissue engineering and drug delivery approaches, the development of biologically inspired tumor models has emerged. Such 3D model systems allow studying the specific role of soluble factor signaling, cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, cell-cell interactions, mechanical cues, and metabolic stress. This chapter discusses specific biological and engineering design considerations for tissue-engineered tumor models and highlights their application for defining the underpinnings of tumor angiogenesis.

  5. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and gene fusion pattern in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ja Hee; Park, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Cheol; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be highly heterogeneous, with various morphologic features and biologic behaviors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is the most frequently observed genetic aberration in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion status. ERG immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in samples from 168 prostate cancer patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy, and 40 cases showing ERG-positive IHC staining were selected for tissue microarray (TMA) construction. Two to six representative cores were selected from each tumor focus. In the cases with heterogeneous ERG IHC staining intensity, the areas showing different intensities were separately selected. Using the TMA blocks, IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were conducted to evaluate the heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and ERG fusion gene patterns, respectively, in a single tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was defined as the simultaneous presence of negative and positive cores in the same tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG FISH was defined by the presence of cores with positive and negative FISH signals or cores with break-apart and interstitial deletion FISH signals in the same tumor focus. A total of 202 TMA cores were isolated from 40 ERG-positive cases. Of the 202 total cores, 19 were negative for ERG IHC staining, and 46 showed 1+, 52 showed 2+, and 85 showed 3+ ERG staining intensity. Eleven cores were negative for ERG FISH signal, 119 cores showed ERG break-apart FISH signals, and the remaining 72 cores revealed interstitial deletion. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was found in 20% (8/40) of cases, and intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion pattern was found in 32.5% (13/40) of cases. In summary, this study showed significantly frequent intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression, gene fusion status and fusion pattern. This heterogeneity can be caused by the development

  6. Direct arylation and heterogeneous catalysis; ever the twain shall meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The formation of aryl–aryl bonds and heteroaryl analogues is one of the most important C–C bond forming processes in organic chemistry. Recently, a methodology termed Direct Arylation (DA) has emerged as an attractive alternative to traditional cross-coupling reactions (Suzuki–Miyaura, Stille, Negishi, etc.). A parallel focus of the pharmaceutical and other chemical industries has been on the use heterogeneous catalysis as a favourable substitute for its homogeneous counterpart in cross-coupling reactions. Only very recently has heterogeneous catalysis been proposed and applied, to DA reactions. In this perspective, we consider the terms ‘heterogeneous’ and ‘homogeneous’ and the problems associated with their delineation in transition-metal catalysed reactions. We highlight the reports at the interface of DA and heterogeneous catalysis and we comment briefly on the methods used which attempt to classify reaction types as homo- or heterogeneous. In future work we recommend an emphasis be placed on kinetic methods which provide an excellent platform for analysis. In addition two analytical techniques are described which if developed to run in situ with DA reactions would illuminate our understanding of the catalysis. Overall, we provide an entry point, and bring together the mature, yet poorly-understood, subject of heterogeneous catalysis with the rapidly expanding area of DA, with a view towards the acceleration of catalyst design and the understanding of catalyst behaviour. PMID:28717441

  7. WAYS TO ENHANCE LYMPHOCYTE TRAFFICKING INTO TUMORS AND FITNESS OF TUMOR INFILTRATING LYMPHOCYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eBellone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The tumor is a hostile microenvironment for T lymphocytes. Indeed, irregular blood flow and endothelial cell (EC anergy that characterize most solid tumors hamper leukocyte adhesion, extravasation and infiltration. In addition, hypoxia and reprogramming of energy metabolism within cancer cells transform the tumor mass in a harsh environment that limits survival and effector functions of T cells, regardless of being induced in vivo by vaccination or adoptively transferred. In this review, we will summarize on recent advances in our understanding of the characteristics of tumor associated neoangiogenic vessels as well as of the tumor metabolism that may impact on T cell trafficking and fitness of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. In particular, we will focus on how advances in knowledge of the characteristics of tumor ECs have enabled identifying strategies to normalize the tumor vasculature and/or overcome EC anergy, thus increasing leukocyte-vessel wall interactions and lymphocyte infiltration in tumors. We will also focus on drugs acting on cells and their released molecules to transiently render the tumor microenvironment more suitable for tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes, thus increasing the therapeutic effectiveness of both active and adoptive immunotherapies.

  8. Understanding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Shelby, Blake; Mattingly, Christine

    2016-01-01

    "Energy" is a term often used in everyday language. Even young children associate energy with the food they eat, feeling tired after playing soccer, or when asked to turn the lights off to save light energy. However, they may not have the scientific conceptual understanding of energy at this age. Teaching energy and matter could be…

  9. A proposed grading system for standardizing tumor consistency of intracranial meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zada, Gabriel; Yashar, Parham; Robison, Aaron; Winer, Jesse; Khalessi, Alexander; Mack, William J; Giannotta, Steven L

    2013-12-01

    Tumor consistency plays an important and underrecognized role in the surgeon's ability to resect meningiomas, especially with evolving trends toward minimally invasive and keyhole surgical approaches. Aside from descriptors such as "hard" or "soft," no objective criteria exist for grading, studying, and conveying the consistency of meningiomas. The authors designed a practical 5-point scale for intraoperative grading of meningiomas based on the surgeon's ability to internally debulk the tumor and on the subsequent resistance to folding of the tumor capsule. Tumor consistency grades and features are as follows: 1) extremely soft tumor, internal debulking with suction only; 2) soft tumor, internal debulking mostly with suction, and remaining fibrous strands resected with easily folded capsule; 3) average consistency, tumor cannot be freely suctioned and requires mechanical debulking, and the capsule then folds with relative ease; 4) firm tumor, high degree of mechanical debulking required, and capsule remains difficult to fold; and 5) extremely firm, calcified tumor, approaches density of bone, and capsule does not fold. Additional grading categories included tumor heterogeneity (with minimum and maximum consistency scores) and a 3-point vascularity score. This grading system was prospectively assessed in 50 consecutive patients undergoing craniotomy for meningioma resection by 2 surgeons in an independent fashion. Grading scores were subjected to a linear weighted kappa analysis for interuser reliability. Fifty patients (100 scores) were included in the analysis. The mean maximal tumor diameter was 4.3 cm. The distribution of overall tumor consistency scores was as follows: Grade 1, 4%; Grade 2, 9%; Grade 3, 43%; Grade 4, 44%; and Grade 5, 0%. Regions of Grade 5 consistency were reported only focally in 14% of heterogeneous tumors. Tumors were designated as homogeneous in 68% and heterogeneous in 32% of grades. The kappa analysis score for overall tumor consistency

  10. Retrospective review of 21 cases of neuroendocrine tumors and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.; Alonso, S.; Cordoba, A.; Vazquez, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: literature review and case histories. Neuroendocrine tumors (Nets) are considered rare and comprise a group very heterogeneous with different prognosis and evolution. They represent less than 1% of all malignant tumors and most originate from the gastrointestinal tract in enterocromoafines cells are widely distributed in the same: in the stomach, duodenum, pancreas, small, colon and rectum. Carcinoid tumors Gastrointestinal represent over 70% of all tumors (Nets) in humans. And frequently they are finding their debut as disseminated disease, coinciding our review. 21 records were retrospectively analyzed between 1995 and June 2010. No significant difference in gender, of these 9 patients were 12 female and male sex. Ages ranged from 36 years to 83 years, with an average of 63 years. The locations were distributed as follows: 6 patients with small bowel tumor, 2 with blind tumor, 2 esophageal tumor , 1 patient with pancreatic tumor, 1 patient with stomach tumor, 2 patients with retroperitoneal disease in which failed to define the primary, 2 patients with tumor in breast, 3 patients with lung tumor, 1 patient with piriform sinus tumor and 1 patient with parotid tumor. Of the 21 patients, only 4 sometime had functional syndrome characterized by diarrhea and flushing. The treatments that received these patients were also very heterogeneous. From these patients, only one died in 2008 and the others are still alive, some in control and other treatment. Because of the number of patients seen and the therapeutic variability the statistical analysis no was done

  11. Hepatic tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, J T

    2001-02-01

    Although they account for only 1% to 4% of solid tumors in children, hepatic tumors and pseudotumors offer a diagnostic challenge to the clinician seeing only an occasional case. Metastatic lesions such as neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, and lymphoma are the most common neoplasm seen in the liver, but 10 distinct primary tumors and pseudotumors of the liver occur with some regularity, and a few others may be seen rarely, including leiomyosarcoma, rhabdoid tumor, and endodermal sinus tumor. Five of these neoplasms--hepatoblastoma, infantile hemangio-endothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tree--occur only in children and are the major focus of the article.

  12. A retrorectal tumor: Presacral chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Birur Parmeshwarappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The retrorectal space contains multiple embryologic remnants derived from various tissues and tumors that develop in this space are both grossly and histologically heterogeneous. Most lesions are benign, but malignant neoplasms are not uncommon. Malignancy is more common in the pediatric population than in adults and solid lesions are more likely to be malignant than are cystic lesions. Here, 50-year-old male presented bleeding with mass per rectum and lower abdominal pain. The computed tomography scan showed retrorectal mass with destruction of the sacrum and excision of the presacral mass with removal of involved sacrum from third sacral vertebra to tip of coccyx. Finally, histopathology was chordoma of sacrum. Patient had received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy.

  13. Chloride Transport in Heterogeneous Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Holt, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The chloride mass balance (CMB) is a commonly-used method for estimating groundwater recharge. Observations of the vertical distribution of pore-water chloride are related to the groundwater infiltration rates (i.e. recharge rates). In CMB method, the chloride distribution is attributed mainly to the assumption of one dimensional piston flow. In many places, however, the vertical distribution of chloride will be influenced by heterogeneity, leading to horizontal movement of infiltrating waters. The impact of heterogeneity will be particularly important when recharge is locally focused. When recharge is focused in an area, horizontal movement of chloride-bearing waters, coupled with upward movement driven by evapotranspiration, may lead to chloride bulges that could be misinterpreted if the CMB method is used to estimate recharge. We numerically simulate chloride transport and evaluate the validity of the CMB method in highly heterogeneous systems. This simulation is conducted for the unsaturated zone of Ogallala, Antlers, and Gatuna (OAG) formations in Andrews County, Texas. A two dimensional finite element model will show the movement of chloride through heterogeneous systems. We expect to see chloride bulges not only close to the surface but also at depths characterized by horizontal or upward movement. A comparative study of focused recharge estimates in this study with available recharge data will be presented.

  14. A Heterogeneous Quantum Computer Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, X.; Riesebos, L.; Lao, L.; Garcia Almudever, C.; Sebastiano, F.; Versluis, R.; Charbon, E.; Bertels, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a high level view of the heterogeneous quantum computer architecture as any future quantum computer will consist of both a classical and quantum computing part. The classical part is needed for error correction as well as for the execution of algorithms that contain both

  15. Heterogeneous Beliefs and Climate Catastrophes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiseleva, T.

    2016-01-01

    We study how heterogeneous beliefs about the causes and extent of global warming affect local mitigation and adaptation strategies and therefore global climate dynamics. Local policies are determined by expectations of policy makers about future climate. There are three types of expectations: strong

  16. Communicating to heterogeneous target groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    very often have to communicate to rather heterogeneous target groups that have little more in common than a certain geographical habitat. That goes against most schoolbook teaching in the field of communication, but is none the less the terms with which that kind of communication has to live...... will be able to make a much stronger case....

  17. Prices and heterogeneous search costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luis Moraga-Gonzalez, Jose; Sandor, Zsolt; Wildenbeest, Matthijs R.

    2017-01-01

    We study price formation in a model of consumer search for differentiated products in which consumers have heterogeneous search costs. We provide conditions under which a pure-strategy symmetric Nash equilibrium exists and is unique. Search costs affect two margins-the intensive search margin (or

  18. Languages as semiotically heterogenous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendon, Adam

    2017-01-01

    The target article is consistent with seeing languages as semiotically heterogenous, using categorial, depictive, and analogic semiotic signs. "Gesture," used in the target article, is shown to be vague and not useful. Kendon's view, criticised in the target, is restated. His proposal for comparative semiotic analyses of how visible bodily action is used in utterance production is reexplained.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 6. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis - The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. R S Swathi K L Sebastian. General Article Volume 13 Issue 6 June 2008 pp 548-560 ...

  20. Social capital and community heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, Hilde R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the

  1. Social Capital and Community Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Hilde

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the number of parties in the local party system as a more…

  2. Understanding translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  3. Understanding Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eWu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is the ability to adapt successfully in the face of stress and adversity. Stressful life events, trauma and chronic adversity can have a substantial impact on brain function and structure, and can result in the development of PTSD, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, most individuals do not develop such illnesses after experiencing stressful life events, and are thus thought to be resilient. Resilience as successful adaptation relies on effective responses to environmental challenges and ultimate resistance to the deleterious effects of stress, therefore a greater understanding of the factors that promote such effects is of great relevance. This review focuses on recent findings regarding genetic, epigenetic, developmental, psychosocial and neurochemical factors that are considered essential contributors to the development of resilience. Neural circuits and pathways involved in mediating resilience are also discussed. The growing understanding of resilience factors will hopefully lead to the development of new pharmacological and psychological interventions for enhancing resilience and mitigating the untoward consequences.

  4. Metabolomics analysis of postharvest ripening heterogeneity of ‘Hass' avocadoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedreschi, R.; Munoz, P.; Robledo, P.; Becerra, C.; Defilippi, B.G.; Eekelen, van H.D.L.M.; Mumm, R.; Westra, E.H.; Vos, de R.C.H.

    2014-01-01

    The complex physiology of ‘Hass’ avocado renders its postharvest ripening heterogeneous and unpre-dictable. Several approaches have previously been undertaken to broaden our understanding of the causesof this postharvest ripening heterogeneity but without much success. In this study, a fruit biopsy

  5. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  6. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  7. Understanding unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Rocheteau

    2006-01-01

    Modern economists have built models of the labor market, which isolate the market’s key drivers and describe the way these interact to produce particular levels of unemployment. One of the most popular models used by macroeconomists today is the search-matching model of equilibrium unemployment. We explain this model, and show how it can be applied to understand the way various policies, such as unemployment benefits, taxes, or technological changes, can affect the unemployment rate.

  8. Surface heterogeneity of small asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho

    A rubble pile model of asteroid origin would predict averaged rather homogeneous surface of an asteroid. Previous spacecraft observations (mostly S-type asteroids) did not show large color/albedo variation on the surface. Vesta would be exceptional since HST observation suggested that its surface should be heterogeneous due to the impact excavation of the interior. As for a young asteroid (832) Karin (age being 5Ma), Sasaki et al. (2004) detected variation of infrared spectra which could be explained by the difference of the space weathering degree. They discussed the possibility of the survival of the old surface. However, the variation was not confirmed by later observation (Chapman et al., 2007; Vernazza et al., 2007). Recent observation of a small (550m) asteroid Itokawa by Hayabusa spacecraft revealed that Itokawa is heterogeneous in color and albedo although the overall rocky structure is considered as a rubble pile (Saito et al., 2006). The color difference can be explained by the difference of weathering degree (Ishiguro et al., 2008). The heterogeneity could be explained by mass movement caused by rapid rotation from YORP effect (Scheeres et al., 2007) or seismic shaking (Sasaki, 2006). Probably small silicate asteroids without significant regolith could have heterogeneous in color and albedo. On large asteroids (˜ a few 10km), regolith reaccumulation should have covered the underlying heterogeneity. References: Chapman, C. R. et al (2007) Icarus, 191, 323-329 Ishiguro, M. et al. (2008) MAPS, in press. Saito, J. et al. (2006) Science, 312, 1341-1344 Sasaki, S. (2006) in Spacecraft Reconnaissance of Asteroid and Comet Interiors Sasaki, T. et al (2004) Astrophys. J. 615, L161-L164 Scheeres, D. J. (2007) Icarus 188, 425-429 Vernazza, P. et al. (2007) Icarus 191, 330-336.

  9. Understanding Technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Bendtsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We are facing radical changes in our ways of living in the nearest future. Not necessarily of our own choice, but because tchnological development is moving so fast, that it will have still greater impact on many aspects of our lives. We have seen the beginnings of that change within the latest 35 years or so, but according to newest research that change will speed up immensely in the nearest years to come. The impact of that change or these changes will affect our working life immensely as a consequence of automation. How these changes are brought about and which are their consequences in a broad sense is being attempted to be understood and guessed by researchers. No one knows for sure, but specific patterns are visible. This paper will not try to guess, what will come, but will rather try to understand the deepest ”nature” of technology in order to understand the driving factors in this development: the genesis of technology in a broad sense in order to contibute to the understanding of the basis for the expected development.

  10. Pathological Bases and Clinical Impact of Intratumor Heterogeneity in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, José I; Angulo, Javier C

    2018-01-27

    Intratumor heterogeneity is an inherent event in tumor development that is receiving much attention in the last years since it is responsible for most failures of current targeted therapies. The purpose of this review is to offer clinicians an updated insight of the multiple manifestations of a complex event that impacts significantly patient's life. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor and a paradigmatic example of a heterogeneous neoplasm. Next-generation sequencing has demonstrated that intratumor heterogeneity encompasses genetic, epigenetic, and microenvironmental variability. Currently accepted protocols of tumor sampling seem insufficient in unveiling intratumor heterogeneity with reliability and need to be updated. This variability challenges the precise morphological diagnosis, its molecular characterization, and the selection of optimal personalized therapies in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, a neoplasm traditionally considered chemo- and radio-resistant. We review the state of the art of the different approaches to intratumor heterogeneity in clear cell renal cell carcinomas, from the simple morphology to the most sophisticated massive sequencing tools.

  11. Multi-region and single-cell sequencing reveal variable genomic heterogeneity in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingshan; Liu, Yang; Di, Jiabo; Su, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Beihai; Wang, Zaozao; Zhuang, Meng; Bai, Fan; Su, Xiangqian

    2017-11-23

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with complex molecular subtypes. While colon cancer has been widely investigated, studies on rectal cancer are very limited. Here, we performed multi-region whole-exome sequencing and single-cell whole-genome sequencing to examine the genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of rectal tumors. We sequenced nine tumor regions and 88 single cells from two rectal cancer patients with tumors of the same molecular classification and characterized their mutation profiles and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) at the multi-region and the single-cell levels. A variable extent of genomic heterogeneity was observed between the two patients, and the degree of ITH increased when analyzed on the single-cell level. We found that major SCNAs were early events in cancer development and inherited steadily. Single-cell sequencing revealed mutations and SCNAs which were hidden in bulk sequencing. In summary, we studied the ITH of rectal cancer at regional and single-cell resolution and demonstrated that variable heterogeneity existed in two patients. The mutational scenarios and SCNA profiles of two patients with treatment naïve from the same molecular subtype are quite different. Our results suggest each tumor possesses its own architecture, which may result in different diagnosis, prognosis, and drug responses. Remarkable ITH exists in the two patients we have studied, providing a preliminary impression of ITH in rectal cancer.

  12. RET mutation heterogeneity in primary advanced medullary thyroid cancers and their metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romei, Cristina; Ciampi, Raffaele; Casella, Francesca; Tacito, Alessia; Torregrossa, Liborio; Ugolini, Clara; Basolo, Fulvio; Materazzi, Gabriele; Vitti, Paolo; Elisei, Rossella

    2018-02-09

    Medullary Thyroid Cancer (MTC) whose pathogenesis is strictly related to RET proto-oncogene alterations, has been shown to have a heterogenic RET mutation profile in subpopulations of MTC. The aim of our study was to investigate the RET somatic mutation profile in primary MTC and in the corresponding metastatic tissues in a series of advanced metastatic cases. This study demonstrated that in about 20% of cases a different RET mutation profile can be found when comparing primary tumor and its corresponding metastases. Furthermore in 8% of tumors, RET intratumor heterogeneity was observed We also showed that in some cases an imbalance of RET copy number was present. We confirmed a high prevalence (90%) of RET somatic mutations in advanced tumors. Fifty-six MTC patients (50 somatic and 6 hereditary cases) have been included in the study and a total of 209 specimens have been analysed by direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used to investigate amplification/deletion of RET alleles. In conclusion, this study showed a genetic intra- and intertumor heterogeneity in MTC, But in only 20% of CASES These results could justify the relatively moderate level of aggressiveness of the disease with respect to more aggressive human tumors that are characterized by a high rate of mutation and heterogeneity.

  13. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Veirman, Kim, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Rao, Luigia [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Van Riet, Ivan [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Stem Cell Laboratory, Division of Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Frassanito, Maria Antonia [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of General Pathology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Vanderkerken, Karin, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium)

    2014-06-27

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease.

  14. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Veirman, Kim; Rao, Luigia; De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Van Riet, Ivan; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease

  15. Capturing Structural Heterogeneity in Chromatin Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekundayo, Babatunde; Richmond, Timothy J; Schalch, Thomas

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin fiber organization is implicated in processes such as transcription, DNA repair and chromosome segregation, but how nucleosomes interact to form higher-order structure remains poorly understood. We solved two crystal structures of tetranucleosomes with approximately 11-bp DNA linker length at 5.8 and 6.7 Å resolution. Minimal intramolecular nucleosome-nucleosome interactions result in a fiber model resembling a flat ribbon that is compatible with a two-start helical architecture, and that exposes histone and DNA surfaces to the environment. The differences in the two structures combined with electron microscopy reveal heterogeneous structural states, and we used site-specific chemical crosslinking to assess the diversity of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions through identification of structure-sensitive crosslink sites that provide a means to characterize fibers in solution. The chromatin fiber architectures observed here provide a basis for understanding heterogeneous chromatin higher-order structures as they occur in a genomic context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain tumor stem cell dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzuto, Giuseppina; Toccacieli, Laura; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Frustagli, Gianluca; Chistolini, Pietro; Galli, Rossella; Molinari, Agnese

    2014-01-01

    Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC) movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  17. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels. Also under investigation are ways to improve drug delivery to the tumor and to prevent the side- ... vessels. Also under investigation are ways to improve drug delivery to the tumor and to prevent the side- ...

  18. Is tissue CA125 expression in epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma heterogenic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparholt, Morten H; Høgdall, Claus K; Nedergaard, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate if heterogeneity of tissue cancer antigen 125 (CA125) expression is present in epithelial serous adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, to investigate whether there is a correlation between levels of CA125 tissue expression, serum level of CA125, stage, and grade. A total of 10 patients...... diagnosed with serous ovarian adenocarcinomas were included. Preoperative blood samples were collected to determine serum CA125 levels. Tumor tissue from primary surgery was collected and processed for immunohistochemical analyses. CA125 was expressed in varying degrees in tumor tissues from all patients....... Mean tissue CA125 expression for each patient ranged from 36% to 98%. Intrapatient variations in tissue expression ranged from 10% to 90% point. No significant correlations between levels of CA125 tissue expression, serum level of CA125, stage, and grade were found. We found that the tissue expression...

  19. Tumor-Derived Exosomes and Their Role in Tumor-Induced Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa L. Whiteside

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX are emerging as critical components of an intercellular information network between the tumor and the host. The tumor escapes from the host immune system by using a variety of mechanisms designed to impair or eliminate anti-tumor immunity. TEX carrying a cargo of immunoinhibitory molecules and factors represent one such mechanism. TEX, which are present in all body fluids of cancer patients, deliver negative molecular or genetic signals to immune cells re-programming their functions. Although TEX can also stimulate immune activity, in the microenvironments dominated by the tumor, TEX tend to mediate immune suppression thus promoting tumor progression. The TEX content, in part resembling that of the parent cell, may serve as a source of cancer biomarkers. TEX also interfere with immune therapies. A better understanding of TEX and their contribution to cancer progression and cancer patients’ response to immune therapies represents a challenging new field of investigation.

  20. Aggressive malignant phyllodes tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan Roberts; Dianne M. Runk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Originally described in 1838 by Muller, phyllodes tumor is a rare fibroepithelial neoplasm which represents roughly 0.3–0.9% of all breast cancers. Phyllodes tumor are divided into benign, borderline and malignant histologic categories. Malignant phyllodes tumor represent anywhere from 10–30% of all phyllodes tumors. This group has both the potential to recur locally and metastasize, however not all malignant phyllodes behave this way. The challenge lays in predicting which tumo...