WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding physician satisfaction

  1. Referring physician satisfaction: toward a better understanding of hospital referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzurick, T G; France, K R; Logar, C M

    1998-01-01

    Customer satisfaction literature has contributed significantly to the development of marketing strategies in the health-care arena. The research has led to the development of hospital-driven relationship marketing programs. This study examines the inclusion of referring physicians as partners in the hospital's relationship marketing program. In exploring this relationship, medical and hospital facility characteristics that referring physicians find important in making patient referrals to specialty care hospitals are identified and analyzed. The results lead to the development of strategic initiatives which hospital marketers should consider when developing relationship marketing programs designed to satisfy their referring physicians.

  2. Physicians' Job Satisfaction.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    job satisfaction. The job demand resource model was used to characterize working conditions by two categories: job demands and job resources. Job demands refer to organizational, physical, psychological or social characteristics of work environment, demanding one's time and cognitive or physical efforts.(5) Examples of ...

  3. Physician Behaviors that Correlate with Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Loretto M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of 15 internal medicine residents was observed through a one-way mirror and ratings by the patients of satisfaction with their physicians were obtained. The teaching of caring skills and which physician caring skills affect the patients' satisfaction are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  4. Low Job Satisfaction Among Physicians in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Gamal Abdel-Rahman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM/BACKGROUND: Physician’s job satisfaction is a cornerstone for improving the quality of health care, and its continuity. To identify the extent of job satisfaction and explain its main components among physicians, together with finding out the main indicators for job satisfaction. METHODS: We randomly selected physicians from the Egyptian Ministry of Health and Population Hospitals. All participants were asked to fill a self administrated questionnaire which included data pertaining socio-demographic characteristics and job satisfaction regarding salaries/incentives, monitoring, administration system, management, career satisfaction, relationship with colleagues, social support, opportunities for promotion, and job responsibilities. Satisfied was defined as satisfaction of>60%. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty eight physicians participated in this study; with mean age of 37.1+ 9.4 years, and 70.2% were males. Only 42.9% of the physicians’ reported job satisfaction. Relationship with colleagues was the most important component of satisfaction with mean of 81.3+19.6 while, salaries/incentives were the least one with mean of 16.2+ 14. The overall current satisfying domains were not significantly associated with marital status or educational level, however it was significantly associated with specialty. Neither age nor gender was significantly associated with the degree of job satisfaction. CONCLUSION: Our results call for paying more attention to improve physicians’ job satisfaction in Egypt, to meet needed higher standards in health care. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(2: 91-96

  5. Career satisfaction and burnout among Ghanaian physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku, Samuel T; Apenteng, Bettye A

    2014-03-01

    Thus far, there has been limited inquiry into the factors associated with physician career satisfaction and burnout in Ghana, although the two have been linked to the brain drain problem. The objective of this study was to assess career satisfaction and burnout among physicians practicing in a developing nation, Ghana. A 21-item instrument was used to assess career satisfaction among actively practicing Ghanaian physicians, using items adapted from the Physician Worklife Study survey. Burnout was assessed using the Abbreviated Maslach's Burnout Inventory. Two hundred physicians participated in the online survey from December 2012 to February 2013. Generally, physicians in Ghana expressed moderate overall career satisfaction. However, they were least satisfied with the availability of resources, their compensation and work-life balance. Overall, burnout was low in the study population; however physicians exhibited moderate levels of emotional exhaustion. Career satisfaction was negatively associated with the burnout dimensions of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and low personal accomplishment. Health policy-makers in Ghana should address issues relating to resource adequacy, compensation and the work-life balance of physicians in order to improve the overall career satisfaction of an already dwindling physician workforce.

  6. Communication Skills of Physicians and Patients’ Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglu, Mohammad-Hossein; Nateq, Farnaz; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Asgharzadeh, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: The communication skills of physicians is an effective step of making effective relationship between doctor and patient. It plays essential role through diagnosis and treatment processes. This current study was performed to investigate the impact of communication skillfulness of physicians on patients’ satisfaction. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was done to determine the impact of communication capability of practitioners on patients’ satisfaction. The DiMatto’s Patient Satisfaction Scale was administered among patients referring to the all 8 specialized clinics of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The validity and reliability of Persian translation of questionnaire of DiMatto’s Patient Satisfaction was verified by 10 specialists. The validity of the questionnaire was measured by content and structural analysis, and Cronbach’s alpha coefficients. The data were analyzed by software package of SPSS version 16 using Pearson’s correlation coefficient, U Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-wallis Test, Regression. Results: The study showed that there was a significant correlation between patients’ satisfaction and the communication skills of physicians (devoting the appropriate time for visiting the patients, explaining diagnosis and treatment procedures). In addition, the therapeutic skills of physicians, their friendly manners, respecting the patients’ feelings, and careful examination of patients by physician, revealed a significant correlation with patient satisfaction (P Communication skills of physician play an important role on patients’ satisfaction; therefore, we propose strongly to improve the communication skills of physicians by improving the communication skills through related training courses. PMID:29109665

  7. Communication Skills of Physicians and Patients' Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglu, Mohammad-Hossein; Nateq, Farnaz; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Asgharzadeh, Ali

    2017-09-01

    The communication skills of physicians is an effective step of making effective relationship between doctor and patient. It plays essential role through diagnosis and treatment processes. This current study was performed to investigate the impact of communication skillfulness of physicians on patients' satisfaction. A cross-sectional descriptive study was done to determine the impact of communication capability of practitioners on patients' satisfaction. The DiMatto's Patient Satisfaction Scale was administered among patients referring to the all 8 specialized clinics of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The validity and reliability of Persian translation of questionnaire of DiMatto's Patient Satisfaction was verified by 10 specialists. The validity of the questionnaire was measured by content and structural analysis, and Cronbach's alpha coefficients. The data were analyzed by software package of SPSS version 16 using Pearson's correlation coefficient, U Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-wallis Test, Regression. The study showed that there was a significant correlation between patients' satisfaction and the communication skills of physicians (devoting the appropriate time for visiting the patients, explaining diagnosis and treatment procedures). In addition, the therapeutic skills of physicians, their friendly manners, respecting the patients' feelings, and careful examination of patients by physician, revealed a significant correlation with patient satisfaction (P Communication skills of physician play an important role on patients' satisfaction; therefore, we propose strongly to improve the communication skills of physicians by improving the communication skills through related training courses.

  8. Physician Satisfaction in Treating Medically Unexplained Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Simon G; Yoon, John D; Curlin, Farr A

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether treating conditions having medically unexplained symptoms is associated with lower physician satisfaction and higher ascribed patient responsibility, and to determine whether higher ascribed patient responsibility is associated with lower physician satisfaction in treating a given condition. We surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1504 US primary care physicians. Respondents were asked how responsible patients are for two conditions with more-developed medical explanations (depression and anxiety) and two conditions with less-developed medical explanations (chronic back pain and fibromyalgia), and how much satisfaction they experienced in treating each condition. We used Wald tests to compare mean satisfaction and ascribed patient responsibility between medically explained conditions and medically unexplained conditions. We conducted single-level and multilevel ordinal logistic models to test the relation between ascribed patient responsibility and physician satisfaction. Treating medically unexplained conditions elicited less satisfaction than treating medically explained conditions (Wald P satisfaction when treating symptoms that result from choices for which patients are responsible (multilevel odds ratio 0.57, P = 0.000). Physicians experience less satisfaction in treating conditions characterized by medically unexplained conditions and in treating conditions for which they believe the patient is responsible.

  9. Low Job Satisfaction Among Physicians in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Gamal Abdel-Rahman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM/BACKGROUND: Physician’s job satisfaction is a cornerstone for improving the quality of health care, and its continuity. To identify the extent of job satisfaction and explain its main components among physicians, together with finding out the main indicators for job satisfaction. METHODS: We randomly selected physicians from the Egyptian Ministry of Health and Population Hospitals. All participants were asked to fill a self administrated questionnaire which included data pertaining socio-demographic characteristics and job satisfaction regarding salaries/incentives, monitoring, administration system, management, career satisfaction, relationship with colleagues, social support, opportunities for promotion, and job responsibilities. Satisfied was defined as satisfaction of>60%. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty eight physicians participated in this study; with mean age of 37.1+ 9.4 years, and 70.2% were males. Only 42.9% of the physicians’ reported job satisfaction. Relationship with colleagues was the most important component of satisfaction with mean of 81.3+19.6 while, salaries/incentives were the least one with mean of 16.2+ 14. The overall current satisfying domains were not significantly associated with marital status or educational level, however it was significantly associated with specialty. Neither age nor gender was significantly associated with the degree of job satisfaction. CONCLUSION: Our results call for paying more attention to improve physicians’ job satisfaction in Egypt, to meet needed higher standards in health care. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 91-96

  10. Physician Order Entry Clerical Support Improves Physician Satisfaction and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contratto, Erin; Romp, Katherine; Estrada, Carlos A; Agne, April; Willett, Lisa L

    2017-05-01

    To examine the impact of clerical support personnel for physician order entry on physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with electronic health record (EHR) documentation, and physician attitudes. All seven part-time physicians at an academic general internal medicine practice were included in this quasi-experimental (single group, pre- and postintervention) mixed-methods study. One full-time clerical support staff member was trained and hired to enter physician orders in the EHR and conduct previsit planning. Physician satisfaction, productivity, timeliness with EHR documentation, and physician attitudes toward the intervention were measured. Four months after the intervention, physicians reported improvements in overall quality of life (good quality, 71%-100%), personal balance (43%-71%), and burnout (weekly, 43%-14%; callousness, 14%-0%). Matched for quarter, productivity increased: work relative value unit (wRVU) per session increased by 20.5% (before, April-June 2014; after, April-June 2015; range -9.2% to 27.5%). Physicians reported feeling more supported, more focused on patient care, and less stressed and fatigued after the intervention. This study supports the use of physician order entry clerical personnel as a simple, cost-effective intervention to improve the work lives of primary care physicians.

  11. Physician Job Satisfaction across Six Major Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Richard, George V.

    2006-01-01

    A random sample of 763 physicians was surveyed to examine the relation of 18 critical work-related factors to job satisfaction. On the whole, physicians reported that they were satisfied with their careers and believed that caring for patients, sense of accomplishment, continuity of care, autonomy, and personal time were the five most important…

  12. [Population satisfaction with health care and physicians' job satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Fredrik; Bringedal, Berit

    2009-02-26

    To assess whether development of health services in Norway has been well balanced in terms of satisfaction; time series variation has been compared for population satisfaction with health services and physician job satisfaction. Data were retrieved from the following sources and years: the reference panel of The Research Institute of the Norwegian Medical Association on physician job satisfaction in the years 1994, 2000, 2002 and 2006; the municipal surveys of TNS Gallup on population satisfaction with health care (primary) in the years 1995 - 2000, 2003 and 2005 and in 1999, 2000 and 2003 for satisfaction with hospitals, and from the Norwegian part of the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) on population willingness to allocate resources to public health care (in 1990 and 2006). Time series of physician satisfaction were computed from changes in satisfaction between consecutive surveys. Time series of population satisfaction were computed from annual regression-adjusted means that control for the association between satisfaction and observable personal characteristics. On a scale from 10 to 70, hospital doctors' job satisfaction increased from 50.2 in 1994 to 52.3 in 2006. General practitioners' job satisfaction increased from 52.3 to 55.5 in the same period. From 1995 to 2005, consumer satisfaction with primary care increased from 4.43 to 4.54 and with hospital services from 4.23 to 4.47 (on a scale from 1 to 6). The proportion of the population who believes more public resources should be spent on health care increased from 82.7 % in 1990 to 85.2 % in 2006. The development in the health care sector seems to be balanced in the sense that views of the population and health personnel have followed parallel trajectories. A large and increasing share of the population is willing to allocate more resources to health care.

  13. Physician motivation, satisfaction and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimberg, S E; Clement, D G

    1997-01-01

    Physicians are working harder today and enjoying it less. What has happened to create such dissatisfaction among those in one of the most autonomous professions? What can be done to address the anger, fear and unhappiness? This article is an analysis of the factors influencing human motivation. Maslow's hierarchy of needs--physiological, safety/security, social/affiliation, esteem and self-actualization--is used to suggest ways physicians can satisfy their needs in turbulent financial and professional times.

  14. Physician job satisfaction related to actual and preferred job size

    OpenAIRE

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Stewart, Roy E.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Job satisfaction is essential for physicians' well-being and patient care. The work ethic of long days and hard work that has been advocated for decades is acknowledged as a threat for physicians' job satisfaction, well-being, and patient safety. Our aim was to determine the actual and preferred job size of physicians and to investigate how these and the differences between them influence physicians' job satisfaction. Method: Data were retrieved from a larger, longitudinal study a...

  15. Aligning Career Expectations with the Practice of Medicine: Physician Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Denise D.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined physicians' level of satisfaction with their job and the match between expectations and actual practice of specialty. Quantitative results suggested that physicians (N = 211) had a moderately high level of overall job satisfaction with no significant differences found between men and women physicians. Among those in primary…

  16. Job satisfaction of primary care physicians in Switzerland: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Jossen, Marianne; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Rosemann, Thomas; Hahn, Karolin; Hess, Sigrid

    2016-10-01

    Job satisfaction of physicians is an important issue for performance of a health care system. The aim of the study was to evaluate the job satisfaction of primary care physicians in Switzerland and to explore associations between overall job satisfaction, individual characteristics and satisfaction with aspects of work within the practice separated by gender. This cross-sectional study was based on a job satisfaction survey. Data were collected from 176 primary care physicians working in 91 primary care practices. Job satisfaction was measured with the 10-item Warr-Cook-Wall job satisfaction scale. Stepwise linear regression analysis was performed for physicians separated by gender. The response rate was 92.6%. Primary care physicians reported the highest level of satisfaction with 'freedom of working method' (mean = 6.45) and the lowest satisfaction for 'hours of work' (mean = 5.38) and 'income' (mean = 5.49). Moreover, some aspects of job satisfaction were rated higher by female physicians than male physicians. Within the stepwise regression analysis, the aspect 'opportunity to use abilities' (β = 0.644) showed the highest association to overall job satisfaction for male physicians while for female physicians it was income (β = 0.733). The presented results contribute to an understanding of factors that influence levels of satisfaction of female and male physicians. Therefore, research and intervention about job satisfaction should consider gender as well as the stereotypes that come along with these social roles. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Physician satisfaction and practice intentions in Northwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Mary Lou; Kuluski, Kerry; Brownlee, Keith; Snow, Serena

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this research was to understand factors that affect future practice intentions of physicians who practise in rural and underserviced areas. The following 2 research questions are answered: "How many physicians in Northwestern Ontario intend to leave their practice in 5 years?" and "What is the association between professional, personal/family and community factors in physician satisfaction and intention to stay in practice?" Between September and October 2004, physicians practising in Northwestern Ontario were mailed a survey measuring professional, personal/family and community satisfaction as well as future practice intentions. Future practice intention (question 1) was analyzed through a frequency distribution, while the factors that influenced intention (question 2) were analyzed using a 3-step process: a factor analysis, the creation of scales and a logistic regression. The themes of the scales emerging from the factor analysis were family/community, time, professional support and efficacy, and sense of belonging and appreciation. The means of these 4 scales were entered into a logistic regression model along with demographic variables that were independent predictors of future practice intention. Three hundred and twenty-eight physicians were sent the survey. After 3 consecutive mailings, the response rate was 61.3% (n=201). Over two-thirds of Northwestern Ontario physicians intended to remain in practice in 5 years; however, most of these physicians were from Thunder Bay, the only city (100 000+ population) in Northwestern Ontario. Physicians were significantly more likely to intend to stay in practice if they were younger, practised in Thunder Bay and scored higher on the family/community scale. These findings underscore the importance of addressing family and community factors, as opposed to strictly professional factors, in future retention initiatives.

  18. Physician job satisfaction related to actual and preferred job size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Stewart, Roy E.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Job satisfaction is essential for physicians' well-being and patient care. The work ethic of long days and hard work that has been advocated for decades is acknowledged as a threat for physicians' job satisfaction, well-being, and patient safety. Our aim was to determine the actual and

  19. The Relationships among Physician Nonverbal Immediacy and Measures of Patient Satisfaction with Physician Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlee, Connie J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines the relationship among four dimensions of patient satisfaction with physician care and nonverbal immediacy. Finds a significant positive correlation between nonverbal immediacy and overall patient satisfaction, with the strongest correlation to the attention/respect factor. (SR)

  20. The Relationship of Perceived Physician Communicator Style to Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Laura L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines how patients' perceptions of their physicians' communicator styles were related to patient satisfaction. Identifies eight communicator styles and six dimensions of patient satisfaction. Concludes that most significant relationships were nonlinear and that different styles were related to different types of satisfaction. Discusses…

  1. Inability of Physicians and Nurses to Predict Patient Satisfaction in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Matthew C.; Page, David B.; Kunstadt, Ethan B.; Ragan, Matt; Rodgers, Joel; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction is a commonly assessed dimension of emergency department (ED) care quality. The ability of ED clinicians to estimate patient satisfaction is unknown. We sought to evaluate the ability of emergency medicine resident physicians and nurses to predict patient-reported satisfaction with physician and nursing care, pain levels, and understanding of discharge instructions. Methods We studied a convenience sample of 100 patients treated at an urban academic ED. Patients rated satisfaction with nursing care, physician care, pain level at time of disposition and understanding of discharge instructions. Resident physicians and nurses estimated responses for each patient. We compared patient, physician and nursing responses using Cohen’s kappa, weighting the estimates to account for the ordinal responses. Results Overall, patients had a high degree of satisfaction with care provided by the nurses and physicians, although this was underestimated by providers. There was poor agreement between physician estimation of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.23, standard error: 0.078) and nursing estimates of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.11, standard error: 0.043); physician estimation of patient pain (weighted κ=0.43, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.39, standard error: 0.081); physician estimates of patient comprehension of discharge instruction (weighted κ=0.19, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.13, standard error: 0.078). Providers underestimated pain and patient comprehension of discharge instructions. Conclusion ED providers were not able to predict patient satisfaction with nurse or physician care, pain level, or understanding of discharge instructions. PMID:26759661

  2. Job satisfaction among obstetrician-gynecologists: a comparison between private practice physicians and academic physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Darrel J; Bringman, Jay; Bush, Andrew; Phillips, Owen P

    2006-11-01

    Physician job satisfaction has been the subject of much research. However, no studies have been conducted comparing academic and private practice physician satisfaction in obstetrics and gynecology. This study was undertaken to measure satisfaction levels for academic and private practice obstetrician-gynecologists and compare different aspects of their practice that contributed to their satisfaction. A survey was mailed to randomly selected obstetrician-gynecologists in Memphis, TN; Birmingham, AL; Little Rock, AR; and Jackson, MS. Physicians were asked to respond to questions concerning demographics and career satisfaction. They were also asked to assess the contribution of 13 different aspects of their practice in contributing to their job selection and satisfaction using a Likert scale. A score of 1 meant the physician completely disagreed with a statement regarding a factor's contribution or was completely dissatisfied; a score of 5 meant the physician completely agreed with a factor's contribution or was completely satisfied. Simple descriptive statistics, as well as the 2-sample t test, were used. Likert scale values were assumed to be interval measurements. Of the 297 questionnaires mailed, 129 (43%) physicians responded. Ninety-five (74%) respondents rated their overall satisfaction as 4 or 5. No significant difference was found between academic and private physicians when comparing overall job satisfaction (P = .25). When compared to private practice physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to overall job satisfaction for academic physicians were the ability to teach, conduct research, and practice variety (P = .0001, P = .0001, and P = .007, respectively). When compared with academic physicians, the aspects most likely contributing to job satisfaction for private practice physicians were autonomy, physician-patient relationship, and insurance reimbursement (P = .0058, P = .0001, and P = .0098, respectively). When choosing a practice setting

  3. Job and life satisfaction among remote physicians in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M C; Chou, M C

    1991-07-01

    To determine the nature and current level of job and life satisfaction among remote physicians in Taiwan, 115 physicians practicing in 31 aboriginal townships and on 3 offshore islands were interviewed through a mail survey. Out of 95 respondents, 93% were male. The average age was 46.0 years, and 82% of the physicians practiced only primary care. About half of the respondents had not received any residency training prior to their beginning practice. Physicians aboriginal areas and on offshore islands appear to be moderately satisfied with their jobs and with their lives in general. In aggregate, the areas of greatest job satisfaction included their contacts with other physicians and their relationships with other health care workers. Areas of least satisfaction included physicians' salary/income and their opportunities for promotion in the future. Most respondents felt that the greatest causes of work stress were the realities of medical practice and the time pressures. Areas of least stress included clinical competence/interpersonal relations and anxieties about the future. In aggregate, the areas of lowest life satisfaction included the physicians' incomes and the lack of leisure activities. It is suggested that a family practice residency training course prior to practice and access to continuing medical education programs are urgently needed for remote physicians in Taiwan. On the other hand, economic incentives seem to be the best strategy to increase the job and life satisfaction of these physicians.

  4. Physician job satisfaction related to actual and preferred job size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Borleffs, Jan C C; Stewart, Roy E; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna

    2017-05-11

    Job satisfaction is essential for physicians' well-being and patient care. The work ethic of long days and hard work that has been advocated for decades is acknowledged as a threat for physicians' job satisfaction, well-being, and patient safety. Our aim was to determine the actual and preferred job size of physicians and to investigate how these and the differences between them influence physicians' job satisfaction. Data were retrieved from a larger, longitudinal study among physicians starting medical training at Groningen University in 1982/83/92/93 (N = 597). Data from 506 participants (85%) were available for this study. We used regression analysis to investigate the influence of job size on physicians' job satisfaction (13 aspects) and ANOVA to examine differences in job satisfaction between physicians wishing to retain, reduce or increase job size. The majority of the respondents (57%) had an actual job size less than 1.0 FTE. More than 80% of all respondents preferred not to work full-time in the future. Respondents' average actual and preferred job sizes were .85 FTE and .81 FTE, respectively. On average, respondents who wished to work less (35% of respondents) preferred a job size reduction of 0.18 FTE and those who wished to work more (12%) preferred an increase in job size of 0.16 FTE. Job size influenced satisfaction with balance work-private hours most (β = -.351). Physicians who preferred larger job sizes were - compared to the other groups of physicians - least satisfied with professional accomplishments. A considerable group of physicians reported a gap between actual and preferred job size. Realizing physicians' preferences as to job size will hardly affect total workforce, but may greatly benefit individual physicians as well as their patients and society. Therefore, it seems time for a shift in work ethic.

  5. Determinants of Indian physicians' satisfaction & dissatisfaction from their job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Goel, Sonu; Singh, Sharad Kumar; Sharma, Raman; Gupta, Pramod K

    2014-03-01

    Physicians' satisfaction/dissatisfaction from their job is an important factor associated with health service that deals with human life. This study was conducted to ascertain overall level and proportion of physicians' satisfaction from their job as well as to identify those components that influenced it. A comprehensive customized questionnaire was used with Section A to assess demographic profile of physicians and Section B to assess satisfaction. Response to each question was devised using Likert scale. Likert scale responses were converted to normal scale so that statistical procedures could be naturally developed. A total of 170 physicians were selected using multistage sampling. Questionnaire was administered on one to one basis to avoid non-response. Precise and contextualized descriptive and inferential statistical procedures were used for analysis. Of the 140 physicians, 103 (74%) were satisfied from their job with average score of 19.15 ± 11.46 while 37 (26%) were dissatisfied with average score -09.27 ± 06.30. Nine out of 15 components were found significant (P<0.05). Comparative assessment of the present results with those of other studies revealed that satisfaction percentage of Indian physicians and those of the developed countries were almost the same. Perhaps, magnitude of satisfaction level (average score) of the Indian physicians were towards the lower side. Nine determinants, identified in this study can be used safely to assess any professionals' satisfaction.

  6. Physician Empathy as a Driver of Hand Surgery Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Mariano E; Chen, Neal C; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Jupiter, Jesse B; Ring, David

    2015-09-01

    To examine the relationship between patient-rated physician empathy and patient satisfaction after a single new hand surgery office visit. Directly after the office visit, 112 consecutive new patients rated their overall satisfaction with the provider and completed the Consultation and Relational Empathy Measure, the Newest Vital Sign health literacy test, a sociodemographic survey, and 3 Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-based questionnaires: Pain Interference, Upper-Extremity Function, and Depression. We also measured the waiting time in the office to see the physician, the duration of the visit, and the time from booking until appointment. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to identify factors independently associated with patient satisfaction. Patient-rated physician empathy correlated strongly with the degree of overall satisfaction with the provider. After controlling for confounding effects, greater empathy was independently associated with patient satisfaction, and it alone accounted for 65% of the variation in satisfaction scores. Older patient age was also associated with satisfaction. There were no differences between satisfied and dissatisfied patients with regard to waiting time in the office, duration of the appointment, time from booking until appointment, and health literacy. Physician empathy was the strongest driver of patient satisfaction in the hand surgery office setting. As patient satisfaction plays a growing role in reimbursement, targeted educational programs to enhance empathic communication skills in hand surgeons merit consideration. Prognostic II. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Career satisfaction and retention of a sample of women physicians who work reduced hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Rosalind C; Gareis, Karen C; Carr, Phyllis L

    2005-03-01

    To better understand the career satisfaction and factors related to retention of women physicians who work reduced hours and are in dual-earner couples in comparison to their full-time counterparts. Survey of a random sample of female physicians between 25 and 50 years of age working within 25 miles of Boston, whose names were obtained from the Board of Registration in Medicine in Massachusetts. Interviewers conducted a 60-minute face-to-face closed-ended interview after interviewees completed a 20-minute mailed questionnaire. Fifty-one full-time physicians and 47 reduced hours physicians completed the study; the completion rate was 49.5%. The two groups were similar in age, years as a physician, mean household income, number of children, and presence of an infant in the home. Reduced hours physicians in this sample had a different relationship to experiences in the family than full-time physicians. (1) When reduced hours physicians had low marital role quality, there was an associated lower career satisfaction; full-time physicians report high career satisfaction regardless of their marital role quality. (2) When reduced hours physicians had low marital role or parental role quality, there was an associated higher intention to leave their jobs than for full-time physicians; when marital role or parental role quality was high, there was an associated lower intention to leave their jobs than for full-time physicians. (3) When reduced hours physicians perceived that work interfering with family was high, there was an associated greater intention to leave their jobs that was not apparent for full-time physicians. Women physicians in this sample who worked reduced hours had stronger relationships between family experiences (marital and parental role quality and work interference with family) and professional outcomes than had their full-time counterparts. Both career satisfaction and intention to leave their employment are correlated with the quality of home life for

  8. Electronic health records: postadoption physician satisfaction and continued use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward; Marvel, Jon

    2012-01-01

    One goal of public-policy makers in general and health care managers in particular is the adoption and efficient utilization of electronic health record (EHR) systems throughout the health care industry. Consequently, this investigation focused on the effects of known antecedents of technology adoption on physician satisfaction with EHR technology and the continued use of such systems. The American Academy of Family Physicians provided support in the survey of 453 physicians regarding their satisfaction with their EHR use experience. A conceptual model merging technology adoption and computer user satisfaction models was tested using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that effort expectancy (ease of use) has the most substantive effect on physician satisfaction and the continued use of EHR systems. As such, health care managers should be especially sensitive to the user and computer interface of prospective EHR systems to avoid costly and disruptive system selection mistakes.

  9. Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

  10. Improving patient satisfaction through physician education, feedback, and incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banka, Gaurav; Edgington, Sarah; Kyulo, Namgyal; Padilla, Tony; Mosley, Virgie; Afsarmanesh, Nasim; Fonarow, Gregg C; Ong, Michael K

    2015-08-01

    Patient satisfaction has been associated with improved outcomes and become a focus of reimbursement. Evaluate an intervention to improve patient satisfaction. Nonrandomized, pre-post study that took place from 2011 to 2012. Large tertiary academic medical center. Internal medicine (IM) resident physicians, non-IM resident physicians, and adult patients of the resident physicians. IM resident physicians were provided with patient satisfaction education through a conference, real-time individualized patient satisfaction score feedback, monthly recognition, and incentives for high patient-satisfaction scores. Patient satisfaction on physician-related and overall satisfaction questions on the HCAHPS survey. We conducted a difference-in-differences regression analysis comparing IM and non-IM patient responses, adjusting for differences in patient characteristics. In our regression analysis, the percentage of patients who responded positively to all 3 physician-related Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) questions increased by 8.1% in the IM and 1.5% in the control cohorts (absolute difference 6.6%, P = 0.04). The percentage of patients who would definitely recommend this hospital to friends and family increased by 7.1% in the IM and 1.5% in the control cohorts (absolute difference 5.6%, P = 0.02). The national average for the HCAHPS outcomes studied improved by no more than 3.1%. This study was nonrandomized and was conducted at a single site. To our knowledge, this is the first intervention associated with a significant improvement in HCAHPS scores. This may serve as a model to increase patient satisfaction, hospital revenue, and train resident physicians. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  11. Determinants of Job Satisfaction among Physicians in Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNIBEN

    study was to identify the determinants of job satisfaction among physicians in Calabar. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among all 157 eligible and consenting physicians who had worked for at least six months in three public hospitals in. Calabar. ...... livestock development assistants of West.

  12. Patterns of Physician-Patient Communication Associated with Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. Lee; Clampitt, Phillip G.

    Using data drawn from ten initial physician/patient interviews, an original category system was employed to analyze patterns of physician/patient communication. Static analysis, interaction analysis, and Markov chain analysis were used to discover the underlying communication patterns associated with patient satisfaction. Results revealed that…

  13. Physician satisfaction with a multi-platform digital scheduling system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Octávio Deliberato

    Full Text Available Physician shift schedules are regularly created manually, using paper or a shared online spreadsheet. Mistakes are not unusual, leading to last minute scrambles to cover a shift. We developed a web-based shift scheduling system and a mobile application tool to facilitate both the monthly scheduling and shift exchanges between physicians. The primary objective was to compare physician satisfaction before and after the mobile application implementation.Over a 9-month period, three surveys, using the 4-point Likert type scale were performed to assess the physician satisfaction. The first survey was conducted three months prior mobile application release, a second survey three months after implementation and the last survey six months after.51 (77% of the physicians answered the baseline survey. Of those, 32 (63% were males with a mean age of 37.8 ± 5.5 years. Prior to the mobile application implementation, 36 (70% of the responders were using more than one method to carry out shift exchanges and only 20 (40% were using the official department report sheet to document shift exchanges. The second and third survey were answered by 48 (73% physicians. Forty-eight (98% of them found the mobile application easy or very easy to install and 47 (96% did not want to go back to the previous method. Regarding physician satisfaction, at baseline 37% of the physicians were unsatisfied or very unsatisfied with shift scheduling. After the mobile application was implementation, only 4% reported being unsatisfied (OR = 0.11, p < 0.001. The satisfaction level improved from 63% to 96% between the first and the last survey. Satisfaction levels significantly increased between the three time points (OR = 13.33, p < 0.001.Our web and mobile phone-based scheduling system resulted in better physician satisfaction.

  14. Impact of Scribes on Physician Satisfaction, Patient Satisfaction, and Charting Efficiency: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidwani, Risha; Nguyen, Cathina; Kofoed, Alexis; Carragee, Catherine; Rydel, Tracy; Nelligan, Ian; Sattler, Amelia; Mahoney, Megan; Lin, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Scribes are increasingly being used in clinical practice despite a lack of high-quality evidence regarding their effects. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of medical scribes on physician satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and charting efficiency. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in which physicians in an academic family medicine clinic were randomized to 1 week with a scribe then 1 week without a scribe for the course of 1 year. Scribes drafted all relevant documentation, which was reviewed by the physician before attestation and signing. In encounters without a scribe, the physician performed all charting duties. Our outcomes were physician satisfaction, measured by a 5-item instrument that included physicians' perceptions of chart quality and chart accuracy; patient satisfaction, measured by a 6-item instrument; and charting efficiency, measured by time to chart close. Scribes improved all aspects of physician satisfaction, including overall satisfaction with clinic (OR = 10.75), having enough face time with patients (OR = 3.71), time spent charting (OR = 86.09), chart quality (OR = 7.25), and chart accuracy (OR = 4.61) (all P values patient satisfaction. Scribes increased the proportion of charts that were closed within 48 hours (OR =1.18, P =.028). To our knowledge, we have conducted the first randomized controlled trial of scribes. We found that scribes produced significant improvements in overall physician satisfaction, satisfaction with chart quality and accuracy, and charting efficiency without detracting from patient satisfaction. Scribes appear to be a promising strategy to improve health care efficiency and reduce physician burnout. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  15. Communication Skills Training for Physicians Improves Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissy, Adrienne; Windover, Amy K; Bokar, Dan; Karafa, Matthew; Neuendorf, Katie; Frankel, Richard M; Merlino, James; Rothberg, Michael B

    2016-07-01

    Skilled physician communication is a key component of patient experience. Large-scale studies of exposure to communication skills training and its impact on patient satisfaction have not been conducted. We aimed to examine the impact of experiential relationship-centered physician communication skills training on patient satisfaction and physician experience. This was an observational study. The study was conducted at a large, multispecialty academic medical center. Participants included 1537 attending physicians who participated in, and 1951 physicians who did not participate in, communication skills training between 1 August 2013 and 30 April 2014. An 8-h block of interactive didactics, live or video skill demonstrations, and small group and large group skills practice sessions using a relationship-centered model. Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CGCAHPS), Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), self-efficacy, and post course satisfaction. Following the course, adjusted overall CGCAHPS scores for physician communication were higher for intervention physicians than for controls (92.09 vs. 91.09, p communication scores (83.95 vs. 82.73, p = 0.22). Physicians reported high course satisfaction and showed significant improvement in empathy (116.4 ± 12.7 vs. 124 ± 11.9, p communication skills training improved patient satisfaction scores, improved physician empathy, self-efficacy, and reduced physician burnout. Further research is necessary to examine longer-term sustainability of such interventions.

  16. Physician satisfaction with a critical care clinical information system using a multimethod evaluation of usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Darren; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Zuege, Danny J

    2018-04-01

    Physician satisfaction with electronic medical records has often been poor. Usability has frequently been identified as a source for decreased satisfaction. While surveys can identify many issues, and are logistically easier to administer, they may miss issues identified using other methods This study sought to understand the level of physician satisfaction and usability issues associated with a critical care clinical information system (eCritical Alberta) implemented throughout the province of Alberta, Canada. All critical care attending physicians using the system were invited to participate in an online survey. Questions included components of the User Acceptance of Information Technology and Usability Questionnaire as well as free text feedback on system components. Physicians were also invited to participate in a think aloud test using simulated scenarios. The transcribed think aloud text and questionnaire were subjected to textual analysis. 82% of all eligible physicians completed the on-line survey (n = 61). Eight physicians were invited and seven completed the think aloud test. Overall satisfaction with the system was moderate. Usability was identified as a significant factor contributing to satisfaction. The major usability factors identified were system response time and layout. The think aloud component identified additional factors beyond those identified in the on-line survey. This study found a modestly high level of physician satisfaction with a province-wide clinical critical care information system. Usability continues to be a significant factor in physician satisfaction. Using multiple methods of evaluation can capture the benefits of a large sample size and deeper understanding of the issues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Physician job satisfaction and working conditions in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koji; Arimatsu, Mayuri; Higashi, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Toru; Oda, Susumu; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Kawashima, Masatoshi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors of working conditions associated with job satisfaction among physicians in Japan. We sent a questionnaire to all the physicians who graduated from a medical school in Japan. Physicians who were satisfied with their job were determined as those who selected "very satisfied" and "satisfied" in response to the question: "Overall, are you satisfied with your job?" Working conditions were determined from 10 different aspects: income fairness, hospital resources, career satisfaction, difficulty in patient care, lack of personal time, administrative work, workload, and relationships with physician colleagues, staff and patients. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the association between working conditions and job satisfaction. Among the respondents, 209 (55.4%) men and 62 (61.4%) women were determined to be satisfied with their job. Job satisfaction was associated with income fairness for both men (corrected odds ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.47) and women (1.35, 1.05 to 1.53). For men, job satisfaction was associated with good hospital resources (1.45, 1.29 to 1.57), high career satisfaction (1.41, 1.23 to 1.57), good relationships with physician colleagues (1.33, 1.12 to 1.49), and good relationships with hospital staff (1.28, 1.07 to 1.45). For women, job satisfaction was associated with good relationships with patients (1.41, 1.07 to 1.56). Certain working conditions were important factors for job satisfaction among physicians. These factors should be discussed for improving working conditions.

  18. Marital and Parental Satisfaction of Married Physicians with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warde, Carole M; Moonesinghe, Kushan; Allen, Walter; Gelberg, Lillian

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate personal and professional factors associated with marital and parental satisfaction of physicians. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS A survey was sent to equal numbers of licensed male and female physicians in a Southern California county. Of 964 delivered questionnaires, 656 (68%) were returned completed. Our sample includes 415 currently married physicians with children, 64% male and 36% female. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Ratings of marital and parental satisfaction were measured on a 5-point Likert scale, 5 being extremely satisfied. Prevalence of work and home life factors was also evaluated. The mean score for marital satisfaction was 3.92 (range 1.75–5.0). Approximately half of the physicians reported high levels of marital satisfaction (63% of male physicians and 45% of female physicians). The gender difference disappeared after adjusting for age differences. Two factors were associated with high marital satisfaction: a supportive spouse (odds ratio [OR] 10.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.66, 40.08) and role conflict (OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.42, 0.88). The mean score for parental satisfaction was 3.43 (range 1.0–5.0), and approximately two thirds of both male and female physicians reported at least moderate levels of parental satisfaction. The major factors associated with parental satisfaction were a supportive spouse (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.32, 3.80), role conflict (OR 0.35; 95% CI 0.23, 0.53), salaried practice setting (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.21, 3.81), marriage to a spouse working in a profession (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.21, 3.81), and marriage to a spouse working as a homemaker (OR 2.33; 95% CI 1.20, 4.56). Number of hours worked was not found to be related to either satisfaction score, but rather to an intervening variable, role conflict. CONCLUSIONS For physicians with children, our study indicates that minimizing the level of role conflict and having a supportive spouse are associated with higher levels of marital and

  19. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgierska A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Zgierska,1 David Rabago,1 Michael M Miller2–4 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, 2American Society of Addiction Medicine, Chevy Chase, MD, 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, 4Herrington Recovery Center, Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, WI, USA Background: Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective: The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods: A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results: One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state's emergency department [ED] physicians. The respondents were predominantly male (85% and practicing in solo or private practice (45%, hospital (43%, or academia (15%. The majority were ED (57%, followed by primary care (16% physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion

  20. Interprofessional collaboration and job satisfaction of chiropractic physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Thomas R; Fletcher, Grant S; Carey, Timothy S

    2004-05-01

    Despite the fact that chiropractic physicians (DCs) are growing in number and legitimacy in the community of health care professionals, little recent research describes how their relationships with medical doctors (MDs) affect their job and career perceptions. This study explores interprofessional relations by identifying factors associated with variations in how DCs evaluate their interaction with MDs. It also adapts a previously validated multifaceted measure of MD job satisfaction for use with DCs. Cross-sectional survey of 311 DC physicians in North Carolina. The hypothesized multifaceted nature of DC job satisfaction was confirmed. Four distinct job facets and global career satisfaction were measured effectively in DCs. DCs' career satisfaction is related to satisfaction with compensation, intrinsic motivation of relating to patients, and having positive relationships with DC colleagues. DCs report referring patients to MDs more often than they report MDs referring patients to them. Satisfaction with relationships between DCs and MDs is relatively low and is strongly linked to the quantity of referrals from MDs and the perception that MDs practice collaboratively with DCs. However, DCs' global career satisfaction is unrelated to their relationships with MDs. Global career satisfaction of DCs is relatively high and unaffected by the low level of satisfaction DCs report having with their relationships with MDs. These findings suggest that despite increasing interaction and interdependence, DCs' relationship with MDs is of minor importance in their professional self-image.

  1. Effect of HCAHPS reporting on patient satisfaction with physician communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Rupinder K; Siddiqui, Zishan; Kurbanova, Nargiza; Qayyum, Rehan

    2016-02-01

    Prior studies, using limited data from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys, reported that public reporting increases satisfaction scores in all domains except physician communication. Our objective was to examine changes in patient satisfaction with physician communication using all available data. We used publicly accessible datasets: HCAHPS (2007-2013), socioeconomic datasets from the US Census Bureau, and hospital service area (HSA) dataset from the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. Satisfaction scores were determined by the percentage of responses to "doctors always communicated well." Hospitals were grouped into quartiles based on 2007 scores. We used multilevel models to account for correlation between within-hospital observations. HCAHPS data were reported by 2273 hospitals in 2007. During the 7-year period, overall satisfaction scores with physician communication increased by 2.8% (P < 0.001). The lowest quartile hospitals had significant increase in satisfaction scores, whereas the highest quartile scores decreased (0.87% per year vs -0.23% per year; P < 0.001). These differences remained significant after adjusting for hospital and local population characteristics. Survey response rate and the number of acute-care beds and physicians in the HSA were positively associated, whereas HSA population size and being a teaching hospital were negatively associated with patient satisfaction scores (all P < 0.005). Although there has been an improvement in patient satisfaction with physicians during the past 7 years, this improvement was not seen in all hospitals. The overall gap between hospitals has narrowed, which can be further improved through sharing best practices. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Hospital restructuring and physician job satisfaction: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Daniele; Morandi, Federica; Cicchetti, Americo

    2014-02-01

    The adoption of clinical directorates through the internal reconfiguration of hospital organizations has been one of the most widespread restructuring interventions in many Western European countries. Despite its extensive adoption, a lack of knowledge remains on the analysis of how this reorganization affects professionals' job satisfaction. This paper contributes to the debate on clinical directorates by exploring how the structural characteristics of newly adopted organizational models influence physician's job satisfaction. More than 300 physicians in 18 clinical directorates in the Italian National Health Service were surveyed regarding their overall job satisfaction following the introduction of departmental arrangements. Survey results were then linked to another survey that classified newly adopted models according to the criteria used to merge hospital wards into directorates, by recognizing "Process-integration", "Specialty-integration" and "Mixed-integration" types of directorates. Our findings show that structural aspects of change significantly influenced overall job satisfaction, and that a physician's openness to experience moderated the adoption and implementation of new clinical directorates. Specifically, results demonstrate that physicians with high openness to experience scores were more receptive to the positive impacts of change on overall job satisfaction. Implications for how these findings may facilitate organizational shifts within hospital settings are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating word-of-mouth (WOM factors influencing patients’ physician choice and satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Argan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to determine the word-of-mouth constructs related to physician choice and to investigate relationships between the constructs and satisfaction. Method: A questionnaire consisted of three parts was conducted on people (n=1193 living in the province of Eskisehir, Turkey. The first part contained sixteen statements related to word-of-mouth messages about choosing a physician. A traditional approach to scale development was utilized. Items in the second part were concerned with satisfaction as the dependent variable. The final part included demographic variables. Results: The results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA revealed four valid WOM constructs (communication skill, expertise, reputation and success, and institutional facilities and structural equation model (SEM indicate that these constructs have both directly and indirectly effect on patient satisfaction. The results also showed that institutional facility mediated relationship between remaining factors and satisfaction. Conclusions: The relationships between physicians and patients have an indirect effect on potential patients. By understanding sources of patients’ satisfaction and dissatisfaction, physicians can develop appropriate relationship strategies to minimize the adverse effects of negative word-of-mouth on costs, quality and patient turnover. The results of the current study provide suggestions for better health care management and further insight into the challenges of improving patient satisfaction.

  4. Burnout, job satisfaction, and medical malpractice among physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Che-Ming; Lien, Che-Hui; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Lin, Mau-Roung; Chang, Hui-Ru; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to estimate the incidence of recent burnout in a large sample of Taiwanese physicians and analyze associations with job related satisfaction and medical malpractice experience. We performed a cross-sectional survey. Physicians were asked to fill out a questionnaire that included demographic information, practice characteristics, burnout, medical malpractice experience, job satisfaction, and medical error experience. There are about 2% of total physicians. Physicians who were members of the Taiwan Society of Emergency Medicine, Taiwan Surgical Association, Taiwan Association of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Taiwan Pediatric Association, and Taiwan Stroke Association, and physicians of two medical centers, three metropolitan hospitals, and two local community hospitals were recruited. There is high incidence of burnout among Taiwan physicians. In our research, Visiting staff (VS) and residents were more likely to have higher level of burnout of the emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA). There was no difference in burnout types in gender. Married had higher-level burnout in EE. Physicians who were 20~30 years old had higher burnout levels in EE, those 31~40 years old had higher burnout levels in DP, and PA. Physicians who worked in medical centers had a higher rate in EE, DP, and who worked in metropolitan had higher burnout in PA. With specialty-in-training, physicians had higher-level burnout in EE and DP, but lower burnout in PA. Physicians who worked 13-17hr continuously had higher-level burnout in EE. Those with ≥41 times/week of being on call had higher-level burnout in EE and DP. Physicians who had medical malpractice experience had higher-level burnout in EE, DP, and PA. Physicians who were not satisfied with physician-patient relationships had higher-level burnout than those who were satisfied. Physicians in Taiwan face both burnout and a high risk in medical malpractice. There is high

  5. Pharmacist or Physician: Age Differences in Satisfaction with Medical Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Odette N.; Wasylkiw, Louise; Rogers, Erin E.; MacPherson, Miranda

    2006-01-01

    Two studies examined predictors of medical care satisfaction in communities in Eastern Canada. Both studies focused on how the roles of pharmacists and physicians are perceived by adults of different ages. Using a survey methodology, Study 1 demonstrated that middle-aged adults, older adults, and community pharmacists differ in the extent to which…

  6. [Job satisfaction among primary care physicians at the IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama-Martínez, José Arturo; Dávalos-Díaz, Guillermina

    2009-01-01

    To know factors related to job satisfaction among primary care Physicians from the Mexican Social Security Institute. Cross-sectional survey applied to physicians of outpatient visit areas in four Family Medicine Units in Leon, Guanajuato, from February to May 2007. The survey explored six areas. We used 95% confidence intervals and One-Way ANOVA to compare means among clinics and Chi square and OR'95% confidence intervals to compare proportions. One hundred sixty physicians participated (response rate 88.9%), three were excluded. Most physicians were satisfied with their work (86%). Half of the doctors feel satisfied with their economic benefits (48%), non-economic benefits (52%), and those from the collective bargaining agreement (53%), as well as with the labor union (46%) and their actual insurances (45%). Only one third or less of participants refer to receive incentives (31%) or recognitions for their work (33%), were satisfied with the opportunities for training (31%), the economic incentives (29%), or the salary (24%). The satisfaction's means of work, benefits, insurances, labor union and collective bargaining agreement were significantly higher than the means of salary and economic incentives. Satisfaction means were significantly higher in Clinic #53 than in Clinic #51 for job satisfaction and opportunities for training, as well as percentages of response in institutional support, incentives and recognitions for their work, were higher in Clinic 53 compared to all other clinics; however, it's the smallest clinic in this study. Family doctors find satisfaction in their practice, and factors such as institutional support, recognition and incentives may improve their general job satisfaction.

  7. The Relationship between Social Capital in Hospitals and Physician Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Petra

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Job satisfaction in the hospital is an important predictor for many significant management ratios. Acceptance in professional life or high workload are known as important predictors for job satisfaction. The influence of social capital in hospitals on job satisfaction within the health care system, however, remains to be determined. Thus, this article aimed at analysing the relationship between overall job satisfaction of physicians and social capital in hospitals. Methods The results of this study are based upon questionnaires sent by mail to 454 physicians working in the field of patient care in 4 different German hospitals in 2002. 277 clinicians responded to the poll, for a response rate of 61%. Analysis was performed using three linear regression models with physician overall job satisfaction as the dependent variable and age, gender, professional experience, workload, and social capital as independent variables. Results The first regression model explained nearly 9% of the variance of job satisfaction. Whereas job satisfaction increased slightly with age, gender and professional experience were not identified as significant factors to explain the variance. Setting up a second model with the addition of subjectively-perceived workload to the analysis, the explained variance increased to 18% and job satisfaction decreased significantly with increasing workload. The third model including social capital in hospital explained 36% of the variance with social capital, professional experience and workload as significant factors. Conclusion This analysis demonstrated that the social capital of an organisation, in addition to professional experience and workload, represents a significant predictor of overall job satisfaction of physicians working in the field of patient care. Trust, mutual understanding, shared aims, and ethical values are qualities of social capital that unify members of social networks and communities and

  8. Disentangling physician sex and physician communication style: their effects on patient satisfaction in a virtual medical visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid Mast, Marianne; Hall, Judith A; Roter, Debra L

    2007-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of physician sex and physician communication style on patient satisfaction. In real medical visits, physician sex and physician communication style are confounded variables. By using the virtual medical visit paradigm, we were able to disentangle the two variables and study their separate and/or joint effects on patient satisfaction. In an experimental design, analogue patients (167 students) interacted with a computer-generated virtual physician on a computer screen. The patients' satisfaction during the visit was assessed. Depending on the sex composition of the dyad, physician communication style affected analogue patients' satisfaction differently. For instance, in male-male dyads, physician communication style did not affect the patients' satisfaction, whereas in female-female dyads, analogue patients were more satisfied when the physician adopted a caring as opposed to a non-caring communication style. Sex of the physician and sex of the patient moderate how different physician communication styles affect patient satisfaction. In particular, a female-sex role congruent communication style leads to higher patient satisfaction when women see a female physician. Physician communication training cannot be one size fits all. Rather female and male physicians should obtain different training and they need to be made aware of the fact that female and male patients harbor different expectations toward them.

  9. Physicians' job satisfaction and motivation in a public academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Vasconcelos Filho, Paulo; de Souza, Miriam Regina; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon; D'Ávila Viana, Ana Luiza

    2016-12-07

    Physician shortage is a global issue that concerns Brazil's authorities. The organizational structure and the environment of a medical institution can hide a low-quality life of a physician. This study examines the relationship between the hospital work environment and physicians' job satisfaction and motivation when working in a large public academic hospital. The study was restricted to one large, multispecialty Brazil's hospital. Six hundred hospital physicians were invited to participate by e-mail. A short version of the Physician Worklife Survey (PWS) was used to measure working satisfaction. Physicians were also asked for socio-demographic information, medical specialty, and the intention to continue working in the hospital. Data from 141 questionnaires were included in the analyses. Forty-five physicians graduated from the hospital's university, and they did not intend to leave the hospital under any circumstance (affective bond). The motivating factor for beginning the career at the hospital and to continue working there were the connection to the medical school and the hospital status as a "prestigious academic hospital"; the physicians were more satisfied with the career than the specialty. Only 30% completely agreed with the statement "If I had to start my career over again, I would choose my current specialty," while 45% completely agreed with the statement "I am not well compensated given my training and experience." The greater point of satisfaction was the relationship with physician colleagues. They are annoyed about the amount of calls they are requested to take and about how work encroaches on their personal time. No significant differences between medical specialties were found in the analysis. The participants were satisfied with their profession. The fact that they remained at the hospital was related to the academic environment, the relationship with colleagues, and the high prestige in which society holds the institution. The points of

  10. Physician Courtesy and Patient Satisfaction in a Pediatric Plastic and Oral Surgery Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Kimberly M; Yorlets, Rachel R; Flath-Sporn, Susan J; Labow, Brian I; Heald, Ronald R; Taghinia, Amir H

    Hospitals in the United States have started collecting information related to the patient experience with the objective of improving overall patient satisfaction. Between 2012 and 2015, the authors collected data from 2,875 patient satisfaction surveys. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of several variables-wait time, physician courtesy, administrative staff courtesy, patients' opportunity to ask questions, and patients' understanding of the answers-on a patient satisfaction score. A linear regression model was used to analyze the effects of these variables on patient satisfaction. All variables but one were significantly associated with patient satisfaction in the multivariable model. Healthcare provider courtesy was the strongest predictor of patient satisfaction; a score of "excellent" was associated with a 2.63-point (95% confidence interval [2.36, 2.90]) increase on a 5-point scale for patient satisfaction compared with a courtesy score of "poor." These findings suggest that patients had a positive experience when physicians and staff members were courteous.

  11. Online Physician Reviews Do Not Reflect Patient Satisfaction Survey Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, R Jay; Maurer, Matthew J; Nayar, Veena R; Aase, Lee A; Wald, John T; Kotsenas, Amy L; Timimi, Farris K; Harper, Charles M; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2018-04-01

    Online physician reviews have become increasingly prevalent and are a common means by which patients explore medical options online. Currently, there are no data comparing physicians with negative online reviews and those without negative reviews. We sought to compare industry-vetted patient satisfaction surveys (PSSs), such as Press Ganey (PG) PSSs, between those physicians with negative online reviews and those without negative reviews. Overall, there were 113 unique individuals with negative online reviews from September 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014, with 8 being nonphysicians. We matched 113 physicians in similar departments/divisions. We obtained PG PSS scores of both groups and compared the mean scores of the 2 groups. Press Ganey PSS scores were available for 98 physicians with negative online reviews compared with 82 matched physicians without negative online reviews. The mean raw PG PSS scores were not different between the 2 groups (4.05; 95% CI, 3.99-4.11 vs 4.04; 95% CI, 3.97-4.11; P=.92). We also noted no difference in mean scores on questions related to physician-patient communication and interaction skills between those with poor online reviews and those without (4.38; 95% CI, 4.32-4.43 vs 4.41; 95% CI, 4.35-4.47; P=.42). However, there was a significantly lower non-physician-specific mean in those with negative online reviews (3.91; 95% CI, 3.84-3.97) vs those without negative online reviews (4.01; 95% CI, 3.95-4.09) (P=.02). Here, we provide data indicating that online physician reviews do not correlate to formal institutional PG PSS. Furthermore, physicians with negative online reviews have lower scores on non-physician-specific variables included in the PG PSSs, emphasizing that these discrepancies can negatively affect overall patient experience, online physician reviews, and physician reputation. It is prudent that an improved mechanism for online ratings be implemented to better inform patients about a physician's online reputation. Copyright

  12. Women in rural family medicine: a qualitative exploration of practice attributes that promote physician satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustedde, Carol; Paladine, Heather; Wendling, Andrea; Prasad, Rupa; Sola, Orlando; Bjorkman, Sarah; Phillips, Julie

    2018-04-01

    The USA needs more rural physicians. Although women represent half of all US trained medical students, the rural physician workforce has remained predominantly male. Insight is needed into what makes rural practice attractive for women and which practice characteristics allow women physicians to practice successfully in rural areas. This study's purpose was to examine aspects of the practice environment that impact women physicians' professional satisfaction and commitment to rural medicine. Twenty-five women family physicians practicing in rural areas of the USA were interviewed by phone using a semi-structured format. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using an immersion and crystallization approach. Emergent themes were identified, coded, and discussed until team consensus was attained. Interviews continued until saturation of themes was reached. Three themes emerged from the data, in relationship to practice and employment attributes that contribute to US women physicians' professional satisfaction and willingness to remain in a rural setting: professional relationships, practice characteristics, and support during times of transition. Participants placed high importance on professional relationships, both within and outside of their rural practice. Rural women physicians enjoyed practicing an expanded scope of care, valued loan repayment opportunities, and appreciated supportive practice partners. Importantly, women physicians who found themselves struggling to maintain rural careers often had experienced difficulty during times of practice transition, including maternity leaves. Understanding practice attributes valued by successful rural women family physicians in the USA will help rural health systems, practices, and physicians-in-training to develop and evaluate opportunities that will best contribute to successful rural practice. Supporting women physicians during periods of practice transition may improve retention.

  13. Relationship between job satisfaction and performance of primary care physicians after the family physician reform of east Azerbaijan province in Northwest Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Hossein; Pezeshki, Mohamad Zakarria; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Asghari, Mohammad; Bakhshian, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Following the implementation of family physician program in 2004 in Iranian healthcare system, the understanding in changes in physicians' practice has become important. The objective of this study was to determine the level of family physicians' job satisfaction and its relationship with their performance level. A cross-sectional study was conducted among all 367 family physicians of East Azerbaijan province in during December 2009 to May 2011 using a self-administered, anonymous questionnaire for job satisfaction. The performance scores of primary care physicians were obtained from health deputy of Tabriz Medical University. In this study, overall response rate was 64.5%. The average score of job satisfaction was 42.10 (±18.46), and performance score was 87.52 (±5.74) out of 100. There was significant relationships between working history and job satisfaction (P = 0.014), marital status (P = 0.014), and sex (P = 0.018) with performance among different personal and organizational variables. However, there was no significant relationship between job satisfaction and performance, but satisfied people had about three times better performance than their counterparts (all P job satisfaction are obvious indications for more extensive research in identifying causes and finding mechanisms to improve the situation, especially in payment methods and work condition, in existing health system.

  14. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p relationships (p communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  15. Front-Line Physicians' Satisfaction with Information Systems in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Junttila, Kristiina; Salanterä, Sanna

    2018-01-01

    Day-to-day operations management in hospital units is difficult due to continuously varying situations, several actors involved and a vast number of information systems in use. The aim of this study was to describe front-line physicians' satisfaction with existing information systems needed to support the day-to-day operations management in hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was used and data chosen with stratified random sampling were collected in nine hospitals. Data were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistical methods. The response rate was 65 % (n = 111). The physicians reported that information systems support their decision making to some extent, but they do not improve access to information nor are they tailored for physicians. The respondents also reported that they need to use several information systems to support decision making and that they would prefer one information system to access important information. Improved information access would better support physicians' decision making and has the potential to improve the quality of decisions and speed up the decision making process.

  16. The influence of achievement before, during and after medical school on physician job satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Stewart, Roy E.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-01-01

    In this longitudinal study, we investigated the relationship between physicians' prior achievements (before, during and after medical school) and job satisfaction, and tested the two lines of reasoning that prior achievements influence job satisfaction positively or negatively, respectively. The

  17. [Distress and job satisfaction among hospital physicians in internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Groneberg, D A

    2014-10-01

    How physicians within the specialty of internal medicine perceive their stress-related working conditions, especially due to a changing health system with an impact on workflows and working hours, is examined in this study. A total of 1696 online questionnaires completed by internists were analyzed. The questionnaire was based upon the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model by Siegrist et al. and the Job-Demand-Control model (JDC) by Karasek et al. Working conditions in the specialty of internal medicine seem to have a high risk of leading to distress. As a result 62.1 % [95 % confidence interval (CI): 59.8-64.5] of the respondents described working conditions with unfavorable stress (distress). Analyzing the distress prevalence in subgroups, there were significant differences between gender (65.9 % of female physicians and 58.6 % of male physicians; p = 0.002; odds ratio (OR): 1.37; 95 % CI: 1.12-1.66), age (69.3 % of under 35-year-old to 56.6 % of 35- to 59-year-old), and functional position (38.3 % of chief physician to 69.1 % of junior physicians; OR: 7.17; 95 % CI: 3.91-13.16). Regarding job satisfaction 48.1 % of respondents said, they were very satisfied with their job. This study should be a cause for concern, since current data suggest a future shortage of qualified employers in the specialty of internal medicine. Taking this into account, working conditions in hospitals should be improved in order to bind current employees and attract new employees.

  18. Gender differences in the vocational satisfaction of physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarbera, Dawn M

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze vocational satisfaction differences by gender as a follow-up of data gathered from a mailed survey study on American physician assistant vocational satisfaction. This is an analysis of a database from an original piloted, validated survey with a response rate of 50% from 2,323 labels from the 2003 AAPA's mailing list (n = 1,137). The survey measured vocational satisfaction in terms of career, job, and specialty choice on a forced-choice 6-point Likert-type scale. A qualitative analysis of answers to open-ended questions addressing career satisfiers and dissatisfiers was also conducted. PAs were shown to be highly satisfied with their careers, specialty choices, and jobs. Trends for male PAs showed that they were more satisfied with their careers, specialty choices, and jobs (6-point Likert scale) but female PAs were more likely to refer others into the PA profession than their male counterparts (4-point Likert scale). Statistically significant differences via 2-tailed Mann-Whitney U tests were shown for job satisfaction (P = .02, male Likert mean 3.92 vs. female 3.78) and the likelihood to refer others into the profession (P = .04, female Likert mean 3.43 vs. male 3.33). Twenty-one factors for vocational satisfaction and 29 for dissatisfaction were qualitatively analyzed by gender. The top three satisfiers of helping others, patient interaction, and intellectual challenge were the same by rank regardless of gender. Similarly, the top three dissatisfiers were the same but in reverse order for female and male PAs: (lack of) respect, compensation, and other, for females; and other, compensation, and respect, for males. This study demonstrated very similar vocational satisfaction measures for female PAs and male PAs via quantitative and qualitative methods with the noteworthy exception that male PAs were statistically more satisfied with their jobs while female PAs were statistically more likely to refer others into the career

  19. Patient-Physician Communicative Patterns, Physicians’ Job Satisfaction, and Patients’ Satisfaction: The Case of a Hospital in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yaghoubi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose:Now-a-days, patient satisfaction is increasingly receiving the attention of health-service providers, which is a necessary step to enhance the quality of health services. The present study aimed at exploring patient-physician communicative patterns, physicians’ job satisfaction, and patients’ satisfaction at Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods:This study was a descriptive analytical and cross-sectional survey in the summer of 2010. Simple random sampling was used to select participants. Data were collected through using three self-designed questionnaires on physicians’ job satisfaction, patient-physician relationship patterns (based on Hollander and Szase’ ideas, and patients’ satisfaction. Validity of the questionnaire was checked by a panel of experts. Furthermore, internal consistency reliability of the questionnaires was confirmed by Cronbach’s alpha (α = 0.80. Different dimensions of the job satisfaction questionnaire were salary, supervision, setting, promotion, fringe benefits, and working conditions. Data were analyzed by using SPSS for Windows 13.0 software. Results:The mean score of patient-physician relationship was 63. Therefore, the most frequent patient-physician communication pattern was guidance-cooperation. The mean score of physician’ job satisfaction was 50.2. The mean score of patients’ satisfaction was 86.5. Physicians’ job satisfaction was found to be related to patient-physician communication pattern (P < 0.05. Conclusion:Although patient-physician communication patterns are important, different variable such as patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction influence the patterns. Furthermore, improvement communication process between health care providers can be useful in the increasing patient satisfaction and patient quality of care.

  20. Emotional intelligence, emotional labor, and job satisfaction among physicians in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that psychological constructs, such as emotional intelligence and emotional labor, play an important role in various organizational outcomes in service sector. Recently, in the “emotionally charged” healthcare field, emotional intelligence and emotional labor have both emerged as research tools, rather than just as theoretical concepts, influencing various organizational parameters including job satisfaction. The present study aimed at investigating the relationships, direct and/or indirect, between emotional intelligence, the surface acting component of emotional labor, and job satisfaction in medical staff working in tertiary healthcare. Methods Data were collected from 130 physicians in Greece, who completed a series of self-report questionnaires including: a) the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, which assessed the four dimensions of emotional intelligence, i.e. Self-Emotion Appraisal, Others’ Emotion Appraisal, Use of Emotion, and Regulation of Emotion, b) the General Index of Job Satisfaction, and c) the Dutch Questionnaire on Emotional Labor (surface acting component). Results Emotional intelligence (Use of Emotion dimension) was significantly and positively correlated with job satisfaction (r=.42, p<.001), whereas a significant negative correlation between surface acting and job satisfaction was observed (r=−.39, p<.001). Furthermore, Self-Emotion Appraisal was negatively correlated with surface acting (r=−.20, p<.01). Self-Emotion Appraisal was found to influence job satisfaction both directly and indirectly through surface acting, while this indirect effect was moderated by gender. Apart from its mediating role, surface acting was also a moderator of the emotional intelligence-job satisfaction relationship. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that surface acting could predict job satisfaction over and above emotional intelligence dimensions. Conclusions The results of the present study

  1. Emotional intelligence, emotional labor, and job satisfaction among physicians in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psilopanagioti Aristea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that psychological constructs, such as emotional intelligence and emotional labor, play an important role in various organizational outcomes in service sector. Recently, in the “emotionally charged” healthcare field, emotional intelligence and emotional labor have both emerged as research tools, rather than just as theoretical concepts, influencing various organizational parameters including job satisfaction. The present study aimed at investigating the relationships, direct and/or indirect, between emotional intelligence, the surface acting component of emotional labor, and job satisfaction in medical staff working in tertiary healthcare. Methods Data were collected from 130 physicians in Greece, who completed a series of self-report questionnaires including: a the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, which assessed the four dimensions of emotional intelligence, i.e. Self-Emotion Appraisal, Others’ Emotion Appraisal, Use of Emotion, and Regulation of Emotion, b the General Index of Job Satisfaction, and c the Dutch Questionnaire on Emotional Labor (surface acting component. Results Emotional intelligence (Use of Emotion dimension was significantly and positively correlated with job satisfaction (r=.42, p, whereas a significant negative correlation between surface acting and job satisfaction was observed (r=−.39, p. Furthermore, Self-Emotion Appraisal was negatively correlated with surface acting (r=−.20, p. Self-Emotion Appraisal was found to influence job satisfaction both directly and indirectly through surface acting, while this indirect effect was moderated by gender. Apart from its mediating role, surface acting was also a moderator of the emotional intelligence-job satisfaction relationship. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that surface acting could predict job satisfaction over and above emotional intelligence dimensions. Conclusions The results of the present

  2. Patient-Physician Communicative Patterns, Physicians’ Job Satisfaction, and Patients’ Satisfaction: The Case of a Hospital in Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Yaghoubi; Fatemeh Rahmati-Najarkolaei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose:Now-a-days, patient satisfaction is increasingly receiving the attention of health-service providers, which is a necessary step to enhance the quality of health services. The present study aimed at exploring patient-physician communicative patterns, physicians’ job satisfaction, and patients’ satisfaction at Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods:This study was a descriptive analytical and cross-sectional survey in the summer of 2010. Simple random sa...

  3. Physician cross-cultural nonverbal communication skills, patient satisfaction and health outcomes in the physician-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ken Russell; Galan, Chardee

    2012-01-01

    Recent empirical findings document the role of nonverbal communication in cross-cultural interactions. As ethnic minority health disparities in the United States continue to persist, physician competence in this area is important. We examine physicians' abilities to decode nonverbal emotions across cultures, our hypothesis being that there is a relationship between physicians' skill in this area and their patients' satisfaction and outcomes. First part tested Caucasian and South Asian physicians' cross-cultural emotional recognition ability. Physicians completed a fully balanced forced multiple-choice test of decoding accuracy judging emotions based on facial expressions and vocal tones. In the second part, patients reported on satisfaction and health outcomes with their physicians using a survey. Scores from the patient survey were correlated with scores from the physician decoding accuracy test. Physicians, regardless of their ethnicity, were more accurate at rating Caucasian faces and vocal tones. South Asian physicians were no better at decoding the facial expressions or vocal tones of South Asian patients, who were also less likely to be satisfied with the quality of care provided by their physicians and to adhere to their physicians' recommendations. Implications include the development of cultural sensitivity training programs in medical schools, continuing medical education and public health programs.

  4. Emotional intelligence, emotional labor, and job satisfaction among physicians in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psilopanagioti, Aristea; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Mourtou, Efstratia; Niakas, Dimitris

    2012-12-17

    There is increasing evidence that psychological constructs, such as emotional intelligence and emotional labor, play an important role in various organizational outcomes in service sector. Recently, in the "emotionally charged" healthcare field, emotional intelligence and emotional labor have both emerged as research tools, rather than just as theoretical concepts, influencing various organizational parameters including job satisfaction. The present study aimed at investigating the relationships, direct and/or indirect, between emotional intelligence, the surface acting component of emotional labor, and job satisfaction in medical staff working in tertiary healthcare. Data were collected from 130 physicians in Greece, who completed a series of self-report questionnaires including: a) the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, which assessed the four dimensions of emotional intelligence, i.e. Self-Emotion Appraisal, Others' Emotion Appraisal, Use of Emotion, and Regulation of Emotion, b) the General Index of Job Satisfaction, and c) the Dutch Questionnaire on Emotional Labor (surface acting component). Emotional intelligence (Use of Emotion dimension) was significantly and positively correlated with job satisfaction (r=.42, pEmotion Appraisal was negatively correlated with surface acting (r=-.20, pEmotion Appraisal was found to influence job satisfaction both directly and indirectly through surface acting, while this indirect effect was moderated by gender. Apart from its mediating role, surface acting was also a moderator of the emotional intelligence-job satisfaction relationship. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that surface acting could predict job satisfaction over and above emotional intelligence dimensions. The results of the present study may contribute to the better understanding of emotion-related parameters that affect the work process with a view to increasing the quality of service in the health sector.

  5. Job characteristics and job satisfaction among physicians involved with research in the veterans health administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Burgess, James F

    2011-08-01

    Research conducted by physicians generates knowledge and has led to important advances and changes in the health care system. Physician retention is a concern facing many health care systems, and job satisfaction and attitudes play a role in retention. This study examined whether physicians who are involved with research have greater job satisfaction and more positive job characteristics perceptions. Cross-sectional analysis examined this research question using a sample of 7,734 physicians across 135 medical centers in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in 2008. Using existing survey results, ratings on job characteristics (job autonomy, skill development opportunities, work and family balance, and performance feedback) and job satisfaction were regressed on research involvement in a multilevel hierarchical generalized linear model. The model controlled for physician-level characteristics and organization-level characteristics related to research activities. Analyses revealed that physicians who spent part of their time involved with research activities were more likely to report favorable job characteristics ratings. Physicians involved with research were also more likely to be satisfied with their job. Physicians who worked in medical centers with greater levels of research funding were more likely to report favorable ratings for job characteristics and job satisfaction. Involvement with research was associated with more favorable job characteristics and job satisfaction perceptions among physicians in VA. Although there is a time and opportunity cost involved with research, medical centers that provide physicians with the opportunity to conduct research may have a more satisfied workforce.

  6. Job Satisfactions of Nurses and Physicians Working in the Same Health Care Facility in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Züleyha Alper; Đlker Ercan; Güven Özkaya; Neriman Akansel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Job satisfaction is defined as the degree to which employees like or enjoy their jobs and the degreeof satisfaction is based on the importance placed upon this reward and benefit.Objective: Aim of this study was to determine the job satisfaction levels of nurses and physicians working in thesame health care facility, analyze the factors that may affect job satisfaction levels. This study was conducted asa descriptive study and was carried out in one Medical Care Center Northwester...

  7. Physician identification and patient satisfaction in the emergency department: are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Mary P; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Mahadevan, Swaminatha V; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Patient satisfaction has become a quality indicator tracked closely by hospitals and emergency departments (EDs). Unfortunately, the primary factors driving patient satisfaction remain poorly studied. It has been suggested that correct physician identification impacts patient satisfaction in hospitalized patients, however, the limited studies that exist have demonstrated mixed results. In this study, we sought to identify factors associated with improved satisfaction among ED patients, and specifically, to test whether improving physician identification by patients would lead to increased satisfaction. We performed a pre- and postintervention, survey-based study of patients at the end of their ED visits. We compared patient satisfaction scores as well as patients' abilities to correctly identify their physicians over two separate 1-week periods: prior to and after introducing a multimedia presentation of the attending physicians into the waiting room. A total of 486 patients (25% of all ED visits) were enrolled in the study. In the combined study population, overall patient satisfaction was higher among patients who correctly identified their physicians than among those who could not identify their physicians (combined mean satisfaction score of 8.1 vs. 7.2; odds ratio [OR] 1.07). Overall satisfaction was also higher among parents or guardians of pediatric patients than among adult patients (satisfaction score of 8.4 vs. 7.4; OR 1.07), and among patients who experienced a shorter door-to-doctor time (satisfaction score of 8.2 for shorter waiting time vs. 5.6 for longer waiting time; OR 1.15). Ambulance patients showed decreased satisfaction over some satisfaction parameters, including physician courtesy and knowledge. No direct relationship was demonstrated between the study intervention (multimedia presentation) and improved patient satisfaction or physician identification. Improved patient satisfaction was found to be positively correlated with correct physician

  8. Job satisfaction and the work situation of physicians: a survey at a German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Wilfried; Fischbeck, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Job demands and workload of hospital physicians are increasing. The object of this survey was to examine the factors that constitute job satisfaction and to analyse physicians' work situation in the area of in-patient care. 447 physicians at a German University Hospital received questionnaires with regard to work situation, job satisfaction and personal health. Data were analysed by MANOVA and multiple regression models. A first regression model explained 53% of the variance in satisfaction with "work and profession". Among the explanatory variables "superiors and hierarchy" showed the highest beta-weight (beta = -0.49). "Personal health" also determined job satisfaction, for female physicians stronger (beta = -0.31) than for male physicians (beta = -0.11). In a second regression model on satisfaction with "Financial situation" only 18% of the variance was explained, whereby "work condition on the ward", "personal health" and "collaboration between occupational groups" showed the highest beta-weights. Among resident physicians, work conditions, superiors, hierarchy, transparency and participation in decisions are very important variables for job satisfaction. Improvements in these aspects may improve job satisfaction and help to reduce physician shortage in hospitals.

  9. Concordance between physician communication style and patient attitudes predicts patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Gaëtan; Schmid Mast, Marianne; Roter, Debra L; Hall, Judith A

    2012-05-01

    This study tested whether the impact of the physician's communication style on patient satisfaction differs depending on patients' attitudes toward caring and sharing. We predicted that the impact of physician caring on patient satisfaction depends on patient attitudes toward caring, and that the impact of physician sharing on patient satisfaction depends on patient attitudes toward sharing. Participants (N=167) were asked to imagine that they were consulting for recurrent headaches. They interacted on a computer with a virtual physician that communicated either in a low or high caring way and either in a low or high sharing way (2 × 2 design). Then, participants answered questions about their attitudes toward caring and sharing and about their satisfaction with the physician. Hypotheses were confirmed. Furthermore, a high caring physician communication style led to higher satisfaction than a low caring one, regardless of participants' attitudes toward caring, while satisfaction with physicians' level of sharing was dependent on the participants' attitude toward sharing. Physicians may adopt a high caring style with confidence that all patients will benefit. Adoption of a sharing style should be more carefully adjusted to patient attitudes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Job satisfaction among primary health care physicians and nurses in Al-madinah Al-munawwara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Juhani, Abdullah M; Kishk, Nahla A

    2006-01-01

    Job satisfaction is the affective orientation that an employee has towards his work. Greater physician satisfaction is associated with greater patient adherence and satisfaction. Nurses' job satisfaction, have great impact on the organizational success. Knowing parts of job dissatisfaction among physicians and nurses is important in forming strategies for retaining them in primary health care (PHC) centers. Therefore, this study aimed at assessing the level of job satisfaction among PHC physicians and nurses in Al- Madina Al- Munawwara. Also, to explore the relationship of their personal and job characteristics with job satisfaction. A descriptive cross- sectional epidemiological approach was adopted. A self completion questionnaire was distributed to physicians and nurses at PHC centers. A multi-dimensional job scale adopted by Traynor and Wade (1993) was modified and used. The studied sample included 445 health care providers, 23.6% were physicians and 76.4% were nurses. Job dissatisfaction was highly encountered where 67.1% of the nurses & 52.4% of physicians were dissatisfied. Professional opportunities, patient care and financial reward were the most frequently encountered domains with which physicians were dissatisfied. The dissatisfying domains for majority of nurses were professional opportunities, workload and appreciation reward. Exploring the relation between demographic and job characteristics with job satisfaction revealed that older, male, non-Saudi, specialists physicians had insignificantly higher mean score of job satisfaction than their counterparts. While older, female, non-Saudi, senior nurses had significantly higher mean score than their counterparts. It is highly recommended to reduce workload for nurses and provision of better opportunities promotional for PHC physicians and nurses.

  11. Physician's gender, communication style, patient preferences and patient satisfaction in gynecology and obstetrics: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Review of studies published in the last 10 years about women seeking gynecological- or obstetrical care and physician's gender in relation to patient preferences, differences in communication style and patient satisfaction. METHODS: Studies were identified by searching the online

  12. Job Satisfactions of Nurses and Physicians Working in the Same Health Care Facility in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Züleyha Alper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job satisfaction is defined as the degree to which employees like or enjoy their jobs and the degreeof satisfaction is based on the importance placed upon this reward and benefit.Objective: Aim of this study was to determine the job satisfaction levels of nurses and physicians working in thesame health care facility, analyze the factors that may affect job satisfaction levels. This study was conducted asa descriptive study and was carried out in one Medical Care Center Northwestern Region of Turkey, Bursa.Results:A job satisfaction scale developed by researchers according to literature review. The scale contained 36items related to measure job satisfaction levels of the participants. Data were collected from 65 nurses and 15physicians. Motivation of nurses is significantly higher than physicians. There is no affect of nurses’ educationlevels on general job satisfaction levels (p>0.05. No significant association was found between gender andmotivation (p>0.05. Payments and organization–related factors affect job satisfaction among nurses andphysicians.Conclusion:This scale yielded significant results in all subgroups except for satisfaction with patient treatment,care services and age. Seniority in the profession and age correlates with general job satisfaction level. Futurestudies need to focus on if job dissatisfaction affects health care workers to quit their jobs, differences amonggenders and profession.

  13. Factors associated with job satisfaction among public-sector physicians in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rafael Brito Nery; Assunção, Ada Avila; de Araújo, Tânia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates an association between job satisfaction and illness among physicians. There are also negative consequences of physician dissatisfaction on the quality of medical services. With this in view, a cross-sectional study of a stratified random sample of physicians (n = 266) was conducted in the municipal public health care system in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Participants answered a questionnaire about job satisfaction, sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics, work and employment conditions, and health status. Of the 232 respondents, 150 (64.94%) declared themselves satisfied with the work, with no significant difference between male and female physicians (66.4% vs. 64.2%; p = 0.74). The number of physicians satisfied with their work was significantly higher among those who experienced a high level of social support at work (p job satisfaction of these professionals.

  14. Physician satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services in Aden Governorate, Yemen, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adulkader, N Mujahed; Triana, B E Garcia

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the level of physicians' satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services and related factors in Aden Governorate, we carried out this cross-sectional study during September 2008-September 2009. Satisfaction with laboratory services of 3 public and 3 private hospitals was assessed. The overall physician satisfaction was 3.30 out of 5.00. The highest mean score (3.40) was observed for phlebotomy services, while the lowest mean score (1.95) was for esoteric test turnaround time. The most important laboratory service category forthe physicians was quality and reliability of the results (54.4%). An association was observed between physician satisfaction and institution type in 11 categories, with lower satisfaction for public compared to private institutions for all services. No statistically significant association was observed between physician satisfaction and experience in the field. Lower satisfaction was observed among those with more than 20 years experience. Our findings may help to improve the quality of clinical laboratory services.

  15. Physicians' communication styles as correlates of elderly cancer patients' satisfaction with their doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, A; Carmel, S; Bachner, Y G

    2017-01-01

    Physician-patient communication style is of utmost importance to patients with life-threatening diseases. This study identifies the most desired physician communication style by older cancer patients; and examines which of the studied communication styles significantly explains cancer patients' satisfaction with family physicians. A total of 200 older cancer patients, with average age of 75 years, participated in the study, yielding a response rate of 42%. Prospective respondents were randomly selected from the list of cancer patients in the central geographical district of Israel's second largest Health Maintenance Organization fund. Respondents rated their satisfaction with physicians as relatively high. All three communication styles studied were found to be associated with patient's satisfaction. Associations were found between self-rated health, time since the diagnosis of cancer and satisfaction. Women were less satisfied than men with their physicians. Two variables emerged as significant predictors of satisfaction: the physician's caring communication style and patient's gender. Intervention programmes should focus on elevating physicians' awareness of the importance of their communication with cancer patients in general, and of the caring communication style in particular. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Factors influencing the satisfaction of rural physician assistants: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipova, Anna A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors that attract physician assistants (PAs) to rural settings, and what they found satisfying about their practice and community. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All PAs who were practicing in both nonmetropolitan counties and rural communities in metropolitan counties, in a single midwestern US state, served as the population for the study. A total of 414 usable questionnaires were returned of the 1,072 distributed, a 39% response rate. Factor analysis, descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation analysis, and robust regression analyses were used. Statistical models were tested to identify antecedents of four job satisfaction factors (satisfaction with professional respect, satisfaction with supervising physician, satisfaction with authority/ autonomy, and satisfaction with workload/salary). The strongest predictor of all four job satisfaction factors was community satisfaction, followed by importance of job practice. Additionally, the four job satisfaction factors had some significant associations with importance of socialization, community importance, practice attributes (years of practice, years in current location, specialty, and facility type), job responsibilities (percentage of patient load not discussed with physician, weekly hours as PA, inpatient visits), and demographics (marital status, race, age, education).

  17. Personal values of exemplary family physicians: implications for professional satisfaction in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, B C; Schubot, D B

    1995-09-01

    Personal social values have been identified as important determinants of generalists' specialty choice. However, the personal values or "guiding principles" of generalist physicians have not been identified scientifically. To establish a benchmark, we measured the personal values of exemplary family physicians because they serve as role models for current and future physicians. We also explored the relationship between personal values and practice satisfaction. We obtained a list of 330 family physicians nominated for the American Academy of Family Physicians' (AAFP) Family Doctor of the Year award for the years 1988 through 1993. We asked them to complete the Schwartz Values Questionnaire, a 56-item instrument for measuring personal values. They also answered three questions concerning practice satisfaction. The return rate was 83%. The physicians' mean age was 63 years. They had been in practice an average of 34 years, 93% were male, and 52% practiced in rural areas. Honesty was rated as the most important of the 56 values, and social power as the least important. Of the 10 value types (groups of common values), the responding physicians rated "Benevolence" as most important and "Power" as least important. Practice satisfaction correlated positively with the Benevolence value type (r = .21, P = .001) and negatively with the Power value type (r = -.15, P = .023). Of the 10 value types, Benevolence was rated the most important and Power the least important by exemplary family physicians, and both value types also correlated, positively and negatively, respectively, with their practice satisfaction. These results have implications for the selection, training, and career satisfaction of generalist physicians.

  18. Customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology. A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes study of 3065 physician surveys from 94 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Richard J; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Walsh, Molly

    2003-01-01

    relevant information, teaching conferences and courses, notification of significant abnormal results, and timeliness of reporting). The database of 3065 physician surveys was derived from 94 laboratories. An average of 32.6 surveys (median 30) was returned per institution, with a range of 5 to 50 surveys per institution. The mean response rate was 35.6% (median 32.5%). The median (50th percentile) laboratory had an overall median satisfaction score of 4.4. The lowest satisfaction scores that were obtained all related to poor communication, which included timeliness of reporting, communication of relevant information, and notification of significant abnormal results. Statistically significant associations of customer satisfaction with certain institutional characteristics and laboratory performance improvement activities were identified. The importance of this satisfaction survey lies not in its requirement as an exercise for accrediting agencies but in understanding the needs of the customer (in this case the physician) to direct performance improvement in the delivery of quality anatomic pathology laboratory services.

  19. Gender differences in physicians' communicative skills and their influence on patient satisfaction in gynaecological outpatient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Regula Nelly; Alder, Judith; Bitzer, Johannes

    2008-04-01

    As previous research has displayed, a physician's communication style is an essential factor predicting patient satisfaction and compliance. Furthermore, a good physician-patient relationship and high communication quality seem to be crucial elements fostering the activation of patients' self-healing powers. Due to their intimate nature, gynaecological health issues require specific adapted communicative skills. Several studies in primary care reveal gender differences in physicians' communication style. However, controversial findings have been reported in the field of obstetrics and gynaecology. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the expected gender differences in gynaecologists' communicative skills affect patient satisfaction and compliance. We analysed 196 videotapes of 30 real-life and 166 simulated (standardised) patient consultations in four different gynaecological outpatient settings with 13 male and 36 female gynaecologists from the University Hospital of Basel, Switzerland. Communicative skills were analysed by independent raters with the Revised Maastricht History-Taking and Advice Checklist (MAAS-R). All patients assessed their satisfaction after the consultation using the patient satisfaction questionnaire. Patients were more satisfied with female gynaecologists regarding the relationship and the consultation process, whereas the expected compliance was not related to physician gender. However, regression analyses demonstrated that it is not the gender of the physician but gender-related specific communicative skills -- mainly patient-centred communication -- that seem to be the crucial factor influencing patient satisfaction and likewise compliance. Hence, further research should be carried out on how these skills could be improved through specific training.

  20. Provider-Initiated Patient Satisfaction Reporting Yields Improved Physician Ratings Relative to Online Rating Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Waddell, Brad S; Nodzo, Scott R; Lange, Jeffrey; Nocon, Allina A; Amundsen, Spencer; Tarity, T David; McLawhorn, Alexander S

    2017-09-01

    Recently, providers have begun to publicly report the results of patient satisfaction surveys from their practices. However, these outcomes have never been compared with the findings of commercial online physician rating websites. The goals of the current study were to (1) compare overall patient satisfaction ratings for orthopedic surgeons derived from provider-based third-party surveys with existing commercial physician rating websites and (2) determine the association between patient ratings and provider characteristics. The authors identified 12 institutions that provided publicly available patient satisfaction outcomes derived from third-party surveys for their orthopedic surgeons as of August 2016. Orthopedic surgeons at these institutions were eligible for inclusion (N=340 surgeons). Provider characteristics were recorded from publicly available data. Four high-traffic commercial online physician rating websites were identified: Healthgrades.com, UCompareHealthCare.com, Vitals.com, and RateMDs.com. For each surgeon, overall ratings (on a scale of 1-5), total number of ratings, and percentage of negative ratings were compared between provider-initiated internal ratings and each commercial online website. Associations between baseline factors and overall physician ratings and negative ratings were assessed. Provider-initiated internal patient satisfaction ratings showed a greater number of overall patient ratings, higher overall patient satisfaction ratings, and a lower percentage of negative comments compared with commercial online physician rating websites. A greater number of years in practice had a weak association with lower internal ratings, and an academic practice setting and a location in the Northeast were protective factors for negative physician ratings. Compared with commercial online physician rating websites, provider-initiated patient satisfaction ratings of orthopedic surgeons appear to be more favorable, with greater numbers of responses

  1. Physician Satisfaction in a Cancer Prevention Program for Low-Income Women in Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Cochran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians and health care organizations that provide services to low-income patients are valuable partners in improving health care access for the uninsured and medically underserved. In this pilot study, we explored physicians' needs and factors for satisfaction in the Women's Health Connection (WHC, a breast and cervical cancer-screening program for low-income women in Nevada. Of the 126 physicians in the WHC program, 50 physicians completed a needs-and-satisfaction questionnaire. Survey data were subjected to factor analysis using Varimax rotation. The results yielded three components, which accounted for 65% of the variance. The three components or dimensions for physician satisfaction were: (1 appropriate administrative support and documentation, (2 availability of support for medical management, and (3 timeliness of diagnostic reports. Amount of reimbursement was not a significant factor. The respondents serving in this cancer prevention program for low-income women were satisfied in their involvement in the program. Further attention should be given on the identified issues for satisfaction among physicians, which could lead to quality improvement and serve as a model for other programs that serve low-income patients in cancer prevention.

  2. Rapport between Cancer Patients and Their Physicians is Critical for Patient Satisfaction with Treatment Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umihara, Junko; Nishikitani, Mariko; Kubota, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patients' satisfaction with their treatment decisions has been demonstrated to be associated with improved health outcomes, but few studies of this issue have been conducted in Japan. To explore key factors in enhancing patient satisfaction, we assessed the association between their satisfaction and their relationships with their physicians. We conducted cross-sectional questionnaire surveys among patients who had received cancer treatment. One source was outpatients from a cancer center hospital, and the other was through the website of Japan's most popular newspaper. The questionnaire included demographic questions and general self-rated life status issues, such as peace of mind, quality of life, daily activities, family relationships, rapport with attending physician, assessment of the physician's explanations, and feelings of happiness during the previous week. Of 576 respondents, 383 subjects said they were satisfied and 193 dissatisfied. It was confirmed that the online survey was comparable to the paper-based survey in examining patient satisfaction. The dissatisfied group included more females and fewer subjects who were forced to retire from jobs than the satisfied group. The patients in the satisfied group had a more favorable subjective opinion of their recent life. The patients in the dissatisfied group received more chemotherapy and had more side effects than those in the satisfied group. Assessment of the physician's role showed significant differences between the two groups; the patients in the satisfied group felt more than those in the dissatisfied group that their physicians' explanations of treatment were sufficient and were satisfied with their rapport with their physicians. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that rapport with physicians was a significant factor (odds ratio=3.79, 95% CI=2.25-6.39). Rapport between physicians and patients is one of the most important factors in patient satisfaction with treatment decisions.

  3. Patients' and physicians' satisfaction with a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program in a family medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lisa; Young, Stephanie; Twells, Laurie; Dillon, Carla; Hawboldt, John

    2015-06-09

    A pharmacist managed anticoagulation service was initiated in a multi-physician family medicine clinic in December 2006. In order to determine the patient and physician satisfaction with the service, a study was designed to describe the patients' satisfaction with the warfarin education and management they received from the pharmacist, and to describe the physicians' satisfaction with the level of care provided by the pharmacist for patients taking warfarin. A self-administered survey was completed by both eligible patients receiving warfarin and physicians prescribing warfarin between December 2006 and May 2008. The patient survey collected information on patient demographics, satisfaction with warfarin education and daily warfarin management. The physician survey collected data about the satisfaction with patient education and daily anticoagulation management by the pharmacist. Seventy-six of 94 (81%) patients completed the survey. Fifty-nine percent were male with a mean age of 65 years (range 24-90). Ninety-six percent agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist did a good job teaching the importance of warfarin adherence, the necessity of INR testing and the risks of bleeding. Eighty-five percent agreed/strongly agreed the risk of blood clots was well explained, 79% felt the pharmacist did a good job teaching about dietary considerations and 77% agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist explained when to see a doctor. All patients felt the pharmacist gave clear instructions on warfarin dosing and INR testing. Four of nine physicians (44%) completed the survey. All agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist was competent in the care provided, were confident in the care their patients received, would like the pharmacist to continue the service, and would recommend this program to other clinics. Patients and family physicians were satisfied with the pharmacist managed anticoagulation program and recommended continuation of the program. These results support the role of the

  4. Does the physician's emotional intelligence matter? Impacts of the physician's emotional intelligence on the trust, patient-physician relationship, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Much of the literature pertinent to management indicates that service providers with high emotional intelligence (EI) receive higher customer satisfaction scores. Previous studies offer limited evidence regarding the impact of physician's EI on patient-physician relationship. Using a multilevel and multisource data approach, the current study aimed to build a model that demonstrated the impact of a physician's EI on the patient's trust and the patient-physician relationship. The survey sample included 983 outpatients and 39 physicians representing 11 specialties. Results of path analyses demonstrated that the ratio of patient's follow-up visits (p services. This study suggests that nurses had the sensitivity and intellectual skills in assessing the physician's performance and the patient's need. Our findings suggest that patient's trust is the cornerstone of the patient-physician relationship; however, mutual trust and professional respect between nurses and physicians play a critical role in reinforcing the patient-physician relationship to effect improvements in the provision of patient-centered care.

  5. Physicians' and nurses' satisfaction with the clinical laboratory service of Gondar University Hospital, northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Zelalem; Birhan, Wubet; Derseh, Dejene; Sahle, Biruktawit; Gizaw, Netsanet

    2013-09-01

    To assess physicians' and nurses' satisfaction with the service provided by the laboratory at Gondar University Hospital. We conducted a cross-sectional study involving 196 nurses and physicians. Overall level of satisfaction was 51.1% for nurses and 51.5% for physicians. Lack of consistency in the quality of laboratory work, absence of a timely report of critical values, test turnaround time, acceptability of results released, and reporting of reference ranges with test results were areas mentioned as sources of dissatisfaction. The study showed wide room for improvement. In addition to taking intervention, root causes of dissatisfaction need to be investigated and means of improving the satisfaction level should be designed and implemented.

  6. MULTIVARIABLE ANALYSIS OF PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH FAMILY PHYSICIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janko Kersnik

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patient satisfaction is an indicator of the quality of care.Methods. We used an internationally standardised and validated instrument for patients’ evaluations of general practice care developed in a series of studies. Sample. 60 consecutive patients in 36 practices in Slovenia were approached and offered a self-administered questionnaire.Results. I’ve got 84% response rate. The respondents’ mean age was 50 years. 64% were female, and 36% male. Higher satisfaction was predicted by eight variables: higher age of the patient, higher number of office visits, patient satisfaction with the organisation of the health care system, lower self-evaluated health status, lower number of anxiety and depression signs, not being visited in home during out of hours services, higher number of home visits made by a family practitioner daily and active appointment system.Conclusions. The patients evaluate parts of the health care system as a whole. The survey showed necessary changes in order to improve patient satisfaction. Introduction of appointment system in primary care seems to be unavoidable. Communication skill besides family medicine curricula and vocational training in family medicine should be included in each curricula for undergraduate teaching as well in vocational training. Those who did not benefit of such training courses in communication skills should be offered. Home visits as one of the basic characteristics of family practice should be supported professionally and with financial incentives.

  7. Personal values of family physicians, practice satisfaction, and service to the underserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, B C; Guse, C; Gottlieb, M S

    2000-03-01

    Personal values are defined as "desirable goals varying in importance that serve as guiding principles in people's lives," and have been shown to influence specialty choice and relate to practice satisfaction. We wished to examine further the relationship of personal values to practice satisfaction and also to a physician's willingness to care for the underserved. We also wished to study associations that might exist among personal values, practice satisfaction, and a variety of practice characteristics. We randomly surveyed a stratified probability sample of 1224 practicing family physicians about their personal values (using the Schwartz values questionnaire), practice satisfaction, practice location, breadth of practice, demographics, board certification status, teaching involvement, and the payor mix of the practice. Family physicians rated the benevolence (motivation to help those close to you) value type highest, and the ratings of the benevolence value type were positively associated with practice satisfaction (correlation coefficient = 0.14, P = .002). Those involved in teaching medical trainees were more satisfied than those who were not involved (P = .009). Some value-type ratings were found to be positively associated with caring for the underserved. Those whose practices consisted of more than 40% underserved (underserved defined as Medicare, Medicaid, and indigent populations) rated the tradition (motivation to maintain customs of traditional culture and religion) value type significantly higher (P = .02). Those whose practices consisted of more than 30% indigent care rated the universalism (motivation to enhance and protect the well-being of all people) value type significantly higher (P = .03). Family physicians who viewed benevolence as a guiding principle in their lives reported a higher level of professional satisfaction. Likewise, physicians involved in the teaching of medical trainees were more satisfied with their profession. Family physicians

  8. Patients’ satisfaction regarding family physician's consultation in primary healthcare centers of Ministry of Health, Jeddah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawakid, Khalid; Rashid, Ola Abdul; Mandoura, Najlaa; Usman Shah, Hassan Bin; Ahmed, Waqar Asrar; Ibrahim, Adel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The current study aims to assess the level of patients’ satisfaction and the factors contributing to patients’ satisfaction toward family physicians (FPs) consultation, visiting primary healthcare centers (PHCCs) working under Ministry of Health, Jeddah. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study conducted in Jeddah from November 1, 2016 to March 1, 2017, we used consultation satisfaction questionnaire and its four subscales with standard cutoffs. These subscales include general satisfaction, professional care, depth of relationship, and length of consultation. Mean scores along with standard deviation of these subscales were measured. Independent sample t-test, ANOVA, and multivariate regression analysis were performed to test the association between satisfaction level and predictors. Results: Overall, patients’ satisfaction was 60%. Around 74% of patients were satisfied with the professional care and 58% with the depth of the relationship. Around 60% of patients need more consultation time with the physicians. Knowledge about the presence of FP in the nearest PHCCs was around 70%. Multivariate regression analysis for the overall high satisfaction showed that the most important predictors of this high satisfaction level are regular visits to a particular FP (P < 0.001), distance from the PHCC (P = 0.044) and gender of the patient (P = 0.027). Conclusion: This study concluded that satisfaction with the FP's consultation is acceptable but needs improvement. Lower satisfaction was reported among males, patients living at a distance from PHCC and who had less knowledge about the presence of FP in their nearest PHCC. Such study data are vital for any corrective measures to boost satisfaction in patients attending PHCCs. PMID:29564270

  9. Patients' satisfaction regarding family physician's consultation in primary healthcare centers of Ministry of Health, Jeddah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Bawakid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current study aims to assess the level of patients' satisfaction and the factors contributing to patients' satisfaction toward family physicians (FPs consultation, visiting primary healthcare centers (PHCCs working under Ministry of Health, Jeddah. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study conducted in Jeddah from November 1, 2016 to March 1, 2017, we used consultation satisfaction questionnaire and its four subscales with standard cutoffs. These subscales include general satisfaction, professional care, depth of relationship, and length of consultation. Mean scores along with standard deviation of these subscales were measured. Independent sample t-test, ANOVA, and multivariate regression analysis were performed to test the association between satisfaction level and predictors. Results: Overall, patients' satisfaction was 60%. Around 74% of patients were satisfied with the professional care and 58% with the depth of the relationship. Around 60% of patients need more consultation time with the physicians. Knowledge about the presence of FP in the nearest PHCCs was around 70%. Multivariate regression analysis for the overall high satisfaction showed that the most important predictors of this high satisfaction level are regular visits to a particular FP (P < 0.001, distance from the PHCC (P = 0.044 and gender of the patient (P = 0.027. Conclusion: This study concluded that satisfaction with the FP's consultation is acceptable but needs improvement. Lower satisfaction was reported among males, patients living at a distance from PHCC and who had less knowledge about the presence of FP in their nearest PHCC. Such study data are vital for any corrective measures to boost satisfaction in patients attending PHCCs.

  10. Job satisfaction of occupational physicians in commercial and other delivery settings: a comparative and explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, Harmen Nico; van der Beek, Allard J

    2014-08-01

    Commercialization of occupational health services (OHS) and transition to a supplier market which started in 1995, has affected work and working conditions of occupational physicians (OPs) profoundly. OPs have lost influence on the organization of their work and managers took over control. This study explores the impact of commercialization on job satisfaction of occupational physicians. Data were collected through a questionnaire completed by 797 OPs, members of the Netherlands Association of Occupational Medicine (response: 45%). A range of work satisfiers and dissatisfiers measures was included that, according to the Social Action Approach, could explain the variation in job satisfaction. Stepwise multivariate regression analyses were performed to explore to what extent the differences in job satisfaction can be attributed to the characteristics of the setting, biographical variables, satisfiers and dissatisfiers. Occupational physicians in commercial settings had the lowest average score as regards job satisfaction (6.7) contrasting sharply with their colleagues in private practices (8.7) and in non-commercial settings (7.9). The variation in job satisfaction between delivery settings could largely be attributed to satisfiers and dissatisfiers. Biographical characteristics (age, gender) had no effect. The data suggested that not commercialization as such, but the ability of commercial OHS providers to integrate professional values was the crucial factor to bring about job satisfaction. The challenge for commercial OHS providers is to preserve the professional zeal in OPs by integrating professional values in their organization in order to improve the quality of the services and the attractiveness of the profession.

  11. Physician Verbal Compliance-Gaining Strategies and Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olynick, Janna; Iliopulos, Alexandra; Li, Han Z.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The patient healthcare experience is a complex phenomenon, as is encouraging patient compliance with medical advice. To address this multifaceted relationship, the purpose of this paper is to explore the ways resident physicians verbally encourage patient compliance and the relationship between these compliance-seeking strategies and…

  12. Patient- and Physician-reported Satisfaction With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Treatment in US Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Katie; Lobosco, Steve; Bell, David; Hoskin, Ben; Chang, David J; Pobiner, Bonnie; Ramachandran, Sulabha

    2017-09-01

    This two-part study comprised two descriptive, cross-sectional surveys to evaluate treatment satisfaction among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and their physicians from US clinical practices. The Lupus Plus Project (LPP; part one) involved belimumab-containing regimens; the Disease Specific Program (DSP; part two) included all treatments and was designed to build on the body of evidence from part one. The LPP recruited patients receiving belimumab, and comprised 2 paper questionnaires: a patient self-completion questionnaire (PSC) and a patient record form (PRF) completed by the physician. The DSP enrolled patients with SLE receiving any treatment and comprised four parts: a PSC, a PRF completed by the physician after patient consultation, face-to-face physician interviews, and a workload form completed by the physicians to indicate their total SLE patient workload. The key objective of this study was to assess physician and patient satisfaction with current treatment. From the PSCs, data regarding patient-reported satisfaction with current treatment were available for 263 patients who were receiving belimumab combination therapy (LPP) and 250 patients who were receiving non-belimumab treatment (DSP). The majority of patients (belimumab, 86.3% [227/263]; non-belimumab, 78.4% [196/250]) responded positively (at least "somewhat satisfied") when asked about current treatment satisfaction, as did physicians (belimumab, 82.9% [311/375]; non-belimumab, 74.3% [326/439]). In multivariate analysis, factors most strongly associated with patient-reported satisfaction for patients receiving belimumab were patient-reported improvements in leisure activities since taking belimumab (odds ratio [OR] = 4.66), physician-reported improvements in fatigue (OR = 3.72), patient-reported improvements in general symptoms (OR = 3.02), and pain/achiness (OR = 2.71). Physician satisfaction was associated with clinical outcome such as improvements in pain/achiness (OR = 6

  13. Physician Gender Is Associated with Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Scores in Outpatient Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogo-Gupta, Lisa J; Haunschild, Carolyn; Altamirano, Jonathan; Maldonado, Yvonne A; Fassiotto, Magali

    2018-02-08

    Patient satisfaction is gaining increasing attention as a quality measure in health care, but the methods used to assess it may negatively impact women physicians. Our objective was to examine the relationship between physician gender and patient satisfaction with outpatient gynecology care as measured by the Press Ganey patient satisfaction survey. This cross-sectional study analyzed 909 Press Ganey patient satisfaction surveys linked to outpatient gynecology visits at a single academic institution (March 2013-August 2014), including self-reported demographics and satisfaction. Surveys are delivered in a standardized fashion electronically and by mail. Surveys were completed by 821 unique patients and 13,780 gynecology visits occurred during the study period. The primary outcome variable was likelihood to recommend (LTR) a physician. We used χ 2 tests of independence to assess the effect of demographic concordance on LTR and two generalized estimating equations models were run clustered by physician, with topbox physician LTR as the outcome variable. Analysis was performed in SAS Enterprise Guide 7.1 (SAS, Inc., Cary, NC). Nine hundred nine surveys with complete demographic data were completed by women during the study period (mean age, 49.3 years). Age- and race-concordant patient-physician pairs received significantly higher proportions of top LTR score than discordant pairs (p = .014 and p < .0001, respectively). In contrast, gender-concordant pairs received a significantly lower proportion of top scores than discordant pairs (p = .027). In the generalized estimating equations model adjusting for health care environment, only gender remained statistically significant. Women physicians had significantly lower odds (47%) of receiving a top score (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37-0.78; p = .001). Women gynecologists are 47% less likely to receive top patient satisfaction scores compared with their male counterparts owing to their gender alone, suggesting

  14. Parent Satisfaction With Communication Is Associated With Physician's Patient-Centered Communication Patterns During Family Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    October, Tessie W; Hinds, Pamela S; Wang, Jichuan; Dizon, Zoelle B; Cheng, Yao I; Roter, Debra L

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the association between physician's patient-centered communication patterns and parental satisfaction during decision-making family conferences in the PICU. Single-site, cross-sectional study. Forty-four-bed PICUs in a free-standing children's hospital. Sixty-seven English-speaking parents of 39 children who participated in an audiorecorded family conference with 11 critical care attending physicians. Thirty-nine family conferences were audiorecorded. Sixty-seven of 77 (92%) eligible parents were enrolled. The conference recordings were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System and a Roter Interaction Analysis System-based patient-centeredness score, which quantitatively evaluates the conversations for physician verbal dominance and discussion of psychosocial elements, such as a family's goals and preferences. Higher patient-centeredness scores reflect higher proportionate dialogue focused on psychosocial, lifestyle, and socioemotional topics relative to medically focused talk. Parents completed satisfaction surveys within 24 hours of the conference. Conferences averaged 45 minutes in length (SD, 19 min), during which the medical team contributed 73% of the dialogue compared with parental contribution of 27%. Physicians dominated the medical team, contributing 89% of the team contribution to the dialogue. The majority of physician speech was medically focused (79%). A patient-centeredness score more than 0.75 predicted parental satisfaction (β = 12.05; p satisfaction was negatively influenced by severity of illness of the patient (β = -4.34; p = 0.0003), controlling for previously mentioned factors in the model. Parent-physician interactions with more patient-centered elements, such as increased proportions of empathetic statements, question asking, and emotional talk, positively influence parent satisfaction despite the child's severity of illness.

  15. Predictors of physician career satisfaction, work-life balance, and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeton, Kristie; Fenner, Dee E; Johnson, Timothy R B; Hayward, Rodney A

    2007-04-01

    To explore factors associated with physician career satisfaction, work-life balance, and burnout focusing on differences across age, gender, and specialty. A cross-sectional, mailed, self-administered survey was sent to a national sample of 2,000 randomly-selected physicians, stratified by specialty, age, and gender (response rate 48%). Main outcome measures included career satisfaction, burnout, and work-life balance. Scales ranged from 1 to 100. Both women and men report being highly satisfied with their careers (79% compared with 76%, Pwork-life balance (48% compared with 49%, P=.24), and having moderate levels of emotional resilience (51% compared with 53%, P=.09). Measures of burnout strongly predicted career satisfaction (standardized beta 0.36-0.60, Pwork-life balance and burnout was having some control over schedule and hours worked (standardized beta 0.28, Pwork-life balance, or burnout. This national physician survey suggests that physicians can struggle with work-life balance yet remain highly satisfied with their career. Burnout is an important predictor of career satisfaction, and control over schedule and work hours are the most important predictors of work-life balance and burnout. II.

  16. The influence of achievement before, during and after medical school on physician job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Borleffs, Jan C C; Stewart, Roy E; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-10-01

    In this longitudinal study, we investigated the relationship between physicians' prior achievements (before, during and after medical school) and job satisfaction, and tested the two lines of reasoning that prior achievements influence job satisfaction positively or negatively, respectively. The participants were graduates who started their medical training in 1982 (n = 147), 1983 (n = 154), 1992 (n = 143) and 1993 (n = 153). We operationalised job satisfaction as satisfaction (on a 10-point scale) with 13 cognitive, affective and instrumental aspects of the participants' jobs. The measures of achievement before, during and after medical school included pre-university grade point average, study progress and a residency position in the specialty of first choice, respectively. We included the effect of curriculum type (problem-based learning versus traditional), gender and years of experience as moderator variables. Higher achievers before and during medical school were more satisfied about their income (β = .152, p job satisfaction. The direction of the influences depended on the job satisfaction aspect in question, which indicates that it is important to distinguish between aspects of job satisfaction. To optimize job satisfaction of high achievers, it is important for graduates to obtain their preferred specialty. Furthermore, it is vital to provide them with enough opportunities for further development.

  17. Patient, staff and physician satisfaction: a new model, instrument and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Anne S; McCarthy, Kim A

    2011-01-01

    Customer satisfaction's importance is well-documented in the marketing literature and is rapidly gaining wide acceptance in the healthcare industry. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new customer-satisfaction measuring method - Reichheld's ultimate question - and compare it with traditional techniques using data gathered from four healthcare clinics. A new survey method, called the ultimate question, was used to collect patient satisfaction data. It was subsequently compared with the data collected via an existing method. Findings suggest that the ultimate question provides similar ratings to existing models at lower costs. A relatively small sample size may affect the generalizability of the results; it is also possible that potential spill-over effects exist owing to two patient satisfaction surveys administered at the same time. This new ultimate question method greatly improves the process and ease with which hospital or clinic administrators are able to collect patient (as well as staff and physician) satisfaction data in healthcare settings. Also, the feedback gained from this method is actionable and can be used to make strategic improvements that will impact business and ultimately increase profitability. The paper's real value is pinpointing specific quality improvement areas based not just on patient ratings but also physician and staff satisfaction, which often underlie patients' clinical experiences.

  18. The effects of patient and physician characteristics on early outpatient satisfaction with substance dependence care: results of the SUBUSQOL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourion-Bédès S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Stéphanie Bourion-Bédès,1–3 Raymund Schwan,2 Paolo Di Patrizio,2 Guillaume Vlamynck,2 Sarah Viennet,2 Maxime Schvartz,2 Anne Gaunard,2 Alex Bédès,4 Isabelle Clerc-Urmès,5 Cédric Baumann3,5 1Regional Medical and Psychological Service (SMPR, 2CSAPA (Healthcare Center of Accompaniment and Prevention in Addictology, University Hospital of Nancy, 3EA4360 APEMAC, University of Lorraine, Nancy, 4ANPAA 15-CSAPA (Healthcare Center of Accompaniment and Prevention in Addictology, Saint-Flour, Cantal, 5Platform of Clinical Research Facility PARC, Unit MDS, University Hospital of Nancy, Nancy, France Background: Although patient perceptions of health care have increasingly been explored in the literature, little is known about care satisfaction among individuals with substance dependence. This exploratory study assessed the relationships between patient and physician characteristics and early outpatient satisfaction with care for alcohol and opioid dependence. Methods: Satisfaction was assessed using a multidimensional, self-administered and validated questionnaire during the early care process among a prospective outpatient cohort. In addition to measuring satisfaction and obtaining sociodemographic and clinical data, this study collected data on the self-reported health status and physician characteristics at inclusion. Cross-sectional analysis with multiple linear regression was performed to identify the variables associated with satisfaction level. Results: A total of 249 outpatients were included, and 63.8% completed the satisfaction questionnaire. Patients without a history of previous care for substance dependence were more satisfied with the appointment-making process (β=7.2; P=0.029 and with the doctor consultation (β=10.3; P=0.003 than those who had received care previously. Neither sociodemographic characteristics nor self-reported health status was associated with outpatient satisfaction. Conclusion: The factors that affect patients

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease patient's satisfaction with healthcare services received. Physicians' and nurses' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, Francesc; Vera, Isabel; Ginard, Daniel; Torrejón, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    patient satisfaction with healthcare services provided for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is essential due to high resources use. the study aimed to describe patient satisfaction with healthcare services using the CACHE questionnaire and to assess gastroenterologist and nurse perception on patients' satisfaction. observational multicentric prospective study in 35 Spanish hospitals. Patients included had Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The study was approved by the Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron Ethics Committee. Scheduled study visits: baseline (patient sociodemographics and clinical data were collected), 2-4 and 6-months. Patient satisfaction with healthcare was assessed by CACHE questionnaire at each visit; it scores from 0-least satisfaction to 100-highest satisfaction.Gastroenterologists and nurses answered once an adapted questionnaire. participating 290 patients (54.2 % males, 41.3 years old), 62 gastroenterologists and 47 nurses. At baseline mean (SD) CACHE score was 81.7 (10.9); satisfaction with clinician care was the highest, patient information the lowest. Scores did not change across study. Gastroenterologist global score was 72.5 (9.8); Staff Care satisfaction was the highest, patient information the lowest. All scores were significantly lower than patients'. Nurses' global score was 82.2 (8.5), clinician care satisfaction was the highest, centre facilities the lowest. Scores on satisfaction with clinician care, centre facilities, and patient information scored statistically lower than patients'. No relationship was found between patients' satisfaction and patients characteristics. conclusions: IBD patients are satisfied with healthcare services provided, even though the information may be improved. Nurses' perception is similar to that of patients, physicians have a lower perception.

  20. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozaffarian N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neelufar Mozaffarian,1 Steve Lobosco,2 Peng Lu,3 Adam Roughley,2 Gabriela Alperovich4 1Clinical Development, AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, USA; 2Adelphi Real World Ltd., Macclesfield, UK; 3Clinical Development, AbbVie Inc., Worcester, MA, USA; 4Global Medical Affairs Immunology, AbbVie Inc., Madrid, Spain Purpose: Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods: Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE or lupus nephritis (LN. Results: Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168 and 73.8% (152/206 of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99 with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113 with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7% on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445 for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4% on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695 for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied were more likely to have

  1. Determinants of patient satisfaction with physician interaction: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    positive adjustment.12. It influences promptness in seeking help and increases patients' understanding and retention of information.18. Communication skills, often not sufficiently emphasised during medical training, make a ...

  2. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center.

  3. [Satisfaction of patients with oncological diseases--an assessment of the key sectors in patient care: primary care physicians, specialist physicians, hospitals and health insurance providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degen, C; Möller, D; Schlechter, C

    2014-04-01

    The following study examines the influencing factors on the satisfaction of oncological patients with their primary care physician, specialist physician, hospital and health insurance provider. Individual patient satisfaction with cross-sectoral collaboration is examined based on the satisfaction with these sectors. 12 specialist practices from 8 federal states participated in the patient survey. Altogether, 516 patients took part during the investigation period 2011-2012. The results were evaluated by multiple regression analysis. The results show that patients are content with cross-sectoral collaboration if they are satisfied with their health insurance and the specialist physician. With regard to satisfaction with the primary care physician and the specialist physician, trust is perceived to be the most important influencing factor. For hospitals, the most significant influencing factor is interest in and time for patients. Regarding health insurance, providing the patients with information leads to a greater degree of satisfaction. Psychosocial factors are of key importance for the patient's perceptions of satisfaction with the different sectors. This contains for instance factors like to 'putting confidence in physicians' or 'talking about patients' fears'. The sectors considered in this study should therefore give more consideration to these factors during patient care. A health insurance provider can take on the role of a competent point of contact, providing quality-assured information in the context of oncological diseases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Association between satisfaction and stress with aspects of job and practice management among primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Lapi, Francesco; Silvestri, Caterina; Roti, Lorenzo; Giustini, Saffi Ettore; Buiatti, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Reforms introduced in the last decade in Italian general practice, have contributed to the changing role of primary care physicians (PCPs) within the Italian National Health Service, with potential difficulties adapting that may lead to job stress and dissatisfaction. The present study aims to compare job satisfaction and stress levels of PCPs working in primary healthcare teams (PHCTs) with those for practitioners operating in single ambulatory offices, and to assess potential associations with aspects of job and practice management. A postal survey was conducted between January and March 2005 among PCPs working in Tuscany. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire containing questions concerning personal, professional, job and practice characteristics. The Warr-Cook-Wall scale and the Cooper test were used to assess job satisfaction and stress, respectively. From 3043 PCPs, a response rate of 45.2% was achieved. Significant differences were found between PHCT physicians and solo practitioners in several aspects of their job. Physicians working in PHCTs appeared more satisfied in some aspects of their practice such as organisation, whereas they were less satisfied about workload and interaction with other healthcare providers. Multivariate modelling showed relevant aspects of dissatisfaction and stress, particularly the difficulties of collaboration with other healthcare providers, and access to specialised services. Reform strategies aimed at improving the quality of care among PCPs needs to take into account the contextual determinants of physician satisfaction and stress, and should highlight programmes that might be pursued to improve the integration of PCPs within the Italian National Health System.

  5. Physician's gender, communication style, patient preferences and patient satisfaction in gynecology and obstetrics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Sabine M; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M

    2012-11-01

    Review of studies published in the last 10 years about women seeking gynecological- or obstetrical care and physician's gender in relation to patient preferences, differences in communication style and patient satisfaction. Studies were identified by searching the online databases PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase and the Cochrane Library. The search strategies 'gender'; 'obstetrics' and 'gynecology' were combined with 'communication'; 'physician-patient relations'; 'patient preference' and 'patient satisfaction'. After screening title and abstract, evaluating full text and quality assessment, 9 articles were included in this review. Most patients preferred a female rather than a male gynecologist-obstetrician. This was partly explained by a more patient-centered communication style used by female gynecologists-obstetricians. Also experience and clinical competence were important factors in choosing a gynecologist-obstetrician. It was not clear whether patient's age or ethnicity influenced patients gender preference. Patient satisfaction increased when gynecologists-obstetricians used a patient-centered communication style. Preference for a female gynecologist-obstetrician might be explained by a more patient-centered communication style used by female gynecologists-obstetricians. Using a patient-centered communication style increases patient satisfaction. To increase patient satisfaction, gynecologists-obstetricians should learn to integrate patient-centered communication style into the consultation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Job satisfaction of occupational physicians in commercial and other delivery settings: A comparative and explorative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmen Plomp

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Commercialization of occupational health services (OHS and transition to a supplier market which started in 1995, has affected work and working conditions of occupational physicians (OPs profoundly. OPs have lost influence on the organization of their work and managers took over control. This study explores the impact of commercialization on job satisfaction of occupational physicians. Material and Methods: Data were collected through a questionnaire completed by 797 OPs, members of the Netherlands Association of Occupational Medicine (response: 45%. A range of work satisfiers and dissatisfiers measures was included that, according to the Social Action Approach, could explain the variation in job satisfaction. Stepwise multivariate regression analyses were performed to explore to what extent the differences in job satisfaction can be attributed to the characteristics of the setting, biographical variables, satisfiers and dissatisfiers. Results: Occupational physicians in commercial settings had the lowest average score as regards job satisfaction (6.7 contrasting sharply with their colleagues in private practices (8.7 and in non-commercial settings (7.9. The variation in job satisfaction between delivery settings could largely be attributed to satisfiers and dissatisfiers. Biographical characteristics (age, gender had no effect. The data suggested that not commercialization as such, but the ability of commercial OHS providers to integrate professional values was the crucial factor to bring about job satisfaction. Conclusions: The challenge for commercial OHS providers is to preserve the professional zeal in OPs by integrating professional values in their organization in order to improve the quality of the services and the attractiveness of the profession.

  7. A measure of treatment response: patient and physician satisfaction with traditional NSAIDs for osteoarthritis control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie D; Everett, Sharlette V; Taylor, Thomas N; Watson, Douglas J; Taylor-Stokes, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The clinical response to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs) varies substantially. The objective of this study was to describe physicians’ and patients’ perceptions of response to tNSAIDs as measured by satisfaction with control of patients’ osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in 2009 in Germany, Spain, and the UK. Linked physician and patient questionnaires collected data on OA management, degree of pain and disability, and satisfaction with OA control. Results The study included 363 treating physicians and 713 patients receiving tNSAIDs. Patient mean (standard deviation) age was 65.5 (11.0) years (range 36–94 years); 60% were women; 86% were white; and one-quarter were obese. Dissatisfaction with control of patients’ OA was expressed by physicians or their patients, or both, for 51% of patients, including 208 patients (31%) with mild OA and 478 patients (60%) with moderate or severe OA. Overall, 37% of patients reported dissatisfaction and 34% had a physician who reported dissatisfaction. Patient and physician assessments were the same in 70% of cases; Cohen’s κ coefficient was 0.34 (95% confidence interval 0.26–0.41), indicating fair agreement. Of those reporting dissatisfaction, most physicians (79%) and patients (64%) believed that the current control was the best that could be achieved. The most common reasons for which physicians reported dissatisfaction were inadequate response (56%), side effects (11.1%), and poor tolerance (7.8%). Conclusion One-half of patients or their treating physicians were dissatisfied with the control of OA provided by tNSAID therapy; moreover, most believed it was the best control that could be achieved. PMID:27790025

  8. Patient satisfaction and alliance as a function of the physician's self-regulation, the physician's stress, and the content of consultation in cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, A M M; Gholamrezaee, M.M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; Passchier, J; Despland, J.N.; Stiefel, F.; de Roten, Y.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate which characteristics of the physician and of the consultation are related to patient satisfaction with communication and working alliance. METHODS: Real-life consultations (N = 134) between patients (n = 134) and their physicians (n = 24) were audiotaped. All of the

  9. Establishing rapport: Physicians' practice and attendees' satisfaction at a Primary Health Care Center, Dammam, Saudi Arabia, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ali, Ayat A; Elzubair, Ahmed G

    2016-01-01

    Establishing rapport is an important step in physician-patient communication resulting in a positive effect on patient satisfaction and overall clinical outcomes. However, there is a dearth of studies on the condition of doctor-patient relations in Saudi Arabia. This study was performed to estimate the proportion of physicians who have a good rapport with patients in their practice and the proportion of satisfied attendees. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a Primary Health Care Center, Dammam, KSA. The data were collected through a structured self-administered questionnaire given to samples of attendees and physicians to estimate patient satisfaction and the practice of rapport by physicians. A total of 374 attendees and 27 physicians participated in the study. The percentage of physicians who had good rapport was 51.9%. Factors that showed significant relationship with rapport practice were: Physician's age (p = 0.016), physician's experience (p = 0.043), and professional status (p = 0.031). The attendees satisfied with their physician's rapport with them were 50.5%. Factors that showed significant relationship with satisfaction were: Attendee's age (p rapport with patients and patients' satisfaction with physicians' empathy is not high. Training is required to optimize physician-patient communication.

  10. No correlation between physicians administered elbow rating systems and patient's satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, L; Poulain, S; Hardy, P; Longo, U G; Denaro, V; Maffulli, N

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional outcome of patients who had undergone elbow arthroscopy, evaluating the correlation between three elbow scoring systems and the patients' subjective perception of satisfaction Fourteen patients who had undergone elbow arthroscopy were retrospective reviewed to evaluate the correlation between three elbow scoring systems and the patients' subjective perception of satisfaction at a mean follow-up time of 24 months (range 12-64 months). Two independent orthopedic surgeons evaluated all patients using three elbow scoring systems, a simple satisfaction question and a visual analogue scale. The three scoring systems showed significant correlation with each other (Pscoring systems and patients' satisfaction: patients with the same level of satisfaction could perform differently at the scoring systems. Although the three scoring systems used to evaluate the patients showed significant correlation with each other, they failed to correlate to patients' satisfaction. In reporting the results of arthroscopic elbow procedures, emphasis should be placed on individual variables, rather than on global elbow ratings. Further studies are needed to develop a single outcome evaluation system which is reliable, valid and sensitive to changes of clinical importance, which takes into account both patients' and physicians perspective, and which is short and practical to use.

  11. Job and life satisfaction and preference of future practice locations of physicians on remote islands in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Yoshiaki; Kumakura, Shunichi; Onoda, Keiichi; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Kiyoshi

    2015-05-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate job and life satisfaction and preference of future practice locations of physicians in rural and remote islands in Japan. A cross-sectional study was conducted for physicians who reside or resided on the Oki islands: isolated islands situated in the Sea of Japan between the Eurasian continent and the mainland of Japan. A questionnaire was sent to physicians on the Oki islands to evaluate physician satisfaction regarding job environment, career development, living conditions, salary, and support by local government. Data was analysed for 49 physicians; 47 were male and 2 were female, and the mean ± SD age was 44.3 ± 10.9 years. Among the variables related to physicians' satisfaction, most of the physicians (>90%) were satisfied with "team work" and "salary". On the other hand, the majority of physicians (approximately 70%) were not satisfied with the "opportunity to continue professional development". Age ≥ 50 years, graduates of medical schools other than Jichi Medical University (established in 1972 with the aim to produce rural physicians), self-selected the Oki islands as a practice location, and satisfaction in "work as a doctor", "opportunity to consult with peers about patients", "relationship with people in the community", and "acceptance by community" were found to be significant factors influencing the choice of the Oki islands as a future practice location. Factors influencing future practice locations on the remote islands were included in a self-reported questionnaire which illustrated the importance of factors that impact both the spouses and children of physicians. Improving work satisfaction, providing outreach support programmes for career development and professional support in rural practice, and building appropriate relationships between physicians and people in the community, which can in turn improve work satisfaction, may contribute to physicians' choices of practising medicine on rural and

  12. Patient-perceived communication styles of physicians in rehabilitation: the effect on patient satisfaction and compliance in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Park, Byung Kyu

    2008-12-01

    To examine patient-perceived communication styles (empathic and dominant communication styles) of Korean physicians in rehabilitation and their effects on patient outcomes (patient satisfaction and compliance). A total of 150 rehabilitation patients from a large university hospital in Korea were interviewed with a 26 item-questionnaire. Only 30% of the patients considered their physicians as highly affective whereas about 55% of them viewed their doctors as highly dominant. Physicians' affective and cognitive empathic communication styles were significantly and positively correlated with both patient satisfaction and compliance. Correlation analysis showed that physicians' dominant communication style was significantly but negatively related to patient satisfaction. However, compliance, cross-tabulation, and regression analyses suggested that physicians' dominant communication style may not be a good predictor of patient satisfaction and compliance. Those patients who perceived their physicians as highly affective or highly cognitive showed the highest rates of being completely satisfied, whereas none of those patients who ranked their physicians as least affective or least cognitive said that they were completely satisfied. The results confirmed the existing findings in the West that physician's communication styles were major determinants of the patient outcomes. Patients' highly negative view of their physicians' dominant communication style might raise some concerns about Korean physicians' authoritarian attitudes toward their patients.

  13. Patient satisfaction and alliance as a function of the physician's self-regulation, the physician's stress, and the content of consultation in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, A M M; Gholamrezaee, M M; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; Passchier, J; Despland, J-N; Stiefel, F; de Roten, Y

    2017-07-01

    To investigate which characteristics of the physician and of the consultation are related to patient satisfaction with communication and working alliance. Real-life consultations (N = 134) between patients (n = 134) and their physicians (n = 24) were audiotaped. All of the patients were aware of their cancer diagnosis and consulted their physician to discuss the results of tests (CT scans, magnetic resonance imaging, or tumor markers) and the progression of their cancer. The consultations were transcribed and coded with the "Defense Mechanisms Rating Scale-Clinician." The patients and physicians completed questionnaires about stress, satisfaction, and alliance, and the data were analyzed using robust linear modeling. Patient satisfaction with communication and working alliance was high. Both were significantly (negatively) related to the physician's neurotic and action defenses-in particular to the defenses of displacement, self-devaluation, acting out, and hypochondriasis-as well as to the physician's stress level. The content of the consultation was not significantly related to the patient outcomes. Our study shows that patient satisfaction with communication and working alliance is not influenced by the content of the consultation but is significantly associated with the physician's self-regulation (defense mechanisms) and stress. The results of this study might contribute to optimizing communication skills training and to improving communication and working alliance in cancer care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Importance of and satisfaction with work and professional interpersonal issues: a survey of physicians practicing general internal medicine in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Griffith, L E; Sackett, D L

    1995-09-15

    To explore the importance of and satisfaction with clinical responsibilities, teaching, research and interpersonal issues among general internists; to understand the barriers to satisfaction in these domains and the usefulness of potential solutions to these problems. Cross-sectional survey conducted from November 1992 to June 1994. Ontario. General internists who were fellows of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and members of the Ontario Medical Association. Of 1192 physicians, 1007 (84.5%) returned a completed questionnaire; only the 199 who devoted at least 50% of their time to the practice of general internal medicine were included in this analysis. The respondents were satisfied with their primary role as clinicians dealing with complex, undifferentiated problems caring for the total patient and providing consultation. Guidelines for the referral of patients to general internists, computerization of test results, recruitment of general internal medicine fellows and more confidence in the future of general internal medicine were some of the solutions considered likely to increase professional satisfaction. The respondents involved in teaching suggested additional solutions, such as an opportunity to improve their teaching and evidence-based medicine skills and a greater recognition for their teaching efforts. Few of the general internists conducted research, barriers included lack of personal and project funding, and pressure to generate clinical earnings. In the domain of professional interpersonal issues, women were significantly more likely than men to rate having a mentor, peer support groups, ongoing career counselling, promotion and tenure guidelines for parental leave, availability of on-site day care, addressing gender discrimination and adoption of gender-neutral language as likely to improve the work environment. The primary role of general internists is that of patient-centred clinician. Our findings suggest that general

  15. Effects of online palliative care training on knowledge, attitude and satisfaction of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agra Yolanda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Spanish Palliative Care Strategy recommends an intermediate level of training for primary care physicians in order to provide them with knowledge and skills. Most of the training involves face-to-face courses but increasing pressures on physicians have resulted in fewer opportunities for provision of and attendance to this type of training. The effectiveness of on-line continuing medical education in terms of its impact on clinical practice has been scarcely studied. Its effect in relation to palliative care for primary care physicians is currently unknown, in terms of improvement in patient's quality of life and main caregiver's satisfaction. There is uncertainty too in terms of any potential benefits of asynchronous communication and interaction among on-line education participants, as well as of the effect of the learning process. The authors have developed an on-line educational model for palliative care which has been applied to primary care physicians in order to measure its effectiveness regarding knowledge, attitude towards palliative care, and physician's satisfaction in comparison with a control group. The effectiveness evaluation at 18 months and the impact on the quality of life of patients managed by the physicians, and the main caregiver's satisfaction will be addressed in a different paper. Methods Randomized controlled educational trial to compared, on a first stage, the knowledge and attitude of primary care physicians regarding palliative care for advanced cancer patients, as well as satisfaction in those who followed an on-line palliative care training program with tutorship, using a Moodle Platform vs. traditional education. Results 169 physicians were included, 85 in the intervention group and 84 in the control group, of which five were excluded. Finally 82 participants per group were analyzed. There were significant differences in favor of the intervention group, in terms of knowledge (mean 4.6; CI

  16. Factors Affecting Physician Satisfaction and Wisconsin Medical Society Strategies to Drive Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Michele; Dexter, Donn; Nankivil, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    Physicians' dissatisfaction in their work is increasing, which is affecting the stability of health care in America. The Wisconsin Medical Society (Society) surveyed 1016 Wisconsin physicians to determine the source of their dissatisfaction. The survey results indicate Wisconsin physicians are satisfied when it comes to practice environment, work-life balance, and income. In addition, they are extremely satisfied when it comes to rating their ability to provide high quality care, and they have identified some benefits related to the adoption of electronic health records. However, they are feeling burned out, very unsatisfied with the amount of time spent in direct patient care compared to indirect patient care, and that they are spending too much time on administrative and data entry tasks. In terms of future workforce, many physicians are either unsure or would not recommend the profession to a prospective medical student. Electronic health records serve as both a satisfier and dissatisfier and as a potential driver for future physician satisfaction interventions. Changes at the institutional, organizational, and individual levels potentially could address the identified dissatisfiers and build upon the satisfiers. The Society identifies 12 strategies to improve upon the physician experience.

  17. Job Satisfaction and Burnout among Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Myhren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses and physicians working in the intensive care unit (ICU may be exposed to considerable job stress. The study aim was to assess the level of and the relationship between (1 job satisfaction, (2 job stress, and (3 burnout symptoms. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed at ICUs at Oslo University Hospital. 145 of 196 (74% staff members (16 physicians and 129 nurses answered the questionnaire. The following tools were used: job satisfaction scale (scores 10–70, modified Cooper's job stress questionnaire (scores 1–5, and Maslach burnout inventory (scores 1–5; high score in the dimension emotional exhaustion (EE indicates burnout. Personality was measured with the basic character inventory. Dimensions were neuroticism (vulnerability, extroversion (intensity, and control/compulsiveness with the range 0–9. Results. Mean job satisfaction among nurses was 43.9 (42.4–45.4 versus 51.1 (45.3–56.9 among physicians, P<0.05. The mean burnout value (EE was 2.3 (95% CI 2.2–2.4, and mean job stress was 2.6 (2.5–2.7, not significantly different between nurses and physicians. Females scored higher than males on vulnerability, 3.3 (2.9–3.7 versus 2.0 (1.1–2.9 (P<0.05, and experienced staff were less vulnerable, 2.7 (2.2–3.2, than inexperienced staff, 3.6 (3.0–4.2 (P<0.05. Burnout (EE correlated with job satisfaction (r=-0.4, P<0.001, job stress (r=0.6, P<0.001, and vulnerability (r=0.3, P=0.003. Conclusions. The nurses were significantly less satisfied with their jobs compared to the physicians. Burnout mean scores are relatively low, but high burnout scores are correlated with vulnerable personality, low job satisfaction, and high degree of job stress.

  18. Advanced proficiency EHR training: effect on physicians' EHR efficiency, EHR satisfaction and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastagir, M Tariq; Chin, Homer L; McNamara, Michael; Poteraj, Kathy; Battaglini, Sarah; Alstot, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    The best way to train clinicians to optimize their use of the Electronic Health Record (EHR) remains unclear. Approaches range from web-based training, class-room training, EHR functionality training, case-based training, role-based training, process-based training, mock-clinic training and "on the job" training. Similarly, the optimal timing of training remains unclear--whether to engage in extensive pre go-live training vs. minimal pre go-live training followed by more extensive post go-live training. In addition, the effectiveness of non-clinician trainers, clinician trainers, and peer-trainers, remains unclearly defined. This paper describes a program in which relatively experienced clinician users of an EHR underwent an intensive 3-day Peer-Led EHR advanced proficiency training, and the results of that training based on participant surveys. It highlights the effectiveness of Peer-Led Proficiency Training of existing experienced clinician EHR users in improving self-reported efficiency and satisfaction with an EHR and improvements in perceived work-life balance and job satisfaction.

  19. Physician-reported barriers to referring cancer patients to specialists: prevalence, factors, and association with career satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Daniel H; Tisnado, Diana M; Keating, Nancy L; Klabunde, Carrie N; Adams, John L; Rastegar, Afshin; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kahn, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Quality care for patients with cancer often requires access to specialty providers, but little is known about barriers to referring cancer patients for specialized care. Referral barriers may also lessen physician career satisfaction. The study was aimed at determining what factors are associated with these barriers and whether greater barriers are associated with low career satisfaction. This cross-sectional study examined 1562 primary care physicians (PCPs) and 2144 specialists responding to the multiregional Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium physician survey. The prevalence of physician-reported barriers to referring cancer patients for more specialized care (restricted provider networks, preauthorization requirements, patient inability to pay, lack of surgical subspecialists, and excessive patient travel time) was assessed. The 5 items were averaged to calculate a barrier score. A multivariate linear regression was used to determine physician and practice setting characteristics associated with the barrier score, and a multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the association of the barrier score with physician career satisfaction. Three in 5 physicians reported always, usually, or sometimes encountering any barrier to cancer patient specialty referrals. In adjusted analyses of PCPs and specialists, international medical graduates, physicians practicing in solo or government-owned practices, and physicians with <90% of their patients in managed care plans had higher barrier scores than others (P < .05). High barrier scores were associated with lower physician career satisfaction among PCPs and specialists (P < .05). Many physicians experience barriers to specialty referral for cancer patients. Uniform systems for providing and tracking timely referrals may enhance care and promote physician career satisfaction. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  20. Job satisfaction of foreign-national physicians working in patient care: a cross-sectional study in Saxony, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantenburg, Birte; Kitze, Katharina; Luppa, Melanie; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2016-01-01

    Physician migration is gaining attention worldwide. Despite increasing numbers of foreign physicians in Germany, their perceptions on working in Germany remain unexplored. Within a large survey on Saxon physicians, the aim of this study was to elucidate whether foreign-national physicians' job satisfaction differed from German physicians' job satisfaction. The study was designed as a comprehensive cross-sectional survey. All physicians ≤40 years and registered with the State Chamber of Physicians of Saxony (n = 5956) were mailed a paper-pencil questionnaire, of which 2357 were returned (response rate = 40 %). Questionnaires addressed socio-demographics and assessed job satisfaction by asking participants to rate their satisfaction with the overall job situation and 20 different aspects on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied to 5 = very satisfied). Ten percent of participants were foreign-national physicians. The three main countries of origin were the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Poland. Foreign-national physicians were more satisfied with aspects related to patient care, such as "possibility to treat patients as you deem optimal" and "relationship with patients". However, they were less satisfied with aspects related to human relations, such as "work atmosphere", relationship with co-workers, and "social status". Foreign-national physicians were also less satisfied with the aspect "work enjoyment". Further research on determinants promoting foreign-national physicians' job satisfaction is needed as their professional well-being may influence quality of patient care. Measures teaching cross-cultural competence and awareness may be beneficial for both foreign-national and German physicians.

  1. Family caregiver satisfaction with home-based nursing and physician care over the palliative care trajectory: results from a longitudinal survey questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriere, Denise N; Zagorski, Brandon; Coyte, Peter C

    2013-07-01

    A limited understanding of satisfaction with home-based palliative care currently exists. This study measured family caregivers' satisfaction with home-based physician and nursing palliative care services, and explored predictors of satisfaction, across the palliative care trajectory. A longitudinal, cohort design was used. Family caregivers were interviewed by telephone by-weekly from palliative care admission until death. Satisfaction was assessed using the Quality of End-of-Life care and Satisfaction with Treatment (QUEST) questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression models were used to determine the extent to which demographic, quality of care, and service related variables predicted satisfaction. Family caregivers (N=104) of palliative care patients. Each of the nine quality of care parameters were consistently found to be significant predictors of overall satisfaction with palliative care. The results may inform key health policy issues. Specifically, knowledge of how quality of care parameters predict family caregivers' satisfaction over the course of the palliative care trajectory may aid managers responsible for resource allocation and the determination of home care standards.

  2. Physician satisfaction with clinical laboratory services: a College of American Pathologists Q-probes study of 138 institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bruce A; Bekeris, Leonas G; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Walsh, Molly K; Valenstein, Paul N

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring customer satisfaction is a valuable component of a laboratory quality improvement program. To survey the level of physician satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services. Participating institutions provided demographic and practice information and survey results of physician satisfaction with defined aspects of clinical laboratory services, rated on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). One hundred thirty-eight institutions participated in this study and submitted a total of 4329 physician surveys. The overall satisfaction score for all institutions ranged from 2.9 to 5.0. The median overall score for all participants was 4.1 (10th percentile, 3.6; 90th percentile, 4.5). Physicians were most satisfied with the quality/reliability of results and staff courtesy, with median values of excellent or good ratings of 89.9%. Of the 5 service categories that received the lowest percentage values of excellent/good ratings (combined scores of 4 and 5), 4 were related to turnaround time for inpatient stat, outpatient stat, routine, and esoteric tests. Surveys from half of the participating laboratories reported that 96% to 100% of physicians would recommend the laboratory to other physicians. The category most frequently selected as the most important category of laboratory services was quality/reliability of results (31.7%). There continues to be a high level of physician satisfaction and loyalty with clinical laboratory services. Test turnaround times are persistent categories of dissatisfaction and present opportunities for improvement.

  3. Impact of culture on commitment, satisfaction, and extra-role behaviors among Canadian ER physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E S; Rondeau, K V; Francescutti, L H

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of hospital emergency department culture on the job satisfaction, patient commitment, and extra-role performance of Canadian emergency physicians. The conceptual model related four cultural archetypes from the competing valued model to the three outcome variables. In total, 428 Canadian emergency physicians responded to a national survey. The conceptual model was tested via structural equation modeling via LISREL 8. Culture had a relatively weak impact on the outcomes. Human resources culture related positively to job satisfaction while bureaucratic culture related positively to patient commitment. Patient commitment, but not job satisfaction strongly and positively related to extra-role behavior. A direct relationship between entrepreneurial culture and extra-role behavior emerged from an extended analysis. Organizational culture seems to have more distal relationships with outcome variables and its influence is likely to be mediated by more proximal workplace variables. Of value by showing that a key modern leadership challenge is to create the kind of work culture that can become a source of competitive advantage through generating particular organizational outcomes valued by stakeholders.

  4. Physician Satisfaction With Clinical Laboratory Services: A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes Study of 81 Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Shannon J; Souers, Rhona J; Blond, Barbara; Massie, Larry

    2016-10-01

    -Assessment of customer satisfaction is a vital component of the laboratory quality improvement program. -To survey the level of physician satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services. -Participating institutions provided demographic information and survey results of physician satisfaction, with specific features of clinical laboratory services individually rated on a scale of 5 (excellent) to 1 (poor). -Eighty-one institutions submitted 2425 surveys. The median overall satisfaction score was 4.2 (10th percentile, 3.6; 90th percentile, 4.6). Of the 16 surveyed areas receiving the highest percentage of excellent/good ratings (combined scores of 4 and 5), quality of results was highest along with test menu adequacy, staff courtesy, and overall satisfaction. Of the 4 categories receiving the lowest percentage values of excellent/good ratings, 3 were related to turnaround time for inpatient "STAT" (tests performed immediately), outpatient STAT, and esoteric tests. The fourth was a new category presented in this survey: ease of electronic order entry. Here, 11.4% (241 of 2121) of physicians assigned below-average (2) or poor (1) scores. The 5 categories deemed most important to physicians included quality of results, turnaround times for inpatient STAT, routine, and outpatient STAT tests, and clinical report format. Overall satisfaction as measured by physician willingness to recommend their laboratory to another physician remains high at 94.5% (2160 of 2286 respondents). -There is a continued trend of high physician satisfaction and loyalty with clinical laboratory services. Physician dissatisfaction with ease of electronic order entry represents a new challenge. Test turnaround times are persistent areas of dissatisfaction, representing areas for improvement.

  5. Understanding concordance in patient-physician relationships: personal and ethnic dimensions of shared identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L; O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cooper, Lisa A; Haidet, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Although concordance by race and sex in physician-patient relationships has been associated with patient ratings of better care, mechanisms through which concordance leads to better outcomes remains unknown. This investigation examined (1) whether patients' perceptions of similarity to their physicians predicted their ratings of quality of care and (2) whether perceived similarity was influenced by racial and sexual concordance and the physician's communication. The research design was a cross-sectional study with 214 patients and 29 primary care physicians from 10 private and public outpatient clinics. Measures included postvisit patient ratings of similarity to the physician; satisfaction, trust, and intent to adhere; and audiotape analysis of patient involvement and physicians' patient-centered communication. Factor analysis revealed 2 dimensions of similarity, personal (in beliefs, values) and ethnic (in race, community). Black and white patients in racially concordant interactions reported more personal and ethnic similarity (mean score, 87.6 and 78.8, respectively, on a 100-point scale) to their physicians than did minority patients (mean score, 81.4 and 41.2, respectively) and white patients (mean score, 84.4 and 41.9, respectively) in racially discordant encounters. In multivariable models, perceived personal similarity was predicted by the patient's age, education, and physicians' patient-centered communication, but not by racial or sexual concordance. Perceived personal similarity and physicians' patient-centered communication predicted patients' trust, satisfaction, and intent to adhere. The physician-patient relationship is strengthened when patients see themselves as similar to their physicians in personal beliefs, values, and communication. Perceived personal similarity is associated with higher ratings of trust, satisfaction, and intention to adhere. Race concordance is the primary predictor of perceived ethnic similarity, but several factors affect

  6. Relationship between coping skills and job satisfaction among Japanese full-time occupational physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Nagata, Shoji

    2003-09-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between coping skills and job satisfaction among Japanese full-time occupational physicians (OPs). In 2000 we mailed self-administered questionnaires to 716 full-time OPs who were members of "Sanyu-kai", the only Japanese association of full-time OPs. The questionnaires included age, gender, marital status, main type of company's work, the number of full-time OPs, the number of employees, working years as an OP, tenure in the present company, job stress, and coping skills question. The coping skills questions consisted of 11 items which were decided after discussion among several experienced full-time OPs. In total, 351 (49%) of the OPs returned suitable questionnaires for analyses. Considering age, gender, marital status, and coping skills, multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) found that age, simplification of work, obvious roles for staff, consultations, and communication in the community and company were factors which contributed significantly to job satisfaction. Structural equation modeling showed that age and coping skills such as work system improvements, consultations, and communication in the community and company influenced job satisfaction. Our results indicated that the age and coping skills influenced job satisfaction among full-time OPs. Our results are also considered to support the training of OPs in the future.

  7. Parental satisfaction of U.S. physicians: associated factors and comparison with the general U.S. working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Hasan, Omar; Hayes, Sharonne; Sinsky, Christine A; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff; West, Colin P; Dyrbye, Lotte N

    2016-08-27

    Physicians work considerably longer hours and are less satisfied with work-life balance than U.S. workers in other fields. There is, however, minimal data on physicians' parental satisfaction. To evaluate differences in parental satisfaction among physicians and workers in other fields, we surveyed U.S. physicians as well as a probability-based sample of the general U.S. working population between August 2014-October 2014. Parental satisfaction and the perceived impact of career on relationships with children were evaluated. Among 6880 responding physicians (cooperation rate 19.2 %), 5582 (81.1 %) had children. Overall, physicians were satisfied in their relationships with their children, with 4782 (85.9 %) indicating that they were either very satisfied [n = 2738; (49.2 %)] or satisfied [n = 2044 (36.7 %)]. In contrast, less than half believed their career had made either a major [n = 1212; (21.8 %)] or minor positive [n = 1260; (22.7 %)] impact on their relationship with their children, with a slightly larger proportion indicating a major (n = 2071 [37.2 %]) or minor (n = 501 [9 %]) negative impact. Women physicians were less likely to believe their career had made a positive impact as were younger physicians. Hours worked/week inversely correlated with the belief that career had made a positive impact on relationships with children. Both men (OR: 2.75; p impact on relationships with their children than the sex-matched U.S. working population. U.S. physicians report generally high satisfaction in their relationships with their children. Despite their high satisfaction, physicians have a more negative perception of the impact of their career on relationships with their children than U.S. workers in general.

  8. Physicians' perceptions of quality of care, professional autonomy, and job satisfaction in Canada, Norway, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyssen, Reidar; Palmer, Karen S; Solberg, Ingunn B; Voltmer, Edgar; Frank, Erica

    2013-12-15

    We lack national and cross-national studies of physicians' perceptions of quality of patient care, professional autonomy, and job satisfaction to inform clinicians and policymakers. This study aims to compare such perceptions in Canada, the United States (U.S.), and Norway. We analyzed data from large, nationwide, representative samples of physicians in Canada (n = 3,213), the U.S. (n = 6,628), and Norway (n = 657), examining demographics, job satisfaction, and professional autonomy. Among U.S. physicians, 79% strongly agreed/agreed they could provide high quality patient care vs. only 46% of Canadian and 59% of Norwegian physicians. U.S. physicians also perceived more clinical autonomy and time with their patients, with differences remaining significant even after controlling for age, gender, and clinical hours. Women reported less adequate time, clinical freedom, and ability to provide high-quality care. Country differences were the strongest predictors for the professional autonomy variables. In all three countries, physicians' perceptions of quality of care, clinical freedom, and time with patients influenced their overall job satisfaction. Fewer U.S. physicians reported their overall job satisfaction to be at-least-somewhat satisfied than did Norwegian and Canadian physicians. U.S. physicians perceived higher quality of patient care and greater professional autonomy, but somewhat lower job satisfaction than their colleagues in Norway and Canada. Differences in health care system financing and delivery might help explain this difference; Canada and Norway have more publicly-financed, not-for-profit health care delivery systems, vs. a more-privately-financed and profit-driven system in the U.S. None of these three highly-resourced countries, however, seem to have achieved an ideal health care system from the perspective of their physicians.

  9. Frequency of satisfaction and dissatisfaction with practice among rural-based, group-employed physicians and non-physician practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddimba, Anthony C; Scribani, Melissa; Krupa, Nicole; May, John J; Jenkins, Paul

    2016-10-22

    Widespread dissatisfaction among United States (U.S.) clinicians could endanger ongoing reforms. Practitioners in rural/underserved areas withstand stressors that are unique to or accentuated in those settings. Medical professionals employed by integrating delivery systems are often distressed by the cacophony of organizational change(s) that such consolidation portends. We investigated the factors associated with dis/satisfaction with rural practice among doctors/non-physician practitioners employed by an integrated healthcare delivery network serving 9 counties of upstate New York, during a time of organizational transition. We linked administrative data about practice units with cross-sectional data from a self-administered multi-dimensional questionnaire that contained practitioner demographics plus valid scales assessing autonomy/relatedness needs, risk aversion, tolerance for uncertainty/ambiguity, meaningfulness of patient care, and workload. We targeted medical professionals on the institutional payroll for inclusion. We excluded those who retired, resigned or were fired during the study launch, plus members of the advisory board and research team. Fixed-effects beta regressions were performed to test univariate associations between each factor and the percent of time a provider was dis/satisfied. Factors that manifested significant fixed effects were entered into multivariate, inflated beta regression models of the proportion of time that practitioners were dis/satisfied, incorporating clustering by practice unit as a random effect. Of the 473 eligible participants. 308 (65.1 %) completed the questionnaire. 59.1 % of respondents were doctoral-level; 40.9 % mid-level practitioners. Practitioners with heavier workloads and/or greater uncertainty intolerance were less likely to enjoy top-quintile satisfaction; those deriving greater meaning from practice were more likely. Higher meaningfulness and gratified relational needs increased one's likelihood of

  10. [Job Satisfaction Among Young Physicians Working in Psychiatric and Psychosomatic Care - Results of a Survey in Saxony, Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantenburg, Birte; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2016-11-01

    Objective: Analysis of job satisfaction and intentions to quit among physicians working in psychiatric/psychosomatic care compared to physicians working in somatic care. Methods: Full postal survey of all physicians ≤ 40 years of age registered with the State Chamber of Physicians of Saxony (response rate 40 %, n = 2357). Analysis was restricted to physicians working in patient care (n = 1901). Results: Physicians working in psychiatric/psychosomatic care as well as those in somatic care were rather satisfied with their overall job situation (mean: 3.48 [standard deviation: 1.01] vs. 3.40 [0.94], 5 point Likert scale). Physicians working in psychiatric/psychosomatic care were less satisfied with only 2 out of 20 aspects of job satisfaction. Nearly a quarter wished to leave patient care or to go abroad, which did not differ from physicians working in somatic care. Conclusion: The present study did not confirm international results indicating lower job satisfaction among psychiatrists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. The representation of patient experience and satisfaction in physician rating sites. A criteria-based analysis of English- and German-language sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Swantje; Strech, Daniel

    2010-12-07

    Information on patient experience and satisfaction with individual physicians could play an important role for performance measures, improved health care and health literacy. Physician rating sites (PRSs) bear the potential to be a widely available source for this kind of information. However, patient experience and satisfaction are complex constructs operationalized by multiple dimensions. The way in which PRSs allow users to express and rate patient experience and satisfaction could likely influence the image of doctors in society and the self-understanding of both doctors and patients. This study examines the extent to which PRSs currently represent the constructs of patient experience and satisfaction. First, a systematic review of research instruments for measuring patient experience and satisfaction was conducted. The content of these instruments was analyzed qualitatively to create a comprehensive set of dimensions for patient experience and patient satisfaction. Second, PRSs were searched for systematically in English-language and German-language search engines of Google and Yahoo. Finally, we classified every structured question asked by the different PRS using the set of dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. The qualitative content analysis of the measurement instruments produced 13 dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. We identified a total of 21 PRSs. No PRSs represented all 13 dimensions of patient satisfaction and experience with its structured questions. The 3 most trafficked English-language PRS represent between 5 and 6 dimensions and the 3 most trafficked German language PRSs between 8 and 11 dimensions The dimensions for patient experience and satisfaction most frequently represented in PRSs included diversely operationalized ones such as professional competence and doctor-patient relationship/support. However, other less complex but nevertheless important dimensions such as communication skills and information

  12. The representation of patient experience and satisfaction in physician rating sites. A criteria-based analysis of English- and German-language sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strech Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on patient experience and satisfaction with individual physicians could play an important role for performance measures, improved health care and health literacy. Physician rating sites (PRSs bear the potential to be a widely available source for this kind of information. However, patient experience and satisfaction are complex constructs operationalized by multiple dimensions. The way in which PRSs allow users to express and rate patient experience and satisfaction could likely influence the image of doctors in society and the self-understanding of both doctors and patients. This study examines the extent to which PRSs currently represent the constructs of patient experience and satisfaction. Methods First, a systematic review of research instruments for measuring patient experience and satisfaction was conducted. The content of these instruments was analyzed qualitatively to create a comprehensive set of dimensions for patient experience and patient satisfaction. Second, PRSs were searched for systematically in English-language and German-language search engines of Google and Yahoo. Finally, we classified every structured question asked by the different PRS using the set of dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. Results The qualitative content analysis of the measurement instruments produced 13 dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. We identified a total of 21 PRSs. No PRSs represented all 13 dimensions of patient satisfaction and experience with its structured questions. The 3 most trafficked English-language PRS represent between 5 and 6 dimensions and the 3 most trafficked German language PRSs between 8 and 11 dimensions The dimensions for patient experience and satisfaction most frequently represented in PRSs included diversely operationalized ones such as professional competence and doctor-patient relationship/support. However, other less complex but nevertheless important dimensions

  13. Job satisfaction and motivation among physicians in academic medical centers: insights from a cross-national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Katharina; Amelung, Volker E; Baker, Laurence C; Gaitanides, Michael; Schwartz, Friedrich W; Rundall, Thomas G

    2008-12-01

    Our study assesses how work-related monetary and nonmonetary factors affect physicians' job satisfaction at three academic medical centers in Germany and the United States, two countries whose differing health care systems experience similar problems in maintaining their physician workforce. We used descriptive statistics and factor and correlation analyses to evaluate physicians' responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Our study revealed that German physician respondents were less satisfied overall than their U.S. counterparts. In both countries, participation in decision making that may affect physicians' work was an important correlate of satisfaction. In Germany other important factors were opportunities for continuing education, job security, extent of administrative work, collegial relationships, and access to specialized technology. In the U.S. sample, job security, financial incentives, interaction with colleagues, and cooperative working relationships with colleagues and management were important predictors of overall job satisfaction. The implications of these findings for the development of policies and management tactics to increase physician job satisfaction in German and U.S. academic medical centers are discussed.

  14. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses.

  15. Patients report better satisfaction with part-time primary care physicians, despite less continuity of care and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panattoni, Laura; Stone, Ashley; Chung, Sukyung; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2015-03-01

    The growing number of primary care physicians (PCPs) reducing their clinical work hours has raised concerns about meeting the future demand for services and fulfilling the continuity and access mandates for patient-centered care. However, the patient's experience of care with part-time physicians is relatively unknown, and may be mediated by continuity and access to care outcomes. We aimed to examine the relationships between a physicians' clinical full-time equivalent (FTE), continuity of care, access to care, and patient satisfaction with the physician. We used a multi-level structural equation estimation, with continuity and access modeled as mediators, for a cross-section in 2010. The study included family medicine (n = 104) and internal medicine (n = 101) physicians in a multi-specialty group practice, along with their patient satisfaction survey responses (n = 12,688). Physician level FTE, continuity of care received by patients, continuity of care provided by physician, and a Press Ganey patient satisfaction with the physician score, on a 0-100 % scale, were measured. Access to care was measured as days to the third next-available appointment. Physician FTE was directly associated with better continuity of care received (0.172% per FTE, p continuity of care provided (0.108% per FTE, p care (-0.033 days per FTE, p continuity of care provided was a significant mediator (0.016% per FTE, p continuity and access, but they may provide a better patient experience. Physician workforce planning should consider these care attributes when considering the role of part-time PCPs in practice redesign efforts and initiatives to meet the demand for primary care services.

  16. Active-duty physicians' perceptions and satisfaction with humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions: implications for the field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey J Oravec

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The United States Department of Defense participates in more than 500 missions every year, including humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, as part of medical stability operations. This study assessed perceptions of active-duty physicians regarding these activities and related these findings to the retention and overall satisfaction of healthcare professionals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An Internet-based survey was developed and validated. Of the 667 physicians who responded to the survey, 47% had participated in at least one mission. On a 7-point, Likert-type response scale, physicians reported favorable overall satisfaction with their participation in these missions (mean = 5.74. Perceived benefit was greatest for the United States (mean = 5.56 and self (mean = 5.39 compared to the target population (mean = 4.82. These perceptions were related to participants' intentions to extend their military medical service (total model R (2 = .37, with the strongest predictors being perceived benefit to self (β = .21, p<.01, the U.S. (β = .19, p<.01, and satisfaction (β = .18, p<.05. In addition, Air Force physicians reported higher levels of satisfaction (mean = 6.10 than either Army (mean = 5.27, Cohen's d = 0.75, p<.001 or Navy (mean = 5.60, Cohen's d = 0.46, p<.01 physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Military physicians are largely satisfied with humanitarian missions, reporting the greatest benefit of such activities for themselves and the United States. Elucidation of factors that may increase the perceived benefit to the target populations is warranted. Satisfaction and perceived benefits of humanitarian missions were positively correlated with intentions to extend time in service. These findings could inform the larger humanitarian community as well as military medical practices for both recruiting and retaining medical professionals.

  17. Welfare, wellness, and job satisfaction of Chinese physicians: A national survey of public tertiary hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Ma, Jing; Hu, Guangyu; Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Changzheng; Si, Wen; Zhang, Xinqing; Liu, Yuanli

    2017-07-01

    Little national data are available on Chinese physicians' welfare, wellness, and job satisfaction. We conducted a self-administered smartphone-based national survey in early 2016 of 17 945 physicians from 136 tertiary hospitals across 31 provinces in China. In addition to collecting the physicians' basic information, we also measured 5 domains (the ethical and working environments, welfare, wellness, and job satisfaction). Half of the physicians reported a hospital-based annual income of less than RMB 72 000 ($10 300), and 60.31% of them did not think that the current medical pricing system reflects physicians' value. More than half (58.64%) of them did not have or did not know about medical malpractice insurance. These physicians worked long hours (an average of 10 h) and slept short hours (average 6 h). Only 35.78% of them thought that they were in good health, and 51.03% were in good mental health. Approximately, a quarter of them had helped to pay medical bills for patients who could not afford care, and 1 in 7 has been penalised for seeing patients who generated bad debts. Only 33.42% of them thought that their occupation receives social recognition and respect, and 70.98% would not encourage their children to pursue a medical career. The top 3 factors that may influence physician job satisfaction as chosen by the physicians were as follows: (1) the income distribution policy (45.92%), (2) working environment safety (25.86%), and (3) public trust and respect for their job (16.10%). In conclusion, we found that Chinese physicians bear heavy physical, mental, and financial stress, and many of them lack confidence that they receive trust and respect from society. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Perspectives: Using Critical Incidents to Understand ESL Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John

    2015-01-01

    In a marketized environment, ESL providers, in common with other postcompulsory educational institutions, canvass student satisfaction with their services. While the predominant method is likely to be based on tick-box questionnaires using Likert scales that measure degrees of satisfaction, qualitative methodology is an option when rich data is…

  19. The Effect of Nurse-Physician Collaboration on Job Satisfaction, Team Commitment, and Turnover Intention in Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Maura; Portoghese, Igor; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; D'Aloja, Ernesto; Campagna, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    Voluntary turnover in nursing can lead to nursing shortages that affect both individuals and the entire hospital unit. We investigated the relationship between group- and individual-level variables by examining the association of nurses' job satisfaction and team commitment at the individual level, and nurse-physician collaboration at the group level, with individuals' intention to leave the unit at the individual level. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,024 nurses on 72 units in 3 Italian hospitals. At the individual level, affective commitment partially mediated the relationship between job satisfaction and nursing turnover intention. Moreover, a cross-level interaction was found. Nurses with high levels of job satisfaction showed high levels of identification with their team, and this relationship was stronger when the group perception of nurse-physician collaboration was high. Results suggested that managerial strategies to promote nurse-physician collaboration may be important to increase nurses' affective commitment to the team. At the individual level, job satisfaction and team affective commitment are important factors for retaining staff, and at the group level, good work collaboration with physicians is instrumental in developing nurses' affective identification with the team. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Application of statistical process control to physician-specific emergency department patient satisfaction scores: a novel use of the funnel plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, David; Callahan, Charles D; Markwell, Stephen; de la Cruz, Jonathan; Milbrandt, Joseph C; Harvey, Timothy

    2012-03-01

    Emergency department (ED) patient satisfaction remains a high priority for many hospitals. Patient surveys are a common tool for measuring patient satisfaction, and process improvement efforts are aimed at improving patient satisfaction scores. In some institutions, patient satisfaction scores can be calculated for each emergency physician (EP). ED leaders are faced with the task of interpreting individual as well as group physician scores to identify opportunities for improvement. Analysis of these data can be challenging because of the relatively small numbers of returned surveys assignable to a single physician, variable numbers of surveys returned for each physician and high standard deviations (SDs) for individual physician scores. The objective was to apply statistical process control methodology to analyze individual as well as group physician patient satisfaction scores. The novel use of funnel plots to interpret individual physician patient satisfaction scores, track individual physician scores over two successive 8-month periods, and monitor physician group performance is demonstrated. Patient satisfaction with physicians was measured using Press Ganey surveys for a 65,000-volume ED over two successive 8-month periods. Using funnel plots, individual physician patient satisfaction scores were plotted against the number of surveys completed for each physician for each 8-month period. Ninety-fifth and 99th percentile control limits were displayed on the funnel plots to illustrate individual physician patient satisfaction scores that are within, versus those that are outside of, expected random variation. Control limits were calculated using mean patient satisfaction scores and SDs for the entire group of physicians. Additional funnel plots were constructed to demonstrate changes in individual physicians' patient satisfaction scores as a function of increasing numbers of returned surveys and to illustrate changes in the group's patient satisfaction scores

  1. Cross-sectional-derived determinants of satisfaction with physician-scientist training among Canadian MD/PhD graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twa, David D W; Skinnider, Michael A; Squair, Jordan W; Lukac, Christine D

    2017-01-01

    Although MD/PhD programs require considerable commitment on behalf of students and learning institutions, they serve as an integral means of training future physician-scientists; individuals who engage in translational medicine. As attrition from these programs has longstanding effects on the community of translational medicine and comes at substantial cost to MD/PhD programs, we aimed to identify determinants that were associated with satisfaction among MD/PhD graduates, a feature that might inform on limiting program attrition. Anonymized data from a national survey of 139 Canadian MD/PhD alumni was analyzed. Factor analysis was conducted to evaluate the reliability of three questions that measured satisfaction and logistic regression was used to assess the association of outcomes with 17 independent determinants. Eighty-one percent of graduates were satisfied with MD/PhD training. Factor analysis confirmed the reliability of the questions measuring satisfaction. Determinants of self-reported satisfaction with physician-scientist training included co-authorship of more than six manuscripts during MD/PhD training. Additionally, protected research time at the place of current appointment was strongly associated with agreement that MD/PhD training had helped career progression. Demographic variables were not associated with any satisfaction indicator. Taken together, the majority of Canadian MD/PhD graduates are satisfied with their physician-scientist training. Project collaboration leading to co-authorships and protected research time were strongly associated with training satisfaction among graduates. If the value of collaboration can be realized among current and future physician-scientist trainees who are dissatisfied with their training, this might ultimately reduce program attrition.

  2. The prospective effects of workplace violence on physicians' job satisfaction and turnover intentions: the buffering effect of job control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Kouvonen, Anne; Virtanen, Marianna; Vänskä, Jukka; Elovainio, Marko

    2014-01-17

    Health care professionals, including physicians, are at high risk of encountering workplace violence. At the same time physician turnover is an increasing problem that threatens the functioning of the health care sector worldwide. The present study examined the prospective associations of work-related physical violence and bullying with physicians' turnover intentions and job satisfaction. In addition, we tested whether job control would modify these associations. The present study was a 4-year longitudinal survey study, with data gathered in 2006 and 2010.The present sample included 1515 (61% women) Finnish physicians aged 25-63 years at baseline. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were conducted while adjusting for gender, age, baseline levels, specialisation status, and employment sector. The results of covariance analyses showed that physical violence led to increased physician turnover intentions and that both bullying and physical violence led to reduced physician job satisfaction even after adjustments. We also found that opportunities for job control were able to alleviate the increase in turnover intentions resulting from bullying. Our results suggest that workplace violence is an extensive problem in the health care sector and may lead to increased turnover and job dissatisfaction. Thus, health care organisations should approach this problem through different means, for example, by giving health care employees more opportunities to control their own work.

  3. The Physician Attrition Crisis: A Cross-Sectional Survey of the Risk Factors for Reduced Job Satisfaction Among US Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Theresa N; Pearcy, Chris P; Khorgami, Zhamak; Agrawal, Vaidehi; Taubman, Kevin E; Truitt, Michael S

    2018-05-01

    A physician shortage is on the horizon, and surgeons are particularly vulnerable due to attrition. Reduced job satisfaction leads to increased job turnover and earlier retirement. The purpose of this study is to delineate the risk factors that contribute to reduced job satisfaction. A cross-sectional survey of US surgeons was conducted from September 2016 to May 2017. Screening for job satisfaction was performed using the abridged Job in General scale. Respondents were grouped into more and less satisfied using the median split. Twenty-five potential risk factors were examined that included demographic, occupational, psychological, wellness, and work-environment variables. Overall, 993 respondents were grouped into more satisfied (n = 502) and less satisfied (n = 491) cohorts. Of the demographic variables, female gender and younger age were associated with decreased job satisfaction (p = 0.003 and p = 0.008). Most occupational variables (specialty, experience, academics, practice size, payment model) were not significant. However, increased average hours worked correlated with less satisfaction (p = 0.008). Posttraumatic stress disorder, burnout, wellness, all eight work-environment variables, and unhappiness with career choice were linked to reduced job satisfaction (p = 0.001). A surgeon shortage has serious implications for health care. Job satisfaction is associated with physician retention. Our results suggest women and younger surgeons may be at increased risk for job dissatisfaction. Targeted work-environment interventions to reduce work-hours, improve hospital culture, and provide adequate financial reimbursement may promote job satisfaction and wellness.

  4. Electronic health record in the internal medicine clinic of a Brazilian university hospital: Expectations and satisfaction of physicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jurandir Godoy; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the satisfaction and expectations of patients and physicians before and after the implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital. We conducted 389 interviews with patients and 151 with physicians before and after the implementation of a commercial EHR at the internal medicine clinic of Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Brazil. The physicians were identified by their connection to the outpatient clinic and categorized by their years since graduation: residents and preceptors (with 10 years or less of graduation) or assistants (with more than 10 years of graduation). The answers to the questionnaire given by the physicians were classified as favorable or against the use of EHR, before and after the implementation of this system in this clinic, receiving 1 or 0 points, respectively. The sum of these points generated a multiple regression score to determine which factors contribute to the acceptance of EHR by physicians. We also did a third survey, after the EHR was routinely established in the outpatient clinic. The degree of patient satisfaction was the same before and after implementation, with more than 90% positive evaluations. They noted the use of the computer during the consultation and valued such use. Resident (younger) physicians had more positive expectations than assistants (older physicians) before EHR implementation. This optimism was reduced after implementation. In the third evaluation the use of EHR was higher among resident physicians. Resident physicians perceived and valued the EHR more and used it more. In 28 of the 57 questions on performance of clinical tasks, resident physicians found it easier to use EHR than assistant physicians with significant differences (pPatients do not seem to notice much difference to the quality of the consultation done using paper or EHR. It became clear after the third evaluation with the

  5. Primary Care Physician Involvement in Shared Decision Making for Critically Ill Patients and Family Satisfaction with Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kevin B; Weber, Urs; Johnson, Jennifer; Anderson, Nathanial; Knies, Andrea K; Nhundu, Belinda; Bautista, Cynthia; Poskus, Kelly; Sheth, Kevin N; Hwang, David Y

    2018-01-01

    An intensive care unit (ICU) patient's primary care physician (PCP) may be able to assist family with certain ICU shared medical decisions. We explored whether families of patients in nonopen ICUs who nevertheless report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making are more satisfied with ICU shared decision making than families who do not. Between March 2013 and December 2015, we administered the Family Satisfaction in the ICU 24 survey to family members of adult neuroscience ICU patients. We compared the mean score for the survey subsection regarding shared decision making (graded on a 100-point scale), as well as individual survey items, between those who reported the patient's PCP involvement in any medical decision making versus those who did not. Among 263 respondents, there was no difference in mean overall decision-making satisfaction scores for those who reported involvement (81.1; SD = 15.2) versus those who did not (80.1; SD = 12.8; P = .16). However, a higher proportion reporting involvement felt completely satisfied with their 1) inclusion in the ICU decision making process (75.9% vs 61.4%; P = .055), and 2) control over the care of the patient (73.6% vs 55.6%; P = .02), with no difference regarding consistency of clinical information provided by the medical team (64.8% vs 63.5%; P = 1.00). Families who report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making for critically ill patients may be more satisfied than those who do not with regard to specific aspects of ICU decision making. Further research would help understand how best to engage PCPs in shared decisions. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. Understanding Student Satisfaction and Loyalty in the UAE HE Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cedwyn; Ross, Kieran; Meraj, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to verify and estimate the impact of the antecedents of Programme satisfaction and to explore its link with student loyalty in the higher education (HE) sector in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design/methodology/approach: A Programme Experience Questionnaire (PEQ) was developed, based on the National Student…

  7. Determinants of customer satisfaction with the health care system, with the possibility to choose a personal physician and with a family doctor in a transition country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersnik, J

    2001-08-01

    Many Eastern and Central European counties are reforming their health care systems. The aim of this study was to determine customer satisfaction with a reformed health care system, with the possibility of free choice of a family physician and patient satisfaction with the family physician in Slovenia and their major determinants. We used a postal survey of the patients who attended their family physician's offices during the study period. We obtained an 84% response rate. Some 72.9% of the respondents were satisfied with the current organisation of health care services, 95.5% of the respondents were satisfied with the possibility of choosing their own family physician and 58% of participants were very satisfied with the level of care received from their personal family practitioners. It was shown that higher patient satisfaction with the family physician was the most powerful predictor of patients' satisfaction with the health care system. The results show that health care reform in Slovenia has a positive impact on the consumers' perceptions of health care quality, measured in terms of consumer satisfaction with the health care system, the possibility to choose a family physician and the overall satisfaction with the family physician.

  8. Patient Understanding, Expectations, Outcomes, and Satisfaction Regarding Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries and Surgical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brian J; Cotter, Eric J; Wang, Kevin C; Davey, Annabelle

    2017-05-01

    Patient satisfaction has become an increasingly important outcome metric in orthopaedics and medicine in general as many initiatives at both the state and national levels aim to improve the efficiency and quality of health care. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are among the most common injuries in orthopaedics, with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) surgery consistently reported as one of the most frequently performed procedures by orthopaedic surgeons. Patient-reported outcomes are frequently used to evaluate outcomes from the patient's perspective, and many physicians also ask patients about their satisfaction with treatment. A growing volume of literature has investigated the relation between preoperative patient expectations and postoperative patient satisfaction. The quality of online resources, patient expectations for ACLR, and factors associated with and/or predictive of either poor or good to excellent outcomes after surgery are described. This article critically reviews the orthopaedic literature on this important topic and identifies variables that influence patient expectations and satisfaction to help treating physicians better counsel and evaluate patients and ultimately improve outcomes of and satisfaction with ACLR surgery. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Basic skills workshop for physician assistant educators: effects of participation on perceived mastery of teaching skills and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincy, Brenda; Archambault, Mark; Sedrak, Mona; Essary, Alison C; Hull, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The study examined participation in the Basic Skills Faculty Development Workshops (BSW) offered by the Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA). The aim was to determine the effects of participation on perceived mastery of teaching skills and job satisfaction. The 1,290 faculty and program director members of PAEA were invited to complete an electronic survey regarding their past participation in a BSW, levels of satisfaction with various aspects of their work, and their perception of their level of mastery of various teaching skills. Additionally, those who had participated in these workshops completed a section on colleague relationships that were developed or strengthened through workshop participation. Approximately half (n = 248) of the 493 respondents had participated in a BSW. Mean scores for satisfaction with salary, rank, position, and overall satisfaction did not differ significantly according to BSW participation. Perceived mastery of various teaching skills was significantly higher for nonattendees of BSW. However, controlling for "years in physician assistant education" nullified that association. Attendees reported a mean of 1.02 (SD = 1.47) new mentoring relationships and 2.45 (SD = 2.97) new peer relationships. Satisfaction with current position was significantly positively correlated with the number of colleague relationships. The number of new and strengthened mentor relationships correlated significantly with perceived mastery of advising students. Basic Skills Workshop attendees experience acceleration in their perceived mastery of teaching skills, closing the proficiency gap between them and their more-experienced colleagues who did not attend a Basic Skills Workshop. Also, participation is associated with an increased number of colleague relationships, which has a positive effect on satisfaction.

  10. Family physicians understanding about Mantoux test: A survey from a high endemic TB country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Niloufer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a global health emergency and is a big challenge to diagnose and manage it. Family physicians being first contact health persons should be well competent to diagnose and manage the patients with tuberculosis. Aims This study was aimed to assess the level of understanding about Mantoux Test amongst Family Physicians in Karachi, Pakistan and to determine the difference of level of understanding by gender and number of tuberculosis patients seen in a month. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted among 200 Family Physicians working in Karachi; the largest city and economic hub of Pakistan. Family Physicians who attended Continuous Medical Education sessions were approached after taking consent. Pre-tested, self administered questionnaire was filled consisting of: basic demographic characteristics, questions regarding knowledge about Mantoux Test, its application and interpretation. Data of 159 questionnaires was analyzed for percentages, as rest were incomplete. Chi square test was used to calculate the difference of understanding levels between various groups. Results Almost two thirds of respondents were males and above 35 years of age. Majority of Family Physicians were private practitioners and seeing more than five tuberculosis patients per month. Overall, a big gap was identified about the knowledge of Mantoux Test among study participants. Only 18.8% of Family Physicians secured Excellent (≥ 80% correct responses. This poor level of understanding was almost equally distributed in all comparative groups (Male = 20.8% versus Female = 15.9%; p - 0.69 and (Seen Conclusion Our study revealed an overall major deficit in understanding and interpretation of Mantoux Test amongst Family Physicians which needs to be addressed. Continues Medical Education sessions for Family Physicians should be organized in regular basis for upgrading their knowledge in this regards.

  11. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LR Stoneking,1 AL Waterbrook,1 J Garst Orozco,2 D Johnston,1 A Bellafiore,1 C Davies,3 T Nuño,1 J Fatás-Cabeza,4 O Beita,5 V Ng,1 KH Grall,6 W Adamas-Rappaport7 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Sinai Health System, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 4Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, St Paul, MN, 7Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: After emergency department (ED discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit.Objectives: To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.Methods: Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC and South Campus (SC. SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions.Results: Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study

  12. [Are American physicians more satisfied?--results from an International Study of Physicians in University Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, K; Amelung, V E; Baker, L C; Gaitanides, M; Rundall, T G; Schwartz, F W

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the factors that affect physicians' job satisfaction is important not only to physicians themselves, but also to patients, health system managers, and policy makers. Physicians represent the crucial resource in health-care delivery. In order to enhance efficiency and quality in health care, it is indispensable to analyse and consider the motivators of physicians. Physician job satisfaction has significant effects on productivity, the quality of care, and the supply of physicians. The purpose of our study was to assess the associations between work-related monetary and non-monetary factors and physicians' work satisfaction as perceived by similar groups of physicians practicing at academic medical centres in Germany and the U.S.A., two countries that, in spite of differing health-care systems, simultaneously experience problems in maintaining their physician workforce. We used descriptive statistics, factor and correlation analyses to evaluate physicians' responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Our study revealed that overall German physicians were less satisfied than U.S. physicians. With respect to particular work-related predictors of job satisfaction we found that similar factors contributed to job satisfaction in both countries. To improve physicians' satisfaction with working conditions, our results call for the implementation of policies that reduce the time burden on physicians to allow more time for interaction with patients and colleagues, increase monetary incentives, and enhance physicians' participation in the development of care management processes and in managerial decisions that affect patient care.

  13. Beyond the focus group: understanding physicians' barriers to electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Helen; Gardner, Rebekah; Baier, Rosa

    2012-04-01

    Although electronic medical records (EMRs) have potential to improve quality of care, physician adoption remains low. Rhode Island physicians' perceptions of barriers to EMRs and the association between these barriers and physician characteristics were examined. It was hypothesized that physicians with and without EMRs would differ in the types and magnitude of barriers identified. Data were drawn from the Rhode Island Department of Health's mandatory 2009 Physician Health Information Technology (HIT) survey of physicians licensed and in active practice in Rhode Island or an adjacent state. Some 1,888 (58.1% of the target population of 3,248 physicians) responded. Respondents, who were invited to provide open-ended comments, were asked to consider 11 issues as barriers to EMR use: Access to technical support, lack of computer skills, availability of a computer in the appropriate location, impact of a computer on doctor-patient interaction, lack of interoperability, privacy or security concerns, start-up financial costs, ongoing financial costs, technic limitations of systems, training and productivity impact, and lack of uniform industry standards. Respondents with EMRs consistently perceived significantly fewer barriers than those without them (p < .0001). For example, 78.9% of physicians without EMRs viewed start-up financial costs as a major barrier versus only 45.8% of physicians with EMRs. An understanding of physicians' reluctance to use EMRs is critical for developing adoption strategies. Policies to increase EMR adoption should be tailored to different physician groups to achieve maximum effectiveness. Further research into the differences between current EMR users' and nonusers' perceptions of barriers may help elucidate how to facilitate subsequent adoption.

  14. The relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention among physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions in Hubei, China: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yimin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout China, a growing number of physicians are leaving or intending to depart from their organizations owing to job dissatisfaction. Little information is available about the role of occupational burnout in this association. We set out to analyze the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention, and further to determine whether occupational burnout can serve as a mediator among Chinese physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in March 2010 in Hubei Province, central China. The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention. The job satisfaction and occupational burnout instruments were obtained by modifying the Chinese Physicians' Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (CPJSQ and the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI, respectively. Such statistical methods as one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, GLM-univariate and structural equation modeling were used. Results Of the 1600 physicians surveyed, 1451 provided valid responses. The respondents had medium scores (3.18 +/-0.73 on turnover intention, in which there was significant difference among the groups from three urban areas with different development levels. Turnover intention, which significantly and negatively related to all job-satisfaction subscales, positively related to each subscale of burnout syndrome. Work environment satisfaction (b = -0.074, p , job rewards satisfaction (b = -0.073, p , organizational management satisfaction (b = -0.146, p , and emotional exhaustion (b = 0.135, p were identified as significant direct predictors of the turnover intention of physicians, with 41.2% of the variance explained unitedly, under the control of sociodemographic variables, among which gender, age, and years of service were always significant. However, job-itself satisfaction no longer became significant, with the estimated

  15. The relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention among physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions in Hubei, China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Feng, Xueshan

    2011-09-24

    Throughout China, a growing number of physicians are leaving or intending to depart from their organizations owing to job dissatisfaction. Little information is available about the role of occupational burnout in this association. We set out to analyze the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention, and further to determine whether occupational burnout can serve as a mediator among Chinese physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in March 2010 in Hubei Province, central China. The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention. The job satisfaction and occupational burnout instruments were obtained by modifying the Chinese Physicians' Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (CPJSQ) and the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI), respectively. Such statistical methods as one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, GLM-univariate and structural equation modeling were used. Of the 1600 physicians surveyed, 1451 provided valid responses. The respondents had medium scores (3.18 +/-0.73) on turnover intention, in which there was significant difference among the groups from three urban areas with different development levels. Turnover intention, which significantly and negatively related to all job-satisfaction subscales, positively related to each subscale of burnout syndrome. Work environment satisfaction (b = -0.074, p job rewards satisfaction (b = -0.073, p satisfaction (b = -0.146, p turnover intention of physicians, with 41.2% of the variance explained unitedly, under the control of sociodemographic variables, among which gender, age, and years of service were always significant. However, job-itself satisfaction no longer became significant, with the estimated parameter on job rewards satisfaction smaller after burnout syndrome variables were included. As congregated latent concepts, job satisfaction had both significant direct effects

  16. A randomized, controlled study of an online intervention to promote job satisfaction and well-being among physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselotte N. Dyrbye

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although burnout, poor quality of life (QOL, depression, and other forms of psychological distress are common among physicians, few studies testing interventions to reduce distress have been reported. We conducted a randomized trial to determine the impact of a 10-week, individualized, online intervention on well-being among physicians (n = 290. Participants were randomized to either the intervention or control arm. Those in the intervention arm received a menu of self-directed micro-tasks once a week for 10 weeks, and were asked to select and complete one task weekly. Baseline and end-of-study questionnaires evaluating well-being (i.e., burnout, depression, QOL, fatigue and professional satisfaction (i.e., job satisfaction, work engagement, meaning in work, and satisfaction with work-life balance were administered to both arms. Overall quality of life and fatigue improved over the 10 weeks of the study for those in the intervention arm (both p < 0.01. When compared to the control arm, however, no statistically significant improvement in these dimensions of well-being was observed. At the completion of the study, those in the intervention arm were more likely to report participating in the study was worthwhile compared to those in the control arm. The findings suggest that although participants found the micro-tasks in the intervention arm worthwhile, they did not result in measurable improvements in well-being or professional satisfaction when compared to the control group. These results also highlight the critical importance of an appropriate control group in studies evaluating interventions to address physician burnout and distress.

  17. Nurse-physician collaboration impacts job satisfaction and turnover among nurses: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Huang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Yan, Hong; Li, Xiue

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to explore the impact of physician-nurse collaboration on nurse job satisfaction and turnover in a dental hospital. Physician-nurse collaboration is important for the stability of the entire nursing team. Few studies have shown the impact on job satisfaction and turnover among nurses working in Chinese dental hospitals. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study and investigated nurses from a tertiary dental hospital in Beijing using convenience non-randomized sampling. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which included general information, the Index of Work Satisfaction, the Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale and the Turnover Intention Scale. The scores of physician-nurse collaboration correlated positively with those for job satisfaction and negatively with the stated likelihood of turnover intention. Physician-nurse collaboration scores positively predicted job satisfaction and negatively predicted the likelihood of quitting the current job. In conclusion, improving the level of physician-nurse collaboration is helpful to enhance job satisfaction and reduce turnover among nurses in a dental hospital. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. National Study of Burnout and Career Satisfaction Among Physician Assistants in Oncology: Implications for Team-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Eric Daniel; Hylton, Heather Marie; DeMora, Lyudmila; Ruth, Karen; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2018-01-01

    A high rate of burnout has been reported in oncology physicians. Physician assistants (PAs) may also face similar risks of burnout. We sought to measure the personal and professional characteristics associated with burnout and career satisfaction and the potential impact on the oncology PA workforce. A national survey of PAs in oncology was completed by using the Maslach Burnout Inventory from September 2015 to January 2016. In all, 855 PAs were contacted and 250 submitted complete surveys (response rate, 29.2%). Respondents were representative of PAs in oncology with a mean age of 41.8 years, females (88.8%), academic practice (55.2%), urban location (61.2%), outpatient (74.4%), medical oncology (75.2%), worked 41 to 50 hours per week (52.8%), and had a mean of 9.6 years as a PA in oncology. Burnout was reported in 34.8% of PAs, 30.4% reported high emotional exhaustion, 17.6% reported high depersonalization, and 19.6% reported a low sense of personal accomplishment. In multivariable analysis, age, time spent on indirect patient care, oncology subspecialty, and relationship with collaborating physician were factors associated with burnout. Career and specialty satisfaction was high (86.4% and 88.8%, respectively). In the next 2 years, only 3.6% of PAs plan to pursue a different career or specialty and only 2.0% plan to retire. Despite high career and specialty satisfaction, burnout is reported in one third of PAs in oncology. Further exploration of the relationship between PAs and collaborating physicians may provide insight on methods to decrease burnout. Negligible short-term attrition of the current oncology PA workforce is anticipated.

  19. The Relationship of Organizational Commitment, Job Satisfaction and Burnout on Physicians and Nurses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosun Nurperihan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/purpose - This study has three main aims; the first aim is determining doctors' and nurses' organizational commitment, vocational satisfaction and burnout levels; the second is analyzing the relations between organizational commitment, vocational satisfaction and burnout levels; and the third aim is analyzing doctors' and nurses' organizational commitment, vocational satisfaction and burnout levels according to their demographical characteristics. Design/methodology/approach - Data for the cross-sectional study was gathered from a university hospital in Turkey of 735 doctors and nurses. Data was gathered by a four part data gathering medium. The medium consists of a personal data form developed by the researchers, Allen - Meyer organizational commitment scale, Minnesota satisfaction scale and Maslach burnout scale. The gathered data was evaluated with correlation analysis, variance analysis, definitive statistics, meaningfulness test of variance between two averages and averaging methods. Findings - The evaluated data showed that participants' emotional and normative commitment levels are over average and continuation commitment level is high; their burnout level is high, desensitization level is at average, intrinsic satisfaction level is high because of their personal success; and extrinsic satisfaction level is low and general vocational satisfaction level is close to neutral. Academician doctors' emotional and normative commitment levels; intrinsic and extrinsic vocational satisfaction levels; desensitization and personal success levels are higher than assistants' and nurses'. In our study, it is found out that as emotional and normative commitment levels increase, so does the vocational satisfaction; while the continuation commitment level increases, vocational satisfaction level decreases; and meaningful statistical relation was determined between vocational satisfaction and burnout levels. Research implications - The limitation of the

  20. [How gender and communication style of physicians affect patient satisfaction: the little difference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid Mast, M; Kindlimann, A; Hornung, R

    2004-07-14

    Patients are particularly satisfied with the medical consultation when physicians adopt a patient-oriented communication style which is characterized by emotional participation, exploring the meaning of a disease for the life of the patient, and including the patient in decision making. Female physicians are much more likely to adopt such a patient-oriented communication style than male physicians. As a consequence, patients should be more satisfied after consultations with female than with male physicians. However, research shows that there is no difference: patients are equally satisfied with female and male physicians. This article sheds light on this paradox and explains it based on gender role stereotypes and patient expectations.

  1. Understanding how social networking influences perceived satisfaction with conference experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riper, Carena J.; van Riper, Charles; Kyle, Gerard T.; Lee, Martha E.

    2013-01-01

    Social networking is a key benefit derived from participation in conferences that bind the ties of a professional community. Building social networks can lead to satisfactory experiences while furthering participants' long- and short-term career goals. Although investigations of social networking can lend insight into how to effectively engage individuals and groups within a professional cohort, this area has been largely overlooked in past research. The present study investigates the relationship between social networking and satisfaction with the 10th Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau using structural equation modelling. Results partially support the hypothesis that three dimensions of social networking – interpersonal connections, social cohesion, and secondary associations – positively contribute to the performance of various conference attributes identified in two focus group sessions. The theoretical and applied contributions of this paper shed light on the social systems formed within professional communities and resource allocation among service providers.

  2. Does Objective Quality of Physicians Correlate with Patient Satisfaction Measured by Hospital Compare Metrics in New York State?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; MacKenzie, Todd A; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick M

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear whether publicly reported benchmarks correlate with quality of physicians and institutions. We investigated the association of patient satisfaction measures from a public reporting platform with performance of neurosurgeons in New York State. This cohort study comprised patients undergoing neurosurgical operations from 2009 to 2013 who were registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database. The cohort was merged with publicly available data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare website. Propensity-adjusted regression analysis was used to investigate the association of patient satisfaction metrics with neurosurgeon quality, as measured by the neurosurgeon's individual rate of mortality and average length of stay. During the study period, 166,365 patients underwent neurosurgical procedures. Using propensity-adjusted multivariable regression analysis, we demonstrated that undergoing neurosurgical operations in hospitals with a greater percentage of patient-assigned "high" scores was associated with higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of mortality (odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.86-1.95), and a higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of length of stay (odds ratio 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.21-1.27). Similar associations were identified for hospitals with a higher percentage of patients who claimed they would recommend these institutions to others. Merging a comprehensive all-payer cohort of neurosurgery patients in New York State with data from the Hospital Compare website, we observed an association of superior hospital-level patient satisfaction measures with objective performance of individual neurosurgeons in the corresponding hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of job satisfaction, job dissatisfaction and demographic factors on physicians' intentions to switch work sector from public to private.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanranta, Terhi; Nummi, Tapio; Vainiomäki, Jari; Halila, Hannu; Hyppölä, Harri; Isokoski, Mauri; Kujala, Santero; Kumpusalo, Esko; Mattila, Kari; Virjo, Irma; Vänskä, Jukka; Rissanen, Pekka

    2007-09-01

    This study is based on a unique data set for the years 1988-2003 and uses structural equation models to examine the impact of job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction on physicians' intention to switch from public- to private-sector work. In Finland, physicians who work primarily in a public-hospital or health-centre setting can also run a private practice. Therefore, we also analysed the impact of having a private practice on a physician's intention to change sector. We found that private practice had a positive, statistically significant effect on the intention to switch sector in 1998 and 2003. Results also suggest that job satisfaction decreases a physician's intention to switch sector, although for 1998 it had no effect. Surprisingly, job dissatisfaction significantly increased the physicians' intentions to leave the public sector only in the 1988 data.

  4. Determining customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Measurement of physicians' and patients' satisfaction with laboratory services has become a standard practice in the United States, prompted by national accreditation requirements. Unlike other surveys of hospital-, outpatient care-, or physician-related activities, no ongoing, comprehensive customer satisfaction survey of anatomic pathology services is available for subscription that would allow continual benchmarking against peer laboratories. Pathologists, therefore, must often design their own local assessment tools to determine physician satisfaction in anatomic pathology. To describe satisfaction survey design that would elicit specific information from physician customers about key elements of anatomic pathology services. The author shares his experience in biannually assessing customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology with survey tools designed at the Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. Benchmarks for physician satisfaction, opportunities for improvement, and characteristics that correlated with a high level of physician satisfaction were identified nationally from a standardized survey tool used by 94 laboratories in the 2001 College of American Pathologists Q-Probes quality improvement program. In general, physicians are most satisfied with professional diagnostic services and least satisfied with pathology services related to poor communication. A well-designed and conducted customer satisfaction survey is an opportunity for pathologists to periodically educate physician customers about services offered, manage unrealistic expectations, and understand the evolving needs of the physician customer. Armed with current information from physician customers, the pathologist is better able to strategically plan for resources that facilitate performance improvements in anatomic pathology laboratory services that align with evolving clinical needs in health care delivery.

  5. Changes in Burnout and Satisfaction With Work-Life Balance in Physicians and the General US Working Population Between 2011 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Hasan, Omar; Dyrbye, Lotte N; Sinsky, Christine; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff; West, Colin P

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of burnout and satisfaction with work-life balance in physicians and US workers in 2014 relative to 2011. From August 28, 2014, to October 6, 2014, we surveyed both US physicians and a probability-based sample of the general US population using the methods and measures used in our 2011 study. Burnout was measured using validated metrics, and satisfaction with work-life balance was assessed using standard tools. Of the 35,922 physicians who received an invitation to participate, 6880 (19.2%) completed surveys. When assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, 54.4% (n=3680) of the physicians reported at least 1 symptom of burnout in 2014 compared with 45.5% (n=3310) in 2011 (Pwork-life balance also declined in physicians between 2011 and 2014 (48.5% vs 40.9%; Pwork-life balance were observed by specialty. In contrast to the trends in physicians, minimal changes in burnout or satisfaction with work-life balance were observed between 2011 and 2014 in probability-based samples of working US adults, resulting in an increasing disparity in burnout and satisfaction with work-life balance in physicians relative to the general US working population. After pooled multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, relationship status, and hours worked per week, physicians remained at an increased risk of burnout (odds ratio, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.80-2.16; Pwork-life balance (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.62-0.75; Pwork-life balance in US physicians worsened from 2011 to 2014. More than half of US physicians are now experiencing professional burnout. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Communicating bodily changes: physicians' ways of enabling patient understanding in gastrointestinal cancer consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Febe; Lidén, Eva; Håkanson, Cecilia; Öhlén, Joakim

    2015-06-01

    To explore how physicians communicatively enable patients' understanding of bodily changes in gastrointestinal cancer care consultations. Two datasets were used. The first consisted of transcribed video-recorded palliative care consultations with three oncologists and six patients diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer, in the context of outpatient palliative care. The second dataset was audio-recorded transcriptions from diagnostic consultations with six surgeons and seven patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, in the context of cancer surgery. An inductively driven and iterative analysis of interaction was performed, guided by Wetherell et al. (2001). Two overarching communicative strategies were identified: (1) "visualizing strategies," with the dimensions: visible strategies (visualizing with what you actually or potentially can see), sensory strategies (visualizing with what is possible to feel), and imaginative strategies; and (2) "contrasting strategies," with the dimensions: contrasting subjective experiences and contrasting between the patient and other people. The visualizing and contrasting communicative strategies form parts of physicians' tacit and experience-based knowledge. The strategies employed by physicians reveal clear potentials to enable patients' understanding and sense making of bodily changes. However, these strategies need to be explicated and problematized as parts of both consultation practice and basic medical education. By means of increased awareness, physicians can more easily identify turning points in patients' levels of understanding, thereby enriching ordinary medical consultations with reflected pedagogical strategies and skills in how to dialogue in a person-centered manner.

  7. Association of perceived physician communication style with patient satisfaction, distress, cancer-related self-efficacy, and perceived control over the disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R; Pedersen, C G; Jensen, A B

    2003-01-01

    -efficacy, and perceived control were completed prior to and after the consultation by 454 patients attending an oncology outpatient clinic. After the consultation, the patients also rated the physicians' communicative behaviours by completing a patient-physician relationship inventory (PPRI), and the physicians were......The aim of the study was to investigate the association of physician communication behaviours as perceived by the patient with patient reported satisfaction, distress, cancer-related self-efficacy, and perceived control over the disease in cancer patients. Questionnaires measuring distress, self...

  8. Understanding the relationship between Kano model's customer satisfaction scores and self-stated requirements importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O C; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the result of product quality and viability. The place of the perceived satisfaction of users/customers for a software product cannot be neglected especially in today competitive market environment as it drives the loyalty of customers and promotes high profitability and return on investment. Therefore understanding the importance of requirements as it is associated with the satisfaction of users/customers when their requirements are met is worth the pain considering. It is necessary to know the relationship between customer satisfactions when their requirements are met (or their dissatisfaction when their requirements are unmet) and the importance of such requirement. So many works have been carried out on customer satisfaction in connection with the importance of requirements but the relationship between customer satisfaction scores (coefficients) of the Kano model and users/customers self-stated requirements importance have not been sufficiently explored. In this study, an attempt is made to unravel the underlying relationship existing between Kano model's customer satisfaction indexes and users/customers self reported requirements importance. The results of the study indicate some interesting associations between these considered variables. These bivariate associations reveal that customer satisfaction index (SI), and average satisfaction coefficient (ASC) and customer dissatisfaction index (DI) and average satisfaction coefficient (ASC) are highly correlated (r = 96 %) and thus ASC can be used in place of either SI or DI in representing customer satisfaction scores. Also, these Kano model's customer satisfaction variables (SI, DI, and ASC) are each associated with self-stated requirements importance (IMP). Further analysis indicates that the value customers or users place on requirements that are met or on features that are incorporated into a product influences the level of satisfaction such customers derive from the product. The

  9. The relationship between job satisfaction, work stress, work-family conflict, and turnover intention among physicians in Guangdong, China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Min; Huang, Xiao-Liang; Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Pi; Feng, Li-Fen; Hu, Wei; Chen, Long; Zou, Huachun; Hao, Yuan-Tao

    2017-05-12

    To investigate the relationship between job satisfaction, work stress, work-family conflict and turnover intention, and explore factors associated with turnover intention, among physicians in Guangdong Province, China. From August to October 2013, physicians completed questionnaires and scales with regard to their job satisfaction, work stress, work-family conflict, and turnover intention. Binary logistic regression and structural equation modelling (SEM) were used in data analysis. A total of 3963 physicians were approached, with 3563 completing the questionnaire. The mean score of the overall perception of turnover intention of physicians who worked in Guangdong was 2.71 on a scale ranging from 1 to 6. Hours worked per week, working in an urban/rural area, type of institution, and age significantly impacted on turnover intention. Turnover intention was directly and negatively related to job satisfaction, and it was directly, indirectly and positively related to work stress and work-family conflict. Job satisfaction, work stress, work-family conflict, hours worked per week, working in an urban/rural area, types of institution and age are influencing factors of turnover intention. Reducing working hours, raising salary, providing more opportunities for career development and training, supporting and encouraging physicians by senior managers could potentially contribute to the reduction in turnover intention. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The relationship between job satisfaction, work stress, work–family conflict, and turnover intention among physicians in Guangdong, China: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Min; Huang, Xiao-Liang; Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Pi; Feng, Li-Fen; Hu, Wei; Chen, Long; Zou, Huachun; Hao, Yuan-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between job satisfaction, work stress, work–family conflict and turnover intention, and explore factors associated with turnover intention, among physicians in Guangdong Province, China. Methods From August to October 2013, physicians completed questionnaires and scales with regard to their job satisfaction, work stress, work–family conflict, and turnover intention. Binary logistic regression and structural equation modelling (SEM) were used in data analysis. Results A total of 3963 physicians were approached, with 3563 completing the questionnaire. The mean score of the overall perception of turnover intention of physicians who worked in Guangdong was 2.71 on a scale ranging from 1 to 6. Hours worked per week, working in an urban/rural area, type of institution, and age significantly impacted on turnover intention. Turnover intention was directly and negatively related to job satisfaction, and it was directly, indirectly and positively related to work stress and work–family conflict. Conclusion Job satisfaction, work stress, work–family conflict, hours worked per week, working in an urban/rural area, types of institution and age are influencing factors of turnover intention. Reducing working hours, raising salary, providing more opportunities for career development and training, supporting and encouraging physicians by senior managers could potentially contribute to the reduction in turnover intention. PMID:28501813

  11. Pre-Post Evaluation of Physicians' Satisfaction with a Redesigned Electronic Medical Record System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Monique W. M.; Peute, Linda W. P.; Lauteslager, Arnaud; Bakker, Piet J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Physicians' acceptance of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMRs) is closely related to their usability. Knowledge about end-users' opinions on usability of an EMR system may contribute to planning for the next phase of the usability cycle of the system. A demand for integration of new

  12. Job satisfaction of occupational physicians in commercial and other delivery settings: A comparative and explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, H.N.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Commercialization of occupational health services (OHS) and transition to a supplier market which started in 1995, has affected work and working conditions of occupational physicians (OPs) profoundly. OPs have lost influence on the organization of their work and managers took over

  13. Gender influences on career opportunities, practice choices, and job satisfaction in a cohort of physicians with certification in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pana, A L; McShane, J

    2001-04-01

    To examine the gender differences in practice patterns, experiences, and career opportunities for family physicians who practice sports medicine. Descriptive, self-administered questionnaire. Family physicians with Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ) in sports medicine were surveyed. The survey was sent to all women with a CAQ in Sports Medicine and a random sample of 20% of the men with CAQs in sports medicine. Survey consisted of multiple choice, Likert scale, and opened-ended questions. The data was analyzed with contingency tables, with gender as the dependent variable. Response rate to the survey was 75%, which included 42 females and 102 males. Demographics of our population demonstrated some gender differences. Males were of higher average age (41.1 vs. 38.1), and more likely to be married and have children. Practice types, location, and time spent in sports medicine did not differ with the exception of training room and event coverage. Males were more likely to cover all levels of training room except at the Division I level, where the percent of males and females covering training rooms were equal. Males were also more likely to cover all types of sporting events. Job satisfaction and reasons for choosing current jobs did not show significant gender differences. However, factors affecting career opportunities did vary. Professional relationships with athletic trainers and coaches were perceived to be different by males and females surveyed. Our survey of sports medicine physicians showed some gender differences in practice patterns relative to training room and sporting event coverage. Surprisingly, there were not many differences in the factors that affected job choice and factors affecting job opportunities with the exception of gender itself. However, our study does not conclude how or when gender begins to affect the female sports medicine physician's career opportunities.

  14. African migrant patients' trust in Chinese physicians: a social ecological approach to understanding patient-physician trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Patient trust in physicians is a critical determinant of health seeking behaviors, medication adherence, and health outcomes. A crisis of interpersonal trust exists in China, extending throughout multiple social spheres, including the healthcare system. At the same time, with increased migration from Africa to China in the last two decades, Chinese physicians must establish mutual trust with an increasingly diverse patient population. We undertook a qualitative study to identify factors affecting African migrants' trust in Chinese physicians and to identify potential mechanisms for promoting trust.We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 40 African migrants in Guangzhou, China. A modified version of the social ecological model was used as a theoretical framework. At the patient-physician level, interpersonal treatment, technical competence, perceived commitment and motive, and language concordance were associated with enhanced trust. At the health system level, two primary factors influenced African migrants' trust in their physicians: the fee-for-service payment system and lack of continuity with any one physician. Patients' social networks and the broader socio-cultural context of interactions between African migrants and Chinese locals also influenced patients' trust of their physicians.These findings demonstrate the importance of factors beyond the immediate patient-physician interaction and suggest opportunities to promote trust through health system interventions.

  15. Emotional intelligence, emotional labor, and job satisfaction among physicians in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Psilopanagioti Aristea; Anagnostopoulos Fotios; Mourtou Efstratia; Niakas Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that psychological constructs, such as emotional intelligence and emotional labor, play an important role in various organizational outcomes in service sector. Recently, in the “emotionally charged” healthcare field, emotional intelligence and emotional labor have both emerged as research tools, rather than just as theoretical concepts, influencing various organizational parameters including job satisfaction. The present study aimed at investig...

  16. Relational factors in understanding satisfaction in the lasting relationships of same sex and heterosexual couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Richard A; Diemer, Matthew A; O'Brien, Bernard A

    2004-01-01

    Satisfying relationships are important to the well-being of individuals and families. Because of increased longevity, many couples are staying together for extended periods of time. Thus, it is valuable to understand the factors that contribute to a sense of satisfaction among partners in lasting relationships. Relatively little attention has been paid in the research literature to relationships among older couples who have remained together for many years. Even less attention has been paid to the lasting relationships of couples of color and to gay male and lesbian couples. This paper focuses on understanding the factors that contribute to satisfaction of partners in the long-term relationships of a purposive sample of heterosexual and same-sex couples. Data was collected through in-depth interviews with 216 partners in 108 relationships that had lasted an average of 30 years. Using logistic regression analysis, two factors were identified as predictive of satisfaction during the recent years of these relationships: containment of relational conflict and psychologically intimate communication between partners. Based on these findings, a theoretical model for understanding satisfaction in lasting relationships is discussed.

  17. Understanding how emergency medicine physicians survive and thrive in rural practice: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhatkar, Ashra; Keesey, Andrea; Bluman, Bob; Lynn, Brenna; Wilkinson, Tandi

    2017-11-01

    arise in the practice of rural EM. Ultimately, the ability to manage the pressures of rural EM leads physicians to either thrive in or leave rural EM practice. The theoretical model provides a more complex view of the realities of rural EM care than has been previously described. It identifies factors that enable and hinder rural EM physicians in their practice, and provides an understanding of the strategies they employ to navigate challenges. Some elements of the theoretical model have been previously identified. For example, existing work has found that many rural physicians experience fear and anxiety in their practice. The challenges posed by the variation in rural practice environments have also been previously identified as an important influence. Other elements of the theoretical model, and the common need for practitioners to creatively respond to barriers arising from the healthcare system's inability to respond to local needs, have not been previously identified. This work finds these factors to be a common experience for participants, and as such, more widespread recognition of the importance of these factors could lead to system improvements. Future research is needed to test the hypotheses proposed in this study and explore the generalizability of the findings.

  18. HIV Task Sharing Between Nurses and Physicians in Nigeria: Examining the Correlates of Nurse Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwu, Emilia Ngozi; Holzemer, William L

    A global shortfall of 12.9 million health care workers has been predicted to occur in the next two decades. Task sharing between physicians and nurses, a method used to help compensate for provider shortages, was shown to improve access to antiretroviral therapy in Africa, but led to nurses performing beyond their scopes of practice. We surveyed 508 nurses in task-shifted roles in Nigeria. Respondents (n = 399) provided information on age, years in practice, gender, registration status, employment site, and access to task-sharing training and mentoring. Years in practice negatively influenced task-sharing self-efficacy. Positive correlates of job satisfaction were years in practice, older age, male gender, single licensure, employment at a tertiary hospital, mentoring, and duration of training. System challenges and employment in faith-based and nontertiary hospitals increased likelihood of job dissatisfaction. Supportive practice and policy interventions are needed to minimize negative effects of disparities in job satisfaction across facilities. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding Consumer Interaction on Instagram: The Role of Satisfaction, Hedonism, and Content Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaló, Luis V; Flavián, Carlos; Ibáñez-Sánchez, Sergio

    2017-06-01

    The increasing relevance of Instagram and its growing adoption among top brands suggest an effort to better understand consumers' behaviors within this context. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of perceived hedonism and satisfaction in determining consumers' intentions to interact and their actual interaction behaviors (the number of likes, by tapping a heart icon, and comments) in a brand's official Instagram account. Also, we investigate the effect of consumer perceptions about the characteristics of the content generated in the account (perceived originality, quantity, and quality) on their perceived hedonism and satisfaction. Data were collected in two stages from 808 members of a fashion brand's official Instagram account. First, participants answered an online questionnaire to evaluate their perceptions, satisfaction, and interaction intentions. Second, 1 month later, we measure the number of likes and comments done by each participant in the brand's official Instagram account during that month. Using partial least squares to analyze the data, perceived hedonism is found to affect both satisfaction and the intention to interact in Instagram, which in turn influences actual behavior. Besides, perceived originality is the most relevant content characteristic to develop perceived hedonism. These findings offer managers a general vision of consumers' behaviors on Instagram, highlighting the importance of hedonism to create a satisfactory experience.

  20. Patient-physician discordance in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Patricia L; De Civita, Mirella; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Bernatsky, Sasha; Schulz, Jan; Sewitch, Maida; Baron, Murray

    2003-06-01

    Discordance between patients' and physicians' health perceptions and satisfaction with the office visit in fibromyalgia (FM) has not been examined. We investigated this phenomenon to identify demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with patient-physician discordance on physical functioning, well being, and satisfaction with the office visit. A sample of 182 women were examined by a rheumatologist to confirm the FM diagnosis. Patients and physicians independently completed the Patient-Physician Discordance Scale to assess perceptions of health and satisfaction with the office visit. Patients also completed questionnaires pertaining to sociodemographics, social support, disability, perceived stress, and psychological distress following the office visit. Separate generalized estimating equations with forward selection, controlling for the possible dependence of outcomes among patients of same physician, were modeled for each measure of discordance. The highest discordance score was on satisfaction with the office visit; physicians systematically underestimated patients' level of satisfaction. Higher levels of satisfaction with social support (p psychological distress (p social support (p < 0.003), younger age (p < 0.02), and lower disability (p < 0.03) were associated with greater discordance on well being. More sexual abuse (p < 0.01) was significantly associated with more discordance on satisfaction with the office visit. There is a gap between what patients with FM and rheumatologists examining them experience during the office visit. Psychosocial factors contribute to our understanding of discordance on physical functioning, well being, and satisfaction.

  1. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausvik, Christian; Lautar, Ashley; Miller, Lisa; Pallerla, Harini; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR) on an acute care for the elderly (ACE) unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer patient care. These results point to the interconnectedness and dual benefit to both job satisfaction and patient quality of care that can come from enhancements to team communication.

  2. Sensory factors in food satisfaction. An understanding of the satisfaction term and a measurement of factors involved in sensory- and food satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Barbara Vad

    satisfaction and factors influencing food satisfaction 3) to use the method in case studies Definitions of “satisfaction” which previously had been used within sensory science were analysed according to three factors; type of response, focus in the response and timing of the response. The analysis showed...... that “satisfaction” could be regarded an affective response to food. The focus of the response varied between definitions. In addition to focus on the intake experience, the food was evaluated based on intake induced physical- and psychological well-being related sensations, and the context in which the food...... was eaten. The timing of the response varied between definitions. One definition did not imply when to measure satisfaction, others implied that satisfaction could be measured after intake. The analysis of the satisfaction terms was employed to develop working definitions of satisfaction which should...

  3. Job stress and job satisfaction of physicians, radiographers, nurses and physicists working in radiotherapy: a multicenter analysis by the DEGRO Quality of Life Work Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehlen, Susanne; Wypior, Hans Joachim; Zehentmayr, Franz; Schulze, Wolfgang; Geinitz, Hans; Vordermark, Dirk; Schäfer, Christof; Herschbach, Peter; Bayerl, Anja; Pigorsch, Steffi; Rittweger, Jutta; Dormin, Claudia; Bölling, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing changes in cancer care cause an increase in the complexity of cases which is characterized by modern treatment techniques and a higher demand for patient information about the underlying disease and therapeutic options. At the same time, the restructuring of health services and reduced funding have led to the downsizing of hospital care services. These trends strongly influence the workplace environment and are a potential source of stress and burnout among professionals working in radiotherapy. A postal survey was sent to members of the workgroup 'Quality of Life' which is part of DEGRO (German Society for Radiooncology). Thus far, 11 departments have answered the survey. 406 (76.1%) out of 534 cancer care workers (23% physicians, 35% radiographers, 31% nurses, 11% physicists) from 8 university hospitals and 3 general hospitals completed the FBAS form (Stress Questionnaire of Physicians and Nurses; 42 items, 7 scales), and a self-designed questionnaire regarding work situation and one question on global job satisfaction. Furthermore, the participants could make voluntary suggestions about how to improve their situation. Nurses and physicians showed the highest level of job stress (total score 2.2 and 2.1). The greatest source of job stress (physicians, nurses and radiographers) stemmed from structural conditions (e.g. underpayment, ringing of the telephone) a 'stress by compassion' (e.g. 'long suffering of patients', 'patients will be kept alive using all available resources against the conviction of staff'). In multivariate analyses professional group (p < 0.001), working night shifts (p = 0.001), age group (p = 0.012) and free time compensation (p = 0.024) gained significance for total FBAS score. Global job satisfaction was 4.1 on a 9-point scale (from 1 – very satisfied to 9 – not satisfied). Comparing the total stress scores of the hospitals and job groups we found significant differences in nurses (p = 0

  4. Checking the relationship between physicians' communication skills and outpatients' satisfaction in the clinics of Isfahan Al-Zahra(S) Hospital in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Askari, Hedayat Allah

    2014-01-01

    The quality of communication skills of health care providers has a significant impact on patient treatment consequences. The present research has been conducted to check the relationship of communication skills on the rate of patients' satisfaction in the clinics of one of the hospitals in Isfahan. The checking list was completed by the researcher in the clinics by using the comments of patients or their relatives. Sampling was performed by using the regular random sampling method. This research was a descriptive-analytical study. The used tool was a standard checking list for evaluating the patients' satisfaction and also the researcher-made checking list for the measurement of effective communication skills. The researcher-made checking list for the measurement of effective communication skills was confirmed by the experts with the face validity, structure, content, and reliability (α =87%). After visiting the patient by the physician, the mentioned list was filled by using the patients' comments, and the collected data was analyzed by SPSS software version 16 with calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient and α2. The study showed that there was a significant relationship between the application of communication skills in the five areas of verbal, body language, effective communicating, establishment, patient privacy and patient participation, except for eye communication of the physician with patients' satisfaction (P communication skills by physicians is associated with patients' satisfaction, and it is the cause of increasing the acceptance of the physician by the patient. Therefore, it is suggested that the opportunity to improve the communication skills should be provided in addition to clinical skills in continuing education programs for the medical community.

  5. [Subjective Workload, Job Satisfaction, and Work-Life-Balance of Physicians and Nurses in a Municipal Hospital in a Rural Area Compared to an Urban University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Michael; Schmid, Klaus; Drexler, Hans; Kiesel, Johannes

    2017-02-15

    Medical and nursing shortages in rural areas represent a current serious public health problem. The healthcare of the rural population is at risk. This study compares perceived workload, job satisfaction and work-life balance of physicians and nurses at a clinic in a rural area with two clinics of a University hospital. Physicians and nurses were interviewed anonymously with a standardized questionnaire (paper and pencil), including questions on job satisfaction, subjective workload and work-life balance. The response rate was almost 50% in the University hospital as well as in the municipal hospital. 32 physicians and 54 nurses from the University hospital and 18 physicians and 137 nurses from the municipal hospital participated in the survey. Nurses at the University hospital assessed the organization of the daily routine with 94.1% as better than those at the municipal hospital (82.4%, p=0.03). Physicians at the University hospital were able to better implement acquired knowledge at a University clinic with 87.5% than their counterparts at the municipal hospital (55.5%, p=0.02). In contrast to their colleagues at the municipal hospital, only 50% of the physicians at the University hospital subjectively considered their workload as just right (83.3% municipal, p=0.02). 96.9% of the physicians at the University hospital were "daily" or "several times a week" under time pressure (municipal 50%, pwork and family life (62.9% University hospital, 72.8% Municipal hospital). In contrast, only 20% of the physicians at the University Hospital but 42.9% of the physicians of the municipal hospital had sufficient opportunities to balance workload and family (p=0.13). The return rate of almost 50% can be described as good. Due to the small number of physicians, especially from the municipal hospital, it can be assumed that some interesting differences could not be detected. There were only slight differences between the nurses from the two hospitals. In contrast, subjective

  6. Understanding of Constipation Symptoms and the Diagnosis and Management of Constipation in Chinese Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Huikuan; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a range of guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic constipation has been carried out, there was very little information about the understanding on constipation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the understanding of constipation symptoms and the diagnosis and management of constipation by clinical physicians in China. Methods Participants were physicians and researchers in the field of gastroenterology in China who were scheduled to attend the National Conference on gastrointestinal motility(Constipation). Based on the recommendation of the Rome Foundation Board, the self-reported questionnaire was constructed. Findings Although most of the opinions on symptoms of constipation were consistent, there were still some differences. Opinions on the Bristol stool form during constipation were discordant, 34% of the doctors thought that it was type 1 and type 2, while 46%of the doctors suggested that type 3 should also be considered constipation. There was no significant difference between them(P = 0.05); We investigated the interpretation on the duration of defecation prolonged, 27% of the doctors suggested it should be longer than 10 minutes, 22% of the doctors suggested it should be longer than 20 minutes, and other 22% of the doctors suggested it should be time of defecation became longer compared to previously bowel habits, there was no significant difference among them(P = 0.38).Only 36% of the doctors thought that psychotherapy was most important in the treatment of severe constipation, while 37% of the doctors thought that medication treatment was most important in the treatment of severe constipation, there was no significant difference between them(P = 0.895). Conclusion We were able to obtain valuable information about current views on symptoms of constipation and the diagnosis and treatment of constipation among Chinese doctors. Although most of the opinions were consistent there were still some differences

  7. Assessing patient and caregiver understanding of and satisfaction with the use of contact isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittick, Paul; Koppisetty, Shalini; Lombardo, Lia; Vadhavana, Akash; Solanki, Ashish; Cumming, Kristi; Agboto, Vincent; Karl, Cindy; Band, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Contact isolation is a method used for limiting the spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms when caring for patients. This policy has been linked to several adverse outcomes and less patient satisfaction. We assessed patient and caregiver understanding and satisfaction with the use of contact isolation. A prospective survey of >500 patients in contact isolation at our institution was performed during 2014. Participants responded to a series of statements relating to contact isolation, using a 5-point Likert scale. Responses were assessed for overall positivity or negativity and further compared according to floor type or designation. Of the patients, 48.7% responded to the survey; 70 caregivers also responded. Patient and caregiver responses were similar and were positive overall. Most respondents felt safer because of the use of contact isolation and because it prevented infections. A smaller majority of respondents also thought the policy was adequately explained to them and adhered to by staff. In the largest collection of respondents surveyed to date about contact isolation and its impact on them, the policy was viewed positively, both by patients and caregivers. There is still room for improvement in the area of patient education regarding the use of contact isolation. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Job stress and job satisfaction of physicians, radiographers, nurses and physicists working in radiotherapy: a multicenter analysis by the DEGRO Quality of Life Work Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bölling Tobias

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ongoing changes in cancer care cause an increase in the complexity of cases which is characterized by modern treatment techniques and a higher demand for patient information about the underlying disease and therapeutic options. At the same time, the restructuring of health services and reduced funding have led to the downsizing of hospital care services. These trends strongly influence the workplace environment and are a potential source of stress and burnout among professionals working in radiotherapy. Methods and patients A postal survey was sent to members of the workgroup "Quality of Life" which is part of DEGRO (German Society for Radiooncology. Thus far, 11 departments have answered the survey. 406 (76.1% out of 534 cancer care workers (23% physicians, 35% radiographers, 31% nurses, 11% physicists from 8 university hospitals and 3 general hospitals completed the FBAS form (Stress Questionnaire of Physicians and Nurses; 42 items, 7 scales, and a self-designed questionnaire regarding work situation and one question on global job satisfaction. Furthermore, the participants could make voluntary suggestions about how to improve their situation. Results Nurses and physicians showed the highest level of job stress (total score 2.2 and 2.1. The greatest source of job stress (physicians, nurses and radiographers stemmed from structural conditions (e.g. underpayment, ringing of the telephone a "stress by compassion" (e.g. "long suffering of patients", "patients will be kept alive using all available resources against the conviction of staff". In multivariate analyses professional group (p In multivariate analyses "professional group" (p = 0.006 and "vocational experience" (p = 0.036 were associated with job satisfaction (cancer care workers with Conclusion Current workplace environments have a negative impact on stress levels and the satisfaction of radiotherapy staff. Identification and removal of the above-mentioned critical

  9. Satisfaction with the decision to participate in cancer clinical trials is high, but understanding is a problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefford, M; Mileshkin, L; Matthews, J; Raunow, H; O'Kane, C; Cavicchiolo, T; Brasier, H; Anderson, M; Reynolds, J

    2011-03-01

    Partially presented in poster format at the 40th and 41st Annual Meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held in 2004 in New Orleans, Louisiana and in 2005 in Orlando, Florida. We aimed to: (a) assess patient knowledge about cancer clinical trials (CCT) and satisfaction with their decision to participate, (b) determine whether satisfaction correlates with objective understanding, or other factors, and (c) identify correlates of increased understanding. A convenience sample of 100 patients were recruited. Instruments assessed quality of informed consent (QuIC), quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), and preferences for information and involvement in decision making. Measures were completed within 2 weeks of clinical trial enrollment. One hundred two patients (68 male) with a median age of 58.4 years (29-85) were registered in 27 of the 33 therapeutic cancer clinical trials approved for the Consent Study. Mean QuIC objective knowledge (QuIC-A) was 77.6 (/100) (95% CI, 75.7-79.4) and perceived (subjective) understanding (QuIC-B) 91.5 (95% CI, 89.6-93.3). There was low but significant correlation between QuIC-A and B (R = 0.26, p = 0.008). Satisfaction was very high. Correlation between QuIC-B and satisfaction was moderate (0.430, p < 0.001). QuIC-B, but not QuIC-A was associated with QOL scores. Preferences regarding participation in decision making and whether these preferences were achieved did not impact upon knowledge, understanding or satisfaction. Patient knowledge regarding CCT is similar to published US data, and satisfaction is high. Satisfaction correlates with perceived but not objective understanding of CCT. Strategies to further improve the consent process need to be developed.

  10. Understanding the Interplay Between Consumer Knowledge, Trust and Relationship Satisfaction in Financial Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Grønholdt, Lars; Josiassen, Alexander

    to exaggerate their ability to make right choices, are more likely to opt out of necessary information search, spend less time to carry out a specific task than less knowledge confident consumers, and are more likely to show high financial trading volumes. Through the use of financial services as a case study......, this study contributes to previous research by examining how consumer knowledge O/U affects two types of trust (broad-scope trust and narrow-scope trust) and consumer relationship satisfaction. Trust does not only concern consumer trust in individual companies (i.e., narrow.-scope confidence NST), but also...... that companies within a particular business type can generally be relied on to deliver on their promises.’ This study expands our understanding of the interplay between consumer knowledge bias, consumer trust, and relationship marketing in two main ways: First, it is demonstrated that the more knowledge O...

  11. Understanding the medical marriage: physicians and their partners share strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Rachel L; Ross, Paula T; Lypson, Monica L

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and their spouses experience challenges to their relationships, some of which are shared with the general population and others of which are unique to the field of medicine. Trainees and junior faculty members remain curious about how they will balance their careers alongside marriage and family obligations. This study explores the challenges and strengths of dual- and single-physician relationships. In 2009, using appreciative inquiry as a theoretical framework, the authors conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 25 individuals: 12 women and 13 men; 10 from dual-physician and 15 from single-physician relationships. A phenomenological analytic approach was used to arrive at the final themes. Four themes emerged during the interviews: "We rely on mutual support in our relationships," "We recognize the important roles of each family member," "We have shared values," and "We acknowledge the benefit of being a physician to our relationships." These findings illustrate that physicians identify strategies to navigate the difficult aspects of their lives. Learn ing from others' best practices can assist in managing personal relationships and work-life balance. These data can also be useful when counseling physicians on successful relationship strategies. As systems are developed that improve wellness and focus on role models for work-life balance, it will be important for this topic to be integrated into formal curricula across the continuum of medical education.

  12. Understanding the exercise habits of residents and attending physicians: a mixed methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy S; Williams, Casey D; Cronk, Nikole J; Kruse, Robin L; Ringdahl, Erika N; Koopman, Richelle J

    2015-02-01

    Although the benefits of exercise are well known, rates of exercise among residents are much lower than those of attendings or medical students. Little is known about the barriers that prevent residents from exercising regularly. This mixed methodology study identifies and compares these barriers for resident and attending physicians practicing in the same setting. We conducted three focus groups with first-year and senior residents and attending physicians in the University of Missouri Department of Family and Community Medicine from April to August 2013. We also administered a survey inquiring about exercise rates and habits to 110 resident and attending physicians in the same department using both paper and electronic versions. During both inpatient and non-inpatient rotations, residents reported exercising less than attending physicians. No residents exercised more than 150 minutes/week during inpatient rotations compared to 18.42% of attendings. Only 6.9% of residents exercised more than 150 minutes/week during non-inpatient rotations, compared to 25% of attendings. Residents and attendings reported different barriers to regular exercise. Residents reported lack of time for a traditional structured workout as a major barrier, which leads to an adversarial relationship between work and exercise. Residency programs can help residents overcome exercise barriers by reframing exercise expectations to include more frequent but brief periods of exercise during the workday and by developing a supportive exercise culture. Changing worksite environments to support physician exercise may improve physician wellness.

  13. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gausvik C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Christian Gausvik,1 Ashley Lautar,2 Lisa Miller,2 Harini Pallerla,3 Jeffrey Schlaudecker4,5 1University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 2The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 5Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program, University of Cincinnati/The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR on an acute care for the elderly (ACE unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer

  14. Physicians interrupted by mobile devices in hospitals: understanding the interaction between devices, roles, and duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvoll, Terje; Scholl, Jeremiah; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-03-07

    A common denominator of modern hospitals is a variety of communication problems. In particular, interruptions from mobile communication devices are a cause of great concern for many physicians. To characterize how interruptions from mobile devices disturb physicians in their daily work. The gathered knowledge will be subsequently used as input for the design and development of a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communications suitable for hospitals. This study adheres to an ethnographic and interpretive field research approach. The data gathering consisted of participant observations, non-structured and mostly ad hoc interviews, and open-ended discussions with a selected group of physicians. Eleven physicians were observed for a total of 135 hours during May and June 2009. The study demonstrates to what degree physicians are interrupted by mobile devices in their daily work and in which situations they are interrupted, such as surgery, examinations, and during patients/relatives high-importance level conversations. The participants in the study expected, and also indicated, that wireless phones probably led to more interruptions immediately after their introduction in a clinic, when compared to a pager, but this changed after a short while. The unpleasant feeling experienced by the caller when interrupting someone by calling them differs compared to sending a page message, which leaves it up to the receiver when to return the call. Mobile devices, which frequently interrupt physicians in hospitals, are a problem for both physicians and patients. The results from this study contribute to knowledge being used as input for designing and developing a prototype for a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communication suitable for hospitals. We combined these findings with results from earlier studies and also involved actual users to develop the prototype, CallMeSmart. This system intends to reduce such interruptions and at the same time

  15. Understanding the barriers to physician error reporting and disclosure: a systemic approach to a systemic problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Bianca; Knych, Stephen A; Weaver, Sallie J; Liberman, Aaron; Abel, Eileen M; Oetjen, Dawn; Wan, Thomas T H

    2014-03-01

    The issues of medical errors and medical malpractice have stimulated significant interest in establishing transparency in health care, in other words, ensuring that medical professionals formally report medical errors and disclose related outcomes to patients and families. However, research has amply shown that transparency is not a universal practice among physicians. A review of the literature was carried out using the search terms "transparency," "patient safety," "disclosure," "medical error," "error reporting," "medical malpractice," "doctor-patient relationship," and "physician" to find articles describing physician barriers to transparency. The current literature underscores that a complex Web of factors influence physician reluctance to engage in transparency. Specifically, 4 domains of barriers emerged from this analysis: intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and societal. Transparency initiatives will require vigorous, interdisciplinary efforts to address the systemic and pervasive nature of the problem. Several ethical and social-psychological barriers suggest that medical schools and hospitals should collaborate to establish continuity in education and ensure that knowledge acquired in early education is transferred into long-term learning. At the institutional level, practical and cultural barriers suggest the creation of supportive learning environments and private discussion forums where physicians can seek moral support in the aftermath of an error. To overcome resistance to culture transformation, incremental change should be considered, for example, replacing arcane transparency policies and complex reporting mechanisms with clear, user-friendly guidelines.

  16. Job satisfaction or production? How staff and leadership understand operating room efficiency: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelian, E; Gunningberg, L; Larsson, J

    2008-11-01

    How to increase efficiency in operating departments has been widely studied. However, there is no overall definition of efficiency. Supervisors urging staff to work efficiently may meet strong reactions due to staff believing that demands for efficiency means just stress at work. Differences in how efficiency is understood may constitute an obstacle to supervisors' efforts to promote it. This study aimed to explore how staff and leadership understand operating room efficiency. Twenty-one members of staff and supervisors in an operating department in a Swedish county hospital were interviewed. The analysis was performed with a phenomenographic approach that aims to discover the variations in how a phenomenon is understood by a group of people. Six categories were found in the understanding of operation room efficiency: (A) having the right qualifications; (B) enjoying work; (C) planning and having good control and overview; (D) each professional performing the correct tasks; (E) completing a work assignment; and (F) producing as much as possible per time unit. The most significant finding was that most of the nurses and assistant nurses understood efficiency as individual knowledge and experience emphasizing the importance of the work process, whereas the supervisors and physicians understood efficiency in terms of production per time unit or completing an assignment. The concept 'operating room efficiency' is understood in different ways by leadership and staff members. Supervisors who are aware of this variation will have better prerequisites for defining the concept and for creating a common platform towards becoming efficient.

  17. Sociocultural Factors Influencing Incident Reporting Among Physicians and Nurses: Understanding Frames Underlying Self- and Peer-Reporting Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Tanya; Chreim, Samia; Forster, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Voluntary reporting of incidents is a common approach for improving patient safety. Reporting behaviors may vary because of different frames within and across professions, where frames are templates that individuals hold and that guide interpretation of events. Our objectives were to investigate frames of physicians and nurses who report into a voluntary incident reporting system as well as to understand enablers and inhibitors of self-reporting and peer reporting. This is a qualitative case study-confidential in-depth interviews with physicians and nurses in General Internal Medicine in a Canadian tertiary care hospital. Frames that health care practitioners use in their reporting practices serve as enablers and inhibitors for self-reporting and peer reporting. Frames that inhibit reporting are shared by physicians and nurses, such as the fear of blame frame regarding self-reporting and the tattletale frame regarding peer reporting. These frames are underpinned by a focus on the individual, despite the organizational message of reporting for learning. A learning frame is an enabler to incident reporting. Viewing the objective of voluntary incident reporting as learning allows practitioners to depersonalize incident reporting. The focus becomes preventing recurrence and not the individual reporting or reported on. Physicians and nurses use various frames that bound their views of self and peer incident reporting-further progress should incorporate an understanding of these deep-seated views and beliefs.

  18. Understanding client satisfaction with a health insurance scheme in Nigeria: factors and enrollees experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambo Mohammad N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health insurance schemes have been widely introduced during this last decade in many African countries, which have strived for improvements in health service provision and the promotion of health care utilization. Client satisfaction with health service provision during the implementation of health insurance schemes has often been neglected since numerous activities take place concurrently. The satisfaction of enrollees and its influencing factors have been providing evidence which have assisted in policy and decision making. Our objective is to determine the enrollee's satisfaction with health service provision under a health insurance scheme and the factors which influence the satisfaction. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional survey took place between May and September 2008. Two hundred and eighty (280 enrollees insured for more than one year in Zaria-Nigeria were recruited using two stage sampling. Enrollee's satisfaction was categorized into more satisfied and less satisfied based on positive responses obtained. Satisfaction, general knowledge and awareness of contribution were each aggregated and assessed as composite measure. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze factors that influenced the satisfaction of enrollees. Results A high satisfaction rate with the health insurance scheme was observed (42.1%. Marital status (p Conclusions This study highlighted the potential effects of general health insurance knowledge and awareness of contributions by end-users (beneficiaries of such new program on client satisfaction which have significant importance. The findings provided evidence which have assisted the amendment and re-prioritization of the medium term strategic plan of operations for the scheme. Future planning efforts could consider the client satisfaction and the factors which influenced it regularly.

  19. Diagnosis of depression by primary care physicians versus a structured diagnostic interview - Understanding discordance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemens, BG; VonKorff, M; Lin, EHB

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, false-negative and false-positive cases of depressive illness are examined, differentiating levels of disagreement between a primary care physician's diagnosis and a standardized research diagnosis. Two stratified random samples of primary cave patients in Seattle, USA (N = 373) and

  20. Understanding the association between employee satisfaction and family perceptions of the quality of care in hospice service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Grady S; Jones, Janet L; Churchman, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Families often draw their conclusions about the quality of care received by a family member during the last months of life from their interactions with professional caregivers. A more comprehensive understanding of how these relationships influence the care experience should include an investigation of the association between employee job satisfaction and family perception of the quality of care. This cross-sectional study investigated the association at a regional hospice. Using the Kendall's tau correlation, employee satisfaction scores for care teams trended toward a positive correlation with family overall satisfaction scores from the Family Evaluation of Hospice Care (tau=0.47, P=0.10). A trend for differences in employee satisfaction between the care teams to associate with differences in overall family perceptions of the quality of care also was found using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (chi(2)(K-W)=9.236, P=0.075). Post hoc tests indicated that overall family perceptions of quality of care differed between the hospice's Residence Team and Non-Hospice Facilities Team. Finally, positive associations between employee satisfaction and the families' Intent to recommend hospice (tau=0.55, P=0.059) and Inform and communicate about patient (tau=0.55, P=0.059) were noted. Selected employee and family comments provide complementarity to further clarify or explain the respondent data. These results suggest that employee satisfaction is associated with family perceptions of the quality of hospice care. Opportunities for improving both employee job satisfaction and family perceptions of the quality of care are discussed.

  1. Médicos y médicas, estilos asistenciales distintos: ¿satisfacción diferente de los usuarios? Male physicians and female physicians, different medical styles: different users' satisfaction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Biedma-Velázquez

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar la existencia de diferencias en la satisfacción de los usuarios de los servicios sanitarios, según sea que la atención se reciba de un médico hombre o mujer. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se utilizó la encuesta realizada a usuarios de atención primaria en 2005 que llevó a cabo el Instituto de Estudios Sociales Avanzados, del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IESA/CSIC. Se efectuó un análisis bivariado entre el sexo del médico y las variables de satisfacción, y un análisis de varianza (ANOVA; se tomó como variable dependiente el indicador de satisfacción general y como variables independientes las características del individuo y del sistema, entre estas últimas el sexo del médico. RESULTADOS: En el análisis bivariado se constató la relación entre sexo del médico y la satisfacción con algunos de los elementos del servicio, si bien en el análisis de dependencia, que incluye variables sociodemográficas y del sistema, esta influencia desaparece. CONCLUSIÓN: Se confirmaron las diferencias en la práctica asistencial de hombres y mujeres médicos, pero no así las diferencias en la satisfacción general con el servicio recibido.OBJECTIVE: To analyse differences in the satisfaction of health service users associated with the sex of the attending doctor. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data obtained from the Primary Care Services User Survey (2005, part of a project regarding user satisfaction with the Andalusian Public Health Services. A bivariate analysis was conducted, the two variables being doctors´ sex and user satisfaction, as was an ANOVA, taking as a dependent variable the indicator of general satisfaction and as independent variables the characteristics of the individual and that of the system, including physician sex. RESULTS: In the bivariate analysis a relation was confirmed between doctors´ sex and satisfaction with the components of the health service received. Nevertheless, this influence

  2. Relation Between Physicians' Work Lives and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckleberry-Hunt, Jodie; Kirkpatrick, Heather; Taku, Kanako; Hunt, Ronald; Vasappa, Rashmi

    2016-04-01

    Although we know much about work-related physician burnout and the subsequent negative effects, we do not fully understand work-related physician wellness. Likewise, the relation of wellness and burnout to physician happiness is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine how physician burnout and wellness contribute to happiness. We sampled 2000 full-time physician members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Respondents completed a demographics questionnaire, questions about workload, the Physician Wellness Inventory, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the Subjective Happiness Scale. We performed a hierarchical regression analysis with the burnout and wellness subscales as predictor variables and physician happiness as the outcome variable. Our response rate was 22%. Career purpose, personal accomplishment, and perception of workload manageability had significant positive correlations with physician happiness. Distress had a significant negative correlation with physician happiness. A sense of career meaning and accomplishment, along with a lack of distress, are important factors in determining physician happiness. The number of hours a physician works is not related to happiness, but the perceived ability to manage workload was significantly related to happiness. Wellness-promotion efforts could focus on assisting physicians with skills to manage the workload by eliminating unnecessary tasks or sharing workload among team members, improving feelings of work accomplishment, improving career satisfaction and meaning, and managing distress related to patient care.

  3. Factors influencing professional life satisfaction among neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie M; Halpern, Michael T; Kane, Heather L; Keating, Michael; Olmsted, Murrey

    2017-06-19

    Predicted shortages in the supply of neurologists may limit patients' access to and quality of care for neurological disorders. Retaining neurologists already in practice provides one opportunity to support the overall supply of practicing neurologists. Understanding factors associated with professional life satisfaction (and dissatisfaction) and implementing policies to enhance satisfaction may encourage neurologists to remain in clinical practice. In this paper, we present results from the first study examining factors associated with professional life satisfaction among a large sample of U.S, neurologists. We collaborated with the AAN to survey a sample of U.S. neurologists about their professional life satisfaction. Analyses examined the association of physician and practice characteristics with aspects of professional life satisfaction, including satisfaction with their career in medicine, medical specialty, current position, relationship with colleagues, relationship with patients, work/life balance, and pay. The study population consisted of 625 neurologists. In multivariate regression analyses, no single group or population stratum indicated high (or low) responses to all aspects of satisfaction. Older neurologists reported higher satisfaction with career, specialty, and relationship with patients than younger neurologists. Female neurologists had significantly lower satisfaction with pay than male neurologists. Neurologists who spent more time in research and teaching had greater satisfaction with specialty, relationship with colleagues, and relationship with patients than those spending no time in research. Neurologists who practiced in small cities/rural areas reported lower satisfaction across multiple dimensions than those practicing in large urban areas. Neurologists in solo practice had greater satisfaction with the relationship with their patients, but lower satisfaction with pay. Satisfaction is a multidimensional construct that is associated with

  4. [To know, understand and combating medication errors related to computerized physician order entry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle, V; Tiphine, T; Poirier, Y; Raingeard, E; Feldman, D; Freville, J-C

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study is to identify medication errors related to computerized physician order entry in our hospital. At the end of this 1-year study (2008 to 2009), 378 beds were computerized by a business software. Medication errors were identified from notifications sent to the publisher of the software, feedback of health professionals and the analysis of Pharmacists' interventions formulate following prescription errors due to computerization. They were qualified according to the medication error's French dictionary of the French Society of Clinical Pharmacy. Thirty-five categories of medication errors were found. Most of them appear during prescription. Dosage and concentration errors, dose errors, omission errors and drug errors are the most frequent. Three main causes were found: human factor, closely related to the software settings and the quality of user training; communication problems, related to the ergonomics; conception problems, related to intuitiveness and intricacy of the software. These results confirm the existence of medication errors induced by computerized physician order entry systems. They highlight the need to involve initial and ongoing training of users, relevance and scalability of the setup and use of mature and certified software to minimized them. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. UNDERSTANDING THE RELATIONSHIPS OF PROGRAM SATISFACTION, PROGRAM LOYALTY AND STORE LOYALTY AMONG CARDHOLDERS OF LOYALTY PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Asiah Omar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Loyalty programs have increasingly attracted interest in both academic marketing research and practice. One major factor that has been increasingly discussed is loyalty. In this study we examine the influence of cardholders' satisfaction on loyalty (program loyalty and store loyalty in a retail context, namely, in department stores and superstores. Data were collected from 400 cardholders of a retail loyalty program in Klang Valley, Malaysia via the drop-off-and-collect technique. Structural modelling techniques were applied to analyze the data. The results indicated that program satisfaction is not related to store loyalty (share-of-wallet, share-of-visit and store preference. However, loyalty to the program (program loyalty plays a crucial intervening role in the relationship between program satisfaction and store loyalty. The study underscores the principal importance of program loyalty in the retail loyalty program.

  6. Common concepts in separate domains? Family physicians' ways of understanding teaching patients and trainees, a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Berg, Mattias; Scott, Ian; Bates, Joanna

    2015-06-27

    Medical education is increasingly expanding into new community teaching settings and the need for clinical teachers is rising. Many physicians taking on this new role are already skilled patient educators. The purpose of this research was to explore how family physicians conceptualize teaching patients compared to the teaching of trainees. Our aim was to understand if there is any common ground between these two roles in order to support faculty development based on already existing skills. Semi-structured interviews with twenty-five family physician preceptors were conducted in Vancouver, Canada and thematically analyzed. We identified four key areas of overlap between the two fields (being learner-centered; supporting the acquisition, application and integration of knowledge; role modeling and self-disclosure; and facilitating autonomy) and three areas of divergence (aim of teaching and setting the learning objectives; establishing rapport; and providing feedback). Finding common ground between these two teaching roles would support knowledge translation and inquiry between the domains of teaching patients and trainees. It would furthermore open up new avenues for improving training and practice for clinical teachers by better linking faculty development and continuing medical education (CME).

  7. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael Wv

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients.

  8. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael WV

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Discussion Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. Conclusion It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients. PMID:22693481

  9. The impact of economic rationalization, prioritization and rationing on job satisfaction, motivation and team cohesion in hospitals: a survey among retired physician executives in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Joerg; Braehler, Elmar; Ghanem, Mohamed; Heyde, Christoph E

    2017-01-01

    The growing economization of the health care system and implication of market principles in the medical field have risen new and serious questions on the meaning of the medical profession, the doctor-patient relationship and the orientation of medicine itself. The impact of the dynamic clinical structures on the doctor-doctor and the doctor-patient interaction appear even unpredictable. Therefore, the impact of market-based methods, i.e. rationalization, prioritization and rationing, on job satisfaction, motivation and team cohesion should be quantified. The experiences of former and now retired physician executives in numerous hospitals in Saxony were determined. For this purpose, an anonymously written survey using a standardized questionnaire was conducted in the first quarter of 2016. Rationalization measures were confirmed by 88% of respondents. In more than a third of cases, former executives also experienced prioritization and rationing. The impact of these management techniques on job satisfaction, motivation and team cohesion was carried out in a differentiated manner. There was a tendency to regard rationalization and prioritization measures indifferently to rather disadvantageous, while rationing was predominantly rated negatively. In addition to rationalization, prioritization and rationing measures have now been part of working strategy at the hospitals. On one hand, the conceptual distinction between the terms still seems imprecise; on the other hand, a creeping and imperceptible medico-ethical transgression of the prioritization to rationing seems to have already taken place.

  10. A Dyadic Approach to Understanding the Link Between Sexual Functioning and Sexual Satisfaction in Heterosexual Couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascoal, Patrícia M.; Byers, E. Sandra; Alvarez, Maria-João; Santos-Iglesias, Pablo; Nobre, Pedro J.; Pereira, Cicero Roberto; Laan, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that several dimensions of sexual functioning (e.g., sexual desire, arousal, orgasm) are associated with the sexual satisfaction of individuals in a committed mixed-sex (male-female) relationship. We extended this research by comparing a dyadic model that included both

  11. Understanding job satisfaction amongst mid-level cadres in Malawi: the contribution of organisational justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Eilish; Manafa, Ogenna; Maseko, Fresier; Bowie, Cameron; White, Emma

    2009-05-01

    The migration of doctors and nurses from low- to high-income countries has left many countries relying on mid-level cadres as the mainstay of their health delivery system, Malawi being an example. Although an extremely important resource, little attention has been paid to the management and further development of these cadres. In this paper we use the concept of organisational justice - fairness of treatment, procedures and communication on the part of managers - to explore through a questionnaire how mid-level cadres in jobs traditionally done by higher-level cadres self-assessed their level of job satisfaction. All mid-level health workers present on the day of data collection in 34 health facilities in three health districts of Malawi, one district each from the three geographical regions, were invited to participate; 126 agreed. Perceptions of justice correlated strongly with level of job satisfaction, and in particular perceptions of how well they were treated by their managers and the extent to which they were informed about decisions and changes. Pay was not the only important element in job satisfaction; promotion opportunities and satisfaction with current work assignments were also significant. These findings highlight the important role that managers can play in the motivation, career development and performance of mid-level health workers.

  12. Understanding the process of patient satisfaction with nurse-led chronic disease management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Rosemary; St John, Winsome; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

      To investigate the process of patient satisfaction with nurse-led chronic disease management in Australian general practice.   Nurses working in the primary care context of general practice, referred to as practice nurses, are expanding their role in chronic disease management; this is relatively new to Australia. Therefore, determining patient satisfaction with this trend is pragmatically and ethically important. However, the concept of patient satisfaction is not well understood particularly in relation to care provided by practice nurses.   A grounded theory study underpinned by a relativist ontological position and a relativist epistemology.   Grounded theory was used to develop a theory from data collected through in-depth interviews with 38 participants between November 2007-April 2009. Participants were drawn from a larger project that trialled a practice nurse-led, collaborative model of chronic disease management in three Australian general practices. Theoretical sampling, data collection, and analysis were conducted concurrently consistent with grounded theory methods.   Patients undergo a cyclical process of Navigating Care involving three stages, Determining Care Needs, Forming Relationship, and Having Confidence. The latter two processes are inter-related and a feedback loop from them informs subsequent cycles of Determining Care Needs. If any of these steps fails to develop adequately, patients are likely to opt out of nurse-led care.   Navigating Care explains how and why time, communication, continuity, and trust in general practitioners and nurses are important to patient satisfaction. It can be used in identifying suitable patients for practice nurse-led care and to inform the practice and organization of practice nurse-led care to enhance patient satisfaction. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Procedural Portfolio Planning in Plastic Surgery, Part 1: Strategic Changes in Clinical Practice to Increase Physician Revenue, Improve Operative Throughput, and Maintain Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Portfolio planning in health care represents the strategic prioritization of services that permits an organization to better achieve its goals of margin and mission. Because of recent volatility in the economy, declining reimbursement, and rising costs of providing care, such strategic planning has become increasingly important if physicians want to remain leaders in health care. This project assesses the financial impact of procedural portfolio planning on an academic plastic surgery practice from the physician's perspective. We tracked the top 50 procedures, defined as total charges per CPT code, that were performed in our baseline year, for 6 providers in a stable plastic surgery practice. At the end of the first year, we implemented 3 types of strategic changes: growth of areas with high contribution margin (laser resurfacing of burn scars), curtailment of high-risk procedures with negative contribution margin (panniculectomy in smokers), and improved efficiency of mission-critical services with high resource consumption (free-flap breast reconstruction). During the 2-year study period, we had no turnover in faculty, did not pursue any formal marketing, did not change our surgical fees or billing system, provided care independent of payer mix, and maintained our commitment to indigent care. Outcome measures included procedural charges and revenue, collection rates, work relative value units, operating room times, idle times (room time less case time), receipts/minute in operating room, uncompensated charity care, and patient satisfaction (Press-Gainey scores). Before the study period, annual incremental growth in our practice was 1% to 2%, in terms of charges and receipts. After implementation of the portfolio planning project, the financial position of our division improved significantly, with patient satisfaction rates increasing from 85.5% to 94.1% and charity care remaining constant at US $400,000 per year. Encounters, work relative value units, charges

  14. Understanding Roles of Social Media in Academic Engagement and Satisfaction for Graduate Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyungsik; Volkova, Svitlana; Corley, Courtney D.

    2016-05-07

    Research indicates positive effects of social media in academia and education. However its main populations have been faculty, teachers, high school or college students, and its primary contexts have been course or classroom settings. We realized there exists a lack of studies on how Ph.D. (broadly graduate) students use social media for academic purposes and how its use is associated with academic motivation, engagement, and satisfaction, which are salient factors for the success of their graduate degrees and life. Based on the survey responses from 91 current Ph.D. students, our study results highlight that (1) students mainly use social media for broadcasting and keeping up with up-to-date academic and research information; yet, making connections and developing professional networks is one of the primary reasons, and (2) social media use is positively associated with their academic engagement and satisfaction. We discuss implications and future work of our study.

  15. Radiologic intervention: patient anxiety, fear of pain, understanding of the procedure and satisfaction with the medication-a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    I wanted to prospectively assess patients' anxiety, their understanding of the procedure being performed, the perception of the pain level and the satisfaction with the administered medication for interventional procedures. I investigated 78 patients before and after they underwent 93 interventional procedures. The patients responded to a series of questions by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Two different procedures were performed on 15 patients at different times. Based on the patient's body weight, a combination of sedative and analgesic was intravenously administered. The mean anxiety VAS score for the interventional procedures was about 5.3. The mean anxiety score of the experienced patients was about 3.8 and that of the inexperienced patients was about 5.5 (ρ < .001). The mean score for the understanding of the procedure, which was recorded both before and after the procedure, was about 4.1 and 7.1, respectively. The mean scores for the understanding of the procedure were about 7.0 in the experienced patients and about 3.6 in the inexperienced patients (ρ < .001). The anticipated level of pain recorded before the procedure was about 5.2 and the level of pain during the procedure was 2.9, and the latter was recorded after the procedure (ρ < .001). The level of satisfaction with the medication provided during the procedure was about 8.0 on the VAS score. The patients had a moderate amount of anxiety about the interventional procedures. Most patients had a high level of satisfaction with the medication despite the amount of pain they experienced during the procedure. The patients who were experienced with a procedure tended to have less anxiety and anticipated pain, and they had a greater understanding of the procedure

  16. Radiologic intervention: patient anxiety, fear of pain, understanding of the procedure and satisfaction with the medication-a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    I wanted to prospectively assess patients' anxiety, their understanding of the procedure being performed, the perception of the pain level and the satisfaction with the administered medication for interventional procedures. I investigated 78 patients before and after they underwent 93 interventional procedures. The patients responded to a series of questions by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Two different procedures were performed on 15 patients at different times. Based on the patient's body weight, a combination of sedative and analgesic was intravenously administered. The mean anxiety VAS score for the interventional procedures was about 5.3. The mean anxiety score of the experienced patients was about 3.8 and that of the inexperienced patients was about 5.5 ({rho} < .001). The mean score for the understanding of the procedure, which was recorded both before and after the procedure, was about 4.1 and 7.1, respectively. The mean scores for the understanding of the procedure were about 7.0 in the experienced patients and about 3.6 in the inexperienced patients ({rho} < .001). The anticipated level of pain recorded before the procedure was about 5.2 and the level of pain during the procedure was 2.9, and the latter was recorded after the procedure ({rho} < .001). The level of satisfaction with the medication provided during the procedure was about 8.0 on the VAS score. The patients had a moderate amount of anxiety about the interventional procedures. Most patients had a high level of satisfaction with the medication despite the amount of pain they experienced during the procedure. The patients who were experienced with a procedure tended to have less anxiety and anticipated pain, and they had a greater understanding of the procedure.

  17. Customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmir, Rade B

    2006-01-01

    This paper seeks to present an analysis of the literature examining objective information concerning the subject of customer service, as it applies to the current medical practice. Hopefully, this information will be synthesized to generate a cogent approach to correlate customer service with quality. Articles were obtained by an English language search of MEDLINE from January 1976 to July 2005. This computerized search was supplemented with literature from the author's personal collection of peer-reviewed articles on customer service in a medical setting. This information was presented in a qualitative fashion. There is a significant lack of objective data correlating customer service objectives, patient satisfaction and quality of care. Patients present predominantly for the convenience of emergency department care. Specifics of satisfaction are directed to the timing, and amount of "caring". Demographic correlates including symptom presentation, practice style, location and physician issues directly impact on satisfaction. It is most helpful to develop a productive plan for the "difficult patient", emphasizing communication and empathy. Profiling of the customer satisfaction experience is best accomplished by examining the specifics of satisfaction, nature of the ED patient, demographic profile, symptom presentation and physician interventions emphasizing communication--especially with the difficult patient. The current emergency medicine customer service dilemmas are a complex interaction of both patient and physician factors specifically targeting both efficiency and patient satisfaction. Awareness of these issues particular to the emergency patient can help to maximize efficiency, minimize subsequent medicolegal risk and improve patient care if a tailored management plan is formulated.

  18. Lack of application of the European Work Time Directive: effects on workload, work satisfaction and burnout among Italian physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gnerre

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Italian Parliament has excluded hospital physicians from the application of the European Work Time Directive (EWTD, which imposes a maximum workweek of 48 h and compulsory resting periods. This resulted in extended and excessive work time for the category. This paper is aimed at evaluating the impact of this legislation gap, by assessing the presence of excessive work-related stress and risk for burnout syndrome among Italian physicians working in public hospitals. This observational study is based on an on-line survey conducted on a sample of 1925 Italian doctors (covering a wide range of age, work experience and contractual positions from October 2014 to February 2015. The questionnaire included 30 questions concerning their personal and professional life (e.g., assessment of workloads, number of uncomfortable or extra shifts, unused days-off, etc.. On the basis of the results, it can be inferred that the average Italian doctor working in public hospitals is under considerable stress at work with negative consequences on his health. He is exposed to high risk of suffering from sleep disorders and cardiovascular diseases (due to the lack of time for private practice and eating regular meals. Overall, his perception is that his job worsens his quality of life. This study shows the relevance of the risk of burnout among Italian physicians employed in public hospitals due to severe workload and work conditions. The resulting impact on the quality of care and the significant cost involved - both in human and economic terms - calls for significant emergency measures by the Italian health work organization. An important increase and prolonged working time is associated with a worsening of the objective cognitive performance and an increase of clinical risk, but also to an increased risk of diseases for operators and of the burnout syndrome. Our survey shows that lack of application of the EWTD has adverse effects on the quality of life and

  19. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT for late-life depression in general practice: uptake and satisfaction by patients, therapists and physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan Marten

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT is recommended in most depression treatment guidelines and proved to be a suitable treatment for elderly depressed patients. Despite the favorable results of IPT in research populations, the dissemination to general practice is surprisingly limited. Little is known about uptake and satisfaction when this therapy is introduced into real-life general practice. Methods Motivation and evaluation of patients, GPs and therapists were recorded and organizational barriers described alongside a randomized controlled trial. IPT, given by mental health workers, was compared with usual general practitioner (GP care. Included were patients (≥55 years who met the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. Results Patients were motivated for the psychotherapy intervention: of the 205 eligible patients, 143 (70% entered the study, and of the 69 patients who were offered IPT, 77% complied with the treatment. IPT proved to be an attractive therapy for patients as well as for therapists from mental health organizations. General practitioners evaluated the intervention positively afterwards, mainly because of the time-limited and structured approach. Organizational barriers: no IPT therapists were available; an IPT trainer and supervisor had to be trained and training materials had to be developed and translated. Additionally, there was a lack of office space in some general practices; for therapists from private practices it was not feasible to participate because of financial reasons. IPT was superior to usual care in patients with moderate to severe depression. Conclusion As we succeeded in delivering IPT in primary care practice, and as IPT was superior to usual care, there are grounds to support the implementation of IPT for depressed elderly patients within general practice, as long as the practices have room for the therapists and financial barriers can be overcome. Consolidation may be achieved by

  20. Continuous professional development for physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K., Ghosh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of professional competence remains an exercise of permament learning and an essential requirement for evidence –based medical practice. Physicians attend continuing professional development (CPD programs to acquire new knowledge. Often CPD programs remain the main source for updates of information. CPD organizers have a considerable responsibility in determining appropriate curriculum for their conferences. Organizing an effective CPD activity often requires understanding of the principles of adult education. Prior to deciding on the curriculum for a CPD, course organizers should conduct needs assessment of physicians. CPD planners should create activities that would consistently improve physician competence. CPD sessions that are interactive, using multiple methods of instructions for small groups of physicians from a single specialty are more likely to change physician knowledge and behavior. The effectiveness of a CPD program should be evaluated at a level beyond measuring physician satisfaction. CPD planners should incorporate methods to determine the course attendees’ improvement of knowledge, skills and attitudes during the CPD activities. Pre and post conference evaluations of physicians using multiple choice questions may form a useful method of assessment.

  1. [German language physician rating sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strech, D; Reimann, S

    2012-08-01

    could be found in one of the 6 German language physician rating sites. Of the randomly sampled physicians, between 3% and 28% were evaluated by at least one patient. On average, the ratings for the total sample (on a scale of 1=good to 3=poor) ranged from 1.1 to 1.5, which clearly represents a positive trend. There were no differences found in terms of quantity and quality of ratings, or concerning the identifiability of physicians in the cases of Thuringia and Hamburg. The various PRS vary significantly in the selection and explanation of criteria for the evaluation of medical quality and, respectively, patient satisfaction. The specific selection and explanation of certain evaluation criteria could have a lasting effect on the understanding of physician quality and patient self-conception in the case of increased utilisation of PRS. The lack of standards for medical evaluation for PRS as well as poorly differentiated reviews, since reviews were usually positive, generally speak for the need for full text comments on PRS. This would enable peer-to-peer communication amongst users, especially regarding the practical relevance of evaluation criteria. Through this interaction between PRS users, user-oriented standards can be established and the advanced use of physician rating sites can be promoted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Female Physicians and the Future of Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelley, Elaine; Danoff, Ann; Cooper, David S; Becker, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Given that approximately 70% of current endocrinology fellows are women, female physicians will compose the majority of the future endocrinology workforce. This gender shift partly reflects an apparent waning of interest in endocrinology among male trainees. It also coincides with a projected shortage of endocrinologists overall. Female physicians face unique challenges in the workplace. To continue to attract trainees to the specialty and support their success, it is imperative that these challenges be recognized, understood, and addressed. A PubMed search using the terms "female physician" and "physician gender" covering the years 2000-2015 was performed. Additional references were identified through review of the citations of the retrieved articles. The following topics were identified as key to understanding the impact of this gender shift: professional satisfaction, work-life balance, income, parenthood, academic success, and patient satisfaction. Several changes can be predicted to occur as endocrinology becomes a female-predominant specialty. Although professional satisfaction should remain stable, increased burnout rates are likely. Work-life balance challenges will likely be magnified. The combined effects of occupational gender segregation and a gender pay gap are predicted to negatively impact salaries of endocrinologists of both genders. The underrepresentation of women in academic leadership may mean a lesser voice for endocrinology in this arena. Finally, gender biases evident in patient satisfaction measures--commonly used as proxies for quality of care--may disproportionately impact endocrinology. Endocrinology is predicted to become the most female-predominant subspecialty of internal medicine. The specialty of endocrinology should take a lead role in advocating for changes that support the success of female physicians. Strengthening and supporting the physician workforce can only serve to attract talented physicians of both genders to the

  3. Understanding patient satisfaction with received healthcare services: A natural language processing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doing-Harris, Kristina; Mowery, Danielle L.; Daniels, Chrissy; Chapman, Wendy W.; Conway, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Important information is encoded in free-text patient comments. We determine the most common topics in patient comments, design automatic topic classifiers, identify comments ’ sentiment, and find new topics in negative comments. Our annotation scheme consisted of 28 topics, with positive and negative sentiment. Within those 28 topics, the seven most frequent accounted for 63% of annotations. For automated topic classification, we developed vocabulary-based and Naive Bayes ’ classifiers. For sentiment analysis, another Naive Bayes ’ classifier was used. Finally, we used topic modeling to search for unexpected topics within negative comments. The seven most common topics were appointment access, appointment wait, empathy, explanation, friendliness, practice environment, and overall experience. The best F-measures from our classifier were 0.52(NB), 0.57(NB), 0.36(Vocab), 0.74(NB), 0.40(NB), and 0.44(Vocab), respectively. F- scores ranged from 0.16 to 0.74. The sentiment classification F-score was 0.84. Negative comment topic modeling revealed complaints about appointment access, appointment wait, and time spent with physician. PMID:28269848

  4. Understanding the Factors That Influence the Adoption and Meaningful Use of Social Media by Physicians to Share Medical Information

    OpenAIRE

    McGowan, Brian S; Wasko, Molly; Vartabedian, Bryan Steven; Miller, Robert S; Freiherr, Desirae D; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2012-01-01

    Background Within the medical community there is persistent debate as to whether the information available through social media is trustworthy and valid, and whether physicians are ready to adopt these technologies and ultimately embrace them as a format for professional development and lifelong learning. Objective To identify how physicians are using social media to share and exchange medical information with other physicians, and to identify the factors that influence physicians’ use of soc...

  5. Understanding physicians' acceptance of the Medline system for practicing evidence-based medicine: a decomposed TPB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shin-Yuan; Ku, Yi-Cheng; Chien, Jui-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) supports physicians in their improvement of clinical quality and enhances hospitals' improvement of patient safety. Many health care institutions implement information systems to support physicians practicing EBM. However, studies exploring the antecedent factors of physicians' usage intention of information systems facilitating EBM practice are rare. Hence this study proposed a research model based on the decomposed theory of the planned behavior model (decomposed TPB) to investigate the factors influencing physicians' acceptance of the Medline system. A field survey was conducted in Taiwan to collect data from physicians with experience in using the Medline system. A valid sample of 224 physicians was collected for data analysis. Structural equation modeling using the partial least squares (PLS) method with bootstrap estimate was used to test the research model. The findings of this study show that a physician's usage intention is significantly influenced by three factors, i.e. attitude, the subjective norm, and perceived behavior control. Furthermore, these three factors can be predicted by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, interpersonal influence, personal innovativeness in IT and self-efficacy, respectively. The results of this study indicate that our research model provides an effective prediction of the intention of physicians to use the Medline system and provides valuable implications for academics and practitioners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding Organizational Commitment and Satisfaction of TACOM Life Cycle Management Command Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Associates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 23 MAY 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Academic Thesis 3...they needed the following in their lives to continue being a self-actualized person (Boeree, 2006): Truth, rather than dishonesty UNDERSTANDING...Survey Academic Users Guide 2004. University of Western Ontario. Mowday, R. T., Porter, L. W., & Steers, R. M. (1981). Employee-Organization

  7. Understanding the factors that influence the adoption and meaningful use of social media by physicians to share medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Brian S; Wasko, Molly; Vartabedian, Bryan Steven; Miller, Robert S; Freiherr, Desirae D; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2012-09-24

    Within the medical community there is persistent debate as to whether the information available through social media is trustworthy and valid, and whether physicians are ready to adopt these technologies and ultimately embrace them as a format for professional development and lifelong learning. To identify how physicians are using social media to share and exchange medical information with other physicians, and to identify the factors that influence physicians' use of social media as a component of their lifelong learning and continuing professional development. We developed a survey instrument based on the Technology Acceptance Model, hypothesizing that technology usage is best predicted by a physician's attitudes toward the technology, perceptions about the technology's usefulness and ease of use, and individual factors such as personal innovativeness. The survey was distributed via email to a random sample of 1695 practicing oncologists and primary care physicians in the United States in March 2011. Responses from 485 physicians were analyzed (response rate 28.61%). Overall, 117 of 485 (24.1%) of respondents used social media daily or many times daily to scan or explore medical information, whereas 69 of 485 (14.2%) contributed new information via social media on a daily basis. On a weekly basis or more, 296 of 485 (61.0%) scanned and 223 of 485 (46.0%) contributed. In terms of attitudes toward the use of social media, 279 of 485 respondents (57.5%) perceived social media to be beneficial, engaging, and a good way to get current, high-quality information. In terms of usefulness, 281 of 485 (57.9%) of respondents stated that social media enabled them to care for patients more effectively, and 291 of 485 (60.0%) stated it improved the quality of patient care they delivered. The main factors influencing a physician's usage of social media to share medical knowledge with other physicians were perceived ease of use and usefulness. Respondents who had positive

  8. Verbal Aggressiveness Among Physicians and Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Jenny Lynn; Hosseini, Motahar; Kamangar, Farin; Levien, David H; Rowland, Pamela A; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    To better understand verbal aggressiveness among physicians and trainees, including specialty-specific differences. The Infante Verbal Aggressiveness Scale (IVAS) was administered as part of a survey to 48 medical students, 24 residents, and 257 attending physicians. The 72 trainees received the IVAS and demographic questions, whereas the attending physicians received additional questions regarding type of practice, career satisfaction, litigation, and personality type. The IVAS scores showed high reliability (Cronbach α = 0.83). Among all trainees, 56% were female with mean age 28 years, whereas among attending physicians, 63% were male with mean age 50 years. Average scores of trainees were higher than attending physicians with corresponding averages of 1.88 and 1.68, respectively. Among trainees, higher IVAS scores were significantly associated with male sex, non-US birthplace, choice of surgery, and a history of bullying. Among attending physicians, higher IVAS scores were significantly associated with male sex, younger age, self-reported low-quality of patient-physician relationships, and low enjoyment talking to patients. General surgery and general internal medicine physicians were significantly associated with higher IVAS scores than other specialties. General practitioners (surgeons and medical physicians) had higher IVAS scores than the specialists in their corresponding fields. No significant correlation was found between IVAS scores and threats of legal action against attending physicians, or most personality traits. Additional findings regarding bullying in medical school, physician-patient interactions, and having a method to deal with inappropriate behavior at work were observed. Individuals choosing general specialties display more aggressive verbal communication styles, general surgeons displaying the highest. The IVAS scoring system may identify subgroups of physicians with overly aggressive (problematic) communication skills and may provide a

  9. Influences on patients' ratings of physicians: Physicians demographics and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duberstein, Paul; Meldrum, Sean; Fiscella, Kevin; Shields, Cleveland G; Epstein, Ronald M

    2007-02-01

    There is considerable interest in the influences on patients' ratings of physicians. In this cross-sectional study, patients (n = 4616; age range: 18-65 years) rated their level of satisfaction with their primary care physicians (n = 96). Patients and physicians were recruited from primary care practices in the Rochester, NY metropolitan area. For analytic purposes, length of the patient-physician relationship was stratified ( or =5 years). Principal components factor analysis of items from the Health Care Climate Questionnaire, the Primary Care Assessment Survey and the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire yielded a single factor labeled "Satisfaction" that served as the sole dependent variable. Higher scores mean greater satisfaction. Predictors of interest were patient demographics and morbidity as well as physician demographics and personality, assessed with items from the NEO-FFI. Patients treated by a physician for 1 year or less rated male physicians higher than female physicians. This gender difference disappeared after 1 year, but two physician personality traits, Openness and Conscientiousness, were associated with patients' ratings in lengthier patient-physician relationships. Patients report being more satisfied with physicians who are relatively high in Openness and average in Conscientiousness. Older patients provide higher ratings than younger patients, and those with greater medical burden rated their physicians higher. Patients' ratings of physicians are multidetermined. Future research on patient satisfaction and the doctor-patient relationship would benefit from a consideration of physician personality. Identifying physician personality traits that facilitate or undermine communication, trust, patient-centeredness, and patient adherence to prescribed treatments is an important priority. Learning environments could be created to reinforce certain traits and corresponding habits of mind that enhance patient satisfaction. Such a shift in the culture

  10. Understanding a Nonlinear Causal Relationship Between Rewards and Physicians' Contributions in Online Health Care Communities: Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jying-Nan; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Yu, Haiyan; Hsu, Yuan-Teng

    2017-12-21

    The online health care community is not just a place for the public to share physician reviews or medical knowledge, but also a physician-patient communication platform. The medical resources of developing countries are relatively inadequate, and the online health care community is a potential solution to alleviate the phenomenon of long hospital queues and the lack of medical resources in rural areas. However, the success of the online health care community depends on online contributions by physicians. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of incentive mechanisms on physician's online contribution behavior in the online health community. We addressed the following questions: (1) from which specialty area are physicians more likely to participate in online health care community activities, (2) what are the factors affecting physician online contributions, and (3) do incentive mechanisms, including psychological and material rewards, result in differences of physician online contributions? We designed a longitudinal study involving a data sample in three waves. All data were collected from the Good Doctor website, which is the largest online health care community in China. We first used descriptive statistics to investigate the physician online contribution behavior in its entirety. Then multiple linear and quadratic regression models were applied to verify the causal relationship between rewards and physician online contribution. Our sample included 40,300 physicians from 3607 different hospitals, 10 different major specialty areas, and 31 different provinces or municipalities. Based on the multiple quadratic regression model, we found that the coefficients of the control variables, past physician online contributions, doctor review rating, clinic title, hospital level, and city level, were .415, .189, -.099, -.106, and -.143, respectively. For the psychological (or material) rewards, the standardized coefficient of the main effect was 0.261 (or 0

  11. Understanding the Influence Career Paths Have on Community and Technical College Chief Business Officers' Satisfaction with Their Position: A Mixed Method Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Carter L.

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to understand whether a community or technical college chief business officer's career line influenced the lived experience of job satisfaction. This mixed method study was conducted in a two-phase approach using the Explanatory Design: Participant Selection Model variant. An initial quantitative survey was conducted from…

  12. Received, Understanding and Satisfaction of National Health Insurance Premium Subsidy Scheme by Families of Children with Disabilities: A Census Study in Taipei City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Ya-Wen; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Chwo, Miao-Ju

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of the present study are to provide the first data on utilization, understanding and satisfaction of the National Health Insurance (NHI) premium subsidy for families of children with disabilities in Taipei. Data from the 2001 Taipei Early Intervention Utilization and Evaluation Survey for Aged 0-6 Children with Disabilities were…

  13. Understanding the Factors That Influence the Adoption and Meaningful Use of Social Media by Physicians to Share Medical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Molly; Vartabedian, Bryan Steven; Miller, Robert S; Freiherr, Desirae D; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2012-01-01

    Background Within the medical community there is persistent debate as to whether the information available through social media is trustworthy and valid, and whether physicians are ready to adopt these technologies and ultimately embrace them as a format for professional development and lifelong learning. Objective To identify how physicians are using social media to share and exchange medical information with other physicians, and to identify the factors that influence physicians’ use of social media as a component of their lifelong learning and continuing professional development. Methods We developed a survey instrument based on the Technology Acceptance Model, hypothesizing that technology usage is best predicted by a physician’s attitudes toward the technology, perceptions about the technology’s usefulness and ease of use, and individual factors such as personal innovativeness. The survey was distributed via email to a random sample of 1695 practicing oncologists and primary care physicians in the United States in March 2011. Responses from 485 physicians were analyzed (response rate 28.61%). Results Overall, 117 of 485 (24.1%) of respondents used social media daily or many times daily to scan or explore medical information, whereas 69 of 485 (14.2%) contributed new information via social media on a daily basis. On a weekly basis or more, 296 of 485 (61.0%) scanned and 223 of 485 (46.0%) contributed. In terms of attitudes toward the use of social media, 279 of 485 respondents (57.5%) perceived social media to be beneficial, engaging, and a good way to get current, high-quality information. In terms of usefulness, 281 of 485 (57.9%) of respondents stated that social media enabled them to care for patients more effectively, and 291 of 485 (60.0%) stated it improved the quality of patient care they delivered. The main factors influencing a physician’s usage of social media to share medical knowledge with other physicians were perceived ease of use and

  14. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. Methods A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. Results In total 415 (51 % residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p Residents highly valued their colleagues (67%, program directors (60% and external psychiatrist/psychologist (49% as well-being resources. Over one third of residents wished to have a career counselor (39% and financial counselor (38%. Conclusion Many Albertan residents experience significant stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  15. Understanding the role of physician attire on patient perceptions: a systematic review of the literature--targeting attire to improve likelihood of rapport (TAILOR) investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrilli, Christopher Michael; Mack, Megan; Petrilli, Jennifer Janowitz; Hickner, Andy; Saint, Sanjay; Chopra, Vineet

    2015-01-19

    Despite a growing body of literature, uncertainty regarding the influence of physician dress on patients' perceptions exists. Therefore, we performed a systematic review to examine the influence of physician attire on patient perceptions including trust, satisfaction and confidence. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Biosis Previews and Conference Papers Index. Studies that: (1) involved participants ≥18 years of age; (2) evaluated physician attire; and (3) reported patient perceptions related to attire were included. Two authors determined study eligibility. Studies were categorised by country of origin, clinical discipline (eg, internal medicine, surgery), context (inpatient vs outpatient) and occurrence of a clinical encounter when soliciting opinions regarding attire. Studies were assessed using the Downs and Black Scale risk of bias scale. Owing to clinical and methodological heterogeneity, meta-analyses were not attempted. Of 1040 citations, 30 studies involving 11 533 patients met eligibility criteria. Included studies featured patients from 14 countries. General medicine, procedural (eg, general surgery and obstetrics), clinic, emergency departments and hospital settings were represented. Preferences or positive influence of physician attire on patient perceptions were reported in 21 of the 30 studies (70%). Formal attire and white coats with other attire not specified was preferred in 18 of 30 studies (60%). Preference for formal attire and white coats was more prevalent among older patients and studies conducted in Europe and Asia. Four of seven studies involving procedural specialties reported either no preference for attire or a preference for scrubs; four of five studies in intensive care and emergency settings also found no attire preference. Only 3 of 12 studies that surveyed patients after a clinical encounter concluded that attire influenced patient perceptions. Although patients often prefer formal physician attire, perceptions of attire are

  16. Is the job satisfaction of primary care team members associated with patient satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Reuschenbach, Bernd; Wensing, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown a correlation between physician job satisfaction and patient satisfaction with quality of care, but the connection between job satisfaction of other primary care team members and patient satisfaction is yet unclear. Objective To evaluate whether there is an association between patient satisfaction and job satisfaction of the members of patient care teams. Design The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment and used an observational design. Setting 676 primary care practices in Germany. Participants 47 168 patients, 676 general practitioners (practice principals), 305 physician colleagues (trainees and permanently employed physicians) and 3011 non-physician practice members (nurses, secretaries). Main outcome measures Patient evaluation was measured using the 23-item EUROPEP questionnaire. Job satisfaction was measured using the 10-item Warr–Cook–Wall job satisfaction scale and further items relating to practice structure. Bivariate correlations were applied in which factors of patient satisfaction and practice structure were compared with physicians and non-physicians satisfaction. Results Patient satisfaction correlates positively with the general job satisfaction of the non-physician (r=0.25, ppatient satisfaction was higher than the correlation between satisfaction of physicians and patients. Patients seem to be sensitive to aspects of practice structure. PMID:21262790

  17. Relationship Satisfaction among South Asian Canadians: The Role of ‘Complementary-Equality’ and Listening to Understand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Reid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the ways in which adherence to traditional marital expectations in ones marriage was related to styles of interpersonal listening and marital satisfaction among Indo-Pakistanis living in a Western country. Participants (n = 114 were recruited from a large metropolitan city in Canada, were married, and their ages ranged from 19 to 67 years. They completed measures of marital satisfaction, listening styles, and traditional orientation to marriage. Results indicated that greater adherence to traditional marital beliefs were correlated with lower levels of interpersonal listening and marital satisfaction. However, closer examination of the traditional orientation subscales revealed that expectation of traditional husband and wife roles did not result in lower empathic listening in one’s marriage or lower marital satisfaction, but the lower degree to which one believed in upholding equality in undertaking such traditional roles did. Furthermore, empathic listening mediated the relationship between belief in equality in one’s relationship and marital satisfaction. The implications of these results for enhancing relationship satisfaction for Indo-Pakistanis are discussed.

  18. Outcomes of Prognostic Disclosure: Associations With Prognostic Understanding, Distress, and Relationship With Physician Among Patients With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzinger, Andrea C; Zhang, Baohui; Schrag, Deborah; Prigerson, Holly G

    2015-11-10

    To determine how prognostic conversations influence perceptions of life expectancy (LE), distress, and the patient-physician relationship among patients with advanced cancer. This was a multicenter observational study of 590 patients with metastatic solid malignancies with progressive disease after ≥ one line of palliative chemotherapy, undergoing follow-up to death. At baseline, patients were asked whether their oncologist had disclosed an estimate of prognosis. Patients also estimated their own LE and completed assessments of the patient-physician relationship, distress, advance directives, and end-of-life care preferences. Among this cohort of 590 patients with advanced cancer (median survival, 5.4 months), 71% wanted to be told their LE, but only 17.6% recalled a prognostic disclosure by their physician. Among the 299 (51%) of 590 patients willing to estimate their LE, those who recalled prognostic disclosure offered more realistic estimates as compared with patients who did not (median, 12 months; interquartile range, 6 to 36 months v 48 months; interquartile range, 12 to 180 months; P 2 (30.2% v 49.2%; odds ratio [OR], 0.45; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.82) or 5 years (9.5% v 35.5%; OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.47). In adjusted analyses, recall of prognostic disclosure was associated with a 17.2-month decrease (95% CI, 6.2 to 28.2 months) in patients' LE self-estimates. Longer LE self-estimates were associated with lower likelihood of do-not-resuscitate order (adjusted OR, 0.439; 95% CI, 0.296 to 0.630 per 12-month increase in estimate) and preference for life-prolonging over comfort-oriented care (adjusted OR, 1.493; 95% CI, 1.091 to 1.939). Prognostic disclosure was not associated with worse patient-physician relationship ratings, sadness, or anxiety in adjusted analyses. Prognostic disclosures are associated with more realistic patient expectations of LE, without decrements to their emotional well-being or the patient-physician relationship. © 2015 by American

  19. Evaluating the link between human resource management decisions and patient satisfaction with quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppel, Eva-Maria; Winter, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    Patient satisfaction with quality of care is becoming increasingly important in the competitive hospital market. Simultaneously, the growing shortage of clinical staff poses a considerable challenge to ensuring a high quality of care. In this context, a question emerges regarding whether and how human resource management (HRM) might serve as a means to reduce staff shortage problems and to increase patient satisfaction. Although considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding the concepts of patient satisfaction and HRM, little is known about the interrelationships between these concepts or about the link between staff shortage problems and patients' satisfaction with quality of care. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between strategic human resource management (SHRM), staff shortage problems, and patients' satisfaction with care. Furthermore, we analyze how the HRM decision to fill short-term vacancies through temporary staffing affects patient satisfaction. We differentiate between physicians and nurses. We develop and empirically test a theoretical model. The data (n = 165) are derived from a survey on SHRM that was sent to 732 German hospitals and from a survey on patient satisfaction that comprises 436,848 patient satisfaction ratings. We use a structural equation modeling approach to test the model. The results indicate that SHRM significantly reduces staff shortage problems for both occupational groups. Having fewer physician shortage problems is significantly associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction, whereas this effect is not significant for nurses. Furthermore, the use of temporary staffing considerably reduces patients' satisfaction with care. Hospital managers are advised to consider the effects of HRM decisions on patients' satisfaction with care. In particular, investments in SHRM targeted at physicians have significantly positive effects on patient satisfaction, whereas the temporary staffing of physicians

  20. Efecto del ambiente psicosocial y de la satisfacción laboral en el síndrome de burnout en médicos especialistas Effect of psychosocial work environment and job satisfaction on burnout syndrome among specialist physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicenta Escribà-Agüir

    2008-08-01

    specialist physicians throughout Spain. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 1,021 Spanish physicians. The outcome variables were the 3 dimensions of burnout syndrome: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. The explanatory variables were work psychosocial risk factors and job satisfaction evaluated by a stress scale specifically designed for physicians. Adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated by logistic regression. Results: The probability of high emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were greater in physicians exposed to a high level of contact with suffering and death and to a negative impact of work on home life. The probability of high emotional exhaustion was greater among physicians with a high work overload. The risk of low personal accomplishment was higher among physicians with low professional satisfaction and those without training activities. Dissatisfaction with relationships with patients and relatives had a negative effect on the 3 dimensions of burnout. Conclusions: Psychosocial work environment and job satisfaction have a negative effect on burnout syndrome, especially on emotional exhaustion and depersonalization.

  1. Understanding customer satisfaction in the UK quick service restaurant industry: The influence of the tangible attributes of perceived service quality

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Q.; Nisar, T.; Knox, D.; Prabhakar, G.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the five dimensions of service quality on customer satisfaction in the UK fast food market and to indicate which factors among the five dimensions have a main role in driving overall customer satisfaction.\\ud Primary data in the form of 147 questionnaire responses werebeen collected from a variety of quick service fast food restaurants in the UK. Likert seven-point rating scales were used to structure the questionnaire. Data were collected...

  2. Understanding and teaching key concepts and tools of evidence-based medicine: perspectives of a clinician-researcher pharmaceutical physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianis, Jamie

    2011-12-01

    Clinical practice benefits from research to inform good decision making. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) helps physicians integrate experience and individual expertise with the best evidence. Various philosophical concepts, including "primum non nocere," are balanced to achieve this. The tools of EBM, such as number needed to treat, are easy to calculate and to use. Other valuable tools include number needed to harm, attributable risk, and likelihood of being helped or harmed. It is also important to distinguish between relative risk and absolute risk to avoid drawing the wrong conclusions. With the right teaching techniques to grab attention and encourage active participation, real examples can be used to impart practical skills that the clinician can employ in translating research findings into something that helps the individual patient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Satisfação no trabalho e rotatividade dos médicos do Programa de Saúde da Família Job satisfaction and physician turnover in the Family Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Valentina de Arruda Campos

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Um dos problemas mais graves identificados na implantação do Programa de Saúde da Família no Brasil é a rotatividade do médico generalista. Já que o modelo se fundamenta no vínculo entre profissionais da equipe e população, a alta rotatividade dos médicos pode comprometer a efetividade do modelo. Pesquisa realizada no município de São Paulo para verificar a existência de correlação entre satisfação no trabalho dos médicos do programa e a rotatividade desses profissionais confirmou a hipótese da existência de correlação negativa. O prestígio da instituição parceira do município na implantação do programa foi o fator mais importante na determinação da rotatividade dos médicos. Outros fatores de satisfação no trabalho que apresentaram correlação com a rotatividade foram: capacitação, distância das unidades de saúde e disponibilidade de materiais e equipamentos para realização das atividades profissionais.One of the greatest problems of the Family Health Program in Brazil is the high turnover of its physicians. Given that the program is based on the relationship between health professionals and citizens, these high rates affect the model's effectiveness. A survey to identify the correlation between job satisfaction and physician turnover in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, confirmed the hypothesis that there is a negative correlation between these indicators. The prestige of the partner institutions is the most important factor in determining the program's physician turnover in São Paulo. Other job satisfaction factors that showed correlation with physician turnover were: training, commuting time, and lack of adequate equipment and materials.

  4. Predictores de satisfacción laboral en médicos y enfermeros Predictors of job satisfaction among physicians and nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Paris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos da presente investigação foram: (a identificar estressores e estratégias de enfrentamento comumente empregadas por parte dos profissionais de saúde; (b explorar as vinculações entre o estresse assistencial, o bem-estar e satisfação laboral; e (c individualizar as variáveis explicativas da satisfação laboral assistencial. Foi realizada uma verificação empírica com uma amostra integrada por 196 profissionais argentinos (97 médicos e 99 enfermeiros. A amostra respondeu uma bateria desenvolvida para avaliar estressores, enfrentamento, bem-estar e satisfação laboral. Foram realizadas análises descritivas, correlacionais e de regressão múltipla. Os resultados obtidos indicaram que os estressores que mais afligem aos profissionais da saúde são a sobrecarga, a falta de apoio e a percepção de injustiça organizacional. Tanto a estratégia de resolução de problemas como a de distanciamento surgiram como potenciadoras de satisfação e bem-estar. As variáveis que melhor explicaram a satisfação laboral foram a intenção de permanecer no cargo, a quantidade de horas de trabalho semanal e o apoio do grupo familiar. São apresentadas sugestões para futuras investigações na área.The objectives of this research were: (a to identify the major stressors and the coping strategies commonly used by health professionals; (b to explore the links among health care stressors, subjective wellbeing and job satisfaction; and (c to individualize the explanatory variables of care job satisfaction. Empirical verification was conducted with a sample of 196 Argentinean professionals (97 doctors and 99 nurses. The sample answered a battery developed for assessing stress, coping, wellbeing, and work satisfaction. Data were subjected to descriptive, correlation, and multiple regression analysis. The results indicated that work overload, lack of support, and perceptions of organizational injustice are the main health care stressors. The

  5. Advances in understanding of mammalian penile evolution, human penile anatomy and human erection physiology: clinical implications for physicians and surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Geng-Long; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Molodysky, Eugen; Chen, Ying-Hui; Yu, Hong-Jeng

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies substantiate a model of the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa as a bi-layered structure with a 360° complete inner circular layer and a 300° incomplete outer longitudinal coat spanning from the bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus proximally and extending continuously into the distal ligament within the glans penis. The anatomical location and histology of the distal ligament invites convincing parallels with the quadrupedal os penis and therefore constitutes potential evidence of the evolutionary process. In the corpora cavernosa, a chamber design is responsible for facilitating rigid erections. For investigating its venous factors exclusively, hemodynamic studies have been performed on both fresh and defrosted human male cadavers. In each case, a rigid erection was unequivocally attainable following venous removal. This clearly has significant ramifications in relation to penile venous surgery and its role in treating impotent patients. One deep dorsal vein, 2 cavernosal veins and 2 pairs of para-arterial veins (as opposed to 1 single vein) are situated between Buck's fascia and the tunica albuginea. These newfound insights into penile tunical, venous anatomy and erection physiology were inspired by and, in turn, enhance clinical applications routinely encountered by physicians and surgeons, such as penile morphological reconstruction, penile implantation and penile venous surgery.

  6. Is the job satisfaction of primary care team members associated with patient satisfaction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szecsenyi, J.; Goetz, K.; Campbell, S.M.; Broge, B.; Reuschenbach, B.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous research has shown a correlation between physician job satisfaction and patient satisfaction with quality of care, but the connection between job satisfaction of other primary care team members and patient satisfaction is yet unclear. OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether there is an

  7. PERSIST: Physician's Evaluation of Restasis® Satisfaction in Second Trial of topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% for dry eye: a retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Francis Mah,1 Mark Milner,2 Samuel Yiu,3 Eric Donnenfeld,4 Taryn M Conway,5 David A Hollander51University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 2The Eye Center, Hamden, CT, 3University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 4Ophthalmic Consultants of Long Island and Connecticut, Rockville Centre, New York, NY, 5Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA, USABackground: Chronic dry eye disease often requires long-term therapy. Tear film alterations in the setting of dry eye may include reduced tear volume as well as an increase in inflammatory cytokines and osmolarity. Topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Restasis®; Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA is indicated to increase tear production in patients with dry eye and reduced tear production presumed to be due to ocular inflammation. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a second trial of topical cyclosporine in patients with dry eye who were previously considered treatment failures.Materials and methods: This multicenter (three cornea practices retrospective chart review evaluated clinical outcomes in patients with dry eye who received a second trial of cyclosporine after a prior treatment failure, defined as prior discontinuation of topical cyclosporine after less than 12 weeks.Results: Thirty-five patients, most of whom were female (71.4% and Caucasian (62.9%, were identified. Prior discontinuation was most commonly due to burning/stinging (60%. The median duration of second treatment was 10 months (range 1 week to 45 months. Physician education was provided in the second trial in 97.1% of cases. At initiation of the second trial of cyclosporine, 10 (28.6% patients received courses of topical corticosteroids. Physicians reported on a questionnaire that 80% of patients achieved clinical benefit with a second trial of cyclosporine.Conclusion: A repeat trial with topical cyclosporine can achieve clinical success. Direct patient education via the physician and staff may be key to success. Proper patient

  8. The relationship between physician humility, physician-patient communication, and patient health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberton, Peter M; Huynh, Ho P; Miller, Tricia A; Kruse, Elliott; Chancellor, Joseph; Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Cultural portrayals of physicians suggest an unclear and even contradictory role for humility in the physician-patient relationship. Despite the social importance of humility, however, little empirical research has linked humility in physicians with patient outcomes or the characteristics of the doctor-patient visit. The present study investigated the relationship between physician humility, physician-patient communication, and patients' perceptions of their health during a planned medical visit. Primary care physician-patient interactions (297 patients across 100 physicians) were rated for the physician's humility and the effectiveness of the physician-patient communication. Additionally, patients reported their overall health and physicians and patients reported their satisfaction with the interaction. Within-physician fluctuations in physician humility and self-reported patient health positively predicted one another, and mean-level differences in physician humility predicted effective physician-patient communication, even when controlling for the patient's and physician's satisfaction with the visit and the physician's frustration with the patient. The results suggest that humble, rather than paternalistic or arrogant, physicians are most effective at working with their patients. Interventions to improve physician humility may promote better communication between health care providers and patients, and, in turn, better patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stakeholder expectation and satisfaction in road maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, M.; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the process of stakeholder satisfaction is a prerequisite for successful stakeholder management. The expectancy disconfirmation model describes the process of stakeholder satisfaction by relating customers’ satisfaction with a product or service to discrepancy between the perceived

  10. Understanding consumer's responses to negative emotions related to crowding on satisfaction and impulse purchase in retail: the mediating role of coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlette Cassia Oliveira Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract The perception of crowding, understood as an individual's response to crowds, can be observed in retail environments and influences positive and negative emotions. In this research we test the mediating effect of coping – rational strategies adopted to deal with negative emotions – in the relationship between negative emotions (resulting from crowding perception and consumer behavior (measured by impulse purchase and satisfaction. The findings related to coping explain to what extent there is a positive response to human density in the retail environment. For this, a theoretical model was developed which includes the relationships among perception of crowding, positive and negative emotions, and consumer behavior. The model enhances the understanding of the crowding phenomenon by including relationships mediated by an oppositional strategy (coping dimension between negative emotions and consumer behaviors. To test the theoretical model, a survey was conducted with 456 respondents and hypothesis tests using structural equation modeling. It was evidenced that crowding perception has more robust effects on negative emotions than positive emotions. It is emphasized that with the inclusion of opposition mediation, the weak direct relationship between negative emotions and behaviors, becomes a positive relationship between negative emotion and impulse purchase, and negative emotion and satisfaction. In addition to the theoretical contributions of the tested model, future research and managerial implications are proposed at the end of the article.

  11. Online Physician Reviews in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery: What Do Patients Really Want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanad, Kian; Parameshwar, Pooja S; Houman, Justin; Spiegel, Brennan M; Daskivich, Timothy J; Anger, Jennifer T

    This study aimed to qualitatively analyze online reviews of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS) specialists to better understand patients' experiences and improve patient satisfaction. Fifty urologists and urogynecologists were randomly sampled from the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine, and Urogenital Reconstruction membership website. We evaluated patient ratings and reviews of physicians from 4 websites: Yelp, Healthgrades, Vitals, and UCompareHealthCare. Qualitative data analysis was performed using grounded theory methodology, as described by Charmaz (Constructing Grounded Theory, 2014). Across the four websites, the mean number of stars per physician ranged from 3.6 to 4.1 and the mean number of reviews per physician ranged from 1.3 to 7.6. Qualitative analysis revealed several preliminary themes: patient-physician experience, medical and surgical treatment, office staff, and analysis of worth. Physicians who developed strong connections with patients through empathetic communication were likely to receive a positive review, regardless of wait times. Bedside manner was found to be multidimensional and included physician competence and understanding patients' concerns. Failure to meet several expectations led to dissatisfaction of care and negative patient reviews. Patients' perspectives of quality of care in FPMRS are weighted heavily toward establishing personal connections with physicians. Accurate diagnosis and effective management of urological conditions, especially after negative experiences with previous providers, were associated with satisfaction of care. It seems that the concept of good bedside manner is multifactorial and requires the provider to demonstrate not one but several different sets of communication skills.

  12. Financial implications of serving as team physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemak, Larry

    2007-04-01

    Time is the greatest negative financial burden that you accept as a sports medicine physician, because the only way to produce revenue as a physician is with your time. This cost measured in time of doing business as a team physician can be high. Unless being a team physician is very rewarding to you through personal satisfaction or the other intangible indirect benefits associated with the role, being a team physician may not be a good financial decision for you as a person and a physician, or for your practice and your family.

  13. Psychological contracts: a new strategy for retaining reduced-hour physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Jennifer K

    2010-01-01

    As a retention strategy, healthcare organizations offer reduced-hour schedules to physicians seeking better work-family balance. However, this quantitative study of 94 full-time and reduced-hour female physicians in the Boston area found that working fewer hours helps physicians achieve better balance but does not improve their burnout or career satisfaction, or impact their intention to quit or leave the field of medicine. Instead, the findings demonstrate that psychological contract fulfillment, which reflects the subjective nature of the employment relationship, is more important than work hours, an objective job condition, in predicting intention to quit and these other outcomes. A fine-grained analysis is initiated uncovering the multidimensionality of the psychological contract construct. To integrate successful reduced-hour arrangements for physicians, medical managers are directed to the importance of understanding the composition of reduced-hour physicians' psychological contracts, specifically, their need to do challenging work, receive high levels of supervisor support, and promotion opportunities.

  14. Organizational performance impacting patient satisfaction in Ontario hospitals: a multilevel analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction in health care constitutes an important component of organizational performance in the hospital setting. Satisfaction measures have been developed and used to evaluate and improve hospital performance, quality of care and physician practice. In order to direct improvement strategies, it is necessary to evaluate both individual and organizational factors that can impact patients’ perception of care. The study aims were to determine the dimensions of patient satisfaction, and to analyze the individual and organizational determinants of satisfaction dimensions in hospitals. Methods We used patient and hospital survey data as well as administrative data collected for a 2008 public hospital report in Ontario, Canada. We evaluated the clustering of patient survey items with exploratory factor analysis and derived plausible dimensions of satisfaction. A two-level multivariate model was fitted to analyze the determinants of satisfaction. Results We found eight satisfaction factors, with acceptable to good level of loadings and good reliability. More than 95% of variation in patient satisfaction scores was attributable to patient-level variation, with less than 5% attributable to hospital-level variation. The hierarchical models explain 5 to 17% of variation at the patient level and up to 52% of variation between hospitals. Individual patient characteristics had the strongest association with all dimensions of satisfaction. Few organizational performance indicators are associated with patient satisfaction and significant determinants differ according to the satisfaction dimension. Conclusions The research findings highlight the importance of adjusting for both patient-level and organization-level characteristics when evaluating patient satisfaction. Better understanding and measurement of organization-level activities and processes associated with patient satisfaction could contribute to improved satisfaction ratings and care quality. PMID

  15. On physician well being-you'll get by with a little help from your friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jean Elizabeth; Lemaire, Jane

    2007-06-01

    This study identifies positive and negative factors associated with physician well being. We collected two sets of data from physicians at a university-based Department of Medicine in Western Canada. First, we conducted exploratory, in-depth interviews with 54 physicians to identify factors associated with their well being. Participants explained that certain aspects of their work are demanding and negatively related to their well being, whereas other 5 factors are more enabling and contribute positively. Second, we mailed a structured questionnaire including measures of the key factors identified in the physician interviews to all physicians in the same Department of Medicine. Multivariate analysis was used to assess the extent to which the factors identified in the interviews are significantly related to physicians' well being. The findings show the importance of co-worker support, both in terms of being directly related to physician well being as well as buffering the negative effects of work demands. We discuss several important implications for physicians and the organizations that employ them in understanding the factors related to physician well being. In addition, patient interactions appear to be both a key source of stress and a major source of satisfaction in physicians' daily work lives.

  16. Effect of problem based approach on medical students’ learning satisfaction and understanding in the histology course topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Rezaie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL is a term used within education for a range of teaching approaches that encourage students to learn through the structured exploration of a problem. Histology comes early in the curriculum and the medical students seem unable to see the value of the content, they don't appear to be motivated to learn the content. This project used PBL to help the students make the connection between the content and clinical aspects.Methods: Thirty six undergraduate medical students, 22 female and 14 male, enrolled in the histology course during the spring semester of 2008. A survey which collected information relative to gender, course load, and workload and study time was used. The subjects were accessory glands of digestive system histology. The course is designed into four units: tree units of salivary glands, pancreas and gall bladder histology, were presented in a traditional lecture format; the fourth unit, liver was presented in a problem-based format that used clinical practice. Assessment focused on three issues of a. student engagement, b. lesson assessment in terms of clarity, interest and usefulness and c. student understanding.Results: Student comments collected during PBL class periods indicate engagement in the topic. In PBL method of teaching most of responses were consistent with the aim of teaching but in traditional classes few responses relate to the objectives at hand. Students had more active partnership in PBL class. Students found PBL class more useful, interesting and clear in terms of subject material than traditional method.Conclusions: In this project student comments collected during PBL class periods indicated more engagement in the topic. Students’ understanding of material were significantly higher and students’ partnership in PBL class was more than traditional classes.Keywords: PBL,HISTOLOGY, STUDENT PARTICIPATION

  17. Preliminary physician and pharmacist survey of the National Health Insurance PharmaCloud system in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chang, Elizabeth H; Kuo, Li-Na; Shen, Wan-Chen; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Wang, Chih-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Yin

    2017-10-01

    The PharmaCloud system, a cloud-based medication system, was launched by the Taiwan National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in 2013 to integrate patients' medication lists among different medical institutions. The aim of the preliminary study was to evaluate satisfaction with this system among physicians and pharmacists at the early stage of system implementation. A questionnaire was developed through a review of the literature and discussion in 6 focus groups to understand the level of satisfaction, attitudes, and intentions of physicians and pharmacists using the PharmaCloud system. It was then administered nationally in Taiwan in July to September 2015. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression were performed to identify variables influencing satisfaction and intention to use the system. In total, 895 pharmacist and 105 physician questionnaires were valid for analysis. The results showed that satisfaction with system quality warranted improvement. Positive attitudes toward medication reconciliation among physicians and pharmacists, which were significant predictors of the intention to use the system (β= 0.223, p Taiwan PharmaCloud system a convenient platform for medication reconciliation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ASD Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — ASD implemented a customer satisfaction survey for our products and services. This feedback will provide a better understanding of how ASD products and services can...

  19. Characteristics and outcomes for women physicians who work reduced hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Phyllis L; Gareis, Karen C; Barnett, Rosalind C

    2003-05-01

    To understand the characteristics of women physicians who work reduced hours in dual-earner couples and how such work schedules affect the quality of the marital role, parental role, and job role, as well as indicators of psychological distress, burnout, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Survey of a random sample of female physicians between 25 and 50 years of age, working within 25 miles of Boston, whose names were obtained from the Registry of Board Certification in Medicine in Massachusetts. Interviewers conducted a 60-minute face-to-face close-ended interview after a 20-minute mailed questionnaire had been completed. Fifty-one full-time physicians and 47 reduced-hours physicians completed the study, for a completion rate of 49.5%. There was no difference in age, number of years as a physician, mean household income, number of children, or presence of an infant in the home between reduced-hours and full-time physicians. Reduced-hours physicians, however, were more likely to be in a generalist specialty (40% vs. 12%, p = 0.001) and to spend a greater portion of their time in patient care (64.5% vs. 50.1%, p = 0.003) and less time in research (4.9% vs. 18.0%, p = 0.002) than full-time physicians. In addition, there was no difference between the two groups in the perception of work interfering with family life (1.8 vs. 1.7, p = 0.17; scale 1-7 with 7 high) or family life interfering with work (1.4 vs. 1.5, p = 0.62). Physicians who worked their preferred number of hours (25% of full-time and 57% of reduced-hours physicians), regardless of full-time (self-reported hours 35-90 hours per week) or reduced-hours (20-60 hours per week) status, reported better job role quality (r = 0.35, p = 0.001), schedule fit (r = 0.41, p Women physicians who work their preferred number of hours achieve the best balance of work and family outcomes.

  20. Impact of the physician-patient relationship on the treatment outcomes of arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Račić Maja N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective is to analyze the impact of the physicianpatient relationship on the outcomes of hypertension treatment. Method: The study included 8 family physicians and 240 patients with arterial hypertension, selected according to specific criteria. Physicians were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of physicians who have had completed training in communications, while group 2 was comprised of those with no training in medical communications. Each physician was accompanied by a group of thirty patients with hypertension. The interaction between physician and patient was evaluated using the Bales interaction process analysis. During the 12 months, the functional parameters, blood pressure, patient compliance and patient satisfaction were monitored. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between two groups of physicians in all 12 categories of Bales Interaction Analysis. Physicians from group 1 were showing more empathy, humor, understanding, interest for patient background and their opinion compared to group 2 physicians. The mean systolic blood pressure level of the patients treated by physicians which belonged to group 1 decreased from 155.25 to 137.16 mmHg and diastolic from 94.20 to 79.3 mmHg. Statistically significant improvements in work performance, activities of daily living, psychological function, social activity, compliance and patient's satisfaction were also found in group 1 after 12 months. Conclusion: The study showed that physician-patient relationship significantly affects treatment outcomes in patients with arterial hypertension. Communication with patients can be improved by introducing interaction elements that are not exclusively related to the causes and characteristics of diseases, giving the relevant information and increasing intelligibility of this information during the encounter.

  1. Integration of the sensory experience and post-ingestive measures for understanding food satisfaction. A case study on sucrose replacement by Stevia rebaudiana and addition of beta glucan in fruit drinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Barbara Vad; Mielby, Line H.; Viemose, Ida

    2017-01-01

    of satisfaction. A randomized cross-over consumer study was conducted using 66 subjects. Hedonic ratings of sensory perceptions were collected immediately after intake, and subjective ratings of post-ingestive sensations were collected pre intake and in 10 min intervals up to 40 min post intake. Significant......The present study provides a more holistic view on consumers’ hedonic food experience compared to what is traditionally seen in sensory research, by integrating the hedonic sensory experience and post-ingestive sensations in one study to understand food satisfaction. The study was performed using...... apple-cherry fruit drinks with different levels of beta-glucans and different sweeteners, sucrose or Stevia rebaudiana. The aims were: 1) to study the hedonic sensory experience, 2) to study time and product effects on post-ingestive sensations and satisfaction, and 3) to study main drivers...

  2. Teacher Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David; Levine, Daniel U.

    1988-01-01

    Most teachers are satisfied with most aspects of their jobs. Results from a number of national surveys on teacher satisfaction are presented. Specific aspects of job satisfaction discussed are salaries, status, working conditions, and employment outlook. (IAH)

  3. Career satisfaction, commitment, and well-being among Taiwanese pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Fang; Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan; Lei, Sio-Meng

    2013-06-01

    Currently, the pediatrician shortage in Taiwan has raised concerns about pediatricians' workloads and wellbeing. This study aimed to understand in-hospital pediatricians' perceptions toward career satisfaction and their wellbeing. A questionnaire exploring pediatricians' life management, commitment to work, and work satisfaction was distributed to all the pediatricians (including attending physicians and residents) in 79 certified training institutions in Taiwan. After expert validation and pilot testing, 17 items with a five-point rating scale were developed to reflect the pediatricians' perceptions. There were 287 responses in total, including 180 attending physicians and 107 residents. Factor analysis was used to explore the construct structure underlying the 17 items. None of the 17 items had a "positive" mean score (≥4/5). Using factor analyses, five factors were extracted: commitment to medical career, self-care, benefit, work environment, and job satisfaction, which accounted for 66.97% of the variance. The factor with the lowest scores was self-care, followed by benefit. The mean score of factors ranged from 2.91 ± 0.17 to 1.64 ± 0.1, all considered "negative." Only 33.6% indicated satisfaction with their jobs. Only 60% of the pediatricians liked their medical career and work environment. The reliability alphas of the five factors ranged from 0.85 to 0.60. Currently, Taiwanese pediatricians are not satisfied with their jobs, having low commitment, poor self-care, and little wellbeing. This study provides a possible explanation for why young physicians leave the pediatric sector, and it also reveals the consequences of physician shortage in Taiwan. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice.

  5. Patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice.

  6. Job Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    MANDELÍČKOVÁ, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Bachelor thesis deals with job satisfaction. It is often given to a context with the attitude to work which is very much connected to job satisfaction. Thesis summarises all the pieces of information about job satisfacion, factors that affect it negatively and positively, interconnection of work satisfaction and work motivation, work behaviour and performance of workers, relationship of a man and work and at last general job satisfaction and its individual aspects. In the thesis I shortly pay...

  7. Understanding the differentiating impacts of the communication strategies of a high involvement service (investment advisory services) and a high involvement product (precious jewellery) on customer satisfaction and loyalty.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Gauri

    2009-01-01

    While marketing literature has largely focused on high and low involvement purchases and the positive relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty; the differentiating impacts of communication strategies for a high involvement service and a high involvement product on customer satisfaction and loyalty has received little academic attention. Consequently, this study examines the differentiating impacts of the communication strategies for investment advisory services and precious jewe...

  8. The Phoenix Physician: defining a pathway toward leadership in patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Robert G; Bulger, John B; Hasty, Robert T; Hubbard, Kevin P; Schwartz, Elliott R; Sutton, John R; Troutman, Monte E; Nelinson, Donald S

    2012-08-01

    Health care delivery has evolved in reaction to scientific and technological discoveries, emergent patient needs, and market forces. A current focus on patient-centered care has pointed to the need for the reallocation of resources to improve access to and delivery of efficient, cost-effective, quality care. In response to this need, primary care physicians will find themselves in a new role as team leader. The American College of Osteopathic Internists has developed the Phoenix Physician, a training program that will prepare primary care residents and practicing physicians for the changes in health care delivery and provide them with skills such as understanding the contributions of all team members (including an empowered and educated patient), evaluating and treating patients, and applying performance metrics and information technology to measure and improve patient care and satisfaction. Through the program, physicians will also develop personal leadership and communication skills.

  9. Attribute correlates of hospital outpatient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueckeberg, H F; Hubbert, A

    1995-01-01

    Customer satisfaction (patient satisfaction) with hospital outpatient or ambulatory services is an important factor in influencing patient patronage and loyalty. Based on an empirical study, this article examines the attributes of the ambulatory care experience which were significantly associated with the level of satisfaction resulting from the most recent hospital ambulatory visit. This study focuses on identifying attributes of ambulatory services. This article brings to the health care marketing literature information on ambulatory satisfaction comparable to that which has been contributed to the literature regarding satisfaction with physician and hospital experiences.

  10. Understanding perception of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among general practitioners, physicians, and pulmonologists in India: Results from a face-to-face survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Challenges exist in the diagnosis, management and follow-up of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in India. Lack of awareness of the disease, its symptoms and its implications may significantly contribute in preventing individuals with symptoms from seeking advice from their primary care physicians or eliminating risk factors. This cross-sectional survey aimed to explore the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of doctors (general practitioners [GPs], physicians and pulmonologists related to COPD recognition, diagnosis, and treatment in India. Methods: Data was collated from 91 randomly selected GPs, physicians and pulmonologists through a questionnaire and face-to-face interviews, in 8 cities of India. Results: The response rate to the survey was 68% (61 out of 91. Majority of the doctors (90% of GPs-physicians and 82% of pulmonologists reported that patients with COPD visit them at moderate to severe stages of the disease. 44% of the GPs and physicians reported that they had never performed spirometry to make a diagnosis of COPD. About 35% of doctors reported that COPD occurred only in smokers. The most common reported barriers to the treatment of COPD were difficulty in explaining COPD to the patients, poor patient compliance to the prescribed treatment and the inability of patients to give up smoking. Most doctors agreed that compliance with treatment is a major concern in patients with COPD due to an ageing population, existence of limited therapeutic options and presence of comorbidities. Conclusion: The results of this cross-sectional survey of doctors in India, highlighted the need for increasing the awareness about COPD at both doctor and patients level to overcome the prevalent under-diagnosis and under-treatment in COPD.

  11. Physician-Organization Collaboration Reduces Physician Burnout and Promotes Engagement: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, Stephen; Kabcenell, Andrea; Shanafelt, Tait

    2016-01-01

    The process of creating healthy organization-physician relationships is critical to organizational success. Partnerships in process improvement can nurture these relationships and mitigate burnout by meeting physicians' psychological needs. To flourish, physicians need some degree of choice (control over their lives), camaraderie (social connectedness), and an opportunity for excellence (being part of something meaningful). Organizations can provide these opportunities by establishing constructive organization-physician relationships and developing physician leaders. We present a case study from the Mayo Clinic that supports the foundational principles of a physician-engagement model. We developed the Listen-Act-Develop model as an integrated strategy to reduce burnout and engage physicians in the mission of the organization. The intent of the model is to maximize physician wellness by fostering engagement and mitigating the drivers of burnout. This model provides a path to increase physician satisfaction and meaning in work and to improve organizational effectiveness.

  12. Life satisfaction and beliefs about self and the world in patients with psoriasis: a brief assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovan, Caius; Marcu, Mirona; Chiticariu, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition that can decrease the level of self-esteem, leading to self-devaluation, emotional distress, irrational beliefs and discomfort in everyday life. In this study, we aimed to provide a deeper understanding of lifestyle satisfaction and to identify the nature and magnitude of irrational beliefs in patients with psoriasis. A two-year case-control study was carried out between 2010 and 2012. The study enrolled 100 consecutive patients with psoriasis vulgaris, admitted to a dermatology clinic and 101 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics, willing to subject themselves to the testing. A series of standardized questionnaires were used, including: The Anamnestic Questionnaire, The General Attitudes and Beliefs Scale - Short version, The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, The Self-Efficacy Scale and The Unconditional Self-Acceptance Questionnaire. The tests revealed a strong correlation between the presence of the disease and the decrease of subject's satisfaction regarding: body satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, social satisfaction, family satisfaction, professional satisfaction and satisfaction concerning their own health condition; p 0.35). The focus on psychological impacts of the disease provides important data for a holistic approach to patients with psoriasis. Effective cooperation between all the parties involved (physicians, family and social network) is necessary to improve the patient's psychological status.

  13. Satisfaction with Therapy Among Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain with Opioid-Induced Constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoCasale, Robert J; Datto, Catherine; Margolis, Mary Kay; Coyne, Karin S

    2016-03-01

    Greater satisfaction with medication is associated with better adherence; however, specific to opioid-induced constipation (OIC), data on the relationship between medication satisfaction and efficacy are lacking. To understand satisfaction with therapy among patients with chronic noncancer pain and OIC. A prospective longitudinal study was conducted in the United States, Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom using web-based patient surveys. Patients on daily opioid therapy for ≥ 74 weeks for the treatment of chronic noncancer pain with OIC were recruited from physician offices and completed a web-based survey at baseline and weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24. When completing each survey, patients selected the remedies used in the previous 2 weeks to relieve constipation; options included natural/behavioral therapies, over-the-counter (OTC) therapies, and prescription laxatives. Patients selected the amount of relief and satisfaction with each selected therapy. Descriptive statistics were calculated; Spearman's correlations were calculated for symptom relief and satisfaction. Mean age of the 489 patients who met the criteria for OIC and completed the baseline survey was 52.6 ± 11.6 years; 62% were female; 85% were white. Increasing levels of relief from constipation were associated with increasing levels of satisfaction for all agents; correlations were > 0.55 and statistically significant (P constipation was associated with increased satisfaction for all therapies, there remains a substantial number of patients who report satisfaction despite having only inadequate relief from OIC that merits further investigation.

  14. Physician advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lober, C W

    1993-04-01

    Practically nonexistent until the late 1970s, advertising by physicians has become commonplace. Although informational and educational advertising may contain information that potential patients may find to be useful, laudatory and predatory advertising are unethical and may be patently illegal. There is a conflict between the obligations of a physician to his patients and the intentions of advertising. The role of the Federal Trade Commission and state regulations are discussed.

  15. Effects of perceived autonomy support and basic need satisfaction on quality of life in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Chang, Ray-E; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hou, Ying-Hui

    2018-03-01

    Despite a growing understanding of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its determinants in hemodialysis (HD) patients, little is known about the effects and interrelationships concerning the perception of autonomy support and basic need satisfaction of HD patients on their HRQOL. Based on self-determination theory (SDT), this study examines whether HD patients' perceived autonomy support from health care practitioners (physicians and nurses) relates to the satisfaction of HD patients' basic needs and in turn influences their HRQOL. A questionnaire was administered to 250 Taiwanese HD patients recruited from multiclinical centers and regional hospitals in northern Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was conducted to examine the causal relationships between patient perceptions of autonomy support and HRQOL through basic need satisfaction. The empirical results of SEM indicated that the HD patients' perceived autonomy support increased the satisfaction of their basic needs (autonomy, competency, and relatedness), as expected. The higher degree of basic need satisfaction led to higher HRQOL, as measured by physical and mental component scores. Autonomy support from physicians and nurses contributes to improving HD patients' HRQOL through basic need satisfaction. This indicates that staff caring for patients with severe chronic diseases should offer considerable support for patient autonomy.

  16. Health information technology and physician-patient interactions: impact of computers on communication during outpatient primary care visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John; Huang, Jie; Fung, Vicki; Robertson, Nan; Jimison, Holly; Frankel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of introducing health information technology (HIT) on physician-patient interactions during outpatient visits. This was a longitudinal pre-post study: two months before and one and seven months after introduction of examination room computers. Patient questionnaires (n = 313) after primary care visits with physicians (n = 8) within an integrated delivery system. There were three patient satisfaction domains: (1) satisfaction with visit components, (2) comprehension of the visit, and (3) perceptions of the physician's use of the computer. Patients reported that physicians used computers in 82.3% of visits. Compared with baseline, overall patient satisfaction with visits increased seven months after the introduction of computers (odds ratio [OR] = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.22), as did satisfaction with physicians' familiarity with patients (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.01-2.52), communication about medical issues (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.05-2.47), and comprehension of decisions made during the visit (OR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.06-2.50). In contrast, there were no significant changes in patient satisfaction with comprehension of self-care responsibilities, communication about psychosocial issues, or available visit time. Seven months post-introduction, patients were more likely to report that the computer helped the visit run in a more timely manner (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.28-2.42) compared with the first month after introduction. There were no other significant changes in patient perceptions of the computer use over time. The examination room computers appeared to have positive effects on physician-patient interactions related to medical communication without significant negative effects on other areas such as time available for patient concerns. Further study is needed to better understand HIT use during outpatient visits.

  17. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hospital Pre-Admission Orientation and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ramona L.

    1987-01-01

    The study examined effects of a physician-delivered orientation on patient satisfaction for a short hospital stay (3 days or less). Using a comparative study design, the researcher found that, when patients had an orientation, satisfaction with services improved, as did perception of the physician's professionalism. (Author/CH)

  19. The impact of a patient education bundle on neurosurgery patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Tamara; Zygourakis, Corinna C; Imershein, Sarah; Lau, Catherine; Kliot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    As reimbursements and hospital/physician performance become ever more reliant on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) and other quality metrics, physicians are increasingly incentivized to improve patient satisfaction. A faculty and resident team at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Neurological Surgery developed and implemented a Patient Education Bundle. This consisted of two parts: The first was preoperative expectation letters (designed to inform patients of what to expect before, during, and after their hospitalization for a neurosurgical procedure); the second was a trifold brochure with names, photographs, and specialty/training information about the attending surgeons, resident physicians, and nurse practitioners on the neurosurgical service. We assessed patient satisfaction, as measured by HCAHPS scores and a brief survey tailored to our specific intervention, both before and after our Patient Education Bundle intervention. Prior to our intervention, 74.6% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. After our intervention, 78.7% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. "Neurosurgery Patient Satisfaction survey" results showed that 83% remembered receiving the preoperative letter; of those received the letter, 93% found the letter helpful; and 100% thought that the letter should be continued. Although effects were modest, we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients' hospital experiences and have a positive impact on physician performance scores and hospital ratings.

  20. Understanding nurse anesthetists' intention to leave their job: how burnout and job satisfaction mediate the impact of personality and workplace characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Vera C H; Van Dam, Karen; Brown-Mahoney, Chris; Van Zundert, Andre A J; Knape, Hans T A

    2011-01-01

    The retention of nurse anesthetists is of paramount importance, particularly in view of the fact that the health care workforce is shrinking. Although many health care providers find their work satisfying, they often consider leaving their jobs because of the stress. Are there ways to improve this situation? This study investigated how work environment characteristics and personality dimensions relate to burnout and job satisfaction and ultimately to turnover intention among Dutch nurse anesthetists. An online self-reporting questionnaire survey was performed among Dutch nurse anesthetists. The questionnaire included scales to assess personality dimensions, work climate, work context factors, burnout, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. The research model stated that personality dimensions, work climate, and work context factors, mediated by burnout and job satisfaction, predict turnover intention. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research model. Nine hundred twenty-three questionnaires were completed (46% response rate). Burnout mediated the relationship between personality dimensions and turnover intention; job satisfaction mediated the relationship of work climate and work context factors to turnover intention. To retain nursing staff and to maintain adequate staff strength, it is important to improve job satisfaction by creating a positive work climate and work context and to prevent burnout by selecting the most suitable employees through personality assessment.

  1. Understanding the value of social networks in life satisfaction of elderly people: a comparative study of 16 European countries using SHARE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomini, Florian; Tomini, Sonila M; Groot, Wim

    2016-12-01

    Networks of family and friends are a source of support and are generally associated with higher life satisfaction values among older adults. On the other hand, older adults who are satisfied with their life may be more able to develop and maintain a wider social network. For this reason, the causal link between size and composition of the social networks and satisfaction with life is yet to be explored. This paper investigates the effect of the 'size', (number of family and friends, and network) and the 'composition' (the proportion of friends over total number of persons) of the social network on life satisfaction among older adults (50+). Moreover, we also investigate the patterns of this relation between different European countries. Data from the 4 th wave of Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe and an instrumental variable approach are used to estimate the extent of the relation between life satisfaction and size and composition of social networks. Respondents in Western and Northern European (WNE) countries report larger networks than respondents in Eastern and Southern European (ESE) countries. However, the positive relationship between network size and life satisfaction is consistent across countries. On the other hand, the share of friends in the network appears to be generally negatively related to satisfaction with life, though results are not statistically significant for all countries. Apparently, a larger personal network is important for older adults (50+) to be more satisfied with life. Our results suggest that this relation is particularly positive if the network is comprised of family members.

  2. Application of the Theoretical Domains Framework and the Behaviour Change Wheel to Understand Physicians' Behaviors and Behavior Change in Using Temporary Work Modifications for Return to Work: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horppu, Ritva; Martimo, K P; MacEachen, E; Lallukka, T; Viikari-Juntura, E

    2018-03-01

    Purpose Applying the theoretical domains framework (TDF) and the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) to understand physicians' behaviors and behavior change in using temporary work modifications (TWMs) for return to work (RTW). Methods Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 15 occupational physicians (OPs). Responses were coded using the TDF and the BCW. Results Key behaviors related to applying TWMs were initiating the process with the employee, making recommendations to the workplace, and following up the process. OP behaviors were influenced by several factors related to personal capability and motivation, and opportunities provided by the physical and social environment. Capability comprised relevant knowledge and skills related to applying TWMs, remembering to initiate TWMS and monitor the process, and being accustomed to reflective practice. Opportunity comprised physical resources (e.g., time, predefined procedures, and availability of modified work at companies), and social pressure from stakeholders. Motivation comprised conceptions of a proper OP role, confidence to carry out TWMs, personal RTW-related goals, beliefs about the outcomes of one's actions, feedback received from earlier cases, and feelings related to applying TWMs. OPs' perceived means to target these identified factors were linked to the following BCW intervention functions: education, training, persuasion, environmental restructuring, and enablement. The results suggest that at least these functions should be considered when designing future interventions. Conclusions Our study illustrates how theoretical frameworks TDF and BCW can be utilized in a RTW context to understand which determinants of physicians' behavior need to be targeted, and how, to promote desired behaviors.

  3. Physician Dissatisfaction in the United States: An Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis J. Crosson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses several root causes of dissatisfaction with medical practice among American physicians, and suggests that some, but not all, are potentially remediable. Fixed assumptions about the nature of medical practice in the United States, developed over several decades, appear to be eroding. At the same time, increasing demands on physician time, especially involving low value documentation and administrative tasks are interfering with the physician-patient interaction. In addition, physician practice structure and payment methodologies are beginning to change in the United States leading to a sense of practice instability among physicians. Recent research conducted by the American Medical Association and the RAND Corporation has provided new qualitative and quantitative information about the impact of these trends on physician practices. An evaluation of these research findings indicates that some improvements in physician satisfaction are possible.    Keywords: physician professionalism, practice satisfaction, electronic health records, health care reform in the U.S.

  4. Physician engagement in hospitals: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreira, Tyrone; Perrier, Laure; Prokopy, Melissa; Jonker, Anthony

    2018-01-05

    Literature on healthcare reforms highlights the importance of physician engagement, suggesting that it is a critical factor for lowering costs while improving efficiency, quality of care, patient safety, physician satisfaction and retention. As a result, many hospitals have adopted physician engagement as a top strategic priority, but little is known about the actual evidence, making it difficult for hospital leadership to identify relationships between true physician 'work engagement' and work outcomes. The aim of this scoping review is to identify factors associated with, and tools used to measure, physician engagement. This scoping review will be conducted as per Arksey and O'Malley (2005). The electronic databases that will be searched from inception onwards include MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Grey literature will be searched via websites of relevant agencies such as Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Conferences and abstracts will be viewed and full paper requests made as required. Supplementary articles may be obtained by contacting field experts and searching references of relevant articles. All quantitative and qualitative study designs will be eligible that describe factors associated with, and tools used to measure, hospital physician engagement. After a small calibration exercise, screening and abstraction will be completed separately by two individuals, with discrepancies resolved by a third. Quantitative (frequencies) and qualitative analyses (generation of descriptives) will be conducted. Thematic analysis will be used to evaluate and categorise study findings. This project is part of the Ontario Hospital Association's (OHA) initiative to improve its understanding of physician engagement. The review findings will be shared with all Ontario hospitals. Dissemination will occur through peer-reviewed publications and to the OHA membership through the OHA Learning and Engagement team. © Article author

  5. The Business Case for Investing in Physician Well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait; Goh, Joel; Sinsky, Christine

    2017-12-01

    Widespread burnout among physicians has been recognized for more than 2 decades. Extensive evidence indicates that physician burnout has important personal and professional consequences. A lack of awareness regarding the economic costs of physician burnout and uncertainty regarding what organizations can do to address the problem have been barriers to many organizations taking action. Although there is a strong moral and ethical case for organizations to address physician burnout, financial principles (eg, return on investment) can also be applied to determine the economic cost of burnout and guide appropriate investment to address the problem. The business case to address physician burnout is multifaceted and includes costs associated with turnover, lost revenue associated with decreased productivity, as well as financial risk and threats to the organization's long-term viability due to the relationship between burnout and lower quality of care, decreased patient satisfaction, and problems with patient safety. Nearly all US health care organizations have used similar evidence to justify their investments in safety and quality. Herein, we provide conservative formulas based on readily available organizational characteristics to determine the financial return on organizational investments to reduce physician burnout. A model outlining the steps of the typical organization's journey to address this issue is presented. Critical ingredients to making progress include prioritization by leadership, physician involvement, organizational science/learning, metrics, structured interventions, open communication, and promoting culture change at the work unit, leader, and organization level. Understanding the business case to reduce burnout and promote engagement as well as overcoming the misperception that nothing meaningful can be done are key steps for organizations to begin to take action. Evidence suggests that improvement is possible, investment is justified, and return

  6. Understanding buyers' loyalty to a C2C platform : The roles of social capital, satisfaction and perceived effectiveness of E-commerce institutional mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Q.; Chen, X.Y.; Ou, Carol; Davison, R.M.; Hua, Z.S.

    Drawing upon social capital theory, this study aims to investigate how different dimensions of social capital affect online buyers' satisfaction and ultimately boost their loyalty to a Consumer-to-Consumer (C2C) platform. Specifically, we propose that three dimensions of social capital (i.e.,

  7. Understanding the link between leadership style, employee satisfaction, and absenteeism : A mixed methods design study in a mental health care institution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, R.; Scherp, E.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In service oriented industries, such as the health care sector, leadership styles have been suggested to influence employee satisfaction as well as outcomes in terms of service delivery. However, how this influence comes into effect has not been widely explored. Absenteeism may be a

  8. Recapturing time: a practical approach to time management for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Craig E; Borkan, Steven C

    2014-05-01

    Increasing pressures on physicians demand effective time management and jeopardise professional satisfaction. Effective time management potentially increases productivity, promotes advancement, limits burnout and improves both professional and personal satisfaction. However, strategies for improving time management are lacking in the current medical literature. Adapting time management techniques from the medical and non-medical literature may improve physician time management habits. These techniques can be divided into four categories: (1) setting short and long-term goals; (2) setting priorities among competing responsibilities; (3) planning and organising activities; and (4) minimising 'time wasters'. Efforts to improve time management can increase physician productivity and enhance career satisfaction.

  9. Understanding the link between leadership style, employee satisfaction, and absenteeism: a mixed methods design study in a mental health care institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elshout R

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rachelle Elshout,1 Evelien Scherp,2 Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis31Management of Cultural Diversity, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands; 2Communication and Information Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands; 3Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The NetherlandsBackground: In service oriented industries, such as the health care sector, leadership styles have been suggested to influence employee satisfaction as well as outcomes in terms of service delivery. However, how this influence comes into effect has not been widely explored. Absenteeism may be a factor in this association; however, no studies are available on this subject in the mental health care setting, although this setting has been under a lot of strain lately to provide their services at lower costs. This may have an impact on employers, employees, and the delivery of services, and absenteeism due to illness of employees tends to already be rather high in this particular industry. This study explores the association between leadership style, absenteeism, and employee satisfaction in a stressful work environment, namely a post-merger specialty mental health care institution (MHCI in a country where MHCIs are under governmental pressure to lower their costs (The Netherlands.Methods: We used a mixed methods design with quantitative as well as qualitative research to explore the association between leadership style, sickness absence rates, and employee satisfaction levels in a specialty MHCI. In depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten key informants and triangulated with documented research and a contrast between four departments provided by a factor analysis of the data from the employee satisfaction surveys and sickness rates. Data was analyzed thematically by means of coding and subsequent exploration of patterns. Data analysis was facilitated by qualitative analysis software

  10. Veterinarian satisfaction with companion animal visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jane R; Adams, Cindy L; Bonnett, Brenda N; Larson, Susan; Roter, Debra L

    2012-04-01

    To measure veterinarian satisfaction with companion animal visits through an adaptation of a previously validated physician visit satisfaction scale and to identify demographic, personality, appointment, and communication factors that contribute to veterinarian visit satisfaction. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Random sample of 50 companion animal practitioners in southern Ontario, Canada, and convenience sample of 300 clients and their pets. For each practitioner, 6 clinical appointments were videotaped, and the resulting 300 videotapes were analyzed by use of the Roter interaction analysis system. The physician satisfaction scale, Rosenberg self-esteem scale, and interpersonal reactivity index were used to measure veterinarian visit satisfaction, self-esteem, and empathy, respectively. Linear regression analysis was conducted to study the relationship between factors and veterinarian visit satisfaction. Veterinarian visit satisfaction ranged from 1 to 5 (mean ± SD, 3.97 ± 0.99) and differed significantly between wellness appointments (mean scale score, 4.13) and problem appointments (mean scale score, 3.81). Various elements of client and veterinarian communication as well as personality measures of veterinarian self-esteem and empathy were associated with veterinarian satisfaction. The specific factors differed depending on the nature of the appointment. Results suggested that veterinarian visit-specific satisfaction is enhanced through the use of communication that builds relationships with clients and is associated with degrees of veterinarian empathetic concern and veterinarian self-esteem. The implications extend to overall job satisfaction and its potential link to the health and well-being of individual veterinarians.

  11. Understanding the link between leadership style, employee satisfaction, and absenteeism: a mixed methods design study in a mental health care institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshout, Rachelle; Scherp, Evelien; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    Background In service oriented industries, such as the health care sector, leadership styles have been suggested to influence employee satisfaction as well as outcomes in terms of service delivery. However, how this influence comes into effect has not been widely explored. Absenteeism may be a factor in this association; however, no studies are available on this subject in the mental health care setting, although this setting has been under a lot of strain lately to provide their services at lower costs. This may have an impact on employers, employees, and the delivery of services, and absenteeism due to illness of employees tends to already be rather high in this particular industry. This study explores the association between leadership style, absenteeism, and employee satisfaction in a stressful work environment, namely a post-merger specialty mental health care institution (MHCI) in a country where MHCIs are under governmental pressure to lower their costs (The Netherlands). Methods We used a mixed methods design with quantitative as well as qualitative research to explore the association between leadership style, sickness absence rates, and employee satisfaction levels in a specialty MHCI. In depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten key informants and triangulated with documented research and a contrast between four departments provided by a factor analysis of the data from the employee satisfaction surveys and sickness rates. Data was analyzed thematically by means of coding and subsequent exploration of patterns. Data analysis was facilitated by qualitative analysis software. Results Quantitative analysis revealed sickness rates of 5.7% in 2010, which is slightly higher than the 5.2% average national sickness rate in The Netherlands in 2010. A general pattern of association between low employee satisfaction, high sickness rates, and transactional leadership style in contrast to transformational leadership style was established. The

  12. Understanding the link between leadership style, employee satisfaction, and absenteeism: a mixed methods design study in a mental health care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshout, Rachelle; Scherp, Evelien; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    In service oriented industries, such as the health care sector, leadership styles have been suggested to influence employee satisfaction as well as outcomes in terms of service delivery. However, how this influence comes into effect has not been widely explored. Absenteeism may be a factor in this association; however, no studies are available on this subject in the mental health care setting, although this setting has been under a lot of strain lately to provide their services at lower costs. This may have an impact on employers, employees, and the delivery of services, and absenteeism due to illness of employees tends to already be rather high in this particular industry. This study explores the association between leadership style, absenteeism, and employee satisfaction in a stressful work environment, namely a post-merger specialty mental health care institution (MHCI) in a country where MHCIs are under governmental pressure to lower their costs (The Netherlands). We used a mixed methods design with quantitative as well as qualitative research to explore the association between leadership style, sickness absence rates, and employee satisfaction levels in a specialty MHCI. In depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten key informants and triangulated with documented research and a contrast between four departments provided by a factor analysis of the data from the employee satisfaction surveys and sickness rates. Data was analyzed thematically by means of coding and subsequent exploration of patterns. Data analysis was facilitated by qualitative analysis software. Quantitative analysis revealed sickness rates of 5.7% in 2010, which is slightly higher than the 5.2% average national sickness rate in The Netherlands in 2010. A general pattern of association between low employee satisfaction, high sickness rates, and transactional leadership style in contrast to transformational leadership style was established. The association could be described best

  13. Construct of Dialysis Employee Satisfaction: Acquiring Satisfaction Factors and Their Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    We developed a construct of dialysis employees' satisfaction as an assessment framework and identified the crucial factors that contribute to overall job satisfaction. We also seek to capture some important characteristics of dialysis professionals' job satisfaction/dissatisfaction in Japan. A questionnaire was developed, including 35 facet-specific job-related satisfaction and 10 general satisfaction items in closed-ended questions. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted between August and October 2013. A total of 799 valid responses (87% of response rate) were collected from 46 physicians, 470 nurses and 251 technologists in the dialysis department of 43 facilities in Japan. Five satisfaction factors were derived by applying principal component analysis with 61% of cumulative variance accounted for. Physicians, nurses and technologists in the dialysis department shared a similar trend of job satisfaction that they were more satisfied with leadership, and communication and teamwork among the five factors, whereas their satisfaction level was relatively low with salary and welfare conditions. Physicians expressed the strongest satisfaction with any factor while nurses were the least satisfied. Nurses' and technologists' overall job satisfaction was mostly determined by satisfaction with self-actualization, and work demands and workload. A five-factor construct of dialysis employee satisfaction was identified. Overall job satisfaction of dialysis nurses and technologists were not overly high in Japan, and this seems to be caused by their relatively low satisfaction with self-actualization and with work demands and workload. Therefore, it is suggested that their work conditions and environment must be improved to support their self-actualization and to reduce their workload. © 2015 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2015 International Society for Apheresis.

  14. Assessing residents’ knowledge of patient satisfaction: a cross-sectional study at a large academic medical centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Diana E; Dang, Bich N; Trautner, Barbara; Cai, Cecilia; Torres, Sergio; Turner, Teri

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Patient satisfaction impacts healthcare quality and outcomes. Residents play an important role in patient satisfaction at academic institutions. This study aims to assess residents’ patient satisfaction knowledge and determine which learning experiences contributed to their knowledge acquisition. Settings This study was conducted at a health science university in a large, urban, tertiary-care academic medical centre in the USA. Participants All residents from internal medicine (n=185) and paediatrics (n=156) were asked to participate. Design Residents completed a survey from April 2013 to December 2013 that assessed (1) knowledge of factors that impact patient satisfaction and (2) learning experiences that may have contributed to their understanding of the drivers of patient satisfaction (eg, experiential (personal or clinical) or didactics). Trainees identified the importance of factors in determining patient satisfaction on a five-point Likert scale; answers were compiled into a knowledge score. The score was correlated with prior personal/clinical experience and didactics. Results Of the 341 residents, 247 (72%) completed the survey. No difference was found in knowledge among training levels or residency programme. More than 50% incorrectly thought physician board certification, patient’s education, patient’s income and physician’s age impacted satisfaction. Personal experience, through hospitalisation of a relative or friend, was correlated with higher knowledge (67% vs 71%, p=0.03). Ninety-nine per cent (n=238) stated peer observation, and all stated faculty feedback impacted their patient satisfaction knowledge. Seventy-seven per cent (n=185) had attended didactics on satisfaction, but attendance did not correlate with higher scores. Conclusions Our study showed trainees have a few gaps in their patient satisfaction knowledge, and attending past educational sessions on patient satisfaction did not correlate with higher knowledge scores. Our

  15. Structuring competitive physician compensation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Kim; Turcotte, Claire

    2010-12-01

    When developing and reviewing their physician compensation programs, healthcare organizations should: Understand the market data. Test outcomes of incentive plans for fair market value. Check total compensation for fair market value and reasonableness.

  16. Understanding Customer Satisfaction and Brand Equity in the E-Commerce Setting : An integration of Etail Quality Dimensions, Trust and Perceived Value

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Ying Chen

    2013-01-01

    The internet has become an indispensable part of modern life as it profoundly transforms the way people interact and transact with each other. With the increasing popularity of online shopping, China is one of the major online markets now and is likely to become the largest market in the future. The purpose of this study is to investigate the roles of etail quality dimensions, trust and perceived value which may influence online customer satisfaction in Chinese context. Meanwhile, it also exa...

  17. What factors relate to job satisfaction among rheumatologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNearney, Terry A; Hunnicutt, Sonya E; Maganti, Rashmi; Rice, Janida

    2008-06-01

    A severe shortage of practicing rheumatologists in the workforce is predicted over the next 2 decades. Identification of factors impacting job satisfaction will be needed to design interventional strategies for physician retention. To examine predictors of job satisfaction among rheumatologists. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among rheumatologists from the American College of Rheumatology directory with a portion of this designed to examine their job satisfaction. Questions regarding demographics, practice setting and job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and personal accomplishment based from the Maslach Burnout Inventory were included. Also included was a rank item to prioritize perceived changes that would improve job satisfaction. The response rate was 30% (N = 285) and 236 were analyzed. Data were primarily analyzed by the independent samples chi2 test. Physician demographics: mean age: 51 years, 76% were male, 27% were full time academicians, and 24% in solo practice. Significant differences (P satisfaction versus "very good" and "low" satisfaction groups includes increased age and solo practice, which were associated with "high" satisfaction. Lower job satisfaction rating correlated with items rating emotional exhaustion (r(s) = -0.43) and better satisfaction with personal accomplishment (r(s) = 0.41, P job satisfaction. Measures to improve job satisfaction may promote physician retention as a means of addressing the predicted workforce shortage.

  18. Factors associated with job and personal satisfaction in adult Brazilian intensivists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar Junior, Antonio Paulo; Azevedo, Luciano César Pontes de

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate job and personal satisfaction rates in physicians who work in adult intensive care units and to identify the factors associated with satisfaction. A cross-sectional study performed with physicians who participated in two intensive medicine online discussion groups. A questionnaire designed to assess the physician's sociodemographic profile and job was available for both groups for 3 months. At the end of the questionnaire, the participants addressed their degrees of job and personal satisfaction using a Likert scale in which 1 represented "very dissatisfied" and 5 represented "very satisfied". The association between sociodemographic and job characteristics with job and personal satisfaction was evaluated. Variables independently associated with satisfaction were identified using a logistic regression model. The questionnaire was answered by 250 physicians, of which 137 (54.8%) declared they were satisfied with their jobs and 34 (13.5%) were very satisfied. None of the evaluated characteristics were independently associated with job satisfaction. Regarding personal satisfaction, 136 (54.4%) physicians reported being satisfied, and 48 (19.9%) reported being very satisfied. Job satisfaction (OR = 7.21; 95%CI 3.21 - 16.20) and working in a university hospital (OR = 3.24; 95%CI 1.29 - 8.15) were factors independently associated with the personal satisfaction of the participants. The participant physicians reported job and personal satisfaction with their work in intensive care. Job satisfaction and working in a university hospital were independently associated with greater personal satisfaction.

  19. Patient satisfaction with cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasfi Ehab I

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Measuring the patient satisfaction is a very important issue that will help very much in improving the service provided to patients and improve the level of satisfaction. Aim To evaluate patient satisfaction with the cataract surgery service and identify any areas for improvement, determination of patient satisfaction with referral, out-patient consultation, pre-assessment clinic, surgery and post-operative care, also to report patients' comments relating to improvement in service provision. Methodology A retrospective study was undertaken for 150 patients underwent cataract surgery at Barrow General Hospital, UK, the survey sample was by postal questionnaires. We collected our data from the theatre lists for a period of 4 month. Results This study included 150 patients; the response rate was (72% 108 patients, Most patients were referred from their general practitioner 86.1%, 93 (86.1% patients were happy with the time interval from seeing their GP to eye clinic. In the eye out patient department many factors significantly affected the level of patient satisfaction, in general the more information provided for the patient the more the satisfaction. Conclusion Patient satisfaction is on important health outcome old understanding both the domains of satisfaction as well as their relative importance to patients is necessary to improve the overall quality of patient care. Meeting the doctor, presenting all relevant information and giving printed information are very important factors in improving the patient's satisfaction with cataract surgery.

  20. An analysis of the relationship between burnout, socio-demographic and workplace factors and job satisfaction among emergency department health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcan, Menderes; Hikmet, Neşet; Schooley, Benjamin; Top, Mehmet; Tarcan, Gamze Yorgancıoglu

    2017-04-01

    Burnout among emergency medical practitioners and personnel negatively affects career satisfaction and job performance and can lead to mental health issues, including anxiety, depression, and suicide. This study investigated the relationship between the perceptions of burnout and job satisfaction of those working in two different hospital's emergency departments assessing the effect of burnout dimensions and additional factors (age, position, marital status, annual income, employment type, gender, patient encounters, and household economic well-being) on job satisfaction. This study addresses a gap in the literature of the relationships between a) burnout and job satisfaction of emergency department's health care personnel (physicians, nurses, technicians) and b) the factors that are associated with emergency department employees' job satisfaction. A cross-sectional survey of two hundred and fifty participants was interviewed, using validated instruments (the Maslach Burnout Scale and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire). Participants include 38 physicians, 89 nurses, and 84 medical technicians, and 39 information technicians. The Maslach Burnout Inventory Scale, which assesses emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and personal accomplishment (PA), and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ), which assesses intrinsic satisfaction (IS), extrinsic satisfaction (ES) and overall satisfaction (OS), were used for data collection. Study findings indicate that significant relationship exists between burnout and job satisfaction; annual income and household economic-well-being had a positive association with job satisfaction, whereas gender, age, education, marital status had no significant effect on any form of satisfaction. Moreover, this study reveals that emotional exhaustion (EE) is a significant predictor of all three dimensions of job satisfaction while depersonalization (DP) had no significant showing. Results of this study suggest that it is

  1. Physicians beware: revisiting the physician practice acquisition frenzy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmiller, Judith Riley

    2014-01-01

    This commentary compares the current physician practice acquisition frenzy to that of the mid-1990s and reflects on lessons learned. The bottom line: Physicians must understand that there were no "white knights" in the 1990s, and there really aren't any today. This article delineates five main factors that both physicians and hospital executives should thoroughly explore and agree on before an alignment or acquisition. Agreement on these issues is the glue that holds the deal together after the merger. These factors eliminate both buyer and seller remorse and delve into the true cultural alignment that must take place as the healthcare industry addresses the challenges of the future.

  2. Should physicians have facial piercings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Alison W; Wright, Seth W; Wrenn, Keith D; Bernard, Aline

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of patrons and medical school faculty about physicians with nontraditional facial piercings. We also examined whether a piercing affected the perceived competency and trustworthiness of physicians. Survey. Teaching hospital in the southeastern United States. Emergency department patrons and medical school faculty physicians. First, patrons were shown photographs of models with a nontraditional piercing and asked about the appropriateness for a physician or medical student. In the second phase, patrons blinded to the purpose of the study were shown identical photographs of physician models with or without piercings and asked about competency and trustworthiness. The third phase was an assessment of attitudes of faculty regarding piercings. Nose and lip piercings were felt to be appropriate for a physician by 24% and 22% of patrons, respectively. Perceived competency and trustworthiness of models with these types of piercings were also negatively affected. An earring in a male was felt to be appropriate by 35% of patrons, but an earring on male models did not negatively affect perceived competency or trustworthiness. Nose and eyebrow piercings were felt to be appropriate by only 7% and 5% of faculty physicians and working with a physician or student with a nose or eyebrow piercing would bother 58% and 59% of faculty, respectively. An ear piercing in a male was felt to be appropriate by 20% of faculty, and 25% stated it would bother them to work with a male physician or student with an ear piercing. Many patrons and physicians feel that some types of nontraditional piercings are inappropriate attire for physicians, and some piercings negatively affect perceived competency and trustworthiness. Health care providers should understand that attire may affect a patient's opinion about their abilities and possibly erode confidence in them as a clinician.

  3. Study protocol for improving asthma outcomes through cross-cultural communication training for physicians: a randomized trial of physician training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Minal R; Thomas, Lara J; Hafeez, Kausar; Shankin, Matthew; Wilkin, Margaret; Brown, Randall W

    2014-06-16

    Massive resources are expended every year on cross-cultural communication training for physicians. Such training is a focus of continuing medical education nationwide and is part of the curriculum of virtually every medical school in America. There is a pressing need for evidence regarding the effects on patients of cross-cultural communication training for physicians. There is a need to understand the added benefit of such training compared to more general communication. We know of no rigorous study that has assessed whether cross-cultural communication training for physicians results in better health outcomes for their patients. The current study aims to answer this question by enhancing the Physician Asthma Care Education (PACE) program to cross cultural communication (PACE Plus), and comparing the effect of the enhanced program to PACE on the health outcomes of African American and Latino/Hispanic children with asthma. A three-arm randomized control trial is used to compare PACE Plus, PACE, and usual care. Both PACE and PACE Plus are delivered in two, two-hour sessions over a period of two weeks to 5-10 primary care physicians who treat African American and Latino/Hispanic children with asthma. One hundred twelve physicians and 1060 of their pediatric patients were recruited who self-identify as African American or Latino/Hispanic and experience persistent asthma. Physicians were randomized into receiving either the PACE Plus or PACE intervention or into the control group. The comparative effectiveness of PACE and PACE Plus on clinician's therapeutic and communication practices with the family/patient, children's urgent care use for asthma, asthma control, and quality of life, and parent/caretaker satisfaction with physician performance will be assessed. Data are collected via telephone survey and medical record review at baseline, 9 months following the intervention, and 21 months following the intervention. This study aims to reduce disparities in asthma

  4. Customer satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær; Kristensen, Kai

    2007-01-01

    & Westlund, 2003) as well as the structure of the framework (Eskildsen et al., 2004). We know however very little about how the structure of the individual markets with respect to, for instance, how the transparency of products and services affects customer satisfaction. The aim of this article is to analyze...... the effect of the transparency of products and services on customer satisfaction with respect to Danish mobile phone companies, banks and supermarkets from 2004 based on the authors' experiences from the various analyses conducted within the EPSI rating initiative....

  5. Team dynamics, clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between primary care providers: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hummy; Ryan, Molly; Tendulkar, Shalini; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Frolkis, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Chien, Alyna T; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care is essential for delivering high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care. Despite considerable research about the effects of team-based care on patient outcomes, few studies have examined how team dynamics relate to provider outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among team dynamics, primary care provider (PCP) clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between PCPs in 18 Harvard-affiliated primary care practices participating in Harvard's Academic Innovations Collaborative. First, we administered a cross-sectional survey to all 548 PCPs (267 attending clinicians, 281 resident physicians) working at participating practices; 65% responded. We assessed the relationship of team dynamics with PCPs' clinical work satisfaction and perception of patient care coordination between PCPs, respectively, and the potential mediating effect of patient care coordination on the relationship between team dynamics and work satisfaction. In addition, we embedded a qualitative evaluation within the quantitative evaluation to achieve a convergent mixed methods design to help us better understand our findings and illuminate relationships among key variables. Better team dynamics were positively associated with clinical work satisfaction and quality of patient care coordination between PCPs. Coordination partially mediated the relationship between team dynamics and satisfaction for attending clinicians, suggesting that higher satisfaction depends, in part, on better teamwork, yielding more coordinated patient care. We found no mediating effects for resident physicians. Qualitative results suggest that sources of satisfaction from positive team dynamics for PCPs may be most relevant to attending clinicians. Improving primary care team dynamics could improve clinical work satisfaction among PCPs and patient care coordination between PCPs. In addition to improving outcomes that directly concern health care providers, efforts to

  6. The genetics of congenital heart disease… understanding and improving long-term outcomes in congenital heart disease: a review for the general cardiologist and primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M Abigail; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-10-01

    This review has two purposes: to provide an updated review of the genetic causes of congenital heart disease (CHD) and the clinical implications of these genetic mutations, and to provide a clinical algorithm for clinicians considering a genetics evaluation of a CHD patient. A large portion of congenital heart disease is thought to have a significant genetic contribution, and at this time a genetic cause can be identified in approximately 35% of patients. Through the advances made possible by next generation sequencing, many of the comorbidities that are frequently seen in patients with genetic congenital heart disease patients can be attributed to the genetic mutation that caused the congenital heart disease. These comorbidities are both cardiac and noncardiac and include: neurodevelopmental disability, pulmonary disease, heart failure, renal dysfunction, arrhythmia and an increased risk of malignancy. Identification of the genetic cause of congenital heart disease helps reduce patient morbidity and mortality by improving preventive and early intervention therapies to address these comorbidities. Through an understanding of the clinical implications of the genetic underpinning of congenital heart disease, clinicians can provide care tailored to an individual patient and continue to improve the outcomes of congenital heart disease patients.

  7. Physicians' professional performance: an occupational health psychology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A

    2017-12-01

    Physician work engagement is considered to benefit physicians' professional performance in clinical teaching practice. Following an occupational health psychology perspective, this PhD report presents research on how physicians' professional performance in both doctor and teacher roles can be facilitated by work engagement and how work engagement is facilitated by job resources and personality traits. First, we conducted a systematic review on the impact of physician work engagement and related constructs (e. g. job satisfaction) on physicians' performance in patient care. We additionally investigated physician work engagement and job resources in relation to patient care experience with physicians' performance at ten outpatient clinics covering two hospitals. In a following multicentre survey involving 61 residency training programs of 18 hospitals, we studied associations between physician work engagement and personality traits with resident evaluations of physicians' teaching performance. The findings showed that physician work engagement was associated with fewer reported medical errors and that job satisfaction was associated with better communication and patient satisfaction. Autonomy and learning opportunities were positively associated with physician work engagement. Work engagement was positively associated with teaching performance. In addition, physician work engagement was most likely supported by personality trait conscientiousness (e. g. responsibility). Given the reported associations of physician work engagement with aspects of their professional performance, hospitals could support physician work engagement in service of optimal performance in residency training and patient care. This could be facilitated by worker health surveillance, peer support or promoting job crafting at the individual or team level.

  8. Satisfaction = Revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    Colleges and universities are turning increasingly to private real estate and property management companies to boost customer satisfaction with, and income from, student housing. Issues to be considered are examined, including the market profile, facility types and needs, maintenance and housekeeping, communications technology, complementary…

  9. Job Satisfaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    of congruence between the job and the reward that the job provides.1 Job satisfaction can be viewed in the context of two decisions people make about their work in joining and remaining in the organization (decision to feel belonged) and working hard in pursuit of high levels of task performance (decision to perform).1.

  10. Organizational commitment of military physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Cesim; Sahin, Bayram; Teke, Kadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Kursun, Olcay

    2009-09-01

    An individual's loyalty or bond to his or her employing organization, referred to as organizational commitment, influences various organizational outcomes such as employee motivation, job satisfaction, performance, accomplishment of organizational goals, employee turnover, and absenteeism. Therefore, as in other sectors, employee commitment is crucial also in the healthcare market. This study investigates the effects of organizational factors and personal characteristics on organizational commitment of military physicians using structural equation modeling (SEM) on a self-report, cross-sectional survey that consisted of 635 physicians working in the 2 biggest military hospitals in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that professional commitment and organizational incentives contribute positively to organizational commitment, whereas conflict with organizational goals makes a significantly negative contribution to it. These results might help develop strategies to increase employee commitment, especially in healthcare organizations, because job-related factors have been found to possess greater impact on organizational commitment than personal characteristics.

  11. Understanding the roles of faith-based health-care providers in Africa: review of the evidence with a focus on magnitude, reach, cost, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Jill; Tsimpo, Clarence; Gemignani, Regina; Shojo, Mari; Coulombe, Harold; Dimmock, Frank; Nguyen, Minh Cong; Hines, Harrison; Mills, Edward J; Dieleman, Joseph L; Haakenstad, Annie; Wodon, Quentin

    2015-10-31

    At a time when many countries might not achieve the health targets of the Millennium Development Goals and the post-2015 agenda for sustainable development is being negotiated, the contribution of faith-based health-care providers is potentially crucial. For better partnership to be achieved and for health systems to be strengthened by the alignment of faith-based health-providers with national systems and priorities, improved information is needed at all levels. Comparisons of basic factors (such as magnitude, reach to poor people, cost to patients, modes of financing, and satisfaction of patients with the services received) within faith-based health-providers and national systems show some differences. As the first report in the Series on faith-based health care, we review a broad body of published work and introduce some empirical evidence on the role of faith-based health-care providers, with a focus on Christian faith-based health providers in sub-Saharan Africa (on which the most detailed documentation has been gathered). The restricted and diverse evidence reported supports the idea that faith-based health providers continue to play a part in health provision, especially in fragile health systems, and the subsequent reports in this Series review controversies in faith-based health care and recommendations for how public and faith sectors might collaborate more effectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The happy docs study: a Canadian Association of Internes and Residents well-being survey examining resident physician health and satisfaction within and outside of residency training in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandar Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have included a large sample of resident physicians. Previous studies have also not examined well-being resources nor found significant concerns with perceived stress levels in residency. The goal of "The Happy Docs Study" was to increase knowledge of current stressors affecting the health of residents and to gather information regarding the well-being resources available to them. Findings A questionnaire was distributed to all residents attending all medical schools in Canada outside of Quebec through the Canadian Association of Internes and Residents (CAIR during the 2004–2005 academic years. In total 1999 resident physicians responded to the survey (35%, N = 5784 residents. One third of residents reported their life as "quite a bit" to "extremely" stressful (33%, N = 656. Time pressure was the most significant factor associated with stress (49%, N = 978. Intimidation and harassment was experienced by more than half of all residents (52%, N = 1050 with training status (30%, N = 599 and gender (18%, N = 364 being the main perceived sources. Eighteen percent of residents (N = 356 reported their mental health as either "fair" or "poor". The top two resources that residents wished to have available were career counseling (39%, N = 777 and financial counseling (37%, N = 741. Conclusion Although many Canadian resident physicians have a positive outlook on their well-being, residents experience significant stressors during their training and a significant portion are at risk for emotional and mental health problems. This study can serve as a basis for future research, advocacy and resource application for overall improvements to well-being during residency.

  13. Primary care physician satisfaction with patients diagnosed with depression: International Depression Project results from Colombia Satisfação do médico de cuidados primários com pacientes diagnosticados com depressão: resultados colombianos do Projeto Internacional de Depressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gómez-Restrepo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize physician satisfaction with doctor-patient encounters, distinguishing between those involving patients diagnosed with depression and those involving patients without depression, as well as to determine the impact of an educational intervention aimed at improving the recognition and management of depression in primary care practice, in Bogotá, Columbia. METHOD: Physician satisfaction when treating outpatients in primary care centers was assesed by means of a questionnaire applied before and after the intervention. RESULTS: The intervention was given to 18 physicians and 5 nurses. A total of 1650 questionnaires related to visits were collected in the first phase, and 1832 were collected in the second one. The percentage of patients diagnosed with depression increased from 5.9% (95% CI: 4.8-7.1% before the intervention to 10.6% (95% CI: 9.2-12.06% after. The total duration of the clinical encounter did not change significantly. The percentage of time spent on the physical problems/concerns of the patients decreased in both types of visits. CONCLUSIONS: Health professional satisfaction was the greatest when dealing with the physical problems of the patient. However, in both types of visits, the degree of satisfaction when dealing with the psychological aspects increased after the intervention.OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a satisfação dos clínicos com os encontros médico-paciente, distinguindo entre aqueles que envolvem pacientes diagnosticados com depressão e aqueles que envolvem pacientes sem depressão, bem como determinar o impacto de uma intervenção educacional visando a melhorar o reconhecimento e o gerenciamento da depressão na prática de atendimento primário em Bogotá, Colômbia. MÉTODO: A satisfação dos clínicos ao tratarem de pacientes ambulatoriais em centros de atendimento primário foi avaliada por meio de um questionário aplicado antes e depois da intervenção. RESULTADOS: A intervenção foi

  14. Students do not reduce patient satisfaction in a family medicine clinic as measured by a nationally used patient satisfaction instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, Mark R; Sterrenberg, Timothy R

    2015-03-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys are widely used to give physicians feedback on their treatment of patients, included in physician performance evaluation and payment, and correlated with better health outcomes. Our research uses industry-standard satisfaction measures to gauge the impact on patient satisfaction of having students involved in a patient's medical care at the family medicine clinic of a large southwestern osteopathic medical school. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the Press-Ganey Survey, a national survey commonly used by hospitals and clinics. The survey was modified to indicate the presence of a learner in the patient's treatment room. The survey provided data on patient satisfaction with the office, the visit, and the care received. Overall, 730 survey responses were used in the study, 434 from patients with whose visit included a student. There were no statistically significant differences in patient satisfaction scores, including overall satisfaction with the visit. Our findings indicate that student doctors do not decrease patient satisfaction and that satisfaction scores may be useful in student evaluations. This finding should encourage outpatient physicians who teach medical students that their patient satisfaction scores on the most widely used patient satisfaction survey will not be impacted by teaching students.

  15. Rural nurse job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, D L; Monserud, M A

    2008-01-01

    The lack of rural nursing studies makes it impossible to know whether rural and urban nurses perceive personal and organizational factors of job satisfaction similarly. Few reports of rural nurse job satisfaction are available. Since the unprecedented shortage of qualified rural nurses requires a greater understanding of what factors are important to retention, studies are needed. An analysis of the literature indicates job satisfaction is studied as both an independent and dependent variable. In this study, the concept is used to examine the intention to remain employed by measuring individual and organizational characteristics; thus, job satisfaction is used as a dependent variable. One hundred and three rural hospital nurses, from hospitals throughout the Northwest region of the United States were recruited for the study. Only nurses employed for more than one year were accepted. The sample completed surveys online. The McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale, the Gerber Control Over Practice Scale, and two open-ended job satisfaction questions were completed. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended questions identified themes which were then used to support the quantitative findings. Overall alphas were 0.89 for the McCloskey/Mueller Scale and 0.96 for the Gerber Control Over Practice Scale. Rural nurses indicate a preference for rural lifestyles and the incorporation of rural values in organizational practices. Nurses preferred the generalist role with its job variability, and patient variety. Most participants intended to remain employed. The majority of nurses planning to leave employment were unmarried, without children at home, and stated no preference for a rural lifestyle. The least overall satisfied nurses in the sample were employed from 1 to 3 years. Several new findings inform the literature while others support previous workforce studies. Data suggest some job satisfaction elements can be altered by addressing organizational characteristics and by

  16. Health care workplace discrimination and physician turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    To examine the association between physician race/ ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006-2007 of practicing physicians (n = 529) randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and the National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and chi2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-4.9). Among physicians who experienced workplace discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value workplace discrimination, p value Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist.

  17. Factors affecting public dissatisfaction with urban family physician plan: A general population based study in Fars Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Mirahmadizadeh, Alireza; Imani, Bahareh

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the level of public satisfaction with a family physician plan as well as the relevant factors in this respect, can be employed as valuable tools in identifying quality of services. To determine the factors affecting public dissatisfaction with an urban family physician plan in Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2014 through June 2015 on Fars Province residents in Iran, selected based on cluster sampling method. The data collection instrument was comprised of a two-part checklist including demographic information and items related to dissatisfaction with the family physician plan, specialists, para-clinic services, pharmacy, physicians on shift work, emergency services, and family physician assistants. Data were described by SPSS 20. In this study, 1,020 individuals (524 males, 496 females) were investigated. Based on the results, the most frequent factor affecting dissatisfaction with physicians was their single work shifts and unavailability (53%). In terms of dissatisfaction with family physicians' specialist colleagues and para-clinic services, the most common factors were related to difficulty in obtaining a referral form (41.5%) and making appointments (21.6%), respectively. Given the level of dissatisfaction with pharmacies, the significant factor was reported to be excessive delay in medication delivery (31.6%); and in terms of physicians on shift work and emergency services, the most important factor was lower work hours for family physicians (9.2%). It seems that, the most common causes of dissatisfaction with the urban family physician plan are due to the short duration of services, obtaining a referral form and making appointments, and providing prescribed medications.

  18. Better physician-patient relationships are associated with higher reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Greenfield, Sheldon; Li, Wenjun; Wilson, Ira B

    2004-11-01

    There is little evidence to support the widely accepted assertion that better physician-patient relationships result in higher rates of adherence with recommended therapies. To determine whether and which aspects of a better physician-patient relationship are associated with higher rates of adherence with antiretroviral therapies for persons with HIV infection. Cross-sectional analysis. Twenty-two outpatient HIV practices in a metropolitan area. Five hundred fifty-four patients with HIV infection taking antiretroviral medications. We measured adherence using a 4-item self-report scale (alpha= 0.75). We measured core aspects of physician-patient relationships using 6 previously tested scales (general communication, HIV-specific information, participatory decision making, overall satisfaction, willingness to recommend physician, and physician trust; alpha > 0.70 for all) and 1 new scale, adherence dialogue (alpha= 0.92). For adherence dialogue, patients rated their physician at understanding and solving problems with antiretroviral therapy regimens. Mean patient age was 42 years, 15% were female, 73% were white, and 57% reported gay or bisexual sexual contact as their primary HIV risk factor. In multivariable models that accounted for the clustering of patients within physicians' practices, 6 of the 7 physician-patient relationship quality variables were significantly (P < .05) associated with adherence. In all 7 models worse adherence was independently associated (P < .05) with lower age, not believing in the importance of antiretroviral therapy, and worse mental health. This study showed that multiple, mutable dimensions of the physician-patient relationship were associated with medication adherence in persons with HIV infection, suggesting that physician-patient relationship quality is a potentially important point of intervention to improve patients' medication adherence. In addition, our data suggest that it is critical to investigate and incorporate patients

  19. Gender difference on patients' satisfaction and expectation towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recognizing patient satisfaction and expectation is considered as important components of assessing quality of care. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the gender difference on the patient satisfaction with psychiatrists and explore their expectation from physicians to mental health care needs. Design: ...

  20. Assessing the critical behavioral competencies of outstanding managed care primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duberman, T L

    1999-03-01

    This study used job competence assessment to identify the behavioral characteristics that distinguish outstanding job performances of primary care physicians (PCPs) within a network-model HMO. Primary care physicians were chosen for the study based on six standard performance measures: (1) member satisfaction, (2) utilization, (3) patient complaints, (4) emergency room referrals, (5) out-of-network referrals, and (6) medical record completeness. Outstanding PCPs (N = 16) were identified as those performing within one standard deviation above the mean on all six of the performance measures. A control group of typical PCPs (N = 10) was selected from those performing outside the peer group mean on at least two performance measures. Subjects were administered the Behavioral Event Interview and the Picture Story Exercise. Higher overall competency levels of achievement orientation, concern for personal influence, empathic caregiving, and empowerment drive distinguished outstanding from typical PCPs. Outstanding PCPs also had higher overall frequency of competency in building team effectiveness and interpersonal understanding when compared with typical PCPs. This study suggests that PCP performance is the product of measurable competencies that are potentially amenable to improvement. Competency assessment and development of PCPs may benefit both organizational efficiency and physician and patient satisfaction.

  1. Individual differences in satisfaction with activity-based work environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendervanger, Jan; Ernst, Anja F.; Albers, Casper; Mobach, Mark; Van Yperen, Nico W.

    2018-01-01

    Satisfaction with activity-based work environments (ABW environments) often falls short of expectations, with striking differences among individual workers. A better understanding of these differences may provide clues for optimising satisfaction with ABW environments and associated organisational

  2. Determinants of Indian physicians′ satisfaction & dissatisfaction from their job

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Physicians′ satisfaction/dissatisfaction from their job is an important factor associated with health service that deals with human life. This study was conducted to ascertain overall level and proportion of physicians′ satisfaction from their job as well as to identify those components that influenced it. Methods: A comprehensive customized questionnaire was used with Section A to assess demographic profile of physicians and Section B to assess satisfaction. Response to each question was devised using Likert scale. Likert scale responses were converted to normal scale so that statistical procedures could be naturally developed. A total of 170 physicians were selected using multistage sampling. Questionnaire was administered on one to one basis to avoid non-response. Precise and contextualized descriptive and inferential statistical procedures were used for analysis. Results: Of the 140 physicians, 103 (74% were satisfied from their job with average score of 19.15 ± 11.46 while 37 (26% were dissatisfied with average score -09.27 ± 06.30. Nine out of 15 components were found significant (P<0.05. Conclusions: Comparative assessment of the present results with those of other studies revealed that satisfaction percentage of Indian physicians and those of the developed countries were almost the same. Perhaps, magnitude of satisfaction level (average score of the Indian physicians were towards the lower side. Nine determinants, identified in this study can be used safely to assess any professionals′ satisfaction.

  3. Determinants of Indian physicians’ satisfaction & dissatisfaction from their job

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Goel, Sonu; Singh, Sharad Kumar; Sharma, Raman; Gupta, Pramod K.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Physicians’ satisfaction/dissatisfaction from their job is an important factor associated with health service that deals with human life. This study was conducted to ascertain overall level and proportion of physicians’ satisfaction from their job as well as to identify those components that influenced it. Method: A comprehensive customized questionnaire was used with Section A to assess demographic profile of physicians and Section B to assess satisfaction. Response to each question was devised using Likert scale. Likert scale responses were converted to normal scale so that statistical procedures could be naturally developed. A total of 170 physicians were selected using multistage sampling. Questionnaire was administered on one to one basis to avoid non-response. Precise and contextualized descriptive and inferential statistical procedures were used for analysis. Result: Of the 140 physicians, 103 (74%) were satisfied from their job with average score of 19.15 ± 11.46 while 37 (26%) were dissatisfied with average score -09.27 ± 06.30. Nine out of 15 components were found significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Comparative assessment of the present results with those of other studies revealed that satisfaction percentage of Indian physicians and those of the developed countries were almost the same. Perhaps, magnitude of satisfaction level (average score) of the Indian physicians were towards the lower side. Nine determinants, identified in this study can be used safely to assess any professionals’ satisfaction. PMID:24820835

  4. Evaluation of the consumer model: relationship between patients' expectations, perceptions and satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Epel, O; Dushenat, M; Friedman, N

    2001-08-01

    To evaluate the consumer model in a health care system, by studying the relationship between four variables: expectations, perceived degree of fulfillment, satisfaction and changing of physicians. Cross-sectional study; telephone interview of patients who had visited a primary care physician 1-2 months previously. The Maccabi health plan, Israel. A random sample of 759 patients, aged 18 and over residing in two towns in Israel. Response rate to telephone interview was 50.7% (n=385). Expectation, perceived expectations fulfilled by the physician, satisfaction with the visit to the primary care physician and intention to change physician. The gap between the expectations and their fulfillment showed a low correlation with satisfaction. For attributes where a large difference was found, no correlation was found with patient satisfaction. Attributes such as 'diagnosis', 'preventive health care' and 'answering questions' presented correlation coefficients of 0.3. The correlation between the perceived fulfillment of these attributes and satisfaction presented higher correlation coefficients (between 0.4-0.5). This limits the consumer model as a way to predict satisfaction. Satisfaction correlated highly with intention to change physician. The mean score for the satisfaction of those intending to change doctors was 3.8 compared to 5.5 in the group of consumers not intending to change doctors. The consumer model is able to explain only to a modest extent the variation in satisfaction, but dissatisfaction is a good predictor of the intention to change doctors.

  5. Nurse-physician communication concerning artificial nutrition or hydration (ANH) in patients with dementia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryon, Els; Gastmans, Chris; de Casterlé, Bernadette Dierckx

    2012-10-01

    To explore nurses' experiences with nurse-physician communication during artificial nutrition or hydration (ANH) decision-making in hospitalised patients with dementia. Artificial nutrition or hydration decision-making often occurs in patients with dementia. Effective communication between professionals is extremely challenging in this population, because these patients are unable to communicate their treatment wishes. Qualitative interview design. Between April 2008 and June 2009, we conducted 21 interviews with nurses from nine different hospitals geographically spread throughout Flanders (Belgium). Interviews were audiotaped and later transcribed. Data processing involved (1) simultaneous and systematic data collection and analysis, (2) constant forwards-backwards wave, (3) continuous dialogue with the data and (4) interactive team processes. The interviews showed that communication with physicians is the central instrument the nurses used in their attempts to realise their perception of 'the best possible care'. From the nurses' perspective, we distinguished three mutually connected factors that affected the effectiveness of nurse-physician communication during artificial nutrition or hydration decision-making: the physicians' attitude towards the nurses, the nurses' attitude towards the physicians and the forms of communication used by the nurses. The complex interaction between these three factors resulted in a range of nurses' perceptions, varying from positive to negative. The direction of their perceptions depended on the extent to which they succeeded or failed to use nurse-physician communication as an instrument to realise the 'best care'. Nurse-physician communication was the most important instrument determining whether nurses succeeded or failed to actively act as a patient's representative and whether nurses achieved the best possible care in co-operation with physicians. To reach optimal care and nurse job satisfaction, nurse-physician

  6. Physicians' Internet Information-Seeking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nancy L.; Casebeer, Linda L.; Kristofco, Robert E.; Strasser, Sheryl M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Our understanding about the role of the Internet as a resource for physicians has improved in the past several years with reports of patterns for use and measures of impact on medical practice. The purpose of this study was to begin to shape a theory base for more fully describing physicians' information-seeking behaviors as they…

  7. Appealing to an important customer. Physicians should be the target of marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R

    1989-05-01

    Although many healthcare professionals are turning to the general public to increase market share and referrals, they should be directing their attention to physicians instead. One of the major challenges facing hospitals is determining physician needs. A survey may be necessary to identify physicians' perceptions, attitudes, values, expectations, market, and hospital loyalty. Another important research document is the physician profile, which includes each doctor by age, specialty, office location, admitting and outpatient referral activity, financial contribution, and referral and other affiliations. Surveying should not end with the physician. One of the best means of evaluating patient and physician satisfaction is by questioning physicians' office staff. To centralize physician services, a number of hospitals have established physician liaison programs, which bridge the gap between the hospital and the physician's office, heighten physician satisfaction, and increase referrals. Physician orientation is a key element of most outreach programs, providing an opportunity to develop relationships with new physicians. Other means of directly aiding physicians are physician referral services and practice enhancement and assistance.

  8. Insights Into the Impact of Online Physician Reviews on Patients’ Decision Making: Randomized Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiguny, Martin KJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Physician-rating websites combine public reporting with social networking and offer an attractive means by which users can provide feedback on their physician and obtain information about other patients’ satisfaction and experiences. However, research on how users evaluate information on these portals is still scarce and only little knowledge is available about the potential influence of physician reviews on a patient’s choice. Objective Starting from the perspective of prospective patients, this paper sets out to explore how certain characteristics of physician reviews affect the evaluation of the review and users’ attitudes toward the rated physician. We propose a model that relates review style and review number to constructs of review acceptance and check it with a Web-based experiment. Methods We employed a randomized 2x2 between-subject, factorial experiment manipulating the style of a physician review (factual vs emotional) and the number of reviews for a certain physician (low vs high) to test our hypotheses. A total of 168 participants were presented with a Web-based questionnaire containing a short description of a dentist search scenario and the manipulated reviews for a fictitious dental physician. To investigate the proposed hypotheses, we carried out moderated regression analyses and a moderated mediation analysis using the PROCESS macro 2.11 for SPSS version 22. Results Our analyses indicated that a higher number of reviews resulted in a more positive attitude toward the rated physician. The results of the regression model for attitude toward the physician suggest a positive main effect of the number of reviews (mean [low] 3.73, standard error [SE] 0.13, mean [high] 4.15, SE 0.13). We also observed an interaction effect with the style of the review—if the physician received only a few reviews, fact-oriented reviews (mean 4.09, SE 0.19) induced a more favorable attitude toward the physician compared to emotional reviews (mean 3

  9. Registered nurse job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Karen; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the initial assessment of job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment of registered nurses working on units where a professional practice model was implemented and the relationship between these two variables. The nursing shortage has been linked to overall job satisfaction and specifically to nurses' satisfaction with the professional practice environment. Initiatives to increase retention and recruitment and decrease turnover have been linked to work satisfaction among nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used with participants (N = 101) from four patient care units; this represented a 55% response rate. The nurses were moderately satisfied with the professional practice environment but had overall low job satisfaction. There was a significant negative relationship between overall work satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment (P job satisfaction that were not being met. Thus, the nurses may have become more knowledgeable about the potential needs in these areas. Nurse managers and leaders must recognize that job satisfaction consists of many dimensions, and each of these dimensions is important to nurse retention. Implementation of a professional practice model may heighten awareness of the missing components within a practice environment and lead to decreased overall satisfaction. A broader understanding of characteristics associated with increased satisfaction may aid in development of organizational change necessary to retain and attract nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Physician respect for patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Mary Margaret; Cooper, Lisa A; Bleich, Sara N; Clark, Jeanne M; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2009-11-01

    Obesity stigma is common in our society, and a general stigma towards obesity has also been documented in physicians. We hypothesized that physician respect for patients would be lower in patients with higher body mass index (BMI). We analyzed data from the baseline visit of 40 physicians and 238 patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of patient-physician communication. The independent variable was BMI, and the outcome was physician respect for the patient. We performed Poisson regression analyses with robust variance estimates, accounting for clustering of patients within physicians, to examine the association between BMI and physician ratings of respect for particular patients. The mean (SD) BMI of the patients was 32.9(8.1) kg/m(2). Physicians had low respect for 39% of the participants. Higher BMI was significantly and negatively associated with respect [prevalence ratio (PrR) 0.83, 95% CI: 0.73-0.95; p = 0.006; per 10 kg/m(2) increase in BMI]. BMI remained significantly associated with respect after adjustment for patient age and gender (PrR 0.86, 95%CI: 0.74-1.00; p = 0.049). We found that higher patient BMI was associated with lower physician respect. Further research is needed to understand if lower physician respect for patients with higher BMI adversely affects the quality of care.

  11. Customer convergence: patients, physicians, and employees share in the experience and evaluation of healthcare quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul Alexander; Wolosin, Robert J; Gavran, Goran

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the interrelationships between three categories of service quality in healthcare delivery organizations: patient, employee, and physician satisfaction. Using the largest and most representative national databases available, the study compares the evaluations of hospital care by more than 2 million patients, 150,000 employees, and 40,000 physicians. The results confirm the relationship connecting employees' satisfaction and loyalty to their patients' satisfaction and loyalty. Patients' satisfaction and loyalty were also strongly associated with medical staff physicians' evaluations of overall satisfaction and loyalty to the hospital. Similarly, hospital employees' satisfaction and loyalty were related to the medical staff physicians' satisfaction with and loyalty to the hospital. Based upon the strength of the interrelationships, individual measures and subscales can serve as leverage points for improving linked outcomes. Patients, physicians, and employees, the three co-creators of health, agree on the evaluation of the quality of that service experience. The results demonstrate that promoting patient-centeredness, enhancing medical staff relations, and improving the satisfaction and loyalty of employees are not necessarily three separate activities in competition for hospital resources and marketing leadership attention.

  12. Fractals for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamrin, Cindy; Stern, Georgette; Frey, Urs

    2010-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the study of fractals in medicine. In this review, we provide an overview of fractals, of techniques available to describe fractals in physiological data, and we propose some reasons why a physician might benefit from an understanding of fractals and fractal analysis, with an emphasis on paediatric respiratory medicine where possible. Among these reasons are the ubiquity of fractal organisation in nature and in the body, and how changes in this organisation over the lifespan provide insight into development and senescence. Fractal properties have also been shown to be altered in disease and even to predict the risk of worsening of disease. Finally, implications of a fractal organisation include robustness to errors during development, ability to adapt to surroundings, and the restoration of such organisation as targets for intervention and treatment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Do patients trust their physician? The role of attachment style in the patient-physician relationship within one year after a cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, N.; Sanderman, R.; Pool, G.; Hinnen, C.; Langendijk, J.A.; Bemelman, W.A.; Hagedoorn, M.; Sprangers, M.A.

    Background. The degree of trust in and satisfaction with the physician has been shown to have important implications for treatment outcomes. This study aims to examine individual differences in patients' trust, satisfaction and general distress from an attachment theoretical perspective. Material

  14. Physician communication coaching effects on patient experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianne Seiler

    Full Text Available Excellent communication is a necessary component of high-quality health care. We aimed to determine whether a training module could improve patients' perceptions of physician communication behaviors, as measured by change over time in domains of patient experience scores related to physician communication.We designed a comprehensive physician-training module focused on improving specific "etiquette-based" physician communication skills through standardized simulations and physician coaching with structured feedback. We employed a quasi-experimental pre-post design, with an intervention group consisting of internal medicine hospitalists and residents and a control group consisting of surgeons. The outcome was percent "always" scores for questions related to patients' perceptions of physician communication using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS survey and a Non-HCAHPS Physician-Specific Patient Experience Survey (NHPPES administered to patients cared for by hospitalists.A total of 128 physicians participated in the simulation. Responses from 5020 patients were analyzed using HCAHPS survey data and 1990 patients using NHPPES survey data. The intercept shift, or the degree of change from pre-intervention percent "always" responses, for the HCAHPS questions of doctors "treating patients with courtesy" "explaining things in a way patients could understand," and "overall teamwork" showed no significant differences between surgical control and hospitalist intervention patients. Adjusted NHPPES percent excellent survey results increased significantly post-intervention for the questions of specified individual doctors "keeping patient informed" (adjusted intercept shift 9.9% P = 0.019, "overall teamwork" (adjusted intercept shift 11%, P = 0.037, and "using words the patient could understand" (adjusted intercept shift 14.8%, p = 0.001.A simulation based physician communication coaching method focused on specific

  15. Health care users' satisfaction in Brazil, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Giselle Campozana; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Luna, Carlos F; Souza-Júnior, Paulo Roberto Borges de; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of users' satisfaction with the health system brings back longstanding questions concerning the quality of services provided to the Brazilian population. The current study analyzes satisfaction with outpatient and inpatient care based on the results of the World Health Survey, conducted in Brazil in 2003. To explain satisfaction with various aspects of care through a small number of factors, the factor analysis technique was used, through principal components analysis (PCA). Multiple regression models identified associations between satisfaction scores and different sociodemographic variables. For outpatient care, waiting time showed the lowest degree of satisfaction, and in the case of hospitalization, freedom to choose the physician was the worst evaluated aspect. Three components were extracted from the PCA, related respectively to satisfaction with health professionals, health services, and health problem solution. Multiple regression analysis showed that having experienced some type of discrimination (on the basis of gender, age, poverty, social class, skin color, or type of disease) and being an exclusive user of the public National Health System involved a lower degree of users' satisfaction.

  16. Physician Fee Schedule Search

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This website is designed to provide information on services covered by the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS). It provides more than 10,000 physician services,...

  17. Physician Appraisals: Key Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klich Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to identify key criteria being used for physician appraisals and to find how communication skills of physicians are valued in those appraisals. ScienceDirect and EBSCOhost databases were used for this search. The results show that a physician appraisal is underestimated both theoretically and empirically. The particular gap exists with respect to the communication skills of physicians, which are rarely present in medical training syllabi and physician assessments. The article contributes to the theoretical discourse on physician appraisals and points out at the inconsistency between the high status of physicians as a key hospital resource on the one hand and, on the other hand, at inadequate and poorly researched assessment of their performance with a special emphasis on communication skills. The article may inspire health managers to develop and implement up-to-date assessment forms for physicians and good managerial practices in this respect in hospitals and other health care units.

  18. Three-year customer satisfaction survey in laboratory medicine in a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siqi; Duan, Yifei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Yongmei

    2018-04-25

    Customer satisfaction is a key quality indicator of laboratory service. Patients and physicians are the ultimate customers in medical laboratory, and their opinions are essential components in developing a customer-oriented laboratory. A longitudinal investigation of customer satisfaction was conducted through questionnaires. We designed two different questionnaires and selected 1200 customers (600 outpatients and 600 physicians) to assess customer satisfaction every other year from 2012 to 2016. Items with scores satisfaction in 2014 was better, which illustrated our strategy was effective. However, some items remained to be less than 4, so we repeated the survey after modifying questionnaires in 2016. However, the general satisfaction points of the physicians and patients reduced in 2016, which reminded us of some influential factors we had neglected. By using dynamic survey of satisfaction, we can continuously find deficiencies in our laboratory services and take suitable corrective actions, thereby improving our service quality.

  19. Rural Women Family Physicians: Strategies for Successful Work-Life Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Julie; Hustedde, Carol; Bjorkman, Sarah; Prasad, Rupa; Sola, Orlando; Wendling, Andrea; Bjorkman, Kurt; Paladine, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Women family physicians experience challenges in maintaining work-life balance while practicing in rural communities. We sought to better understand the personal and professional strategies that enable women in rural family medicine to balance work and personal demands and achieve long-term career satisfaction. Women family physicians practicing in rural communities in the United States were interviewed using a semistructured format. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and analyzed using an immersion and crystallization approach, followed by detailed coding of emergent themes. The 25 participants described a set of strategies that facilitated successful work-life balance. First, they used reduced or flexible work hours to help achieve balance with personal roles. Second, many had supportive relationships with spouses and partners, parents, or other members of the community, which facilitated their ability to be readily available to their patients. Third, participants maintained clear boundaries around their work lives, which helped them to have adequate time for parenting, recreation, and rest. Women family physicians can build successful careers in rural communities, but supportive employers, relationships, and patient approaches provide a foundation for this success. Educators, employers, communities, and policymakers can adapt their practices to help women family physicians thrive in rural communities. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  20. Physician heal thyself

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compared to overweight or obese physicians, normal‑weight physicians were significantly more likely to discuss weight loss with their obese patients, according to a study among. 500 primary care physicians, undertaken by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.[4]. A recent, highly accessed ...

  1. Deferred Personal Life Decisions of Women Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, Jamie; Pflibsen, Lacey; Eno, Cassie; Radhakrishnan, Priya

    2018-03-12

    Inadequate work-life balance can have significant implications regarding individual performance, retention, and on the future of the workforce in medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine whether women physicians defer personal life decisions in pursuit of their medical career. We conducted a survey study of women physicians ages 20-80 from various medical specialties using a combination of social media platforms and women physicians' professional listservs with 801 survey responses collected from May through November 2015. The primary endpoint was whether women physicians deferred personal life decisions in pursuit of their medical career. Secondary outcomes include types of decisions deferred and correlations with age, hours worked per week, specialty, number of children, and career satisfaction. Respondents were categorized into deferred and nondeferred groups. Personal decision deferments were reported by 64% of respondents. Of these, 86% reported waiting to have children and 22% reported waiting to get married. Finally, while 85% of women in the nondeferment group would choose medicine again as a career, only 71% of women in the deferment group would do so (p work-life balance, decreasing job satisfaction, and insurance/administrative burden. The results of this survey have significant implications on the future of the workforce in medicine. Overall, our analysis shows that 64% of women physicians defer important life decisions in pursuit of their medical career. With an increase in the number of women physicians entering the workforce, lack of support and deferred personal decisions have a potential negative impact on individual performance and retention. Employers must consider the economic impact and potential workforce shortages that may develop if these issues are not addressed.

  2. Physician health, stress and gender at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, B; Ahmad, F; Stewart, D E

    2003-02-01

    To determine personal and work related factors contributing to physician health and stress in men and women physicians in a university hospital. Mail survey of 161 hospital-based Canadian academic physicians (51 women, 110 men). Women compared to men, physicians were younger (M = 43 years, S.D. = 7.4 vs. M = 48 years, S.D. = 8.64; P = .001) and fewer had spouses (76% vs. 90%; P = .01) and children (76% vs. 91%; P = .02). A five-item scale measured somatic symptoms, the dependent variable. Among physicians of both gender, the somatic symptoms scale was significantly correlated with satisfaction with amount of time spent working and scales of mental health (five items), work satisfaction (five items), workload (five items), healthy lifestyle (five items), coping abilities (three items) and support-in-stress (two items). On stepwise regression analysis, for women physicians, 70% of the variance in somatic symptoms was explained by support from colleagues when stressed, and workload. For men, 42% of the variance was explained by healthy lifestyle, mental health, support from colleagues when stressed, and workload. Regardless of gender, the majority of physicians reported an excessive workload but the sources of support when stressed varied by gender. Different strategies are needed for women and men physicians to reduce their stress levels. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science Inc.

  3. Joint analyses of open comments and quantitative data: Added value in a job satisfaction survey of hospital professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Ingrid; Mayer, Mauro; Courvoisier, Nelly; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the job opinions of hospital professionals by conducting qualitative analyses of the open comments included in a job satisfaction survey and combining these results with the quantitative results. A cross-sectional survey targeting all Lausanne University Hospital professionals was performed in the fall of 2013. The survey considered ten job satisfaction dimensions (e.g. self-fulfilment, workload, management, work-related burnout, organisational commitment, intent to stay) and included an open comment section. Computer-assisted qualitative analyses were conducted on these comments. Satisfaction rates on the included dimensions and professional groups were entered as predictive variables in the qualitative analyses. Of 10 838 hospital professionals, 4978 participated in the survey and 1067 provided open comments. Data from 1045 respondents with usable comments constituted the analytic sample (133 physicians, 393 nurses, 135 laboratory technicians, 247 administrative staff, including researchers, 67 logistic staff, 44 psycho-social workers, and 26 unspecified). Almost a third of the comments addressed scheduling issues, mostly related to problems and exhaustion linked to shifts, work-life balance, and difficulties with colleagues' absences and the consequences for quality of care and patient safety. The other two-thirds related to classic themes included in job satisfaction surveys. Although some comments were provided equally by all professional groups, others were group specific: work and hierarchy pressures for physicians, healthcare quality and patient safety for nurses, skill recognition for administrative staff. Overall, respondents' comments were consistent with their job satisfaction ratings. Open comment analysis provides a comprehensive understanding of hospital professionals' job experiences, allowing better consideration of quality initiatives that match the needs of professionals with reality.

  4. Joint analyses of open comments and quantitative data: Added value in a job satisfaction survey of hospital professionals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Gilles

    Full Text Available To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the job opinions of hospital professionals by conducting qualitative analyses of the open comments included in a job satisfaction survey and combining these results with the quantitative results.A cross-sectional survey targeting all Lausanne University Hospital professionals was performed in the fall of 2013.The survey considered ten job satisfaction dimensions (e.g. self-fulfilment, workload, management, work-related burnout, organisational commitment, intent to stay and included an open comment section. Computer-assisted qualitative analyses were conducted on these comments. Satisfaction rates on the included dimensions and professional groups were entered as predictive variables in the qualitative analyses.Of 10 838 hospital professionals, 4978 participated in the survey and 1067 provided open comments. Data from 1045 respondents with usable comments constituted the analytic sample (133 physicians, 393 nurses, 135 laboratory technicians, 247 administrative staff, including researchers, 67 logistic staff, 44 psycho-social workers, and 26 unspecified.Almost a third of the comments addressed scheduling issues, mostly related to problems and exhaustion linked to shifts, work-life balance, and difficulties with colleagues' absences and the consequences for quality of care and patient safety. The other two-thirds related to classic themes included in job satisfaction surveys. Although some comments were provided equally by all professional groups, others were group specific: work and hierarchy pressures for physicians, healthcare quality and patient safety for nurses, skill recognition for administrative staff. Overall, respondents' comments were consistent with their job satisfaction ratings.Open comment analysis provides a comprehensive understanding of hospital professionals' job experiences, allowing better consideration of quality initiatives that match the needs of professionals with reality.

  5. 'Online Shopping’ Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Pervaiz Ali and Sudha

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to analyze the customer satisfaction and loyalty of the online customers in Norway. The theoretical framework discusses in brief about the effects of customer loyalty and retention on customer satisfaction. The study on customer satisfaction and loyalty has been done from the perspective of a firm performing online business. To understand the customer satisfaction and loyalty level of online Norwegian shoppers, we pursued with the collection of quantitativ...

  6. Difficult physician-patient relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifsteck, S W

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the delivery of health care services in the United States are proceeding so rapidly that many providers are asking how the working relationships between doctors and patients will be effected. Accelerated by cost containment, quality improvement and the growth of managed care, these changes have caused some critics to feel that shorter visits and gatekeeper systems will promote an adversarial relationship between physicians and patients. However, proponents of the changing system feel that better prevention, follow-up care and the attention to customer service these plans can offer will lead to increased patient satisfaction and improved doctor-patient communication. Dedicated to addressing these concerns, the Bayer Institute for Health Care Communication was established in 1987 as a continuing medical education program (CME) focusing on this topic. A half-day workshop on clinician-patient communication to enhance health outcomes was introduced in 1992 and a second workshop, "Difficult' Clinician-Patient Relationships," was developed two years later. The two courses discussed in this article are offered to all physicians, residents, medical students, mid-level providers and other interested staff within the Carle system.

  7. Physician migration: donor country impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluwihare, A P R

    2005-01-01

    Physician migration from the developing to developed region of a country or the world occurs for reasons of financial, social, and job satisfaction. It is an old phenomenon that produces many disadvantages for the donor region or nation. The difficulties include inequities with the provision of health services, financial loss, loss of educated families, potential employers, and role models and diminished resources with which to conduct medical education. Staff for undergraduate and postgraduate education is depleted. The critical mass for research and development becomes difficult to achieve or maintain, and these disadvantages are not compensated for adequately by increased contacts, the introduction of new ideas, or financial inflow to the donor region or country. The political will of governments and international organizations regarding treaties about the ethics of physician recruitment is called into question by discrepancies between the text of agreements and the ground realities. Amelioration of this situation requires economic development and imaginative schemes by the donors and, ideally, ethical considerations from recipient governments. At the very least, adequate compensation should be made to the donor country for the gain obtained by the host country.

  8. Finding the right interactional temperature: do colder patients need more warmth in physician communication style?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Gaëtan; Schmid Mast, Marianne; Jaunin-Stalder, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    Being aware of which communication style should be adopted when facing more difficult patients is important for physicians; it can help prevent patient reactions of dissatisfaction, mistrust, or non-adherence that can be detrimental to the process of care. Past research suggests that less agreeable patients are especially critical towards, and reactive to, their physician's communication style, compared to more agreeable patients. On the basis of the literature, we hypothesized that less agreeable patients would react more negatively than agreeable patients to lower levels of affiliativeness (i.e., warmth, friendliness) in the physicians, in terms of satisfaction with the physician, trust in the physician, and determination to adhere to the treatment. Thirty-six general practitioners (20 men/16 women) working in their own practice in Switzerland were filmed while interacting with 69 patients (36 men/33 women) of different ages (M = 50.7; SD = 18.19; range: 18-84) and presenting different medical problems (e.g., back pain, asthma, hypertension, diabetes). After the medical interview, patients filled in questionnaires measuring their satisfaction with the physician, their trust in the physician, their determination to adhere to the treatment, and their trait of agreeableness. Physician affiliativeness was coded on the basis of the video recordings. Physician gender and dominance, patient gender and age, as well as the gravity of the patient's medical condition were introduced as control variables in the analysis. Results confirmed our hypothesis for satisfaction and trust, but not for adherence; less agreeable patients reacted more negatively (in terms of satisfaction and trust) than agreeable patients to lower levels of affiliativeness in their physicians. This study suggests that physicians should be especially attentive to stay warm and friendly with people low in agreeableness because those patients' satisfaction and trust might be more easily lowered by a cold

  9. IMPLEMENTASI RELATIONSHIP MARKETING UNTUK MENCIPTAKAN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinda Frismandiri

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan menguji dampak relationship marketing inputs melalui understanding customer expectation, building service partnership, total quality management, dan empowering employees terhadap customer satisfaction. Penelitian dilakukan pada nasabah Bank Central Asia Cabang Malang. Sampel diambil dengan metode accidental sampling, dengan jumlah sampel sebanyak 100 nasabah. Metode analisis menggunakan Regresi Berganda. Hasil analisis menunjukkan bahwa understanding customer expectation, building service partnership, total quality management, dan empowering employees teruji mampu menciptakan customer satisfaction nasabah. Di antara variabel relationship marketing inputs ternyata building service partnership memberikan dampak yang paling besar dalam menciptakan customer satisfaction nasabah.

  10. The gendered realities and talent management imperatives of women physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Timothy; Scott, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    U.S. medicine is increasingly a gender-balanced profession with half of all medical school graduates now female. Despite this reality and the potentially transformative nature of a large female physician cohort in U.S. health care, there is less examination of their workplace realities and the key talent management strategies for health care organizations employing women physicians. First, we identify current knowledge about U.S. women physician satisfaction, role challenges, and work tradeoffs. Gender theory is used to help interpret these workplace realities. Second, we use this information to identify talent management strategies health care organizations might consider to mitigate the realities and provide greater support for women physicians. To facilitate our analysis, we conducted a narrative review of published research that includes analysis focused on U.S. women physicians for the time period 2006-2014. Applying ideas from gender theory, we extrapolated key findings from that research related to three issues: satisfaction, role challenges, and tradeoffs. Then we synthesized the findings to identify general talent management strategies that could address these dynamics proactively while enhancing recruitment and retention with respect to women physicians. U.S. women physicians express strong levels of satisfaction, particularly with their careers, at the same time they continue to experience gender-based inequities, role challenges, and lack of work-life balance in their chosen specialty fields. Lack of suitable role models and appropriate mentoring for women physicians, in addition to barriers to career advancement, are also prevalent across different medical specialties. Similar to other occupations and industries, gender-based inequities and role strains are very real issues for women physicians. Health care organizations must acknowledge these issues and employ effective talent management strategies aimed at women doctors if they are to be viewed as an

  11. Physician burnout: contributors, consequences and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C P; Dyrbye, L N; Shanafelt, T D

    2018-03-05

    Physician burnout, a work-related syndrome involving emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment, is prevalent internationally. Rates of burnout symptoms that have been associated with adverse effects on patients, the healthcare workforce, costs and physician health exceed 50% in studies of both physicians-in-training and practicing physicians. This problem represents a public health crisis with negative impacts on individual physicians, patients and healthcare organizations and systems. Drivers of this epidemic are largely rooted within healthcare organizations and systems and include excessive workloads, inefficient work processes, clerical burdens, work-home conflicts, lack of input or control for physicians with respect to issues affecting their work lives, organizational support structures and leadership culture. Individual physician-level factors also play a role, with higher rates of burnout commonly reported in female and younger physicians. Effective solutions align with these drivers. For example, organizational efforts such as locally developed practice modifications and increased support for clinical work have demonstrated benefits in reducing burnout. Individually focused solutions such as mindfulness-based stress reduction and small-group programmes to promote community, connectedness and meaning have also been shown to be effective. Regardless of the specific approach taken, the problem of physician burnout is best addressed when viewed as a shared responsibility of both healthcare systems and individual physicians. Although our understanding of physician burnout has advanced considerably in recent years, many gaps in our knowledge remain. Longitudinal studies of burnout's effects and the impact of interventions on both burnout and its effects are needed, as are studies of effective solutions implemented in combination. For medicine to fulfil its mission for patients and for public health, all stakeholders

  12. Parameters of consultee satisfaction with inpatient academic psychiatric consultation services: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavakumar, Mallika; Gastelum, Emily D; Choo, Tse-Hwei; Gerkin, Jonathan S; Kahn, Debra; Lee, Seonjoo; Nicolson, Stephen E; Rosenthal, Lisa J; Schwartz, Ann C; Tobin, Marie B; Wharton, Ralph N; Shapiro, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatrists commonly perceive consultee satisfaction as a useful global measure of consultation-liaison service performance. No tool exists to measure consultee satisfaction. A single-site study at Columbia University Medical Center elicited ratings of parameters importantly contributing to consultee satisfaction within consultation-liaison services. The purpose of this study was to assess the generalizability of the rating of importance of these parameters in a larger, multicenter sample. From October 2013 to January 2014, a confidential and voluntary Web-based survey was distributed to 133 physicians at 7 academic centers in the United States asking them to rate the importance of 16 performance parameters (identified in the previous single-site study) in determining consultee satisfaction. Overall, 87 recipients (65%) responded to the survey. Among all the 16 items, there was no significant difference between sites in ratings of item importance. Of the 16 parameters, 9 received a mean rating in the "important" to "very important" range. Three items, "completion of consultation within 24 hours of request," "understanding the core questions being asked," and "practical and helpful management suggestions for medical staff" were rated as the most important. Quickly managing behavioral problems, management suggestions for nursing staff, verbal communication of recommendations, providing diagnostic clarification, facilitating transfer to inpatient psychiatry, and providing follow-up consultation were other parameters that were highly valued by consultees. We found good generalizability across academic medical centers for ratings of parameters important for consultee satisfaction with consultation-liaison services, which can provide the basis for a consultee satisfaction measurement tool. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Worklife and satisfaction of hospitalists: toward flourishing careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinami, Keiki; Whelan, Chad T; Wolosin, Robert J; Miller, Joseph A; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2012-01-01

    The number of hospitalists in the US is growing rapidly, yet little is known about their worklife to inform whether hospital medicine is a viable long-term career for physicians. Determine current satisfaction levels among hospitalists. Survey study. A national random stratified sample of 3,105 potential hospitalists plus 662 hospitalist employees of three multi-state hospitalist companies were administered the Hospital Medicine Physician Worklife Survey. Using 5-point Likert scales, the survey assessed demographic information, global job and specialty satisfaction, and 11 satisfaction domains: workload, compensation, care quality, organizational fairness, autonomy, personal time, organizational climate, and relationships with colleagues, staff, patients, and leader. Relationships between global satisfaction and satisfaction domains, and burnout symptoms and career longevity were explored. There were 816 hospitalist responses (adjusted response rate, 25.6%). Correcting for oversampling of pediatricians, 33.5% of respondents were women, and 7.4% were pediatricians. Overall, 62.6% of respondents reported high satisfaction (≥4 on a 5-point scale) with their job, and 69.0% with their specialty. Hospitalists were most satisfied with the quality of care they provided and relationships with staff and colleagues. They were least satisfied with organizational climate, autonomy, compensation, and availability of personal time. In adjusted analysis, satisfaction with organizational climate, quality of care provided, organizational fairness, personal time, relationship with leader, compensation, and relationship with patients predicted job satisfaction. Satisfaction with personal time, care quality, patient relationships, staff relationships, and compensation predicted specialty satisfaction. Job burnout symptoms were reported by 29.9% of respondents who were more likely to leave and reduce work effort. Hospitalists rate their job and specialty satisfaction highly, but

  14. Bogan Bias: Addressing Class-Based Prejudice in Physician-Patient Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Kennedy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a widespread belief in the ‘classlessness’ of Australian society, despite strong evidence demonstrating the impacts of socioeconomic status (SES on individuals’ educational attainment, health, and mortality. Disparities in health care are also prevalent. The quality of communication between physicians and patients is associated with health outcomes and patient satisfaction, and we argue that this communication can be influenced by socioeconomic bias and prejudice. The majority of medical students in Australia are from backgrounds of high SES, and this is likely to influence their communication as physicians with patients from lower SES communities. In particular, mediatised representations of the Australian working-class as ‘the bogan,’ and the acceptability of derogatory humour towards those perceived to be ‘bogans’ – in the absence of lived experience and understanding of lower SES life – can influence the attitudes, expectations, and behaviour of physicians working in low SES communities. To begin to address these biases, we recommend expanding cultural competence training to reflect a multidimensional understanding of culture that includes SES, and going beyond cultural competence to promote self-reflexivity and critical awareness of personal socio-cultural backgrounds, assumptions, and biases, in staff induction programs.

  15. Influences on patient satisfaction in healthcare centers: a semi-quantitative study over 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Ruth D; Nurse, Nicole; Snavely, Laura; Hackett-Zahler, Stacey; Frank, Kenice; DiTomasso, Robert A

    2017-05-19

    Knowledge of ambulatory patients' satisfaction with clinic visits help improve communication and delivery of healthcare. The goal was to examine patient satisfaction in a primary care setting, identify how selected patient and physician setting and characteristics affected satisfaction, and determine if feedback provided to medical directors over time impacted patient satisfaction. A three-phase, semi-quantitative analysis was performed using anonymous, validated patient satisfaction surveys collected from 889 ambulatory outpatients in 6 healthcare centers over 5-years. Patients' responses to 21 questions were analyzed by principal components varimax rotated factor analysis. Three classifiable components emerged: Satisfaction with Physician, Availability/Convenience, and Orderly/Time. To study the effects of several independent variables (location of clinics, patients' and physicians' age, education level and duration at the clinic), data were subjected to multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).. Changes in the healthcare centers over time were not significantly related to patient satisfaction. However, location of the center did affect satisfaction. Urban patients were more satisfied with their physicians than rural, and inner city patients were less satisfied than urban or rural on Availability/Convenience and less satisfied than urban patients on Orderly/Time. How long a patient attended a center most affected satisfaction, with patients attending >10 years more satisfied in all three components than those attending 60 years old. Patients were significantly more satisfied with their 30-40 year-old physicians compared with those over 60. On Orderly/Time, patients were more satisfied with physicians who were in their 50's than physicians >60. Improvement in patient satisfaction includes a need for immediate, specific feedback. Although Medical Directors received feedback yearly, we found no significant changes in patient satisfaction over time. Our results

  16. Patient experience and physician productivity: debunking the mythical divide at HealthPartners clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Thongvanh, Kerri L; Evans, Sarah J Horst; Ahrens, Clay R

    2012-01-01

    Physicians are continually encouraged to be more productive while providing higher levels of patient satisfaction. It is a common presumption that the two goals are somewhat exclusive-that higher productivity must entail a sacrifice in patient satisfaction or vice versa. Moreover, physicians seeking tested, evidence-based approaches to improving satisfaction have had relatively little to go on, and they commonly have justifiable concerns about how ineffective changes may hurt their productivity for no benefit. For our large specialty practice, we plotted physicians into quadrants on a scattergram: strong performers on productivity and patient satisfaction, those who are weak in both areas, and those who are strong in one and weak in the other. We performed an observational study to investigate behaviors and work processes associated with a range of performance levels in productivity and patient satisfaction. The observation yielded clear, discrete sets of common characteristics for physicians and staff in each quadrant. In our organization, these findings have provided practical assistance for physicians performing at any level to assess their own situation and chart a path, on their own or with coaching, that leads to improvement. The findings help dispel commonly held myths about the exclusivity of productivity and patient satisfaction, suggesting that 1) there are many physicians who excel in both areas simultaneously, and 2) there are different characteristics associated with varying levels of performance. The study encourages the further development of evidence-based methods for improving the patient experience while enhancing-not sacrificing-productivity.

  17. Physician performance feedback in a Canadian academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Dennis; Worthington, James; McGuire, Shaun; Burgetz, Stephanie; Forster, Alan J; Patey, Andrea; Gerin-Lajoie, Caroline; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Roth, Virginia

    2017-10-02

    Purpose This paper aims at the implementation and early evaluation of a comprehensive, formative annual physician performance feedback process in a large academic health-care organization. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods approach was used to introduce a formative feedback process to provide physicians with comprehensive feedback on performance and to support professional development. This initiative responded to organization-wide engagement surveys through which physicians identified effective performance feedback as a priority. In 2013, physicians primarily affiliated with the organization participated in a performance feedback process, and physician satisfaction and participant perceptions were explored through participant survey responses and physician leader focus groups. Training was required for physician leaders prior to conducting performance feedback discussions. Findings This process was completed by 98 per cent of eligible physicians, and 30 per cent completed an evaluation survey. While physicians endorsed the concept of a formative feedback process, process improvement opportunities were identified. Qualitative analysis revealed the following process improvement themes: simplify the tool, ensure leaders follow process, eliminate redundancies in data collection (through academic or licensing requirements) and provide objective quality metrics. Following physician leader training on performance feedback, 98 per cent of leaders who completed an evaluation questionnaire agreed or strongly agreed that the performance feedback process was useful and that training objectives were met. Originality/value This paper introduces a physician performance feedback model, leadership training approach and first-year implementation outcomes. The results of this study will be useful to health administrators and physician leaders interested in implementing physician performance feedback or improving physician engagement.

  18. Predictors of prenatal care satisfaction among pregnant women in American Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyinka, Oluwaseyi; Jukic, Anne Marie; McGarvey, Stephen T; Muasau-Howard, Bethel T; Faiai, Mata'uitafa; Hawley, Nicola L

    2017-11-16

    Pregnant women in American Samoa have a high risk of complications due to overweight and obesity. Prenatal care can mitigate the risk, however many women do not seek adequate care during pregnancy. Low utilization of prenatal care may stem from low levels of satisfaction with services offered. Our objective was to identify predictors of prenatal care satisfaction in American Samoa. A structured survey was distributed to 165 pregnant women receiving prenatal care at the Lyndon B Johnson Tropical Medical Center, Pago Pago. Women self-reported demographic characteristics, pregnancy history, and satisfaction with prenatal care. Domains of satisfaction were extracted using principal components analysis. Scores were summed across each domain. Linear regression was used to examine associations between maternal characteristics and the summed scores within individual domains and for overall satisfaction. Three domains of satisfaction were identified: satisfaction with clinic services, clinic accessibility, and physician interactions. Waiting ≥ 2 h to see the doctor negatively impacted satisfaction with clinic services, clinic accessibility, and overall satisfaction. Living > 20 min from the clinic was associated with lower clinic accessibility, physician interactions, and overall satisfaction. Women who were employed/on maternity leave had lower scores for physician interactions compared with unemployed women/students. Women who did not attend all their appointments had lower overall satisfaction scores. Satisfaction with clinic services, clinic accessibility and physician interactions are important contributors to prenatal care satisfaction. To improve patient satisfaction prenatal care clinics should focus on making it easier for women to reach clinics, improving waiting times, and increasing time with providers.

  19. Research on Job Satisfaction of Elementary and High School Teachers and Strategies to Increase Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuming, Xu; Jiliang, Shen

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important topic in teacher education research. Exploring the issue of teacher job satisfaction helps us gain a deeper understanding of teachers' mental state, such as their occupational attitudes, zeal for teaching, and work enthusiasm, which affects the quality of teaching and education. From an examination of teachers' job…

  20. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue.

  1. Physician burnout syndrome | Ibnouf | Sudan Journal of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to high light the Physician Burnout Syndrome and its relation to unintentional medical errors and society lack of satisfaction. Methods: Brief literature review and observations from the current atmosphere of medical practice in Sudan. Conclusion: Early detection is the responsibility of ...

  2. Refining the Practice of Prescribing: Teaching Physician Learners How to Talk to Patients About a New Prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J W; Childress, Marc A; Ledford, Christopher C; Mundy, Heather D

    2014-12-01

    Clinician counseling about medication can improve patient understanding and adherence. This study developed a teaching session for physician learners about medication prescribing and communication, with evaluation at the physician and patient levels. We analyzed whether patients would perceive and report more comprehensive clinician presentation of medication information when receiving prescriptions from their physician in the intervention clinic. We conducted a single site, prospective intervention study that included lectures, role play, an objective standardized clinical examination (OSCE), and reminders displayed in patient care areas. For physician-level assessment, pretests and posttests included a written case presentation and a OSCE. For patient-level assessment, we used a cross-sectional observational design that included study of patient recall information, and assessment of patient satisfaction before and after intervention. Twenty-seven family medicine residents and sports medicine fellows participated in the teaching session, focused on presenting patients the reasons, risks, and regimen of prescribed medication. In written testing, learners presented significantly more comprehensive information in posttests. In the OSCE (n  =  14), all learners presented risks and regimen information. However, patient-level assessment showed no significant difference between before and after intervention. Notably, the covariates patient activation and satisfaction with communication both had a significant association with patient recall information. Our intervention improved learner presentation of medication information. However, patient recall of the information conveyed did not change. Although physician training did not have a positive effect on patient recall, patient activation emerged as a critical influence of patients' perceptions of medication discussions.

  3. Business plan writing for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Kenneth H; Schwartz, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    Physicians are practicing in an era in which they are often expected to write business plans in order to acquire, develop, and implement new technology or programs. This task is yet another reminder of the importance of business principles in providing quality patient care amid allocation of increasingly scarce resources. Unfortunately, few physicians receive training during medical school, residencies, or fellowships in performing such tasks. The process of writing business plans follows an established format similar to writing a consultation, in which the risks, benefits, and alternatives to a treatment option are presented. Although administrative assistance may be available in compiling business plans, it is important for physicians to understand the rationale, process, and pitfalls of business planning. Writing a business plan will serve to focus, clarify, and justify a request for scarce resources, and thus, increase its chance of success, both in terms of funding and implementation. A well-written business plan offers a plausible, coherent story of an uncertain future. Therefore, a business plan is not merely an exercise to obtain funding but also a rationale for investment that can help physicians reestablish leadership in health care.

  4. Physician-centered management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulde, M F

    1999-01-01

    The "Fortune 500 Most Admired" companies fully understand the irreverent premise "the customer comes second" and that there is a direct correlation between a satisfied work force and productivity, service quality, and, ultimately, organizational success. If health care organizations hope to recruit and retain the quality workforce upon which their core competency depends, they must develop a vision strategic plan, organizational structure, and managerial style that acknowledges the vital and central role of physicians in the delivery of care. This article outlines a conceptual framework for effective physician management, a "critical pathway," that will enable health care organizations to add their name to the list of "most admired." The nine principles described in this article are based on a more respectful and solicitous treatment of physicians and their more central directing role in organizational change. They would permit the transformation of health care into a system that both preserves the virtues of the physician-patient relationship and meets the demand for quality and cost-effectiveness.

  5. Difficulties experienced by migrant physicians working in German hospitals: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Corinna; Marckmann, Georg

    2016-09-23

    With Germany facing a shortage of doctors, hospitals have been increasingly recruiting physicians from abroad. Studies in other countries have shown that migrant physicians experience various difficulties in their work, which might impact the quality of patient care, physician job satisfaction, and, accordingly, retention. The experiences of migrant doctors in Germany have not been systematically studied so far and will likely differ from experiences migrant physicians make in other contexts. A thorough understanding of challenges faced by this group, however, is needed to develop adequate support structures-as required by the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel. A qualitative study was conducted to give an overview of the multifaceted difficulties migrant physicians might face in German hospitals. Twenty semi-structured interviews with foreign-born and foreign-trained physicians were conducted in German. Participants were recruited via the State Chambers of Physicians and snowballing based on a maximum variation sampling strategy varying purposefully by source country and medical specialty. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Participants described difficulties relating to healthcare institutions, own competencies, and interpersonal interactions. Participants experienced certain legal norms, the regulation of licensure and application for work, and the organization of the hospital environment as inadequate. Most struggled with their lack of setting-specific (language, cultural, clinical, and system) knowledge. Furthermore, behaviour of patients and co-workers was perceived as discriminating or inadequate for other reasons. This is the first study to describe the broad range of issues migrant physicians experience in Germany. Based on this information, institutional actors should devise support structures to ensure quality of care, physician wellbeing, and

  6. Career satisfaction of women in surgery: perceptions, factors, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadiyeh, Nasim; Cho, Nancy L; Kellogg, Katherine C; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Moore, Francis D; Ashley, Stanley W; Zinner, Michael J; Breen, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    With the current and projected shortages of general surgeons, more attention is being paid to the increasing pool of women physicians. This study seeks to understand the variables leading to career satisfaction for women surgeons to better recruit, retain, and support them. Eighteen semi-structured interviews of 12 female and 6 male surgeons 2 to 12 years into practice were qualitatively analyzed and converted to coded, categorized data. Significance was derived by Fisher's exact test. Participants were recruited by snowball sampling. Our sample represents a highly satisfied group of female and male surgeons. Although both women and men describe with equal frequency having made career tradeoffs for personal and family time, and vice versa, women far more frequently than men cite reasons related to their personal time, predictable time, and family relationships as why they are currently satisfied with their career (34.1% versus 8.7%; p career content equally. When describing strategies used in developing a successful surgical career, women most frequently cite social networks as a key to success (88% versus 12% by men; p career for family and family for career, women's perception of satisfaction comes from viewing their surgical career within the broader context of their lives. Women might be attracted to a career that acknowledges and values the whole person beyond the surgeon, and could benefit from work infrastructures that enhance networking. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Job stressors and job satisfaction in a major metropolitan public EMS service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowron, J S; Todd, K H

    1999-01-01

    Behavioral and social science research suggests that job satisfaction and job performance are positively correlated. It is important that EMS managers identify predictors of job satisfaction in order to maximize job performance among prehospital personnel. Identify job stressors that predict the level of job satisfaction among prehospital personnel. The study was conducted within a large, urban Emergency Medical Services (EMS) service performing approximately 60,000 Advanced Life Support (ALS) responses annually. Using focus groups and informal interviews, potential predictors of global job satisfaction were identified. These factors included: interactions with hospital nurses and physicians; on-line communications; dispatching; training provided by the ambulance service; relationship with supervisors and; standing orders as presently employed by the ambulance service. These factors were incorporated into a 21 item questionnaire including one item measuring global job satisfaction, 14 items measuring potential predictors of satisfaction, and seven questions exploring demographic information such as age, gender, race, years of experience, and years with the company. The survey was administered to all paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) Results of the survey were analyzed using univariate and multivariate techniques to identify predictors of global job satisfaction. Ninety paramedics and EMT participated in the study, a response rate of 57.3%. Job satisfaction was cited as extremely satisfying by 11%, very satisfying by 29%, satisfying by 45%, and not satisfying by 15% of respondents. On univariate analysis, only the quality of training, quality of physician interaction, and career choice were associated with global job satisfaction. On multivariate analysis, only career choice (p = 0.005) and quality of physician interaction (p = 0.05) were predictive of global job satisfaction. Quality of career choice and interactions with physicians are predictive

  8. Public reporting in Germany: the content of physician rating websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, M; Sander, U; Esslinger, A S; Maryschok, M; Schöffski, O

    2012-01-01

    Physician rating websites (PRWs) are gaining in popularity among patients seeking quality information about physicians. However, little knowledge is available about the quantity and type of information provided on the websites. To determine and structure the quantity and type of information about physicians in the outpatient sector provided on German-language physician rating websites. In a first step, we identified PRWs through a systematic internet search using German keywords from a patient´s perspective in the two search engines Google and Yahoo. Afterwards, information about physicians available on the websites was collected and categorised according to Donabedian´s structure/process/outcome model. Furthermore, we investigated whether the information was related to the physician himself/ herself or to the practice as a whole. In total, eight PRWs were detected. Our analysis turned up 139 different information items on eight websites; 67 are related to the structural quality, 4 to process quality, 5 to outcomes, and 63 to patient satisfaction/experience. In total, 37% of all items focus specifically on the physician and 63% on the physician's practice. In terms of the total amount of information provided on the PRWs, results range from 61 down to 13.5 items. A broad range of information is available on German PRWs. While structural information can give a detailed overview of the financial, technical and human resources of a practice, other outcome measures have to be interpreted with caution. Specifically, patient satisfaction results are not risk-adjusted, and thus, are not appropriate to represent a provider's quality of care. Consequently, neither patients nor physicians should yet use the information provided to make their final decision for or against an individual physician.

  9. First and foremost, physicians: the clinical versus leadership identities of physician leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Joann Farrell; Perelli, Sheri

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Physicians are commonly promoted into administrative and managerial roles in US hospitals on the basis of clinical expertise and often lack the skills, training or inclination to lead. Several studies have sought to identify factors associated with effective physician leadership, yet we know little about how physician leaders themselves construe their roles. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach - Phenomenological interviews were performed with 25 physicians at three organizational levels with physicians affiliated or employed by four hospitals within one health care organization in the USA between August and September 2010. A rigorous comparative methodology of data collection and analysis was employed, including the construction of analytic codes for the data and its categorization based on emergent ideas and themes that are not preconceived and logically deduced hypotheses, which is characteristic of grounded theory. Findings - These interviews reveal differences in how part- vs full-time physician leaders understand and value leadership roles vs clinical roles, claim leadership status, and identify as physician leaders on individual, relational and organizational basis. Research limitations/implications - Although the physicians in the sample were affiliated with four community hospitals, all of them were part of a single not-for-profit health care system in one geographical locale. Practical implications - These findings may be of interest to hospital administrators and boards seeking deeper commitment and higher performance from physician leaders, as well as assist physicians in transitioning into a leadership role. Social implications - This work points to a broader and more fundamental need - a modified mindset about the nature and value of physician leadership. Originality/value - This study is unique in the exploration of the nature of physician leadership from the perspective of the physician on an individual, peer

  10. Factors affecting allied health faculty job satisfaction: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romig, Barbara; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Denmark, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests job satisfaction can make a difference in keeping qualified workers on the job, but little research has been conducted focusing specifically on allied health faculty. In order to attract and retain top quality faculty, colleges and universities should understand the variables impacting faculty satisfaction and develop a plan to enhance satisfaction. An integrative literature review (CINHAL, ERIC, Journal of Allied Health, Chronicle of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and current books on job satisfaction) of faculty job satisfaction and dissatisfaction produced a variety of publications presenting the key determinants of job satisfaction by allied health faculty in the United States. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the various factors that influence job satisfaction, especially by allied health faculty, in institutions of higher education in the U.S. The procedure used for this analysis consisted of reviewing allied health and higher education faculty studies to identify factors influencing job satisfaction, research questions, sample size reported, instruments used for measurement of job satisfaction, and job satisfaction results. While the theoretical models of allied health and higher education faculty job satisfaction exist separately in the literature, their remarkable similarities permit the prospect of a contemporary framework of the essential components of job satisfaction. Potential opportunities for continuing research on the personal and professional variables impacting job satisfaction of allied health faculty and similar disciplines are presented.

  11. Patient Satisfaction in Obstetrics and Gynecology: Individualized Patient-centered Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Yeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasingly prevalent topic in medicine, but little is known about patient satisfaction in women's health and other specialties. We review current methods of improving patient satisfaction in the field of obstetrics and gynecology with the intent to increase patient satisfaction even further by enhancing and combining previously used strategies. Methods A search from inception to June 2010 for electronic literature was performed using Medline. The search strategy used the medical subject heading terms “patient satisfaction”, “obstetrics”, “gynecology”, “patient-centered communication”, “communication training”, and “malpractice”. The company websites for Press Ganey Associates, Inc and Integrated Health Associates' were also reviewed. Studies in both general medicine and the field of obstetrics and gynecology were reviewed to emphasize disparities between patients' satisfaction in diverse medical specialties. Results Studies indicating the importance of patient satisfaction, the factors contributing to patient satisfaction, and an evaluation of current, evidence-based methods of increasing patient satisfaction were reviewed. The studies included suggest that current methods of assessing/improving patient satisfaction are effective, but may not be the most productive. Conclusions We expect that the combination of previously successful methods of improving patient satisfaction to allow physicians to employ individualized patient-centered communication may improve patient satisfaction even further. Studying the use of our proposed enhancements in physician-patient communication may be worthwhile tools to increase patient satisfaction and optimize the quality of women's healthcare.

  12. Job satisfaction of Slovenian hospital nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Mirko; Piskar, Franka

    2015-03-01

    To test the psychometric properties of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale and to assess which of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale dimensionalities have a considerable impact on job satisfaction of nursing employees in three public Slovenian hospitals. Job satisfaction of nurses is linked to productivity, turnover, absenteeism and patient outcomes. Little is known about the factors contributing to job satisfaction among Slovenian hospital nurses. Understanding the contributing factors could help nurse managers to take appropriate measures. A cross-sectional survey study was used to obtain a sample of 169 registered nursing assistants and 74 registered nurses working in three public hospitals in Slovenia, from which data was obtained using the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale. Dimensionality was tested using exploratory factor analysis. A seven-factor structure of 29 items was obtained, which accounted for 54.3% of the total variance in job satisfaction, and was internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the instrument was 0.78). The first factor 'Satisfaction with Interaction Opportunities', which is a component of the social rewards dimension in the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale, explained 30.6% of the variation. The registered nursing assistants' job dissatisfaction was higher than that of the registered nurses. Both were mostly dissatisfied with professional opportunities. Using the factor analysis, a seven-factor structure was found instead of the originally introduced eight-factor model, which suggests a need for further redevelopment of the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale. The results suggest that operational management needs to revitalize the work environment by ensuring proactive leadership and allowing participation in the decision-making process, while health-care organisations need to support the professional development of registered nursing assistants and registered nurses in order to achieve sustainable effects

  13. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities.

  14. Mindfulness and Marital Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Langer, Ellen; Burpee, Leslie C.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships among mindfulness, marital satisfaction, and perceived spousal similarity. All 95 subjects responded to a questionnaire measuring each of these variables, and an additional series of demographic variables. A significant positive relationship was found between mindfulness and marital satisfaction, with no statistically significant relationship found between perceived spousal similarity and marital satisfaction. There was a stronger correlation between ...

  15. Satisfaction and 'comparison sharing'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    2009-01-01

    the probability of satisfaction. Results show that comparison sharing impacts satisfaction for women, and that those women who share more equally than their peers are more likely to be satisfied, whereas comparison sharing has no influence on satisfaction for men. Also, parents are less likely to be satisfied...

  16. Negotiation for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Micah J; DeCherney, Alan H

    2013-05-01

    Physicians are involved in negotiations on a daily basis. Interactions with patients, support staff, nurses, fellow physicians, administrators, lawyers, and third parties all can occur within the context of negotiation. This article reviews the basic principles of negotiation and negotiation styles, models, and practical tools. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Physician relationships: make your first impression count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Jason

    2012-05-01

    Strategies for physician recruitment should include the following: Consider creating an in-house recruiting system to save money and to "own" the health system's first impression. Gain a competitive advantage by nurturing relationships with prospects over the long-term. Use innovative recruitment techniques, such as video interviewing and electronic reference checking, to better coordinate recruitment, follow-up, and mentoring. Make a new hire's job satisfaction and home life a top priority during the first 90 days of employment, and then plan regular follow-ups to maintain a positive relationship.

  18. Job satisfaction among nurses: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; While, Alison E; Barriball, K Louise

    2005-02-01

    The current nursing shortage and high turnover is of great concern in many countries because of its impact upon the efficiency and effectiveness of any health-care delivery system. Recruitment and retention of nurses are persistent problems associated with job satisfaction. This paper analyses the growing literature relating to job satisfaction among nurses and concludes that more research is required to understand the relative importance of the many identified factors to job satisfaction. It is argued that the absence of a robust causal model incorporating organizational, professional and personal variables is undermining the development of interventions to improve nurse retention.

  19. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  20. Factors influencing job satisfaction of oncology nurses over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta; Olson, Karin; Raymond-Seniuk, Christy; Lo, Eliza; Masaoud, Elmabrok; Bakker, Debra; Fitch, Margaret; Green, Esther; Butler, Lorna; Conlon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested a structural equation model to examine work environment factors related to changes in job satisfaction of oncology nurses between 2004 and 2006. Relational leadership and good physician/nurse relationships consistently influenced perceptions of enough RNs to provide quality care, and freedom to make patient care decisions, which, in turn, directly influenced nurses' job satisfaction over time. Supervisor support in resolving conflict and the ability to influence patient care outcomes were significant influences on job satisfaction in 2004, whereas, in 2006, a clear philosophy of nursing had a greater significant influence. Several factors that influence job satisfaction of oncology nurses in Canada have changed over time, which may reflect changes in work environments and work life. These findings suggest opportunities to modify work conditions that could improve nurses' job satisfaction and work life.

  1. [Influence of waiting time on patient and companion satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontova-Almató, A; Juvinyà-Canal, D; Suñer-Soler, R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate patient and companion satisfaction of a hospital Emergency Department and its relationship with waiting time. Prospective, observational study. Hospital de Figueres Emergency Department (Girona, Spain). sociodemographic characteristics, satisfaction level, real and perceived waiting time for triage and being seen by a physician. A total of 285 responses were received from patients and companions. The mean age of the patients and companions (n=257) was 54.6years (SD=18.3). The mean overall satisfaction (n=273) was 7.6 (SD=2.2). Lower perceived waiting time until nurse triage was related to higher overall satisfaction (Spearman rho (ρ)=-0.242, P<.001), and lower perceived waiting time until being seen by physician, with a higher overall satisfaction (ρ=-0.304; P<.001). Users who were informed about estimated waiting time showed higher satisfaction than those who were not informed (P=.001). Perceived waiting time and the information about estimated waiting time determined overall satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Sense of meaning as a predictor of burnout in emergency physicians in Israel: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Itzhak, Shulamit; Dvash, Jonathan; Maor, Maya; Rosenberg, Noa; Halpern, Pinchas

    2015-12-01

    Burnout is common in physicians and particularly acute in emergency physicians. Physician burnout may adversely affect physicians' lives and the quality of care they provide, but much remains unknown about its main contributing factors. The present study evaluated burnout rates and contributing factors in emergency physicians in Israel, specifically focusing on the role of a sense of meaning, which has received little attention in the literature concerning burnout in emergency physicians. A multicenter study, involving a convenience sample of physicians working full-time in the emergency departments of 16 general hospitals in Israel, was conducted. Questionnaires were used to assess burnout, demographic characteristics, professional stress, emotional distress, satisfaction, and quality of professional life, and open-ended questions were used to evaluate subjective perception of job satisfaction. Seventy physicians completed the questionnaires; 71.4% reported significant burnout levels in at least one of the burnout measures, while 82% also reported medium or high levels of competency. Burnout levels were associated with work-life balance, work satisfaction, social support, depressive symptoms, stress, and preoccupying thoughts. Regression analysis yielded two significant factors associated with burnout: worry and a sense of existential meaning derived from work. In addition, 61%, 51%, and 17% of participants exhibited high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and a low sense of personal accomplishment, respectively. These results indicate a high burnout rate in emergency physicians in Israel and highlight relevant positive and negative factors including the importance of addressing existential meaning in designing specific intervention programs to counter burnout.

  3. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  4. Can complexity science inform physician leadership development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Colleen Marie

    2016-07-04

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe research that examined physician leadership development using complexity science principles. Design/methodology/approach Intensive interviewing of 21 participants and document review provided data regarding physician leadership development in health-care organizations using five principles of complexity science (connectivity, interdependence, feedback, exploration-of-the-space-of-possibilities and co-evolution), which were grouped in three areas of inquiry (relationships between agents, patterns of behaviour and enabling functions). Findings Physician leaders are viewed as critical in the transformation of healthcare and in improving patient outcomes, and yet significant challenges exist that limit their development. Leadership in health care continues to be associated with traditional, linear models, which are incongruent with the behaviour of a complex system, such as health care. Physician leadership development remains a low priority for most health-care organizations, although physicians admit to being limited in their capacity to lead. This research was based on five principles of complexity science and used grounded theory methodology to understand how the behaviours of a complex system can provide data regarding leadership development for physicians. The study demonstrated that there is a strong association between physician leadership and patient outcomes and that organizations play a primary role in supporting the development of physician leaders. Findings indicate that a physician's relationship with their patient and their capacity for innovation can be extended as catalytic behaviours in a complex system. The findings also identified limiting factors that impact physicians who choose to lead, such as reimbursement models that do not place value on leadership and medical education that provides minimal opportunity for leadership skill development. Practical Implications This research provides practical

  5. The Palliative Treatment Plan as a Bone of Contention between Attending Physicians and Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Lederer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute vital crisis in end-of-life situations may result in hospitalization and intensive care without recognizable benefit in many cases. Advance directives regarding indications for resuscitation, hospitalization, and symptomatic treatment help ensure that acute complications can be managed quickly and satisfactorily in the patient’s customary surroundings. A plan was designed and implemented in Austrian nursing homes to provide emergency physicians with rapidly obtainable information on the patient’s current situation, and whether resuscitation attempts and hospitalization are advised or not. This palliative treatment plan is arranged by a physician together with caregivers, close relatives, and the patient or his court-appointed health care guardian or holder of power of attorney. Four years after implementation of the plan, a user satisfaction survey was carried out. The majority of participating nurses, emergency physicians and family doctors judged application and design of the palliative treatment plan positively. However, the low response rate of family doctors indicates nonconformity. In particular, the delegation of symptomatic treatment to nurses proved to be controversial. There is still a need to provide up-to-date information and training for health professionals in order for them to understand advance directives as extended autonomy for patients who have lost their ability to make their own decisions.

  6. Customer Satisfaction Level in Mount Sherpa Restaurant

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the key to every successful business in the sense of profit motive, as well as in the long run. It is the desire of every business to be able to understand their customers’ need. Many businesses, especially related with the service industry, carry out different surveys and conduct research in order to know what their customers really want. This research was carried out to measure the customer satisfaction level in Mount Sherpa restaurant. The results and findings ...

  7. Customer Satisfaction and Islamic Banking in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Fouzia Ali; Hassan Raziq; Abdul Aleem; Shahrukh Latif; M.Arslan; Arsalan Shah Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose-The purpose of this research study is to focus on the customer satisfaction towards Islamic banking in Pakistan based on the different factors including service quality, product quality offered by Islamic banks, customer care level of Islamic banks, financial benefits given to its customers, competition with conventional banks, religion and market reputation. Methodology- This study will help to understand the level of satisfaction of customers regarding Islamic Banks. In this study d...

  8. Physician medical malpractice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMasurier, Jean

    1985-01-01

    Malpractice insurance premiums for physicians have increased at an average rate of over 30 percent per year. This rate is significantly higher than health care cost inflation and the increase in physician costs. Trends indicate that malpractice related costs, both liability insurance and defensive medicine costs, will continue to increase for the near future. Pressures to limit physician costs under Medicare raise a concern about how malpractice costs can be controlled. This paper presents an overview of the problem, reviews options that are available to policymakers, and discusses State and legislative efforts to address the issue. PMID:10311396

  9. Patient satisfaction and resident postgraduate year status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Sabharwal, Manpreet Singh; Ammakkanavar, Natraj Reddy; Annapureddy, Narender; Malhan, Rishi; Mehta, Bijal; Kanakadandi, Vijay Naag; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Fried, Ethan D

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has been recognized as an important variable affecting healthcare behavior. However, there are limited data on the relationship between doctor post-graduate year (PGY) status and patient satisfaction with provider interpersonal skills and humanistic qualities. The authors aims to assess this relationship using an American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) questionnaire. Participants were: patients attending a primary care clinic at a large urban academic hospital; and physicians treating them. The survey questionnaire was the ABIM patient satisfaction instrument; ten questions pertaining to humanistic qualities and communication skills with responses from poor to excellent. Mann Whitney U test and multi-variable logistic regression analyses were used to explore score differences by PGY level. The postgraduate year one (PGY1) had higher patient-satisfaction levels compared to PGY2/PGY3 residents. The PGY1 level residents were more likely to score in the 90th percentile and this remained constant even after adjusting for confounders. The research was a single-center study and may have been subject to confounding factors such as patient personality types and a survey ceiling effect. The survey's cross-sectional nature may also be a potential limitation. Practical implications - Patient satisfaction varies significantly with PGY status. Though clinical skills may improve with increasing experience, findings imply that interpersonal and humanistic qualities may deteriorate. The study is the first to assess patient satisfaction with PGY status and provides evidence that advanced trainees may need support to keep their communication skills and humanistic qualities from deteriorating as stressors increase to ensure optimal patient satisfaction.

  10. Scope, Breadth, and Differences in Online Physician Ratings Related to Geography, Specialty, and Year: Observational Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jessica Janine; Matelski, John Justin; Bell, Chaim M

    2018-03-07

    Physician ratings websites have emerged as a novel forum for consumers to comment on their health care experiences. Little is known about such ratings in Canada. We investigated the scope and trends for specialty, geographic region, and time for online physician ratings in Canada using a national data source from the country's leading physician-rating website. This observational retrospective study used online ratings data from Canadian physicians (January 2005-September 2013; N=640,603). For specialty, province, and year of rating, we assessed whether physicians were likely to be rated favorably by using the proportion of ratings greater than the overall median rating. In total, 57,412 unique physicians had 640,603 individual ratings. Overall, ratings were positive (mean 3.9, SD 1.3). On average, each physician had 11.2 (SD 10.1) ratings. By comparing specialties with Canadian Institute of Health Information physician population numbers over our study period, we inferred that certain specialties (obstetrics and gynecology, family practice, surgery, and dermatology) were more commonly rated, whereas others (pathology, radiology, genetics, and anesthesia) were less represented. Ratings varied by specialty; cardiac surgery, nephrology, genetics, and radiology were more likely to be rated in the top 50th percentile, whereas addiction medicine, dermatology, neurology, and psychiatry were more often rated in the lower 50th percentile of ratings. Regarding geographic practice location, ratings were more likely to be favorable for physicians practicing in eastern provinces compared with western and central Canada. Regarding year, the absolute number of ratings peaked in 2007 before stabilizing and decreasing by 2013. Moreover, ratings were most likely to be positive in 2007 and again in 2013. Physician-rating websites are a relatively novel source of provider-level patient satisfaction and are a valuable source of the patient experience. It is important to understand the

  11. Evaluations of care by adults following a denial of an advertisement-related prescription drug request: the role of expectations, symptom severity, and physician communication style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mansi B; Bentley, John P; McCaffrey, David J

    2006-02-01

    As patients continue to take a more active role in their health care, an understanding of patient requests of health care providers, including what happens when requests are not fulfilled, is becoming more important. Although its merits have been debated, direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs generates patient requests. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of physician communication style, respondents' expectations of receiving a requested prescription, and perceived symptom severity on respondents' evaluations of care following a physician denial of a prescription drug request stimulated by direct-to-consumer advertising. A 2 x 2 x 2, between-subjects experimental design was used. The respondents were made up of employees of the University of Mississippi. Physician communication style, respondents' expectations, and respondents' perceived symptom severity were manipulated using vignettes. Respondents' post-visit evaluations of care were assessed by measuring trust in the physician, visit-based satisfaction with the physician, and commitment toward the physician. Factorial analysis of variance procedures for a three-way design were used to test the hypotheses and assess the research questions. Manipulation checks suggested that the independent variables were appropriately manipulated. No significant first-order or second-order interactions were noted in any of the analyses. Post-visit evaluations of care were significantly associated with physician communication style (a partnership response led to better evaluations of care). There were no significant effects of either prior expectation of request fulfillment or perceived symptom severity. However, non-significant trends in mean scores suggested a potential role of these variables in the evaluation process following request denial. The manner in which a physician communicates with an individual is an important determinant of the evaluation of care following the denial of a request

  12. Prosocial motivation and physicians' work attitudes. Effects of a triple synergy on prosocial orientation in a healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Shin

    2015-01-01

    Employees work attitudes are key determinants to organizational performance. This article proposes a model integrating servant leadership, prosocial motivation, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in order to explain a mechanism through which prosocial motivation plays a central role in enhanding physicians' work attitudes. A cross sectional survey from a sample of physicians indicates that (1) prosocial motivation can be shaped from servant leadership when physicians perceive high value fit with their supervisors, (2) prosocial motivation improves physicians' job satisfaction. Its effects is strengthened when physicians perceive high CSR, and (3) job satisfaction improves organizational commitment. The results provide meaningful insights that a triple synergy of prosocial orientation among physicians, supervisors and organization enhances physicians' work attitudes.

  13. Physician Assistant profession (PA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020. The first PA students were mostly military medics. They were able to expand on the knowledge ... PA. Most states allow physician supervision by telephone communication with periodic site visits. Supervising doctors and PAs ...

  14. Physician-Owned Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 6001 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 amended section 1877 of the Social Security Act to impose additional requirements for physician-owned hospitals to...

  15. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  16. Physician Referral Patterns

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The physician referral data was initially provided as a response to a Freedom of Information (FOIA) request. These files represent data from 2009 through June 2013...

  17. Physician Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is the official dataset associated with the Medicare.gov Physician Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). These data...

  18. Physician Shared Patient Patterns

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The physician referral data linked below was provided as a response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. These files represent the number of encounters a...

  19. [Customer satisfaction with a quality management system according to DIN EN ISO 9001:2000: Increase in the satisfaction of cooperating clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beholz, Sven; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of customers' satisfaction is elementary for any quality management system. In our university cardiac surgery unit that has been certified according to DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 the influence of repeated evaluation of the referring physicians' satisfaction conducted in the course of three consecutive years on structures and processes in the scope of the quality management system was examined. Customers' satisfaction with the possibility of access to the department could be increased by targeted interventions. Further interventions in the field of documentation led to a measurable increase in satisfaction with postoperative communication. Repeated annual evaluation of the satisfaction of referring physicians has proved to be a valuable tool in the process of continuous quality improvement.

  20. Healthcare economics for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Douglas A; Krubert, Christopher; Sasson, Andres

    2003-01-01

    Although the principles of healthcare economics are not usually part of the fundamental education of emergency physicians, an understanding of these elements will enhance our ability to contribute to improved health-care value. This article introduces the practical aspects of microeconomics, insurance, the supply-and-demand relationship, competition, and costs as they affect the practice of medicine on a daily basis. Being cognizant of how these elements create a dynamic interplay in the health-care industry will allow physicians to better understand the expanded role they need to assume in the ongoing cost and quality debate. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.)

  1. Patient satisfaction: focusing on "excellent".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Koichiro; Waterman, Brian; Faulkner, Kelly M; Boslaugh, Sarah; Burroughs, Thomas E; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2009-01-01

    In an emerging competitive market such as healthcare, managers should focus on achieving excellent ratings to distinguish their organization from others. When it comes to customer loyalty, "excellent" has a different meaning. Customers who are merely satisfied often do not come back. The purpose of this study was to find out what influences adult patients to rate their overall experience as "excellent." The study used patient satisfaction data collected from one major academic hospital and four community hospitals. After conducting a multiple logistic regression analysis, certain attributes were shown to be more likely than others to influence patients to rate their experiences as excellent. The study revealed that staff care is the most influential attribute, followed by nursing care. These two attributes are distinctively stronger drivers of overall satisfaction than are the other attributes studied (i.e., physician care, admission process, room, and food). Staff care and nursing care are under the control of healthcare managers. If improvements are needed, they can be accomplished through training programs such as total quality management or continuous quality improvement, through which staff employees and nurses learn to be sensitive to patients' needs. Satisfying patients' needs is the first step toward having loyal patients, so hospitals that strive to ensure their patients are completely satisfied are more likely to prosper.

  2. Job satisfaction among general practitioners : A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, I.; Verhoeven, A.A.; Groenier, K.H.; Groothoff, J.W.; de Haan, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In recent years, the incidence of being overworked and burnt out has increased among general practitioners (GPs). One of the factors that influences the development of burnout is the job satisfaction that physicians experience. Therefore, we conducted a literature review to answer the

  3. Effects of compensation methods and physician group structure on physicians' perceived incentives to alter services to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschovsky, James D; Hadley, Jack; Landon, Bruce E

    2006-08-01

    To examine how health plan payment, group ownership, compensation methods, and other practice management tools affect physician perceptions of whether their overall financial incentives tilt toward increasing or decreasing services to patients. Nationally representative data on physicians are from the 2000-2001 Community Tracking Study Physician Survey (N=12,406). Ordered and multinomial logistic regression were used to explore how physician, group, and market characteristics are associated with physician reports of whether overall financial incentives are to increase services, decrease services, or neither. Seven percent of physicians report financial incentives are to reduce services to patients, whereas 23 percent report incentives to increase services. Reported incentives to reduce services were associated with reports of lower ability to provide quality care. Group revenue in the form of capitation was associated with incentives to reduce services whereas practice ownership and variable compensation and bonuses for employee physicians were mostly associated with incentives to increase services to patients. Full ownership of groups, productivity incentives, and perceived competitive markets for patients were associated with incentives to both increase and reduce services. Practice ownership and the ways physicians are compensated affect their perceived incentives to increase or decrease services to patients. In the latter case, this adversely affects perceived quality of care and satisfaction, although incentives to increase services may also have adverse implications for quality, cost, and insurance coverage.

  4. Antecedents And Consequences Of Tourist Satisfaction: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GN Joko Adinegara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of satisfaction is being practiced worldwide at very large scale and has drawn signifi- cant attention from academics and practitioners as it played an important role in company marketing strategies and was recognized as the driving force of loyalty. Although the antecedent of satisfaction was vastly learned, it is still debated by researchers. The objective of this article is to develop more integrative constructs of satisfaction and its consequences and investigating the correlations among the constructs that form satisfaction. By understanding the factors that form satisfaction and its conse- quences, a marketing strategy can be composed and implemented in effort to increase satisfaction and loyalty towards tourist destinations. This article also gives direction for future studies and managerial pointers for setting up constructs of satisfaction.

  5. Generation to generation: discrimination and harassment experiences of physician mothers and their physician daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrier, Diane K; Zucker, Alyssa N; Mercurio, Andrea E; Landry, Laura J; Rich, Michael; Shrier, Lydia A

    2007-01-01

    To examine bias and sexual harassment experiences of physician mothers and their physician daughters; correlations of these experiences with career satisfaction, stress at work, stress at home, and percentage of women in specialty; and influences of the mother on her daughter's experiences. A convenience sample of 214 families with mother and daughter physicians was sent a 56-item survey that included questions on bias and sexual harassment experiences. Statistical comparisons were made within 136 dyads where both mother and daughter returned the questionnaire. Eighty-four percent of mothers and 87% of daughters responded. Mothers and daughters reported similarly high rates and severity of sexual harassment before medical school, while in residency/fellowship, while in practice/work setting, and by teachers and supervisors. Daughters reported higher rates of harassment during medical school and by patients, mothers by colleagues. Gender and racial/ethnic discrimination was lower for daughters compared with their mothers, but gender discrimination was still substantial. Compared with other daughters, daughters who experienced discrimination or sexual harassment reported lower career satisfaction and more stress at work and at home and worked in specialties with fewer women. Gender discrimination and sexual harassment remain entrenched in medical education and professional workplaces. Maternal role models and mentors were not as protective as anticipated. Leadership of medical institutions and professional associations must deal more effectively with persistent discrimination and harassment or risk the loss of future leaders.

  6. Workplace spirituality and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Freda; de Klerk, Jeremias J

    2014-06-01

    In order to obtain an improved understanding of behaviour at work, employees should be studied from physical, psychological, and spiritual dimensions. Although the physical and psychological dimensions of individuals at work have been studied extensively, the spiritual dimension has been neglected for many years. The objective of the current research was to determine the relationship between workplace spirituality and a positive attitude related to work, that is, job satisfaction. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 600 white-collar workers, chosen from two organizations in different industries in South Africa. The research results indicate that there is a positive relationship between workplace spirituality and job satisfaction. These findings deepen the understanding of personal spirituality, organizational spirituality, and job satisfaction. They bring new insights into the significant role which spirituality plays in the context of the workplace. To survive in the 21st century, organizations need to be spiritually based. This, in turn, will lead to workers being satisfied with their entire work experience.

  7. Life satisfaction, ethnicity and neighbourhoods: Is there an effect of neighbourhood ethnic composition on life satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, Gundi; Nandi, Alita; Platt, Lucinda

    2016-11-01

    Immigrants and ethnic minorities tend to have lower life satisfaction than majority populations. However, current understanding of the drivers of these gaps is limited. Using a rich, nationally representative data set with a large sample of ethnic minorities and matched neighbourhood characteristics, we test whether first and second generation minorities experience lower life satisfaction once accounting for compositional differences and whether, specifically, neighbourhood deprivation impacts their wellbeing. We further investigate whether a larger proportion of own ethnic group in the neighbourhood improves satisfaction. We find life satisfaction is lower among ethnic minorities, and especially for the second generation, even controlling for individual and area characteristics. Neighbourhood concentration of own ethnic group is, however, associated with higher life satisfaction for Black Africans and UK born Indians and Pakistanis. The effect for Black Africans may stem from selection into areas, but findings for Indians and Pakistanis are robust to sensitivity tests. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictors of overall satisfaction of cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker-Schiebe M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Martina Becker-Schiebe,1,2 Uwe Pinkert,1 Tahera Ahmad,1 Christof Schäfer,3 Wolfgang Hoffmann,1 Heiko Franz4 1Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Städtisches Klinikum Braunschweig gGmbH, Braunschweig, 2Radiation Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 3Radiation Oncology Straubing, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, 4Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Städtisches Klinikum Braunschweig gGmbH, Braunschweig, Germany Background: Reporting the experiences and satisfaction of patients, as well as their quality of care scores is an emerging recommendation in health care systems. Many aspects of patients’ experience determine their overall satisfaction. The aim of this evaluation was to define the main factors contributing to the satisfaction of patients undergoing radiotherapy in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: A total of 1,710 patients with a histologically proven cancer, who were treated in our department between 2012 and 2014, were recruited for this prospective evaluation. At the end of therapy, each patient was asked to grade the skills and the care provided by radiation therapists, physicians, and physician’s assistants, as well as the overall satisfaction during therapy. Statistical analysis was performed to determine which parameters had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction. Results: Overall satisfaction with the provided care was high with a mean satisfaction score of 1.4. Significant correlations were found between overall satisfaction and each of the following survey items: courtesy, protection of privacy, professional skills and care provided by the radiation therapists and physicians, accuracy of provided information, and cleanliness. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that courteous behavior and the protection of privacy were the strongest predictors for overall satisfaction (P<0.001, followed by care and skills of physicians and radiation therapists. Patients suffering from head

  9. Family physician perceptions of working with LGBTQ patients: physician training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagan, Brenda; Fredericks, Erin; Bryson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Medical students and physicians report feeling under-prepared for working with patients who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ). Understanding physician perceptions of this area of practice may aid in developing improved education. In-depth interviews with 24 general practice physicians in Halifax and Vancouver, Canada, were used to explore whether, when and how the gender identity and sexual orientation of LGBTQ women were relevant to good care. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti data analysis software. Three major themes emerged: 1) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity makes little or no difference; treating every patient as an individual while avoiding labels optimises care for everyone. 2) Some physicians perceived sexual/gender identity matters primarily for the provision of holistic care, and in order to address the effects of discrimination. 3) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity both matters and does not matter, as they strove to balance the implications of social group membership with recognition of individual differences. Physicians may be ignoring important aspects of social group memberships that affect health and health care. The authors hold that individual and socio-cultural differences are both important to the provision of quality health care. Distinct from stereotypes, generalisations about social group differences can provide valuable starting points, raising useful lines of inquiry. Emphasizing this distinction in medical education may help change physician approaches to the care of LGBTQ women.

  10. Iranian Physicians' Perspectives Regarding Nurse-Physician Professional Communication: Implications for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilpour-Bandboni, Mohammad; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Salsali, Mahvash; Snelgrove, Sherrill; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy

    2017-08-01

    Nurse-physician professional communication affects the effectiveness and performance of the health care team and the quality of care delivered to the patient. This study aimed to explore the perspectives and experiences of physicians on nurse-physician professional communication in an urban area of Iran. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 physicians selected using a purposive sampling method. Physicians from different medical specialties were chosen from 4 teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. The data were analyzed with content analysis and themes developed. Three themes developed during data analysis: "seeking the formal methods of communication to ensure patient care," "nurses' professional attributes for professional communication," and "patients' health conditions as the mediators of professional communication." Nurses need to be informed of the perspectives and experiences of physicians on professional communication. Our findings can improve nurses' understandings of professional communication that could inform the development of educational and training programs for nurses and physicians. There is a need to incorporate communication courses during degree education and design interprofessional training regarding communication in clinical settings to improve teamwork and patient care. Open discussions between nurses and physicians, training sessions about how to improve their knowledge about barriers to and facilitators of effective professional communication, and key terms and phrases commonly used in patient care are suggested.

  11. Family physician perceptions of working with LGBTQ patients: physician training needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Beagan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students and physicians report feeling under-prepared for working with patients who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ. Understanding physician perceptions of this area of practice may aid in developing improved education. Method: In-depth interviews with 24 general practice physicians in Halifax and Vancouver, Canada, were used to explore whether, when and how the gender identity and sexual orientation of LGBTQ women were relevant to good care. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti data analysis software. Results: Three major themes emerged: 1 Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity makes little or no difference; treating every patient as an individual while avoiding labels optimises care for everyone. 2 Some physicians perceived sexual/gender identity matters primarily for the provision of holistic care, and in order to address the effects of discrimination. 3 Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity both matters and does not matter, as they strove to balance the implications of social group membership with recognition of individual differences. Conclusions: Physicians may be ignoring important aspects of social group memberships that affect health and health care. The authors hold that individual and socio-cultural differences are both important to the provision of quality health care. Distinct from stereotypes, generalisations about social group differences can provide valuable starting points, raising useful lines of inquiry. Emphasizing this distinction in medical education may help change physician approaches to the care of LGBTQ women.

  12. Investing in Physicians Is Investing in Patients: Enhancing Patient Safety Through Physician Health and Well-being Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth; Gundersen, Doris C; Gendel, Michael H

    2017-07-20

    Keeping medical practitioners healthy is an important consideration for workforce satisfaction and retention, as well as public safety. However, there is limited evidence demonstrating how to best care for this group. The absence of data is related to the lack of available funding in this area of research. Supporting investigations that examine physician health often "fall through the cracks" of traditional funding opportunities, landing somewhere between patient safety and workforce development priorities. To address this, funders must extend the scope of current grant opportunities by broadening the scope of patient safety and its relationship to physician health. Other considerations are allocating a portion of doctors' licensing fees to support physician health research and encourage researchers to collaborate with interested stakeholders who can underwrite the costs of studies. Ultimately, funding studies of physician health benefits not only the community of doctors but also the millions of patients receiving care each year.

  13. Management Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Chief Human Capital Officers' Managers' Satisfaction Survey asks managers to rate their perception of workforce planning, interaction with and levels of support...

  14. [Nurses' professional satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cura, M L; Rodrigues, A R

    1999-10-01

    We carried out a study with 91 nurses, trying to find out about the feelings of these professionals regarding their satisfaction at work. We used the Work Satisfaction Assessment Questionnaire (WSAQ), drawn up and validated by Siqueira (1978) and adapted with the analysis of seven factors: General Satisfaction; Physical and Psychological Stress; "Status" of the Job; Location of the Company; Compensating Benefits; Recognition and Personal Development. Data showed nurses satisfied with their work, in its intrinsic aspects (Accomplishment, Recognition and Autonomy). The psychiatric nurses were the most mature, most experienced, showing a higher satisfaction level, whereas the pediatric nurses were the youngest, most inexperienced and presenting the highest level of dissatisfaction at work.

  15. Physicians and advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B H; Wright, R A; Raho, L E

    1985-01-01

    In this study, although the majority of responding physicians seemed to perceive advertising as not having an impact on the medical marketplace, the results concerning the medical profession appear quite different. In addition to soundly rejecting advertising as a communication mode in their profession, the physicians felt strongly that it would damage the profession's public image, plus promote fraud and hucksterism. A majority of respondents even went so far as to state that advertising would cause the quality of care to deteriorate. A majority also felt that advertising is ethically wrong for physicians. From these results, it seems that these physicians were not as concerned about the evils of advertising, per se, as the manner in which advertising would be applied by their colleagues to undermine the profession. It is very clear from the factor analysis that the major dimension of these physicians' attitudes toward advertising pertained to concern for the image of the profession, although economic and media communications aspects were of some importance. The question items loading most heavily on the IMAGE factor reflect perceptions that advertising will impact on the quality of care, promote fraud and hucksterism, convey a negative public image, etc. Thus, the primary focus of the physicians' negative attitudes does not seem to be toward the economic consequences, nor toward advertising as a societal entity. But, the major element for negativity is the way in which advertising would be applied by medical practitioners. More specifically, physicians believed that it would be applied in an unprofessional, unethical manner. Results of the factor analysis imply that the negativity focused upon advertising is really directed toward uncertainty pertaining to the ethics of medical practitioners and the way in which these ethics would be projected through media and other communications vehicles.

  16. Measurement of patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol

    2009-10-01

    trials and to measure changes in satisfaction over time. Novel approaches involving an understanding of expectations and preferences of patients and matching these to the services provided also need to be explored.

  17. [Do online ratings reflect structural differences in healthcare? The example of German physician-rating websites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszmer, Nina; Jaegers, Lena; Schöffski, Oliver; Emmert, Martin

    2018-04-01

    Previous surveys have shown that patient satisfaction varies with the regional supply of physicians. Online ratings on physician-rating websites represent a relatively new instrument to display patient satisfaction results. The aim of this study was (1) to assess the current state of online ratings for two medical disciplines (dermatologists and ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists), and (2) to analyze online derived patient satisfaction results according to the physician density in Germany. We collected online ratings for 420 dermatologists and 450 ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialists on twelve German physician-rating websites. We analyzed the online ratings according to the physician density (low, medium, high physician density). For this purpose, we collected secondary data from both physician-rating websites and the regional associations of statutory health insurance physicians. Data analysis was performed using Median tests and Chi-square tests. In total, 10,239 online ratings for dermatologists and 8,168 online ratings for ENT specialists were analyzed. Almost all dermatologists (99.3 %) and ENT specialists (98.9 %) were listed on one of the physician-rating websites. A total of 93.5 % of all listed dermatologists and 96.9 % of ENT-specialists were rated on at least one of the physician-rating websites. Significant differences were found in the distribution (i.e., percentage of listed or rated physicians) of the ratings according to the regional physician density on only one physician-rating website (ponline ratings were shown to be better in regions with a higher physician density on two physician-rating website. On jameda.de, for example, dermatologist ratings were better in regions with a higher physician density compared to regions with a lower number of physicians (average rating: 2.16 vs. 2.67; pOnline ratings of dermatologists and ENT specialists hardly differ in terms of regional physician density. Physician-rating websites thus do not appear

  18. Patient assessment of primary care physician communication: segmentation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonova, Elena A; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how patient assessment of primary care physician (PCP) communication is related to patient satisfaction with the PCP, patient perception of PCP professional competence, patient assessment of the relationship with the doctor and patient demographic characteristics using a segmentation approach. The authors surveyed 514 adult patients waiting for appointments with their PCPs in two US primary care clinics. A latent class analysis was used to identify mutually exclusive unobserved homogeneous classes of patients. The authors identified three distinct classes/groups with regard to patient assessment of physician communication and the physician-patient relationship. The largest group (53 percent of the sample) assessed their PCP communication and other doctor-patient relationship aspects as excellent. However, 37 percent provided mostly negative assessments, expressed high general dissatisfaction with the physician and disagreed with the statement that their PCP was well qualified to manage their health problems. These patients were on average more educated and affluent and the group included more males. About 10 percent of patients expressed generally lower satisfaction with the PCP, though their dissatisfaction was not as extreme as in the highly dissatisfied group. Further studies are needed to help physicians develop skills to communicate with different patients. Patient segmentation can be an important tool for healthcare quality improvement particularly for emerging approaches to primary care such as patient-centered care.

  19. Analysis of approaches to the concept of job satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lysova E.

    2017-01-01

    the article is devoted the problem of satisfaction of person with his professional activities. It examines different approaches to understanding the phenomenon of job satisfaction, the analysis of their evolution in the works of domestic and Western scholars, describes the strengths and weaknesses of different interpretations of the concept of satisfaction. Almost a third of his life a person spends at work. In the labour force, he reveals himself as a person, implements the physical and ment...

  20. Measuring tourist satisfaction: a factor-cluster segmentation approach

    OpenAIRE

    Andriotis, Konstantinos; Agiomirgianakis, George; Mihiotis, Athanasios

    2008-01-01

    Tourist satisfaction has been considered as a tool for increasing destination competitiveness. In an attempt to gain a better understanding of tourists’ satisfaction in an island mass destination this study has taken Crete as a case with the aim to identify the underlying dimensions of tourists’ satisfaction, to investigate whether tourists could be grouped into distinct segments and to examine the significant difference between the segments and sociodemographic and travel arrangement charact...

  1. Empathy in clinical practice: how individual dispositions, gender, and experience moderate empathic concern, burnout, and emotional distress in physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Gleichgerrcht

    Full Text Available To better understand clinical empathy and what factors can undermine its experience and outcome in care-giving settings, a large-scale study was conducted with 7,584 board certified practicing physicians. Online validated instruments assessing different aspects of empathy, distress, burnout, altruistic behavior, emotional awareness, and well-being were used. Compassion satisfaction was strongly associated with empathic concern, perspective taking and altruism, while compassion fatigue (burnout and secondary traumatic stress was more closely related to personal distress and alexithymia. Gender had a highly selective effect on empathic concern, with women displaying higher values, which led to a wide array of negative and devalued feelings. Years of experience did not influence dispositional measures per se after controlling for the effect of age and gender. Participants who experienced compassion fatigue with little to no compassion satisfaction showed the highest scores on personal distress and alexithymia as well as the strongest indicators of compassion fatigue. Physicians who have difficulty regulating their negative arousal and describing and identifying emotions seem to be more prone to emotional exhaustion, detachment, and a low sense of accomplishment. On the contrary, the ability to engage in self-other awareness and regulate one's emotions and the tendency to help others, seem to contribute to the sense of compassion that comes from assisting patients in clinical practice.

  2. Empathy in clinical practice: how individual dispositions, gender, and experience moderate empathic concern, burnout, and emotional distress in physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Decety, Jean

    2013-01-01

    To better understand clinical empathy and what factors can undermine its experience and outcome in care-giving settings, a large-scale study was conducted with 7,584 board certified practicing physicians. Online validated instruments assessing different aspects of empathy, distress, burnout, altruistic behavior, emotional awareness, and well-being were used. Compassion satisfaction was strongly associated with empathic concern, perspective taking and altruism, while compassion fatigue (burnout and secondary traumatic stress) was more closely related to personal distress and alexithymia. Gender had a highly selective effect on empathic concern, with women displaying higher values, which led to a wide array of negative and devalued feelings. Years of experience did not influence dispositional measures per se after controlling for the effect of age and gender. Participants who experienced compassion fatigue with little to no compassion satisfaction showed the highest scores on personal distress and alexithymia as well as the strongest indicators of compassion fatigue. Physicians who have difficulty regulating their negative arousal and describing and identifying emotions seem to be more prone to emotional exhaustion, detachment, and a low sense of accomplishment. On the contrary, the ability to engage in self-other awareness and regulate one's emotions and the tendency to help others, seem to contribute to the sense of compassion that comes from assisting patients in clinical practice.

  3. Information-seeking behaviors of podiatric physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perzeski, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the information-seeking behaviors of podiatric physicians as they search for answers to clinical questions that arise during patient care visits. Invitations to participate in an Internet survey were e-mailed to alumni of the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine (now Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine [KSUCPM]). Twenty-nine questions surveyed the types and frequency of information that podiatric physicians need during patient care visits, which information resources are used by podiatric physicians, and which barriers podiatric physicians encounter when seeking information in general. With 143 completed surveys, results of this study indicate a preference for searching the Internet over using colleagues and print literature. The most common need is for drug information, and common barriers include lack of time and cost of accessing information. Results are similar to those for physicians and other health-care providers seeking information. Podiatrists recognize the need to become proficient at locating high-quality information, evaluating resources, and improving their understanding and use of resources on evidence-based medicine. Furthermore, with an increased awareness of their own behaviors, practicing podiatric physicians should pursue the best methods to find, judge, and use medical information for patient care.

  4. Physician health and wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Hilary; Brown, Oscar W

    2014-10-01

    Physician health and wellness is a critical issue gaining national attention because of the high prevalence of physician burnout. Pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout at levels equivalent to other medical specialties, highlighting a need for more effective efforts to promote health and well-being in the pediatric community. This report will provide an overview of physician burnout, an update on work in the field of preventive physician health and wellness, and a discussion of emerging initiatives that have potential to promote health at all levels of pediatric training. Pediatricians are uniquely positioned to lead this movement nationally, in part because of the emphasis placed on wellness in the Pediatric Milestone Project, a joint collaboration between the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Pediatrics. Updated core competencies calling for a balanced approach to health, including focus on nutrition, exercise, mindfulness, and effective stress management, signal a paradigm shift and send the message that it is time for pediatricians to cultivate a culture of wellness better aligned with their responsibilities as role models and congruent with advances in pediatric training. Rather than reviewing programs in place to address substance abuse and other serious conditions in distressed physicians, this article focuses on forward progress in the field, with an emphasis on the need for prevention and anticipation of predictable stressors related to burnout in medical training and practice. Examples of positive progress and several programs designed to promote physician health and wellness are reviewed. Areas where more research is needed are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Burnout among physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Maya; Ashkar, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians who are exposed to a high level of stress at work; it includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Burnout among physicians has garnered significant attention because of the negative impact it renders on patient care and medical personnel. Physicians who had high burnout levels reportedly committed more medical errors. Stress management programs that range from relaxation to cognitive-behavioral and patient-centered therapy have been found to be of utmost significance when it comes to preventing and treating burnout. However, evidence is insufficient to support that stress management programs can help reducing job-related stress beyond the intervention period, and similarly mindfulness-based stress reduction interventions efficiently reduce psychological distress and negative vibes, and encourage empathy while significantly enhancing physicians' quality of life. On the other hand, a few small studies have suggested that Balint sessions can have a promising positive effect in preventing burnout; moreover exercises can reduce anxiety levels and exhaustion symptoms while improving the mental and physical well-being of healthcare workers. Occupational interventions in the work settings can also improve the emotional and work-induced exhaustion. Combining both individual and organizational interventions can have a good impact in reducing burnout scores among physicians; therefore, multidisciplinary actions that include changes in the work environmental factors along with stress management programs that teach people how to cope better with stressful events showed promising solutions to manage burnout. However, until now there have been no rigorous studies to prove this. More interventional research targeting medical students, residents, and practicing physicians are needed in order to improve psychological well-being, professional careers, as well as the

  6. Measuring patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Many businesses use customer satisfaction surveys successfully. You may notice that you find one in almost every restaurant or hotel room. I do not think it is a coincidence that the hotel industry provides some of the finest customer service available. When it comes to providing excellent customer service, dental practices can learn from businesses that regularly assess customer satisfaction.

  7. Designing satisfaction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kai; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    2007-01-01

    In the effect sampling method, presentation of researcher, the intro text, the order of questions in the questionnaire along with the number of categories in the rating scale is tested in relation to the design of satisfaction studies. Based on the analyses specific recommendations for designing...... satisfaction studies are given....

  8. Customer satisfaction measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maričić Branko R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Customer satisfaction is important in business management as a basis for long-term profitability of a single line of products and services and the company as a whole. Customer satisfaction in modern market conditions is characterized by a large number of alternatives that can satisfy the same need or desire of consumers, and are a prerequisite for the retention, loyalty, and positive verbal communication between companies and vendors on one hand and consumers on the other. Companies are investing more and more investment and management efforts in improving customer satisfaction. Improving customer satisfaction and its measurement involves the taking of appropriate marketing strategies and tactics, as well as corrective measures. This paper presents the well-known attempts to measure customers' satisfaction at the macro and micro level of marketing analysis. The index of consumer satisfaction is an important indicator of achieved quality and market performance of companies and can be measured on a micro and macro level. National customer satisfaction indexes are useful framework for analyzing the competitiveness of national economies, industries and individual companies and are used for a variety of other aspects of observation and analysis. Standardization of consumer satisfaction indexes in different countries allows comparability of the data, giving a new quality of analysis in the era of globalization and internationalization of business.

  9. Leasing physician office space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Charles

    2009-01-01

    When leasing office space, physicians should determine the effective lease rate (ELR) for each building they are considering before making a selection. The ELR is based on a number of factors, including building quality, building location, basic form of lease agreement, rent escalators and add-on factors in the lease, tenant improvement allowance, method of square footage measurement, quality of building management, and other variables. The ELR enables prospective physician tenants to accurately compare lease rates being quoted by building owners and to make leasing decisions based on objective criteria.

  10. [Hippocrates' treatise physician].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøland, Anders

    2005-01-01

    This small treatise does not appear to have been published in Danish in its entirety. It gives a vivid picture of the physician in ancient Greece. The well known first chapter describes the attitudes and attributes of the doctor. It goes on discussing in some detail how the light should be in the surgery, the instruments to be used, the preparations of bandages and drugs, and the use of cupping instruments. The author stresses both the needs of the patient and the necessity of the physician's dignity and integrity.

  11. Factors associated with physicians’ perception of physician-patient relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Francisco Casanova Saldarriaga

    2017-03-01

    -income people, and 46.7% felt that there was a good physician-patient relationship. Conclusions: Technology and specialization do not contribute to dehumanization of physicians. Studying patients by organs often causes to miss the perception of the patient as a whole. Evidence-based medicine is only necessary as a complement to physician’s experiences. Bureaucratic processes and long waiting periods discourage the patient. It is important to assign more time to patients in the outpatient health care service. The perception of physician-patient relationship strongly correlates to the satisfaction of both patient and physician.

  12. The "Handling" of power in the physician-patient encounter: perceptions from experienced physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmon, Laura; Stenfors-Hayes, Terese

    2016-04-18

    Modern healthcare is burgeoning with patient centered rhetoric where physicians "share power" equally in their interactions with patients. However, how physicians actually conceptualize and manage their power when interacting with patients remains unexamined in the literature. This study explored how power is perceived and exerted in the physician-patient encounter from the perspective of experienced physicians. It is necessary to examine physicians' awareness of power in the context of modern healthcare that espouses values of dialogic, egalitarian, patient centered care. Thirty physicians with a minimum five years' experience practicing medicine in the disciplines of Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Family Medicine were recruited. The authors analyzed semi-structured interview data using LeCompte and Schensul's three stage process: Item analysis, Pattern analysis, and Structural analysis. Theoretical notions from Bourdieu's social theory served as analytic tools for achieving an understanding of physicians' perceptions of power in their interactions with patients. The analysis of data highlighted a range of descriptions and interpretations of relational power. Physicians' responses fell under three broad categories: (1) Perceptions of holding and managing power, (2) Perceptions of power as waning, and (3) Perceptions of power as non-existent or irrelevant. Although the "sharing of power" is an overarching goal of modern patient-centered healthcare, this study highlights how this concept does not fully capture the complex ways experienced physicians perceive, invoke, and redress power in the clinical encounter. Based on the insights, the authors suggest that physicians learn to enact ethical patient-centered therapeutic communication through reflective, effective, and professional use of power in clinical encounters.

  13. Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme-Ostapowicz, Katarzyna; Krajewska-Kułak, Elżbieta; Nwosu, Paul J C; Kułak, Wojciech; Sobolewski, Marek; Olszański, Romuald

    2014-05-03

    Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse. The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick's PPTS and PNTS scales. The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R = 0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p satisfaction with life with p satisfaction with life with p satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance.

  14. Impact of satisfactions with psychological reward and pay on Chinese nurses' work attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feifei; Yang, Min; Gao, Wei; Liu, Ye; De Gieter, Sara

    2015-11-01

    To examine the impact of satisfaction with psychological rewards (received from the head nurse and from physicians) and with pay on Chinese nurses' work attitudes. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in China. A total of 413 nurses completed our survey. We examined the effect of satisfactions with psychological rewards and pay on work attitudes by performing a series of hierarchical regression analyses. We found that both satisfaction with pay and satisfaction with psychological rewards from the head nurse significantly predicted work attitudes, whereas satisfaction with psychological rewards from physicians did not. Our results illustrate that when nurses feel satisfied with their pay and the psychological rewards received from the head nurse they exhibit more positive work attitudes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Service Encounter Related Process Quality, Patient Satisfaction, and Behavioral Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandakumar Mekoth

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies some of the critical service encounters thatthe outpatients undergo in a health care facility and investigateswhether the service encounter related process quality as perceivedby the patients leads to patient satisfaction, repeat visit, and recommendationintentions. Personal visits, observations, and enquiriesat the outpatient center have been conducted to identifythe various service encounters that outpatients undergo in thehospital. Exit interviews of the outpatients have been conductedto identify service encounter related process quality variableswhich determine patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions.A preliminary scale to measure service encounter related processquality was developed and its factor structure and internal consistencyreliability were established. The study reveals that boththe physician quality and laboratory quality have been found tobe significantly related to patient satisfaction. However, quite interestingly,courtesy shown by the registration or outpatient staff,perceived length of waiting time, or even the salient aspects of theservicescape, did not influence patient satisfaction.

  16. Physician rating websites: do radiologists have an online presence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kirven; Hawkins, C Matthew; Hughes, Danny R; Patel, Kishen; Gogia, Navdeep; Sekhar, Aarti; Duszak, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Given that patient satisfaction and provider transparency intersect on online physician-rating websites, we aimed to assess radiologist representation on these increasingly popular sites. From a directory of all Medicare participating physicians, we randomly selected 1,000 self-designated diagnostic radiologists and manually extracted their rating information from five popular online physician-review websites (HealthGrades, Healthcare Reviews, RateMDs, Kudzu, and Yelp). Using automated web "data-scraping" techniques, we separately extracted all radiologist and nonradiologist rating information from a single amenable site (Healthcare Reviews). Rating characteristics were analyzed. Of 1,000 sampled self-designated diagnostic radiologists representing all 50 states, only 197 (19.7%) were profiled on any of the five online physician-review websites. Only 24 (2.4%) were rated on two of the sites, and none was profiled on ≥3 sites. Of all 6,775 physicians listed on a single electronically interrogated site, only 30 (0.4%) were radiologists. With 28,555 (5.2%) of all 547,849 Medicare-participating physicians identified as diagnostic radiologists, radiologists were thus significantly underrepresented online (P rated online by similar numbers of patients (1.13 ± 0.43 versus 1.03 ± 0.22, P = .22), radiologists were rated (on a low to high score of 1 to 10) significantly higher than nonradiologists (median 8.5 versus 5, P = .04). Most diagnostic radiologists are not profiled on common online physician-rating websites, and they are significantly underrepresented compared with nonradiologists. Reviewed radiologists, however, scored favorably. Given the potential for patient satisfaction scores and public domain information to affect referrals and future value-based payments, initiatives to enhance radiologists' online presence are advised. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors Leading to Students' Satisfaction in the Higher Learning Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siming, Luo; Niamatullah; Gao, Jianying; Xu, Dan; Shaf, Khurrum

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to understand factors that affect satisfaction of students with learning. This study will explore the relationship between student satisfaction and teacher-student relationship, teacher preparedness, campus support facilities and experiences provided by the institute to the students. Study is a necessary activity that…

  18. Examining College Satisfaction in Students with and without Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Molly M.

    2017-01-01

    With the increase of students with disabilities attending post secondary education, it is important to have an understanding of how satisfied a student with a disability is with college. At present, the research on college satisfaction focuses on specific variables and how the specific variables moderate or mediate college satisfaction; however,…

  19. Student Satisfaction in Higher Education: A Meta-Analytic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Fernando de Oliveira; Ladeira, Wagner Junior; Sampaio, Claudio Hoffmann; da Silva Costa, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a meta-analysis performed to identify key antecedent and consequent constructs of satisfaction in higher education. We offer an integrated model to achieve a better understanding of satisfaction in the context of higher education. To accomplish this objective, we identified 83 studies that were valid and…

  20. The structure of psychological life satisfaction: insights from farmers and a general community sample in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological life satisfaction is a robust predictor of wellbeing. Public health measures to improve wellbeing would benefit from an understanding of how overall life satisfaction varies as a function of satisfaction with multiple life domains, an area that has been little explored. We examine a sample of drought-affected Australian farmers and a general community sample of Australians to investigate how domain satisfaction combines to form psychological satisfaction. In particular, we introduce a way of statistically testing for the presence of “supra-domains” of satisfaction to propose a novel way of examining the composition of psychological life satisfaction to gain insights for health promotion and policy. Methods Covariance between different perceptions of life domain satisfaction was identified by conducting correlation, regression, and exploratory factor analyses on responses to the Personal Wellbeing Index. Structural equations modelling was then used to (a) validate satisfaction supra-domain constructs emerging from different perceptions of life domain satisfaction, and (b) model relationships between supra-domains and an explicit measure of psychological life satisfaction. Results Perceived satisfaction with eight different life domains loaded onto a single unitary satisfaction construct adequately in each sample. However, in both samples, different domains better loaded onto two separate but correlated constructs (‘supra-domains’): “satisfaction with connectedness” and “satisfaction with efficacy”. Modelling reciprocal pathways between these supra-domains and an explicit measure of psychological life satisfaction revealed that efficacy mediated the link between connectedness and psychological satisfaction. Conclusions If satisfaction with connectedness underlies satisfaction with efficacy (and thus psychological satisfaction), a novel insight for health policy emerges: psychological life satisfaction, a vital part of