WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding successful innovations

  1. Successful innovation by motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Koudelková

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is one of the most important factors for business growth. Human capital plays a significant role in the successful process of innovation. This article deals with employee motivation in the innovation process and the main scientific aim of this study is to present results of research that was undertaken in the Czech Republic at the beginning of 2013. Questionnaires were used for the survey and statistical analyses such as Chi square test or Hierarchical cluster analysis were used for data processing. This study also provides a theoretical and practical overview of business innovation in the Czech Republic.

  2. Understanding How Program Managers Successfully Manage Innovation in Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAPs): An Exploratory Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stinson, Benjamin

    2001-01-01

    .... The DoD 5000 Series encourages PMs to, "continually search for innovative practices that reduce cycle-time, reduce cost, and encourage team-work", yet little is contained in the DoD 5000 Series...

  3. Successful Innovations in Educational Leadership Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen P.; Oliver, John; Solis, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe successful innovations in educational leadership preparation programs. Professors of educational leadership from across the nation nominated innovations of 12 programs. Based on review of descriptions of the innovations provided by nominees, further documentation on the innovations was…

  4. Level of understanding of innovation among the Malaysian executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Norkisme Zainal; Suradi, Nur Riza Mohd; Shahabuddin, Faridatulazna; Mustafa, Zainol; Ismail, Wan Rosmanira

    2014-06-01

    Innovation is among the most frequently used word in the business world today. While many businessman and executives agree that innovation is needed to sustain their long term business success, many struggle to understand the concept of innovation. This study aims to measure the understanding level of innovation among the Malaysian executives using a survey questionnaire. Questions regarding innovation were posted to the respondents and they were requested to answer either it was True or False. Each respondent was given scores for their correct answers. The score of the right answers were then categorized into low, moderate and high understanding level. Results of the survey revealed that the understanding level of innovation among the Malaysian Executives is still at moderate level thus leading to the failure of many initiatives introduced by the organization or the government.

  5. Critical successful factors for innovation in vietnamese firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Hoai Nam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Innovation is considered as a core element of sustainable competitive advantage in the rapidly changing environment. However, in Vietnam, researches on innovation are very rare, which are mostly general reports without underlying analyses of innovation in firms, especially determinants for innovation. Therefore, this paper focuses on analyzing critical successful factors for innovation in Vietnamese firms.  Design/methodology/approach: This study used primary data through questionnaire survey from November 2015 to February 2016. Respondents were senior managers of firms located mostly at Hanoi (Northern, Hochiminh (Southern and Danang city (Central. The questionnaire included multi-items designed to measure factors. Each item was measured by 5 point Likert scale: 1 (strongly disagree to 5 (strongly agree. Questionnaires were administerd to 500 firms belonging to list of Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI in these three cities with rate of 40% (Hochiminh city, 40% (Hanoi city and Danang (20%. However, there were 360 returned questionnaires and valid to next analyses. Analysis methodologies of reliability, factor analysis and regression are utilized in this paper.  Findings: We developed and tested a model of determinants for Innovation in Vietnamese firms. The major contribution of this study is testing six determinants for innovation in Vietnamese companies. The results showed that awareness of innovation, innovation strategy and policy, organization for innovation, HR for innovation and building capabilities have positive impact on innovation.  Originality/value: This study makes a contribution for both academics and practitioners. For academics, this study provided one more empirical evidence of the determinants for innovation. Regarding practical implications, this study suggests that Vietnamese companies have to strengthen capabilities for employees through training, encourage generation of new ideas, rule breaking

  6. Critical successful factors for innovation in vietnamese firms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Hoai Nam; Nham Phong Tuan; Nguyen Van Minh

    2017-01-01

    Innovation is considered as a core element of sustainable competitive advantage in the rapidly changing environment. However, in Vietnam, researches on innovation are very rare, which are mostly general reports without underlying analyses of innovation in firms, especially determinants for innovation. Therefore, this paper focuses on analyzing critical successful factors for innovation in Vietnamese firms. Design/methodology/approach: This study used primary data through questionnaire survey from November 2015 to February 2016. Respondents were senior managers of firms located mostly at Hanoi (Northern), Hochiminh (Southern) and Danang city (Central). The questionnaire included multi-items designed to measure factors. Each item was measured by 5 point Likert scale: 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Questionnaires were administerd to 500 firms belonging to list of Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI) in these three cities with rate of 40% (Hochiminh city), 40% (Hanoi city) and Danang (20%). However, there were 360 returned questionnaires and valid to next analyses. Analysis methodologies of reliability, factor analysis and regression are utilized in this paper. Findings: We developed and tested a model of determinants for Innovation in Vietnamese firms. The major contribution of this study is testing six determinants for innovation in Vietnamese companies. The results showed that awareness of innovation, innovation strategy and policy, organization for innovation, HR for innovation and building capabilities have positive impact on innovation. Originality/value: This study makes a contribution for both academics and practitioners. For academics, this study provided one more empirical evidence of the determinants for innovation. Regarding practical implications, this study suggests that Vietnamese companies have to strengthen capabilities for employees through training, encourage generation of new ideas, rule breaking, and innovative behaviors by

  7. Critical successful factors for innovation in vietnamese firms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Hoai Nam; Nham Phong Tuan; Nguyen Van Minh

    2017-07-01

    Innovation is considered as a core element of sustainable competitive advantage in the rapidly changing environment. However, in Vietnam, researches on innovation are very rare, which are mostly general reports without underlying analyses of innovation in firms, especially determinants for innovation. Therefore, this paper focuses on analyzing critical successful factors for innovation in Vietnamese firms. Design/methodology/approach: This study used primary data through questionnaire survey from November 2015 to February 2016. Respondents were senior managers of firms located mostly at Hanoi (Northern), Hochiminh (Southern) and Danang city (Central). The questionnaire included multi-items designed to measure factors. Each item was measured by 5 point Likert scale: 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Questionnaires were administerd to 500 firms belonging to list of Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI) in these three cities with rate of 40% (Hochiminh city), 40% (Hanoi city) and Danang (20%). However, there were 360 returned questionnaires and valid to next analyses. Analysis methodologies of reliability, factor analysis and regression are utilized in this paper. Findings: We developed and tested a model of determinants for Innovation in Vietnamese firms. The major contribution of this study is testing six determinants for innovation in Vietnamese companies. The results showed that awareness of innovation, innovation strategy and policy, organization for innovation, HR for innovation and building capabilities have positive impact on innovation. Originality/value: This study makes a contribution for both academics and practitioners. For academics, this study provided one more empirical evidence of the determinants for innovation. Regarding practical implications, this study suggests that Vietnamese companies have to strengthen capabilities for employees through training, encourage generation of new ideas, rule breaking, and innovative behaviors by

  8. Understanding CLIL as an innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kiely

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL initiatives in schools have become widespread across Europe and beyond in the last decade or so. Drivers for this include the role of English as the language of international economic activity, media and culture, belief in the value of early start and meaning-focussed instruction in foreign language learning, and a policy position which promotes a multilingual Europe. In many contexts, CLIL initiatives are local: teachers and educational leaders with assistance from teacher educators and experts in universities establish programmes, which are then shaped by available resources, human and material. While the commitment, enthusiasm and energy for CLIL at classroom and school levels are essential requirements for educational innovation, they may not, in the longer term be enough for sustainability and ongoing development. This paper examines the implementation of CLIL as an innovation and identifies some issues where wider policy support and coordination may be useful. It draws on the findings of an evaluation study of a CLIL project implemented in four countries, and identifies issues and ways forward for an effective strategy for CLIL in terms of foreign language learning, subject learning, and positive learning experiences for every child.

  9. Bringing to Market Technological Innovation: What Distinguishes Success from Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Frattini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Commercialization is a critical step in technological innovation. Nevertheless, many scholars believe that it is often the least well-managed activity of the whole innovation process. The launch stage seems to be particularly critical in high-technology markets because of the volatility, interconnectedness and the proliferation of new technologies they experience. However, academic and practitioners’ literature has not, so far, developed a clear understanding of the factors that distinguish an effective commercialization from an unsuccessful one, especially in high-technology environments. This paper discusses the results of a research project that aimed to understand the ingredients for success in the commercialization of a technological innovation. The first stage of the research consisted of a comparative historical analysis of 18 innovations, which were commercialized in consumer high-tech markets in the last 30 years. The analysis advocates that an effective commercialization comprises three sub-strategies: Early adoption strategy, Adoption network configuration strategy and Mainstream adoption strategy, with each one characterized by a coherent set of commercialization dimensions. The relative importance of each sub-strategy in determining the innovation commercial success depends on the type of innovation that is commercialized, be it radical or incremental and discontinuous or continuous.

  10. Innovative approach towards understanding optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Bharadwaj, Sadashiv Raj; Kumar, Raj; Shudhanshu, Avinash Kumar; Verma, Deepak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a decline in the students’ interest towards Science and Optics. Use of technology in the form of various types of sensors and data acquisition systems has come as a saviour. Till date, manual routine tools and techniques are used to perform various experimental procedures in most of the science/optics laboratories in our country. The manual tools are cumbersome whereas the automated ones are costly. It does not enthuse young researchers towards the science laboratories. There is a need to develop applications which can be easily integrated, tailored at school and undergraduate level laboratories and are economical at the same time. Equipments with advanced technologies are available but they are uneconomical and have complicated working principle with a black box approach. The present work describes development of portable tools and applications which are user-friendly. This is being implemented using open-source physical computing platform based on a simple low cost microcontroller board and a development environment for writing software. The present paper reports the development of an automated spectrometer, an instrument used in almost all optics experiments at undergraduate level, and students’ response to this innovation. These tools will inspire young researchers towards science and facilitate development of advance low cost equipments making life easier for Indian as well as developing nations.

  11. Commercializing Government-sponsored Innovations: Twelve Successful Buildings Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. A.; Berry, L. G.; Goel, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies.

  12. Commercializing government-sponsored innovations: Twelve successful buildings case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Goel, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies. 27 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Understanding Eco-innovation and Green Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maj Munch

    2014-01-01

    and definitions of ecoinnovationare lacking leading to much confusion and methodologically weak empirical analyses. This paperseeks to remedy this by offering a definition and taxonomy of eco-innovations and discussing theimplications for green business model thinking, bringing in examples of Danish successful...... patterns(cities/communities, physical planning, symbiosis)7. Business model eco-innovation (green value creation by novel financing or ownership modes)(See also Andersen 2006, 2008 for earlier versions).The taxonomy may be used to understand the conditions for creating green value for different types...... of companies and industries and how this is changing over time as the green economy matures. The complementarities and competition between these eco-innovations are significant for determining the rateand direction of green economic change. Understanding these processes is essential in developing efficient...

  14. Competitiveness Through Innovation: Successes and Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores and discusses innovation for competitiveness scenario based on an ongoing research in Morogoro Canvas Mill using cross sectional case study design. The objective of the research was, and is, to identify and assess innovative practices and challenges facing the Canvas Mill in the process of striving ...

  15. Key Success Factors of Innovation in Multinational Agrifood Prospector Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuin, Frances T.J.M.; Batterink, Maarten H.; Omta, S.W.F. (Onno)

    2007-01-01

    The Wageningen Innovation Assessment Tool (WIAT) assesses a company’s drivers and barriers to innovation and benchmarks the critical success and failure factors of its innovation projects with data of agrifood prospector companies around the world. The present paper discusses its application in 12 multinational agrifood prospector companies in the Netherlands and France. It is concluded that WIAT by uncovering the tacit knowledge of the innovation project team creates opportunities for subs...

  16. Syndicate Innovation Venturing: Translating Academic Innovations into Commercial Successes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain A. Vertès

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Innovations that initiate new technology cycles, i.e., radical innovations, bring tremendous value to Society and build for the companies that deploy them sustainable competitive advantages. However, large firms have typically been relatively inefficient at accessing from academia or technology start-ups such technological leaps. Indeed, most multiyear and multimillion dollar academia-industry partnerships have historically not resulted in any acceleration of the rate of deployment of game-changing innovations, which empirically proceeds in 25 year cycles, such as for example the expansion of the scope of the pharmaceutical industry from small molecules to biologics, or, projecting into the future, to siRNA or therapeutic stem cell technologies. Syndicated innovation venturing is a new strategic partnering concept described here that brings together actors from different economic segments in a non zero-sum game as a means to facilitate seed-funding, with the aim to de-risk technologies while reducing initial financial exposures. A case study in the pharmaceutical industry suggests that alleviating this hurdle may provide an appropriate environment to improve the dynamics of academic technology transfer to the commercial phase. By contributing to the de-risking of the creation of novel biotechnology businesses, this novel mechanism could help speed up the commercialization of emerging technologies on a large scale. At a time when knowledge-based firms such as pharmaceutical companies attempt to revisit their innovation models to advance science, in spite of an environment of increasing risk-aversion, such responses could tilt the balance in favor of disruptive products and sustained corporate financial performance by removing common barriers to radical innovation deployment.

  17. Understanding Successful Sandwich Placements: A Bourdieusian Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Martyn; Zukas, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich placements and other integrated work and study schemes are increasingly advocated as a key means by which universities can promote students' employability. However, there is little understanding of how successful placements work in terms of facilitating learning and development. Drawing on three longitudinal case studies of students who…

  18. Sustaining Innovative Success: A Case Study on Consumer-Centric Innovation in the ICT Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyung Choy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of innovation growing rapidly and having a shorter lifespan is a structural change due to the development of ICT (Information and Communications Technology, diverse investment methods, and reduced pattern of innovation adoption. For ICT companies to survive and maintain their success in this ever-changing environment, they need to succeed in fulfilling both productivity and accuracy of innovation. To sustain their innovative success, ICT companies should consistently maintain the direction of innovation towards consumers. The present study analyzes various cases of ICT companies which succeeded or failed to maintain their prior innovative success, and suggests consumer-centric innovation as a solution. To create consumer-centric innovations, companies have to (1 predict the dynamically evolving demand of consumers and continuously transform; (2 proactively employ observation method and big data analysis to discover hidden demands; and (3 identify hassles such as wastes, inconveniences, and anxieties, and put effort in solving these hassles.

  19. Determinants for Failure and Success of Innovation Projects: The Road to Sustainable Educational Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, P. A.; Hendricks, M.; Paas, F.; Wopereis, I.; Cordewener, B.

    2004-01-01

    Robert Burns wrote: "The best laid schemes of Mice and Men oft go awry". This could be considered the motto of most educational innovation. The question that arises is not so much why some innovations fail (although this is very important question), but rather why other innovations succeed? This study investigated the success factors of…

  20. How is success achieved by individuals innovating for patient safety and quality in the NHS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Laura; Jackson, Cath; Lawton, Rebecca

    2017-09-11

    Innovation in healthcare is said to be notoriously difficult to achieve and sustain yet simultaneously the health service is under intense pressure to innovate given the ever increasing demands placed upon it. Whilst many studies have looked at diffusion of innovation from an organisational perspective, few have sought to understand how individuals working in healthcare innovate successfully. We took a positive deviance approach to understand how innovations are achieved by individuals working in the NHS. We conducted in depth interviews in 2015 with 15 individuals who had received a national award for being a successful UK innovator in healthcare. We invited only those people who were currently (or had recently) worked in the NHS and whose innovation focused on improving patient safety or quality. Thematic analysis was used. Four themes emerged from the data: personal determination, the ability to broker relationships and make connections, the ways in which innovators were able to navigate organisational culture to their advantage and their ability to use evidence to influence others. Determination, focus and persistence were important personal characteristics of innovators as were skills in being able to challenge the status quo. Innovators were able to connect sometimes disparate teams and people, being the broker between them in negotiating collaborative working. The culture of the organisation these participants resided in was important with some being able to use this (and the current patient safety agenda) to their advantage. Gathering robust data to demonstrate their innovation had a positive impact and was seen as essential to its progression. This paper reveals a number of factors which are important to the success of innovators in healthcare. We have uncovered that innovators have particular personal traits which encourage a propensity towards change and action. Yet, for fruitful innovation to take place, it is important for relational networks and

  1. Translation to success of surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecht, Joshua A; von Segesser, Ludwig Karl; Ashrafian, Hutan; Rao, Christopher; Skapinakis, Petros; Saso, Srdjan; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2010-03-01

    Contemporary thoracic and cardiovascular surgery uses extensive equipment and devices to enable its performance. As the specialties develop and new frontiers are crossed, the technology needs to advance in a parallel fashion. Strokes of genius or problem-solving brain-storming may generate great ideas, but the metamorphosis of an idea into a physical functioning tool requires a lot more than just a thinking process. A modern surgical device is the end-point of a sophisticated, complicated and potentially treacherous route, which incorporates new skills and knowledge acquisition. Processes including technology transfer, commercialisation, corporate and product development, intellectual property and regulatory routes all play pivotal roles in this voyage. Many good ideas may fall by the wayside for a multitude of reasons as they may not be marketable or may be badly marketed. In this article, we attempt to illuminate the components required in the process of surgical innovation, which we believe must remain in the remit of the modern-day thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon. Copyright (c) 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding China’s Economic Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xing

    2016-01-01

    cultural and political uniqueness influences economic activities and shapes distinctive institutional forms. In order to grasp the factors behind the Chinese economic success, it is important to understand how the disembedded forces of marketization and commodification were balanced by the embedded forces...... of socio-cultural and political structures. These historically and culturally shaped structures, such as the active role of the state and local governments, the variety of forms of property and business ownership, the traditional culture of clientele-based social relations, etc., provide rich empirical...... context to explain and analyze the “embedded” hegemony in transitional China. The first part of the this paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding socio-cultural and political embeddedness in China and the second part analyzes some characteristics of the state-market-society embedded process...

  3. Innovation and entrepreneurship in India: understanding jugaad

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu, Jaideep Charles; Jain, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we use the term $\\textit{jugaad}$ to describe the frugal, flexible, and inclusive approach to innovation and entrepreneurship emerging from India. We articulate why this method is appropriate within the Indian context and highlight similarities between $\\textit{jugaad}$ and related types of innovation originating from other emerging (and developed) economies. Next, we identify different types of organizations that engage in $\\textit{jugaad}$ and elucidate their abilities, or la...

  4. Understanding Innovation for Sustainable Business Management Capabilities and Competencies under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kuo-Jui; Liao, Ching-Jong; Tseng, Ming-Lang; Chou, Pei-Jay

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many firms have come to understand that innovation is an important issue in sustainable business management, as it helps improve firm capabilities and competencies. Because of the fiercely competitive environment in the hotel industry, innovation has become a critical factor in the process of hotel differentiation, leading to sustainable business success. However, the literature has not thoroughly examined the role of innovation or the hierarchical structure of the capabiliti...

  5. Understanding public sector innovations: the role of leadership activities for a climate for innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorsman, S.J.; Tummers, L.G.; Thaens, M.

    2015-01-01

    Innovations are considered to be crucial for the success of public organizations. However, it is not a foregone conclusion that public organizations are innovative. This study is based on the leadership and innovation literature to consider whether team level leadership activities could be

  6. Innovation practices success in China: the use of innovation mechanisms in Chinese SOEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers-Ren, Liqin; Krabbendam, Johannes Jacobus; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The climate for technical innovation has been improving in the past few years in China. This paper describes a case research concerning technical innovation practices success in three Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in the manufacturing industry. This is executed by applying a

  7. INNOVATION AND SUCCESS: PERCEPTIONS, ATTITUDES AND PRACTICES OF YOUNG FARMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. BOTSIOU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of innovations in business refers to a set of practices and actions which can contribute decisively to the successful development and progression of the enterprise. According to the National Development Low 3299/2004 (GR, innovation is an applied use of knowledge in the production and marketing of new or improved products, processes and services that find immediate productive, utilitarian and commercial application. Innovative practices and operations are an integral part of the organizational culture of the enterprise, and the result of the underlying assumptions and values of the operator itself. In other words, the mentality of the entrepreneur is the one that leads to the application of innovative practices in the business, and this mentality comprises of his beliefs, values and assumptions. The antonym of innovation is “archaism and routine”, and that is why innovation is facing fierce resistance. In the agricultural sector, innovation is a set of practices associated with the organization, producing innovative products, innovative production practices, new technologies for the control and organization of production, and marketing innovations. The evaluation of firm performance, growth and success, linked to, financial measures as growth, profit and turnover and nonfinancial measures such as autonomy and job satisfaction. These two evaluative metrics, financial and non financial measures, are distinguished by the fact that the first relates to perfectly distinct and measurable criteria, while the second to more indistinct as it relates to quality indicators for the investigation of which requires the use of qualitative research tools. In this sense, the effective investigation of farmers’ attitudes on the concept of a successful farmer can be performed using qualitative research tools. While success requires active towards innovation, agribusiness face difficulties in this, as indeed other small companies in other sectors

  8. Bringing to Market Technological Innovation: What Distinguishes Success from Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Frattini, Federico; Massis, Alfredo De; Chiesa, Vittorio; Cassia, Lucio; Campopiano, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Commercialization is a critical step in technological innovation. Nevertheless, many scholars believe that it is often the least well-managed activity of the whole innovation process. The launch stage seems to be particularly critical in high-technology markets because of the volatility, interconnectedness and the proliferation of new technologies they experience. However, academic and practitioners' literature has not, so far, developed a clear understanding of the factors that distinguish a...

  9. Renewable Energy Innovation Policy. Success Criteria and Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Renewable energy technology (RET) innovation involves new, improved processes, as well as strategies to accelerate RET development, ranging from breakthroughs with basic technology inventions and improved research, development and deployment (RDD) systems, to improved market mechanisms and commercialisation. In order to achieve RET innovation, a country needs to put in place the right policy approaches, frameworks, governance and policy instruments. This working paper was compiled to assist countries with policy development in order to strengthen renewable energy innovation, primarily through a discussion of design criteria for innovation policy frameworks. The report identifies broad success criteria for innovation policy in the sector and suggests strategic policy approaches to advance RET innovation in the context of constrained options, competition for resources, and national economic development goals. For renewable energy innovation policy regimes to be succeed, they must satisfy two broad criteria: (a) promotion of sustained multi-stakeholder engagement around an achievable, shared vision; and (b) appropriate positioning of a country or region to anticipate and benefit from renewable energy technology flows.

  10. Investigation and evaluation of key success factors in technological innovation development based on BWM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Ghaffari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing innovation, based on knowledge and technology, as a driving force of the economy, is necessary for survival and is required in having strong interactions within the globalized world of business. Innovation and technology development require an intertwined network of organizational interactions between public and private sector. The activities and interactions of these firms are the reasons for innovation development in the framework of innovation systems. Following strategies is of crucial necessity and importance in industries such as aerospace and remotely-piloted helicopters (RPH with their complex characteristics, costly and time-consuming processes. Understanding the business environment and identifying the success factors is a significant step towards adopting innovative strategies and planning for technology development. The aim of this article is to evaluate the key success factors in technological innovation development of remotely-piloted helicopters (RPH industry. The methodology used in this article is Best-Worst method which is considered as one of the most prominent and effective MCDM methods. Based on a case study and by reviewing the extant and relevant literature, the key success factors of technological innovation development of remotely-piloted helicopters (RPH industry in Iran were identified. Then by applying the “Best-Worst” method and the experts’ opinions, the key success factors were analyzed and prioritized. Finally, some suggestions are made by considering the results of the study.

  11. Understanding University Faculty Perceptions about Innovation in Teaching and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Rieber, Lloyd P.; Walker, Brandy B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand faculty perceptions about innovation in teaching and technology in a college of education in a research-intensive university. This study was motivated by the creation of a new initiative begun in a large college of education at a Carnegie Research-Intensive university to promote innovation in teaching…

  12. Successful Innovation in Tele-Care: Continuous Cocreation and Situated Re-Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Tjørnhøj, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Successful IT-enabled innovation is often attributed to benefit realization. However, often the results of the innovations are disappointing. Reason for this is argued to be a divide between development of the technological solution, and the organizational implementation and change that should...... the technical and the social inextricable linked. This paper challenges the belief in an inherent divide by suggesting integration of the technological and organizational development in the pilot-phase as well as subsequent phases through co-creation and situated re-innovation. With reference to a case...

  13. Understanding energy technology developments from an innovation system perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, M.; Nygaard Madsen, A. [Risoe National Lab., DTU, Systems Analysis Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Gregersen, Birgitte [Aalborg Univ., Department of Business Studies (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    With the increased market-orientation and privatisation of the energy area, the perspective of innovation is becoming more and more relevant for understanding the dynamics of change and technology development in the area. A better understanding of the systemic and complex processes of innovation is needed. This paper presents an innovation systems analysis of new and emerging energy technologies in Denmark. The study focuses on five technology areas: bio fuels, hydrogen technology, wind energy, solar cells and energy-efficient end-use technologies. The main result of the analysis is that the technology areas are quite diverse in a number of innovation-relevant issues like actor set-up, institutional structure, maturity, and connections between market and non-market aspects. The paper constitutes background for discussing the framework conditions for transition to sustainable energy technologies and strengths and weaknesses of the innovation systems. (au)

  14. Innovation Implementation in the Context of Hospital QI: Lessons Learned and Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani

    2018-01-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine reported that 98,000 people die each year due to medical errors. In the following years, the focus on hospital quality was intensified nationally, with policymakers providing evidence-based practice guidelines for improving health care quality. However, these innovations (evidence-based guidelines) that were being produced at policy levels were not translating to clinical practice at the hospital organizational level easily, and stark variations continued to persist, in the quality of health care. Circa 2009, nearly a decade after the release of the IOM report, the health care organizational literature began referring to this challenge as “innovation implementation failure” in health care organizations (HCOs), ie, failure to implement an evidence-based practice that is new to a HCO. This stream of literature drew upon management research to explain why innovation implementation failure occurs in HCOs and what could be done to prevent it. This paper conducts an integrative review of the literature on “innovation implementation” in hospitals and health systems over the last decade, since the spotlight was cast on “innovation implementation failure” in HCOs. The review reveals that while some studies have retrospectively sought to identify the key drivers of innovation implementation, through surveys and interviews of practitioners (the “what”), other studies have prospectively sought to understand how innovation implementation occurs in hospitals and health systems (the “how”). Both make distinctive contributions to identifying strategies for success in innovation implementation. While retrospective studies have helped identify the key drivers of innovation implementation, prospective studies have shed light on how these drivers could be attained, thereby helping to develop context-sensitive management strategies for success. The literature has called for more prospective research on the implementation and

  15. Innovation Implementation in the Context of Hospital QI: Lessons Learned and Strategies for Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani

    2018-01-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine reported that 98,000 people die each year due to medical errors. In the following years, the focus on hospital quality was intensified nationally, with policymakers providing evidence-based practice guidelines for improving health care quality. However, these innovations (evidence-based guidelines) that were being produced at policy levels were not translating to clinical practice at the hospital organizational level easily, and stark variations continued to persist, in the quality of health care. Circa 2009, nearly a decade after the release of the IOM report, the health care organizational literature began referring to this challenge as "innovation implementation failure" in health care organizations (HCOs), ie, failure to implement an evidence-based practice that is new to a HCO. This stream of literature drew upon management research to explain why innovation implementation failure occurs in HCOs and what could be done to prevent it. This paper conducts an integrative review of the literature on "innovation implementation" in hospitals and health systems over the last decade, since the spotlight was cast on "innovation implementation failure" in HCOs. The review reveals that while some studies have retrospectively sought to identify the key drivers of innovation implementation, through surveys and interviews of practitioners (the "what"), other studies have prospectively sought to understand how innovation implementation occurs in hospitals and health systems (the "how"). Both make distinctive contributions to identifying strategies for success in innovation implementation. While retrospective studies have helped identify the key drivers of innovation implementation, prospective studies have shed light on how these drivers could be attained, thereby helping to develop context-sensitive management strategies for success. The literature has called for more prospective research on the implementation and sustainability of health

  16. Innovations in precision seed drilling technology: successes or failures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Benninger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the development of various technological alternatives in precision seed drilling, it has become a matter of research whether there are clear criteria for the success or failure of technological innovations. Around the turn to the 20th century, two very different precision seed drill methods were developed almost at the same time. Band seeding made it possible to achieve nearly perfect single grain sowing. For this purpose, individual, equally spaced seeds were embedded into bands of paper or cotton. In the field, these seed tapes were then unreeled from large drums. The pneumatic system proposed in 1897, by contrast, introduced grain singling using a vacuum for the first time. Although band seeding presented a satisfactory technological solution, it was never widely applied. Pneumatic systems, on the other hand, took long to catch on and only started to be successful in the late 1960s. Up to then, these innovative systems had to be considered as failures. Changing the period under review, however, may completely reverse the assessment of whether an innovation is a success or a failure.

  17. Towards an understanding of business model innovation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taran, Yariv; Boer, Harry; Lindgren, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Companies today, in some industries more than others, invest more capital and resources just to stay competitive, develop more diverse solutions, and increasingly start to think more radically, when considering to innovate their business model. However, the development and innovation of business...... models is a complex venture and has not been widely researched yet. The objective of this paper is therefore 1) to build a [descriptive] theoretical understanding, based on Christensen’s (2005) three-step procedure, to business models and their innovation and, as a result of that, 2) to strengthen...... researchers’ and practitioners’ perspectives as to how the process of business model innovation can be realized. By using various researchers’ perspectives and assumptions, we identify relevant inconsistencies, which consequently lead us to propose possible supplementary solutions. We conclude our paper...

  18. Theory Building- Towards an understanding of business model innovation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taran, Yariv; Boer, Harry; Lindgren, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Companies today, in some industries more than others, invest more capital and resources just to stay competitive, develop more diverse solutions, and increasingly start to think more radically, when considering to innovate their business model. However, the development and innovation of business...... models is a complex venture and has not been widely researched yet. The objective of this paper is therefore 1) to build a [descriptive] theoretical understanding, based on Christensen's (2005) three-step procedure, to business models and their innovation and, as a result of that, 2) to strengthen...... researchers' and practitioners' perspectives as to how the process of business model innovation can be realized. By using various researchers' perspectives and assumptions, we identify relevant inconsistencies, which consequently lead us to propose possible supplementary solutions. We conclude our paper...

  19. The Success Factor Profile for clinical computer innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Nancy M; Smith, Janis B; Conner, Susan R; Campion, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Fifty to seventy percent of information system projects fail. Most of the failures are not the victims of flawed technology, but rather organizational and people related issues. When Vanderbilt University Medical Center began an intensive electronic health record (EHR) effort, a process was carefully designed to select the clinical areas where new tools could be developed and pilot tested. The Success Factor Profile was created to guide the selection of sites most likely to have innovation success. This paper describes both the tools and the processes used to select clinical sites for new computer tools development and pilot implementation. Early results demonstrated that the tools provided structure for the decision making process, permitting side-by-side comparison of "apples and oranges." Selecting the site most likely to succeed with computer application innovation and early implementation has broad applicability in healthcare informatics. Failure to succeed with early system users is not only costly, but also discourages users and developers alike, and may damage the reputation of the tools and systems across the institution.

  20. Reaching an understanding innovations in how we view reading assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Sabatini, John; O'Reilly, Tenaha

    2012-01-01

    Reaching an Understanding: Innovations in How We View Reading Assessment builds upon the editors previous book Measuring Up: Advances in How We Assess Reading Ability by representing some early attempts to apply theory to help guide the development of new assessments and measurement models.

  1. Key Success Factors of Innovation in Multinational Agri-food Prospector Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuin, F.T.J.M.; Batterink, M.H.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2007-01-01

    The Wageningen Innovation Assessment Tool (WIAT) compares the self assessment of the drivers and barriers to innovation at the company level and the critical success and failure factors of innovation at the project level with data of agrifood prospector firms around the world. In total 46 innovation projects, 11 successfully concluded and 6 failed projects, as well as 29 running projects in 12 multinational agrifood prospector companies in the Netherlands and France, two innovation consortia ...

  2. Innovation or Tradition? Succession to the Kingship in Temenid Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene E. Psoma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to show that the free designation of the successor to the throne by Ptolemy I and Seleukos I, and the association in power of the successor during the last years of the king’s reign, was not an innovation of the age of the Diadochi but an old Macedonian practice. Using IG II/III2 102, the treaty between Athens, Amyntas II and his son Alexander as a starting point, this work collects all the evidence for the designation of the succesor to the throne in the Temenid Kingdom, discusses previous theories about succession, and argues that the successor was designated by the king himself, who appears to have had full jurisdiction to decide on the matter freely, unimpeded by custom or law.

  3. Key Success Factors of Innovation in Multinational Agri-food Prospector Companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuin, F.T.J.M.; Batterink, M.H.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2007-01-01

    The Wageningen Innovation Assessment Tool (WIAT) compares the self assessment of the drivers and barriers to innovation at the company level and the critical success and failure factors of innovation at the project level with data of agrifood prospector firms around the world. In total 46 innovation

  4. The Influence of Innovation and Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy to Digital Startup Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Dessyana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Establishing and developing a startup business is not easy. Startup success depend on various aspects, such as financial,business model, and learning organizations. Personalities factor of founders have a contribution in business development, especially entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE and innovation. But, in Indonesia, there is still no psychological study who see the contribution of those factors on business success in digital startup. This study aimed to understand how both factors influence startup digital. The sample is 64 founders. The research instrument is ESE, KAI, and Business Success questionnaire (Kirton in Riyanti, 2003; Chen et al, 1998; Kaplan & Norton, 2006. Multiple-regression analyses reveal ESE and innovation contributes 20.8% to business success. ESE regression coefficient is 0.200 (P 0.05. This means, ESE has significant positive effect, while innovation has a positive relationship but insignificant. Interventions in the form of booklets that inform how to increase ESE. The booklet is already conducted trials on five founders.

  5. Motivations, Challenges, and Opportunities of Successful Solvers on an Innovation Intermediary Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into IC...... other experts, the ability to work in a diverse environment, options of work after retirement and from distant locations, and a new source of income.......The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into ICs...

  6. Motivation, Challenge, and Opportunity of Successful Solvers on an Innovation Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into IC...... other experts, the ability to work in a diverse environment, options of work after retirement and from distant locations, and a new source of income.......The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into ICs...

  7. Success Determination by Innovation: A Theoretical Approach in Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Gautam

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at to identify the main issues in the marketing which needs immediate attention of the marketers. The importance of innovation in the marketing has also been highlighted and marketing mix have been related to innovative and creative ideas. The study is based on the secondary data, various research papers, articles has been studied to develop a innovative approach in the marketing. Marketing innovative ideas relating to business lead generation, product, price, distribution, promotion of product, and revenue generation have been highlighted in the paper. All the suggestions are theoretical and may have relevance and implication to the marketers.

  8. Success Determination by Innovation: A Theoretical Approach in Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Gautam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at to identify the main issues in the marketing which needs immediate attention of the marketers. The importance of innovation in the marketing has also been highlighted and marketing mix have been related to innovative and creative ideas. The study is based on the secondary data, various research papers, articles has been studied to develop a innovative approach in the marketing. Marketing innovative ideas relating to business lead generation, product, price, distribution, promotion of product, and revenue generation have been highlighted in the paper. All the suggestions are theoretical and may have relevance and implication to the marketers.

  9. Key Success Factors of Innovation Projects of Vegetable Breeding Companies in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Zhen, Zhen; Kemp, R.G.M.; Jongsma, M.A.; Huang, Caicheng; Dons, J.J.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    The vegetable breeding industry is generally recognized as an innovation-driven industry. However, innovation is costly, time-consuming and uncertain. This study aims to identify the key success factors of innovation project performance of vegetable breeding companies (VBCs) in China. Based on

  10. Towards a Framework for Understanding Innovation Implementation in the Air Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byrd, Howard

    2003-01-01

    .... The success of the implementing such transformational innovations such as digital technical orders is critical to the Air Force's ability to support the overall DoD force transformation efforts. Despite the critical need for successful innovation implementation few studies are found exploring factors that facilitate innovation within DoD, or the Air Force.

  11. Understanding Innovation for Sustainable Business Management Capabilities and Competencies under Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Jui Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many firms have come to understand that innovation is an important issue in sustainable business management, as it helps improve firm capabilities and competencies. Because of the fiercely competitive environment in the hotel industry, innovation has become a critical factor in the process of hotel differentiation, leading to sustainable business success. However, the literature has not thoroughly examined the role of innovation or the hierarchical structure of the capabilities and competencies in sustainable business management. This study adopts interval-valued triangular fuzzy numbers and grey relational analysis to provide a competitive priority ranking for the aspects and criteria that assist firms in decision-making. The study results indicate that innovation in technology capabilities and networking and social capabilities—in addition to competencies in systemic thinking—are the most important aspects of sustainable business management. In particular, this study indicates that to succeed in building a sustainable business in the hotel industry, firms should upgrade and integrate their business technologies, collaborate with actors inside and outside the firm, build trust as well as a shared vision that includes common agreement, and develop competencies in inventive thinking to support innovation and foster changes in strategy, structure, administrative procedures, and systems when necessary.

  12. Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni; Yaganeh, Suzanne; Bloch Rasmussen, Leif

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to a theoretical discussion of creation of innovation with participants in, or outside, organisations. We address the creation of innovation with a complex theoretical understanding drawing on the Scandinavian and the Participatory Design tradition introducing two approaches...... to the processes of innovation. We ask if innovation can be initiated and enhanced looking at two collaborative approaches; participatory innovation (PIN) and cooperative innovation (COIN). We invite to dialogue and reflections on PIN’s conflict and creative frictions on one side and COIN’s complexity......, complementarity in diversity and the didactic scaffolding of the innovation process on the other side. Our contribution focuses on the methods and practices for facilitation of co-creating activities between different groups leading to cooperation, and innovation in thinking....

  13. Motivations, Challenges, and Opportunities of Successful Solvers on an Innovation Intermediary Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify motivations, challenges, and opportunities of successful solvers participating in virtual teams of innovation contests (ICs) organized by an innovation intermediary. Based on 82 interviews of successful solvers, this study provides novel insights into ICs....... The main motivational factors of successful solvers engaged in problem solving are money, learning, fun, sense of achievement, passion, and networking. Major challenges solvers face include unclear or insufficient problem description, lack of option for communication, language barrier, time zone...

  14. Understanding the group dynamics and success of teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Michael; Bagrow, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Complex problems often require coordinated group effort and can consume significant resources, yet our understanding of how teams form and succeed has been limited by a lack of large-scale, quantitative data. We analyse activity traces and success levels for approximately 150 000 self-organized, online team projects. While larger teams tend to be more successful, workload is highly focused across the team, with only a few members performing most work. We find that highly successful teams are significantly more focused than average teams of the same size, that their members have worked on more diverse sets of projects, and the members of highly successful teams are more likely to be core members or ‘leads’ of other teams. The relations between team success and size, focus and especially team experience cannot be explained by confounding factors such as team age, external contributions from non-team members, nor by group mechanisms such as social loafing. Taken together, these features point to organizational principles that may maximize the success of collaborative endeavours. PMID:27152217

  15. Co-innovation: What are the success factors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmers, H.J.; Sabidussi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The problem we address in this paper is that in projects focusing on public-private cooperation to stimulate innovation in the Netherlands, initiatives often lack continuation after the study-phase. We extracted possible influencing variables from business and (transaction) cost economic theorizing,

  16. The successes and challenges of open-source biopharmaceutical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allarakhia, Minna

    2014-05-01

    Increasingly, open-source-based alliances seek to provide broad access to data, research-based tools, preclinical samples and downstream compounds. The challenge is how to create value from open-source biopharmaceutical innovation. This value creation may occur via transparency and usage of data across the biopharmaceutical value chain as stakeholders move dynamically between open source and open innovation. In this article, several examples are used to trace the evolution of biopharmaceutical open-source initiatives. The article specifically discusses the technological challenges associated with the integration and standardization of big data; the human capacity development challenges associated with skill development around big data usage; and the data-material access challenge associated with data and material access and usage rights, particularly as the boundary between open source and open innovation becomes more fluid. It is the author's opinion that the assessment of when and how value creation will occur, through open-source biopharmaceutical innovation, is paramount. The key is to determine the metrics of value creation and the necessary technological, educational and legal frameworks to support the downstream outcomes of now big data-based open-source initiatives. The continued focus on the early-stage value creation is not advisable. Instead, it would be more advisable to adopt an approach where stakeholders transform open-source initiatives into open-source discovery, crowdsourcing and open product development partnerships on the same platform.

  17. Teaching Qualitative Research: A Successful Pilot of an Innovative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danquah, Adam N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development and delivery of an innovative approach to teaching qualitative research methods in psychology. The teaching incorporated a range of "active" pedagogical practices that it shares with other teaching in this area, but was designed in such a way as to follow the arc of a qualitative research project in…

  18. Understanding the dynamics of multi-stakeholder innovation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through a European Union funded project called JOLISAA (Joint Learning in Innovation Systems in African Agriculture), the nature of smallholder oriented innovation systems have been explored in terms of partnerships, triggers that have given rise to them and the nature of the innovations themselves. The main objective ...

  19. The successful Chief Executive Officer understands quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, D.

    1984-01-01

    The successful Chief Executive Officer (CEO) will have recognized the benefits of, and have implemented, a total quality assurance program. The quality assurance program will be adequately defined in policies and procedures such that managers and supervisors of each organizational element understand their primary and supporting roles in carrying out an effective quality assurance program. The traditional practice of having all quality assurance activities reside in a quality assurance organization will have been cast aside. Instead, the quality assurance activities necessary to achieve and assure the quality of the desired end product will have been defined and assigned to responsible organization elements. The quality assurance organization's primary role will be to define the total quality assurance program, insure that the achieving and assuring functions are assigned in policies and procedures, conduct training necessary to have management and supervisors understand the total quality assurance program, measure the effectiveness of the program and feedback measurement data for improvements in the program. The successful CEO will have implemented a quality assurance program that provides for a graded approach for application of the program based upon the importance of the intended use of the product or service. The successful CEO will rely heavily on the scheduled progress reports and assessments to measure the pulse of his organization's successes and improvement needs. This paper will describe suggested approaches for the Quality Assurance Manager to implement a quality assurance program which results in his corporation's CEO being a supporter of and a driving force in the implementation of the quality assurance program

  20. Technical innovation success in China: The use of innovation mechanisms in Chinese SOEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers-Ren, Liqin; Krabbendam, Johannes Jacobus; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.

    2004-01-01

    Climate for technical innovation has been improving in the past few years in China. This Paper describes a case research related to technical innovation in three Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in the manufacturing industry, by applying a Western technical audit tool. The data and findings

  1. Invisible Success: Problems with the Grand Technological Innovation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates a "grand" educational technology innovation through theoretical lenses inspired by Cervero and Wilson's (1994, 1998) work. Through taking this approach it is possible to show how ideas about the form of the innovation and perceptions of its ultimate "success" or "failure", varied between stakeholder groups. The project was…

  2. Data-Driven Diffusion Of Innovations: Successes And Challenges In 3 Large-Scale Innovative Delivery Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, David A.; Cohen, Deborah J.; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2018-01-01

    Failed diffusion of innovations may be linked to an inability to use and apply data, information, and knowledge to change perceptions of current practice and motivate change. Using qualitative and quantitative data from three large-scale health care delivery innovations—accountable care organizations, advanced primary care practice, and EvidenceNOW—we assessed where data-driven innovation is occurring and where challenges lie. We found that implementation of some technological components of innovation (for example, electronic health records) has occurred among health care organizations, but core functions needed to use data to drive innovation are lacking. Deficits include the inability to extract and aggregate data from the records; gaps in sharing data; and challenges in adopting advanced data functions, particularly those related to timely reporting of performance data. The unexpectedly high costs and burden incurred during implementation of the innovations have limited organizations’ ability to address these and other deficits. Solutions that could help speed progress in data-driven innovation include facilitating peer-to-peer technical assistance, providing tailored feedback reports to providers from data aggregators, and using practice facilitators skilled in using data technology for quality improvement to help practices transform. Policy efforts that promote these solutions may enable more rapid uptake of and successful participation in innovative delivery system reforms. PMID:29401031

  3. Isotopes and innovation: Canadian success in a global market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, S.

    2012-01-01

    Canadian nuclear technology for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease has a global presence. Innovation has as much to do with the way you take a product to market as with the product itself. Nordion targeted therapies are used in the treatment in a variety of cancers. TheraSphere fills a specific medical need for a targeted liver cancer treatment. Nordion is the world's leading supplier of Cobalt-60, the isotope producing gamma radiation required to destroy micro-organisms. Nordion is a world leader in medical isotope processing, packaging and delivery.

  4. Isotopes and innovation: Canadian success in a global market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, S. [Nordion Inc., Kanata, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Canadian nuclear technology for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease has a global presence. Innovation has as much to do with the way you take a product to market as with the product itself. Nordion targeted therapies are used in the treatment in a variety of cancers. TheraSphere fills a specific medical need for a targeted liver cancer treatment. Nordion is the world's leading supplier of Cobalt-60, the isotope producing gamma radiation required to destroy micro-organisms. Nordion is a world leader in medical isotope processing, packaging and delivery.

  5. Innovating and Entrepreneurial Initiatives: Some Cases of Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen De Pablos Heredero

    2017-05-01

    An entrepreneur cannot be guided by his own interests. He has to invest in order to know the needs of the potential customers Impact on Society\t: Customer experience is key to have success in new business models

  6. Successes of Small Business Innovation Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Walter S.; Bitler, Dean W.; Prok, George M.; Metzger, Marie E.; Dreibelbis, Cindy L.; Ganss, Meghan

    2002-01-01

    This booklet of success stories highlights the NASA Glenn Research Center's accomplishments and successes by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. These success stories are the results of selecting projects that support NASA missions and also have high commercialization potential. Each success story describes the innovation accomplished, commercialization of the technology, and further applications and usages. This booklet emphasizes the integration and incorporation of technologies into NASA missions and other government projects. The company name and the NASA contact person are identified to encourage further usage and application of the SBIR developed technologies and also to promote further commercialization of these products.

  7. Reinventing project management the diamond approach to successful growth & innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Shenhar, Aaron J.

    2007-01-01

    Projects are the engines that drive innovation from idea to commercialization. In fact, the number of projects in most organizations today is expanding while operations is shrinking. Yet, since many companies still focus on operational excellence and efficiency, most projects fail--largely because conventional project management concepts cannot adapt to a dynamic business environment. Moreover, top managers neglect their company's project activity, and line managers treat all their projects alike--as part of operations. Based on an unprecedented study of more than 600 projects in a variety of businesses and organizations around the globe, "Reinventing Project Management" provides a new and highly adaptive model for planning and managing projects to achieve superior business results.

  8. Successful Implementation of Technological Innovations in Health Care Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Weijers; T.L. Finch; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2015-01-01

    In order to accept and implement technology in a successful manner, not only determinants (acceptance barriers or facilitators) related to individual persons, for instance, health care providers as well as health care recipients, are important. Also interpersonal relationships on the work floor as

  9. How Understandings Colour the Means and Ends in the Case of Environmental Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgaard, Jette Egelund

    2002-01-01

    Different understandings of the concept of innovation have resulted in different means and ends in the innovation activities within Dan-ish industry. The different emphasis on economic, technical, organ-isational, inter-organisational and institutional issues in product and process-innovation has...... influenced the initiatives made by state, market and civil society. Focusing on environmental innovations, this is revealed in the initiatives and outcome of the previous envi-ronmental policy in Denmark. The paper, makes an analyti-cal distinction between different understandings of innovation, ex...

  10. Nurse manager residency program: an innovative leadership succession plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Amy; Wagner, Jennifer; Martin, Christina; Grant, Brandy; Maule, Katrina; Resh, Kimberly; King, Lisa; Eaton, Holly; Fetter, Katrina; King, Stacey L; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To ensure succession planning within the ranks of nurse managers meet current and projected nursing management needs and organizational goals, we developed and implemented a nurse manager residency program at our hospital. By identifying, supporting, and mentoring clinical experts who express a desire and display an aptitude for nursing leadership, we are graduating individuals who can transition to a nurse manager position with greater ease and competence.

  11. On track for success: an innovative behavioral science curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedy, John R; Carek, Peter J; Dickerson, Lori M; Mallin, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the behavioral science curriculum currently in place at the Trident/MUSC Family Medicine Residency Program. The Trident/MUSC Program is a 10-10-10 community-based, university-affiliated program in Charleston, South Carolina. Over the years, the Trident/MUSC residency program has graduated over 400 Family Medicine physicians. The current behavioral science curriculum consists of both required core elements (didactic lectures, clinical observation, Balint groups, and Resident Grand Rounds) as well as optional elements (longitudinal patient care experiences, elective rotations, behavioral science editorial experience, and scholars project with a behavioral science focus). All Trident/MUSC residents complete core behavioral science curriculum elements and are free to participate in none, some, or all of the optional behavioral science curriculum elements. This flexibility allows resident physicians to tailor the educational program in a manner to meet individual educational needs. The behavioral science curriculum is based upon faculty interpretation of existing "best practice" guidelines (Residency Review Committee-Family Medicine and AAFP). This article provides sufficient curriculum detail to allow the interested reader the opportunity to adapt elements of the behavioral science curriculum to other residency training programs. While this behavioral science track system is currently in an early stage of implementation, the article discusses track advantages as well as future plans to evaluate various aspects of this innovative educational approach.

  12. A mental model for successful inter-disciplinary collaboration in curriculum innovation for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Detken Scheepers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pretoria introduced a compulsory Information Literacy module to address the need for delivering motivated knowledgeable employees that embrace information and have the skills to find, select and use relevant information accurately, efficiently and effectively in an explosive information age. Low class attendance, an indication of unmotivated students, as well as the limited scholarly application of information literacy skills in consecutive academic years of study have been identified as possible barriers to the application of the desired skills. A collaborative action research project based on Whole Brain principles was introduced to motivate learners through innovative learning material in the module. A deeper understanding of the role of thinking preferences and thinking avoidances is essential in selecting a team that is responsible for the planning, design, development and delivery of learning opportunities and material. This article discusses the Whole Brain Model® as a mental model that underpins the successful collaboration of multidisciplinary teams and enhances innovative curriculum design that addresses alternative approaches to the teaching of Information Literacy.

  13. Innovativeness and success perception of Polish small- and medium-sized international new ventures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Baranowska-Prokop

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to analyse the relationship between innovativeness and success perception by managers of Polish small- and medium-sized international new ventures (INVs. We apply statistical analysis (with the use of SPSS to the original data set elicited from the two samples of Polish SME’s by means of a questionnaire and CATI technique. Two measures of success have been taken into account: assessment of financial situation and success perception of managers relative to competitors. The outcomes have been evaluated against two hypotheses. The results indicate that the propensity to innovate in Polish INVs was slightly higher in the group of medium-sized firms as compared to the small ones. The relationship between innovativeness and market success was complex. In the majority of the analysed cases the respondents from the medium-sized innovative firms evaluated success at the market in the most favourable terms whereas those from small innovative firms – in the least favourable terms.

  14. Understanding Innovative Potential (IP) in an ICT Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu

    Abstract; in this paper I discuss innovative potential at a firm level using information system literature and broadening my review to R&D literature as well. This review enables me to develop a theoretical frame of what researchers have indicated to be innovative potential or capacity at the fir...... to consider IP as a long term investment not only in human capital but in the way the human capital is allowed to engage with new ideas. I suggest IP can be build using institutional logics that enable openness and collegiality....

  15. Understanding Innovative Potential (IP) in an ICT Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu

    Abstract; in this paper I discuss innovative potential at a firm level using information system literature and broadening my review to R&D literature as well. This review enables me to develop a theoretical frame of what researchers have indicated to be innovative potential or capacity at the firm...... to consider IP as a long term investment not only in human capital but in the way the human capital is allowed to engage with new ideas. I suggest IP can be build using institutional logics that enable openness and collegiality....

  16. Understanding the innovation adoption process of construction clients, Clients driving Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.; Reymen, Isabelle; Adams, L.; Guest, K.

    2006-01-01

    Although the role of clients in stimulating construction innovation seems to be controversial, little has been known about their innovation adoption behaviour. This paper presents first results of an ongoing research project the aim of which is to shed more light on the adoption processes of

  17. Radical Technological Innovations within the Mechanical Engineering Industry - An Empirical Study for Successful Realization

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlfeil, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Based on a thorough qualitative and quantitative study, Florian Wohlfeil develops a critical success factors framework for the realization of radical technological innovations within the mechanical engineering industry. Furthermore, the author detects five clearly distinguishable innovation archetypes that are based on the project specific contextual circumstances. Finally, he provides an operational framework which serves as a hands-on tool to derive concrete recommendations for action.

  18. Understanding And Developing Innovative Products And Services: The Essential Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Adrian; McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2006-01-01

    , not on the product itself, but on the activity and the effect on stakeholders. Innovative products are products that contain a difference, with appropriate, valuable and desirable effects induced on the company, consumer and society. The approach is exemplified through a case on the Sony Walkman. When designing...

  19. Why did we make that cheese? An empirically based framework for understanding what drives innovation activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Grunert, Klaus G.; Declerck, Francis

    2000-01-01

    In the more recent product development literature the interplay between R&D skills and competencies and market skills and competencies is seen as a major determinant of successful innovation. The study reported in this article was done in order to cast more light on these two constructs in an ind......In the more recent product development literature the interplay between R&D skills and competencies and market skills and competencies is seen as a major determinant of successful innovation. The study reported in this article was done in order to cast more light on these two constructs...... innovation and explaining innovation success in the case material. A new set of constructs focusing on what causes specific innovation activities to occur is proposed and a revised framework is developed. Udgivelsesdato: APR...

  20. Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to gain experience in scanning of diverse media, projects have deliberately been kept small. It has been found that management of scanned images is as important as the process of scanning. Adequate planning, correct storage procedures and accurate metadata are essential to the success of a project. Innovation ...

  1. Innovation Teams : Before Innovation Work is Begun

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on innovation teams before innovation work is begun. The reason is that innovation teams are considered to be successful doing such work. However, prior studies show problems in innovation-related-knowledge, - knowledge gaps, -information and -awareness why this research aims to understand these aspects and how they relate to newly formed innovation team as they need to handle these aspects. Two case studies conducted during 1,5 years show that a newly formed innovation tea...

  2. Innovation in mental health services: what are the key components of success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers Anne

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Service development innovation in health technology and practice is viewed as a pressing need within the field of mental health yet is relatively poorly understood. Macro-level theories have been criticised for their limited explanatory power and they may not be appropriate for understanding local and fine-grained uncertainties of services and barriers to the sustainability of change. This study aimed to identify contextual influences inhibiting or promoting the acceptance and integration of innovations in mental health services in both National Health Service (NHS and community settings. Methods A comparative study using qualitative and case study data collection methods, including semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and follow-up telephone interviews over a one-year period. The analysis was informed by learning organisation theory. Drawn from 11 mental health innovation projects within community, voluntary and NHS settings, 65 participants were recruited including service users, commissioners, health and non-health professionals, managers, and caregivers. The methods deployed in this evaluation focused on process-outcome links within and between the 11 projects. Results Key barriers to innovation included resistance from corporate departments and middle management, complexity of the innovation, and the availability and access to resources on a prospective basis within the host organisation. The results informed the construction of a proposed model of innovation implementation within mental health services. The main components of which are context, process, and outcomes. Conclusions The study produced a model of conducive and impeding factors drawn from the composite picture of 11 innovative mental health projects, and this is discussed in light of relevant literature. The model provides a rich agenda to consider for services wanting to innovate or adopt innovations from elsewhere. The evaluation suggested the

  3. Nuclear innovation in Saskatchewan: innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, N. [Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes nuclear innovation in Saskatchewan. The first stage is the Canadian Institute for Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP) and how you have a successful discussion about a technically complex issue, understand what information people need in order to have an informed discussion, understand how to convey that information to those people in a constructive way.

  4. Where innovation processes make a difference in products' short- and long-term market success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enzing, C.; Batterink, M.H.; Janszen, F.H.A.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper seeks to investigate with reference to which factors the innovation processes of new and improved products differ and how these factors relate to the products' success on the market, with a specific focus on technology- and market-related factors. Design/methodology approach –

  5. What drives successful implementation of pollution prevention and cleaner technology strategy? The role of innovative capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupendra, Kumar Verma; Sangle, Shirish

    2015-05-15

    Firms that are dynamic and prepared to implement environmental strategies have a potential competitive advantage over their industry counterparts. Therefore, it is important to understand, what capabilities are required to implement proactive environmental strategies. The paper discusses the attributes of innovative capability required by firms in order to adopt pollution prevention and cleaner technology strategies. Empirical results show that process and behavioral innovativeness are required by firms to implement a pollution prevention strategy. In addition to process and behavioral innovativeness, firms need a top management with high risk-taking ability as well as market, product, and strategic innovativeness to implement a cleaner technology strategy. The paper proposes some important managerial implications on the basis of the above research findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identifying the Factors Leading to Success: How an Innovative Science Curriculum Cultivates Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.

    2016-06-01

    PlantingScience is an award-winning program recognized for its innovation and use of computer-supported scientist mentoring. Science learners work on inquiry-based experiments in their classrooms and communicate asynchronously with practicing plant scientist-mentors about the projects. The purpose of this study was to identify specific factors contributing to the program's effectiveness in engaging students. Using multiple data sources, grounded theory (Strauss and Corbin in Basics of qualitative research. Sage, Newbury Park, 1990) was used to develop a conceptual model identifying the central phenomenon, causal conditions, intervening conditions, strategies, contexts, and student outcomes of the project. Student motivation was determined to be the central phenomenon explaining the success of the program, with student empowerment, online mentor interaction, and authenticity of the scientific experiences serving as causal conditions. Teachers contributed to student motivation by giving students more freedom, challenging students to take projects deeper, encouraging, and scaffolding. Scientists contributed to student motivation by providing explanations, asking questions, encouraging, and offering themselves as partners in the inquiry process. Several positive student outcomes of the program were uncovered and included increased positivity, greater willingness to take projects deeper, better understanding of scientific concepts, and greater commitments to collaboration. The findings of this study provide relevant information on how to develop curriculum, use technology, and train practitioners and mentors to utilize strategies and actions that improve learners' motivation to engage in authentic science in the classroom.

  7. A success story of multi-national efforts in innovative soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, M.J., P.E.

    1994-01-01

    The global and institutional issues relating to the implementation of innovative technologies in the environmental cleanup market can be significant, limiting, and confusing. Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) has made real progress in utilizing soil washing for full-scale cleanups hazardous waste and low-level radioactive waste sites. ART was formed in 1990 as joint venture between Geraghty ampersand Miller, Inc. (USA) and Heidemij (The Netherlands) for the purpose of using the proven Dutch soil washing technology in the U.S. market. The purpose of this paper is to present the opportunities, methods of implementation, and to examine future developments in the transfer of technology for environmental restoration and waste management applications. The effective transfer of technology is a multi-faceted task integrating the technology itself with an objective understanding of the market coupled with a business plan that can support the financial and administrative requirements of commercialization. This paper contends that technology transfer that falls short of commercialization is not successful since the benefits offered by the technology do not become available for full scale use. ART's specific objective in accomplishing a transfer of technology was to bring a soil washing technology, proven in Europe, to the U.S. to fill an unsatisfied market niche for the treatment of contaminated soils. The measurement of this objective was clear from the beginning...commercialize the technology by performing projects profitably while growing the business. Significant side benefits resulted from this focus, and those will be discussed later

  8. Understanding investors' decisions to purchase innovative products : Drivers of adoption timing and range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, A.O.I.; Broekhuizen, T.L.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper integrates findings from marketing and finance literature to increase our understanding of consumers' decisions to purchase innovative investment products. Two different surveys administered to individual investors examine the psychological and sociological drivers of dispositional

  9. Understanding Megaproject Success beyond the Project Close-Out Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Fahri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Project success has always been an important topic in the project management literature. One of the main discussions is concerned with how a project’s success is evaluated and what factors lead to achieving this success. Traditionally project success has been measured at the point where the project outputs are handed over, after the close out phase. Recently, questions have been raised in the literature as to whether we should be evaluating project success beyond the close out phase, to better account for organizational and societal outcomes.  However, not much has been published about how the long term impacts and outcomes are measured. This is of particular concern in megaprojects as they often attract a high level of public attention and political interest, and have both direct and indirect impacts on the community, environment, and national budgets. In this paper the authors review success factors and criteria that are applicable to projects in general and megaprojects in particular. They identify the significance of evaluating outcomes and impact and propose an ex-post project evaluation (EPPE framework for megaprojects.

  10. Smartcuts: how hackers, innovators, and icons accelerate success by Shane Snow

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Ivo Dias de

    2015-01-01

    Recensão crítica da obra de Shane Snow, “Smartcuts: how hackers, innovators, and icons accelerate success” , 2015 I think “Smartcuts” is one of the best 2014 books about success. It is a well-written and thought provoking book that makes you think about success in new ways. If you are stuck in your professional life or other areas of your life, this book can give you excellent advice. The book develops its argument based on scientific studies and a plethora of stories of success (like Jimm...

  11. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open innovation successes and collaborative projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-11-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, setting the course for development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the successful execution of the strategy, driving organizational change through open innovation efforts and collaborative projects, including efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  12. Innovation and Quality: Drivers of Successful Ventures that Seek Success in Catering to Consumers who Live in Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Satya P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The next big challenge in a global marketplace is to engage the very large segment of world population which survives on less income than the defined poverty level by any measurements that may be applied. This segment in the past has been the focus of aid and charities and been at the receiving end of poverty alleviation programs created by a variety of international donor agencies, with very limited success. It is time now to take a different approach. A radical re-thinking of the problem now has resulted in a novel approach: that of engaging them as customers like any other. The underlying assumption is that folks in this segment still spend billions of dollars in the aggregate and are now able to critically examine offerings and choose to go after quality and value just like any other segment. The opportunity to tap into this huge market lies in innovative entrepreneurial efforts that make goods and services available to this segment without compromising on performance and quality. This paper explores the nature of innovation that is likely to result in entrepreneurial success in what is called the Base (Bottom of the Pyramid marketplace.

  13. Fostering Success or Stratification? A Macroapproach to Understanding "Success" in the Community College Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, S. Mei-Yen

    2015-01-01

    The topic of student success is a central focus for community college educators and researchers, yet little consideration is given to the long-term success that community college students may or may not be attaining. What role (if any) do concerns about social stratification have in the debate over student success? Exploring the ways in which…

  14. Intangible factors leading to success in research: strategy, innovation and leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Louise; Birla, Ravi K

    2008-03-01

    At the heart of research is the scientific process, which includes identifying a knowledge gap, execution of experiments, and finally, presentation of scientific data. Identifying a systematic way to undertake research is important; however, equally important are intangible factors, including strategy, innovation and leadership, in determining the outcome of any research project. These intangible factors, although often unspoken, are the essence of success in research. Strategy determines the direction of research and the ability to respond to acute changes in the field to ensure a competitive advantage. Innovation involves generating novel ideas, and at the heart of innovation is the ability to create a positive work environment. Leadership is the ability to exercise influence so as to create change; empowerment and the ability to create leaders at every level are central to effective leadership. Collectively, defining and implementing aspects of these intangible factors will strengthen any research endeavor.

  15. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open Innovation Successes and Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, which resulted in the development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the open innovation successes and collaborative projects developed over this timeframe, including the efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC), which was established to advance human health and performance innovations for spaceflight and societal benefit via collaboration in new markets.

  16. Understanding Supplier Resistance - Overcoming Obstacles to Supply Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    New Steve

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores an important but unexplored theme in the development of 'total quality' relationships in the supply chain: why suppliers may exhibit resistance to quality initiatives, and why what seems to customers as cooperation can appear as unwelcome interference or even exploitation to suppliers. This is a question of great relevance to all those seeking to understand current business practice, and also to those seeking to bring about practical improvements in supply chain quality. Too much of the supply chain and quality literature assumes the issue of supplier's compliance with customer initiatives is unproblematic (unable to understand this sentence; experience suggests it is one of the major obstacles in developing the quality-oriented, integrated supply chain.

  17. The toilet tripod: understanding successful sanitation in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Kathleen; Louis, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    Building toilets and getting people to use them is critical for public health. We deployed a political ecology approach specifically to identify the multi-scalar political, economic, and environmental factors influencing toilet adoption in rural India. The research used ethnographic and technical methods in rural villages of West Bengal and Himachal Pradesh over the period September 2012 to May 2013. The elements of successful sanitation adoption depended on three factors (i.e., toilet tripod): (1) multi-scalar political will on the part of both government and NGOs over the long term; (2) proximate social pressure, i.e., person-to-person contact between rural inhabitants and toilets; (3) political ecology, i.e., assured access to water, compatible soil type, and changing land use. This research contributes to studies of sustainable development and global public health by developing a theory and framework for successful sanitation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding success and failure of anti-corruption initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Heeks, Richard; Mathisen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the success and failure of anti-corruption initiatives; focusing mainly on those in developing countries. Through a review of extant evidence, it finds a very mixed picture within which there is widespread failure; albeit sometimes only partial failure. As a result, anti-corruption as a field can struggle to gain attention and resources among competing development initiatives. In reviewing that field we find that, while some progress has been made - for example in integr...

  19. Product innovation as a key success factor to build sustainable brand equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Hanaysha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In highly competitive markets, building brand equity has become one of the first priorities for many organizations as it brings several benefits and reputation for them. Past researches have acknowledged that consumers look for brands which provide them with differential values through innovative product and service features. However, despite the importance of product innovation in determining an organization’s success, very limited studies have intended to examine its effect on brand equity. In the present study, we aim to examine the effect of product innovation on brand equity in Malaysian automotive market. The data were collected from 287 passenger cars owners through self-administered questionnaire at several shopping malls in northern Malaysia. The findings revealed that product innovation had significant positive effect on overall brand equity and its dimensions namely; brand awareness, brand loyalty, brand image, and brand leadership. Based on the results of this study, several implications are discussed to enlighten our knowledge on important innovation activities that could develop favorable brand equity. Finally, limitations and future research suggestions are highlighted to gain better insights on brand equity development.

  20. Understanding Absorptive Capacities is an "Innovation Systems" Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to broaden our understanding of the concept underlying absorptive capacity atthe macro -level, paying particular attention to the growth and development perspectives. Weprovide definitions of absorptive and technological capacity, external technology flows,productivity growth......, employment creation and their interrelations. We then analyse the elementsof absorptive capability, focusing on the nature of the relationship within a systems view of aneconomy, focusing primarily on the role of firm and non-firm actors and the institutions thatconnect them, both within and across borders...

  1. Network analysis: An innovative framework for understanding eating disorder psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E; Crosby, Ross D; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Forbush, Kelsie T; Mason, Tyler B; Moessner, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Network theory and analysis is an emerging approach in psychopathology research that has received increasing attention across fields of study. In contrast to medical models or latent variable approaches, network theory suggests that psychiatric syndromes result from systems of causal and reciprocal symptom relationships. Despite the promise of this approach to elucidate key mechanisms contributing to the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs), thus far, few applications of network analysis have been tested in ED samples. We first present an overview of network theory, review the existing findings in the ED literature, and discuss the limitations of this literature to date. In particular, the reliance on cross-sectional designs, use of single-item self-reports of symptoms, and instability of results have raised concern about the inferences that can be made from network analyses. We outline several areas to address in future ED network analytic research, which include the use of prospective designs and adoption of multimodal assessment methods. Doing so will provide a clearer understanding of whether network analysis can enhance our current understanding of ED psychopathology and inform clinical interventions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Letter to Editor: RESITA NETWORK - ACADEMIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION NETWORK OF SOUTH EASTERN EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES: AN EXAMPLE OF SUCCESSFUL NETWORKING IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION AT ACADEMIC LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schulte

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The foundation, development, activities, and wider social impact of the AcademicEntrepreneurship and Innovation Network of South Eastern European Universities, or shortlyRESITA Network, is presented in this paper as a positive example of successful networking inentrepreneurship and innovation at academic level.

  3. Understanding Absorptive Capacities is an "Innovation Systems" Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to broaden our understanding of the concept underlying absorptive capacity atthe macro -level, paying particular attention to the growth and development perspectives. Weprovide definitions of absorptive and technological capacity, external technology flows,productivity growth......, employment creation and their interrelations. We then analyse the elementsof absorptive capability, focusing on the nature of the relationship within a systems view of aneconomy, focusing primarily on the role of firm and non-firm actors and the institutions thatconnect them, both within and across borders....... We also undertake to explain how the nature ofabsorptive capacity changes with stages of economic development, and the importance of thedifferent aspects of absorptive capability at different stages. The relationship is not a linear one:the benefits that accrue from marginal increases in absorptive...

  4. Developing Critical Understanding in HRM Students: Using Innovative Teaching Methods to Encourage Deep Approaches to Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael J. R.; Reddy, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on developing critical understanding in human resource management (HRM) students in Aston Business School, UK. The paper reveals that innovative teaching methods encourage deep approaches to study, an indicator of students reaching their own understanding of material and ideas. This improves student employability…

  5. Product Development in the Automotive Industry – Crucial Success Drivers for Technological Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhard, D.; Brem, Alexander; Voigt, K.-I.

    2008-01-01

    Developing new innovative products in the automotive industrymeans investing huge sums in advance, as one does not know if the productwill be successful on the market after launch. Hence, companies are interestedin knowing and measuring the critical success drivers within the developmentsteps......), an explorative study in the German automotive industry showsthat the findings are confirmed in practice as well. However, the results alsoindicate that there is still a gap between knowledge about practical relevance of those dimensions and the systematic assessment of these in the process. Thestudy shows...

  6. How innovative ICT tools can enhance understanding of interactions between societal, hydrological and environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Borsi, I.; Cannata, M.; De Filippis, G.; Criollo, R.; Mehl, S.; Rossetto, R.

    2017-12-01

    The interaction of environmental, physical, and socioeconomic processes alter and are altered by water and by how human can affect water use. For example, a warming climate increases the chance of warm temperatures and lack of precipitation, and when combined with growing population requires understanding of impact on water resources and on all the processes related to the water budget including evapotranspiration. On this foundation, humans add engineered and social systems to control, manage, utilize, and alter our water environment for a variety of uses and through a variety of organizational and individual decisions. Some engineered systems have mixed consequences, for example groundwater helped sustain agriculture during drought periods, but then groundwater levels critically decrease with no chances to recover in some parts of the world. Innovative ICT tools have been demonstrated as a helpful tool for enhancing human understanding of the effect that societal, economical, and policy-based decisions have on the water resources and on the environment in general. Here we apply the new FREEWAT platform to demonstrate the importance of developing ad-hoc database and hydrological models to simulate different scenarios using a participatory approach. Stakeholders have been involved in data collection, database design and model development during the entire project period and discussion between researcher and stakeholders have been fostered during Focus Groups and workshops organized in many countries in Europe and beyond (including case studies in Ukraine and Africa). FREEWAT is an open source and public domain GIS integrated modelling environment for simulation of water quantity and quality in surface water and groundwater with an integrated water management and planning module. FREEWAT aims at promoting water resource management by simplifying the application of the Water Framework Directive and related Directives. Fourteen case studies have been considered and

  7. Helping Preservice Teachers (PSTs) Understand the Realities of Poverty: Innovative Curriculum Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Convertino, Christina; Khourey-Bowers, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an innovative addition to the curriculum to help preservice teachers cultivate an understanding of poverty. Using technology, an interdisciplinary team created two online learning modules entitled Teacher as Learning Facilitator and Teacher as Anthropologist. Preservice teachers valued the newly developed…

  8. Facilitating Evaluations of Innovative, Competence-Based Assessments: Creating Understanding and Involving Multiple Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulikers, Judith T. M.; Baartman, Liesbeth K. J.; Biemans, Harm J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers' lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders' involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of innovative, competence-based assessments (CBAs). While…

  9. The "Outsider/Insider" Assignment: A Pedagogical Innovation for Teaching Cross-Cultural Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Angela Cora

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I describe an innovative assignment for teaching undergraduate students cross-cultural understanding. The Outsider/Insider assignment simultaneously teaches facts about cultural difference and skills for managing cross-cultural encounters. Briefly, the assignment is to write two short papers, one in which the student describes a…

  10. Private Banking Survey 2013: Success Through Innovation : Achieving Sustainability and Client-Centricity in Swiss Private Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Laamanen, Tomi; Schimmer, Markus; Reuter, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    This year's private banking study by KPMG and the University of St. Gallen (HSG) shows that Swiss private banks can remain successful in the future by innovating. Besides effective implementation of new regulatory requirements, key success factors will include innovative strategies and adaptations to business models, starting with more effective segmentation techniques, an open product architecture, transparent price structures and modern distribution and communication channels. Hardly an...

  11. Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA frames innovation as critical to the protection of human health and the environment through initiatives such as sustainable practices, innovative research, prize competitions, innovation awards, partnerships, and community activities.

  12. Understanding the evolution of eco-innovative activity in the automotive sector: a patent based analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faria, Lourenco; Andersen, Maj Munch

    The paper aims to analyze the evolution of eco-innovative activity and strategies in the automotive sector over time. We suggest to use a patent count methodology tracking the development of selected technologies considered as promising ?green technologies? in the automotive sector. The paper...... contributes to an understanding of the industrial dynamics of the greening of industry and the economy , a theme little analyzed despite the huge and rapidly increasing literature on sustainable development and innovation. Our findings show that all the major firms in the automotive industry are diversifying...

  13. Understanding and Supporting Dynamic Capabilities of Design Teams in Production of Technology-Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Kjeldal

    current environment. This study explores the practices of engineering designers that are executing disruptive innovation projects for DONG Energy, a Danish energy utilities company. The aim of the study was to understand the role of the designer in disruptive innovation and to create a tool for supporting...... multidisciplinary design teams, while creating disruptive innovations. The results from this study are presented in five research Papers that address the following themes: 1) the willingness of engineers to follow formal procedures, 2) critical knowledge domains in front-end technology decisions, 3) knowledge...... associated with product development, such as market design; 3) the diversity of these domains was found to increase the barrier for effective transition from the front-end phase to the product development phase; 4) the transition gate was found to be a separate phase, with its own knowledge...

  14. THE INNOVATION THEORY OF JOSEPH SCHUMPETER: FROM THE CLASSICAL DEFINITION OF THE TERM “INNOVATION” UP TO THE MODERN UNDERSTANDING OF THE INNOVATION IDEAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Masliukivska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the evolution of the appearance of the term “innovation” and its classical definition. The study exposes the main provisions of innovation theory of Joseph Schumpeter and their modern understanding.

  15. THE INNOVATION THEORY OF JOSEPH SCHUMPETER: FROM THE CLASSICAL DEFINITION OF THE TERM “INNOVATION” UP TO THE MODERN UNDERSTANDING OF THE INNOVATION IDEAS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Masliukivska

    2013-01-01

    The paper studies the evolution of the appearance of the term “innovation” and its classical definition. The study exposes the main provisions of innovation theory of Joseph Schumpeter and their modern understanding.

  16. HOW INNOVATION ENCOURAGES SELF EFFICACY TO SUPPORT BUSINESS START UP SUCCESS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinathasya Br Sitepu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A business start up is identical to a new business run by an entrepeneur to gain profit. The research is to analyze the function of the entrepreneurship training given by Universitas Ciputra Surabaya to the villagers in Desa Mojowarno.  The objectives of the research are: 1 to learn the proper innovation technique to increase the self efficacy of the entrepreneur/participant, 2 to understand the impact of the increased self-efficacy towards the business continuity managed by the entrepreneur/participant. The research method used is qualitative descriptive analysis with the subject of the research are entrepreneurs (ten training participants who managed banana trunk chips in Mojowarno. The validation technique used in this research is triangulation data method with participative observation, in depth interview and documentation (photo and video of the participants’ capability. The result of the research: 1 Innovation realization (5+1 concept succeeded in increasing the self efficacy of the participants (ten training participants; 2 The self-efficacy increase provides a positive impact (business increase so that the entrepreneur has an additional income. It is suggested that the entrepreneur must keep on innovating innovated to increase their self-efficacy so that the business can improve the continuity.Keywords: descriptive qualitative, innovation, self-efficacy, business entrepreneur start up, trainingABSTRAKStart-up bisnis identik dengan usaha baru yang dijalankan oleh seorang entrepreneur untuk mendapatkan keuntungan. Penelitian ini menganalisis peran pelatihan kewirausahaan yang diberikan Universitas Ciputra Surabaya kepada masyarakat Desa Mojowarno. Tujuan penelitian ini terdiri dari: 1 mengetahui teknik yang tepat untuk berinovasi guna meningkatkan self-efficacy dari entrepreneur/peseta yang mengikuti pelatihan, 2 Mengetahui dampak dari peningkatan self-efficacy terhadap keberlangsungan bisnis yang dijalankan oleh entrepreneur

  17. A review to collate information on external communication as a basis of innovation success (Deliverable 2.2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.J.; Lans, van der I.A.; Fischer, A.R.H.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of work package 2: “Identify success factors” is to identify relevant success factors and barriers in the scientific literature on internal (between relevant disciplines) and external (from and to the public and end-users) communication strategies to enhance food technology innovation

  18. Different perspectives of success in innovative projects: a comparative analysis of the Design for Six Sigma and Design Thinking approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn Martinelli Lopes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the alignment of the DFSS and DT approaches to innovative projects and the dimensions of success applied to evaluate them. A qualitative research strategy was applied, with the development of a case study in 2014 at a financial company that practices both approaches. The study involved the data analysis of eight projects, four DFSS and four DT. Descriptive statistics and the Mood median test were applied in order to interpret and summarize the results. The results indicate that the approach selected influences the project’s dimensions of success and that DT projects tend to have greater perspectives of success in innovation.

  19. Understanding consumer motivations for interacting in online food communities – potential for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina

    This study contributes to the understanding of online user communities as a potential source of innovation. That would require an interest from users in interacting in such communities. In order to establish interaction, users must provide as well as consume information. However, depending...... on the innovation task, one may be more important than the other. It is therefore important to understand, how companies can increase user willingness to engage in these different interaction forms. This study investigates the influence of various motivation factors and user interests on intention to provide...... or consume information in online food communities. A survey was conducted among 1009 respondents followed by analysis based on Structural Equation Modelling. Results revealed the effect of motivation factors to be stronger than basic consumer interests indicating that companies can influence the intended...

  20. Fibre optic ocean bottom seismic cable system: from innovation to commercial success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringlebotn, Jon Thomas; Nakstad, Hilde; Eriksrud, Morten

    2009-10-01

    Optoplan has been awarded the world's first commercial contract for a fibre optic Ocean Bottom Seismic Cable (OBC) system [1] for permanent reservoir monitoring at the Ekofisk field in the North Sea. An area of 60 sq. km of the seabed will be covered by four component (4C) sensors in 2010. The system consists of i) a top-side (platform) laser interrogation and recording system, and ii) a wet-end system including 200 km of seismic cable with 4000 sensor stations, each containing 4 FBG-based interferometric sensors (three accelerometers and one hydrophone). The wet-end system includes 24000 FBGs and more than 3500km of optical fibres, and will probably be the largest single fibre optic sensor network ever made. The completely passive wet-end part of the system is designed to operate with ultra-high reliability subsea over more than 25 years. The system is expected to significantly enhance the oil and gas recovery of the field. This commercial success is a result of i) Optoplan's long experience and credibility in the field of fibreoptic sensors for the oil and gas industry [2], [3], ii) close collaboration with oil companies and qualification through extensive field testing [4], [5], iii) the establishment of a high capacity supply chain and manufacturing system with innovative automated processes, iv) sensor/manufacturing design for high reliability and good manufacturability with high yield, v) innovative sensor fibre network and instrumentation design [1], [6], [7], [

  1. How we develop and sustain innovation in medical education technology: Keys to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, James B; Kanter, Steven L

    2011-01-01

    The use of information technology to support the educational mission of academic medical centers is nearly universal; however, the scope and methods employed vary greatly (Souza et al. 2008 ). This article reviews the methods, processes, and specific techniques needed to conceive, develop, implement, and assess technology-based educational programs across healthcare disciplines. We discuss the core concepts, structure, and techniques that enable growth, productivity, and sustainability within an academic setting. Herein are specific keys to success with examples including project selection, theory-based design, the technology development process, implementation, and evaluation that can lead to broad participation and positive learning outcomes. Most importantly, this article shares methods to involve students, faculty, and stakeholders in technology design and the development process that fosters a sustainable culture of educational innovation.

  2. The interaction of R&D and market orientation in improving business performance: An empirically based framework for understanding what drives innovation activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Harmsen, Hanne

    1997-01-01

    The interplay between R&D skills and competencies and market skills and competencies is in the more recent product development literature seen as a major determinant of successful innovation. The study reported in this paper was done in order to c more light on these two constructs...... in a traditionally low-tech industry, where product development is nevertheless considered to be strategically important, i.e., the food processing industry. The results of a series of case studies indicate that constructs than R&D and market orientation may be more appropriate for understanding innovation...

  3. Understanding a Successful Implementation of Organizational Social Media: A Multi-Site Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahman, Caroline D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine the successful implementation of social media strategies in multiple organizations. Examining the factors an organization used to implement social media can provide the understanding of the benefits and risks associated with this technology. Some businesses are considered successful using social…

  4. The impact of innovation training on successful outcomes in public–private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Public–private partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly seen as a way of innovating the production and management of public services. However, the question of what drives innovation in partnerships has so far received only limited attention. Drawing on network governance and collaborative innovation...... literature, this article presents the findings from a survey among 260 Danish PPPs. The study shows that while innovation training has a significant effect on achieving innovation in PPPs, factors such as trust and institutional support only affect some innovation types. The findings demonstrate...

  5. Making the energy transition a European success. Tackling the democratic, innovation, financing and social challenges of the energy union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin-Carlin, Thomas; Vinois, Jean-Arnold; Rubio, Eulalia; Fernandes, Sofia; Delors, Jacques; Letta, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    If there is one project today which carries a positive vision for Europe, it is definitely the energy transition. Energy is the foundation of our nations' power and is a key element in our daily lives. If Europe's architects are preparing a democratic, innovative, economically viable and socially fair Energy Union, it will contribute to a Europe that serves its citizens and paves the way for the rest of the world. If we fail in this project, the architects will have to give way to the fire-fighters, who will exhaust themselves putting out the fires caused by our past mistakes: climate refugees, dependence on Russia and Saudi Arabia, worsened energy poverty, the bankruptcy of energy suppliers who failed to adapt their strategy. The Energy Union, which we have been championing since 2010 and which is currently fully supported by President Juncker, is an ambitious project which can already be bolstered by the successes achieved by the European Union. The USA's withdrawal from the Paris Agreement further strengthens European leadership and enables us to attract innovators and investors who understand the opportunity created by the energy transition. This Report clearly sets out four objectives which could contribute to the success of the Energy Union, and in turn restore trust between Europe and Europeans. - Firstly, democracy must be at the heart of the Energy Union's governance. This involves mechanisms for more direct participation of citizens, local elected representatives and civil society in the major choices which shape national and European energy strategies. - Secondly, Europe must implement a genuine innovation-driven industrial policy to make our companies the world leaders in clean energy. - Thirdly, public and private investment arbitrations must fully integrate the energy transition's objectives. - Fourthly, the Energy Union must serve a just and fair energy transition via a 'Social Pact for the Energy Transition' which

  6. Design-Based Innovation for Manufacturing Firm Success in High-Cost Operating Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Roos

    The paper concludes that the design-based innovation paradigm is increasingly important within the manufacturing industry, but that its benefit can only be maximized if it is integrated with the other three value-creating approaches to innovation.

  7. Understanding the joint effects of Cognitive Distance and Competition on Pioneering Innovations through the Dynamics between Suppliers and Competitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ying; Salomo, Søren

    2010-01-01

    with an optimal innovation performance, because a too small cognitive distance provides the focal innovating firm with too little novelty value, while a too large cognitive distance makes it difficult for firms to learn and collaborate with each other. Second, the empirical evidence for the relationship between...... as an exploratory innovation that is technologically new to the innovating focal firm and introduced first to the world. The result of the empirical tests using a Canadian innovation dataset, which contains information on product/process innovations across four decades, confirms an inverted U-shaped relationship...... advance our understanding why and how firms take potential external learning opportunities to undertake pioneering innovations under various levels of competitive pressure....

  8. Defensive behaviours in innovation teams: how project teams discuss defensiveness and its relationship with innovation resilience behaviour and project success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Dhondt, S.; Gaspersz, J.B.R.; Vuuren, T. van

    2016-01-01

    Project team members and project leaders of innovation projects were interviewed about the possible presence of defensive behaviours within the team. While investigating defensive behaviour can be done validly by observation techniques, to talk about defensiveness within a team often leads to

  9. Exploring the Usefulness of Two Conceptual Frameworks for Understanding How Organizational Factors Influence Innovation Implementation in Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Robin; Sargeant, Joan; Grunfeld, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Moving knowledge into practice and the implementation of innovations in health care remain significant challenges. Few researchers adequately address the influence of organizations on the implementation of innovations in health care. The aims of this article are to (1) present 2 conceptual frameworks for understanding the organizational factors…

  10. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Schwartz, Lisa S; DiMeglio, Linda A; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Gabrilove, Janice L

    2016-04-01

    To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and reconceptualize understand ing of career success for this population. In 2013-2014, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators' transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and the transcripts were analyzed thematically. Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support.Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgment of successes. Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator.

  11. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  12. One size does not fit all - understanding the front-end and back-ens of business model innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günzel, Franziska; Holm, Anna B.

    2013-01-01

    production and delivery have affected key components of these business models, namely value creation, proposition, delivery and capture in the period 2002–2011. Our findings suggest the need to distinguish between front-end and back-end business model innovation processes, and to recognize the importance......Business model innovation is becoming a central research topic in management. However, a lack of a common understanding of the nature of the business model leads to disregarding its multifaceted structure when analyzing the business model innovation process. This article proposes a more detailed...... understanding of the business model innovation process by drawing on existing knowledge from new product development literature and examining the front-end and the back-end of business model innovation of three leading Danish newspapers. We studied how changes introduced during the development of digital news...

  13. Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Il s’agit du second ouvrage paru dans le cadre du projet « Innovation und Recht », financé par la Fondation Volkswagen. D’approche interdisciplinaire, celui-ci a pour ambition de dé­terminer l’impact du droit existant sur l’innovation en vue de le faire évoluer. Au regard du droit de la concurrence et de la régulation sectorielle actuels, les auteurs se consacrent aux possibilités offertes par une orientation accrue vers l’innovation, notamment dans le secteur prometteur des télécommunication...

  14. Understanding and Theorizing the Role of Culture in the Conceptualizations of Successful Aging and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Successful aging and lifelong learning are value-laden concepts that are culturally determined. To this effect, people with different value systems and cultural backgrounds may perceive and understand these two concepts differently, resulting in different definitions and conceptualizations by people in diverse cultural contexts. There have been…

  15. Evidence for the acceptability and academic success of an innovative remote and rural extended placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Morven; Cleland, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Time spent in remote medicine as an undergraduate is influential in career choice in Australia and Northern America. However, its influence is not known in smaller countries, where recruitment into rural medicine is also problematic. Differences across countries mean work is required to explore determinants of success of remote and rural undergraduate training locally. The objectives of this pilot study were to identify why 4th year medical students chose an extended remote and rural option within a degree program which includes a short compulsory period of remote and rural practice. Because this was a novel option the study also looks at the academic performance of the first cohort of students to ensure quality control of teaching and learning. This was a mixed methods (questionnaire, focus group, assessment data) pilot study exploring student views and performance outcomes in 4th year medical undergraduate students (n = 14), University of Aberdeen, who completed an innovative, one-year remote and rural placement. Fourteen students took part in the pilot. Questionnaire data indicated they viewed remote and rural medicine positively. This interest was maintained over the placement. Most had no definite career plans, but did have a slight preference towards general practice. Focus group data indicated four main themes relating to the decision to select the remote and rural placement: (1) teaching reputation; (2) to experience remote and rural medicine; (3) a change from Aberdeen; and (4) lifestyle factors. Assessment data indicated that student performances at the end of the year placement were consistent with their 3rd year performance on all assessments: OSCEs (p = 0.79), written exams (p = 0.10; p = 0.49), special study module/ Ethics (p = 0.10) and year mark averages (p = 0.48). The results indicate that the extended remote and rural placement was a valuable and academically successful experience for the students. Important outcomes include that: the students

  16. Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Kravet om innovation og kreativitet er på flere måder en stor og en ny udfordring for voksenuddannelserne. Det udfordrer det didaktiske dilemma, det at vi skal gøres til kompetente og frie mennesker gennem pædagogiske handlinger, som netop pålægger os en ufrihed. – Men hvor denne ufrihed...... innovative, netop er det, vi endnu ikke kender...

  17. Teaching undergraduate nursing research: a comparison of traditional and innovative approaches for success with millennial learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Mary K; Martins, Diane C

    2010-05-01

    Historically, nursing students have questioned the value of a nursing research course and have not appreciated the research-practice link. These are important concerns in light of the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative strategies for teaching undergraduate nursing research that engage millennial learners and emphasize the relationship between evidence-based practice and clinical outcomes. Innovative assignments were developed that included interactive learning, group work, and practical applications preferred by these learners. Using a Likert scale, students' perceived effectiveness of innovative assignments and more traditional assignments were compared. Results indicated a preference for active learning assignments, reading quizzes, clinical nurse researcher presentations, and collaboration with clinical course assignments. By combining traditional assignments with innovative strategies and nursing practice applications, millennial learners were engaged and able to clearly articulate the value of the research-practice link vital to evidence-based nursing practice.

  18. Key performance indicators for project success on innovative building technology projects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mphahlele, Cathy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The South African government, through the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission has resolved to deliver social infrastructure such as schools, early childhood centers, clinics and student accommodation using Innovative Building...

  19. Innovation Compass : How to develop a market and build a successful business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. G.A.A. Bauwen

    2012-01-01

    The book aspires to fill a gap in the existing innovation and strategic marketing literature by providing new insights, practical frameworks, diagnostics, strategies and tactics helpful for entrepreneurs managers, investors, students, the venture community and policy makers.

  20. Application of Innovative Models in Teaching Methods for Introduction to Nature and Society and Students’ Success

    OpenAIRE

    Snezana Stavreva Veselinovska; Snezana Kirova

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the issue of shaping and applying innovative models in the teaching of Teaching methods for introduction to nature and society in the conditions existing in our schools. Most teachers need a modern methodical transformation of program contents for teaching nature and society. Therefore the theoretical part of the work is directed towards the consideration of innovative approaches in Teaching methods for introduction to nature and society, which asked for an indication of...

  1. Designing for sustained adoption: A model of developing educational innovations for successful propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Raina; Henderson, Charles; Cole, Renée; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; Friedrichsen, Debra; Stanford, Courtney

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The physics education research community has produced a wealth of knowledge about effective teaching and learning of college level physics. Based on this knowledge, many research-proven instructional strategies and teaching materials have been developed and are currently available to instructors. Unfortunately, these intensive research and development activities have failed to influence the teaching practices of many physics instructors. This paper describes interim results of a larger study to develop a model of designing materials for successful propagation. The larger study includes three phases, the first two of which are reported here. The goal of the first phase was to characterize typical propagation practices of education developers, using data from a survey of 1284 National Science Foundation (NSF) principal investigators and focus group data from eight disciplinary groups of NSF program directors. The goal of the second phase was to develop an understanding of successful practice by studying three instructional strategies that have been well propagated. The result of the first two phases is a tentative model of designing for successful propagation, which will be further validated in the third phase through purposeful sampling of additional well-propagated instructional strategies along with typical education development projects. We found that interaction with potential adopters was one of the key missing ingredients in typical education development activities. Education developers often develop a polished product before getting feedback, rely on mass-market communication channels for dissemination, and do not plan for supporting adopters during implementation. The tentative model resulting from this study identifies three key propagation activities: interactive development, interactive dissemination, and support of adopters. Interactive development

  2. Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Voilà deux approches complémentaires de la problématique de l’innovation et des pôles de compétitivité. L’innovation, facteur-clef de compétitivité, y est considérée sous deux angles. D’un côté, celui de la politique industrielle et de sa mise en œuvre à l’échelon territorial via la création de pôles de compétitivité et des partenariats institutionnels que cela implique. D’un autre côté, l’angle des systèmes nationaux d’innovation et de leur comparaison internationale ; ces systèmes sont cons...

  3. Quality service delivery for the community, by the community: an innovative Eastern Cape infrastructure and job creation success

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available of Municipal Engineering of Southern Africa Annual (IMIESA) Conference, Port Elizabeth, October 2013 Quality service delivery for the community, by the community: an innovative Eastern Cape infrastructure and job creation success Wall K, Ive O, Bhagwan J..., particularly: job creation- and it creates there at the lowest economic levels of the pyramid, where unemployment is the highest and possession of the workplace skills lowest, transfer of workplace skills; micro-business creation and nurturing; BBBEE...

  4. Open software to innovation: the critical success factors of massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPG) in China and Ireland.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei

    2007-01-01

    This project investigates the factors leading to the success of China’s Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPG) market and gives an analysis of how Open source has contributed to these success factors. It then will look at how the use of open source is mirrored in Ireland’s market for example, the software sector to see if the same factors are apparent or there are indicators of these. Knowledge Management plays a very important role for fasten the innovation of Open source s...

  5. Open innovations, innovation communities and firm's innovative activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getejanc Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The open innovation paradigm emphasizes the fact that firms can improve their performance by opening their business models and reduce their R&D costs by effective incorporation of external knowledge. In other words, companies are able to capture value through knowledge that exists outside the boundaries of their organization. The shift from closed to open model of innovation has imposed the necessity to adopt more open approach to innovation within traditional academic view of business strategy. The adoption of this innovative approach is emphasized even more, by the necessity for stronger connection and cooperation among the participants of the innovation process. Free will and collaboration are the main characteristics of open source software, which is recognized in literature as the role model of open innovation and is a rapidly growing method of technology development. Furthermore, innovative communities represent a great opportunity for improvement of the companies' innovation activities, since they have become an important source for identifying the needs and problems of the users. Their development has been fostered by information technologies and recent social changes in user behavior. Recognizing and better understanding the motivation of the members of the innovation communities that guide them to participate in the process of idea generation, can have significant influence on their incorporation within the innovation process. Equally important is to define the incentives that are suited for stimulating and fostering innovative user activities. Taking this topic in consideration, the purpose of this article is to address the following questions: In what way does the collaboration in open source software projects have positive effect on companies' innovation performance? What are the innovation communities and how can companies establish successful interaction with them? Why does the interaction with innovation communities lead to

  6. Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2017-01-01

    Innovation i krydsfeltet mellem forskellige styringsparadigmer i offentlige organisationer. New Public Governance gør det muligt at skabe offentlig værdi på nye måder. Men NPG er ingen trylledrik, der fra den ene dag til den anden skaber balance mellem borgernes store forventninger og en trængt...

  7. Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... libraries as support for the reading intervention is also an important part of the project. The focus of this article is on the use of family literacy workshops to introduce the reading programme and the fledgling school libraries to parents and the potential role of the school library in supporting reading activities. Innovation Vol.

  8. Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of Innovation journal of appropriate librarianship and information work in Southern Africa is to publish material on libraries, information supply and other related matters in South and Southern Africa. Vol 45 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  9. A model of success: (creation of a culture of friendly innovation generation for german SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Lemme

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the course of the demographic development in Germany, the ratio of elderly workers grows compared to the share of young qualified employees. As a consequence, professional shortages are an increasingly growing problem. Hence, it is more and more important, especially for German small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs, to develop strategies in order to handle this demographic change. Skilled employees have a major impact on the development of innovations particularly in SMEs. Their closely customer-corporate relationship in combination with a high number of SMEs in Germany forces them to be innovative in order to stand out from the crowd. Due to identified deficits regarding an appropriate human resources management as well as a structured innovation process management within SMEs, the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs is funding several research projects to support SMEs by using a set of manifold instruments with the aim to solve the stated problems. The presented research project, called generIK (setting up generation equitable innovation cultures within SMEs, aims to sensitize SMEs and business leaders to build up such a generation friendly innovation culture as part of a holistic corporate culture. Instead of the age of an employee it is his/her personal attitude to the work which decisively influences the engagement to improve products, what finally can lead to the realization of innovations. As further research results, the scientists developed several analysis-methods among them an instrument to conduct a company-specific self-validation for SMEs. To strengthen the market position of SMEs in times of the demographic change which should be accompanied by a rise of employee and customer satisfaction, the output of our project has to be disseminated to the SMEs and especially to the business leaders.  

  10. Understanding the adoption dynamics of medical innovations: affordances of the da Vinci robot in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrishami, Payam; Boer, Albert; Horstman, Klasien

    2014-09-01

    This study explored the rather rapid adoption of a new surgical device - the da Vinci robot - in the Netherlands despite the high costs and its controversial clinical benefits. We used the concept 'affordances' as a conceptual-analytic tool to refer to the perceived promises, symbolic meanings, and utility values of an innovation constructed in the wider social context of use. This concept helps us empirically understand robot adoption. Data from 28 in-depth interviews with diverse purposively-sampled stakeholders, and from medical literature, policy documents, Health Technology Assessment reports, congress websites and patients' weblogs/forums between April 2009 and February 2014 were systematically analysed from the perspective of affordances. We distinguished five interrelated affordances of the robot that accounted for shaping and fulfilling its rapid adoption: 'characteristics-related' affordances such as smart nomenclature and novelty, symbolising high-tech clinical excellence; 'research-related' affordances offering medical-technical scientific excellence; 'entrepreneurship-related' affordances for performing better-than-the-competition; 'policy-related' affordances indicating the robot's liberalised provision and its reduced financial risks; and 'communication-related' affordances of the robot in shaping patients' choices and the public's expectations by resonating promising discourses while pushing uncertainties into the background. These affordances make the take-up and use of the da Vinci robot sound perfectly rational and inevitable. This Dutch case study demonstrates the fruitfulness of the affordances approach to empirically capturing the contextual dynamics of technology adoption in health care: exploring in-depth actors' interaction with the technology while considering the interpretative spaces created in situations of use. This approach can best elicit real-life value of innovations, values as defined through the eyes of (potential) users

  11. Orchestrating innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.; Boer, J. de

    2015-01-01

    Orchestrating Innovation increases the probability of success, minimizing the probability of failure of technological innovations by creating sustained societal and economic value. Orchestrating innovation propagates to take into account and actively involve all relevant stakeholders of the (future)

  12. Competitive Advantage through Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Maier, Maximilian; Wimschneider, Christine

    2016-01-01

    to failure several times. Before the current situation of the company, it remains challenging in the future as well. Hence, the Nespresso story provides interesting space for discussion and learning about what innovation is, how innovation emerges, and under which circumstances innovation can serve...... as a source for competitive advantage. Research limitations/implications Especially given the current market situation, the case offers different starting points for discussion about innovation and long-term company success. Practical implications Especially before the current market situation, the case...... offers different starting points for discussion about innovation and the success of a company on the long term. The case is designed to give practitioners a better understanding on what an innovation as, and how competitive advantages can be linked to innovation. Originality/value This case of Nespresso...

  13. Identifying the Factors Leading to Success: How an Innovative Science Curriculum Cultivates Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    "PlantingScience" is an award-winning program recognized for its innovation and use of computer-supported scientist mentoring. Science learners work on inquiry-based experiments in their classrooms and communicate asynchronously with practicing plant scientist-mentors about the projects. The purpose of this study was to identify specific…

  14. Is temperament a key to the success of teaching innovation? | Blitz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. A section of the undergraduate curriculum was revised due to consistently poor student evaluation. The chosen didactic method for achieving this change was reciprocal peer teaching. This innovation may have required academic members of staff to adapt to a new teaching style. Method. Staff members ...

  15. Disruptive Innovation for Student Success at a Twenty-First Century Four-Year Baccalaureate Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Kelly L.

    2017-01-01

    The problem targeted by this study is the widening imbalance between admissions and graduation rates occurring at many long-standing institutions of higher education. This study applied the theory of disruptive innovation to gain insight into the policies, procedures, beliefs, and perspectives of how a single college that was established in the…

  16. Using Innovations in Financial Aid to Support College Success. Looking Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    MDRC, 2017

    2017-01-01

    The country faces three problems in higher education: increasing costs, increasing student debt, and low completion rates. Although most students receive financial aid, many are left with unmet financial needs and may take on loans or drop out of college as a result. But promising innovations in financial aid could help students pay for college…

  17. Innovation success over time of alliances with different strategic and cooperation objectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manuhutu, Ari; von Raesfeld Meijer, Ariane; Geurts, Peter; Ebrahimi, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    In response to uncertainty of prospective technologies and how they might fit market demand, firms tend to establish R&D alliances. In this chapter the effect over time of continuation of underperforming R&D alliances on innovation performance during the pre-market stage is investigated. This stage

  18. INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Kravet om innovation og kreativitet er på flere måder en stor og en ny udfordring for voksenuddannelserne. Det udfordrer det didaktiske dilemma, det at vi skal gøres til kompetente og frie mennesker gennem pædagogiske handlinger, som netop pålægger os en ufrihed. – Men hvor denne ufrihed tidligere...... kunne begrundes med, at skolen eller uddannelsen vidste bedre, så er det ikke længere tilfældet. Skolen skal sørge for, at vi lærer noget – og ikke noget andet. Men det kan ikke længere med bestemthed afgøres, hvad det er vi skal lære i skolen, fordi det nye, det kreative og ikke mindst innovative...

  19. Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Présenté par FutuRIS, plate-forme prospective sur la recherche, l’innovation et la société animée par l’Association Nationale de la Recherche et de la Technologie, ce volume livre un panorama du système français de recherche et d’innovation dans son environnement européen. Sont abordés dans une première partie les champs décisionnels concernés, les politiques nationales menées en matière de R&D, les relations entre enseignement supérieur et recherche et l’Espace européen de la recherche à l’h...

  20. Online Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vujovic, Sladjana; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2008-01-01

    on proprietary knowledge. Design/methodology/approach - The paper borrows from the theory of communities-of-practice, which takes into account social relations, contacts, and the transfer and incorporation of knowledge. Open source innovation is not the exclusive preserve of computer nerds, but also has...... implications for existing software manufacturers. The paper therefore includes the case of IBM, a company which has successfully integrated this new and more open way of collaboration into its business model. Findings - The paper concludes that online computer-based innovation fundamentally challenges current...... for practitioners directly involved in innovation and product development. Originality/value - This paper develops a conceptual framework for understanding product development based on non-proprietary knowledge, which cannot be adequately accounted for by traditional corporate innovation theory alone....

  1. Women entrepreneurship in South Africa: Understanding the role of competencies in business success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget N.O. Irene

    2017-09-01

    qualitative study. Results: All participants agreed that entrepreneurial competencies are vital for business success. The study also makes a clear distinction between the traits approach and competencies approach in understanding business success. Arguably, the competency variable is viewed and appreciated differently by female entrepreneurs in South Africa. The findings also showed some cultural variations in the application of entrepreneurial competencies among the four dominant racial groups in South Africa. Conclusion: This study offers a comprehensive analysis of the competency variable in understanding the factors that influence business success in the context of South African female entrepreneurs. It provides a basis for an agenda for focus on training and development of the entrepreneurial competencies of female entrepreneurs in South Africa.

  2. Federal Research: Small Business Innovation Research Shows Success but can be Strengthened

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Page 28 GAO/RCED-9287 Small Busness Innvatlion Research Chapter I Results otf SBE Projects in Pise III Minority and Minority and disadvantaged...Martin D. Teckler, SBA’s Acting General Counsel, to Martin E. Sloane, GAO Assistant General Counsel (June 10, 1991). Page 46 GAOIRCED-4237 Small Busness ...8217 clarification. Page 88 GiM/RCED-92--7 Small Busness Innovation Research Appendix IV Comments From the National Science Foundation NATIONAL SCIENCE

  3. Innovation implementation in the context of hospital QI: lessons learned and strategies for success

    OpenAIRE

    Rangachari,Pavani

    2018-01-01

    Pavani Rangachari College of Allied Health Sciences, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) reported that 98,000 people die each year due to medical errors. In the following years, the focus on hospital quality was intensified nationally, with policymakers providing evidence-based practice guidelines for improving health care quality. However, these innovations (evidence-based guidelines) that were being produced at policy levels were not trans...

  4. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  5. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.; Bank, K.Y.; Bonazza, R.; Cho, D.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications

  6. Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cette publication biennale, dont voici le septième volume, recense les tendances et les grandes orientations scientifiques, technologiques et industrielles, dans l’ensemble de la zone OCDE, ainsi que dans les grandes économies non membres. Outre les notes par pays en matière de recherche et d’innovation, le rapport présente l’évolution des politiques nationales et leur évaluation en termes de « dosage ». Comme l’OCDE célèbre cette année son 50e anniversaire, cette édition 2010 comporte égalem...

  7. Understanding the Real Barriers to Technology-Enhanced Innovation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneckenberg, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Background: Academic staff have a key role to play in the innovation efforts of universities aiming to exploit the potential of web-based learning technologies. Although learning technologies are an important building block of educational innovation, the eLearning adoption rate of European academic staff appears disappointing. The majority of…

  8. Integrating Process and Factor Understanding of Environmental Innovation by Water Utilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiller, Marc; McIntosh, Brian S.; Seaton, Roger A.F.; Jeffrey, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Innovations in technology and organisations are central to enabling the water sector to adapt to major environmental changes such as climate change, land degradation or drinking water pollution. While there are literatures on innovation as a process and on the factors that influence it, there is

  9. Why did we make that cheese? An empirically based framework for understanding what drives innovation activities in a low-tech industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    The interplay between R&D skills and competencies and market skills and competencies is in the more recent product development literature seen as a major determinant of success for innovation. The study reported in this paper was done in order to more light on these two contructs in a traditionally...... and explaining innovation success in the case material. A new set of constructs focusing on what causes specific innovation activities to occur is prop and a revised framework is developed....

  10. Integral Innovation The Long Term Warrant for Competitiveness, Success and Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Teodorescu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We are living in a steadily changing world and what is not getting ahead is falling behind, getting obsolete. Therefore Innovation is an existential task for anyone, for the economy and for humanity as a whole. A steady creative input for challenging the routine, means maintaining leadership and competitiveness, as the context, the acceptance and even the addressed problems are subject of changing steadily too. The economy is crossing for a while a critical phase and a major creative effort is needed now for avoiding the following steep slope. There is a strong need for genuine Creative Power and strong flow of game changing concepts, revving up the economy growth.

  11. A recommendation to use the diffusion of innovations theory to understand school nurses' role in HPV vaccine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany; Goodson, Patricia

    Vaccinations represent one of the greatest public health achievements of the past century, but their success largely depends on populations' uptake. Seven years after its approval in 2006 for females, the HPV vaccination rates remain relatively low. Previous literature provides information about research examining U.S. physicians, pediatricians, and other healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and professional practice toward the HPV vaccine. No research has yet investigated U.S. school nurses' role in educating the school community about the vaccine's benefits. Diffusion of Innovations theory is an appropriate perspective for examining school nurses as opinion leaders who can influence the uptake of the HPV vaccine for youth. This theory explains how innovations diffuse throughout a social system, and highlights the construct of opinion leadership. School nurses exhibit the characteristics of opinion leaders; therefore, Diffusion of Innovations can be a useful lens for assessing their role in efforts to promote HPV vaccination for youth.

  12. Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    A l’heure où le gouvernement fédéral accroît ses dépenses de R&D de 7 % pour réaliser l’objectif de Lisbonne des 3 % de R&D dans le PIB à l’horizon 2010, cette étude publiée par la Fondation Hans Böckler du DGB tombe à point nommé. Ses auteurs passent en revue pour les évaluer les politiques d’innovation technologique menée par 9 Länder, dont bien entendu la Bavière et le Bade-Wurtemberg, mais aussi la Saxe ou la Sarre. (ib)

  13. New frontiers in open innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Vanhaverbeke, Wim; West, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Companies have to innovate to stay competitive, and they have to collaborate with other organizations to innovate effectively. Although the benefits of "open innovation" have been described in detail before, mechanisms underlying how companies can be successful "open innovators" have not be understood well. A growing community of innovation management researchers started to develop different frameworks to understand open innovation in a more systematic way. This book provides a thorough examination of research conducted to date on open innovation, as well as a comprehensive overview of what will be the most important, most promising and most relevant research topics in this area during the next decade. "Open Innovation: Researching a new paradigm" (OUP 2006) was the first initiative to bring open innovation closer to the academic community. Open innovation research has since then been growing in an exponential way and research has evolved in different and unexpected directions. As the research field is growin...

  14. UNDERSTANDING EFFECTS OF INNOVATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE APPROACHES ON SUPPLY CHAIN PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Hakan; Sezen, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Purpose- Main goalof this paper is to perform an exploratory and empirical research on theinteractions of collaboration and innovation elements that are presented in theliterature; co-creation, service dominant logic, open innovation, negativeentropy and entrepreneurship orientation. Moreover, this study aims to examinethe effects of these elements on supply chain performance attributes(reliability, responsiveness, flexibility, costs and asset management). Methodology- In order tounderstand t...

  15. Success and failure of firms' innovation co-operations: The role of intermediaries and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, U.; Meder, A.; Wolf, T.

    2011-01-01

    There is manifold literature dealing with co-operative activities of firms. However, no empirical study seems to have investigated the factors leading to malfunctions in co-operation projects in terms of a low likelihood of co-operation, low rate of success, and failed co-operation. Our paper...... attempts to fill this gap by investigating the possible presence of two problems in co-operation: the lack of intermediation and of reciprocity. Based on data gathered for firms in two German regions and one French region, we find that the success of co-operation projects depends on the perceived...

  16. Responsible aquaculture in 2050: Valuing local conditions and human innovations will be key to success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diana, J.S.; Egna, H.S.; Chopin, T.; Peterson, M.S.; Cao, L.; Pomeroy, R.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Slack, W.T.; Bondad-Reantaso, M.G.; Cabello, F.

    2013-01-01

    As aquaculture production expands, we must avoid mistakes made during increasing intensification of agriculture. Understanding environmental impacts and measures to mitigate them is important for designing responsible aquaculture production systems. There are four realistic goals that can make

  17. Success factors of social innovations by a community-based learning course (CBLC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, G.; Casimir, G.; Goris, M.

    2014-01-01

    This is the success story of a community-based learning course (CBLC) project addressing the concerns of the international community of students and staff of Wageningen University and Research Centre (WageningenUR). A joint effort of this community, WageningenUR and social entrepreneurs resulted in

  18. Innovations and economic success in Finnish equine and bio-energy enterprises; Innovaatiotoiminta ja taloudellinen menestyminen hevosalan ja bioenergia-alan pienyrityksissae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiilikainen, S.

    2009-07-01

    Cluster of industries is the critical mass of industries, which are located into certain geographical areas. In cluster supporting and related industries are linked through vertical and a horizontal relationship. Rural clusters are based on local traditions, resources and knowledge. The key advantage of cluster of industries is the fact that innovations are often created in them. The purpose of this study is to find out how creation of innovations can be improved in rural cluster of industries. The subject of this study is the link between innovations and the financial success of enterprises. The research questions are formulated as: What kinds of innovations take place in equine and bio-energy enterprises? How different factors affect to innovations made in these enterprises? How does competitiveness, the economic success of enterprises relate these innovations? Theoretical background of the study lies on the Schumpeter's' theory of entrepreneurship and innovations are defined broadly as doing new things or doing things already done on a new way. Data were collected by postal survey in August 2008 (n =165), the respondents were equine entrepreneurs from Uusimaa region and bio-energy entrepreneurs in Pohjois-Pohjanmaa region. Data were analysed using multivariate analyses. The study results reveal that, most of the innovations related to services or pricing the services. It was fairly uncommon to develop new business models, which was worrying, because many of the enterprises had enlarged or invested heavily on the capacity. The economic success did relate to innovations; those enterprises who performed poorly had not introduced any innovations or improvements during past three years, whist enterprises with good or average performance had introduced innovations or improvements. (orig.)

  19. Balanced Innovation Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, David R

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Defense has demonstrated success in managing innovation. The military's approach to innovation management extends beyond traditional distinctions between internal and external innovation modes...

  20. From idea to blah! understanding mobile services development as interactive innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fontana

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile communications are permeating virtually every aspect of our lives. The market is experiencing rapid improvements in technologies, while mobile operators are trying to figure out new ways their infrastructures can provide services to the customers. Furthermore, user-innovation with new ways of using these technologies generates powerful feedback loops back into the innovation processes. In this turbulent environment it is difficult to capture and conceptualize how newness comes about and what the main characteristics of innovation are. The aim of this paper is to illustrate how the concept of interactive innovation can be applied to explain the development of mobile services. This study adopts the perspective of the developer rather than the user. Moreover, through the social construction of technology lens, the concepts of sense-making and bricolage are applied to explain the innovation appropriation process during the mobile data value chain improvement process. One of the conclusions drawn is that in the rapidly changing and complex context of mobile services development, the traditional notion of ‘interactive innovation’ cannot fully explain this phenomenon that takes place.

  1. An innovative model for achieving breast-feeding success in infants with complex surgical anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Taryn M; Spatz, Diane L

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript describes an innovative nurse-driven continuous quality improvement project. Infants born with congenital surgical anomalies face significant challenges within the newborn period and human milk/breast-feeding may not be viewed as a priority. In many hospitals, nurses refer families to lactation consultants for all breast-feeding assistance and support. The Transition to Breast Pathway was developed on the basis of the evidence-based standards and protocols at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The pathway consists of (1) initiation of pumping and maintenance of milk supply, (2) mouth care with human milk, (3) skin-to-skin care, (4) nonnutritive sucking at the breast, (5) transitioning to at breast feeds. A sample of 80 infants were enrolled in this project. Major results of the project are as follows: (1) mother's average milk supply was approximately 603 mL/d, (2) 71% (57/80) of the infants received mouth care with human milk, (3) 48% (38/80) mother/infant dyads performed skin-to-skin care, (4) 60% (35/58) of mother/infant dyads performed nonnutritive sucking at the breast, (5) 100% (58/58) of mother-infant dyads transitioned to breast prior to discharge. This continuous quality improvement project demonstrates that nurses can and should lead the process of transitioning infants to at breast feeds.

  2. Dilemmas in the Analysis of Technological Change. A Cognitive Approach to Understand Innovation and Change in the Water Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Borri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we argue for the need to apply a cognitive approach to understand deep dynamics and determinants of technological evolutions. After examining main contributions from innovation studies to the conceptualization of innovation and change in complex socio-technical environments, we highlight the contribution coming from the application of the cognitive approach to evolutionary studies on technologies and we introduce the concept of technological memory as an interpretative tool to understand those changes. We discuss our hypothesis with reference to several observations carried out in different local contexts – Mexico, India and Italy – in relation to technological change in the water sector. In those cases deliberate attempts to substitute traditional technologies with modern ones led to interesting trajectories of change ranging from the collapse of old technologies to the development of multifaceted hybridization patterns.

  3. Towards a multidisciplinary understanding of product innovation: the Synopsis network project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2002-01-01

    The product development research area has evolved from the area of engineering design, based upon the recognition that important aspects such as need, market, business, innovation of the company, technology management, etc. fuse together to form a field of competencies, containing its own......, psychology, anthropology, social science and operations management. The group of researchers is formally organised as a research network project, supported and part-funded by the Centre for Industrial Production at Aalborg University. The project, called "Synopsis", has a number of aims and foci...... a set of "images of innovation" which describe the subject from each our viewpoints. The ultimate goals of the network project are to produce: 1. A framework/reference system describing companies´ innovation activities, based upon national and international research findings 2. A vocabulary with which...

  4. Westinghouse Savannah River Site vendor forum: An innovative cooperative technology development success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, H.F. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Supplier Environmental and Waste Management Information Exchange Forum was held August 31 - September 1, 1993. The forum, which was planned and conducted in concert with the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SROO), was held to foster a technical exchange in which new, innovative technologies were proposed by suppliers, to identify more cost-effective methods to apply to future and on-going activities, to increase use of the private sector, and to promote partnerships with other industries. The two day forum provided the opportunity for WSRC and DOE-SR to review program activities and challenges in five major areas, Savannah River Technology Center, Solid Waste Facilities, Environmental Restoration, Environmental Monitoring, and Decontamination and Decommissioning through formal presentations. The second day was designed to provide suppliers the opportunity to talk about current and future activities and challenges with representatives of each of these areas at display booths, special high interest topic interactive sessions, and site tours. Each attendee was then invited to submit pre-proposals relative to the abstracts presented in The Special Consolidate Solicitation for Environmental and Waste Management Basic and Applied Research and Research-Related Development and/or Demonstration No. E10600-E1 document. Twenty-five contracts totaling $12 million were awarded. Twenty-four contracts have now been completed. This paper provides an overview of the pre forum activities, the forum, post-forum and proposal review process, and most importantly a description of the technologies demonstrated, the benefits and savings derived, and future use potential from a DOE perspective, as well as technology transfer and industrial partnership potential

  5. Orchestrating innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.; Boer, J. de

    2015-01-01

    Orchestrating Innovation increases the probability of success, minimizing the probability of failure of technological innovations by creating sustained societal and economic value. Orchestrating innovation propagates to take into account and actively involve all relevant stakeholders of the (future) ecosystem in which the innovation will, can or has to be adopted.

  6. NASA Johnson Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Successes, Infusion and Commercializations and Potential International Partnering Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Kathryn; Goodman, Doug; Whittington, James

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program has served as a beneficial funding vehicle to both US small technology businesses and the Federal Agencies that participate in the program. This paper, to the extent possible, while observing Intellectual Property (IP) laws, will discuss the many SBIR and STTR (SBIR Technology Transfer) successes in the recent history of the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Many of the participants of the International Conference on Environmental Systems (ICES) have based their research and papers on technologies that were made possible by SBIR/STTR awards and post award funding. Many SBIR/STTR successes have flown on Space Shuttle missions, Space X Dragons, and other spacecraft. SBIR/STTR technologies are currently infused on the International Space Station (ISS) and satellites, one of which was a NASA/JAXA (Japanese Space Agency) joint venture. Many of these companies have commercialized their technologies and grown as businesses while helping the economy through the creation of new jobs. In addition, this paper will explore the opportunity for international partnership with US SBIR/STTR companies as up to 49% of the makeup of the company is not required to be American owned. Although this paper will deal with technical achievements, it does not purport to be technical in nature. It will address the many requests for information on successes and opportunities within NASA SBIR and the virtually untapped potential of international partnering.

  7. The knowledge dynamics of organizational innovation : understanding the implementation of decision support for planners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjarbaini, Vivyane Larissa Ratna Nirma

    2009-01-01

    This thesis argues that a knowledge perspective on organizational innovation provides essential insights. A cognitive-semiotic model on knowledge dynamics is presented and used to perform an empirical study. We seek an answer to the question: What happens to the knowledge of planners during an

  8. Doctors on-line: using diffusion of innovations theory to understand internet use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona; Grant, William; Tote, Rohit

    2004-10-01

    Family physicians must be aware of the latest and best evidence for a broad range of clinical and public health topics. The Internet is an important source of this information, but not all family physicians use the Internet. This study used "diffusion of innovations" theory to identify strategies for increasing Internet use by family physicians. We conducted a mail survey of 58 family physicians in a midsized Northeastern metropolitan area in the United States to assess Internet use and identify sources from which physicians obtain medical information. We then used diffusion of innovations theory to describe the process by which physicians learn and develop skills at using the Internet. Internet use begins when physicians are not constrained by a heavy patient volume and are able to learn about and observe the benefits of Internet use. When they experience its usefulness, their Internet browsing and searching develop and become more effortless and less time-consuming. The innovation attributes of diffusion of innovations theory act as predictors of Internet use among family physicians. Internet use by family physicians might be increased by providing them time to learn about how to use it and to experience its benefits. Integration of continuing medical education courses created for the purpose of developing and enhancing Internet usage skills into their schedule may be a workable solution. Demographic factors such as gender and training recency have no influence on Internet use by family physicians.

  9. Experts on Super Innovators: Understanding Staff Adoption of Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jane; Aho, Anne-Maria

    2018-01-01

    Learning management systems (LMSs) are widely used in higher education and offer a gateway to innovative, technology-enhanced teaching and learning. However, many university staff still choose not to adopt them or do not explore the more creative functionality. Previous research has developed models of technology adoption which map observed…

  10. Understanding the diversity of cooperation on innovation across countries: multilevel evidence from Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srholec, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, 1-2 (2015), s. 159-182 ISSN 1043-8599 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/10/2310 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : innovation * cooperation * multilevel model Subject RIV: AH - Economics

  11. The biotechnology innovation machine: a source of intelligent biopharmaceuticals for the pharma industry--mapping biotechnology's success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, R P; Kaitin, K I

    2014-05-01

    The marriage of biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry (pharma) is predicated on an evolution in technology and product innovation. It has come as a result of advances in both the science and the business practices of the biotechnology sector in the past 30 years. Biotechnology products can be thought of as "intelligent pharmaceuticals," in that they often provide novel mechanisms of action, new approaches to disease control, higher clinical success rates, improved patient care, extended patent protection, and a significant likelihood of reimbursement. Although the first biotechnology product, insulin, was approved just 32 years ago in 1982, today there are more than 200 biotechnology products commercially available. Research has expanded to include more than 900 biotechnology products in clinical trials. Pharma is substantially engaged in both the clinical development of these products and their commercialization.

  12. Innovation in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation has been a driving force for the success of nuclear energy and remains essential for its future. For the continued safe and economically effective operation and maintenance of existing nuclear systems, and to meet the goals set out by projects aiming at designing and implementing advanced systems for the future, efficient innovation systems are needed. Consequently, analysing innovation systems is essential to understand their characteristics and enhance their performance in the nuclear sector. Lessons learnt from innovation programmes that have already been completed can help enhance the effectiveness of future programmes. The analysis of past experience provides a means for identifying causes of failure as well as best practices. Although national and local conditions are important factors, the main drivers for the success of innovative endeavors are common to all countries. Cooperation and coordination among the various actors are major elements promoting success. All interested stakeholders, including research organisations, industrial actors, regulators and civil society, have a role to play in supporting the success of innovation, but governments are an essential trigger, especially for projects with long durations and very ambitious objectives. Governments have a major role to play in promoting innovation because they are responsible for the overall national energy policy which sets the stage for the eventual deployment of innovative products and processes. Moreover, only governments can create the stable legal and regulatory framework favourable to the undertaking and successful completion of innovation programmes. International organisations such as the NEA may help enhance the effectiveness of national policies and innovation programmes by providing a forum for exchanging information, facilitating multilateral collaboration and joint endeavors, and offering technical support for the management of innovative programmes

  13. Understanding entrepreneurial intent in late adolescence: the role of intentional self-regulation and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldhof, G John; Weiner, Michelle; Agans, Jennifer P; Mueller, Megan K; Lerner, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Entrepreneurship represents a form of adaptive developmental regulation through which both entrepreneurs and their ecologies benefit. We describe entrepreneurship from the perspective of relational developmental systems theory, and examine the joint role of personal attributes, contextual attributes, and characteristics of person-context relationships in predicting entrepreneurial intent in a sample 3,461 college students enrolled in colleges and universities in the United States (60 % female; 61 % European American). Specifically, we tested whether personal characteristics (i.e., gender, intentional self-regulation skills, innovation orientation) and contextual factors (i.e., entrepreneurial parents) predicted college students' intentions to pursue an entrepreneurial career. Our findings suggest that self-regulation, innovation orientation, and having entrepreneurial role models (i.e., parents) predict entrepreneurial intent. Limitations and future directions for the study of youth entrepreneurship are discussed.

  14. Understanding Managers Decision Making Process for Tools Selection in the Core Front End of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appio, Francesco P.; Achiche, Sofiane; McAloone, Tim C.

    2011-01-01

    and optimise the activities. To select these tools, managers of the product development team have to use several premises to decide upon which tool is more appropriate to which activity. This paper proposes an approach to model the decision making process of the managers. The results underline the dimensions......New product development (NPD) describes the process of bringing a new product or service to the market. The Fuzzy Front End (FFE) of Innovation is the term describing the activities happening before the product development phase of NPD. In the FFE of innovation, several tools are used to facilitate...... influencing the decision process before a certain tool is chosen, and how those tools impact the performance of cost, time and efficiency. In order to achieve this, five companies participated for the data collection. Interesting trends and differences emerge from the analysis of the data in hand, and several...

  15. Understanding stable bi-female grouping in gibbons: feeding competition and reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peng-Fei; Bartlett, Thad Q; Fei, Han-Lan; Ma, Chang-Yong; Zhang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Species of the order Primates are highly gregarious with most species living in permanent heterosexual social groups. According to theory in socioecology maximum social group size is limited by rates of intra-group feeding competition and associated increases in travel costs. Unlike other hylobatids, which are predominantly pair living, cao vit gibbons (Nomascus nasutus), and two other species of crested gibbon (Nomascus spp.) living in northern seasonal forest, regularly exhibit larger bi-female groups. To better understand the ability of northern gibbons to live in stable bi-female groups, we examined food distribution, feeding competition and reproductive success over a period of six years in a small cao vit gibbon population at Bangliang, Guangxi, China. In general, we found weak evidences for within-group contest or scramble competition in our two study groups, which we attribute to high spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the distribution of their important food species. Nevertheless, the larger of the two groups studied increased feeding time and group spread during lean periods, factors that may limit cao vit gibbon group size to a maximum of two breeding females. Relative to tropical pair-living gibbons, there is no evidence that cao vit gibbons travel farther or spend more time feeding, but they did consume more leaves and buds and less fruit and figs. Despite their highly folivorous diet, the average inter-birth interval is comparable to tropical gibbon populations, and the survival rate of infants and juveniles in our study groups is high. Cao vit gibbons do not suffer obvious costs in terms of feeding competition and reproductive success by living in bi-female groups, but within-group feeding competition may determine the upper the limit of cao vit gibbon group size to a maximum of two breeding females. These findings contribute to a growing body of evidence that bi-female grouping can be a stable grouping pattern of gibbons in certain habitats and

  16. The myths of innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berkun, Scott

    2007-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 2 We understand the history of innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Chapter 3 There is a method for innovation...

  17. Innovation hubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Hara, J.; Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård; Turner, N.

    2008-01-01

    hubs that attempts to discover the causes of failure of innovation hubs through the comparison of successful and failed hubs. Success factors for innovation hubs are also discussed and suggestions are made as to lessons that can be learned from the experiences of innovation hubs."......"Whilst ‘incremental innovation' is an imperative for the short-to-medium term success of a company, there is also a need for companies to engage in innovation activity that goes beyond the incremental in order to guarantee long-term success. However, such ‘radical innovation' (RI) poses new...... of separation from the culture and routines of the mainstream organisation. Unfortunately, it would appear that many attempts to set-up innovation hubs have ended in failure within a few years; not before considerable time, effort and resource has been expended. This paper reports on a study of six innovation...

  18. Understanding the formative stage of technological innovation system development: The case of natural gas as an automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suurs, Roald A.A.; Hekkert, Marko P.; Kieboom, Sander; Smits, Ruud E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study contributes to insights into mechanisms that influence the successes and failures of emerging energy technologies. It is assumed that for an emerging technology to fruitfully develop, it should be fostered by a Technological Innovation System (TIS), which is the network of actors, institutions and technologies in which it is embedded. For an emerging technology a TIS has yet to be built up. This research focuses on the dynamics of this build-up process by mapping the development of seven key activities: so-called system functions. The main contribution revolves around the notion of cumulative causation, or the phenomenon that the build-up of a TIS accelerates due to system functions reinforcing each other over time. As an empirical basis, an analysis is provided of the historical development of the TIS around automotive natural gas technology in the Netherlands (1970-2007). The results show that this TIS undergoes a gradual build-up in the 1970s, followed by a breakdown in the 1980s and, again, a build-up from 2000 to 2007. It is shown that underlying these trends are different forms of cumulative causation, here called motors of innovation. The study provides strategic insights for practitioners that aspire to support such motors of innovation.

  19. Understanding the Properties of Arithmetic: A Prerequisite for Success in Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tent, Margaret W.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the commutative, associative, distributive, and identity properties of addition and multiplication in preparing children for future success in algebra. (Contains 3 figures.)

  20. The Model for Understanding Success in Quality (MUSIQ): building a theory of context in healthcare quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Heather C; Provost, Lloyd P; Froehle, Craig M; Margolis, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Quality improvement (QI) efforts have become widespread in healthcare, however there is significant variability in their success. Differences in context are thought to be responsible for some of the variability seen. To develop a conceptual model that can be used by organisations and QI researchers to understand and optimise contextual factors affecting the success of a QI project. 10 QI experts were provided with the results of a systematic literature review and then participated in two rounds of opinion gathering to identify and define important contextual factors. The experts subsequently met in person to identify relationships among factors and to begin to build the model. The Model for Understanding Success in Quality (MUSIQ) is organised based on the level of the healthcare system and identifies 25 contextual factors likely to influence QI success. Contextual factors within microsystems and those related to the QI team are hypothesised to directly shape QI success, whereas factors within the organisation and external environment are believed to influence success indirectly. The MUSIQ framework has the potential to guide the application of QI methods in healthcare and focus research. The specificity of MUSIQ and the explicit delineation of relationships among factors allows a deeper understanding of the mechanism of action by which context influences QI success. MUSIQ also provides a foundation to support further studies to test and refine the theory and advance the field of QI science.

  1. Understanding palliative care on the heart failure care team: an innovative research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Lorelei A; McDougall, Allan; Schulz, Valerie; Shadd, Joshua; Marshall, Denise; Strachan, Patricia H; Tait, Glendon R; Arnold, J Malcolm; Kimel, Gil

    2013-05-01

    There is a growing call to integrate palliative care for patients with advanced heart failure (HF). However, the knowledge to inform integration efforts comes largely from interview and survey research with individual patients and providers. This work has been critically important in raising awareness of the need for integration, but it is insufficient to inform solutions that must be enacted not by isolated individuals but by complex care teams. Research methods are urgently required to support systematic exploration of the experiences of patients with HF, family caregivers, and health care providers as they interact as a care team. To design a research methodology that can support systematic exploration of the experiences of patients with HF, caregivers, and health care providers as they interact as a care team. This article describes in detail a methodology that we have piloted and are currently using in a multisite study of HF care teams. We describe three aspects of the methodology: the theoretical framework, an innovative sampling strategy, and an iterative system of data collection and analysis that incorporates four data sources and four analytical steps. We anticipate that this innovative methodology will support groundbreaking research in both HF care and other team settings in which palliative integration efforts are emerging for patients with advanced nonmalignant disease. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Conceptualizing innovation capabilities: A contingency perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Helge Aas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research has confirmed that a positive relationship exists between the implementation of innovation activities and the future performance of organizations. Firms utilize resources and capabilities to develop innovations in the form of new products, services or processes. Some firms prove to be better at reproducing innovation success than others, and the capacity to do so is referred to as innovation capability. However, the term innovation capability is ambiguously treated in extant literature. There are several different definitions of the concept and the distinction between innovation capabilities and other types of capabilities, such as dynamic capabilities, is neither explicitly stated, nor is the relationship between the concept and other resource- and capability-based concepts within strategy theory established. Although innovation is increasingly identified as crucial for a firm’s sustainable competitiveness in contemporary volatile and complex markets, the strategy-innovation link is underdeveloped in extant research. To overcome this challenge this paper raises the following research question: What type of innovation capabilities are required to innovate successfully? Due to the status of the extant research, we chose a conceptual research design to answer our research question and the paper contributes with a conceptual framework to discuss what innovation capabilities firms need to reproduce innovation success. Based on careful examination of current literature on innovation capability specifically, and the strategy-innovation link in general, we suggest that innovation capability must be viewed along two dimensions – innovation novelty and market characteristics. This framework enables the identification of four different contexts for innovation capabilities in a two-bytwo matrix. We discuss the types of innovation capabilities necessary within the four different contexts. This novel framework contributes to the

  3. Simulation-Based Performance Assessment: An Innovative Approach to Exploring Understanding of Physical Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Jessica; Wind, Stefanie; Koval, Jayma; Dagosta, Joseph; Ryan, Mike; Usselman, Marion

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of simulation-based performance assessment (PA) methodology in a recent study of eighth-grade students' understanding of physical science concepts. A set of four simulation-based PA tasks were iteratively developed to assess student understanding of an array of physical science concepts, including net force,…

  4. Innovative Approaches to Understanding Transportation/Societal Interactions. Volume 2 : Study Design Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    In 1979, the Transportation Systems Center (TSC), under sponsorship of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA), began a program of research directed toward improving the understanding of the role of transportation in society, in particula...

  5. Facilitating evaluations of innovative, competence-based assessments: creating understanding and involving multiple stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, J.T.M.; Baartman, L.; Biemans, H.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers’ lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders’ involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of

  6. Understanding the factors that limit restoration success on a recreation-impacted subalpine site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherine Zabinski; David Cole

    2000-01-01

    Factors that limit successful revegetation of a subalpine site were studied through a combination of soil assays, greenhouse studies, and field manipulations. Campsite soils had higher available nitrogen, lower microbial community diversity, and lower seed bank density than undisturbed soils. In the greenhouse, there was no significant difference in plant growth on...

  7. A Systematic Understanding of Successful Web Searches in Information-Based Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to research how Chinese university students solve information-based problems. With the Search Performance Index as the measure of search success, participants were divided into high, medium and low-performing groups. Based on their web search logs, these three groups were compared along five dimensions of the search…

  8. Understanding the Effect of Loneliness on Academic Participation and Success among International University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Hafiz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of loneliness on academic participation and success among 213 students studying at Usak University. A total of 213 international students studying at Usak University, including 151 males and 62 females, were selected and participated in the research voluntarily. In the study, feelings of…

  9. Stories of Success: Understanding Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Amanda

    A review of the literature shows that there is much evidence to suggest the challenges facing Hispanic students in American public schools. Hispanic enrollment in K--12 public schools has increased from 6 to 19% in the last thirty years, yet schools have not made adequate adjustments to accommodate this changing population. Issues such as remedial tracking and cultural differences have led to low high school graduate rates for Hispanic students and inequities in schooling experiences (Gay, 2000). Particularly in the area of science, Hispanic students struggle with academic success (Cole & Espinoza, 2008). Despite these obstacles, some Hispanic students are academically successful (Rochin & Mello, 2007; Merisotis & Kee, 2006). This dissertation tells the stories of these Hispanic students who have been successful in science in secondary public schools. This study followed a grounded theory methodology and utilized individual interviews to collect data about Hispanics who have demonstrated achievement in the area of science. Through the analysis of these interviews, factors were identified which may have contributed to the success of these Hispanics in the field of science. Implications for future practice in public schools are also discussed.

  10. How Ideological Differences Influence Pre-Service Teachers' Understandings of Educational Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Justin

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores how popular ideological discourses within public policy are influencing the views and practices of preservice teachers at a university in Melbourne. The research began by examining how educational success has been historically understood by individuals vis-à-vis government discourse. Three values and four corresponding…

  11. Development of innovative tools for understanding marine biodiversity and assessing good environmental status, within the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Angel; Uyarra, María C.

    2014-05-01

    Marine natural resources and ecosystem services constitute the natural capital that supports economies, societies and individual well-being. Good governance requires a quantification of the interactions and trade-offs among ecosystem services and understanding of how biodiversity underpins ecosystem functions and services across time, scales and sectors. Marine biodiversity is a key descriptor for the assessment within the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), approved in 2008, which comprises a total of 11 descriptors. However, the relationships between pressures from human activities and climatic influences and their effects on marine biological diversity are still only partially understood. Hence, these relationships need to be better understood in order to fully achieve a good environmental status (GEnS), as required by the MSFD. This contribution is based upon the FP7 EU project DEVOTES (DEVelopment Of innovative Tools for understanding marine biodiversity and assessing good Environmental Status), which focus on developing innovative conceptual frameworks, methods and coherent, shared protocols to provide consistent datasets and knowledge at different scales, within four regional seas (Black Sea, Mediterranean, Atlantic and Baltic Sea). This project is developing innovative approaches to valuate biodiversity and ecosystem services and to develop public goods and sustainable economic activities from them. The research will benefit sea users and stakeholders, and will contribute to assess and monitor the environmental status of marine waters. The main objectives are: (i) to improve our understanding of the impact of human activities and variations associated to climate on marine biodiversity, (ii) to test indicators (referred in the Commission Decision on GEnS) and develop new ones for assessment at several ecological levels (species, habitat, ecosystems) and for the characterization and status classification of the marine waters, (iii) to develop, test

  12. Understanding passengers’ experiences of train journeys to inform the design of technological innovations\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luis; Bradley, Callum; Birrell, Stewart A.; Davies, Andy; Tinworth, Neil; Cain, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present results from a collaborative research between academic institutions and industry partners in the UK, which aimed to understand the experience of rail passengers and to identify how the design of technology can improve this experience. Travelling by train can often provide passengers with negative experiences. New technologies give the opportunity to design new interactions that support the creation of positive experiences, but the design should be based on solid unde...

  13. Situating Second-Year Success: Understanding Second-Year STEM Experiences at a Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg-Jolly, Leslie; Swartz, Jim; Iverson, Ellen; Stern, Joyce; Brown, Narren; Lopatto, David

    2016-01-01

    Challenges particular to second-year students have been identified that can impact persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. We implemented a program to improve student success in intermediate-level science courses by helping students to feel they belonged and could succeed in STEM. We used survey measures of perceptions and attitudes and then qualitative measures to characterize the impact of support strategies, including peer mentoring, a second-year science student retreat, learning and advising support resources, and department-specific activities. Analysis of registration and transcript information revealed underperformance by students of color (SOC) and first-generation (FG) students in 200-level science courses. Comparison of these data before and during programming revealed significant improvement in success rates of these students in 200-level biology and chemistry courses, but success rates of SOC and FG students remain lower than the overall rate for 200-level science courses. Contemporaneous with the program, qualitative and quantitative measures of student attitudes revealed a high level of belongingness and support. The results suggest that a focus on students’ metacognition about their own abilities and strategic knowledge of how to succeed may be a fruitful direction for future research. PMID:27587855

  14. The Kids Got Smarter: Case Studies of Successful Comer Schools. Understanding Education and Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblit, George W., Ed.; Malloy, William W., Ed.; Malloy, Carol E., Ed.

    This book reports on the School Development Program (SDP) designed by James Comer. Known also as the Comer program, this reform effort assists underachieving urban schools by analyzing the school as a system to better understand the complex interactions occurring within this system. Favoring a variety of pedagogical approaches, the SDP focuses on…

  15. From an Analytical Framework for Understanding the Innovation Process in Higher Education to an Emerging Research Field of Innovations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo

    2017-01-01

    While studies dealing with issues related to innovations in higher education proliferate, there has been little consensus on key concepts and central issues for research. To respond to the challenges, this paper calls for developing a new research field--studies on innovations in higher education, by integrating two disciplines, namely innovation…

  16. Value system for distruptive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jizhen; Zhang, Si; Hu, Yimei

    and the market trajectory is the terminal, through the coordination of the elements in the value system the success of firms in disruptive innovation could be obtained and sustained. In other words, with the understanding of how value system works in disruptive innovation, the failure of incumbent firms may......After reviewing the theory of disruptive innovation, this paper forms a new framework for analyzing disruptive innovation from the perspective of value system, which suggests that the technology per se is the value source, industrial Ecosystem is the carrier, business model is the instrument...

  17. Understanding organisational development, sustainability, and diffusion of innovations within hospitals participating in a multilevel quality collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cordula

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between 2004 and 2008, 24 Dutch hospitals participated in a two-year multilevel quality collaborative (MQC comprised of (a a leadership programme for hospital executives, (b six quality-improvement collaboratives (QICs for healthcare professionals and other staff, and (c an internal programme organisation to help senior management monitor and coordinate team progress. The MQC aimed to stimulate the development of quality-management systems and the spread of methods to improve patient safety and logistics. The objective of this study is to describe how the first group of eight MQC hospitals sustained and disseminated improvements made and the quality methods used. Methods The approach followed by the hospitals was described using interview and questionnaire data gathered from eight programme coordinators. Results MQC hospitals followed a systematic strategy of diffusion and sustainability. Hospital quality-management systems are further developed according to a model linking plan-do-study-act cycles at the unit and hospital level. The model involves quality norms based on realised successes, performance agreements with unit heads, organisational support, monitoring, and quarterly accountability reports. Conclusions It is concluded from this study that the MQC contributed to organisational development and dissemination within participating hospitals. Organisational learning effects were demonstrated. System changes affect the context factors in the theory of organisational readiness: organisational culture, policies and procedures, past experience, organisational resources, and organisational structure. Programme coordinator responses indicate that these factors are utilised to manage spread and sustainability. Further research is needed to assess long-term effects.

  18. Understanding organisational development, sustainability, and diffusion of innovations within hospitals participating in a multilevel quality collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dückers, Michel La; Wagner, Cordula; Vos, Leti; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2011-03-09

    Between 2004 and 2008, 24 Dutch hospitals participated in a two-year multilevel quality collaborative (MQC) comprised of (a) a leadership programme for hospital executives, (b) six quality-improvement collaboratives (QICs) for healthcare professionals and other staff, and (c) an internal programme organisation to help senior management monitor and coordinate team progress. The MQC aimed to stimulate the development of quality-management systems and the spread of methods to improve patient safety and logistics. The objective of this study is to describe how the first group of eight MQC hospitals sustained and disseminated improvements made and the quality methods used. The approach followed by the hospitals was described using interview and questionnaire data gathered from eight programme coordinators. MQC hospitals followed a systematic strategy of diffusion and sustainability. Hospital quality-management systems are further developed according to a model linking plan-do-study-act cycles at the unit and hospital level. The model involves quality norms based on realised successes, performance agreements with unit heads, organisational support, monitoring, and quarterly accountability reports. It is concluded from this study that the MQC contributed to organisational development and dissemination within participating hospitals. Organisational learning effects were demonstrated. System changes affect the context factors in the theory of organisational readiness: organisational culture, policies and procedures, past experience, organisational resources, and organisational structure. Programme coordinator responses indicate that these factors are utilised to manage spread and sustainability. Further research is needed to assess long-term effects.

  19. Understanding the sorption and biotransformation of organic micropollutants in innovative biological wastewater treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarino, T; Suarez, S; Lema, J; Omil, F

    2018-02-15

    New technologies for wastewater treatment have been developed in the last years based on the combination of biological reactors operating under different redox conditions. Their efficiency in the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) has not been clearly assessed yet. This review paper is focussed on understanding the sorption and biotransformation of a selected group of 17 OMPs, including pharmaceuticals, hormones and personal care products, during biological wastewater treatment processes. Apart from considering the role of "classical" operational parameters, new factors such as biomass conformation and particle size, upward velocity applied or the addition of adsorbents have been considered. It has been found that the OMP removal by sorption not only depends on their physico-chemical characteristics and other parameters, such as the biomass conformation and particle size, or some operational conditions also relevant. Membrane biological reactors (MBR), have shown to enhance sorption and biotransformation of some OMPs. The same applies to technologies bases on direct addition of activated carbon in bioreactors. The OMP biotransformation degree and pathway is mainly driven by the redox potential and the primary substrate activity. The combination of different redox potentials in hybrid reactor systems can significantly enhance the overall OMP removal efficiency. Sorption and biotransformation can be synergistically promoted in biological reactors by the addition of activated carbon. The deeper knowledge of the main parameters influencing OMP removal provided by this review will allow optimizing the biological processes in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A study of success and failure in product innovation with specific reference to the South African electronics industry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) The innovation and marketing of new products has become increasingly important for the profitability of companies. Developing new products is a risky endeavour. Research shows that new product development often fails. As such, it is very important that product development managers are aware of the factors that can cause product failure. This research studied the product innovation process in the South African electronics industry. The objective of the study was...

  1. Understanding the medical marriage: physicians and their partners share strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Rachel L; Ross, Paula T; Lypson, Monica L

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and their spouses experience challenges to their relationships, some of which are shared with the general population and others of which are unique to the field of medicine. Trainees and junior faculty members remain curious about how they will balance their careers alongside marriage and family obligations. This study explores the challenges and strengths of dual- and single-physician relationships. In 2009, using appreciative inquiry as a theoretical framework, the authors conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 25 individuals: 12 women and 13 men; 10 from dual-physician and 15 from single-physician relationships. A phenomenological analytic approach was used to arrive at the final themes. Four themes emerged during the interviews: "We rely on mutual support in our relationships," "We recognize the important roles of each family member," "We have shared values," and "We acknowledge the benefit of being a physician to our relationships." These findings illustrate that physicians identify strategies to navigate the difficult aspects of their lives. Learn ing from others' best practices can assist in managing personal relationships and work-life balance. These data can also be useful when counseling physicians on successful relationship strategies. As systems are developed that improve wellness and focus on role models for work-life balance, it will be important for this topic to be integrated into formal curricula across the continuum of medical education.

  2. Innovation through accelerators: A case for open innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerato E. Mohalajeng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Open innovation is becoming a progressive business practice in Southern Africa because it plays a significant role in economic development through promoting the commercialisation of new ideas. The challenge is that while the benefits of open innovation are widely spoken about, not much is understood about the challenges and successes of open innovation accelerators (OIAs in taking ideas to market. Aim: The purpose of this research was to investigate an OIA in South Africa for taking ideas to market. Setting: The Innovation Hub is a science park in Pretoria, South Africa, using open innovation to stimulate entrepreneurship in South Africa. Through The Innovation Hub Open IX, a webbased platform, an opportunity to investigate the bridging from invention to commercialisation is presented. Methods: A qualitative research method using semi-structured, in-depth interviews was applied to collect data. Five key stakeholders of the OIA were interviewed. Results: The findings suggest that stakeholder buy-in is essential for commercialisation through OIAs in South Africa. By involving stakeholders in the initial phases of the open innovation process, the likelihood of a solution being incorporated and fitted into the organisation’s business strategy is increased. Conclusion: The insight gained from this research suggests policymakers, research institutions and commercial businesses ought to explore various innovations across industries relevant to their open innovation proficiencies. This research makes a significant contribution to an indepth understanding of what is needed to bridge the gap from invention to successful commercialisation through open innovation.

  3. Understanding Stakeholders’ Influence on Project Success with a New SNA Method: A Case Study of the Green Retrofit in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholders strongly influence project success, particularly for complex projects with heterogeneous stakeholders, and hence, understanding their influence is essential for project management and implementation. This paper proposes an original model based on social network analysis (SNA, which first introduces critical success factors (CSFs as intermediate variables between stakeholders and project success. The model can demonstrate the interrelation between stakeholders and CSFs, and the results can reveal how stakeholders influence project success. Green retrofit is a typical type of complex project. The stakeholder relationship in green retrofit projects is more complex than in new projects, since more stakeholders (e.g., tenants and facility managers who have particular interrelations (e.g., lease contract and split incentives between owners and tenants are involved. Therefore, a case study of green retrofit in China was conducted to illustrate how the proposed model works. The results indicated the priorities and similarities of stakeholders in green retrofit. Stakeholders are categorized into five clusters according to their relationship. Based on the results, the important role of stakeholders in green retrofit projects was discussed. The main contribution of this study is providing a novel method to reveal how stakeholders influence the success of complex projects.

  4. Understanding the Process and Success Factors to Increase Synergies between Research and Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Ballou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While the synergies between research for knowledge discovery and teaching are widely accepted, the evidence is mostly implicit, verbal and poorly documented, and many times contradictive. In an effort to better understand the interaction between these important activities, the main objective of this study is to collect knowledge illustrating their synergies through specific cases. A complementary objective is to identify the important factors, which professionals should implement or avoid for increasing the likelihood that these synergies will be derived. To collect the necessary information personal interviews have been used to address the research question. The same set of questions was sent to several professionals known to have extensive experience in the areas of academic research and teaching. The respondents were asked to: 1. briefly describe the knowledge area in which the synergies occurred; 2. For the specified knowledge area, to please describe in summary form but specifically how they derived the synergy between research and teaching; and 3. Based on their personal experience, to please identify the important factors to increase the likelihood that academic research will produce benefits for teaching, and vice versa. The results strongly corroborate the importance of academic research for effective teaching. Based on the results, a set of recommendations are made to faculty members and school administrators to further promote academic research as an important factor for more effective teaching.

  5. Crowdsourcing Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldner, Florian; Poetz, Marion

    Successfully adapting existing business models or developing new ones significantly influences a firm?s ability to generate profits and develop competitive advantages. However, business model innovation is perceived as a complex, risky and uncertain process and its success strongly depends...... models in the podcast industry, we provide first exploratory insights into the value of crowdsourcing for innovating a firm?s business model, and discuss which characteristics of crowd-contributors increase the quantity and quality of the outcome....... on whether or not firms are capable of understanding and addressing their customers? needs. This study explores how crowdsourcing-based search approaches can contribute to the process of business model innovation. Drawing on data from a crowdsourcing initiative designed to develop ideas for new business...

  6. Crowdsourcing Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldner, Florian; Poetz, Marion

    Successfully adapting existing business models or developing new ones significantly influences a firm?s ability to generate profits and develop competitive advantages. However, business model innovation is perceived as a complex, risky and uncertain process and its success strongly depends...... on whether or not firms are capable of understanding and addressing their customers? needs. This study explores how crowdsourcing-based search approaches can contribute to the process of business model innovation. Drawing on data from a crowdsourcing initiative designed to develop ideas for new business...... models in the podcast industry, we provide first exploratory insights into the value of crowdsourcing for innovating a firm?s business model, and discuss which characteristics of crowd-contributors increase the quantity and quality of the outcome....

  7. Crowdsourcing business model innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldner, Florian; Poetz, Marion Kristin; Bogers, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Successfully adapting existing business models or developing new ones significantly influences a firm’s ability to generate profits and develop competitive advantages. However, business model innovation is perceived as a complex, risky and uncertain process and its success strongly depends...... on whether or not the firm is capable of understanding and addressing their customers’ needs. We conduct a quantitative exploratory case study to investigate how crowdsourcing-based search approaches among user communities can contribute to developing business model innovation. Drawing on data from...... a crowdsourcing initiative designed to develop ideas for new business models in the podcast industry, we provide first exploratory insights into the value of crowdsourcing for innovating a firm’s way of creating, delivering and capturing value, and discuss characteristics of crowd-contributors that influence...

  8. Using diffusion of innovation theory to understand the factors impacting patient acceptance and use of consumer e-health innovations: a case study in a primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Ping; Yan, Jun; Ton A M Spil, Ir

    2015-02-21

    Consumer e-Health is a potential solution to the problems of accessibility, quality and costs of delivering public healthcare services to patients. Although consumer e-Health has proliferated in recent years, it remains unclear if patients are willing and able to accept and use this new and rapidly developing technology. Therefore, the aim of this research is to study the factors influencing patients' acceptance and usage of consumer e-health innovations. A simple but typical consumer e-health innovation--an e-appointment scheduling service--was developed and implemented in a primary health care clinic in a regional town in Australia. A longitudinal case study was undertaken for 29 months after system implementation. The major factors influencing patients' acceptance and use of the e-appointment service were examined through the theoretical lens of Rogers' innovation diffusion theory. Data were collected from the computer log records of 25,616 patients who visited the medical centre in the entire study period, and from in-depth interviews with 125 patients. The study results show that the overall adoption rate of the e-appointment service increased slowly from 1.5% at 3 months after implementation, to 4% at 29 months, which means only the 'innovators' had used this new service. The majority of patients did not adopt this innovation. The factors contributing to the low the adoption rate were: (1) insufficient communication about the e-appointment service to the patients, (2) lack of value of the e-appointment service for the majority of patients who could easily make phone call-based appointment, and limitation of the functionality of the e-appointment service, (3) incompatibility of the new service with the patients' preference for oral communication with receptionists, and (4) the limitation of the characteristics of the patients, including their low level of Internet literacy, lack of access to a computer or the Internet at home, and a lack of experience with

  9. A mini-midwifery business institute in a midwifery professional roles course: an innovative teaching strategy for successful career planning and business management of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, D Elizabeth; Dewees, Connie; McDowell, William C

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to include teaching strategies in midwifery education that address career planning and the business aspects of practice. This article presents the Mini-Midwifery Business Institute (M-MBI), an innovative teaching strategy for midwives that can also be applied to other advanced practice professions. The M-MBI can be integrated into a professional roles course. Before and after graduation, midwifery students and other advanced practice professionals can use the information to gain confidence and skills for successful career planning and the business management of practice. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  10. Stimulating technological innovation : problem identification and intervention formulation with the technological innovation systems framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    The technological innovation systems (TIS) framework provides a theory to understand under what conditions technological innovations are successfully developed and implemented. The objective of this dissertation is to further strengthen this TIS intervention framework, which is the part of the TIS

  11. Successful development of innovative fabrication technique based on laser welding, for superconducting RF cavities - results and path ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Prashant; Upadhyay, B.N.; Dwivedi, Jishnu

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities are the heart of any particle accelerator based on SCRF technology. All over the world, efforts are being made to develop a technique which can bring down the cost and time of fabrication of these cavities. The present day fabrication method of SCRF cavities uses Electron beam welding (EBW) technique. The cavities fabricated by this method turn out to be expensive and take long fabrication time. To overcome such difficulties related with EBW process, an innovative concept for fabrication of SCRF cavities based on laser welding was formulated at RRCAT. International patent application was immediately launched for this work, to protect intellectual property rights of DAE

  12. Innovation Enablers for Innovation Teams - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    This review consolidates research on innovation enablers for innovation teams, defined within this research as factors that enable a crossfunctional team within an organization to conduct innovation work, to provide a deeper understanding of what factors enable innovation teams to conduct innovation work, which means that this research involves three areas to provide a holistic picture: the organizational context, the team itself, and the individuals within the innovation team. A systematic d...

  13. Novice chimpanzees cooperate successfully in the presence of experts, but may have limited understanding of the task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchak, Malini; Watzek, Julia; Quarles, Luke F; de Waal, Frans B M

    2018-01-01

    Despite many observations of cooperation in nature, laboratory studies often fail to find careful coordination between individuals who are solving a cooperative task. Further, individuals tested are often naïve to cooperative tasks and there has been little exploration of partnerships with mixed expertise. In the current study, we examined acquisition of a cooperative pulling task in a group with both expert (N = 4) and novice (N = 11) chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We used five measures of competence and understanding: (1) success at the task, (2) latency to succeed, (3) efficiency, (4) uncoordinated pulling, and (5) pulling when a partner was present versus absent. We found that novices showed evidence of trial and error learning and developed competence over time, whereas the behavior of experts did not change throughout the course of the study. In addition to looking at patterns over time, we compared the performance of novices in this mixed-expertise group to an earlier study of novices in a group of all-novices. Novices in the mixed-expertise group pulled the same overall amount but for shorter periods of time, leading to higher pulling rates than individuals in the all-novice group. Taken together, these results suggest that learning in the presence of experts led to rapid and frequent success, although not necessarily careful coordination.

  14. Innovation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodovski, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose of this report: This report was prepared for RISO team involved in design of the innovation system Report provides innovation methodology to establish common understanding of the process concepts and related terminology The report does not includeRISO- or Denmark-specific cultural, econom...

  15. ICT Innovation in Emerging Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xiao; B. Califf, Christopher; Sarker, Saonee

    2013-01-01

    a third of the world’s largest 25 economies, and that they are likely to be critical for the success of a global economy, it is important to understand how these economies innovate, what factors affect innovation in such nations, and what are the impacts. However, to the best of our knowledge, little......ICT innovation is known to significantly elevate a country’s growth and to enhance productivity. It is now well-acknowledged that emerging economies are beginning to innovate at a rapid rate despite some of the challenges they face. Given that these countries with such economies now comprise...... economies, what needs to be studied, and how they should be studied. We attempt to contribute in this area by: (1) providing a comprehensive framework of existing research on ICT innovation in emerging economies, (2) highlighting the gaps that have been left behind, and (3) providing specific guidelines...

  16. Using Innovative Tools to Teach Computer Application to Business Students--A Hawthorne Effect or Successful Implementation Here to Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeenath Reza

    2014-01-01

    A year after the primary study that tested the impact of introducing blended learning and guided discovery to help teach computer application to business students, this paper looks into the continued success of using guided discovery and blended learning with learning management system in and out of classrooms to enhance student learning.…

  17. Managing risks in business model innovation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taran, Yariv; Boer, Harry; Lindgren, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Companies today, in some industries more than others, invest more capital and resources just to stay competitive, develop more diverse solutions, and increasingly start thinking more radically when considering their business models. However, despite the understanding that business model (BM) inno...... forward, which link success and failure to the way companies appreciate and handle the risks involved in BM innovation.......) innovation is a risky enterprise, many companies are still choosing not to apply any risk management in the BM innovation process. The objective of this paper is to develop a better understanding of how risks are handled in the practice of BM innovation. An analysis of the BM innovation experiences of two...... industrial companies shows that both companies are experiencing high levels of uncertainty and complexity during their innovation processes and are, consequently, struggling to find new processes for handling the risks involved. Based on the two companies’ experiences, various testable propositions are put...

  18. Exploring business models for open innovation in rural living labs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schaffers, H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available identifies critical aspects of business models and pre-conditions for business models design. These first findings are relevant to understand how to arrive at successful business models for open collaborative innovation fostering rural and regional...

  19. From Idea to Innovation: The Role of LDRD Investments in Sandia's Recent Successful B61 Experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrowsmith, Marie Danielle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, authorized by U.S. Congress in 1991, enables Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to devote a small portion of their research funding to high-risk and potentially high-payoff research. Because it is high-risk, LDRD-supported research may not lead to immediate mission impacts; however, many successes at DOE labs can be traced back to investments in LDRD. LDRD investments have a history of enabling significant payoffs for long-running DOE and NNSA missions and for providing anticipatory new technologies that ultimately become critical to future missions. Many of Sandia National Laboratories’ successes can be traced back to investments in LDRD. Capabilities from three LDRDs were critical to recent tests of the B61-12 gravity bomb—tests that would previously have only been performed experimentally.

  20. Innovation, adaptability, and collaboration: Keys to success for small and medium sized reactors. Cairo, 27 May 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2001-01-01

    Small and medium sized reactors, within a power output of less than 700 MW(e), are receiving increased consideration in the effort to meet changing market requirements. Smaller plants allow a more incremental investment, which can be used to hedge against demand uncertainty. They are more suitable for standardization and prefabrication, which in turn encourages enhanced quality control and stimulates rapid development of expertise and shorter construction schedules. They provide a better match to grid capacity in developing countries. And they are more easily adapted to a broad range of industrial settings and applications, such as district heating, heavy oil recovery, or the production of hydrogen and other chemical fuels. Sea water desalination is an application for which smaller reactors hold a particular advantage. Nuclear powered desalination is a proven technology. Clearly, we live in an era in which our society faces many difficult economic, environmental and social issues associated with sustainable development and energy demand. Against that backdrop, nuclear power is a mature technology that deserves careful consideration as a contributor to solving some of these issues. The development of innovative small and medium sized reactors will play a key role in helping to match state-of-the-art technology to user needs. An exchange of information and ideas is a step towards further progress

  1. Innovate or Die.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagersma, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrates on innovation as an under-exploited path to success in the business community, though reckons becoming innovative is not easy. Suggests innovative companies have a number of common characteristics, which are ten strategies to be implemented to create success, these are listed in full.

  2. Understanding the Adoption Process of National Security Technology: An Integration of Diffusion of Innovations and Volitional Behavior Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, Irina A; Egnoto, Michael J; Fisher Liu, Brooke; Ackerman, Gary; Roberts, Holly; Smith, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the U.S. government initiated several national security technology adoption programs. The American public, however, has been skeptical about these initiatives and adoption of national security technologies has been mandated, rather than voluntary. We propose and test a voluntary behavioral intention formation model for the adoption of one type of new security technology: portable radiation detectors. Portable radiation detectors are an efficient way of detecting radiological and nuclear threats and could potentially prevent loss of life and damage to individuals' health. However, their functioning requires that a critical mass of individuals use them on a daily basis. We combine the explanatory advantages of diffusion of innovation with the predictive power of two volitional behavior frameworks: the theory of reasoned action and the health belief model. A large sample survey (N = 1,482) investigated the influence of factors identified in previous diffusion of innovation research on portable radiation detector adoption intention. Results indicated that nonfinancial incentives, as opposed to financial incentives, should be emphasized in persuasive communications aimed at fostering adoption. The research provides a new integration of diffusion of innovation elements with determinants of volitional behavior from persuasion literature, and offers recommendations on effective communication about new security technologies to motivate public adoption and enhance national safety. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  3. Participatory Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Matthews, Ben

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of corporations engage with users in co-innovation of products and services. But there are a number of competing perspectives on how best to integrate these understandings into existing corporate innovation development processes. This paper maps out three of the dominant...... approaches, compares them in terms of goals, methods and basic philosophy, and shows how they may beneficially enrich one another. We will present an industrial innovation case that has been instrumental to the development of what we have termed ‘Participatory Innovation’. Based on this we will list...... the challenges such an approach sets to innovation management, and discuss research directions we see as fundamental to the development of the field of user-driven innovation. Udgivelsesdato: September...

  4. Accidental Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Robert D.; Devin, Lee; Sullivan, Erin E.

    2012-01-01

    Historical accounts of human achievement suggest that accidents can play an important role in innovation. In this paper, we seek to contribute to an understanding of how digital systems might support valuable unpredictability in innovation processes by examining how innovators who obtain value from...... they incorporate accidents into their deliberate processes and arranged surroundings. By comparing makers working in varied conditions, we identify specific factors (e.g., technologies, characteristics of technologies) that appear to support accidental innovation. We show that makers in certain specified...... conditions not only remain open to accident but also intentionally design their processes and surroundings to invite and exploit valuable accidents. Based on these findings, we offer advice for the design of digital systems to support innovation processes that can access valuable unpredictability....

  5. Marketers Understanding Engineers and Engineers Understanding Marketers: The Opportunities and Constraints of a Cross-Discipline Course Using 3D Printing to Develop Marketable Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifschneider, Louis; Kaufman, Peter; Langrehr, Frederick W.; Kaufman, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Marketers are criticized for not understanding the steps in the engineering research and development process and the challenges of manufacturing a new product at a profit. Engineers are criticized for not considering the marketability of and customer interest in such a product during the planning stages. With the development of 3D printing, rapid…

  6. Participatory Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Matthews, Ben

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of corporations engage with users in co-innovation of products and services. But there are a number of competing perspectives on how best to integrate these understandings into existing corporate innovation development processes. This paper maps out three of the dominant appr...... the challenges such an approach sets to innovation management, and discuss research directions we see as fundamental to the development of the field of user-driven innovation. Udgivelsesdato: September......An increasing number of corporations engage with users in co-innovation of products and services. But there are a number of competing perspectives on how best to integrate these understandings into existing corporate innovation development processes. This paper maps out three of the dominant...... approaches, compares them in terms of goals, methods and basic philosophy, and shows how they may beneficially enrich one another. We will present an industrial innovation case that has been instrumental to the development of what we have termed ‘Participatory Innovation’. Based on this we will list...

  7. The laddering method in service innovation research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe

    2017-01-01

    map of what is actually going on in the consumer’s mind when the consumer is buying and consuming specific goods. It is argued, in this chapter, that this understanding is indeed both interesting and relevant in service innovation. More specifically, realizations of consumers’ values will help...... to guide marketers to understand what to innovate, how to innovate, how to plan and efficiently communicate changes, how to sell the innovations in the market place and how to implement organizational changes that innovations might cause. Furthermore, the laddering methodology has been applied across many...... fields with good success and the premises for using the method and for analyzing obtained data, is rather well described. The latter (i.e. premises and data analysis) is often raised as central and critical points of qualitative research methodology when arguing for problems with validity and reliability...

  8. This research is to study the factors which influence the business success of small business ‘processed rotan’. The data employed in the study are primary data within the period of July to August 2013, 30 research observations through census method. Method of analysis used in the study is multiple linear regressions. The results of analysis showed that the factors of labor, innovation and promotion have positive and significant influence on the business success of small business ‘processed rotan’ simultaneously. The analysis also showed that partially labor has positive and significant influence on the business success, yet innovation and promotion have insignificant and positive influence on the business success.

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Inggrita Gusti Sari; Muchtar, Yasmin Chairunnisa

    2013-01-01

    This research is to study the factors which influence the business success of small business ‘processed rotan’. The data employed in the study are primary data within the period of July to August 2013, 30 research observations through census method. Method of analysis used in the study is multiple linear regressions. The results of analysis showed that the factors of labor, innovation and promotion have positive and significant influence on the business success of small busine...

  9. Role of Universities in Forming a Competence of Innovative Activity as an Essential Factor of Successful Realization of a Strategy of Innovative Development of the Russian Federation Until 2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina M. Pestereva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available World economic crisis of 2008-2009 slowed down a development of Russian innovative system. Dedicated federal target programs have been worked out in order to restore after-crisis situation in the country and speed up a transfer to an innovative development. These programs envisage a range of activities aimed at forming competences of innovative activity, improvement of forms and scale of personnel training and re-training programs in engineering and scientific specializations, enhancing a range of educational programs in innovative entrepreneurship and technological management.The article describes mechanisms of attracting students, postgraduates and young researchers to solving tasks of Russia’s innovative development until 2020.

  10. Open innovation with an effective open innovation team.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanvoorden, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This master's thesis explores how open innovation teams can successfully support open innovation inside of an organisation. Open innovation is a paradigm introduced by Henry Chesbrough (2003) a decade ago. It expands the innovation potential of organisations by opening them up to new ways of working with external partners. To implement open innovation, many companies rely on a small group of managers named open innovation teams. Although open innovation teams can potentially be vital for impl...

  11. "Maybe we should talk about it anyway": a qualitative study of understanding expectations and use of an established technology innovation in caring practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokke, Randi

    2017-09-15

    Technological innovations are strongly promoted to meet the demands posed by increased pressure on home care services and to assist ageing in place in western societies. Although heavily advocated as plug and play solutions, technologies have proven difficult and unpredictable when integrated into home care services. We need greater insight into what happens when technologies are integrated into caring practices. All technologies come with expectations as to their function. This study explores how actors who are involved with the social alarm, which is an established technology innovation, relate to, perceive and articulate these expectations of the technology in everyday living. The article presents results from a two-case study, using a triangulation of qualitative methods in order to gain an in-depth understanding of technology in use in home care services through "thick descriptions". The study was conducted in Norway and data were analysed using a stepwise deductive-inductive analysis. The empirical findings demonstrate that expectations regarding the social alarm, even though it represents a simple and well-established technology, are complex and multidimensional. The notion of script and domestication provided relevant tools for exploring these expectations and for understanding how actors interpret and adapt their practices of using the technology. This enabled a more comprehensive understanding of how technology opens up for different interpretations and puts values in play. This article suggests exploring technology in use as scripted in multidimensional script, and offers a frame for doing so. It also reveals how technology scripts and articulation prove important for understanding the complex reality when integrated into home care practices, thus identifying how using the technology leads to the taming and unleashing of both technology and actors. The study offers an increased understanding of how and why technology is unpredictable and works

  12. Open Innovation Ecosystem: Towards Collaborative Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Böhmer, Annette Isabel; Lindemann, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Innovation is a precondition for the success of companies in today’s markets to differentiate from their competitors. Particularly disruptive innovations are addressed in numerous research contributions, product contests and advertisements. They carry a high risk of failure and often require a high investment in research and development. (Watty, 2013) Corporate groups are often very successful in specialized market segments and with incremental innovations adapted to the needs ...

  13. From Focus on Price to the Pyramid of Innovation, Information, Cooperation, Value and Trust: A Success Story of Five Swedish Building Material Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Sundquist

    2010-07-01

    In the building sector, value for the customer, is often regarded as being value for money and this, in turn, is achieved by means of competitive tendering. However, there are companies that also focus on innovation as a competitive parameter in their contribution; hereafter referred to as innovative companies. Five managing directors from innovative companies in Sweden were interviewed about how innovation is dealt with in their respective companies. As well as the importance of information, this study points to two additional important factors for innovation, namely cooperation with a carefully chosen partner and the transference of values to the employees. Those innovative companies made careful choices and use means of information, cooperation, value and vision to create innovation in order to build trust for the company and for its products and services.

  14. From Focus on Price to the Pyramid of Innovation, Information, Cooperation, Value and Trust: A Success Story of Five Swedish Building Material Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Sundquist

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a reprint from vol 8 no 2 which has not previously beeen available electronically.In the building sector, value for the customer, is often regarded as being value for money and this, in turn, is achieved by means of competitive tendering. However, there are companies that also focus on innovation as a competitive parameter in their contribution; hereafter referred to as innovative companies. Five managing directors from innovative companies in Sweden were interviewed about how innovation is dealt with in their respective companies. As well as the importance of information, this study points to two additional important factors for innovation, namely cooperation with a carefully chosen partner and the transference of values to the employees. Those innovative companies made careful choices and use means of information, cooperation, value and vision to create innovation in order to build trust for the company and for its products and services.

  15. Understanding the Pathological Basis of Neurological Diseases Through Diagnostic Platforms Based on Innovations in Biomedical Engineering: New Concepts and Theranostics Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ganau

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The pace of advancement of genomics and proteomics together with the recent understanding of the molecular basis behind rare diseases could lead in the near future to significant advances in the diagnosing and treating of many pathological conditions. Innovative diagnostic platforms based on biomedical engineering (microdialysis and proteomics, biochip analysis, non-invasive impedance spectroscopy, etc. are introduced at a rapid speed in clinical practice: this article primarily aims to highlight how such platforms will advance our understanding of the pathological basis of neurological diseases. An overview of the clinical challenges and regulatory hurdles facing the introduction of such platforms in clinical practice, as well as their potential impact on patient management, will complement the discussion on foreseeable theranostic perspectives. Indeed, the techniques outlined in this article are revolutionizing how we (1 identify biomarkers that better define the diagnostic criteria of any given disease, (2 develop research models, and (3 exploit the externalities coming from innovative pharmacological protocols (i.e., those based on monoclonal antibodies, nanodrugs, etc. meant to tackle the molecular cascade so far identified.

  16. "Eh! I Felt I Was Sabotaged!": Facilitators' Understandings of Success in a Participatory HIV and IPV Prevention Intervention in Urban South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Andrew; Willan, Samantha; Jama-Shai, Nwabisa; Washington, Laura; Jewkes, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Participatory approaches to behaviour change dominate HIV- and intimate partner violence prevention interventions. Research has identified multiple challenges in the delivery of these. In this article, we focus on how facilitators conceptualize successful facilitation and how these understandings may undermine dialogue and critical consciousness,…

  17. In search of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lex, Simon Westergaard

    2016-01-01

    This essay explores innovation as a socially and culturally embedded practice, coming to life in correlation between structural organizational conventions and entrepreneurial performances. With an empirical departure, it describes a rational understanding of creation, and it identifies innovation...

  18. Acculturation and School Success: Understanding the Variability of Mexican American Youth Adaptation across Urban and Suburban Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchas, Gilberto Q.; Oseguera, Leticia; Vigil, James Diego

    2012-01-01

    This article concentrates on the educational experiences of urban and suburban Mexican American youth, from recent immigrants to those that have been in the United States for generations. The article seeks to unravel the relationship between acculturation and school success by offering a holistic and longitudinal approach of three time periods:…

  19. The Systems Approach to Innovation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Manley

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The academic literature, and business practice, reveals a shift in the way analysts understand innovation processes. This shift is not revealed as a cohesive trend, rather it comprises contributions from a wide range of academic disciplines and empirical evidence. Building on Edquist (1997 this paper ties together the diverse new ideas which stress a systems approach to successful innovation. The paper presents an up-to-date overview of this fast moving field, with a view to assisting public policy makers and business managers in designing more effective innovation processes.

  20. An innovative lab-based training program to help patient groups understand their disease and the research process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genuine partnership between patient groups and medical experts is important but challenging. Our training program meets this challenge by organizing hands-on, lab-based training sessions for members of patient groups. These sessions allow "trainees" to better understand their disease and the biomedical research process, and strengthen links between patients and local researchers. Over the past decade, we and our partner institutes have received more than 900 French patients, with the participation of over 60 researchers and clinicians.

  1. An innovative lab-based training program to help patient groups understand their disease and the research process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Marion; Hammond, Constance; Karlin, David G

    2015-02-01

    Genuine partnership between patient groups and medical experts is important but challenging. Our training program meets this challenge by organizing hands-on, lab-based training sessions for members of patient groups. These sessions allow "trainees" to better understand their disease and the biomedical research process, and strengthen links between patients and local researchers. Over the past decade, we and our partner institutes have received more than 900 French patients, with the participation of over 60 researchers and clinicians.

  2. Business Model Innovation Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter

    2012-01-01

    When SME´s practice business model (BM) innovation (BMI), leading strategically BMs through the innovation process can be the difference between success and failure to a BM. Business Model Innovation Leadership (BMIL) is however extremely complex to carry out especially to small and medium size...

  3. Active Bodies, Active Minds: A Case Study on Physical Activity and Academic Success in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Understanding Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacheck, Jennifer; Wright, Catherine; Chomitz, Virginia; Chui, Kenneth; Economos, Christina; Schultz, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This case study addresses two major priorities of the Boston Foundation--health and education. Since the 2007 publication of the "Understanding Boston" report "The Boston Paradox: Lots of Health Care, Not Enough Health," the Boston Foundation has worked to draw attention to the epidemic of preventable chronic disease that not…

  4. What has made deer farming in New Zealand so successful? The importance of venison quality, understanding the industry, the market and the biology of the animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Pearse

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available In summarising these aspects of success within the NZ deer industry we can note: (1 NZ traditional farming skills of pasture based production have been readily adapted to deer farming. (2 The industry has grown with strength through the diversity of its participants, leading farmers, innovative researchers, business investors and leaders and the NZDFA and its membership. All are united in their determination that market signals, rather than farm production demands should shape the development of venison supply and presentation. (3 The frank and rapid exchange of research results, farmer innovation, market information and exchange of experience and ideas within the industry. (4 The overwhelming commitment to quality production. Biologically, deer has their own contributing attributes: (a they are intelligent and easy to farm; (b they are efficient converters of pasture and supplements to venison or to progeny; (c they thrive throughout NZ varied agricultural terrain on native grasses or improved pasture, and have a healthy and long productive life; (d they have enormous climatic and environmental tolerance, a defined breeding season and predictable calving pattern; (e they are immensely seasonal, and now, when feeding and breeding requirements are well understood in terms of that seasonality, productive growth targets are readily set and achieved to accommodate the market signal; (f they are simple to manage with a minimum of labour and physical inputs.

  5. Using the Five Senses of Success framework to understand the experiences of midwifery students enroled in an undergraduate degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, M; Fenwick, J; Carter, A; Gamble, J

    2015-01-01

    developing a student's sense of capability, purpose, resourcefulness, identity and connectedness (five-senses of success) are key factors that may be important in predicting student satisfaction and progression within their university program. the study aimed to examine the expectations and experiences of second and third year midwifery students enroled in a Bachelor of Midwifery program and identify barriers and enablers to success. a descriptive exploratory qualitative design was used. Fifty-six students enroled in either year 2 or 3 of the Bachelor of Midwifery program in SE Queensland participated in an anonymous survey using open-ended questions. In addition, 16 students participated in two year-level focus groups. Template analysis, using the Five Senses Framework, was used to analyse the data set. early exposure to 'hands on' clinical midwifery practice as well as continuity of care experiences provided students with an opportunity to link theory to practice and increased their perception of capability as they transitioned through the program. Students' sense of identity, purpose, resourcefulness, and capability was strongly influenced by the programs embedded meta-values, including a 'woman centred' approach. In addition, a student's ability to form strong positive relationships with women, peers, lecturers and supportive clinicians was central to developing connections and ultimately a sense of success. A sense of connection not only fostered an ongoing belief that challenges could be overcome but that students themselves could initiate or influence change. the five senses framework provided a useful lens through which to analyse the student experience. Key factors to student satisfaction and retention within a Bachelor of Midwifery program include: a clearly articulated midwifery philosophy, strategies to promote student connectedness including the use of social media, and further development of clinicians' skills in preceptorship, clinical teaching and

  6. Piles of Rocks Create Mountains of Understanding; The Fossil Finders Model for success in Earth Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pella-Donnelly, M. A.; Daley, B.; Crawford, B.

    2010-12-01

    Through the implementation of the Fossil Finders Resources and Tools Project; students across the country have found increased academic understanding of biological evolution. Evolution curriculum is currently covered minimally in many elementary and middle schools. Fossil Finders is a collaboration of the Cornell University Department of Education, The Paleontological Institution of Ithaca, New York and classrooms all over the United States. Essential elements of this curriculum include a scaffolded series of lessons on nature of science, making observations and inferences of fossils and development of an increased understanding of essential earth science topics including the Law of Uniformitarianism and the principle of superposition . Through these hands-on lessons, students begin to understand evolutionary theory and nature of science. The rewards of implementing this curriculum can be observed with student excitement as they engage in authentic research; they become student paleontologists as they scour bags of rocks for the fossils that may be unearthed. The rocks had been collected during a field study, by the teachers and are well known to contain a multitude of Devonian era fossils. Students become researchers as they examine, identify, measure and quantify all fossils found in these rocks. As the children contribute their own data to an online database of an actual paleontological study, they become self driven to examine that compiled data in order to construct explanations of past life in that collection area. This presentation will focus on personal experiences of two teachers, as they engaged their students in authentic research in earth science It will focus on using inquiry-based strategies that can be transferred to a multitude of classrooms and how to use this basic format to engage, excite and develop understanding of earth science. Teachers will learn about effective inquiry-based lessons that incorporate aspects nature of science. Additionally

  7. The understanding and interpretation of innovative technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity feedback in patients at risk of future chronic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max J Western

    Full Text Available Innovative physical activity monitoring technology can be used to depict rich visual feedback that encompasses the various aspects of physical activity known to be important for health. However, it is unknown whether patients who are at risk of chronic disease would understand such sophisticated personalised feedback or whether they would find it useful and motivating. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity graphics and visualisations are comprehensible and usable for patients at risk of chronic disease.We developed several iterations of graphics depicting minute-by-minute activity patterns and integrated physical activity health targets. Subsequently, patients at moderate/high risk of chronic disease (n=29 and healthcare practitioners (n=15 from South West England underwent full 7-days activity monitoring followed by individual semi-structured interviews in which they were asked to comment on their own personalised visual feedback Framework analysis was used to gauge their interpretation and of personalised feedback, graphics and visualisations.We identified two main components focussing on (a the interpretation of feedback designs and data and (b the impact of personalised visual physical activity feedback on facilitation of health behaviour change. Participants demonstrated a clear ability to understand the sophisticated personal information plus an enhanced physical activity knowledge. They reported that receiving multidimensional feedback was motivating and could be usefully applied to facilitate their efforts in becoming more physically active.Multidimensional physical activity feedback can be made comprehensible, informative and motivational by using appropriate graphics and visualisations. There is an opportunity to exploit the full potential created by technological innovation and provide sophisticated personalised physical activity feedback as an adjunct to

  8. The understanding and interpretation of innovative technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity feedback in patients at risk of future chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, Max J; Peacock, Oliver J; Stathi, Afroditi; Thompson, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Innovative physical activity monitoring technology can be used to depict rich visual feedback that encompasses the various aspects of physical activity known to be important for health. However, it is unknown whether patients who are at risk of chronic disease would understand such sophisticated personalised feedback or whether they would find it useful and motivating. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity graphics and visualisations are comprehensible and usable for patients at risk of chronic disease. We developed several iterations of graphics depicting minute-by-minute activity patterns and integrated physical activity health targets. Subsequently, patients at moderate/high risk of chronic disease (n=29) and healthcare practitioners (n=15) from South West England underwent full 7-days activity monitoring followed by individual semi-structured interviews in which they were asked to comment on their own personalised visual feedback Framework analysis was used to gauge their interpretation and of personalised feedback, graphics and visualisations. We identified two main components focussing on (a) the interpretation of feedback designs and data and (b) the impact of personalised visual physical activity feedback on facilitation of health behaviour change. Participants demonstrated a clear ability to understand the sophisticated personal information plus an enhanced physical activity knowledge. They reported that receiving multidimensional feedback was motivating and could be usefully applied to facilitate their efforts in becoming more physically active. Multidimensional physical activity feedback can be made comprehensible, informative and motivational by using appropriate graphics and visualisations. There is an opportunity to exploit the full potential created by technological innovation and provide sophisticated personalised physical activity feedback as an adjunct to support behaviour

  9. The impact of Thailand's public health response to the HIV epidemic 1984-2015: understanding the ingredients of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siraprapasiri, Taweesap; Ongwangdee, Sumet; Benjarattanaporn, Patchara; Peerapatanapokin, Wiwat; Sharma, Mukta

    2016-11-28

    in the period 2001-2006, and 31,000-46,000 annual deaths between 2007 and 2014. The main impact in terms of deaths averted is seen from 2004 onwards, reflecting treatment scale up. Thailand's AIDS response has prevented needless morbidity and mortality due to the HIV epidemic. In the context of Thailand's ageing population, it is faced with the twin challenges of maintaining life-long quality services among HIV patients and sustaining behaviour change to maintain primary prevention gains. Keeping the focus of the policy makers and health administrators on 'Ending the HIV epidemic' will require consistent advocacy, and evidence-based, innovative and efficient approaches.

  10. Academic success across the transition from primary to secondary schooling among lower-income adolescents: understanding the effects of family resources and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, Lisa A; Stack, Dale M; Kingdon, Danielle

    2013-09-01

    Successful academic performance during adolescence is a key predictor of lifetime achievement, including occupational and social success. The present study investigated the important transition from primary to secondary schooling during early adolescence, when academic performance among youth often declines. The goal of the study was to understand how risk factors, specifically lower family resources and male gender, threaten academic success following this "critical transition" in schooling. The study involved a longitudinal examination of the predictors of academic performance in grades 7-8 among 127 (56 % girls) French-speaking Quebec (Canada) adolescents from lower-income backgrounds. As hypothesized based on transition theory, hierarchical regression analyses showed that supportive parenting and specific academic, social and behavioral competencies (including spelling ability, social skills, and lower levels of attention problems) predicted success across this transition among at-risk youth. Multiple-mediation procedures demonstrated that the set of compensatory factors fully mediated the negative impact of lower family resources on academic success in grades 7-8. Unique mediators (social skills, spelling ability, supportive parenting) also were identified. In addition, the "gender gap" in performance across the transition could be attributed statistically to differences between boys and girls in specific competencies observed prior to the transition, as well as differential parenting (i.e., support from mother) towards girls and boys. The present results contribute to our understanding of the processes by which established risk factors, such as low family income and gender impact development and academic performance during early adolescence. These "transitional" processes and subsequent academic performance may have consequences across adolescence and beyond, with an impact on lifetime patterns of achievement and occupational success.

  11. Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy

      Innovation is the forgotten key to modern systems development - the element that defines the enterprising engineer, the thriving software firm and the cutting edge software application.  Traditional forms of technical education pay little attention to creativity - often encouraging overly ratio...... out the new field of software innovation. It organizes the existing scientific research into eight simple heuristics - guiding principles for organizing a system developer's work-life so that it focuses on innovation.......  Innovation is the forgotten key to modern systems development - the element that defines the enterprising engineer, the thriving software firm and the cutting edge software application.  Traditional forms of technical education pay little attention to creativity - often encouraging overly...... rationalistic ways of thinking which stifle the ability to innovate. Professional software developers are often drowned in commercial drudgery and overwhelmed by work pressure and deadlines. The topic that will both ensure success in the market and revitalize their work lives is never addressed. This book sets...

  12. The effects of innovation on firm performance of supporting industries in Hanoi, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nham Tuan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Innovation, including product, process, marketing, and organizational innovation within a firm, is considered as one of essential component for surviving and growing. These innovation activities create value and competitive advantages for successful organizations; therefore, understanding the organization’s overall innovation is the first and foremost to understand the role of innovation on firm performance. The objective of this research is to explore two parts: the impacts of innovation on the different aspect of innovation performance, then their effects to firm performance (production, market, and financial performance. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses primary data from questionnaire survey. The questionnaire involves 4 parts including general information, innovation activities; innovative performance, and firm performance. This research focuses on firms in supporting industries of mechanics, electronics, motorbike and automobile. These firms are in a list of companies (known as The Excellent Vietnamese Companies in Northern and Central Vietnam established by JETRO and VCCI. There are 150 firms in this list. The questionnaire survey was administered to directors, CEO of those firms during April and May, 2014. Out of the 150 questionnaires sent out, 118 were valid, accounting for 78.7% of the true response rate. Analysis methodologies of reliability, factor analysis and regression are utilized in this paper. Findings: The result demonstrated there are positive effects of process, marketing, and organizational innovations on firm performance in supporting firms. More specifically, the higher the level of innovation activities is, the greater the innovative performance is, which means the larger level of Process, organization and marketing innovation activities are, the higher level of innovative performance are likely to be. Secondly, the higher level of Process, organization and marketing innovative performance, the

  13. The effects of innovation on firm performance of supporting industries in Hanoi, Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, N.; Nhan, N.; Giang, P.; Ngoc, N.

    2016-07-01

    Innovation, including product, process, marketing, and organizational innovation within a firm, is considered as one of essential component for surviving and growing. These innovation activities create value and competitive advantages for successful organizations; therefore, understanding the organization’s overall innovation is the first and foremost to understand the role of innovation on firm performance. The objective of this research is to explore two parts: the impacts of innovation on the different aspect of innovation performance, then their effects to firm performance (production, market, and financial performance). This study uses primary data from questionnaire survey. The questionnaire involves 4 parts including general information, innovation activities; innovative performance, and firm performance. This research focuses on firms in supporting industries of mechanics, electronics, motorbike and automobile. These firms are in a list of companies (known as The Excellent Vietnamese Companies in Northern and Central Vietnam) established by JETRO and VCCI. There are 150 firms in this list. The questionnaire survey was administered to directors, CEO of those firms during April and May, 2014. Out of the 150 questionnaires sent out, 118 were valid, accounting for 78.7% of the true response rate. Analysis methodologies of reliability, factor analysis and regression are utilized in this paper. The result demonstrated there are positive effects of process, marketing, and organizational innovations on firm performance in supporting firms. More specifically, the higher the level of innovation activities is, the greater the innovative performance is, which means the larger level of Process, organization and marketing innovation activities are, the higher level of innovative performance are likely to be. Secondly, the higher level of Process, organization and marketing innovative performance, the better level of firm performances is likely to be. To sum up, in

  14. BNFL's advertising phase II: 'We understand that you are a successful scientific company, but what do you actually do?'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskins, Louise

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Last year, I presented a case study about the development of BNFL's advertising strategy and the challenges which we overcame since its launch in 1995. The case study this year will follow the progress of the strategy's second phase. It will begin by reiterating the role of advertising in the communications mix and the distinct part we believe it plays in building and retaining a strong corporate reputation amongst influential audiences within the UK. Our advertising to date has aimed to define BNFL's role in the nuclear sector and so detach the company from the contentious debate which surrounds the nuclear industry in general. The case study will briefly summarise how effective we have been in achieving this objective through the first phase of television and press advertising. The presentation will concentrate, in particular, on the development of the second phase which has involved the production of a new television advertisement and a press and poster advertisement. Having introduced the key characteristics of the company to the UK population during the first phase through describing key scientific achievements, phase two concentrates on BNFL's core activity - recycling nuclear fuel. The presentation will outline the various development phases including concept research, our tough negotiations with the UK's advertising regulatory bodies (the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre (BACC) and the Independent Television Commission (ITC) through to final production, testing and media scheduling. Generating positive attribution amongst the UK population is obviously the key success indicator. Equally, we believe that it is imperative to share such communications activity with another key stakeholder - our own employees. The case study will outline the phase of internal negotiations and substantiation through to the methods we adopted to ensure that employees saw the television advertisement before the UK population at large. The campaign was launched on

  15. Explaining Innovation. An Empirical Analysis of Industry Data from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjørn Lorentzen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to analyse why some firms innovate while others do not. The paper combines different theories of innovation by relating innovation to internal, firm specific assets and external, regional factors. Hypotheses are derived from theories and tested empirically by using logistic regression. The empirical analysis indicates that internal funding of R&D and size of the firm are the most important firm specific attributes for successful innovation. External, regional factors are also important. The analysis shows that firms located in large urban regions have significantly higher innovation rates than firms located in the periphery, and firms involved in regional networking are more likely to innovate compared to firms not involved in networking. The analysis contributes to a theoretical and empirical understanding of factors that influence on innovation and the role innovation plays in the market economy. Innovation policy should be targeted at developing a tax system and building infrastructure which give firms incentives to invest and allocate internal resources to R&D-activities and collaborate with others in innovation. From an economic policy perspective, consideration should be given to allocating more public resources to rural areas in order to compensate for the asymmetric distribution of resources between the centre and periphery. The paper contributes to the scientific literature of innovation by combining the firm oriented perspective with weight on firm specific, internal resources and a system perspective which focuses on external resources and networking as the most important determinants of innovation in firms.

  16. Innovation and collective entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spear, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine different forms of innovation including social innovation, and why innovation and social innovation have become important themes in public policy – in a context of the increasing and diverse demands on welfare regimes, and in an era of constrained budgets. It will review......, including the role of the institutional and policy framework. It will set this analysis within the context of public policy, demonstrating the role of public policy in enabling such innovations in the social and solidarity economy....... different perspectives on innovation and social innovation and the dynamic interaction through collective entrepreneurship in the the social and solidarity economy; bringing out process and outcome dimensions of innovation. And it will develop an understanding of the drivers and barriers to innovation...

  17. Open the "Black Box" Creativity and Innovation: A Study of Activities in R&D Departments. Some Prospects for Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Charlyne; Oget, David; Cavallucci, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Innovation is a key component to the success and longevity of companies. Our research opens the "black box" of creativity and innovation in R&D teams. We argue that understanding the nature of R&D projects in terms of creativity/innovation, efficiency/inefficiency, is important for designing education policies and improving…

  18. Integrating Stand and Soil Properties to Understand Foliar Nutrient Dynamics during Forest Succession Following Slash-and-Burn Agriculture in the Bolivian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Eben N.; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Soriano, Marlene; Field, Christopher B.; de Souza, Harrison Ramos; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Adams, Rachel I.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Giles, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Secondary forests cover large areas of the tropics and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. During secondary forest succession, simultaneous changes occur among stand structural attributes, soil properties, and species composition. Most studies classify tree species into categories based on their regeneration requirements. We use a high-resolution secondary forest chronosequence to assign trees to a continuous gradient in species successional status assigned according to their distribution across the chronosequence. Species successional status, not stand age or differences in stand structure or soil properties, was found to be the best predictor of leaf trait variation. Foliar δ13C had a significant positive relationship with species successional status, indicating changes in foliar physiology related to growth and competitive strategy, but was not correlated with stand age, whereas soil δ13C dynamics were largely constrained by plant species composition. Foliar δ15N had a significant negative correlation with both stand age and species successional status, – most likely resulting from a large initial biomass-burning enrichment in soil 15N and 13C and not closure of the nitrogen cycle. Foliar %C was neither correlated with stand age nor species successional status but was found to display significant phylogenetic signal. Results from this study are relevant to understanding the dynamics of tree species growth and competition during forest succession and highlight possibilities of, and potentially confounding signals affecting, the utility of leaf traits to understand community and species dynamics during secondary forest succession. PMID:24516525

  19. Understanding, promoting and protecting geodiversity and geoheritage of the Piemonte region (Italy) through innovative techniques and public engagement in Earth Science studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Lozar, Francesca; Perotti, Luigi; Palomba, Mauro; Groppo, Chiara; Natalicchio, Marcello; Ghiraldi, Luca; Beltramo, Riccardo; Lombardo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The onset of Antropocene demonstrates the importance of considering both 1) geodiversity and 2) geoheritage as parts of the landscape "interfaces" where relationships between natural and socio-economic systems can be studied and interpreted. By definition: 1) is the variety, recognizable in nature ("diversity"), of geological features (rocks, minerals, fossils…), of geomorphological environments (and related forms and processes) and of soil characteristics; 2) is an integral part of the global natural heritage focusing on unique, special and representative sites of geological interests (geosites l.s.). In the Antropocene, both 1) and 2) hold a dynamic character, as the result of actions and interactions of natural and/or human factors. Therefore, geodiversity and geoheritage studies are essential for breaking down geological environments and human territories into their main parts and to understand the variables and mechanisms that control their changes. In this perspective, results of the multidisciplinary project PROGEO-Piemonte ("PROactive management of GEOlogical heritage in the Piemonte Region") are presented here: an innovative approach for assessing geodiversity in order to select areas of high potential value of geoheritage to be enhanced by targeted management actions. Since the geodiversity of Piemonte is materialized by elements of high scientific, educational, tourism, etc. value, the geosites where this geoheritage is preserved have been comprehensively analysed and characterized for encompassing both public and private interests. 9 strategic geothematic areas have been selected in the Piemonte Region to test this approach, and to improve social engagement aimed at protecting and promoting geodiversity ad geoheritage. The investigated areas represent the multifaceted geodiversity of Piemonte; each area is characterized by high potential for scientific studies, enhancement of public understanding of science, recreation activities and for economic

  20. How do new innovation paradigms challenge current innovation policy perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Præst; Tanev, Stoyan; Bisgaard, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Successful firms today are forced to deal with new competitive realities by being globally present, innovatively resourceful and internationally competitive on multiple markets across the world. The new competitive realities challenge firms to open their innovation processes by adopting new...

  1. Triggering system innovation in agricultural innovation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, James A.; Williams, Tracy; Nicholas, Graeme; Foote, Jeff; Rijswijk, Kelly; Barnard, Tim; Beechener, Sam; Horita, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a process for stimulating engagement among change agents to develop a shared understanding of systemic problems in the agricultural innovation system (AIS), challenge prevalent institutional logics and identify actions they might undertake to stimulate system innovation.

  2. U.S. EPA Water Technology Innovation Cluster Leaders Meeting - "Successfully Supporting Early-Stage Companies: The Role of Technology Testing" Meeting Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of this workshop were to: (1) increase the cluster leaders’ level of knowledge regarding past and current water technology testing programs, facilities and requirements; (2) learn from the experiences of technology vendors in getting innovative, commercial-ready product...

  3. Frugal innovation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter; Levänen, Jarkko; Lindeman, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to understand the processes of the development of frugal innovation with an entrepreneurial spirit. The contributions of this study are twofold. First, we explore, compare, and contrast two very different contexts - grassroots and elite - of frugal innovation...... processes. Second, we show how individuals have very different understandings of frugal innovations as well as capacities and resources needed for the development of frugal innovations. Two prominent frugal innovation cases are used in this study. One innovation was developed by individuals from the USA...... and another developed by an individual from the Gujarat, India. Using effectuation theory we find that there are some distinct differences between two categories regarding finance, access to science and technology, the motivation of innovators, options they have, actions they take, etc....

  4. Developing Agreed and Accepted Understandings of Spirituality and Spiritual Care Concepts among Members of an Innovative Spirituality Interest Group in the Republic of Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Timmins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A Spirituality Interest Group (SIG was set up in in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Republic of Ireland (ROI, in March 2013. This paper reports on some of the journey and requirements involved in developing the group. It highlights the essential work of establishing agreed understandings in an objective way in order for the group to move forward with action. These agreed understandings have contributed to the group’s success. Outlining the group’s journey in arriving at agreements may be of use to others considering creating similar groups. One key action taken to determine the suitability of the group’s aims and terms of reference was the distribution of a Survey Monkey to group members (n = 28 in 2014. One early meeting of the group discussed future goals and direction using the responses of this anonymous survey. This paper reports on the results of the survey regarding the establishment of the SIG and the development of a shared understanding of spiritual care among the members. There is consensus in the group that the spiritual care required by clients receiving healthcare ought to be an integrated effort across the healthcare team. However, there is an acceptance that spirituality and spiritual care are not always clearly understood concepts in practice. By developing shared or at least accepted understandings of spirituality and spiritual care, SIG hopes to be able to underpin both research and practice with solid foundational conceptual understanding, and in the process also to meet essential prerequisites for achieving the group’s aims.

  5. Understanding Disabilities & Online Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Kristen; Welsh, Bill; Pruitt, Cheryl; Hermann, Kelly; Dietrich, Gaeir; Trevino, Jorge G.; Watson, Terry L.; Brooks, Michael L.; Cohen, Alex H.; Coombs, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Online learning has been growing at an exponential rate over the past decade, providing new opportunities for students seeking quality courses and programs offered through flexible formats. However, as higher education continues to expand online offerings, services must be expanded simultaneously to support all students. This article focuses on…

  6. Understanding Whole Systems Change in Health Care: Insights into System Level Diffusion from Nursing Service Delivery Innovations--A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Whitney; Virani, Tazim; Bajnok, Irmajean; Edwards, Nancy; Rowan, Margo

    2014-01-01

    Our study responds to calls for theory-driven approaches to studying innovation diffusion processes in health care. While most research on diffusion in health care is situated at the service delivery level, we study innovations and associated processes that have diffused to the system level, and refer to work on complex adaptive systems and whole…

  7. The Dynamics of Innovation Influents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijonen, Satu; Pinheiro-Croisel, Rebecca

    Despite a growing interest, sustainable energy innovations encounter difficulties in attaining market success. This paper investigates the role of contracts, a hitherto understudied innovation influent, in generating more conducive conditions for sustainable energy innovations in building projects...... of the project and the ways in which the benefits and costs are calculated and thereby create a strong entanglement of the sustainable energy innovation and the design project. Furthermore, the dynamics lead to favouring of uptake of existing innovations rather than generating completely novel solutions...

  8. Innovative learning for innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr.Ir. Hay Geraedts

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Innovation is crucial for companies who have to react to constantly changing markets. Several national and European research institutes stress the importance of developing innovation for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs). This was a trigger to design a minor on strategic

  9. Adoption of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This edited volume brings together academics from both innovation and marketing fields to explore the additional value for companies that can be generated with the innovations in marketing and the marketing of innovations. If ideas need to reach the marketplace, then marketing strategies, concepts...... innovation and marketing research need to be much stronger as companies have to convince internal and external stakeholders to achieve successful innovation strategies. State-of-the-art research output from different perspectives would suit the needs of a researcher as well as the company CEO alike....... and tools - such as the continuous development of new product and services - become vital for their success. On the other hand, marketing management is influenced by innovation as illustrated by the way social media and Internet have revolutionized the traditional marketing-mix. Such linkages between...

  10. The development of global energy supply as a succession of energy-related innovation processes. A qualitative model approach to assess the use of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Often, the development of the world energy supply is adopted as a painful sequence of the exhaustible and polluting use of primary energy sources. Therefore the expectations in practically inexhaustible and environmentally neutral renewable energy sources are high. However, in fact, it depends on the available production, conversion, and utilization technology, which sources of energy are suitable to meet given demands and requirements. In particular, the development of the energy demand requires energy technology innovations to use new energy sources, to use known energy sources more efficient and to replace exhaustible energy sources at an early stage by others. The historical development of the global energy supply is a sequence of interrelated energy technology innovation processes. This makes it also possible, to analyse the historical development of nuclear power and to derive a model on the future role of nuclear power worldwide.

  11. An Innovative Therapeutic Protocol for Vitiligo: Experience with the Use of Fraxel Herbium Laser, Topical Latanoprost and Successive Irradiation with UVA - 1 Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torello Lotti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the continuous introduction of innovative therapies for vitiligo, today none of them provide constant and excellent results in term of repigmentation. The authors report their experience in treating a localised form of vitiligo with a new protocol consisting in the use of a Fraxel Herbium laser, and in the following application of topical Latanoprost solution and, one day after, in lesional irradiation with UVA1 laser.

  12. MACVIA-LR (Fighting Chronic Diseases for Active and Healthy Ageing in Languedoc-Roussillon): A Success Story of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Bourret, R; Camuzat, T; Augé, P; Bringer, J; Noguès, M; Jonquet, O; de la Coussaye, J E; Ankri, J; Cesari, M; Guérin, O; Vellas, B; Blain, H; Arnavielhe, S; Avignon, A; Combe, B; Canovas, G; Daien, C; Dray, G; Dupeyron, A; Jeandel, C; Laffont, I; Laune, D; Marion, C; Pastor, E; Pélissier, J Y; Galan, B; Reynes, J; Reuzeau, J C; Bedbrook, A; Granier, S; Adnet, P A; Amouyal, M; Alomène, B; Bernard, P L; Berr, C; Caimmi, D; Claret, P G; Costa, D J; Cristol, J P; Fesler, P; Hève, D; Millot-Keurinck, J; Morquin, D; Ninot, G; Picot, M C; Raffort, N; Roubille, F; Sultan, A; Touchon, J; Attalin, V; Azevedo, C; Badin, M; Bakhti, K; Bardy, B; Battesti, M P; Bobia, X; Boegner, C; Boichot, S; Bonnin, H Y; Bouly, S; Boubakri, C; Bourrain, J L; Bourrel, G; Bouix, V; Bruguière, V; Cade, S; Camu, W; Carre, V; Cavalli, G; Cayla, G; Chiron, R; Coignard, P; Coroian, F; Costa, P; Cottalorda, J; Coulet, B; Coupet, A L; Courrouy-Michel, M C; Courtet, P; Cros, V; Cuisinier, F; Danko, M; Dauenhauer, P; Dauzat, M; David, M; Davy, J M; Delignières, D; Demoly, P; Desplan, J; Dujols, P; Dupeyron, G; Engberink, O; Enjalbert, M; Fattal, C; Fernandes, J; Fouletier, M; Fraisse, P; Gabrion, P; Gellerat-Rogier, M; Gelis, A; Genis, C; Giraudeau, N; Goucham, A Y; Gouzi, F; Gressard, F; Gris, J C; Guillot, B; Guiraud, D; Handweiler, V; Hayot, M; Hérisson, C; Heroum, C; Hoa, D; Jacquemin, S; Jaber, S; Jakovenko, D; Jorgensen, C; Kouyoudjian, P; Lamoureux, R; Landreau, L; Lapierre, M; Larrey, D; Laurent, C; Léglise, M S; Lemaitre, J M; Le Quellec, A; Leclercq, F; Lehmann, S; Lognos, B; Lussert, Cj M; Makinson, A; Mandrick, K; Mares, P; Martin-Gousset, P; Matheron, A; Mathieu, G; Meissonnier, M; Mercier, G; Messner, P; Meunier, C; Mondain, M; Morales, R; Morel, J; Mottet, D; Nérin, P; Nicolas, P; Nouvel, F; Paccard, D; Pandraud, G; Pasdelou, M P; Pasquié, J L; Patte, K; Perrey, S; Pers, Y M; Portejoie, F; Pujol, J L E; Quantin, X; Quéré, I; Ramdani, S; Ribstein, J; Rédini-Martinez, I; Richard, S; Ritchie, K; Riso, J P; Rivier, F; Robine, J M; Rolland, C; Royère, E; Sablot, D; Savy, J L; Schifano, L; Senesse, P; Sicard, R; Stephan, Y; Strubel, D; Tallon, G; Tanfin, M; Tassery, H; Tavares, I; Torre, K; Tribout, V; Uziel, A; Van de Perre, P; Venail, F; Vergne-Richard, C; Vergotte, G; Vian, L; Vialla, F; Viart, F; Villain, M; Viollet, E; Ychou, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    The Région Languedoc Roussillon is the umbrella organisation for an interconnected and integrated project on active and healthy ageing (AHA). It covers the 3 pillars of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA): (A) Prevention and health promotion, (B) Care and cure, (C) and (D) Active and independent living of elderly people. All sub-activities (poly-pharmacy, falls prevention initiative, prevention of frailty, chronic respiratory diseases, chronic diseases with multimorbidities, chronic infectious diseases, active and independent living and disability) have been included in MACVIA-LR which has a strong political commitment and involves all stakeholders (public, private, patients, policy makers) including CARSAT-LR and the Eurobiomed cluster. It is a Reference Site of the EIP on AHA. The framework of MACVIA-LR has the vision that the prevention and management of chronic diseases is essential for the promotion of AHA and for the reduction of handicap. The main objectives of MACVIA-LR are: (i) to develop innovative solutions for a network of Living labs in order to reduce avoidable hospitalisations and loss of autonomy while improving quality of life, (ii) to disseminate the innovation. The three years of MACVIA-LR activities are reported in this paper.

  13. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Waldorff, Susanne Boch

    2014-01-01

    Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...... of collaborative policy innovation in the area of mental health care in Denmark indicates that collaboration can contribute to qualify the politicians’ understanding of wicked policy problems, and to fostering new creative policy solutions. The study also shows, however, that the new problem understandings...

  14. RELATIONSHIP MARKETING IN THE INNOVATION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Boier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inspired from the context of business-to-business markets, relationship marketing in the context of innovation have been expanded more and more to the consumer markets as well. The paper starts with a review of several most relevant studies on relationship marketing-innovation topic, from the first references to the current complex approaches. The effective stakeholder involvement in the value creation provides a more fertile ground for further successful innovations. All of the variables generating the success of a relationship marketing approach – trust, commitment, communication, seller’s customer orientation and empathy, experience and satisfaction a.s.o. – are also involved, with specific particularities, in the management of the innovation and new product development processes. The paper also outline the different perspectives to understand the relationship marketing-innovation approaches, coming from the product type, its business-to-business or business-to-consumer settings, the specific industry, the actual stage of the market evolution – emerging or mature –, the level of technological novelty as dimension of technological uncertainty, the position/ status and role of stakeholders as part in the relationships, the state of the new product development process in which the interactions occurs or special issues like sustainable innovation, for profit and not-for-profit areas etc.

  15. Innovative process engineering: a generic model of the innovation process

    OpenAIRE

    Pénide, Thomas; Gourc, Didier; Pingaud, Hervé; Peillon, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Innovation can be represented as a knowledge transformation process perceived with different levels of granularity. The milestones of this process allow assessment for its each step and set up feedback loops that will be highlighted. This innovation process is a good starting point to understand innovation and then to manage it. Best practices being patterns of processes, we describe innovation best practices as compulsory steps in our innovation process. To put into p...

  16. Innovative instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    At this year's particle physics conference at Brighton, a parallel session was given over to instrumentation and detector development. While this work is vital to the health of research and its continued progress, its share of prime international conference time is limited. Instrumentation can be innovative three times — first when a new idea is outlined, secondly when it is shown to be feasible, and finally when it becomes productive in a real experiment, amassing useful data rather than operational experience. Hyams' examples showed that it can take a long time for a new idea to filter through these successive stages, if it ever makes it at all

  17. Selecting and evoking innovators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    prepared for and conducted selection of and collaboration with innovators. The outcome was successful in the sense that the innovators produced excellent foundation for conceptual interaction design by creating mock-ups and explanations incarnating their preferences, attitudes and habits. By referring...

  18. AN INVESTIGATION OF CONTEXTUAL INFLUENCES ON INNOVATION IN COMPLEX PROJECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavin, Lone; Narasimhan, Ram

    2018-01-01

    There is paucity of literature on supplier-enabled-innovation in complex project-contexts. Based on literature from repetitive-manufacturing-contexts, this conceptual chapter identifies innovation-fostering-practices and develops a conceptual-framework relating them to innovation-performance. The......There is paucity of literature on supplier-enabled-innovation in complex project-contexts. Based on literature from repetitive-manufacturing-contexts, this conceptual chapter identifies innovation-fostering-practices and develops a conceptual-framework relating them to innovation...... commercialized. Suppliers can play an important role in ensuring successful exploitation of new knowledge. We posit that innovation-fostering-practices mediate the exploitation of new knowledge into superior innovation-performance. Thus, the proposed conceptual-framework incorporates the exploration...... and exploitation-aspects of innovation. Since contextual-differences can play a major role in the efficacy of these innovation-practices, our conceptual-framework might not fit complex project-environments in its entirety. To better understand the contextual-influences in complex projects, we evaluate...

  19. Innovating in a Government Context: An Evaluation of a Dutch Water Innovation Program Using the Cyclic Innovation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick van der Duin; Hans Hermeler

    2014-01-01

    Innovation is of vital importance, not only to commercial companies, but also to governments. For the Dutch, innovation in the field of water management is even a matter of survival, because much of their country lies below sea level. An evaluation of a water innovation program carried out by the Dutch government, using the cyclic innovation model, shows that there is a broad understanding of innovation, that innovators see innovation as a significant break from the "old" and recognize the co...

  20. Medical innovation laws: an unnecessary innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bernadette

    2016-06-01

    Objective This paper aims to demonstrate that any suggestion that there is a need for specific innovation laws is flawed. Innovation is central to good medical practice and is adequately supported by current law. Methods The paper reviews the nature of medical innovation and outlines recent attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws aimed at 'encouraging' and 'supporting' innovation. The current legal framework is outlined and the role of the law in relation to medical innovation explored. Results The analysis demonstrates the cyclic relationship between medical advancement and the law and concludes that there is no requirement for specific innovation laws. Conclusions The law not only supports innovation and development in medical treatment but encourages it as central to a functioning medical system. There is no need to introduce specific laws aimed at medical innovation; to do so represents an unnecessary legal innovation and serves to complicate matters. What is known about the topic? Over recent months, there has been a great deal of discussion surrounding the law in the context of medical innovation. This was driven by the attempts in the UK to introduce specific laws in the Medical Innovation Bill. The general subject matter - negligence and the expected standard of care in the provision of treatment - is very well understood, but not in cases where the treatment can be described as innovative. The general rhetoric in both the UK and Australia around the Medical Innovation Bill demonstrates a lack of understanding of the position of the law with regards to innovative treatment. What does this paper add? This paper adds clarity to the debate. It presents the law and explains the manner in which the law can operate around innovative treatment. The paper asserts that medical innovation is both supported and encouraged by existing legal principles. What are the implications for practitioners? The paper presents an argument that can guide the policy position

  1. Opening the door to innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurman, Janine; Graus, Yvo F; Labrijn, Aran F; Ruuls, Sigrid; Parren, Paul W H I

    2014-01-01

    Open innovation is the new buzz, with initiatives popping up left and right. Here, we give a personal perspective on a very successful, knowledge-driven innovation initiated in an academia- industry alliance, which culminated in technology platforms that enable the generation of therapeutic antibodies with novel properties. To start, we provide a general background on open innovation in the drug development field.

  2. Innovation and internationalization through exports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassiman, B.; Golovko, E.

    2011-01-01

    Successful product innovation leads to the decision by small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to enter the export market. We argue that in addition to a direct effect of innovation on exports, product innovation, through its effect on firm productivity, increases the likelihood of the firm entering the

  3. Innovation af innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    , at innovation af innovationen forsøges gennemført på en måde, hvor tiden kræves at forholde sig til sin egen tidslighed i form af fremtid, nutid, fortid og ikke mindst i form af samtidighed. I tiden skal vi iagttage, hvordan vi iagttager tiden. Vi dobbelt-koder tiden på samme måde, som forskning forsker i...... organisationssystemerne. De to typer systemer kan noget helt bestemt med fænomenet tid. De kan synkronisere. Analyseres organisationssystemer ser vi, imidlertid at innovation kræver ro. Stærkt innovative systemer er militærsystemet og kunstsystemet, der også inddrages, og hvor vi ser paradokset mellem innovation og...... involution. Tid er med et medium og ikke et lufttomt rum. Tid er end ikke en gasart, men udgør et solidt fluidum, som samfundet bader i og flyder i, konstant i bevægelse. Reformer forudsætter former, og innovation forudsætter involution. Kun sådan muliggøres evolution....

  4. UK innovation systems for new and renewable energy technologies: drivers, barriers and systems failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxon, T.J.; Gross, R.; Chase, A.; Howes, J.; Arnall, A.; Anderson, D.

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of the systemic processes by which innovation occurs is useful, both conceptually and to inform policy-making in support of innovation in more sustainable technologies. This paper analyses current innovation systems in the UK for a range of new and renewable energy technologies, and generates policy recommendations for improving the effectiveness of these innovation systems. Although incentives are in place in the UK to encourage innovation in these technologies, system failures - or 'gaps' - are identified in moving technologies along the innovation chain, preventing their successful commercialisation. Sustained investment will be needed for these technologies to achieve their potential. It is argued that a stable and consistent policy framework is required to help create the conditions for this. In particular, such a framework should be aimed at improving risk/reward ratios for demonstration and pre-commercial stage technologies. This would enhance positive expectations, stimulate learning effects leading to cost reductions, and increase the likelihood of successful commercialisation

  5. Innovation in Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.; Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo

    2005-01-01

    The course on Innovation in Product Development attempts to identify and understand the nature of innovation and product development and their important factors. The course takes both a theoretical and a practical approach and employs a mix of lectures, project work and group discussion. Format...

  6. Open Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Gassmann, Oliver; Enkel, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    In the past 10 years, numerous interesting articles, book chapters, and books have been written on open innovation strategies in mainly large companies. While closed innovation models have resulted in important breakthrough innovations, many large companies have abandoned vertical integration strategies in recent years and have moved toward a combination of both closed and open innovation models that are used for reaching different sets of innovative goals. The definition of open innovation a...

  7. Scaling up the Success for All: Model of School Reform. Final Report from the Investing in Innovation (i3) Evaluation. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Janet; Zhu, Pei; Balu, Rekha; Rappaport, Shelley; DeLaurentis, Micah

    2015-01-01

    Success for All (SFA), one of the best-known school reform models, aims to improve the reading skills of all children but is especially directed at schools that serve large numbers of students from low-income families. First implemented in 1987, SFA combines a challenging reading program, whole-school reform elements, and an emphasis on continuous…

  8. Business Models for Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saebi, Tina; Foss, Nicolai J.

    2015-01-01

    Research on open innovation suggests that companies benefit differentially from adopting open innovation strategies; however, it is unclear why this is so. One possible explanation is that companies' business models are not attuned to open strategies. Accordingly, we propose a contingency model...... of open business models by systematically linking open innovation strategies to core business model dimensions, notably the content, structure, governance of transactions. We further illustrate a continuum of open innovativeness, differentiating between four types of open business models. We contribute...... to the open innovation literature by specifying the conditions under which business models are conducive to the success of open innovation strategies....

  9. Business Models for Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saebi, Tina; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    Research on open innovation suggests that companies benefit differentially from adopting open innovation strategies; however, it is unclear why this is so. One possible explanation is that companies’ business models are not attuned to open strategies. Accordingly, we propose a contingency model...... of open business models by systematically linking open innovation strategies to core business model dimensions, notably the content, structure, governance of transactions. We further illustrate a continuum of open innovativeness, differentiating between four types of open business models. We contribute...... to the open innovation literature by specifying the conditions under which business models are conducive to the success of open innovation strategies....

  10. Public Procurement and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfstam, Max

    Max Rolfstam examines the increasing emphasis on public procurement as a means to stimulate innovation and the theoretical implications of this policy development. While ‘regular’ public procurement may be regarded as the outcome of anonymous market processes, public procurement of innovation must...... be understood as a special case of innovation, where social processes – and consequently the institutions governing these social processes – need to be considered. This book contributes to our understanding with a detailed institutional analysis of the public procurement of innovation....

  11. Incremental Innovation and Competitive Pressure in the Presence of Discrete Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosh, Arghya; Kato, Takao; Morita, Hodaka

    2017-01-01

    Technical progress consists of improvements made upon the existing technology (incremental innovation) and innovative activities aiming at entirely new technology (discrete innovation). Incremental innovation is often of limited relevance to the new technology invented by successful discrete...... innovation. Previous theoretical studies have indicated that higher competitive pressure measured by product substitutability increases incremental innovation. In contrast, we find that intensified competition can decrease incremental innovation. A firm's market share upon its failure in discrete innovation...... decreases as competition intensifies. This effect decreases firms’ incentives for incremental innovation because the innovation outcome can be applied to a smaller amount of units....

  12. Investigating Teachers' Exploration of a Professional Development Website: An Innovative Approach to Understanding the Factors that Motivate Teachers to Use Internet-Based Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Pamela; Willows, Dale

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined an innovative methodology, combining screen capture technology and a retrospective think aloud, for exploring the use of Internet-based resources by elementary teachers. Pre-service and in-service teachers explored "The Balanced Literacy Diet," a free, interactive, and evidenced-informed professional…

  13. Innovative organotypic in vitro models for safety assessment: aligning with regulatory requirements and understanding models of the heart, skin, and liver as paradigms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pridgeon, Chris S; Schlott, Constanze; Wong, Min Wei; Heringa, Minne B; Heckel, Tobias; Leedale, Joe; Launay, Laurence; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Przyborski, Stefan; Bearon, Rachel N; Wilkinson, Emma L; Ansari, Tahera; Greenman, John; Hendriks, Delilah F G; Gibbs, Sue; Sidaway, James; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Walker, Paul; Cross, Mike J; Park, B Kevin; Goldring, Chris E P

    2018-01-01

    The development of improved, innovative models for the detection of toxicity of drugs, chemicals, or chemicals in cosmetics is crucial to efficiently bring new products safely to market in a cost-effective and timely manner. In addition, improvement in models to detect toxicity may reduce the

  14. Current trends of banking innovations

    OpenAIRE

    A.M. Karminskiy; O.R. Zhdanova

    2013-01-01

    The current stage of the global banking system development takes place in an increasingly competitive environment and unstable financial markets. One of the key factors of bank's successful development is a policy of continuous innovative behavior. Nowadays innovation is a key factor of bankingnstability, competitiveness and sustainable growth.The aim of the article. The main goal of this article is to examine key trends of banking innovations and innovative in Russia. Experience in the devel...

  15. Learning to Innovate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mei, Maggie

    . Specifically, essay 1 focuses on how to manage ambidextrous learning for superior radical and incremental innovation capabilities; essay 2 examines how learning through knowledge sharing in the context of standard setting impacts on firms’ innovation performance; and essay 3 moves down to project level...... the relationship between organizational learning and innovation creation in an organizational context. Taking a nuanced view of organizational learning, the dissertation investigates how three different organizational learning processes could affect innovation creation at the firm level and project level...... to the understanding of managing organizational learning for innovation creation at firms. The three studies in this dissertation show how three prominent organizational learning processes impact on firms’ innovation performance. Furthermore, the studies in this dissertation emphasize that there are limitation...

  16. The importance of innovations for the development of franchising systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Milica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In today's global competitive business environment, innovations are crucial for the success of the company. It is necessary to emphasize the importance of understanding wishes and needs of consumers and an innovative manner in which their needs can be met more efficiently in comparison to competition. Franchising is, certainly, one of the business concepts that is difficult to associate with innovation, as it presents the use of a proven business model. At the global level, there is a constant tendency in the development of existing and new franchise systems. In this regard, the paper points out the importance of innovation for the development and improvement of the franchise systems. The phenomenon of open innovation is increasingly important in recent years. The paper highlights the importance of open innovation as the best way to innovate the franchising company's business through the adoption of ideas from the external environment and the exchange of internally created ideas. The model of open innovation involves the integration of customers, suppliers and franchisees in the new product development process. The open strategy of new product development is very important for franchising companies that want to be leaders. The paper reviews the development perspectives of open innovation in franchising systems in the future.

  17. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations – from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. Methods We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Results Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Conclusions Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets

  18. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Peter; Conrad, Douglas A; Hernandez, Susan E; Watts, Carolyn; Marcus-Smith, Miriam

    2012-12-14

    Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations - from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets and addressing conditions for innovation.

  19. School Libraries and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    School library programs have measured success by improved test scores. But how do next-generation school libraries demonstrate success as they strive to be centers of innovation and creativity? These libraries offer solutions for school leaders who struggle to restructure existing systems built around traditional silos of learning (subjects and…

  20. Mechanisms and Functions within a National Innovation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Gogodze

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern society, the competitive success of countries is increasingly dependent on the effective management of their national innovation system (NIS. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms behind NISs has become essential. After reviewing the current understanding of the NIS concept and the existing measurement models, this study proposes to consider the NIS as an intangible (underlying asset of a specific kind and identifies its seven fundamental components, which are extracted with a new measurement model, the Global Innovation Index (GII. This study employs the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM techniques to analyze the relationships among the components of an NIS. Our results support the existence of a causal link between the constituents of an NIS and provide several perspectives regarding NIS management opportunities. In particular, we find that the efficient management of institutional capital is a key determinant of innovation success for non-high-income countries.

  1. Innovative didaktik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Birthe

    Innovative didaktik. This deals with innovative didaktik from at methodological point of view in three ways - how to define the concept, how to develop it and how analyse it. Issues analysed: How to create innovative students? How to create innovative learning envoriments? These are core questions...

  2. Mindful innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Poul Bitsch

    2008-01-01

    Mindful innovation is an approach to innovation that pays attention to people's experience in an organization rather than to formal organization or social role.......Mindful innovation is an approach to innovation that pays attention to people's experience in an organization rather than to formal organization or social role....

  3. Work(er)-Driven Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The focus on innovation as a foundational element of enhanced organisational performance has led to the promoting and valuing of greater levels of employee participation in innovation processes. An emergent concept of employee-driven innovation could be argued to have hindered understandings of the creative and transformative nature of…

  4. Teaching innovation is social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Monika Hoeck; Olsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to explore how teaching practitioners teach innovation – by cross comparing the local nursing college innovation program and the innovation teaching at the bachelor program in Mechatronic engineering at the local University; to explore and develop attention points in understanding ...... that emerging entrepreneurial attitudes are linked to the social processes of interaction between the participants of teachers and students....

  5. Factores de éxito y fracaso en el comportamiento innovador de las empresas ganaderas cubanas Success and failure factors in the innovating performance of the Cuban livestock production enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Suárez

    2007-09-01

    de éxito y fracaso de la innovación en el sector ganadero cubano son muy similares a los obtenidos en el sector industrial y referidos en la literatura internacionalWith the objective of learning the factors that favor the success of innovation and those that cause its failure, in the Cuban livestock production sector, a questionnaire was applied to the directors of a non probabilistic sample of 34 livestock production enterprises (36% of the sector, which comprised the different geographical zones of the country, all the types of production systems existing in Cuban livestock production, organizations in the different stages of the Enterprise Improvement process and the different enterprise sizes. The internal factors with the highest incidence on the success of innovation in the enterprises were considered to be: A Top Management opened to new ideas and inclined to assuming risks, the decentralization in decision-making and a participatory management, motivation and commitment to innovation in the managers, constant training of the personnel and execution of team work; while the external factors were the dynamics and turbulence of the surroundings, which demand changes in the enterprise, the establishment of cooperation links and networks in the country, the existence of state policies of support to innovation, having facility of access to international funding sources and possibilities of national financing for the development of innovation. Regarding the obstacles that constrain to a higher extent innovation in the enterprises, they are: scarcity of financial resources, external pressures on the enterprise, which have incidence on the productive and management processes, the possession of insufficient scientific and technological information, problems of availability and utilization of computing equipment, lack of efficient financing mechanisms for innovation, as well as insufficient mechanisms of incentives that encourage to innovate and establish links with

  6. Comprehensive Innovation and its Implications on New High-Tech Product Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, innovation represents an essential ingredient within organizations for their survival in a strong competitive marketplace. Innovations emerging from R&D projects could represent key factors for the foundation of new businesses. Various supporting programs for establishing innovative start-ups within business incubators, as well as spin-offs within uni-versities are promoted by authorities at local and national levels. Statistics have shown that only a small percentage of these initiatives (around 30% succeed to survive more than three years. There are various causes which keep the success rate only at this level, but a major one is the lack in understanding the complex nature of innovation by the people which initiate these businesses; they are mainly focused on technological innovation (product innovation. This paper is going to give a broader perspective on innovation, seeing it as an integrated model of product innovation, marketing innovation, production process innovation and business model innovation over their life-cycles. From this enhanced view of innovation, conse-quences on new product development are further analysed.

  7. Strategic innovation portfolio management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In knowledge-based economy, strategic innovation portfolio management becomes more and more important and critical factor of enterprise's success. Value creation for all the participants in value chain is more successful if it is based on efficient resource allocation and improvement of innovation performances. Numerous researches have shown that companies with best position on the market found their competitiveness on efficient development and exploitation of innovations. In decision making process, enterprise's management is constantly faced with challenge to allocate resources and capabilities as efficiently as possible, in both short and long term. In this paper authors present preliminary results of realized empirical research related to strategic innovation portfolio management in ten chosen enterprises in Serbia. The structure of the paper includes the following parts: theoretical background, explanation of research purpose and methodology, discussion of the results and concluding remarks, including limitations and directions for further research.

  8. Play. Learn. Innovate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sproedt, Henrik

    as a communication designer, a manager in retail, and a consultant I have been involved in several innovation projects from different perspectives. After experiencing that a major factor for success or failure of innovation processes – which always entail change – were people and how they relate to each other, I......„Play. Learn. Innovate. – Grasping the Social Dynamics of Participatory Innovation“ the title of this thesis describes how the complex interplay of unexpected events led to some burning questions and eventually to this thesis, which one could call an innovation*1*. During several years......, organizations, complexity, and knowledge – but also drawing on psychology, sociology, and philosophy – I did not find any satisfying approach that resonated with my complex experiences in innovation practice where in the messy everyday of projects the only thing I knew for sure was that my role and function...

  9. Innovation for Sustainable Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Jack; Edwards, D; Forde, P

    Innovation is the key to responding to the future challenges that confront all sectors of society and the economy, and especially in tourism. Within tourism, there are numerous corporations and destinations around the world that are responding to the ecological, social and economic challenges...... for an integrated overview of the drivers, barriers, processes and networks for innovation. The cases have been prepared for use in research and teaching of innovation, and the analysis and case notes are both designed to facilitate discussion and further investigation of innovation, not only in tourism......, but in other economic sectors as well. Being an online publication, it is expected that updates in successive editions of this first book will add further to the description and analysis of innovation for sustainable tourism and hence provide a resource for those seeking to enhance the teaching, research...

  10. Intellectual Property and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Francis Gurry has led WIPO as Director General since 1st October, 2008. He was reappointed in May 2014 for a second six-year term, which runs until September 2020. Under his leadership, WIPO is addressing major challenges. These include managing the stress on the international patent and copyright systems produced by rapid technological change, by globalisation and increased demand; reducing the knowledge gap between developed and developing countries; and ensuring that the intellectual property (IP) system serves its fundamental purpose of encouraging creativity and innovation in all countries. Every year, WIPO publishes the Global Innovation Index (GII), which provides detailed metrics about the innovation performance of countries and economies around the world. The 2016 edition highlighted CERN as an example of successful, regional innovation initiatives. In this seminar Mr. Gurry will share his knowledge and views on the role of IP in innovation. You can read a message from Mr. Gurry here : http://...

  11. Managing Human Resource Learning for Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter

    Managing human resource learning for innovation develops a systemic understanding of building innovative capabilities. Building innovative capabilities require active creation, coordination and absorption of useful knowledge and thus a cohesive management approach to learning. Often learning...... in organizations and work is approached without considerations on how to integrate it in the management of human resources. The book investigates the empirical conditions for managing human resources learning for innovation. With focus on innovative performance the importance of modes of innovation, clues...

  12. Persistence of innovation in unstable environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suarez, Diana Valeria

    2014-01-01

    of the environment impact on the type of profitable innovations, and past innovations might not be suitable for the new environment. As a result, firm's innovative behavior might change, which means that the firm's set of decisions about engaging in the seek for innovations or not and, if so, the set of investments...... and capabilities it allocates to innovate could be modified. Empirical evidence is provided to reject the persistence hypothesis and to show that past innovations do not necessarily impact present ones. This paper examines the relationship between past and present innovations for a group of Argentinean firms...... of successfully responding to changes in the environment and continuing to innovate....

  13. Mapping your innovation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Scott D; Eyring, Matt; Gibson, Lib

    2006-05-01

    In the complex sport of American football, teams rely on playbooks as thick as the Manhattan phone directory. But when it comes to creating innovative growth businesses-which is at least as complicated as professional football--most companies have not developed detailed game plans. Indeed, many managers have concluded that a fog enshrouds the world of innovation, obscuring high-potential opportunities. The authors believe that companies can penetrate that fog by developing growth strategies based on disruptive innovations, as defined by Clayton Christensen. Such innovations conform to a pattern: They offer an entirely new solution; they perform adequately along traditional dimensions and much better along other dimensions that matter more to target customers; and they are not initially appealing to powerful incumbents. Companies can develop customized checklists, or playbooks, by combining this basic pattern with analysis of major innovations in their markets. The key early on is to focus not on detailed financial estimates--which will always guide companies toward the markets most hostile to disruptive innovations--but on how well the innovation fits the pattern of success. It's also crucial to encourage flexibility: Companies must be willing to kill projects that are going nowhere, exempt innovations from standard development processes, and avoid burdening project teams with extra financing, which can keep them heading in the wrong direction. Companies can create competitive advantage by becoming champions at defining the pattern of successful innovations and executing against it. But as that pattern becomes obvious--and others emerge-building a sustainable advantage on innovation competencies will again prove elusive.

  14. Innovators Intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Maria Luisa; Rai, Sudhanshu

    With this paper we want to explore further the innovators intent, where social enterprises use imaginative ways to take advantage of information technology to create, share and manage the knowledge pool of their small enterprise. We draw on several perspectives on how information processing needs...... of understanding on how IT can support the management of knowledge within the context of SEs dealing with different contextual settings influenced by: constant tensions between social and economic objectives, more focus on sustainability than competiveness, limited resources, and high levels of democratic...... are addressed, as well as the manner in which IT enables and facilitates sense-making. Studies exploring the role of IT in organisations abound, however our focus is not large organisations but small social enterprises (SEs) and how they use IT to further their business objectives. Hence there is still a lack...

  15. Collaborative innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Sørensen, Eva; Hartley, Jean

    2013-01-01

    There are growing pressures for the public sector to be more innovative but considerable disagreement about how to achieve it. This article uses institutional and organizational analysis to compare three major public innovation strategies. The article confronts the myth that the market......-driven private sector is more innovative than the public sector by showing that both sectors have a number of drivers of as well as barriers to innovation, some of which are similar, while others are sector specific. The article then systematically analyzes three strategies for innovation: New Public Management...... for enhancing public innovation is contingent rather than absolute. Some contingencies for each strategy are outlined....

  16. Improving Design with Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Gasparin, Marta; Varnes, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Is it necessary or even possible to apply the management technology of open innovation to all projects in the same way? An analysis of the practices used in different product development projects in the same European medical company shows that commercially successful projects did apply many...... for success, and some open innovation practices were more successful than others. The most open and exploratory practices were not so successful in this company. This might be due to the nature of innovation, which develops in unpredictable and nonlinear ways. These observations suggest that those involved...... in open innovation need both a broad knowledge of the various potential elements of an open innovation effort and a flexible attitude toward their application. INSET: Summary of Projects....

  17. Pragmatic Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan; Jensen, Rikke Hagensby

    2014-01-01

    We understand software innovation as concerned with introducing innovation into the development of software intensive systems, i.e. systems in which software development and/or integration are dominant considerations. Innovation is key in almost any strategy for competitiveness in existing markets......, for creating new markets, or for curbing rising public expenses, and software intensive systems are core elements in most such strategies. Software innovation therefore is vital for about every sector of the economy. Changes in software technologies over the last decades have opened up for experimentation......, learning, and flexibility in ongoing software projects, but how can this change be used to facilitate software innovation? How can a team systematically identify and pursue opportunities to create added value in ongoing projects? In this paper, we describe Deweyan pragmatism as the philosophical foundation...

  18. Organisations in Innovation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana

    Organisations are crucial elements in an innovation system. Yet, their role is so ubiquitous that it is difficult to grasp and to examine from the perspective of public policy. Besides, links between the literature at firm and system levels on the one hand, and public policy and governance studies...... on the other, are still scarce. The purpose of this paper is to define the conceptual background of innovation policy in relation to the role of organisations in general, and entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship in particular. In so doing, this paper aims at making three contributions. Firstly......, it distinguishes between different types of organisations in the innovation system, a crucial topic in understanding innovation dynamics and blurring borders. Secondly, it identifies the organisation-related bottlenecks in the innovation system, and examines the policy instruments to solve them. Thirdly...

  19. In search of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lex, Simon Westergaard

    2016-01-01

    as a retrospective concept that entails a “re-development” process from the final product to the initial idea. Furthermore, it (re)locates innovation “in the (organizational) box”, and discusses the prototype as an enchanting artifact that entraps and transmits an innovative sensation. The essay concludes......This essay explores innovation as a socially and culturally embedded practice, coming to life in correlation between structural organizational conventions and entrepreneurial performances. With an empirical departure, it describes a rational understanding of creation, and it identifies innovation...... that innovation, although put forward as a strategic vision of a prosperous future, rather seems to serve as an inducted fundamental, a working imperative, from which employees are to manage and negotiate their everyday work. The essay emerges from ethnographic fieldwork that is consciously organized...

  20. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    . The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance......The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation....

  1. Technology Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA produces innovative technologies and facilitates their creation in line with the Agency mission to create products such as the stormwater calculator, remote sensing, innovation clusters, and low-cost air sensors.

  2. Science Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA provides innovative research activities that help transform the protection of human health and the environment with high-risk, high-reward Pathfinder Innovation Projects, the P3 student competition, and low-cost air monitoring.

  3. Responsive Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten

    Although the importance of stakeholder networks has been recognized in recent years, a non-teleological model that incorporates their collective sensing into innovation processes has so far not been developed. Hence, this paper argues that traditional linear and sequential innovation models...... are insufficient in hypercompetitive environments. Instead, it is proposed that companies should ground their innovation processes in the collective sensing of frontline-employees and customers that operate around the organizational periphery. This frames the concept of responsive innovation, where key...

  4. Political innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    2017-01-01

    are mainly interested in assessing and promoting innovations in public service delivery, but have paid little or no attention to the need for innovations in polity, politics and policy. This article develops a research agenda for studying innovations in political institutions, in the political process...... and in policy outputs. It proposes a number of research themes related to political innovations that call for scholarly attention, and identifies push and pull factors influencing the likelihood that these themes will be addressed in future research....

  5. Brugerdreven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2007-01-01

    På et generelt plan er vores afsæt et opgør med traditionelle modeller for kreativitet og innovation. Artiklen mener, at brugerdreven innovation ikke bare en god idé, men en beskrivelse af, hvordan innovation finder sted. Vores afsæt er interaktionsdesign, hvor vi bygger på den antagelse...

  6. Facilitating innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, J.S.; Visser, A.J.; Migchels, G.

    2011-01-01

    Many innovations involve changes which transcend the individual business or are only achievable when various businesses and/or interested parties take up the challenge together. In System Innovation Programmes, the necessary innovations are facilitated by means of workshops related to specific areas

  7. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Waldorff, Susanne Boch

    2014-01-01

    and policy ideas produced in collaborative governance arenas are not diffused to the formal political institutions of representative democracy because the participating politicians only to a limited extent function as boundary spanners between the collaborative governance arena and the decision making arenas......Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...... of collaborative policy innovation in the area of mental health care in Denmark indicates that collaboration can contribute to qualify the politicians’ understanding of wicked policy problems, and to fostering new creative policy solutions. The study also shows, however, that the new problem understandings...

  8. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ in 1987, this article maps out the important themes...... strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of ‘ successful ageing’....... and discussions that have emerged from the interdisciplinary field of ageing research. These include an emphasis on interdisciplinarity; the interaction between biology, psycho-social contexts and lifestyle choices; the experiences of elderly people; life-course perspectives; optimisation and prevention...

  9. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    Never a fad, but always in or out of fashion, innovation gets rediscovered as a growth enabler every half dozen years. Too often, though, grand declarations about innovation are followed by mediocre execution that produces anemic results, and innovation groups are quietly disbanded in cost-cutting drives. Each managerial generation embarks on the same enthusiastic quest for the next new thing. And each generation faces the same vexing challenges- most of which stem from the tensions between protecting existing revenue streams critical to current success and supporting new concepts that may be crucial to future success. In this article, Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter reflects on the four major waves of innovation enthusiasm she's observed over the past 25 years. She describes the classic mistakes companies make in innovation strategy, process, structure, and skills assessment, illustrating her points with a plethora of real-world examples--including AT&T Worldnet, Timberland, and Ocean Spray. A typical strategic blunder is when managers set their hurdles too high or limit the scope of their innovation efforts. Quaker Oats, for instance, was so busy in the 1990s making minor tweaks to its product formulas that it missed larger opportunities in distribution. A common process mistake is when managers strangle innovation efforts with the same rigid planning, budgeting, and reviewing approaches they use in their existing businesses--thereby discouraging people from adapting as circumstances warrant. Companies must be careful how they structure fledgling entities alongside existing ones, Kanter says, to avoid a clash of cultures and agendas--which Arrow Electronics experienced in its attempts to create an online venture. Finally, companies commonly undervalue and underinvest in the human side of innovation--for instance, promoting individuals out of innovation teams long before their efforts can pay off. Kanter offers practical advice for avoiding

  10. The innovative behaviour of tourism firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundbo, Jon; Orfila-Sintes, Francina; Sørensen, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    systems. The article suggests that large size, professionalism, but also entrepreneurship among small tourism firms are important determinants of innovation. Varied innovation networks are another determinant as are supportive innovation systems. These determinants favour Spanish firms, which are more...... innovative than Danish ones. In the final section, policy recommendations are presented.......Tourism firms operate in a competitive sector where innovating is often a condition for survival. This article presents a theoretical framework for understanding tourist firms’ innovative behaviour and innovation systems in tourism. The innovativeness of tourism firms and its determinants...

  11. Ethical issues in surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Megan E; Siegler, Mark; Angelos, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Innovation is responsible for most advances in the field of surgery. Innovative approaches to solving clinical problems have significantly decreased morbidity and mortality for many surgical procedures, and have led to improved patient outcomes. While innovation is motivated by the surgeon's expectation that the new approach will be beneficial to patients, not all innovations are successful or result in improved patient care. The ethical dilemma of surgical innovation lies in the uncertainty of whether a particular innovation will prove to be a "good thing." This uncertainty creates challenges for surgeons, patients, and the healthcare system. By its very nature, innovation introduces a potential risk to patient safety, a risk that may not be fully known, and it simultaneously fosters an optimism bias. These factors increase the complexity of informed consent and shared decision making for the surgeon and the patient. Innovative procedures and their associated technology raise issues of cost and resource distribution in the contemporary, financially conscious, healthcare environment. Surgeons and institutions must identify and address conflicts of interest created by the development and application of an innovation, always preserving the best interest of the patient above the academic or financial rewards of success. Potential strategies to address the challenges inherent in surgical innovation include collecting and reporting objective outcomes data, enhancing the informed consent process, and adhering to the principles of disclosure and professionalism. As surgeons, we must encourage creativity and innovation while maintaining our ethical awareness and responsibility to patients.

  12. Regulatory barriers to hazardous waste technology innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusinen, T.L.; Siegel, M.R.

    1991-02-01

    The primary federal regulatory programs that influence the development of new technology for hazardous waste are the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA, also commonly known as Superfund). Two important aspects of RCRA that can create barriers to hazardous waste technology innovation are technology-based waste pre-treatment standards and a cumbersome permitting program. By choosing a technology-based approach to the RCRA land disposal restrictions program, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has simultaneously created tremendous demand for the technologies specified in its regulations, while at the same time significantly reduced incentives for technology innovation that might have otherwise existed. Also, the RCRA hazardous waste permitting process can take years and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. The natural tendency of permit writers to be cautious of unproven (i.e., innovative) technology also can create a barrier to deployment of new technologies. EPA has created several permitting innovations, however, to attempt to mitigate this latter barrier. Understanding the constraints of these permitting innovations can be important to the success of hazardous waste technology development programs. 3 refs

  13. Management and organizational innovation in Brazil: evidence from technology innovation surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paulino Teixeira Lopes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available From a broad perspective on the topic of innovation, considering not only technological innovations in products and processes but also management and organizational innovations, this study seeks to (1 discuss the main theoretical and conceptual approaches to innovation, especially management and organizational innovation; (2 understand how the subject has been studied since 1998 by the official innovation survey in Brazil (PINTEC; and (3 examine the evidence presented in three editions of the survey. The results show that innovation involves diverse phenomena and that there is a strong interrelation between technological innovation in products and processes and management and organizational innovations.

  14. Needs-Based Innovation in Interventional Radiology: The Biodesign Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jonathan D; Denend, Lyn; Azagury, Dan E; Brinton, Todd J; Makower, Josh; Yock, Paul G

    2017-06-01

    There are many possible mechanisms for innovation and bringing new technology into the marketplace. The Stanford Biodesign innovation process is based in a deep understanding of clinical unmet needs as the basis for focused ideation and development. By identifying and vetting a compelling unmet need, the aspiring innovator can "derisk" a project and maximize chances for successful development in an increasingly challenging regulatory and economic environment. As a specialty founded by tinkerers, with a history of disruptive innovation that has yielded countless new ways of delivering care with minimal invasiveness, lower morbidity, and lower cost, interventional radiologists are uniquely well positioned to identify unmet needs and develop novel solutions free of dogmatic convention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Legal and Regulatory Barriers to Reverse Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowthorn, Virginia; Plum, Alexander J; Zervos, John

    Reverse innovation, or the importation of new, affordable, and efficacious models to high-income countries from the developing world, has emerged as a way to improve the health care system in the United States. Reverse innovation has been identified as a key emerging trend in global health systems in part because low-resourced settings are particularly good laboratories for low-cost/high-impact innovations that are developed out of necessity. A difficult question receiving scant attention is that of legal and regulatory barriers. The objective of this paper is to understand and elucidate the legal barriers faced by innovators bringing health interventions to the United States. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 9 key informants who have directly participated in the introduction of global health care approaches to the United States health system. A purposive sampling scheme was employed to identify participants. Phone interviews were conducted over one week in July 2016 with each participant and lasted an average of 35 minutes each. Purely legal barriers included questions surrounding tort liability, standard of care, and concerns around patient-administered self-care. Regulatory burdens included issues of international medical licensure, reimbursement, and task shifting and scope of work challenges among nonprofessionals (e.g. community health workers). Finally, perceived (i.e. not realized or experienced) legal and regulatory barriers to innovative modalities served as disincentives to bringing products or services developed outside of the United States to the United States market. Conflicting interests within the health care system, safety concerns, and little value placed on low-cost interventions inhibit innovation. Legal and regulatory barriers rank among, and contribute to, an anti-innovation atmosphere in healthcare for domestic and reverse innovators alike. Reverse innovation should be fostered through the thoughtful development of

  16. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Chesbrough, Henry; Moedas, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Open innovation is now a widely used concept in academia, business, and policy making. This article describes the state of open innovation at the intersection of research, practice, and policy. It discusses some key trends (e.g., digital transformation), challenges (e.g., uncertainty......), and potential solutions (e.g., EU funding programs) in the context of open innovation and innovation policy. With this background, the authors introduce select papers published in this Special Section of California Management Review that were originally presented at the second annual World Open Innovation...

  17. Innovation Hub How-To

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Andreas; Brem, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Firms around the world are eager to replicate the successes of enterprises that have established innovation labs in California's Silicon Valley. An analysis of four leading US companies that have set up idea incubators in the Valley—Xerox, Apple, Google, and Cisco—point to eight factors for success...... disruptive over incremental innovation, and being patient. Regardless of where an innovation hub is established, the key to success lies in hiring creative, intrinsically motivated staff and then giving them the freedom to do what they do best....

  18. Hospital innovation portfolios: Key determinants of size and innovativeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Carsten; Zippel-Schultz, Bettina; Salomo, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health care organizations face an increasing demand for strategic change and innovation; however, there are also several barriers to innovation that impede successful implementation. Purposes: We aimed to shed light on key issues of innovation management in hospitals and provide...... and reward systems) organizational mechanisms. Methodology: To develop hypotheses, we integrated the innovation management literature into the hospital context. Detailed information about the innovation portfolio of 87 German hospitals was generated and combined with multirespondent survey data using ratings....... Reward systems did not have direct effects on the composition of innovation portfolios. However, they adjusted bottom-up employee and top-down strategic initiatives to match with the existing organization, thereby decreasing the degree of innovativeness and enforcing exploitation. Practice Implications...

  19. How Can Innovative Learning Environments Promote the Diffusion of Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Schools implementing innovative learning environments (ILEs) face many challenges, including the need to discard previously cherished practices and behaviours, adjust mindsets, and invent successful new ways of operating. Leaders can support these processes by implementing structures that: i) support ongoing, distributed, participatory innovation;…

  20. Managing innovation complexity: About the co-existence of innovation types

    OpenAIRE

    Pohlmann, Philipp Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to the changing innovation management literature by providing an overview of different innovation types and organizational complexity factors. Aiming at a better understanding of effective innovation management, innovation and complexity are related to the formulation of an innovation strategy and interaction between different innovation types is further explored. The chosen approach in this study is to review the existing literature on different inn...

  1. Cross-border innovation cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda; Makkonen, Teemu; Sørensen, Nils Karl

    2014-01-01

    of cross-border innovation cooperation. Accordingly, geographical proximity to international borders is found to have a significant, positive effect on choosing partners within EU. The multivariate probit model shows that the decision of choosing a domestic innovation partner is independent of the choice......Finding a suitable partner is paramount for the success of innovation cooperation. Thus, this paper sets out to analyse the determinants of cross-border innovation cooperation in Denmark focusing on partner selection. The aim of the article is to investigate determinants of partner selection taking...... the location of the partners into account. In particular, the discussion is tied to the notion of varying knowledge bases firms utilize in their innovation creation processes. Firm level data from the 2010 Community Innovation Survey in Denmark was used to analyse cross-border innovation cooperation patterns...

  2. CERN featured as leader in Global Innovation Index

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Rassat, KT group

    2016-01-01

    The Global Innovation Index 2016 report is a leading reference on innovation and uses CERN as an example of a highly successful regional initiative.   The Global Innovation Index 2016 (GII) report highlights CERN’s successful innovation initiatives. (Image: GII) Read more here.

  3. National Innovation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundvall, Bengt-Åke

    2007-01-01

    of the innovation system is defined and it is illustrated that it is necessary both to understand micro-behaviour in the core and understand "the wider setting" within which the core operates. Concepts used in organization theory referring to fit and misfit may be used to enrich the understanding of the performance...... of power, to institution building and to the openness of innovation systems.......The term national system of innovation has been around for more than 20 years and today it has become widely spread among policy makers as well as among scholars all over the world. This paper takes stock and looks ahead from a somewhat personal point of view. It also gives some insight into how...

  4. Ba, Japanese-Style Knowledge Creation Concept: A Building Brick of Innovation Process inside Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pribadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Survival of a firm in industry will be primarily determined by how efficient it can harness competitive advantage from innovation process. Innovation process itself has strong correlation with knowledge creation, and to understand about innovation, people must understand about knowledge creation process. By successfully harnessing knowledge, people can use those resources to create some innovation product or service that in the end will provide competitive edge into the company. Unfortunately, not much research can be sought to provide more insight on the creation of knowledge inside a company. This paper explores about interesting concept of knowledge creation in Japanese term, which is called as “ba”. Ba concept can be used to describe how tacit knowledge and casual knowledge can be harnessed into a useful knowledge which in turn will be transformed into innovation process. This paper will briefly give some introduction about ba concept and how it is related to innovation process. A brief study of one multinational company will be used to describe how concept of ba is applied in understanding the success story of innovation from knowledge creation.

  5. Understanding Product Attachment and Expected Product Lifetime by Extending Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with Product Personalization and Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Younghwa

    2013-01-01

    Identifying and understanding consumers is fundamental, especially for quickly spreading new products. In recent years, the popularity of digital gadgets has sky rocketed; however, there has also been a growing tendency of relative obsolescence--replacement of a product regardless of the demise of its perfect functioning. Therefore, a question is…

  6. MANAGERIAL ANTECEDENTS OF SUCCESSFUL IKT INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Nørup, Iben

    This study analyses to what extent differences in the management of change may have an impact on the outcome. Theoretically we combine an institutional approach emphasizing context and field level trends with a generic change management approach. Empirically we analyse the implementation of an IK...

  7. Innovation, Translation, and Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    The 9th Wound Healing and Tissue Repair and Regeneration Annual Meeting of Chinese Tissue Repair Society was hold in Wuhan, China. This meeting was focused on the innovation, translation application, and cooperation in wound care both in China and other countries. More than 400 delegates took part in this meeting and communicated successfully. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Innovative detector ideas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchti, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Excellent ideas abound in high resolution vertex detection, high resolution calorimetry, particle detection, and in operation of devices in high luminosity environments. With appropriate development of these innovations in instrumentation, we should be able to confront successfully the challenges of physics requiring high luminosity and very high energy

  9. Developing critical thinking, creativity and innovation skills of undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop, Barry L.

    2014-07-01

    A desirable goal of engineering education is to teach students how to be creative and innovative. However, the speed of technological innovation and the continual expansion of disciplinary knowledge leave little time in the curriculum for students to formally study innovation. At West Point we have developed a novel upper-division undergraduate course that develops the critical thinking, creativity and innovation of undergraduate science and engineering students. This course is structured as a deliberate interactive engagement between students and faculty that employs the Socratic method to develop an understanding of disruptive and innovative technologies and a historical context of how social, cultural, and religious factors impact the acceptance or rejection of technological innovation. The course begins by developing the background understanding of what disruptive technology is and a historical context about successes and failures of social, cultural, and religious acceptance of technological innovation. To develop this framework, students read The Innovator's Dilemma by Clayton M. Christensen, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. Kuhn, The Discoverers by Daniel J. Boorstin, and The Two Cultures by C.P. Snow. For each class meeting, students survey current scientific and technical literature and come prepared to discuss current events related to technological innovation. Each student researches potential disruptive technologies and prepares a compelling argument of why the specific technologies are disruptive so they can defend their choice and rationale. During course meetings students discuss the readings and specific technologies found during their independent research. As part of this research, each student has the opportunity to interview forward thinking technology leaders in their respective fields of interest. In this paper we will describe the course and highlight the results from teaching this course over the past five years.

  10. Informal Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Mia Rosa Koss; Hartmann, Rasmus Koss

    Informal innovation, defined as the development and putting-into-use of novel solutions by non-R&D employees without prior formal approval from or subsequent revealing to superiors, has been recurrently observed in organizational research. But even as it is increasingly recognized that R......, creating a need for further informal innovation. We discuss the generalizability of these findings and implications for research and managerial practice.......&D is not the only plausible source of innovation inside organizations, informal innovation has yet to be systematically explored or theorized. We propose a theory of informal innovation based on analyses of prior literature and mixed-method, multi-site studies of innovation at the working level of two extreme...

  11. Using the Diffusion of Innovations theory to understand the uptake of genetics in nursing practice: identifying the characteristics of genetic nurse adopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Verity; Tonkin, Emma; Lancastle, Deborah; Kirk, Maggie

    2014-04-01

    To identify the characteristics of nurses who are using genetics in practice and consider the implications of the findings for optimizing its wider uptake. Nurses are crucial in realizing the benefits from advances in genetic and genomic health care. Although many recognize genetics as an important component of disease, most feel unprepared to engage with it in practice. The Diffusion of Innovation theory provides a useful framework to describe different levels of engagement. Identifying the characteristics of nurses who have engaged with genetics (adopters) may provide insights of relevance to promoting wider adoption. A primarily quantitative approach over two phases, using online surveys conducted during 2011. In phase 1, consensus (>75%) was sought from experts in genetics and nursing on four potential Indicators of Genetic Adoption could identify nurses who have adopted genetics. In phase 2, oncology and primary care nurses were surveyed to identify the characteristics and demographic indicators of genetic nurse adopters. A consensus was achieved to include all Indicators of Genetic Adoption (phase 1). In phase 2, 27·3% of respondents (n = 24/88) were categorized as being adopters. Eighteen characteristics were determined to be statistically significant (Mann-Whitney) in defining an adopter and included being open to experience and being more knowledgeable of and confident in using genetics. Nurses can be categorized in terms of their engagement with genetics through several distinguishing characteristics. Further research is needed to test the generalizability of the findings to a larger sample and other areas of nursing practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Assessing Risk of Innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allgood, GO

    2001-01-01

    Today's manufacturing systems and equipment must perform at levels thought impossible a decade ago. Companies must push operations, quality, and efficiencies to unprecedented levels while holding down costs. In this new economy, companies must be concerned with market shares, equity growth, market saturation, and profit. U.S. manufacturing is no exception and is a prime example of businesses forced to adapt to constant and rapid changes in customer needs and product mixes, giving rise to the term ''Agile Manufacturing''. The survival and ultimate success of the American Manufacturing economy may depend upon its ability to create, innovate, and quickly assess the impact that new innovations will have on its business practices. Given the need for flexibility, companies need proven methods to predict and measure the impact that new technologies and strategies will have on overall plant performance from an enterprise perspective. The Value-Derivative Model provides a methodology and approach to assess such impacts in terms of energy savings, production increases, quality impacts, emission reduction, and maintenance and operating costs as they relate to enabling and emerging technologies. This is realized by calculating a set of first order sensitivity parameters obtained from expanding a Taylor Series about the system's operating point. These sensitivity parameters are invariant economic and operational indicators that quantify the impact of any proposed technology in terms of material throughput, efficiency, energy usage, environmental effects, and costs. These parameters also provide a mechanism to define metrics and performance measures that can be qualified in terms of real economic impact. Value-Derivative Analysis can be applied across all manufacturing and production segments of our economy and has found specific use in steel and textiles. Where economic models give the cost of conducting a business, Value-Derivative Analysis provides the cost to conduct

  13. Innovation @ NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  14. Responsive Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten

    Although the importance of stakeholder networks has been recognized in recent years, a non-teleological model that incorporates their collective sensing into innovation processes has so far not been developed. Hence, this paper argues that traditional linear and sequential innovation models are i...... stakeholders engaged in the organization’s ongoing business activities collectively identify issues that central managers subsequently can resolve.......Although the importance of stakeholder networks has been recognized in recent years, a non-teleological model that incorporates their collective sensing into innovation processes has so far not been developed. Hence, this paper argues that traditional linear and sequential innovation models...

  15. Seeking Innovation: Librarians Help Push Organizations Ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudner, Ed

    2002-01-01

    Defines and discusses innovation in organizations and considers roles that information professionals can play in encouraging and supporting innovation in their organizations. Highlights include understanding future possibilities; contributing to strategy development; distilling information to create added value; developing partnerships; organizing…

  16. Constructing China’s wind energy innovation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klagge, Britta; Liu Zhigao; Campos Silva, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise of China as the largest wind energy market worldwide with several global leaders in turbine manufacturing received much attention from both scholarly and policy-analytical work. However, little attention has been given to the innovation activities of the Chinese wind industry. In our paper, we aim to address this gap, based on second-hand sources and over 50 personal interviews with wind energy-related experts. We argue that China’s wind industry has made great progress in terms of manufacturing and installing, but is confronted with various challenges and problems regarding the development of its indigenous innovation capabilities. Using innovation systems approaches as an analytical tool and focusing on institutions, actors, technology and their interaction in supporting innovation activities, we decompose the elements of China’s wind energy innovation system and their role in developing the domestic wind industry. Against this backdrop we identify and discuss challenges and obstacles in the development of an innovation-driven wind industry in China. The paper strongly argues that more attention should be paid to improve the coordination and cooperation among the various actors of the wind energy innovation system, to the build-up of a market-oriented education and training system as well as to intellectual property protection. - Highlights: ► Innovation systems concepts as analytical tool to understand wind energy in China. ► Focus on institutions, actor constellations and technology development in China. ► Analysis of success in manufacturing and the rapid rise of China’s wind industry. ► Identification of challenges and problems regarding innovation activities. ► Recommendation to (better) integrate innovation policy and wind industry policy.

  17. Innovation in Family Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filser, Matthias; Brem, Alexander; Gast, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    , organizational culture and behaviour, resources, and innovation and strategy. Second, based on a thorough literature review the major research avenues are reflected. The comparison of the results of both analyses showed the following areas for future research on family firm innovation: members‘ individual human......Over the past decade, research on innovation in family firms has received growing attention by scholars and practitioners around the globe with a wide range of aspects explored within the current body of literature. Despite the constantly growing number of scientific publications, research lacks...... a comprehensive and critical review of past and present research achievements. First, conducting a bibliometric analysis with a focus on innovation in family firms, we identify five topical clusters that help to understand the foundations of recent findings: namely ownership and governance, structural settings...

  18. Neighbourhood System of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo; Kraemer-Mbula, Erika

    2010-01-01

    The innovation systems literature has provided a useful framework to analyse the linkages of firms and other organisations with both domestic and foreign actors. Although the concept of innovation systems was originally developed at the national level (Freeman, 1982; Nelson & Winter, 1982; Lundvall......, 1985; Nelson, 1988, etc), the literature has expanded rapidly over the years. Since its origins innovation systems have been defined at different levels. National, regional, local, sectoral and technological systems of innovation now constituted alternative units of analysis to better understand...... the processes of creation, diffusion and use of knowledge. These different views, rather than conflicting, tend to complement each other and depend on the attributed boundaries to the system subject of analysis....

  19. Revelation and Innovation of Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghaug, Kristin Margrethe

    show that many of the business owners in this study try to balance between their personal values and economic values. A further investigation into this results in a model of innovation of value from a theological perspective in respect to business model innovation. It is the very understanding......Kristin F. Saghaug’s Phd thesis investigates the interaction of revelatory theology, artistic creativity and small business owners in a business model innovation context. This project challenges mainstream business management’s concept of value and adds to the understanding of the innovation...... process through a pioneering conversation across different specialized domains. How can philosophical theology, namely, Paul Tillich’s theory of revelation, contribute to productive reflection on the innovation of value among small business owners in a business model innovation context? Empirical findings...

  20. Innovating for ‘active ageing’ in a public–private innovation partnership: Creating doable problems and alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul; Bønnelycke, Julie; Otto, Lene

    2015-01-01

    By focusing on different constructions of the elderly and how these definitions are aligned within a Danish public–private innovation partnership called No Age, the article examines how various understandings of ‘the elderly’, ‘active ageing’ and ‘health’ clash and entangle in innovation work...... the products are designed to address. Furthermore, we argue that the specific constellation and alignment of actors in such a partnership define how and what kinds of users are constituted, as the target groups and success criteria for the development of welfare technologies are shaped throughout...

  1. Combining the technological innovation systems framework with the entrepreneurs’ perspective on innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planko, Julia; Cramer, Jacqueline; Hekkert, Marko P.; Chappin, Maryse M H

    2017-01-01

    For their technological sustainability innovations to become successful, entrepreneurs can strategically shape the technological field in which they are involved. The technological innovation systems (TISs) literature has generated valuable insights into the processes which need to be stimulated for

  2. Understanding regime shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heymann, Matthias; Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    ”. Danish wind power development is all the more surprising, as the innovation process in wind technology was carried to a large extent by non-academic craftsmen and political activists. Many features of this innovation story have been investigated and that research makes it possible to summarize...... the current understanding of the regime shift....

  3. New ways of organizing innovation work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grex, Sara; Møller, Niels

    2006-01-01

    There is an intensified focus in innovation and companies ability to create innovation. In many companies these activities are organized by projects, but studies show this innovation is stifled in this structure. In this paper we argue that there is a need for developing alternative ways...... of organizing innovative activities in project-based settings. We propose the Contextual Design method as a way of both studying innovation work processes and an approach to redesign the innovation work organization. We find that the method can contribute to a better understanding of the innovation work...

  4. Toward systematic reviews to understand the determinants of wait time management success to help decision-makers and managers better manage wait times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Sanmartin, Claudia; Decoster, Carolyn; Clavel, Nathalie; Warren, Elaine; Drew, Madeleine; Noseworthy, Tom

    2013-06-06

    Long waits for core specialized services have consistently been identified as a key barrier to access. Governments and organizations at all levels have responded with strategies for better wait list management. While these initiatives are promising, insufficient attention has been paid to factors influencing the implementation and sustainability of wait time management strategies (WTMS) implemented at the organizational level. A systematic review was conducted using the main electronic databases, such as CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, to identify articles published between 1990 and 2011 on WTMS for scheduled care implemented at the organizational level or higher and on frameworks for analyzing factors influencing their success. Data was extracted on governance, culture, resources, and tools. We organized a workshop with Canadian healthcare policy-makers and managers to compare our initial findings with their experience. Our systematic review included 47 articles: 36 related to implementation and 11 to sustainability. From these, we identified a variety of WTMS initiated at the organizational level or higher, and within these, certain factors that were specific to either implementation or sustainability and others common to both. The main common factors influencing success at the contextual level were stakeholder engagement and strong funding, and at the organizational level, physician involvement, human resources capacity, and information management systems. Specific factors for successful implementation at the contextual level were consultation with front-line actors and common standards and guidelines, and at the organizational level, financial incentives and dedicated staffing. For sustainability, we found no new factors. The workshop participants identified the same major factors as found in the articles and added others, such as information sharing between physicians and managers. Factors related to implementation were studied

  5. The Various Shapes of Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roubou I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Innovation is one of the most difficult words to define, especially when it comes to health technology. The aim of this article is to get a better understanding of the multi-dimensional facet of innovation, how this is valued by different stakeholders and the way forward in order to create innovative interventions for the sake of the patients and the society.

  6. Incumbent response to disruptive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulio, Matti; Thorén, Kent; Rohrbeck, René

    changes, however successful in minor business model adaptions. An implication hereof is that the business model concept as such has low predictive power in explaining success and failure and is in the need of an operationalization. In addition, the article discusses the relationship between technological...... in relation to disruptive change. In relation to technical change the case company has successfully in transferred its technology from one generation to the next during more than 20 years. In relation to business model change the case company has been proactive but not successful in major business model...... innovation and business innovation....

  7. Firm’s Innovation Expectation, Potential and Actions: Impressions on the Japanese Videogame Console Market

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Antônio Zawislak; Fabiano Larentis; Cassio B. Machado; Alexandre M. Andrade

    2009-01-01

    From the major assumptions proposed by the Theory of the Firm, it is possible to understand the firm as the primary site for innovation. Innovation efforts are justified by the vital need of any firm to generate enough solutions to be validated in the market. All along the market validation process, one can identify the life cycle of the innovation, easily represented by an “S-curve”. Whether due to the new solution’s success in terms of sales, market share or technological improvements, ther...

  8. A Systematic Review of Mass Media Campaigns for Suicide Prevention: Understanding Their Efficacy and the Mechanisms Needed for Successful Behavioral and Literacy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Michelle; Calear, Alison; Shand, Fiona; Christensen, Helen

    2017-12-01

    Mass media campaigns are increasingly seen as an important part of suicide prevention; however, despite their popularity, their efficacy is not well understood. The current review aimed to address key knowledge gaps regarding how mass media campaigns can be optimized to prevent suicide, by looking at their global efficacy, and mechanisms related to successful outcomes. A systematic review of the international literature examined studies which evaluated mass media campaigns targeted at suicide prevention, where suicide behaviors (mortality, attempts) or suicide literacy (knowledge, attitudes, help-seeking) was identified as a primary outcome. Thirteen articles describing 12 unique campaigns met eligibility criteria. For behavioral outcomes, mass media campaigns appear to be most effective when delivered as part of a multicomponent suicide prevention strategy, while "standalone campaigns" were modestly useful for increasing suicide literacy. Level of exposure, repeat exposure, and community engagement appeared to be fundamental to the success of these campaigns; however, these constructs were poorly adhered to in the development and implementation of campaigns. Overall, the mixed quality of the included studies highlights a need for increased quantity, consistency, and quality of evaluations to advance the evidence base. © 2016 The American Association of Suicidology.

  9. Design & Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelskifte, Per; Jørgensen, Ulrik

    2005-01-01

    The new design and innovation programme at DTU is challenging some of the standard concepts dominating most engineering educations. The programme, its background, context and basic educational ideas are presented and discussed in this paper. To build competences that match the need for innovative...

  10. Sensitive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret

    Present paper discusses sources of innovation as heterogenic and at times intangible processes. Arguing for heterogeneity and intangibility as sources of innovation originates from a theoretical reading in STS and ANT studies (e.g. Callon 1986, Latour 1996, Mol 2002, Pols 2005) and from field work...

  11. Entrepreneurial Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigotti, L.; Ryan, M.; Vaithianathan, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper constructs an equilibrium model of entrepreneurial innovation where individuals differ in their attitude toward uncertainty.Unlike previous models of innovation, the firm-formation process is endogenous.An entrepreneur, who owns residual profits, utilizes an uncertain technology and hires

  12. The innovator's DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Jeffrey H; Gregersen, Hal B; Christensen, Clayton M

    2009-12-01

    "How do I find innovative people for my organization? And how can I become more innovative myself?" These are questions that stump most senior executives, who know that the ability to innovate is the "secret sauce" of business success. Perhaps for this reason most of us stand in awe of the work of visionary entrepreneurs such as Apple's Steve Jobs, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, eBay's Pierre Omidyar, and P&G's A.G. Lafley. How do these individuals come up with groundbreaking new ideas? In this article, Dyer, of Brigham Young University; Gregersen, of Insead; and Christensen, of Harvard Business School, reveal how innovative entrepreneurs differ from typical executives. Their study demonstrates that five "discovery skills" distinguish the most creative executives: Associating helps them discover new directions by making connections among seemingly unrelated questions, problems, or ideas. Questioning allows innovators to break out of the status quo and consider new ideas. Through observing, innovators carefully and consistently look out for small behavioral details--in the activities of customers, suppliers, and other companies -to gain insights about new ways of doing things. In experimenting, they relentlessly try on new experiences and explore the world. And through networking with diverse individuals from an array of backgrounds, they gain radically different perspectives.

  13. The Brazilian sugarcane innovation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi Furtado, Andre; Gaya Scandiffio, Mirna Ivonne; Barbosa Cortez, Luis Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol has recently been of great interest worldwide because it is a viable economic alternative to petroleum products and it is a renewable source of energy that mitigates the emission of greenhouse gases. Brazilian bioethanol from sugarcane is the most successful case at the world level because of its low cost and low level of greenhouse gas emissions. Brazil's success with sugarcane cannot be understood as based solely on a natural comparative advantage, but as a result of efforts that culminated in a positive trajectory of technological learning, relying mostly on incremental innovations. The purpose of this article is to analyze the key aspects of the innovation system built around the Brazilian sugarcane industry. It is based on the national innovation systems approach according to which innovation results from the interaction of different institutional actors. Institutional arrangements are analyzed as the basis for the innovative process, in particular R and D and the innovation policies and strategies of the main players in the sugarcane sector, including sugar and ethanol mills, industrial goods suppliers, public and private research institutions, and governmental agencies. - Research Highlights: → The Brazilian success in bioethanol is due to the sugarcane innovation system. → Private funds for R and D became central after IAA closure. → Nowadays Brazilian innovation system is transforming to keep its leadership. → Public funds for research in the second generation bioethanol.

  14. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. Theories within SNM look upon innovation in a sector as a socio-technical phenomenon and identifies three levels of socio......-technical interaction within which sectorial innovation can be explained. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built in the existing ways of working and developing over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the sociotechnical landscape through...... trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being...

  15. Responsible innovation

    CERN Document Server

    De Woot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Economic development is rooted in disruption, not in equilibrium. And a powerful engine of economic development is innovation; but is this innovation always for the common good? The dark side of the extraordinary dynamism of innovation lies precisely in its destructive power. If simply left to market forces, it could lead to social chaos and great human suffering. To face the challenges of our time, we must create the proper climate and culture to develop strong entrepreneurial drive. But, more than ever, we must give this entrepreneurial drive its ethical and societal dimensions. Responsible innovation means a more voluntary orientation towards the great problems of the 21st century, e.g. depletion of the planet's resources, rising inequality, and new scientific developments potentially threatening freedom, democracy and human integrity. We need to transform our ceaseless creativity into real progress for humankind. In this respect, the rapid development of social innovation opens the door for new methods an...

  16. The Pharmakon of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Christian Garmann

    While popular management handbooks tends to promise concrete lessons, prescriptions and advice for how to make an successful organization, this paper argues that there can resides considerable ambiguity and obscurity in the writings of management gurus. In the discourse on management innovation...... ‘poison’ and ‘remedy’, we will engage with the management guru Gary Hamel’s book The Future of Management. Although Hamel attempts to establish a clear-cut distinction between principles of management that obstructs and those managerial principles that facilitate innovation, it is ultimately indeterminate...

  17. Subsidizing Media Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Aske; Hobel, Emil

    When the Danish Parliament revised the media-subsidy framework in 2013/2014, one of the new initiatives was the introduction of a pool of funding earmarked to establishing and developing new news media – the so-called “innovation fund”. So, as the news industry struggles to keep journalism a viab...... subsidized, (2) what characterizes the successful applicants’ approaches to innovation, and (3) which patterns exist in this connection, and it measures each of these three dimensions against the welfare framework that the national context provides....

  18. Civil Sciety Organisations and peacebuilding in Northern Ghana. Understanding the factors that have facilitated the successful entry of Civil Society Organizations in conflict zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Awonnatey Ateng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Civil Society Organizations (CSOs in the Northern Region of Ghana have played significant roles in peacebuilding processes, resulting in the peaceful settlement of disputes. This paper examined the factors that have facilitated the successful entry of CSOs in peacebuilding processes in northern Ghana. Employing qualitative and quantitative research approaches, the study revealed that, the neutrality and impartiality of CSOs have made conflicting parties to trust their work. Again, the capacity of CSOs, method of delivery and visibility has made their work more acceptable by all. Finally, the idea of coordination and networking has shaped the concept of peacebuilding and the avoidance of the duplication of efforts. This research concludes that CSOs are more recognized, respected and preferred by communities experiencing conflicts, than state institutions.

  19. Incumbent Participation in Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    and performance of the SME partners. Findings support the hypothesis that open innovation engagement with incumbents has a negative impact on future survival and performance, moderated by radicalness and technological maturity. This elaborates on open innovation by increased understanding of drawbacks...

  20. Cross-border innovation cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda; Makkonen, Teemu; Sørensen, Nils Karl

    2017-01-01

    of innovativeness increase the likelihood of cross-border innovation cooperation. Accordingly, geographical proximity to international borders is found to have a significant, positive effect on selecting partners within the European Union. The multivariate probit model shows that the decision of choosing a domestic......Finding a suitable partner is paramount for the success of innovation cooperation. Thus, this paper sets out to analyse the determinants of cross-border innovation cooperation in Denmark by focusing on partner selection. The aim of the article is to investigate determinants of partner selection...... cooperation patterns of Danish firms focusing on their choices of foreign innovation partners. The results indicate that firm size and research and development (R&D) intensity have a positive effect on firm’s propensity to cooperate on innovation and that having R&D activities abroad as well as high level...

  1. Opening up the Agile Innovation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, Kieran; Donnellan, Brian; Morgan, Lorraine; Wang, Xiaofeng

    The objective of this panel is to discuss how firms can operate both an open and agile innovation process. In an era of unprecedented changes, companies need to be open and agile in order to adapt rapidly and maximize their innovation processes. Proponents of agile methods claim that one of the main distinctions between agile methods and their traditional bureaucratic counterparts is their drive toward creativity and innovation. However, agile methods are rarely adopted in their textbook, "vanilla" format, and are usually adopted in part or are tailored or modified to suit the organization. While we are aware that this happens, there is still limited understanding of what is actually happening in practice. Using innovation adoption theory, this panel will discuss the issues and challenges surrounding the successful adoption of agile practices. In addition, this panel will report on the obstacles and benefits reported by over 20 industrial partners engaged in a pan-European research project into agile practices between 2006 and 2009.

  2. Innovation system foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Andersen, Allan; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2014-01-01

    an improved integration of the contemporary understanding of innovation into foresight. Furthermore, the article explores four preliminary implications of ISF on the conceptual design of foresight, including the goal of foresight, system definition and boundary setting, participation of actors, and finally...

  3. Understanding Responsible Innovation in Small Producers’ Clusters in  Vietnam through Actor Network Theory (ANT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voeten, J.; de Haan, J.A.C.; Roome, N.; de Groot, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that innovation offers perspectives for poverty alleviation in small producers’ contexts in developing countries. However, innovations sometimes imply additional harmful environmental and social consequences, which are not in line with broader poverty alleviation and

  4. A Conjecture on Institutional Rationalities and Property Rights in Public Procurement of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Robert; Rolfstam, Max

    2013-01-01

    The increased interest in using public procurement as a policy tool for innovation has renewed a need for understanding the procurement process. A conjecture on institutional rationalities and property rights is offered to explain the hurdles present for conducting successful procurement projects...

  5. Innovation and dynamic capabilities of the firm: Defining an assessment model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cherubini Alves

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Innovation and dynamic capabilities have gained considerable attention in both academia and practice. While one of the oldest inquiries in economic and strategy literature involves understanding the features that drive business success and a firm’s perpetuity, the literature still lacks a comprehensive model of innovation and dynamic capabilities. This study presents a model that assesses firms’ innovation and dynamic capabilities perspectives based on four essential capabilities: development, operations, management, and transaction capabilities. Data from a survey of 1,107 Brazilian manufacturing firms were used for empirical testing and discussion of the dynamic capabilities framework. Regression and factor analyses validated the model; we discuss the results, contrasting with the dynamic capabilities’ framework. Operations Capability is the least dynamic of all capabilities, with the least influence on innovation. This reinforces the notion that operations capabilities as “ordinary capabilities,” whereas management, development, and transaction capabilities better explain firms’ dynamics and innovation.

  6. Design & Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelskifte, Per; Jørgensen, Ulrik

    2005-01-01

    The new design and innovation programme at DTU is challenging some of the standard concepts dominating most engineering educations. The programme, its background, context and basic educational ideas are presented and discussed in this paper. To build competences that match the need for innovative...... and design oriented engineers in industry and society has turned out to challenge a number of the standard – and often taken for granted – concepts in engineering education still dominated world wide by rather strict norms and concepts of learning that do not challenge the students creativity and innovative...

  7. Basic Market Factors Affecting Innovative Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Sergeevich Morozov; Natalia Nikolaevna Taskaeva

    2016-01-01

    This article contains the results of the authors' complete research on basic market factors affecting innovative activities. Innovations are perceived to ensure competitiveness of goods produced by enterprises and of sustainable success of companies or corporations in the market on the whole. All market factors affecting innovative activities are ranked by the authors to internal and external. The authors emphasized the importance of innovation factors for the development of small and medium-...

  8. Developing hospitality innovation through Supply Chain Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Darren

    2009-01-01

    As economic clouds darken and the pressure on hospitality providers to cut costs and maintain competitiveness grows, the requirement for innovation and product development in the tourism sector continues to be of critical importance. The important question for the next decade is not whether hospitality organisations should innovate but rather how can they develop their innovative capability and what steps should they be taking to improve the likelihood of success in their innovation activitie...

  9. Educational Attainment: Success to the Successful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Peter; Gould, David; Smith, Gina

    2013-01-01

    Systems archetypes are patterns of structure found in systems that are helpful in understanding some of the dynamics within them. The intent of this study was to examine educational attainment data using the success-to-the-successful archetype as a model to see if it helps to explain the inequality observed in the data. Data covering 1990 to 2009…

  10. Panacea or diagnosis? Imaginaries of innovation and the 'MIT model' in three political cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian; Jasanoff, Sheila

    2017-12-01

    Innovation studies continue to struggle with an apparent disconnect between innovation's supposedly universal dynamics and a sense that policy frameworks and associated instruments of innovation are often ineffectual or even harmful when transported across regions or countries. Using a cross-country comparative analysis of three implementations of the 'MIT model' of innovation in the UK, Portugal and Singapore, we show how key features in the design, implementation and performance of the model cannot be explained as mere variations on an identical solution to the same underlying problem. We draw on the concept of sociotechnical imaginaries to show how implementations of the 'same' innovation model - and with it the notion of 'innovation' itself - are co-produced with locally specific diagnoses of a societal deficiency and equally specific understandings of acceptable remedies. Our analysis thus flips the conventional notion of 'best-practice transfer' on its head: Instead of asking 'how well' an innovation model has been implemented, we analyze the differences among the three importations to reveal the idiosyncratic ways in which each country imagines the purpose of innovation. We replace the notion of innovation as a 'panacea' - a universal fix for all social woes - with that of innovation-as-diagnosis in which a particular 'cure' is 'prescribed' for a 'diagnosed' societal 'pathology,' which may in turn trigger 'reactions' within the receiving body. This approach offers new possibilities for theorizing how and where culture matters in innovation policy. It suggests that the 'successes' and 'failures' of innovation models are not a matter of how well societies are able to implement a sound, universal model, but more about how effectively they articulate their imaginaries of innovation and tailor their strategies accordingly.

  11. Understanding the barriers to successful adoption and use of a mobile health information system in a community health center in São Paulo, Brazil: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Jayant V; Moura, Juliana; Gourley, Gato; Kiso, Karina; Sizilio, Alexandre; Cortez, Ana Maria; Riley, Lee W; Veras, Maria Amelia; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2016-11-17

    entry errors our testing revealed. Our results highlight the fact that without a deep understanding of local process to optimize usability, technology-based solutions in health may fail. Developing such an understanding must be a central component in the design of any mHealth solution in global health.

  12. Implications of Reverse Innovation for Socio-Economic Sustainability: A Case Study of Philips China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Shan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The idea of reverse innovation, local innovation happening in emerging markets for the global market, has gained much academic and managerial attention in recent years. The purpose of this study is to understand how reverse innovation has successfully diffused into the product and market development strategies at Philips Inc., a prominent multinational company (MNC of the modern era. Furthermore, the study presents the success achieved by these innovations at both the domestic and global levels, along with their implications regarding socio-economic sustainability in emerging markets. In order to investigate the research questions, a case study of Philips China was conducted involving three product innovations that were found to be suitable examples of reverse innovation. After the study of extant literature on the topic, drawing from research databases, newspaper articles, and company press releases, five semi-structuredinterviews were conducted with key managers and a market practitioner to gain sufficient understanding for this exploratory study. Subsequent case analysis concludes that these innovations are examples of reverse innovation representing a new paradigm change in innovation flow. This flow of innovation from emerging markets to developed markets as confirmed by Corsi’s framework could potentially disrupt developed markets as well as contribute to ensure healthy living conditions for the population living in developing countries. If so, this represents a sustainable socio-economic change in-line with the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goal (SDG of “ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages.” This is relevant as Philips aspires to be a prominent private sector player in achieving the above-stated goal by defeating non-communicable disease and strengthening local healthcare systems.

  13. Innovation Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA promotes environmental stewardship by recognizing innovators in schools, communities and businesses in categories such as environmental education, green chemistry, smart growth, green power, and reducing air pollution and climate change impacts.

  14. Reconsidering Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Nana Katrine

    Innovation and reforms seem to be on the agenda everywhere, not least in political attempts to reorganize the public sector in ways that are supposed to enable our welfare societies to survive economic turmoil and sinister future prognosis. This paper examines how classical anthropological theories...... and debates about change, myths, and othering can help us rethink theoretical approaches to innovation in organizational studies, and the concern is especially to consider the implications that our “innovation myths” can have for public employees and the valuation their work. The argument in the paper...... is that innovation is better understood as a perspective (a prism) than as a product or a process, and that this perspective tends to “other” people who’s work is not visible as a positive asset in a budget, but may be visible as a positive contribution in people’s lives. The way in which that point is made...

  15. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  16. Participatory Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Matthews, Ben

    In this paper we discuss the potential for Participatory Design (PD) to make a fundamental contribution to the business-oriented field of user-driven innovation, taking note of where we find PD can best benefit from interaction with this other field. We examine some of the challenges that must be...... be addressed if PD is to contribute to innovation processes in companies. We conclude by presenting a research agenda comprising of six promising topics to shape a new discipline of Participatory Innovation.......In this paper we discuss the potential for Participatory Design (PD) to make a fundamental contribution to the business-oriented field of user-driven innovation, taking note of where we find PD can best benefit from interaction with this other field. We examine some of the challenges that must...

  17. Innovation networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrweiler, Petra; Keane, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper advances a framework for modeling the component interactions between cognitive and social aspects of scientific creativity and technological innovation. Specifically, it aims to characterize Innovation Networks; those networks that involve the interplay of people, ideas and organizations to create new, technologically feasible, commercially-realizable products, processes and organizational structures. The tri-partite framework captures networks of ideas (Concept Level), people (Ind...

  18. Leadership Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    leadership " and " leadership in innovation." 3 THEORY , AS AN INSTRUMENT OF ANALYSIS FOR INNOVATION IN LEADERSHIP There are many...attributes of a leader.𔃺 Attempts to define leadership usually contrast it with "followship", management ," or sometimes - with ’beadship."’" These...plausible theory . - . . . -. - -- Nevertheless, some authors consider, and I agree, that there is no true leadership theory because existing

  19. Innovation in a complex environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Pellissier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As our world becomes more global and competitive yet less predictable, the focus seems to be increasingly on looking to innovation activities to remain competitive. Although there is little doubt that a nation’s competitiveness is embedded in its innovativeness, the complex environment should not be ignored. Complexity is not accounted for in balance sheets or reported in reports; it becomes entrenched in every activity in the organisation. Innovation takes many forms and comes in different shapes.Objectives: The study objectives were, firstly, to establish the determinants for complexity and how these can be addressed from a design point of view in order to ensure innovation success and, secondly, to determine how this changes innovation forms and applications.Method: Two approaches were offered to deal with a complex environment – one allowing for complexity for organisational innovation and the other introducing reductionism to minimise complexity. These approaches were examined in a qualitative study involving case studies, open-ended interviews and content analysis between seven developing economy (South African organisations and seven developed economy (US organisations.Results: This study presented a proposed framework for (organisational innovation in a complex environment versus a framework that minimises complexity. The comparative organisational analysis demonstrated the importance of initiating organisational innovation to address internal and external complexity, with the focus being on the leadership actions, their selected operating models and resultant organisational innovations designs, rather than on technological innovations.Conclusion: This study cautioned the preference for technological innovation within organisations and suggested alternative innovation forms (such as organisational and management innovation be used to remain competitive in a complex environment. 

  20. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    the research questions which are studied in the thesis.      Chapter 2 reviews relevant literature on systems of innovation, human capital, and skill-biased technological and organisational change. It is stated in the chapter that this thesis primarily refers to a system of innovation approach as its......Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources...... stemming from human resources - such as insight, understanding, creativity, and action - are inherently important to all innovation processes. The chapter also suggests a tentative conceptual and analytical framework for studying human resources and their development within a system of innovation approach...

  1. The Use of Balanced Scorecard in Implementation of the User-Driven Innovation Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena KRAWCZYK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Customers play a crucial role in innovation processes. Their importance is proved by numerous theories and innovation models which put users and clients in the heart of innovation processes. One of the newest concept, popular in Scandinavian countries, picking up this thread is the User–Driven Innovation (UDI. To increase probability of innovation success consumers must be involved in the firm’s business model / innovation strategy, becoming a part of the innovation processes and all other stakeholders should be aware of the significance and character of the linkage between customer and company. As a result, building, implementing and monitoring of the customer–oriented innovation strategy should take place. The Balanced Scorecard (BSC may turn out to be very helpful in achieving the above. The aim of this paper is to show that BSC may be a device of implementing the User–Driven Innovation concept, helping to understand UDI assumptions and the role of customers in creating value. Examples of strategic goals and performance indicators presented in this paper may be used by enterprises, which intend to build UDI-based BSC.

  2. Innovation as Social Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sproedt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    relational view on knowledge and knowing (Cook and Brown 1999; Carlile, 2004). I argue, that we do not understand, and consequently cannot support the complex social process of innovating with others across boundaries, if we only apply a hierarchical, divisional, system approach to knowledge. In order...... to meaningfully transform knowledge across boundaries we cannot separate it from knowing and context. We need to adopt a multi-level relational-practice view of knowledge and knowing, embracing the complex dynamic interplay between knowledge and knowing on different levels of the social: relating individuals......, group relations and organizational rules. What would a coherent conceptual framework for innovation practice look like?...

  3. Relationship between innovation capability, innovation type, and firm performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Jayani Rajapathirana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Insurers are well versed in the litany of challenging conditions facing the sector. These challenges are economic, political, regulatory, legal, social, and technological. As a result of those pressures, the industry is experiencing increasing competition, muted growth, and an excess of capital. The increased connectivity among household and workplace devices, the development of autonomous vehicle and the rising threat of cyber attacks are transforming the way people live and risk they need to mitigate with insurance products. Insurers need to adopt their business models address the changes which can be threatening to the growth of the industry (Deloitte, 2017. Innovation is widely regarded as pinnacle success factor in highly competitive and global economy. An innovation perspective draws a clear picture of future opportunities that lie ahead. The main purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship among innovations capability, innovation type and on the different aspect of firm performance including innovation, market and financial performance based on an empirical study covering insurance industry in Sri Lanka. The research framework developed in this study was tested 379 senior managers of insurance companies. The empirical verification of assumption of this model has given evidence to confirm the relationship between innovation capabilities; innovation efforts and firm performance are significant and strong. The results of this study could lead effective management of innovation capability which helps to deliver more effective innovations outcomes to generate better performance and it would be benefits for management of the insurance companies.

  4. Development models and technological innovation. A conservative revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Gras

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In Argentina, innovations related to biotechnologies were rapidly adopted while initially there was an absence of a large social debate. To understand this absence, the institutional framework which legitimized technological innovations must be addressed. This framework was undoubtedly one of the conditions of success of the dissemination of the agribusiness model. It´s unfolding also evidences the restructuring of local rural dominant classes that led to the emergency of new social actors. These were the “innovators” gathered in the Argentine Association of No-Tilling Farmers (or AAPRESID.  Here, we analyze how innovations were introduced and legitimated in Argentina. In contrast to what AAPRESID has termed as a “paradigmatic revolution”, we will characterize the introduction of biotechnologies in Argentine agriculture as a “conservative revolution”.

  5. MANAGING HIGH-END, HIGH-VOLUME INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gembong Baskoro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuses the concept of managing high-end, high-volume innovative products. High-end, high-volume consumer products are products that have considerable influence to the way of life. Characteristic of High-end, high-volume consumer products are (1 short cycle time, (2 quick obsolete time, and (3 rapid price erosion. Beside the disadvantages that they are high risk for manufacturers, if manufacturers are able to understand precisely the consumer needs then they have the potential benefit or success to be the market leader. High innovation implies to high utilization of the user, therefore these products can influence indirectly to the way of people life. The objective of managing them is to achieve sustainability of the products development and innovation. This paper observes the behavior of these products in companies operated in high-end, high-volume consumer product.

  6. Nurse leaders and the innovation competence gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kenneth R; Pillay, Rubin; Huang, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are well-positioned for innovation in health care delivery, although innovation is not generally learned in formal educational programs. The purpose of this study was to assess critical competencies for innovation success among nurse leaders in academia and practice, the perceived gaps on those competencies, and teaching methods that would be helpful in developing competencies related to innovation. A Web-enabled descriptive survey design was used to capture nurse leaders' perceptions of important innovation competencies and how they assess their level of competence in the particular innovation domain. Preferred approaches for innovation pedagogy were also queried. Respondents indicated significant gaps in 18 of 19 innovation competencies. Implications are for inclusion of innovation competencies in formal and continuing nursing education. The most preferred innovation pedagogical approaches are case studies of failures and successes and project- and field-based approaches. Traditional lectures are the least preferred way to address innovation competency gaps. There is a significant gap in innovation competencies among nurse leaders in practice and academia. The way we teach innovation needs to involve closer collaboration between academia and practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Dynamics of Digital Platform Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Curated platforms provide an architectural basis for third parties to develop platform complements and for platform owners to control their implementation as a form of open innovation. The refusal to implement complements as innovations can cause tension between platform owners and developers. Th...... digital platforms. In doing so, it uses IS notions of digitalization to challenge traditional understandings of innovation in platform architectures....

  8. Spatial and Social Networks in Organizational Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineman, Jean D.; Kabo, Felichism W.; Davis, Gerald F.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the enabling factors of innovation has focused on either the social component of organizations or on the spatial dimensions involved in the innovation process. But no one has examined the aggregate consequences of the link from spatial layout, to social networks, to innovation. This project enriches our understanding of how innovation…

  9. A Survey of the Innovation Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Shangqin; Oxley, Les; McCann, Philip

    Both theoretical and conceptual understanding of innovation has developed significantly since the early 1980s. More noticeable, however, are the major changes that have been experienced in empirically-oriented innovation research as a result of the introduction of firm level innovation surveys.

  10. Designing Geoscience Educational Innovations That Propagate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, P.

    2014-12-01

    NSF and other funders have supported the development of undergraduate STEM educational innovations over the past decades, only to see many yield limited uptake and impact beyond the grantee institutions. Numerous factors contribute to this complex problem, but one cause is likely insufficient incorporation of the understanding of how innovations propagate into project design. Following J.W. Dearing and colleagues, "dissemination" can be characterized by "push" approaches, which mainly emphasize one-to-many information sharing. In TUES/CCLI proposals, dissemination strategies have commonly taken the form of the "3 Ps" (presenting, publishing and posting) , with overall modest impact. Since the seminal work of Everett Rogers, however, "diffusion" of innovations has been understood as an inherently social process among potential adopters, which interacts with community norms and existing practices. Keys to diffusion include close understanding of the needs and context of the potential-adopter community and the development of "pull" within it, as well as support for implementation of innovations. Potential approaches to facilitating diffusion of innovations include a) using "lean start-up" methodologies (e.g., NSF's I-Corps-L program), in which explicit business-model hypotheses are tested through customer-discovery interviews, commonly leading to pivots where initial hypotheses are not confirmed, b) providing a range of potential commitment levels for adopters tailored to levels of support ("reverse Kickstarter model"), c) supporting decentralized communities of practice in which adaptations and tacit knowledge can readily be shared, d) encouraging crowd-sourcing of innovations, with an "architecture of participation" informed by successful open-source projects, and e) integrating innovations with discipline-based educational research, e.g., big-data approaches which allow A/B testing and analysis of clickstream data that reveal behaviors along a novice

  11. Business Intelligence Success Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardboe, Rikke; Jonasen, Tanja Svarre

    2018-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) is a strategically important practice in many organizations. Several studies have investigated the factors that contribute to BI success; however, an overview of the critical success factors (CSFs) involved is lacking in the extant literature. We have integrated...... culture. In addition, we contribute to the extant research by extending the framework of information system success and identifying gaps in the extant literature. Furthermore, we contribute to practical implementation through an enhanced understanding of the CSFs related to BI success....

  12. Logistics innovation development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedrosa, Alex; Blazevic, Vera; Jasmand, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    innovation development. Data was analyzed for similarities and differences in boundary-spanning employees’ knowledge acquisition and their interactions with customers across six innovations. Findings — Results show that boundary-spanning employees engage sequentially in deepening and broadening customer......Purpose — This paper aims to investigate the microfoundations of customer knowledge acquisition during logistics innovation development. Specifically, we explore the activities and behaviors of employees with customer contact (i.e., boundary-spanning employees) to deepen and broaden their knowledge...... and diverse customer firm members. Research limitations/implications — In general, this paper contributes to the understanding of the individuals’ behaviors underlying organization-level phenomena, such as logistics service providers’ customer knowledge acquisition. Practical implications — Findings...

  13. Logistics innovation development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedrosa, Alex; Blazevic, Vera; Jasmand, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    to investigate the role of boundary-spanning employees in deepening and broadening customer knowledge while developing logistics service innovations. Findings The results show that boundary-spanning employees’ engage sequentially in deepening and broadening customer knowledge throughout the logistics innovation......, this paper contributes to the understanding of the individuals’ behaviors underlying organization-level phenomena, such as logistics service providers’ customer knowledge acquisition. Practical implications (if applicable) Our findings illustrate that boundary-spanning employees might be well advised......Purpose This paper aims to investigate the microfoundations—boundary-spanning employees activities and behaviors—of deepening and broadening customer knowledge during logistics innovation development. Design/methodology/approach A multiple case study approach (six case studies) was adopted...

  14. 75 FR 82378 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2011 Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... Innovation is to recognize American innovators whose vision, creativity, and brilliance in moving ideas to... commercially successful products and services. Eligibility and Nomination Criteria: Information on eligibility...

  15. 75 FR 3203 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2010 Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... and Innovation is to recognize American innovators whose vision, creativity, and brilliance in moving... in commercially successful products and services. Eligibility and Nomination Criteria: Information on...

  16. Supporting FEI through innovation strategy implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    activities must be given a strategic direction. An explicit innovation strategy is addressed as a success factor for several reasons. First, it provides a guideline for dealing with strategic issues, such as selecting the markets to enter and the skills to develop (Lester, 1998). Second, strategically...... planned projects enable the firm to take advantage of synergy between parallel innovation projects. Third, learning-by-doing can materialise, enabling the firm to reap benefits of previously successful innovations along with firm-specific skills that emanate from them (Rothwell, 1992). The pharmaceutical......Front end innovation (FEI) represents the first building blocks of product development, but is often regarded as a weak link in innovation literature. Various theorists emphasize that a firm’s innovation can benefit substantially by improving the front end of innovation process (Reinertsen, 1999...

  17. The cultural side of innovation adding values

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Dany

    2013-01-01

    In most discussions about the knowledge-based economy, innovation is associated or even equated with technology, while culture's influence is ignored. Innovation is however embedded in cultural and social contexts, and neglecting these crucial contexts may impede an innovation's diffusion-and eventual success. This book places culture at the center of discussions on innovation, beginning with a comprehensive introduction to innovation's various forms, including the history, sociology, and economics of innovation. Insights from marketing and psychology are integrated into a complexity theory framework, which are then utilized to evaluate case studies of organizations experiencing repeated innovation successes. The sometimes fraught relationship of firms to creativity is discussed, and a new model for to calculating the creativity of an economy is presented.

  18. Customer Integration during Innovation Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedrosa, Alex

    2012-01-01

    To stay viable, companies need to increase their innovation development investments over time. However, successful innovation development also cannot happen without customers, and thus companies seek opportunities to enhance their knowledge of current and future customer needs. As a result...... of companies’ growing interest in effectively collaborating with customers, research has investigated the importance of firm–customer interaction during innovation development. However, despite valuable insights into the performance-enhancing effects of customer integration, research has thus far overlooked...... the activities companies should engage in when integrating customers during innovation development. Thus, this study investigates how and when customer-oriented companies engage in customer interaction during innovation development. Using a multiple case study design, this study examines four substantive cases...

  19. Innovative powertrains 2008; Innovative Fahrzeugantriebe 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Our 6th congress ''Innovative Powertrains'' is going to happen in Dresden. We will meet from November 6th to 7th under the focus of ''Systems Evaluation of Innovative Powertrains''.Fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} reduction is getting more and more importance in the development of powertrains. Only with optimized powertrain systems on a sustainable base remarkable progress will be demonstrated. Total optimized systems not necessarily can be guaranteed by just combining optimized components. This is true especially under the aspects of cost, dominating the market success and so the affectivity of innovations. So not only the electrification of powertrains with motors, fuels cells and batteries but also realizing the full potential of traditional combustion based powertrain systems is interesting. This congress will evaluate the newest development in the fields of combustion engines, transmissions, plug-in-hybrids, range-extenders as well as battery electric systems. An accompanying poster and technical exhibition is enforcing discussions directly in the presence of exponents. A social program will give you and your accompanying persons an insight to the history and specialities of Dresden. The foreseeable changes in society towards a more ecological thinking and acting, new legislative frameworks and exciting potential out of new technologies allow us a new rating of mobility systems up to now not being competitive. We live in an exciting time, where engineers and researchers more then ever are asked for answers to this change.

  20. Understanding Innovation Adoption in the Air Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evans, Morgan J

    2006-01-01

    .... The United States Air Force is seeking to adapt to this new information age by transforming its business processes in order to sustain its competitive advantage as the world's most respected air force...

  1. Everyday Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Wegener, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    activities in which teachers succeed to balance continuities and discontinuities. Studying innovation as a balance between change and stability thus involves emerging, negotiated processes of learning and participation in everyday practices where people talk, interact and conduct their work and studies......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how vocational teachers’ everyday practices can constitute innovative learning spaces that help students to experience engagement and commitment towards education and thus increase their possibilities for completing their studies despite notable...... difficulties. Design/methodology/approach – Based on two ethnographic field studies, we analyse vocational teaching situations in which teachers and students engage in daily remaking of the vocational educational training practice. It is argued that these everyday situations can be understood as innovative...

  2. Collaborative innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timenes Laugen, Bjørge; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2011-01-01

    Industry and academia alike are increasingly becoming aware of the fact that innovation does not take place in isolated cells or functions within the firm. Although the idea of involving internal and external actors in the new product development (NPD) process is not new, the knowledge about...... the benefits and pitfalls is still limited. This paper aims to contribute to refining the concept of open innovation, by investigating how strategic priorities influence the degree of external and internal involvement in the NPD process, moderated by contextual factors. The results indicate that suppliers...... are heavily involved in the NPD process in firms in B2C markets aiming at increasing the innovation volume. For B2B companies the reverse picture emerges. However, when the aim is to increase the radicality of new products, suppliers and customers are heavily involved for firms in B2B markets....

  3. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Joel; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in open innovation (OI) as a field of research has grown exponentially since the phrase was coined by Chesbrough in his 2003 book, with numerous articles, special issues, books, and conference sessions. Various reviews of the literature have summarized prior work, offered new frameworks......, and identified opportunities for future research. Here we summarize these opportunities, which include more research on outbound OI, the role of open innovation in services, and network forms of collaboration such as consortia, communities, ecosystems, and platforms. Research should also examine the use of OI...... is rejected, abandoned, or fails. Finally, we consider how OI can be better linked to prior theoretical research, including topics such as absorptive capacity, user innovation, resources, dynamic capabilities, business models, and the definition of the firm....

  4. Reconsidering Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Nana Katrine

    Innovation og reformer er på dagsordenen allevegne, ikke mindst i politiske forsøg på at reorganisere den offentlige sektor for at få velfærdssamfundet til at kunne overleve økonomisk tumult og dystre fremtidsprognoser. Dette papir undersøger, hvordan klassiske antropologiske teorier og debatter om...... forandring og myter kan hjælpe os med at genoverveje teoretiske forståelser af innovation i organisatoriske studier. I særlig grad sættes der fokus på de implikationer som vores "innovationsmyte" kan have for offentligt ansatte og værdsættelsen af deres arbejde. Analysens argument er, at innovation ikke skal...

  5. Responsive Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Carsten

    In dynamic environments, competitive advantage lies in developing useful knowledge from continuous streams of unstructured and ambiguous data. Frontline employees and certain groups of customers are often the first to sense emerging issues of strate-gic importance due to their experiential insights...... of the firm’s daily operations. Yet, they are rarely asked to provide updated information about critical issues. The present paper seeks to conceptually develop the notion of responsive innovation, by drawing on literary streams concerning collective sensing, strategic issue diagnosis and integra......-tive strategy within a micro foundations perspective. It is posited that companies should root their innovation processes in the collective sensing of frontline-employees and customers that operate around the organizational periphery. This frames the con-cept of responsive innovation, where individuals engaged...

  6. Effektiv innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret; Brandi, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Er det vækst og udvikling eller åbenhed, videnudvikling, netværk, leg og innovation? Eller er det prisregulering, tilpasning og stærk styring, som skal gøre universiteterne til førende drivkræfter for dansk vækst?......Er det vækst og udvikling eller åbenhed, videnudvikling, netværk, leg og innovation? Eller er det prisregulering, tilpasning og stærk styring, som skal gøre universiteterne til førende drivkræfter for dansk vækst?...

  7. Innovation Management and Performance Framework for Research University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowang, Tan Owee; Long, Choi Sang; Rasli, Amran

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) in Malaysia are recognized as the core of new innovation development. This paper empirically studies one of IHLs in Malaysia with the objectives to gauge the perceived important level of success factors for innovation management, and to examine the relationship between innovation management success factors…

  8. Conceptualising strategic innovation leadership for competitive survival and excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Maizura Ailin; Lindgren, Peter

    2008-01-01

    )Network innovation leadership (upstream)Product innovation leadership (downstream)Customer innovation leadership (downstream) Our discussion chiefly concerns the challenges of innovation leadership while introducing our proposed framework. In the final manuscript, we will include practical suggestions on how...... the innovation process. Until recently, the literature has not dealt with the strategic (and combined) use of innovation and leadership in order for companies to be leaders in the industry- What we term as innovation leadership. The significance of innovation is widely acknowledged in a range of organizations......, societies and in global competition. Thus, it is important for companies to develop the ability to lead innovation and to understand what leadership of innovation is all about. Innovation is an ongoing, never-ending concept and process. Though literature exists on managing innovation, innovation management...

  9. Investigating healthcare IT innovations: a "conceptual blending" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranfield, Steven; Hendy, Jane; Reeves, Barnaby; Hutchings, Andrew; Collin, Simon; Fulop, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to better understand how and why adoption and implementation of healthcare IT innovations occur. The authors examine two IT applications, computerised physician order entry (CPOE) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) at the meso and micro levels, within the context of the National Programme for IT in the English National Health Service (NHS). To analyse these multi-level dynamics, the authors blend Rogers' diffusion of innovations theory (DoIT) with Webster's sociological critique of technological innovation in medicine and healthcare systems to illuminate a wider range of interacting factors. Qualitative data collected between 2004 and 2006 uses semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 72 stakeholders across four English NHS hospital trusts. Overall, PACS was more successfully implemented (fully or partially in three out of four trusts) than CPOE (implemented in one trust only). Factors such as perceived benefit to users and attributes of the application - in particular speed, ease of use, reliability and flexibility and levels of readiness - were highly relevant but their influence was modulated through interaction with complex structural and relational issues. Results reveal that combining contextual system level theories with DoIT increases understanding of real-life processes underpinning implementation of IT innovations within healthcare. They also highlight important drivers affecting success of implementation, including socio-political factors, the social body of practice and degree of "co-construction" between designers and end-users. The originality of the study partly rests on its methodological innovativeness and its value on critical insights afforded into understanding complex IT implementation programmes.

  10. Perceptions and attitudes of car owners on innovative automobiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pol, M.; Brunsting, S.

    2012-01-01

    To abate the detrimental effects of transport a transition is foreseen from the conventional fossil cars to energy-sustainable cars. A successful transition requires a major behavioral change of car consumers who need to make choices about new options for transport with uncertain costs and benefits compared to their current car. This paper examines consumers' perceptions about innovative cars and considerations for buying or not buying innovative cars (hybrid, electric, plug-in electric, hydrogen, flexifuel). In this study an on-line questionnaire on attitudes, interests and social norms regarding innovative cars was conducted among 339 Dutch respondents who recently bought a new car. To obtain in-depth understanding of the answers, a follow-up study was conducted consisting of two focus groups with a sample of survey participants. These focus groups respectively concentrated on respondents' perceptions of innovative cars, and on the personality traits of the 'typical' innovative car driver. The results of the survey shows that the attitude towards innovative cars are strongly influenced by affective aspects (such as comfort and pleasant) and to a (much) smaller extent by environmental considerations. The results of the focus groups confirm these findings. According to the participants the price of the car is decisive whereby environmental concerns play no role. The design and image of the car are important. In addition, it appears that the familiarity with (and thus the knowledge about) the innovative cars is still very limited (with the exception of the hybrid car). This point of view stresses the importance of the way in which innovative cars are positioned thereby affecting the image (social norms) people will have regarding these cars. [nl

  11. Introduction to Innovation WITHIN and ACROSS Borders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrillo, Janice E.; Druehl, Cheryl; Hsuan, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    on innovation management, including the operations management and information systems communities. We review the literature in this important area and offer suggestions for future research on the following topics: innovation within a firm and across the supply chain, technology management, and new product......Innovation is an integral part of every firm's ongoing operations. While new product and service creation is an essential task to ensure a firm's immediate success in the marketplace, process and supply chain innovations can also create a unique source of competitive advantage for the future....... Encouraging innovative thinking, developing new innovations, and managing the processes by which those innovations are developed are critical aspects of today's firm. Consequently, research which aids in the creation and maintenance of innovative firms is an important topic of inquiry for research communities...

  12. Understanding hydrotransport : the key to Syncrude's success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, R.B.; Wright, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Syncrude's use of pipeline slurries to convey oilsand from its Athabasca deposit to the extraction plant marks the beginning of a new era in oilsand processing. With this new conveyance system Syncrude plans to phase out the dragline, bucketwheel reclaimer, and conveyor ore mining and delivery system in favour of shovel, truck, and hydrotransport technology. Shovels will be used to mine the ore in a conventional open pit bench mining scheme. The oilsand will then be loaded onto trucks, hauled to a crusher for sizing and fed into the hydrotransport system where it will be slurried with water and caustic soda and pumped to the extraction plant by pipeline. The advantages of hydrotransport include significant energy savings and considerably less plant infrastructure. A new method to describe the source ore characteristics and plant performance was also developed. The use of this information system within the corporation is described. 7 refs., 3 figs

  13. Policy Innovation in Innovation Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borras, Susana

    as with national and sub-national governments in Europe, all of them introducing interesting novelties in their innovation policy. These changes refer to different aspects of policy, mainly the content of policy initiatives towards science, technology and innovation; the instruments governments are using...... to achieve their goals; and the actors in the policy system that are being mobilised in pursuing these goals. This paper deals with these policy changes, paying special attention to the novelties introduced since the early 1990s in Europe. The perspective of this paper deals mainly on the changes introduced...... at the EU level, and mentions similar trends taking place at national and sub-national levels. The questions that guide the contents here are essentially three, namely, what are the main traits of innovation policies in Europe since the 1990s and how have the EU and different national governments approached...

  14. Innovative Pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main purpose of this book is to take a closer look at how students and teachers in educational institutions apply the innovative, the playful and the emotional and creative dimensions of learning. With this contribution, the authors aim at reaching an international audience of educators at se...

  15. Financing Innovation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Finance, real estate and business services are expanding their share with regard to government services. South Africa's ...... Although limited in amplitude, venture capital (VC) initiatives have existed since the 1980s, supported by the Brazilian Innovation Agency (FINEP) and BNDES (Melo 1988 and 1994). The question ...

  16. The development of co-innovation strategies: stages and interaction patterns in interfirm innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Bossink, B.A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Organizations that choose or are forced to innovate in co-operation with other organizations, go through four stages of co-innovation strategy development. The stages are successively: (1) autonomous strategy making: organizations develop strategies on their own, (2) co-operative strategy making: organizations concentrate on developing innovation strategies in close co-operation with other organizations, (3) founding an organization for co-innovation: organizations found a joint organization ...

  17. Barriers Approach to Innovation in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hsuan Chuang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in academic libraries is not a brand new issue. Academic libraries can benefit from successful innovation, since innovation is a key contributor to gaining and sustaining competitive advantage for survival. Building on two case studies, 28 participants from leadership teams to practitioners are involved, the qualitative findings identified the specific two types of barriers that academic libraries face by applying a barriers approach to innovation, that’s, environmental and organizational barriers. Especially, seven dimensions of two types of barriers to innovation are found.

  18. MANAGING INNOVATION PROJECTS USING DISTRIBUTION LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Loučanová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant part of innovation projects management is the distribution logistics. From the point of view of time and material content, the properly chosen way of distribution is one of many factors for success of the project and innovation creation itself. The paper points out the fundamental basis of innovation management in the stage of its realization referring to the importance of distribution logistics in this part of innovation project management. Distribution logistics in the project management provides comprehensive solutions to efficiency of tangible relocating processes in all connections and mutual relations of project in order to maintain compliance between economy and business when implementing innovations.

  19. Understanding Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eWu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is the ability to adapt successfully in the face of stress and adversity. Stressful life events, trauma and chronic adversity can have a substantial impact on brain function and structure, and can result in the development of PTSD, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, most individuals do not develop such illnesses after experiencing stressful life events, and are thus thought to be resilient. Resilience as successful adaptation relies on effective responses to environmental challenges and ultimate resistance to the deleterious effects of stress, therefore a greater understanding of the factors that promote such effects is of great relevance. This review focuses on recent findings regarding genetic, epigenetic, developmental, psychosocial and neurochemical factors that are considered essential contributors to the development of resilience. Neural circuits and pathways involved in mediating resilience are also discussed. The growing understanding of resilience factors will hopefully lead to the development of new pharmacological and psychological interventions for enhancing resilience and mitigating the untoward consequences.

  20. Innovation Dialectics: An Extended Process Perspective on Innovation in Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Services are characterised by the involvement of customers and other interest groups in the innovation process. The aim of this study is to understand how and why, in the service context, tensions and potential conflicts between heterogeneous interest groups unfold during processes of innovation...... service context. The findings suggest that tensions and conflicts between heterogeneous interest groups are an intrinsic element of innovation processes in services, and that emphasising them might actually support a clearer understanding of processes of innovation in services. The outcome of the analysis....... The empirical field in which the investigation was set is facility services, a type of business-to-business support services. The findings were extracted from a longitudinal, in-depth case study of a Danish, multi-national organisation over 13 years, complemented with an explorative study in the Danish facility...

  1. Social Dynamics of Participatory Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sproedt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    , relating, cognitive social capital and the justification of knowledge are described as different but interdependent dimensions of transforming knowledge across boundaries in participatory innovation. A multi-level concept of social dynamics of participatory innovation is proposed, and a model......A conceptual framework for a coherent understanding of knowledge as a socially constructed resource in flux over boundaries when innovating with others is constructed. Starting with an overview of different perspectives on innovation, showing a development towards a more iterative social process...... perspective on innovation. Then, a similar development in the field of knowledge and knowing is presented, where the perspective changes from a divisional systemthinking towards a more relational view of complementing combinations of knowledge and knowing, recognizing the challenge of boundaries. Further...

  2. Danish User-Centered Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Lars Bo

    2007-01-01

    provides valuable information for scholars, managers and policy makers. The DUCI lab team consists of a number of academics, six major Danish companies and representatives from Danish Government. The efforts of the DUCI team focuses on the identification of best practice user innovation inside leading edge......Danish User-centered Innovation Lab (DUCI lab) is a collaboration between faculty at Copenhagen Business School, Aarhus School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, based at Copenhagen Business School. DUCI lab is a unique effort to understand the issues involved in user innovation...... processes, with particular emphasis on managing user driven innovation. The project takes advantage of CBS location in Denmark. Denmark has been at the forefront in creating policies that favor user driven innovation. CBS's location at the heart of one of the world's most vibrant user driven regions...

  3. System thinking shaping innovation ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, António; Urze, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been a trend to build innovation platforms as enablers for groups of companies to jointly develop new products and services. As a result, the notion of co-innovation is getting wider acceptance. However, a critical issue that is still open, despite some efforts in this area, is the lack of tools and models that explain the synergies created in a co-innovation process. In this context, the present paper aims at discussing the advantages of applying a system thinking approach to understand the mechanisms associated with co-innovation processes. Finally, based on experimental results from a Portuguese co-innovation network, a discussion on the benefits, challenges and difficulties found are presented and discussed.

  4. Innovation through developing consumers’ community. Part I: Innovation in action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gălăţanu (Avram, E.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2015-11-01

    Technological changes and need for innovation represents the main concerns for organizational growth and profitability. However the main priority is still about achieving high performance through product development and consumers' engagement activities. As implementation of open innovation applications increased and value co — creation became well known and major process, companies were engaged into value co — innovation activities. From this point of view the need for joint efforts with consumers in product development arose. Thus the primary condition for an organization to be consumer centric is to define clear the vision and mission which reflects the common efforts for co — creation and diffusion of innovation. As Research & Development processes evolved and interest for innovative concepts and products arose, companies started to implement the specific instruments for consumers' attraction and engagement into design and product development. The digitalized innovation became the main source for establishing the direct communication with the consumers. In order to achieve organization growth, profitability and recognition, the companies should be aware of the innovation importance and the need for internal change. From this point of view, there is necessary to assess the organizational structures, to implement new policies and to establish strategic targets. Basically it is justified the need for platform occurrence and development. Based on case study of BMW Group, recognised leader in automotive industry for innovative concepts, there will be analysed main features within organizational context which promotes the innovation implementation. There will be provided the review of the BMW Group experience of innovation activities, main consumers' engagement strategies, the values which promote the consumer — centric product development, new opportunities assessment, major policies and concerns. The foreseen result is to understand how companies are

  5. LOGISTICS - EVOLUTION THROUGH INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrache Alexandru Constantin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The current economic conditions, the rapidity with which the exchange of information, resources and products in the market takes place makes the logistics seem appreciably less significant. However, the importance of logistics has been presented in the military field, through strategies that have led to wining of the great wars that mankind has seen, through the supply of troops with food or moving military equipment. The literature in the field of logistics has numerous works on this topic. But while most focuses on efficient ways of carrying out the component activities of logistics or the strategies of organizations with regard to logistics or its functions, research on dynamics of logistics is underdeveloped. To be able to propose new methods or strategies of logistic activities is necessary to understand the development of this concept, determinant factors and economic and social conditions that gave rise to such developments. Thus, after a presentation of the main landmarks of the historical development of logistics we highlight the importance of the innovation within an organization's value chain innovation, in particular, and how to conduct the business in general. Using generations of innovation identified in the literature, we determine the generation of logistics development, taking into account innovation and how to conduct business. In addition for a better highlight of the own vision over the logistics generations identified, we will present the graphical concept for each generation in part. Last but not least, for each generation identified we try to allocate the chronological landmarks featured in order to reinforce the importance played by innovation in the development of the logistics industry and to give future directions of research within this topic. The study took into account the information presented in articles, books and websites of the relevant specialty in logistics and innovation to be able to build and expose a

  6. Balancing cognitive diversity and mutual understanding in multidisciplinary teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Boyle, Brendan; O'Brien, Rachael; Malik, Ashish; Tian, Karen; Parker, Vicki; Giles, Michelle; Joyce, Pauline; Chiang, Vico

    Interprofessional health care teams are increasingly utilized in health care organizations. Although there is support for their capacity to solve complex problems, there is also evidence that such teams are not always successful. In an effort to understand the capacity of interprofessional teams to innovate successfully, we investigate the role of cognitive diversity to establish whether and how knowledge differences lead to innovation. The aim of this study was to construct and investigate a model of team innovation predicted by cognitive diversity. In addition to investigating the direct impact of cognitive diversity in interprofessional health care teams, we develop a model incorporating mediated and moderated effects. In this study, we explore the role of debate as a mediating factor capable of explaining the impact of cognitive diversity on innovation. We further propose that the link between cognitive diversity and innovation through debate is contingent upon trans-specialist knowledge, knowledge shared by health care professionals, spanning specialist divides and enabling mutual understanding. The hypotheses were investigated using a cross-sectional, correlational design. Survey data received from 75 interprofessional teams employed in an acute care setting, representing a 36% response rate, were used to investigate our model. Analysis supports a significant relationship between cognitive diversity and debate, which is stronger when teams rate highly for trans-specialist knowledge. Results also support a positive relationship between debate and innovation and our full moderated mediated pathway. A range of strategies are indicated by our results to increase innovation in interprofessional teams. In particular, interventions such as interprofessional education and training, which have been shown to facilitate the development of shared language and meaning, are recommended by our findings.

  7. What is Climate Leadership: Spotlight on Innovative Partnerships Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovative Partnerships category winners from the 2015 Climate Leadership Award recipients discuss their innovative and collaborative initiatives and achievements that allowed them to measure the successes of their greenhouse gas reduction goals.

  8. The Project of Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    . To the extent that project success becomes a matter of meeting the explicit targets, it loses its relevance as independent phenomenon. For that reason, perhaps, project success is hardly ever discussed in the project management literature. However, empirical studies demonstrate that project success is a much...... more complicated matter than meeting targets. While success may ultimately be justified in terms of a correspondence between aims and achievements, the understanding of both aspects is highly dependent on the project process. An example of a successful project that did not meet the original performance...... targets will serve to show that success is at matter of perspective as much as it is a matter of achievement. Other types of research, e.g. social psychology, have addressed the issue of success more explicitly. I draw on such literature to conceptualize project success anew and to reestablish...

  9. The adoption of sustainable innovations : Driven by symbolic and environmental motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noppers, Ernst H.; Keizer, Kees; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    Critical to the environmental success of sustainable innovations is the adoption by consumers. The consensus is that instrumental shortcomings of sustainable innovations inhibit their adoption. However, we argue that the adoption of sustainable innovations does not exclusively depend on their

  10. Rethinking Open Innovation Beyond the Innovation Funnel

    OpenAIRE

    Wim Vanhaverbeke

    2013-01-01

    In his article, I first argue that open innovation can be applied in situations where companies do not themselves develop new products or services. As a consequence, open innovation becomes relevant for a much larger group of organizations than previously considered. Second, I argue that open-innovation scholars have insufficiently differentiated open-innovation initiatives in terms of their impact on companies’ growth: some open-innovation initiatives lead to incremental innovations in an ex...

  11. Bridging the Research-to-Practice Gap in Autism Intervention: An Application of Diffusion of Innovation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingfelder, Hilary E.; Mandell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that efficacious interventions for autism are rarely adopted or successfully implemented in public mental health and education systems. We propose applying diffusion of innovation theory to further our understanding of why this is the case. We pose a practical set of questions that administrators face as they decide about…

  12. Open innovation : State of the art and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizingh, K.R.E.

    Open innovation has become one of the hottest topics in innovation management. This article intends to explore the limits in our understanding of the open innovation concept. In doing so, I address the questions of what (the content of open innovation), when (the context dependency) and how (the

  13. INNOVATION - THE ROLE OF TRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornélia Lazányi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovations and constant change are inevitable parts of our everyday lives. It is not only because advanced technologies are more effective, but mostly because in the 21st century more and more realise that scarce resources – among them the safe and clean environment as such - necessitate a paradigm change and intense innovation. This revolution is easily trackable in the organisational and (supranational policies. However, innovation, and its necessary prerequisites are seldom investigated from the individuals’ point of view. It is easy to understand that inter-organisational trust is inevitable on both the consumers’ and the providers’ (innovators’ side, however, it has to be made clear that an innovative organisation has to create a trusting environment within the company, in order to foster collaboration, the generation of new ideas, creativity and finally innovation. The present paper endeavours to call attention to the notion of trust and its antecedents and consequences in relation to innovations. The aim is to provide assistance in understanding how to develop trust in each other and hence foster further innovations and development.

  14. Transformative social innovation and (dis)empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avelino, Flor; Wittmayer, Julia; Pel, Bonno

    2017-01-01

    , this article proposes a set of concepts to study the dynamics of transformative social innovation and underlying processes of multi-actor (dis)empowerment. First, the concept of transformative social innovation is unpacked by proposing four foundational concepts to help distinguish between different pertinent...... ‘shades’ of change and innovation: 1) social innovation, (2) system innovation, (3) game-changers, and (4) narratives of change. These concepts, invoking insights from transitions studies and social innovations literature, are used to construct a conceptual account of how transformative social innovation...... to three empirical case-studies of transformative social innovation: Impact Hub, Time Banks and Credit Unions. In the conclusion we synthesise how the concepts and the empirical examples help to understand contemporary shifts in societal power relations and the changing role of the welfare state....

  15. Innovation Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Current regulatory approaches are ill-equipped to address the challenges of governing through periods of disruptive technological change. This article hones in on the use of assessment regimes at the level of the European Union, particularly in the work of the Commission, to argue for a missing...... middle between technology assessment and impact assessment. Technology assessment focuses on the upstream governance of science and technology, while impact assessment focuses on the downstream governance of the impacts of specific policy options. What is missing is a form of midstream governance, which...... I label innovation assessment, to steer polities through periods of disruptive technological change, during which innovations have taken concrete forms and are beginning to diffuse, but still exhibit much scope for rapid, unexpected change and alternative trajectories of development. By juxtaposing...

  16. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  17. The UK Ecosystem for Fostering Innovation in the Earth & Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The UK national government supports an ecosystem of government-funded organisations that carry a specific remit for innovation. By specifically cultivating the commercialisation of research where appropriate, the UK demonstrates a forward-thinking and coordinated approach to deriving economic and societal impact from scientific research activities. This presentation provides an overview of innovation activities at government-backed organisations that support the Earth and space science communities. At the broadest and highest levels, the UK has a whole-of-government approach to fostering innovation. The government also has a designated innovation agency - Innovate UK - which works with people, companies, and partner organisations to find and drive the science & technology innovations that will grow the UK economy. A primary source of scientific funding to UK-based researchers comes from the Research Councils UK (RCUK), which has seven constituent Research Councils. Along with funding activities that support basic research, innovation is supported through a variety of activities. The National Environmental Research Council (NERC), the UK's leading public funder for Earth & environmental science, has brought to market a wide variety of ideas and innovations, including by helping to register patents, negotiating licensing deals, and setting up spin-out companies or joint ventures with commercial organisations. Case studies of NERC commercialization successes will be given, as well as an overview of mechanisms by which NERC supports innovation. These include 'Pathfinder' awards that help enable researchers to develop a greater understanding of the commercial aspects and possibilities of their research. Complementary 'Follow-on Fund' awards provide proof-of-concept funding to support the commercialisation of ideas arising from NERC-funded research. Early-career researchers are also eligible for NERC's Environment Young Entrepreneurs Scheme. Innovation activity, like

  18. Innovations in urban agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, van der J.W.; Renting, Henk; Veenhuizen, Van René

    2014-01-01

    This issuehighlights innovations in urban agriculture. Innovation and the various forms of innovations are of particular importance because urban agriculture is adapted to specific urban challenges and opportunities. Innovation is taking place continuously, exploring the multiple fundions of urban

  19. Innovation, entrepreneurship and textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton Godfrey, A.; Pourmojib, S.

    2017-10-01

    Innovation and entrepreneurship have become increasingly important parts of economic development in almost every country, region, and community. In this research we investigate the reasons people become entrepreneurs in the textile and apparel industries and compare entrepreneurship in these industries with other industries looking also at the success factors for start up companies. During our research we found many disrupters, people entering the textile and apparel industries from outside often having no prior experience in textiles or apparel. We also investigate the impact of government intervention on entrepreneurship. In recognition of the large economic impact entrepreneurial companies have on economic development and job growth, almost all federal governments, regional governments, and community governments have created support for innovation and entrepreneurship.

  20. Priority setting: what constitutes success? A conceptual framework for successful priority setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Shannon L; Singer, Peter A; Upshur, Ross; Martin, Douglas K

    2009-03-05

    The sustainability of healthcare systems worldwide is threatened by a growing demand for services and expensive innovative technologies. Decision makers struggle in this environment to set priorities appropriately, particularly because they lack consensus about which values should guide their decisions. One way to approach this problem is to determine what all relevant stakeholders understand successful priority setting to mean. The goal of this research was to develop a conceptual framework for successful priority setting. Three separate empirical studies were completed using qualitative data collection methods (one-on-one interviews with healthcare decision makers from across Canada; focus groups with representation of patients, caregivers and policy makers; and Delphi study including scholars and decision makers from five countries). This paper synthesizes the findings from three studies into a framework of ten separate but interconnected elements germane to successful priority setting: stakeholder understanding, shifted priorities/reallocation of resources, decision making quality, stakeholder acceptance and satisfaction, positive externalities, stakeholder engagement, use of explicit process, information management, consideration of values and context, and revision or appeals mechanism. The ten elements specify both quantitative and qualitative dimensions of priority setting and relate to both process and outcome components. To our knowledge, this is the first framework that describes successful priority setting. The ten elements identified in this research provide guidance for decision makers and a common language to discuss priority setting success and work toward improving priority setting efforts.

  1. Priority setting: what constitutes success? A conceptual framework for successful priority setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibbald Shannon L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sustainability of healthcare systems worldwide is threatened by a growing demand for services and expensive innovative technologies. Decision makers struggle in this environment to set priorities appropriately, particularly because they lack consensus about which values should guide their decisions. One way to approach this problem is to determine what all relevant stakeholders understand successful priority setting to mean. The goal of this research was to develop a conceptual framework for successful priority setting. Methods Three separate empirical studies were completed using qualitative data collection methods (one-on-one interviews with healthcare decision makers from across Canada; focus groups with representation of patients, caregivers and policy makers; and Delphi study including scholars and decision makers from five countries. Results This paper synthesizes the findings from three studies into a framework of ten separate but interconnected elements germane to successful priority setting: stakeholder understanding, shifted priorities/reallocation of resources, decision making quality, stakeholder acceptance and satisfaction, positive externalities, stakeholder engagement, use of explicit process, information management, consideration of values and context, and revision or appeals mechanism. Conclusion The ten elements specify both quantitative and qualitative dimensions of priority setting and relate to both process and outcome components. To our knowledge, this is the first framework that describes successful priority setting. The ten elements identified in this research provide guidance for decision makers and a common language to discuss priority setting success and work toward improving priority setting efforts.

  2. Eight Forces for Leaders of Change: Presence of the Core Concepts Does Not Guarantee Success, but Their Absence Ensures Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullan, Michael; Cuttress, Claudia; Kilcher, Ann

    2005-01-01

    The history of educational reform and innovation is replete with good ideas or policies that fail to get implemented or that are successful in one situation but not in another. A missing ingredient in most failed cases is appreciation and use of what is called change knowledge: understanding and insight about the process of change and the key…

  3. Customer value & business success in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablowski, P A

    2000-01-01

    Many health care organizations are realizing the importance of understanding the needs and expectations of customers and prospective customers, coupled with developing services that best meet and exceed those expectations. These concepts represent an innovative yet fundamental approach to building success beyond the clinical aspects. To create, build on, and measure the "customer value factor" in its bottom line, health care organizations must (1) understand how meeting and exceeding the needs and expectations of customers will become the most significant differentiator of true business value, (2) learn how to develop realistic, measurable, and successful customer value processes within complex organizations, (3) understand how customer value can link with the power of strategic communications to become the new currency for the next millennium.

  4. Assessing construction innovation: theoretical and practical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Davis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is key for productivity improvement and advancements in different sectors of the economy, including the construction sector.  The criticism of the slow pace of innovation in construction industry may be unwarranted, considering the structure of the industry and nature of the construction business.  The loosely coupled nature of firms, mostly Small and Medium Enterprises (SME’s, delivering ‘projects’ through partial engagement, together with the distinction between the project innovation and firm innovation makes it difficult to extract innovations in a meaningful way.  The problem also lies in conceptualising, defining, articulating and assessing innovation in construction.  The literature is replete with research into construction innovation, however, there is limited research into understanding how innovation is perceived and narrated in practice.  The paper aims to explore how innovation is assessed and narrated in construction, specifically analysing theory and practice perspectives.  A theoretical model was constructed from a structured literature review illustrating existing discourse and narratives of construction innovation assessment.  A qualitative analysis of ‘Professional Excellence in Building’ submission documents to the Australian Institute of Building was performed to identify the practice perspective of innovation.  The findings suggest that internal organizational and process innovation account for the majority of improvements identified.  Importantly a taxonomy of narrative is developed that articulates how the construction industry in Australia views industry innovation.

  5. How Frugal Innovation Promotes Social Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhshanda Khan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop an understanding of how frugal innovation promotes social sustainability. The objective of this paper is to find the connections between the two concepts of social sustainability and frugal innovation, by reviewing the existing literature concerning both fields. This paper presents a framework that identifies essential themes of social sustainability and explores them through frugal innovation. The framework builds on the important themes of social sustainability and shows their relevance in practice through frugal innovation. The notion of frugal innovation can be viewed as an approach towards realizing social sustainability and fulfilling the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

  6. Public Procurement of Innovation as Endogenous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfstam, Max

    Public procurement used as an innovation policy instrument has attracted attention the last decade. It has been argued that public procurement can be used to stimulate innovation from the demand-side. This paper problematizes ‘demand’ understood as a problem defined by a public procurer given to ...... underlying mechanisms critical for success. Instead the paper views public procurement of innovation as an instrument of endogenous- exogenous knowledge conversion....

  7. Understanding consumer intention to participate in online travel community and effects on consumer intention to purchase travel online and WOM: an integration of innovation diffusion theory and TAM with trust

    OpenAIRE

    El-Masry, AA; Agag, G

    2016-01-01

    The growing presence of online travel communities is leading to great developments in the travel industry. Grounded in the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) and the technology acceptance model (TAM), this paper seek to develop and empirically test a comprehensive framework to examine the antecedents of customers' intention to participate in online travel community. Using SEM to analyse the data collected from a sample of 495 members, the results indicate that innovation diffusion theory and T...

  8. Customer as a participant of innovative networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in market conditions and basis for competing have brought the changes in profiling and realizing innovation strategies. Customers are the key subject in the process of generating of innovation. Customers in modern conditions do not wait for initiative of enterprise in value creation and they are not a part of formal processes of marketing research. The new communication technologies help them to be included in voluntary way in innovative activities of enterprise, which is motivated by brand loyalty, enthusiasm, hobby, wish to investigate. The enterprises realize the validity of this important source of new ideas and change their behaviour. The intention of author is to consider the importance of innovative networks for market innovation success, to analyse customer evolution from user to value creator, to identify the characteristics of customer as innovator, and to point to challenges for enterprise in the process of including them in its innovative activities.

  9. Supporting Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Innovation in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lukeš

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on existence and support of entrepreneurial behaviour and innovation in larger organizations. It first suggests why it is important to pay attention to entrepreneurship and innovation and then defines corporate entrepreneurship. Typical barriers of entrepreneurial activities are described as well as innovation dilemmas organizations solve. Innovation process is not linear, but six components of innovation behaviour may be identified, together with specific roles employees play when moving the idea forward from idea creation to implementation. Important factors influencing the success of entrepreneurial behaviour are discussed, involving the role of middle managers and reward systems. Recommendations for fostering entrepreneurial behaviour and innovation are provided together with a simple inventory for measuring employee perception of manager's and organizational support for innovation.

  10. The organisation of work and innovative performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arundel, Anthony; Lorenz, Edward; Lundvall, Bengt-Åke

    It is widely recognised that while expenditures on research and development are important inputs to successful innovation, these are not the only inputs. Further, rather than viewing innovation as a linear process, recent work on innovation in business and economics literatures characterises...... that are used to explore at the level of national innovation systems the relation between innovation and the organisation of work. In order to construct these aggregate measures we make use of micro data from two European surveys: the third European survey of Working Conditions and the third Community...... Innovation Survey (CIS-3). Although our data can only show correlations rather than causality they support the view that how firms innovate is linked to the way work is organised to promote learning and problem-solving....

  11. INNOVATION CONSTITUENT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhylinska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates an innovation constituent of sustainable development along with environmental, social and economic pillars of the concept. Determining of implementation details of innovation activity by J. Schumpeter is a theoretical prerequisite to understanding of innovation constituent. An innovator-entrepreneur provides a customer with an information image of 'new combinations.' The image is created by identifying customer's future needs, which outline business aims, subject and appropriate means for creating the innovation products. However, consumer choice is largely motivated by values and specific rules of behavior. The rules of consumer society that in the industrial age become the motive, morality and institution, did not consider the reproductive capabilities of the environment. This disagreement was previously presented in The Limits to Growth by the Club of Rome and was reflected in the concept of sustainable development, which gained immense significance after the report of the World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987 (Our Common Future. The study highlights importance for establishment of new social values that motivate innovators to change their thinking, comprehend their responsibility not only to consumers but also to the environment and future generations. The Rio+20 Corporate Sustainability Forum: Innovation and Collaboration for the Future We want, organized by the UN Global Compact, demonstrates the interest of entrepreneurs in practical implementation of the concept of sustainable development, through an effective innovation activity. The paper summarizes management tools for implementing business commitments to action in priority areas of ensuring sustainable development: Energy & Climate, Water & Ecosystems, Agriculture & Food, Economics & Finance of Sustainable Development, Social Development, and Urbanization & Cities. Main stages of changes in companies are outlined for making responsible

  12. Innovative Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M.G. Meems, MD, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natriuretic peptides (NPs are essential for the maintenance of volume homeostasis, and can be of myocardial, renal, and endothelial origin. Advances in peptide engineering have enabled the design of innovative designer NPs that go beyond native peptides in efficacy, specificity, and resistance to enzymatic degradation. Therefore, designer NPs provide an unparalleled opportunity for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we report the conceptual framework of peptide engineering of the NPs that resulted in designer peptides for cardiovascular disease. We specifically provide an update on those currently in clinical trials for heart failure and hypertension.

  13. Logistics innovation development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedrosa, Alex; Blazevic, Vera; Jasmand, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    and broaden their knowledge about customers for the development of innovations. Design/methodology/approach – Qualitative research based on multiple semi-structured interviews with BSEs of six logistics service providers was conducted to explore the deepening and broadening of customer knowledge during...... limitations/implications – In general, this paper contributes to the understanding of the individuals’ behaviors underlying organization-level phenomena, such as logistics service providers’ customer knowledge acquisition. Practical implications – Findings illustrate that BSEs are well advised to concentrate......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the microfoundations of customer knowledge acquisition during logistics innovation development. Specifically, the authors explore the activities and behaviors of employees with customer contact (i.e. boundary-spanning employees (BSEs)) to deepen...

  14. A framework for analysing innovation in the food sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Harmsen, Hanne; Meulenberg, Matthias

    is regarded as the detection and fulfilment of unfilled needs and wants of potential customers, presupposing a market orientation of the innovative company. In the food sector, the interaction of R& market orientation can be expected to be a major determinant of innovation and innovativeness. 2. A product...... innovation is defined as something which is new to the consumer, the distributor, and/or the producer. It can be caused by any changes in the marketing parameters. A process innovation is defined as investments enabling product innovations. Innovations can be more or less successful, as measured by market...... acceptance of fulfilment of company goals. Companies can differ in their degree of innovativeness, depending on the number and success of their innovations. 3. There is no clear-cut evidence on the relationship between the extent of R&D activities and business performance, neither in general nor in the food...

  15. Enabling innovations in energy access: An African perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agbemabiese, Lawrence; Nkomo, Jabavu; Sokona, Youba

    2012-01-01

    Conventional energy technologies and deployment approaches cannot be relied upon to eliminate energy poverty in Africa. Innovations in energy access are necessary. Previous attempts at introducing and scaling up innovative solutions do not sufficiently address dynamic and structural determinants of success. This limits their actual performance as scalable drivers of innovations in technology, policy and institutions. Using technological innovation systems theory, we demonstrate a practical approach to assess the sustainability of innovations in energy access, and develop a framework to guide energy policy makers, clean energy entrepreneurs and energy-development researchers. - Highlights: ► Innovative technologies and policies are needed to expand energy access. ► TIS approach can guide the formulation and deployment of sustainable energy innovations. ► Learning by exploring and doing are the keys to entrepreneurial success. ► Lack of infrastructure and institutional frameworks are major barriers to innovations. ► Government intervention is needed to eliminate barriers to innovations.

  16. Lessons Learned with the Innovation Triangle Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freire, Marco; Guglielmi, Marco; Lascar, Stephane

    2005-01-01

    ... seed for significant innovation. ITI is based on the concept that a close collaboration between three different entities -- the inventor, the developer, and the customer -- is an important factor for the rapid and successful...

  17. Designing an AHP methodology to prioritize critical elements for product innovation: an intellectual capital perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa, R. V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual capital has for the past decades been evidenced as an important source of competitive advantages and differentiation at the firm level. At the same time, innovation has become a critical factor for companies to ensure their sustainability and even their survival in a globalized business landscape. Having in mind these two crucial concepts for business success, this study intends to build on the relationships between intellectual capital and product innovation at the firm level. Specifically, we will design and test a model based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process, whose aim is to allow the prioritization of intellectual capital elements according to their relative importance for product innovation performance at the firm level. The main goal of this research is to build a diagnosis and action tool that helps business managers incorporate an intellectual capital perspective into their product innovation initiatives. This framework will help managers to better understand which intellectual capital elements are more critical to their product innovation efforts, and thereby systematize actions and clarify resource allocation priorities to improve their product innovation capabilities. In order to validate the practicability of this proposal, the methodology was empirically applied to a Portuguese innovative company.

  18. Collaboration Patterns and Product Innovation in the Basque Country. Does a Firm’s Nationality Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henar Alcalde Heras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More and more, the ability to innovate can be considered as an explanatory factor in determining the long-term potential of firms to be competitive. Therefore, it is of increasing importance to understand the critical success factors behind notably radical product innovations. The present paper explores the yields and results in terms of a series of competitiveness indicators that domestic and foreign firms in the Basque Country obtain from technological collaboration practices. In particular, the study seeks to assess differences in the way these two groups of firms organize their technological partnerships (in terms of the geographical spread of partners with whom they cooperate and the purposes for which they deploy collaboration: for commercial or science/knowledge generation, and the comparative differences that stem from their respective practices. The study uses firm level data from the Euskadi Innovation Survey 2011, for firms located in the Basque Country. The paper finds that (a technological collaborations comprising different types of partners have the greatest positive impact on innovation novelty, and (b when looking at the firm’s nationality, collaboration strategies developed by foreign firms have a higher impact on achieving novel innovation. We posit that the higher degree of product innovation we observe among foreign firms – as opposed to domestic firms in the Basque Country – relies on their ability to benefit from both inter-regional partnerships and commercial-based networks for the sake of innovation purposes.

  19. INNOVATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Arditi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper%2C existing innovation models are reviewed. The influence of technology and market-driven schools of thought on the creation and diffusion of innovation is examined. Incremental vs. radical models and autonomous vs. systemic models are considered in the context of the construction industry. The concept of %93technology adoption life cycle%94 is investigated to understand better the acceptance of new technology by key parties. A new model of innovation is proposed. In this model%2C the transformation process of invention into adoption flows through a cyclical mechanism encompassing six phases%3A 1%29 need%2C 2%29 creation%2C 3%29 invention%2C 4%29 innovation%2C 5%29 diffusion%2C and 6%29 adoption. This model clearly shows the interaction of the three most influential domains%3A users%2C changes%2C and the environment. The model also takes into consideration the influence of technology and market-driven forces on the creation and diffusion of innovation. As a consequence of their particular function in the construction activity%2C construction management firms should perform as catalysts in the generation and diffusion of technological advances in the Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Innovation%2C+invention%2C+innovation+models%2C+technology+adoption+life+cycle%2C+construction+management.+

  20. Approaching Service Innovation Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    NAGY Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims at analyzing the types of innovation in the field of services. First, the concept of innovation is defined and second, field literature is reviewed from the perspective of service innovation. The main types of innovation are identified based on several attempts at defining innovation, the most notable being Schumpeter’s. Thus, it is possible to approach concepts such as product and process innovation, incremental and radical innovation. Another aim has been to regard se...