WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding over-the-counter medicines

  1. Over-the-Counter Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are drugs you can buy without a prescription. Some OTC medicines relieve aches, pains and itches. ... medicine is safe enough to sell over-the-counter. Taking OTC medicines still has risks. Some interact ...

  2. Using over-the-counter medicines safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000882.htm Using over-the-counter medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... need to know about OTC drugs. About OTC Medicines You can buy OTC medicines without a prescription ...

  3. Over-the-counter medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lozenges: Soothe "tickle" in the throat (Halls, Robitussin, Vicks). Liquid cough medicines with dextromethorphan: Suppress the urge to cough (Benylin, Delsym, Robitussin DM, Simply Cough, Vicks 44, and store brands). Decongestants: Decongestants help clear ...

  4. Over-the-counter medicine abuse ? a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The sale of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines from pharmacies can help individuals self-manage symptoms. However, some OTC medicines may be abused, with addiction and harms being increasingly recognised. This review describes the current knowledge and understanding of OTC medicine abuse. Approach: Comprehensive search of international empirical and review literature between 1990 and 2011. Findings: OTC medicine abuse was identified in many countries and although implicated products...

  5. Over-the-counter medicine abuse: a review of the\\ud literature

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The sale of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines from pharmacies can help individuals self-manage symptoms. However, some OTC medicines may be abused, with addiction and harms being increasingly recognised. This review describes the current knowledge and understanding of\\ud OTC medicine abuse.\\ud \\ud Approach: Comprehensive search of international empirical and review literature between 1990 and 2011.\\ud \\ud Findings: OTC medicine abuse was identified in many countries and although im...

  6. Analysis of Marketing Strategy for Food Supplements and Over-The-Counter Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzeparoski, Marjan; Trajkovic-Jolevska, Suzana

    2016-09-15

    Marketing strategy is correlated with the regulations for the corresponding product category. Accordingly, there is a big difference in the marketing strategy of food supplements and over-the-counter medicines. In this paper are presented 2 different marketing strategies of a new small pharmaceutical company in two studies. The findings of studies analysis can be used for developing marketing strategies in the wider sense and other products, for other small to medium sized companies in other countries of interest with similar regulations and help them understand how to position and promote themselves and their products.

  7. Analysis of Marketing Strategy for Food Supplements and Over-The-Counter Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Dzeparoski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Marketing strategy is correlated with the regulations for the corresponding product category. Accordingly, there is a big difference in the marketing strategy of food supplements and over-the-counter medicines. In this paper are presented 2 different marketing strategies of a new small pharmaceutical company in two studies. The findings of studies analysis can be used for developing marketing strategies in the wider sense and other products, for other small to medium sized companies in other countries of interest with similar regulations and help them understand how to position and promote themselves and their products.

  8. Current Over-the-Counter Medicine Label: Take a Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are arranged in a simpler eye-catching, consistent style; and may contain easier to understand words. While ... Products Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance ...

  9. Over-the-counter and prescription medicine misuse in Cape Town ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To provide community-level public health surveillance information on over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medicine misuse. Methods. A retrospective study of OTC and prescription medicine misuse among 9 063 patients from 23 specialist substance abuse treatment centres in Cape Town, South Africa, ...

  10. Surveillance and uncertainty: community pharmacy responses to over the counter medicine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The sale of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines from community pharmacies offers important opportunities for members of the public to access medicines and self-treat conditions. They are increasingly recognised, however, as having the potential for abuse and harm despite their perceived relative safety. This study reports on a qualitative study that explored the experiences and views of community pharmacy staff in relation to current practices and concerns, management and support relating to OTC medicine abuse. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of ten pharmacists and seven medicines counter assistants in the United Kingdom. Analysis of interviews indicated that a range of medicines was implicated, including opiates, sedative antihistamines, laxatives and decongestants. A surveillance role was apparent for assistants, who placed emphasis on regulations, procedure and monitoring frequency of purchases to manage abuse, with referral on to pharmacists. Frequency of purchase was central to assistants' definition of those suspected of OTC medicine abuse, which pharmacists also utilised as well as a distinction between intentional abuse and unintentional medicine misuse. A lack of information about customers, easy access to, and poor communication between community pharmacies were emergent barriers to pharmacists providing more support. Many appeared uncertain of referral options or how pharmacists could effectively stop the problem of abuse. The commercial environment was a particular concern, in relation to customer expectations, medicine advertising and easy access to different community pharmacies. A key tension emerged between providing medicine supplies that permitted consumer freedom, with the needs of healthcare professionals to understand more about those consumers qua patients. Policy implications include the need for improved knowledge for community pharmacy staff about signposting to relevant services, increased awareness of who

  11. Review of the efficacy and safety of over-the-counter medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerusa Clazer Halila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over-the-counter medicines are available without prescription because of their safety and effectiveness, to treat minor ailments and symptoms. The objective of the study was to analyze the availability and quality of systematic reviews published about nonprescription medicines, identifying the groups for which there are gaps in evidence. We identified published articles through the Cochrane Database of Systematic Review and MEDLINE, from the start of the database until May 2012, using the search terms "nonprescription drugs," "over the counter," and "OTC." We searched for articles that describe systematic reviews addressing the efficacy and safety of drugs dispensed without a prescription, according to the lists published by the Association of the European Self-Medication Industry and in Brazil, in the clinical conditions listed in Groups and Specified Therapeutic Indications. We included 49 articles, 18 articles were of moderate quality and 31 of high quality. Of the studies, 74.5% demonstrated efficacy in favor of the use of drugs evaluated. Of the 24 studies that evaluated safety, 21% showed evidence unfavorable to the drug. Overall, the evidence found in the studies included in the overview is favorable to the use of the drugs evaluated. However, there are gaps in evidence for some therapy groups.

  12. Students' attitude toward use of over the counter medicines during exams in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalak, Haya; Albluwi, Ala'a Ibrahim; Alkhelb, Dalal Ahmed; Alsaleh, Hajar Mohmmed; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2014-04-01

    To explore the use of over the counter (OTC) medicines among students during exams in Riyadh City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was designed; using a self-administered twenty-two item online questionnaire for the students' convenience and easy response disclosure. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 13®. A total of N = 1596 students participated in this survey, of whom 829 (51.9%) were university students and 767 (48.1%) were high school students. Overall, 80.0% of the respondents disclosed the use of OTC non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for headache and pain relief. In addition, other substances used during the exams were Energy Drinks (5.0%), Flu Medication (5.0%), Vitamins (5.0%) and Antibiotics (5.0%). Female students were found to be more knowledgeable about safety issues concerning the use of OTC medicines (5.11 ± 1.27, p = media were the main factors disclosed by the respondents that may result in an increase in the use of OTC products. The use of OTC medicines was generally higher among female students (p = 0.001). The use of OTC medication during exams was more among high school and university students. Gender, age and educational institution were found significantly affecting the use of OTC medicines during exams.

  13. Medicine reclassification processes and regulations for proper use of over-the-counter self-care medicines in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura K; Kitagawa Y; Yuda Y; Takano-Ohmuro H

    2016-01-01

    Kaori Nomura,1 Yuki Kitagawa,2 Yasukatsu Yuda,2 Hiromi Takano-Ohmuro2 1Division of Molecular Epidemiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, Shinmachi, Tokyo, Japan Objectives: Japan has actively reclassified substances ranging from prescription drugs to over-the-counter (OTC) drugs in recent years. The sale of most OTC drugs was deregulated several times and pharmacists’ supervision was deemed no longer mandatory. Japan established a ...

  14. Medicines in My Home: Information for Adults on Using Over-the-Counter Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicines In My Home More about using medicines safely Medicines in My Home: www.fda.gov/medsinmyhome FDA Consumer Medicine Education: www.fda.gov/usemedicinesafely National Council on Patient Information and ...

  15. Community pharmacy customer segmentation based on factors influencing their selection of pharmacy and over-the-counter medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Kevrekidis, Dimitrios Phaedon; Minarikova, Daniela; Markos, Angelos; Malovecka, Ivona; Minarik, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Within the competitive pharmacy market environment, community pharmacies are required to develop efficient marketing strategies based on contemporary information about consumer behavior in order to attract clients and develop customer loyalty. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the consumers’ preferences concerning the selection of pharmacy and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, and to identify customer segments in relation to these preferences. Methods: A cross-sect...

  16. Purchasing Over-the-counter medicines from Australian pharmacy: What do the pharmacy customers value and expect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan V

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over-the-counter medicines (OTC are widely available and can be purchased without a prescription. Their availability means that a customer may choose to purchase them without the involvement of a pharmacy/pharmacist. It is important to understand customer OTC purchasing perceptions and behaviour from a pharmacy to better understand the needs and opportunities in this space. Objective: This study aimed to examine customers’ key expectations and what they value when purchasing OTC and how the effect of health status/stress and perceived risks/benefits of purchasing OTCs from a pharmacy may influence their OTC shopping behaviour. Methods: Customers from two metropolitan pharmacies across two different suburbs in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia completed a self-administered questionnaire. Data collection was conducted over a six-week period. The questionnaire examined demographics, current level of health and stress, as well as a range of questions (seven-point Likert-scale examining perceived benefits and risks, what they value, trust and expect when purchasing OTC. Results: A total of 86 customers from a broad range of demographics were captured in this study. When asked about their current health state, 41% and 23% respectively indicated that they were stressed and tense when they arrived at the pharmacy but many were feeling well (38%. Most customers strongly agreed/agreed that trust in the advice from a pharmacy (96%, trust in the products (73%, and the altruistic approach of a pharmacy (95% were critical to them. Further, 82% and 78% respectively disagreed that time pressures or costs were concerns, despite many feeling tense and stressed when they came in. When asked where they intend to buy their future OTC, 89% indicated pharmacy instead of a supermarket. Conclusions: High levels of trust, confidence and sense of altruism and care were key factors for customers buying OTC from a pharmacy, regardless of time pressures, costs or

  17. Purchasing Over-the-counter medicines from Australian pharmacy: What do the pharmacy customers value and expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincent; Tran, Hung

    2016-01-01

    Over-the-counter medicines (OTC) are widely available and can be purchased without a prescription. Their availability means that a customer may choose to purchase them without the involvement of a pharmacy/pharmacist. It is important to understand customer OTC purchasing perceptions and behaviour from a pharmacy to better understand the needs and opportunities in this space. This study aimed to examine customers' key expectations and what they value when purchasing OTC and how the effect of health status/stress and perceived risks/benefits of purchasing OTCs from a pharmacy may influence their OTC shopping behaviour. Customers from two metropolitan pharmacies across two different suburbs in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia completed a self-administered questionnaire. Data collection was conducted over a six-week period. The questionnaire examined demographics, current level of health and stress, as well as a range of questions (seven-point Likert-scale) examining perceived benefits and risks, what they value, trust and expect when purchasing OTC. A total of 86 customers from a broad range of demographics were captured in this study. When asked about their current health state, 41% and 23% respectively indicated that they were stressed and tense when they arrived at the pharmacy but many were feeling well (38%). Most customers strongly agreed/agreed that trust in the advice from a pharmacy (96%), trust in the products (73%), and the altruistic approach of a pharmacy (95%) were critical to them. Further, 82% and 78% respectively disagreed that time pressures or costs were concerns, despite many feeling tense and stressed when they came in. When asked where they intend to buy their future OTC, 89% indicated pharmacy instead of a supermarket. High levels of trust, confidence and sense of altruism and care were key factors for customers buying OTC from a pharmacy, regardless of time pressures, costs or existing levels of stress and health.

  18. Medicine reclassification processes and regulations for proper use of over-the-counter self-care medicines in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kaori; Kitagawa, Yuki; Yuda, Yasukatsu; Takano-Ohmuro, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Japan has actively reclassified substances ranging from prescription drugs to over-the-counter (OTC) drugs in recent years. The sale of most OTC drugs was deregulated several times and pharmacists' supervision was deemed no longer mandatory. Japan established a new OTC evaluation system in 2015 to hear opinions from various stakeholders regarding medicine types to be reclassified. This study aimed to examine the new framework to identify candidate substances for reclassification. Moreover, we examined how to manage the safe, self-care use of OTC drugs in Japan. The necessary regulatory information on OTC approvals as of January 2015 was collected using an Internet search and relevant databases. To highlight the characteristics of OTC drugs in Japan, the UK was selected as a comparison country because it too was actively promoting the reclassification of medicines from prescription to nonprescription status, and because of economic similarity. Japan and the UK have a risk-based classification for nonprescription medicines. Japan has made OTC drugs available with mandatory pharmacists' supervision, face-to-face with pharmacists, or online instruction, which is similar to the "pharmacy medicine" practiced in the UK. Japan recently reformed the reclassification process to involve physicians and the public in the process; some interactions were back to "prescription-only medicine" in the UK. It is expected that the opinion of marketers, medical professionals, and the public will improve the discussion that will greatly contribute to the safe use of drugs. Monitoring the new system will be noteworthy to ensure that OTC drug users are managing their self-care properly and visiting a doctor only when necessary. The supply methods are similar in Japan and the UK; however, the expected growth in the Japanese OTC market by the Cabinet and the industry is still uncertain.

  19. Elemental composition of herbal medicines sold over-the-counter in Sao Paulo city, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil, the use of herbal medicines is very popular due to its immense flora, cultural aspects and to the popular belief that herbs, which are of natural origin, are safe and without undesirable side effects. Aside from that public interest in natural therapies, the use of herbal medicines has increased expressively due to the high cost of synthetic medicines. In this study, elemental compositions of herbal medicines from the species Ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, Centella asiatica, Mulberry and Aloe vera supplied by different suppliers were evaluated by neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, Zn and some lanthanides were determined in these samples. Comparisons made between the results indicated differences in their elemental contents depending on the plant species, origins of the samples and the age of the leaves. The results also showed that the herbal medicines contain elements such as Ca, Co, K, Fe, Mg and Zn known as essential to humans and for treatment and prevention of diseases. Toxic elements such as Hg, Cd and Cu were not detected. Elements As and Sb were detected in some samples but at very low concentrations at the μg kg -1 levels. Herbal medicine results were also compared to literature values. Biological certified reference material was analyzed for quality control of the analytical results. (author)

  20. Medicine reclassification processes and regulations for proper use of over-the-counter self-care medicines in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomura K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaori Nomura,1 Yuki Kitagawa,2 Yasukatsu Yuda,2 Hiromi Takano-Ohmuro2 1Division of Molecular Epidemiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, Shinmachi, Tokyo, Japan Objectives: Japan has actively reclassified substances ranging from prescription drugs to over-the-counter (OTC drugs in recent years. The sale of most OTC drugs was deregulated several times and pharmacists’ supervision was deemed no longer mandatory. Japan established a new OTC evaluation system in 2015 to hear opinions from various stakeholders regarding medicine types to be reclassified. This study aimed to examine the new framework to identify candidate substances for reclassification. Moreover, we examined how to manage the safe, self-care use of OTC drugs in Japan. Methods: The necessary regulatory information on OTC approvals as of January 2015 was collected using an Internet search and relevant databases. To highlight the characteristics of OTC drugs in Japan, the UK was selected as a comparison country because it too was actively promoting the reclassification of medicines from prescription to nonprescription status, and because of economic similarity. Results: Japan and the UK have a risk-based classification for nonprescription medicines. Japan has made OTC drugs available with mandatory pharmacists’ supervision, face-to-face with pharmacists, or online instruction, which is similar to the “pharmacy medicine” practiced in the UK. Japan recently reformed the reclassification process to involve physicians and the public in the process; some interactions were back to “prescription-only medicine” in the UK. Conclusion: It is expected that the opinion of marketers, medical professionals, and the public will improve the discussion that will greatly contribute to the safe use of drugs. Monitoring the new system will be noteworthy to ensure that OTC drug users are managing their self-care properly and visiting a doctor

  1. The application of a DNA-based identification technique to over-the-counter herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Tazimuddin; Hussain, Nazreen; Bremner, Paul; Slater, Adrian; Howard, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Reliable methods to identify medicinal plant material are becoming more important in an increasingly regulated market place. DNA-based methods have been recognised as a valuable tool in this area with benefits such as being unaffected by the age of the plant material, growth conditions and harvesting techniques. It is possible that the methods of production used for medicinal plant products will degrade or remove DNA. So how applicable are these techniques to processed medicinal plant products? A simple PCR-based identification technique has been developed for St. John's Wort, Hypericum perforatum L. Thirteen St. John's Wort products were purchased including capsules, tablets and tinctures. DNA was extracted from each product, and the species specific PCR test conducted. DNA was successfully extracted from all thirteen products, using a fast and efficient modified method for extracting DNA from tinctures. Only four products yielded the full length ITS region (850 bp) due to the quality of the DNA. All of the products tested positive for H. perforatum DNA. DNA-based identification methods can complement existing methods of authentication. This paper shows that these methods are applicable to a wide range of processed products, provided that they are designed to account for the possibility of DNA degradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Receipt and use of spoken and written over-the-counter medicine information: insights into Australian and UK consumers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Vivien; Raynor, David K; Aslani, Parisa

    2018-04-01

    To explore Australian and UK consumers' receipt and use of spoken and written medicine information and examine the role of leaflets for consumers of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 37 Australian and 39 UK consumers to explore information received with their most recent OTC medicine purchase, and how information was used at different times post-purchase. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Similarities were evident between the key themes identified from Australian and UK consumers' experiences. Consumers infrequently sought spoken information and reported that pharmacy staff provided minimal spoken information for OTC medicines. Leaflets were not always received or wanted and had a less salient role as an information source for repeat OTC purchases. Consumers tended not to read OTC labels or leaflets. Product familiarity led to consumers tending not to seek information on labels or leaflets. When labels were consulted, directions for use were commonly read. However, OTC medicine information in general was infrequently revisited. As familiarity is not an infallible proxy for safe and effective medication use, strategies to promote the value and use of these OTC medicine information sources are important and needed. Minimal spoken information provision coupled with limited written information use may adversely impact medication safety in self-management. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Druggists and pharmacists as gatekeepers: Sales routines and compliance with sales protocols for over-the-counter naproxen 275 mg medicines in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, Joris Jasper; Cents, Michel H.G.; Megens, Nicole M.J.; van der Tang, Sijbrand J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Since for the sales of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, prescribing physicians are not involved, and written instructions on/in the medicine boxes are inefficient, druggists and pharmacists are important gatekeepers in preventing customers’ accidents. In this study we investigated the

  4. Effects of over-the-counter sales restriction of antibiotics on substitution with medicines for symptoms relief of cold in Mexico and Brazil : time series analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santa Ana Tellez, Y.; Teeuwisse, A.K.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated changes in the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), non-opioid analgesics and cough and cold medicines and its relation with the use of antibiotics after the over-the-counter (OTC) antibiotic sales restrictions in Mexico and Brazil. IMS Health provided retail quarterly

  5. Community pharmacy customer segmentation based on factors influencing their selection of pharmacy and over-the-counter medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevrekidis, Dimitrios Phaedon; Minarikova, Daniela; Markos, Angelos; Malovecka, Ivona; Minarik, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Within the competitive pharmacy market environment, community pharmacies are required to develop efficient marketing strategies based on contemporary information about consumer behavior in order to attract clients and develop customer loyalty. This study aimed to investigate the consumers' preferences concerning the selection of pharmacy and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, and to identify customer segments in relation to these preferences. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and March 2016 on a convenient quota sample of 300 participants recruited in the metropolitan area of Thessaloniki, Greece. The main instrument used for data collection was a structured questionnaire with close-ended, multiple choice questions. To identify customer segments, Two-Step cluster analysis was conducted. Three distinct pharmacy customer clusters emerged. Customers of the largest cluster (49%; 'convenience customers') were mostly younger consumers. They gave moderate to positive ratings to factors affecting the selection of pharmacy and OTCs; convenience, and previous experience and the pharmacist's opinion, received the highest ratings. Customers of the second cluster (35%; 'loyal customers') were mainly retired; most of them reported visiting a single pharmacy. They gave high ratings to all factors that influence pharmacy selection, especially the pharmacy's staff, and factors influencing the purchase of OTCs, particularly previous experience and the pharmacist's opinion. Customers of the smallest cluster (16%; 'convenience and price-sensitive customers') were mainly retired or unemployed with low to moderate education, and low personal income. They gave the lowest ratings to most of the examined factors; convenience among factors influencing pharmacy selection, whereas previous experience, the pharmacist's opinion and product price among those affecting the purchase of OTCs, received the highest ratings. The community pharmacy market comprised of distinct

  6. Community pharmacy customer segmentation based on factors influencing their selection of pharmacy and over-the-counter medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Phaedon Kevrekidis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Within the competitive pharmacy market environment, community pharmacies are required to develop efficient marketing strategies based on contemporary information about consumer behavior in order to attract clients and develop customer loyalty. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the consumers’ preferences concerning the selection of pharmacy and over-the-counter (OTC medicines, and to identify customer segments in relation to these preferences. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and March 2016 on a convenient quota sample of 300 participants recruited in the metropolitan area of Thessaloniki, Greece. The main instrument used for data collection was a structured questionnaire with close-ended, multiple choice questions. To identify customer segments, Two-Step cluster analysis was conducted. Results: Three distinct pharmacy customer clusters emerged. Customers of the largest cluster (49%; ‘convenience customers’ were mostly younger consumers. They gave moderate to positive ratings to factors affecting the selection of pharmacy and OTCs; convenience, and previous experience and the pharmacist’s opinion, received the highest ratings. Customers of the second cluster (35%; ‘loyal customers’ were mainly retired; most of them reported visiting a single pharmacy. They gave high ratings to all factors that influence pharmacy selection, especially the pharmacy’s staff, and factors influencing the purchase of OTCs, particularly previous experience and the pharmacist’s opinion. Customers of the smallest cluster (16%; ‘convenience and price-sensitive customers’ were mainly retired or unemployed with low to moderate education, and low personal income. They gave the lowest ratings to most of the examined factors; convenience among factors influencing pharmacy selection, whereas previous experience, the pharmacist’s opinion and product price among those affecting the purchase of OTCs

  7. Medicines in My Home: Information for Students on the Safe Use of Over-the-Counter Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get the right amount. • Use the measuring spoon, cup, or syringe that comes with your medicine. It ... pains caused by headaches, muscle aches, backaches, toothaches, menstrual cramps, and the common cold: • acetaminophen • aspirin • ibuprofen • ...

  8. Socio-economic differences in use of prescribed and over-the-counter medicine for pain and psychological problems among Danish adolescents—a longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Mette Jørgine; Hansen, Claus D.; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2014-01-01

    The objective for this study was to investigate socio-economic status (SES) differentials in the use of overthe- counter and prescribed medicine for pain and psychological problems among adolescents. Data consisted of questionnaire data on medicine use and health status, collected from 17- to 18...... in the use of prescribed medicine for pain. Conclusion: The risk of use of prescribed medicine for psychological problems increased in adolescents with decreasing parental education, while the risk of overall medicine use and use of over-the-counter medicine was increased in adolescents from low household......-year-old adolescents (n=2,400) during second round of theWest Jutland cohort study 2007, and register data on prescribed medicine use, parental educational level and household income. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to calculate odd ratios for self-reported and register-based use...

  9. Popularity and customer preferences for over-the-counter Chinese medicines perceived by community pharmacists in Shanghai and Guangzhou: a questionnaire survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shuai; He, Tian-Tian; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    This study interviewed community pharmacists in Shanghai and Guangzhou for their perception of the popular categories of over-the-counter (OTC) Chinese medicines and the factors affecting customer preferences for OTC Chinese medicines. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in six main administrative districts in Guangzhou and eight main administrative districts in Shanghai, China. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted in this study. OTC Chinese medicines contributed 21-50% among all the pharmaceutical sales by the community pharmacies. The prevalent categories of OTC Chinese medicines were common cold medicines, respiratory system medicines, digestive system agents, gynecological medicines, health tonic medicines, and qing re (heat-clearing) and qu du (detoxifying) medicines. Customers were more concerned about medical factors of OTC Chinese medicines than business factors. Among the medical factors, the most important was drug safety, followed by efficacy, contraindications, indications, and side effects. Among the business factors, the most important were brand and price. This study identified the top sales categories of OTC Chinese medicines in Shanghai and Guangzhou and the important factors such as drug safety, efficacy, period of validity, contraindications, and indications that are affecting the customer preferences for OTC Chinese medicines.

  10. Popularity and customer preferences for over-the-counter Chinese medicines perceived by community pharmacists in Shanghai and Guangzhou: a questionnaire survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study interviewed community pharmacists in Shanghai and Guangzhou for their perception of the popular categories of over-the-counter (OTC) Chinese medicines and the factors affecting customer preferences for OTC Chinese medicines. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in six main administrative districts in Guangzhou and eight main administrative districts in Shanghai, China. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted in this study. Results OTC Chinese medicines contributed 21–50% among all the pharmaceutical sales by the community pharmacies. The prevalent categories of OTC Chinese medicines were common cold medicines, respiratory system medicines, digestive system agents, gynecological medicines, health tonic medicines, and qing re (heat-clearing) and qu du (detoxifying) medicines. Customers were more concerned about medical factors of OTC Chinese medicines than business factors. Among the medical factors, the most important was drug safety, followed by efficacy, contraindications, indications, and side effects. Among the business factors, the most important were brand and price. Conclusions This study identified the top sales categories of OTC Chinese medicines in Shanghai and Guangzhou and the important factors such as drug safety, efficacy, period of validity, contraindications, and indications that are affecting the customer preferences for OTC Chinese medicines. PMID:25243017

  11. Use of over-the-counter malaria medicines in children and adults in three districts in Kenya: implications for private medicine retailer interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuya, Timothy O; Mutemi, Wilfred; Karisa, Baya; Ochola, Sam A; Fegan, Greg; Marsh, Vicki

    2007-05-10

    Global malaria control strategies highlight the need to increase early uptake of effective antimalarials for childhood fevers in endemic settings, based on a presumptive diagnosis of malaria in this age group. Many control programmes identify private medicine sellers as important targets to promote effective early treatment, based on reported widespread inadequate childhood fever treatment practices involving the retail sector. Data on adult use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines is limited. This study aimed to assess childhood and adult patterns of OTC medicine use to inform national medicine retailer programmes in Kenya and other similar settings. Large-scale cluster randomized surveys of treatment seeking practices and malaria parasite prevalence were conducted for recent fevers in children under five years and recent acute illnesses in adults in three districts in Kenya with differing malaria endemicity. A total of 12, 445 households were visited and data collected on recent illnesses in 11, 505 children and 19, 914 adults. OTC medicines were the most popular first response to fever in children with fever (47.0%; 95% CI 45.5, 48.5) and adults with acute illnesses (56.8%; 95% CI 55.2, 58.3). 36.9% (95% CI 34.7, 39.2) adults and 22.7% (95% CI 20.9, 24.6) children using OTC medicines purchased antimalarials, with similar proportions in low and high endemicity districts. 1.9% (95% CI 0.8, 4.2) adults and 12.1% (95% CI 16.3,34.2) children used multidose antimalarials appropriately. Although the majority of children and adults sought no further treatment, self-referral to a health facility within 72 hours of illness onset was the commonest pattern amongst those seeking further help. In these surveys, OTC medicines were popular first treatments for fever in children or acute illnesses in adults. The proportions using OTC antimalarials were similar in areas of high and low malaria endemicity. In all districts, adults were more likely to self-treat with OTC

  12. Public knowledge, attitude and perception of over the counter medicines: case study in Dar es Salaam region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin-Temu, M; Mwambete, D K; Nyaki, D

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate on misuse, abuse and the general public opinion as well as perception of OTC medicines. Data were collected, by face-to-face interview guided with a semi-structured questionnaire. The key questions focused on community attitude towards retail pharmacy, use of OTC medicines, views on OTC in terms of safety and effectiveness and knowledge and opinion on misuse and abuse of OTC medicines. The collected data were coded and statistically analyzed using EPI-Info version 6 database. Out of 270 interviewees, 50% admitted to have had visited retail pharmacies at least once per month. More than half of the participants (64.1%) reported to having been buying OTC medicines at least once in a month and 55.7% used the medicines as per containers label or leaflets' instructions The public demonstrated high awareness on the potential misuse of OTC medicines. The study revealed a high level of awareness on the potential abuse of OTC medicines and positive perception with regard to safety and effectiveness of OTC medicines. From these findings, it shows those pharmacists need to be more proactive in the management of inappropriate OTC drug use.

  13. Correlation between the use of 'over-the-counter' medicines and adherence in elderly patients on multiple medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Harbig, Philipp; Barat, Ishay

    2014-01-01

    (herbal medicines, dietary supplements, or non-prescribed drugs) was elicited during home visit interviews. Prescription drug adherence was determined by pill counts. A patient was categorised as non-adherent if the mean adherence rate for all drugs consumed was ... to be adherent than were non-users (odds ratio 0.41; 95 % confidence interval 0.18–0.91). Sensitivity analyses where adherence was defined different show no relationship between adherence and use of OTC medicine. Furthermore, separate analyses of herbal medicines, dietary supplements, or non-prescribed drugs did...... not correlate with adherence to prescriptions. Conclusion Amongst elderly patients on multiple medications a positive relationship was found between the overall use of OTC medicines and adherence to prescription drugs, in contrast to none when adherence were defined different or herbal medicines, dietary...

  14. Use of over-the-counter malaria medicines in children and adults in three districts in Kenya: implications for private medicine retailer interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochola Sam A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global malaria control strategies highlight the need to increase early uptake of effective antimalarials for childhood fevers in endemic settings, based on a presumptive diagnosis of malaria in this age group. Many control programmes identify private medicine sellers as important targets to promote effective early treatment, based on reported widespread inadequate childhood fever treatment practices involving the retail sector. Data on adult use of over-the-counter (OTC medicines is limited. This study aimed to assess childhood and adult patterns of OTC medicine use to inform national medicine retailer programmes in Kenya and other similar settings. Methods Large-scale cluster randomized surveys of treatment seeking practices and malaria parasite prevalence were conducted for recent fevers in children under five years and recent acute illnesses in adults in three districts in Kenya with differing malaria endemicity. Results A total of 12, 445 households were visited and data collected on recent illnesses in 11, 505 children and 19, 914 adults. OTC medicines were the most popular first response to fever in children with fever (47.0%; 95% CI 45.5, 48.5 and adults with acute illnesses (56.8%; 95% CI 55.2, 58.3. 36.9% (95% CI 34.7, 39.2 adults and 22.7% (95% CI 20.9, 24.6 children using OTC medicines purchased antimalarials, with similar proportions in low and high endemicity districts. 1.9% (95% CI 0.8, 4.2 adults and 12.1% (95% CI 16.3,34.2 children used multidose antimalarials appropriately. Although the majority of children and adults sought no further treatment, self-referral to a health facility within 72 hours of illness onset was the commonest pattern amongst those seeking further help. Conclusion In these surveys, OTC medicines were popular first treatments for fever in children or acute illnesses in adults. The proportions using OTC antimalarials were similar in areas of high and low malaria endemicity. In all districts

  15. Gold nanoparticles bridging infra-red spectroscopy and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct analysis of over-the-counter drug and botanical medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Siu-Leung; Tang, Ho-Wai; Ng, Kwan-Ming

    2016-05-05

    With a coating of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and Chinese herbal medicine granules in KBr pellets could be analyzed by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Surface-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS). FT-IR spectroscopy allows fast detection of major active ingredient (e.g., acetaminophen) in OTC drugs in KBr pellets. Upon coating a thin layer of AuNPs on the KBr pellet, minor active ingredients (e.g., noscapine and loratadine) in OTC drugs, which were not revealed by FT-IR, could be detected unambiguously using AuNPs-assisted LDI-MS. Moreover, phytochemical markers of Coptidis Rhizoma (i.e. berberine, palmatine and coptisine) could be quantified in the concentrated Chinese medicine (CCM) granules by the SALDI-MS using standard addition method. The quantitative results matched with those determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Being strongly absorbing in UV yet transparent to IR, AuNPs successfully bridged FT-IR and SALDI-MS for direct analysis of active ingredients in the same solid sample. FT-IR allowed the fast analysis of major active ingredient in drugs, while SALDI-MS allowed the detection of minor active ingredient in the presence of excipient, and also quantitation of phytochemicals in herbal granules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of over-the-counter sales restriction of antibiotics on substitution with medicines for symptoms relief of cold in Mexico and Brazil: time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa-Ana-Tellez, Yared; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated changes in the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), non-opioid analgesics and cough and cold medicines and its relation with the use of antibiotics after the over-the-counter (OTC) antibiotic sales restrictions in Mexico and Brazil. IMS Health provided retail quarterly data from the private sectors in Mexico and Brazil from the first quarter of 2007 to the first quarter of 2013. Data of each active substance of antibiotics, easily accessible medicines perceived as antibiotics substitutes (cough and cold medicines, analgesics and NSAIDs-the latter two being combined in the analyses), and medicines to control for external factors that can affect the medicines usage trend (antihypertensives) were converted from kilograms to defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants days (DDD/TID). Interrupted time series were used to estimate changes in level of medicines use at the intervention point and slope after the regulation. The Gregory-Hansen cointegration test was used to explore the relation between the use of antibiotics and perceived substitutes. After the regulation in Mexico NSAIDs-analgesics usage level increased by 1.1 DDD/TID with a slope increase of 0.2 DDD/TID per quarter and the cough and cold medicines usage level increased by 0.4 DDD/TID. In Brazil NSAIDs-analgesics usage level increased by 1.9 DDD/TID, and cough and cold medicines did not change. In the two countries, NSAIDs-analgesics usage changes were related with antibiotic usage changes; in Mexico cough and cold medicines usage changes had a relation with the antibiotics usage changes. These results showed a substitution effect on the use of other medicines, especially NSAIDs and analgesics, after reinforcement of OTC antibiotics sales restrictions. These regulations aimed to improve the antibiotics use and as a consequence reduce antimicrobial resistance; however, this type of policies should be comprehensive and take into account the potential substitution effects on the use

  17. Don't ask, don't tell: parental nondisclosure of complementary and alternative medicine and over-the-counter medication use in children's asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly; Yoos, H Lorrie; Kitzman, Harriet; McMullen, Ann; Anson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Parent-health care provider (HCP) communication is an important component of pediatric asthma management. Given the high prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and over-the-counter (OTC) medication use among this population, it is important to examine parental nondisclosure of these asthma management strategies. One-time interview and 1-year retrospective medical record review with 228 parents of 5- to 12-year-old children with asthma enrolled from six pediatric primary care practices examining parental nondisclosure of CAM and OTC medication use, reasons for nondisclosure, medical record documentation of CAM usage, and association between parent-HCP relationship and nondisclosure. Seventy-one percent of parents reported using CAM and/or OTC medication for children's asthma management, and 54% of those parents did not disclose usage. Seventy-five percent "did not think" to discuss it. Better parent-HCP relationship led to decreased nondisclosure. HCPs can play an important role in creating an environment where parents feel comfortable sharing information about their children's asthma management strategies in order to arrive at a shared asthma management plan for the child, leading to improved asthma health outcomes.

  18. Naloxone rescheduling in Australia: Processes, implementation and challenges with supply of naloxone as a 'pharmacist only' over-the-counter medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricolo, Angelo; Nielsen, Suzanne

    2017-04-27

    Numerous studies and systematic reviews have concluded that naloxone for take-home use is an effective intervention to reduce overdose morbidity and mortality, with few side effects and no abuse potential. One barrier to supply is that naloxone has traditionally been a prescription medication. In May 2015, the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia announced the intention to down-schedule naloxone when used for the treatment of opioid overdose, enabling sale in pharmacies without a prescription. The aim of this article is to describe process of rescheduling of naloxone and some of the challenges observed. We describe the process of rescheduling from initial proposal development to gaining support and submissions from a range of individuals and professional bodies to support this change. The implications of the change, particularly for pharmacy supply of naloxone, are discussed, including next steps to facilitate implementation of this change in the Australian context. A submission to reschedule naloxone was successfully instigated by a member of the public. The change may help remove access barriers to naloxone by allowing pharmacist supply. Cost, pharmacist training, existing naloxone formulation, presentation and packaging remain challenges to address. Implications and Conclusion. Naloxone down-scheduling has opened up an additional way to supply naloxone through community pharmacy. Further expansion of naloxone availability may be achieved through addressing cost as a barrier, and making naloxone more widely accessible through needle syringe programs, and other services that do not have medical staff. [Pricolo A, Nielsen S. Naloxone rescheduling in Australia: Processes, implementation and challenges with supply of naloxone as a 'pharmacist only' over-the-counter medicine. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;00:000-000]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  19. INTRODUCING OVER THE COUNTER COUNSELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Bakić-Mirić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A pharmacist in today’s world has a great responsibility – to help and educate patients about diverse ways for effective self-treatment. Whereas self-care is becoming increasingly popular among patients today the availability of over-the-counter medications makes it possible for patients to treat numerous conditions on their own but still under the supervision of a healthcare provider. During the pharmacist-patient encounter, the pharmacist’s obligation is to evaluate the patient’s medical condition, provide proper advice and counsel the patient on the proper course of treatment to be taken. Also by employing effective over the counter (OTC counseling as the most proper means in a pharmacist/patient communication process and, accordingly, rapport building in the OTC area, the pharmacist needs to demonstrate high energy, enthusiasm, respect, empathy, know-how of sensitive intercultural issues alongside personal appearance, body language, eye contact that all together make his/her personal “signature”. Accordingly, apart from patient education, the primary objective of OTC counseling becomes to educate pharmacists on basic principles used in assisting patients in the selection of over-the-counter (OTC products, provide examples of proper communication techniques for effective patient counseling concerning the OTC products (i.e. dosage, administration technique, storage, food and beverage interaction, monitoring etc where the pharmacist plays the key role in helping patients maximize their pharmaceutical care.

  20. A cross-sectional survey of pharmacists to understand their personal preference of brand and generic over-the-counter medications used to treat common health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira; Slack, Marion; Cooley, Janet; Bhattacharjee, Sandipan

    2016-01-01

    Consumers are hesitant in choosing generic medications as they are under the assumption that they are not as safe nor effective as brand medications. However, pharmacists do have the education and training to know that this is not the case. The aim of this study was to determine pharmacists' preference of generic versus brand over-the-counter (OTC) medication for their personal use as self-treatment for various health symptoms. A prospective, cross sectional study was conducted on 553 licensed pharmacists who were presumed to have expertise in the use of generic and brand name OTC medications. In a single Southwestern state in the United States, from December 2014 to January 2015, a web-based questionnaire was sent to pharmacists to explore their preference of brand and generic medications based on various health symptoms. Thirty-one brand-generic medication pairs were used to identify which medication type pharmacists preferred when asked about nine health symptoms. Frequency counts of pharmacists' preference of a brand medication or a generic OTC medication overall and for each of the nine health symptoms were determined. Chi-squared analyses and one-way ANOVA were conducted to determine if there were any differences between the preferences of brand and generic OTC medications across each symptom. The study overall showed that pharmacists preferred generic OTC medications to brand OTC medications (62 to 5 %, respectively). Based on an 11-point rating scale, pharmacists were likely to take OTC generic medications (as their choice of self-treatment) when presented with health symptoms (mean = 7.32 ± 2.88). In addition, pharmacists chose generic OTC medications over brand medications regardless of health symptoms (p brand name OTC medications for self-treating a variety of health symptoms. These study findings support the theory that expertise affects preference for generic versus brand name OTC medications. This information can be used to provide

  1. Over-the-Counter Medicines - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Farsi (فارسی) Karen (S’gaw Karen) Kinyarwanda (Rwanda) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul- ... Pax̌tō / پښتو ) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) HealthReach resources will open in a ...

  2. Over-the-counter pain relievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 54. Review Date 12/10/2016 Updated by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of ...

  3. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prescription Drugs and Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Drugs and Over-the-Counter Medicines Email Facebook Twitter What are Over-the-Counter Medicines? Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are those that ...

  4. Over-the-counter codeine use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, A B; Grimsson, A

    2000-01-01

    an interrupted time series design that contrasts the monthly sales data for over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine before and after the legislation took effect. RESULTS: The total use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine as well as those containing paracetamol and codeine has risen...... steadily throughout the period under study. The interrupted time series did not show a substantial effect from the legislative change on the use of all over-the-counter codeine pain relievers, paracetemol with codeine, and aspirin with codeine combinations. CONCLUSION: The assumption that increased access...

  5. Over-the-counter codeine use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Grímsson, Almar

    2000-01-01

    an interrupted time series design that contrasts the monthly sales data for over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine before and after the legislation took effect. Results: The total use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine as well as those containing paracetamol and codeine has risen...... steadily throughout the period under study. The interrupted time series did not show a substantial effect from the legislative change on the use of all over-the-counter codeine pain relievers, paracetemol with codeine, and aspirin with codeine combinations. Conclusion: The assumption that increased access...

  6. A Survey of Teenagers' Attitudes Toward Moving Oral Contraceptives Over the Counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Ruth; Kottke, Melissa

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives may help expand use among adult women. Teenagers may particularly benefit from this approach, as they experience disproportionately high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique challenges accessing contraceptives. However, limited research has explored teenagers' attitudes toward over-the-counter access. In 2014, a sample of 348 females aged 14-17, recruited via Facebook advertisements, participated in an online survey assessing teenagers' attitudes toward over-the-counter access and their understanding of how to use oral contraceptives after reading a prototype over-the-counter product label. Differences by participants' characteristics were assessed in bivariate analyses (Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests for categorical measures, and independent t tests and one-way analyses of variance for continuous measures). Seventy-three percent of participants supported over-the-counter access, and 61% reported that they would likely use oral contraceptives available through this approach. Few subgroup differences were found. Notably, sexually experienced participants were significantly more likely than others both to support this approach (85% vs. 63%) and to be interested in obtaining oral contraceptives this way (77% vs. 48%). Participants understood an average of 7.1 of eight key concepts that the prototype product label was intended to convey; no significant differences were found among subgroups. Over-the-counter access may be a promising approach for providing oral contraceptives to teenagers. Additional research is needed to evaluate whether teenagers can screen themselves for contraindications to oral contraceptive use and correctly use oral contraceptives obtained over the counter. Copyright © 2015 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  7. Over-the-counter codeine use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Grimsson, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the assumption that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership in Iceland would lead to increased irrational use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine.......The objective of this study was to test the assumption that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership in Iceland would lead to increased irrational use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine....

  8. Perception and practice of self-medication with over-the-counter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics increase access to and ease of medication, they are a major contributor to irrational use of medicines worldwide.This study assessed perception and practice of self-medication with OTC analgesics among students of Federal College of Education,Zaria. Method: It ...

  9. Stress and use of over-the-counter analgesics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke Jenny; Ekholm, Ola; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2011-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of over-the-counter analgesic (OTCA) use and perceived stress among 25 to 44-year-old men and women from 1994 to 2005; to examine the association between stress and OTCA use over time, and to explore whether the association attenuates when controlled by stress-related sy......To examine the prevalence of over-the-counter analgesic (OTCA) use and perceived stress among 25 to 44-year-old men and women from 1994 to 2005; to examine the association between stress and OTCA use over time, and to explore whether the association attenuates when controlled by stress...

  10. Utilisation of prescription and over-the-counter triptans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisk, Pia; Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Ljunggren, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Triptans are widely used in acute migraine, and in some countries, they are also available over-the-counter (OTC). In Sweden, sales have increased for both prescription and OTC triptans. This study aimed to describe current prescribing and utilisation patterns of prescription and OTC tri...

  11. Over-the-Counter Medicines: What's Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... public service by: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) , a national organization representing companies dedicated to providing consumers with safe and effective ...

  12. Availability of Paracetamol Sold Over-the-Counter in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthorst, Britt Reuter; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2018-01-01

    Due to the risk of hepatotoxicity when excessive amounts of paracetamol are consumed, Poisons Information Centers (PICs) frequently receive paracetamol-related enquiries. This study examined how widely pack size restrictions of paracetamol sold over-the-counter have been implemented in Europe...... and also availability of paracetamol through non-pharmacy outlets and their possible associations with frequency of poisoning enquiries. A cross-sectional European multicentre questionnaire study was performed using a questionnaire to identify the extent and nature of paracetamol pack size restrictions......, non-pharmacy outlet sales and the frequency of paracetamol-related enquiries to PICs. In total, 21 European countries participated. All PICs provided telephone hotline services. In 14 (67%) countries, pack size restrictions had been implemented in pharmacies (range: 8-30 grams). No significant...

  13. Over-the-counter-drug-induced thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thanh D; Mai, Vinh Q; Clyde, Patrick W; Shakir, Mohamed K M

    2013-01-01

    Excessive iodine ingestion may cause thyroid dysfunction. In this case series, we report four patients who developed significant thyroid dysfunction after ingesting over-the-counter (OTC) drugs containing large concentrations of iodine. Four patients from a tertiary medical center are reported. Case 1 involved acute exacerbation of thyrotoxicosis induced by taking OTC Tri-iodine™ in a 35-year-old woman while still on methimazole therapy. Case 2 involved thyroid-extract-induced thyrotoxicosis following ingestion of Thyromine™, and was confirmed by laboratory studies and ¹³¹I thyroid uptake. Cases 3 and 4 involved severe, symptomatic hypothyroidism induced in 2 patients with underlying autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) following ingestion of Iodoral™. In all cases, thyroid dysfunction resolved with appropriate management and discontinuation of the OTC drugs. These case reports demonstrate the significant risks associated with OTC preparations containing iodine in patients predisposed to thyroid dysfunction. There is no valid reason for taking high-dose OTC iodine supplements, which have been shown to cause harm and have no known benefit.

  14. Physical Characteristics of Selected Over-the-Counter Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Shipp, Shawnte

    2005-01-01

    The physical characteristics of over-the-counter medications may be useful to the compounding pharmacist in preparing dosage forms by serving as physical limits for the basis of choice of vehicles and supporting ingredients for formulations. In this study, three bottles of 16 different products were tested for their specific gravity, pH, suface tension and rheological properties. All products tested were heavier than water, with the exception of the lotions. The pH value varied greatly among the products, and the lotions were neutral to slightly acidic; the other preparations were acidic with the exception of Dulcolax and Maalox, which showed a basic pH. Aqueous solutions had a surface tension very close in value to water; all other products that were tested exhibited lower surface tension than water. The viscosity of the products varied greatly; lotions and suspensions demonstrated shear-thinning properties of either plastic or pseudoplastic type; and all solutions had low viscosity similar to that of water, except for Children's Dimetapp and Vicks Nyquil, which showed a somewhat higher viscosity than water.

  15. Gastrointestinal safety of NSAIDs and over-the-counter analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, I

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used. It is well recognised that they may adversely cause damage throughout the gastrointestinal tract and aggravate pre-existing disease. Their side effects on the upper gastrointestinal tract can be assessed by various means; each study type has different clinical connotations. Short-term use (less than 14 days) demonstrates dose-dependent damage of prescribed NSAIDs; the damage is proportional to the acidity of the drugs and not seen with Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors that have a pKa over 7.0. There have not been any serious outcomes, such as bleeding or perforation in these studies, and Helicobacter pylori (HP) plays no role in this damage. Long-term (3 months or more) endoscopy studies in patients show ulcer rates from 15%-35% with the various NSAIDs, but serious outcomes are exceedingly rare. Epidemiological studies show an association between NSAID intake and serious events. Ibuprofen is consistently at the lower end of toxicity rankings, whereas ketorolac and azapropazone are the worst. The risk of bleeding is increased with advancing age, presence of HP, previous history of bleeding, anticoagulant use, etc. The mega-trials show that COX-2 selective agents halve the bleeding episodes, but NSAID-induced gastric bleeding is very rare usually, less than 1 in 200 subjects taking them for a year. Seventy percent of patients develop NSAID-enteropathy, which is associated with intestinal blood and protein loss and rarely strictures. Over-the-counter (OTC) use of ibuprofen and diclofenac is associated with symptomatic gastrointestinal side effects comparable with placebo. Ibuprofen is shown to be remarkably well tolerated at OTC doses in a number of studies. There are recent studies to suggest that OTC NSAIDs should be taken on a fasting stomach, not with food as commonly advocated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Over-the-counter whitening agents: a concise review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Fernando Demarco

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tooth discoloration is commonly found in the dental clinic and tooth bleaching has been considered the preferred esthetic alternative, being more conservative, safe and with predictable results. Supervised home-use of 10% Carbamide Peroxide (CP bleaching with custom-trays is the most common bleaching procedure dispensed by dentists to their patients. The good results obtained with this technique stimulated the flourishing of new products and techniques. Over-the-counter (OTC bleaching products appeared as a low-cost alternative to bleach discolored teeth without dentist supervision. Different OTC products are available in supermarkets, drug stores or on the Internet, including rinses, paint-on brushes, toothpastes, chewing guns, dental floss, and whitening strips. There is lack of clinical evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of these products, being most of the studies supported by the manufacturers'. Basically, toothpastes, chewing gums, and dental floss are removal agents of superficial stains. Rinses and paint-on brushes with low levels of hydrogen peroxide have some whitening effect, but without clinical relevance. Strips present similar esthetic results and side-effects, compared to bleaching with 10% CP using trays; however, the studies have financial support from the manufacturers and were based on short term evaluations. Legislation varies widely in different countries regarding OTC dental bleaching. Concerns have appeared due to the potential abusive use of these self-medication agents, especially in young patients, with potential harmful results. Dentists should be acquainted with this kind of products to be able to inform their patients. In conclusion, there is a need for independent clinical trials to provide sufficient evidence regarding the use of OTC bleaching products.

  17. Over the counter drugs (and dietary supplement) exercise: a team-based introduction to biochemistry for health professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadtare, Sangita; Abali, Emine; Brodsky, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    For successful delivery of basic science topics for health-professional students, it is critical to reduce apprehension and illustrate relevance to clinical settings and everyday life. At the beginning of the Biochemistry course for Physician Assistants, a team-based assignment was designed to develop an understanding of the mechanism of action, effectiveness, and toxicity of five common over the counter (OTC) drugs and dietary supplements, and place these familiar medicines in a political and historical context. The objectives of this exercise were to stimulate interest in biochemistry; to provide basic information on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors related to these drugs to be expanded upon later in the course; and to encourage active and interactive learning. Teams of five students were formed, and each student was given an information sheet on aspirin, alpha-galactosidase, orlistat, dextromethorphan, or simvastatin, a low dose statin, which was previously available without prescription at pharmacies in the UK. After each member of the team acquired information on one OTC drug/dietary supplement by reading an assigned information sheet, the team was asked to go through a series of questions, and then submit answers to a quiz as a group. A high rate of success on the quiz, an overwhelmingly positive response on formal course evaluations, and enthusiastic exchanges during class suggested this team-based session accomplished its goals. Copyright © 2013 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. 'Over the Counter' Analgesics among Students of a University in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In some developing countries, poor implementations of drug policies make many non-OTC products available from a pharmacy without a prescription. However, sometimes certain situations also act as compelling factors (such as unavailability of physician) to request an OTC product or a non- prescription medicine [14,15].

  19. Public knowledge, attitude and perception of over the counter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate on misuse, abuse and the general public opinion as well as perception of OTC medicines. Methods: Data were collected, by face-to-face interview guided with a semi-structured questionnaire. The key questions focused on community attitude towards retail pharmacy, ...

  20. Over-the-counter medications containing diphenhydramine and doxylamine used by older adults to improve sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Olufunmilola; Schleiden, Loren; Albert, Steven M

    2017-08-01

    Background The unintentional misuse of over-the-counter sleep aids among older adults is an important public health problem and a focus of Healthy People 2020. Accordingly, the 2015 Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults recommends that individuals 65 years or older avoid use of diphenhydramine and doxylamine; however, many over-the-counter sleep products contain these active ingredients. Objective To identify the proportion of older adults using an over-the-counter medication containing diphenhydramine or doxylamine, and compare their characteristics with older adults using an over-the-counter medication that does not contain these ingredients. Setting Study participants were recruited from the Community Registry of the Pittsburgh Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center. Method The study sample was taken from a larger survey of 1025 participants on sleep health and over-the-counter sleep medication use conducted from February to April 2015. A subset of 169 participants aged 65 and older reporting taking at least one over-the-counter product to improve sleep within the past 30 days (16.5%) were selected for our analysis on associations between participant characteristics and potentially inappropriate use of over-the-counter sleep medications. Main outcome measure The proportion and characteristics of older adults taking at least one over-the-counter medication containing diphenhydramine or doxylamine. Results Of the 223 over-the-counter sleep medications listed by participants, 115 (52%) contained diphenhydramine or doxylamine. Using the Beers Criteria, we found that more than half of participants (59%) had used a potentially inappropriate over-the-counter medication containing diphenhydramine or doxylamine to improve sleep within the past 30 days. Participants taking at least one diphenhydramine or doxylamine containing medication were less likely to be aware of any safety risks in taking over-the-counter sleep

  1. American and German students' knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors with respect to over-the-counter pain relievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Katsikopoulos, Konstantinos V; Gummerum, Michaela; Brass, Eric P

    2007-11-01

    To better understand the knowledge base and perceptions involved in the decision to buy and use over-the-counter pain relievers (OTCPRs) by taking into account the environment in which these decisions are made. The authors expected that the differences in access and marketing would affect knowledge and decision making related to OTCPRs in the United States and Germany. A survey was given to 108 undergraduate university students in the United States and Germany (58 and 50 participants, respectively). The authors found that significantly more Americans than Germans take OTCPRs and that they also take significantly more OTCPRs. Americans exhibited less knowledge about side effects than their German counterparts. When asked when they consulted package labels, Americans reported they were more likely to do so before buying a product, whereas Germans reported consulting labels before taking OTCPRs for the first time. Package labels affected more Americans' decisions to purchase OTCPRs; Americans were also less likely to consult a doctor when feeling pain but more likely to take OTCPRs. Finally, Americans viewed OTCPRs as riskier after their status changed from prescription only to over the counter, whereas Germans believed they posed less risk. This study analyzed health-related behavior by looking at how environmental factors shape decision processes related to over-the-counter drug use. The results indicate that looking at environmental factors does help to explain differences in knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors among German and American students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Prescription Drugs, Over-the-Counter Drugs, Supplements and Herbal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herbal products Prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, supplements and herbal products Now playing: E-mail to ... it’s safe for you and your baby. Are supplements safe to take during pregnancy? A supplement is ...

  3. Assessing the relationship between pharmacists' job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling at community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Kubilienė, Loreta

    2016-04-01

    Community pharmacies have an increasing role in self-medication and community health is dependent on the quality of counselling services provided to patients. Some studies show that pharmacists' job satisfaction affects their work quality; other studies found that higher involvement in clinical services increases pharmacists' job satisfaction. To test the relationship between job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling practice at community pharmacies. Community pharmacies in Lithuania. A convenience sample (n = 305) of community pharmacists participated in the cross-sectional survey where they expressed satisfaction with job and reported on their over-the-counter counselling behaviour on self-report scales. The Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling approach was employed for data analysis. The strength of the relationship between job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling service. A bidirectional relationship between job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling service was found. In addition, job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling quality depended on pharmacists' age. Organizations were recommended to create a counselling friendly environment that would increase pharmacists' job satisfaction and, in return, counselling quality. Also, additional motivation of the retired pharmacists, as well as development of counselling skills of the younger pharmacy workforce, were seen as a means to improve both organizational climate and counselling quality over the counter.

  4. 31 CFR 359.34 - May I purchase definitive Series I savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... savings bonds over-the-counter? 359.34 Section 359.34 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT... definitive Series I savings bonds over-the-counter? You may purchase definitive bonds over-the-counter...

  5. Factors influencing consumer purchasing patterns of generic versus brand name over-the-counter drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Erol; Buller, Allison

    2013-02-01

    US consumers spend more than $20 billion/year on over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Although generic and brand name OTC drugs share the same active ingredients and undergo the same rigorous Food and Drug Administration approval process, brand name formulations continue to lead the OTC drug market with a higher market share. There is a limited amount of publicly available information regarding consumer perceptions and awareness about generic and brand name OTC drugs. The main objective of this research was to understand what factors influence US consumers to purchase generic versus brand name OTC drugs. The researchers used a 20-question, self-administered, multiple-choice survey to collect data on the factors influencing consumers' preferences for generic versus brand name OTC drugs. Results revealed that the single most influential factor for participants when purchasing OTC drugs was lower cost. Although economic factors play an important role in influencing consumers to choose generic formulations, a variety of other factors including advertisements, duration of the OTC effectiveness, severity of sickness, preferable form of OTC medication, safety of the OTC, relief of multiple symptoms, and preferred company will persuade others to pay more for brand name drugs. Ultimately, increased awareness and use of generic OTC drugs may result in substantial cost savings for consumers.

  6. "Just Advil": Harm reduction and identity construction in the consumption of over-the-counter medication for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Emery R

    2015-12-01

    Direct-to-consumer marketing has sparked ongoing debate concerning whether ads empower consumers to be agents of their own care or shift greater control to the pharmaceutical industry. Ads for over-the-counter (OTC) medications in particular portend to offer simple, harmless solutions for meeting the demands of social life. Rather than join the longstanding debate between consumer agency and social control in pharmaceutical advertising, I approach self-medication with over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics using Harm Reduction as a framework. From this perspective, consumption of OTC analgesics by chronic pain sufferers is a means of seeking some level of relief while also avoiding the stigma associated with prescription pain medication. Qualitative methods are used to analyze data from two sources: (1) semi-structured qualitative interviews with 95 participants in a trial examining the effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) from 2006 to 2011 in Tucson, AZ and Portland, OR; and (2) print, online, and television advertisements for three major brands of OTC pain medication. Participants described their use of OTC medications as minimal, responsible, and justified by the severity of their pain. OTC medication advertising, while ostensibly ambiguous and targeting all forms of pain, effectively lends support to the consumption of these medications as part of the self-projects of chronic pain sufferers, allowing them to reconcile conflicting demands for pain relief while being stoic and maintaining a positive moral identity. Describing OTC medication as "just over-the-counter" or "not real pain medication," sufferers engage in ideological harm reduction, distinguishing themselves from "those people who like taking pain medication" while still seeking relief. Justifying one's use of OTC medication as minimal and "normal," regardless of intake, avoids association with the addictive potential of prescription pain medications and

  7. Use of over-the-counter analgesics and perceived stress among 25-44-year olds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke; Holstein, Bjørn E; Andersen, Anette

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the association between perceived stress and use of over-the-counter analgesics in a representative sample of 25-44-year old adults, and to examine the association across various socio-demographic strata. Furthermore, to examine whether an association between perceived stress...... and use of over-the-counter analgesics attenuates when controlled by potential stress-related pain and discomfort. METHODS: National representative cross-sectional study in Denmark. The study population consisted of men and women aged 25-44 years, n = 4739. The survey was conducted by face......-to-face interviews. The outcome measure was use of over-the-counter analgesics (OTCA). The independent variable was perceived stress. Demographic variables and pain and discomfort symptoms were included as covariates. RESULTS: Analyses stratified by socio-demographic factors (gender, education, cohabiting status...

  8. Over-the-counter sales of antibiotics from community pharmacies in Abu Dhabi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameh, Majd; Green, James; Norris, Pauline

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate over-the-counter sale of antibiotics from community pharmacies in Abu Dhabi city, focusing on the extent, demographic and socioeconomic determinants of this practice. The study was conducted in the capital of the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi, and involved 17 randomly selected private pharmacies. A cross-sectional design using structured observations of 30 clients purchasing antibiotics from a pharmacy staff (either a pharmacist or pharmacy assistant) at each selected pharmacy. A total of 510 interactions were observed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The extent and types of antibiotics sold over-the-counter in Abu Dhabi city as observed in the selected sample of community pharmacies, and the demographic and socioeconomic factors that contributed to this practice. Sixty eight percent (68.4%) of the observed antibiotic sales were sold over-the-counter without prescriptions. Injection antibiotics constituted 2.2% of the antibiotics sold, 45.5% of which were sold over-the-counter. Combination of penicillins including β-lactamase inhibitors (34.0%), penicillins with extended spectrum (22.3%) and second generation cephalosporins (11.2%) were the mostly commonly sold antibiotic groups. Respiratory conditions (63.1%) were the most frequent reason for purchasing antibiotics. Over-the-counter sales of antibiotics were related to client ethnicity and age, gender of pharmacy staff and health complaint. Our study revealed high sales of over-the-counter antibiotics, despite this being illegal. The ineffectiveness of antibiotics in treating respiratory conditions of viral origin and effects of such practice on the emergence of bacterial resistance necessitates prompt action.

  9. Over-the-counter self-medication leading to intracranial hypertension in a young lady.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana Reddy, A M; Prashanth, L K; Sharat Kumar, G G; Chandana, G; Jadav, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Intracranial hypertension (idiopathic-IIH and secondary) is a potentially treatable condition. Although various factors such as female gender and obesity, certain drugs have been implicated as risk factors for IIH, there remains a lack of clarity in the exact causal-effect relationship. In India, self-medication by obtaining drugs over the counter due to lack of adequate drug regulation and ignorance of the public is a very common practice with a potential for severe adverse effects. We present a case of a young lady who has developed intracranial hypertension possibly due to self-medication with steroids and cyproheptadine, obtained over the counter.

  10. Deaths due to abuse of dextromethorphan sold over-the-counter in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humera Shafi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dextromethorphan is the most commonly used over-the-counter anti-tussive and expectorant medicine at therapeutic doses. Due to easy availability, euphoric high and hallucinogenic effects at larger doses, dextromethorphan popularity amongst the drug abusers is growing day by day. It is often mixed with alcohol, opiates, cannabinoids or other drugs of abuse for recreational purposes despite their lethal synergistic effects. More than 50 deaths were reported the first time in Pakistan after consuming cough syrups containing dextromethorphan, manufactured by two local pharmaceutical industries. All deceased had the history of drug abuse. We report the deaths of nineteen males, ages ranged from 17 to 45 years, in two major cities of Pakistan who purposefully ingested large doses of dextromethorphan for recreational purposes and died as a result of direct toxic effects of the drug. Toxicological analysis revealed high levels of dextromethorphan ranging from 7.3 to 41.7 mg/L in the peripheral blood, 4.2–92.6 mg/kg in the liver and 9.9–349.6 mg/L in the gastric content by high performance liquid chromatography. The dextromethorphan concentrations in all subjects significantly exceeded the therapeutic range and were consistent with concentrations reported in other cases of dextromethorphan abuse and toxicity. Besides dextromethorphan other drugs of abuse like cannabinoids, opiates, benzodiazepines, ethanol and chlorpheniramine were also detected. The cause of death was determined to be acute dextromethorphan intoxication with lethal synergistic effect of other co-ingested drugs of abuse. The deaths resulted in the prosecution of all individuals involved in manufacturing, distribution or sale of the cough syrup.

  11. Buyer beware? Does the information provided with herbal products available over the counter enable safe use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapp Peter

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbal products obtained over the counter are commonly used in Europe, North America and Australia. Although there is concern about a lack of information provided to consumers to allow the safe use of these products, there has been no published research to confirm these fears. In this study, we evaluated written information provided with commonly used herbal products in the UK in advance of a European Union Directive issued in April 2011 that tightened regulations for some herbal products, including requirements to provide safety information. Methods Five commonly used herbal products were purchased from pharmacies, health food shops and supermarkets: St John's wort, Asian ginseng, echinacea, garlic and ginkgo. Written information provided with the products (on the package or on a leaflet contained in the package was evaluated for inclusion of each of the key safety messages included in the monographs of the US National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Specifically, we looked for information on precautions (such as Asian ginseng not being suitable for people with diabetes, interactions with conventional medicines (such as St John's wort with the contraceptive pill and warfarin and side effects (such as ginkgo and allergic reactions. Results Our analysis showed that, overall, 51 (75% of 68 products contained none of the key safety messages. This included 4 of 12 St John's wort products, 12 of 12 ginkgo products, 6 of 7 Asian ginseng products, 20 of 21 garlic products and 9 of 13 echinacea products. The two products purchased that are registered under the new European Union regulations (for St John's wort contained at least 85% of the safety messages. Conclusions Most of the herbal medicine products studied did not provide key safety information which consumers need for their safe use. The new European Union legislation should ensure that St John's wort and echinacea products will include the previously

  12. Buyer beware? Does the information provided with herbal products available over the counter enable safe use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Herbal products obtained over the counter are commonly used in Europe, North America and Australia. Although there is concern about a lack of information provided to consumers to allow the safe use of these products, there has been no published research to confirm these fears. In this study, we evaluated written information provided with commonly used herbal products in the UK in advance of a European Union Directive issued in April 2011 that tightened regulations for some herbal products, including requirements to provide safety information. Methods Five commonly used herbal products were purchased from pharmacies, health food shops and supermarkets: St John's wort, Asian ginseng, echinacea, garlic and ginkgo. Written information provided with the products (on the package or on a leaflet contained in the package) was evaluated for inclusion of each of the key safety messages included in the monographs of the US National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Specifically, we looked for information on precautions (such as Asian ginseng not being suitable for people with diabetes), interactions with conventional medicines (such as St John's wort with the contraceptive pill and warfarin) and side effects (such as ginkgo and allergic reactions). Results Our analysis showed that, overall, 51 (75%) of 68 products contained none of the key safety messages. This included 4 of 12 St John's wort products, 12 of 12 ginkgo products, 6 of 7 Asian ginseng products, 20 of 21 garlic products and 9 of 13 echinacea products. The two products purchased that are registered under the new European Union regulations (for St John's wort) contained at least 85% of the safety messages. Conclusions Most of the herbal medicine products studied did not provide key safety information which consumers need for their safe use. The new European Union legislation should ensure that St John's wort and echinacea products will include the previously missing information in due

  13. Over-the-Counter Drug Advertising in Gender Oriented Popular Magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, A. M.; Krupka, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    Survey of 64 popular men's magazines and 47 women's magazines revealed that almost seven times as many over-the-counter drug advertisements were found in the latter than in the former. Most advertisements directed toward women concerned appearance; most directed toward men were for stimulants. Suggests enhanced regulatory efforts against…

  14. Consumer judgement and risk perception on availability of over-the-counter-drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabers, A.E.M.; Dijk, L. van; Bouvy, M.L.; Jong, J.D. de

    2011-01-01

    Background: Over-the-counter (OTC)-drugs are available without a doctor’s prescription. Whereas this is convenient for consumers, it also makes consumers responsible for appropriate and safe use. European countries differ considerably when it comes to the availability of OTC-drugs. In the

  15. Parent, Teacher, and School Factors Associated with Over-the-Counter Drug Use among Multiracial Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Over-the-counter (OTC) drug use is an increasing health issue among adolescents. Purpose: This study investigated OTC drug use among 7th through 12th grade multiracial students in one metropolitan area. Methods: A total of 2134 students completed the PRIDE Questionnaire, which examines alcohol and other drug use. Results: A total of…

  16. 78 FR 57623 - TRICARE Over-the-Counter Drug Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... B One-Step (levonorgestrel) emergency contraceptive as an over-the-counter product ``for all women...-Counter Plan B One-Step Emergency Contraceptive (levonorgestrel). (2) OTC availability of Plan B One-Step Emergency Contraceptive (levonorgestrel) through the demonstration project will be at retail dispensing...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1092(c)-3 - Qualifying over-the-counter options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Qualifying over-the-counter options. 1.1092(c)-3 Section 1.1092(c)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities § 1.1092(c)-3 Qualifying over-the...

  18. Over-the-Counter Data's Impact on Educators' Data Analysis Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jenny Grant

    2013-01-01

    There is extensive research on the benefits of making data-informed decisions, but research also contains evidence many educators incorrectly interpret student data. Meanwhile, the types of detailed labeling on over-the-counter medication have been shown to improve use of "non"-medication products, as well. However, data systems most…

  19. Association of Maternal Self-Medication and Over-the-Counter Analgesics for Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne Fangel; Gottschau, Mathilde; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Self-medication with over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics, such as paracetamol (PCM), among children and adolescents is increasing and constitutes an important public health issue internationally. Reasons for this development are unclear; parental influence is suggested. Our objective was to examine...

  20. Summary of: Over-the-counter (OTC) bruxism splints available on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassell, R.W.; Verhees, L.; Lawrence, K.; Davies, S.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some individuals may now be bypassing their dentists for treatment of bruxism. Self-diagnosed, self-adjusted and self-monitored consumers can access over-the-counter (OTC) bruxism splints via the Internet. While some may regard this market as benefiting consumers there are potential

  1. Over-the-counter (OTC) bruxism splints available on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassell, R.W.; Verhees, L.; Lawrence, K.; Davies, S.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some individuals may now be bypassing their dentists for treatment of bruxism. Self-diagnosed, self-adjusted and self-monitored consumers can access over-the-counter (OTC) bruxism splints via the Internet. While some may regard this market as benefiting consumers there are potential

  2. Patient characteristics among users of analgesic over-the-counter aspirin in a Danish pharmacy setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Kviesgaard, Ann-Katrine; Hesse, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of over-the-counter (OTC) high-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is a risk factor for experiencing gastric bleeding. However, more detailed knowledge on the characteristics of users of OTC ASA is needed. OBJECTIVE: To characterise users of OTC high-dose ASA in a Danish pharmacy sett...

  3. Dissolution rates of over-the-counter painkillers: a comparison among formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemanni, Matteo; Gatoulis, Sergio C; Voelker, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We wanted to compare the dissolution profile of several over-the-counter analgesics to understand whether the different formulation techniques employed to enhance absorption were associated with variations in the dissolution rate, a parameter known to affect drug absorption. We considered 5 formulations currently marketed in Italy: aspirin tablets (Aspirina Dolore e Infiammazione®), ibuprofen tablets and liquid capsules (Moment®), ibuprofen lysine tablets (Nurofenimmedia®) and dexketoprofen trometamol tablets (Enantyum®). Dissolution tests were performed according to the current USP/NF monograph dissolution procedure. Drug dissolution was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, 15, and 30 minutes since the start of the test. Dissolution was evaluated at three different pH: 1.2, 4.5 and 6.8. Every test was repeated 12 times. The aspirin formulation was by far the most rapid dissolving formulation, among those tested, with more than 80% of the tablet dissolved at 6 minutes for every pH considered. At pH 1.2 and 4.5, only the dexketoprofen formulation was able to reach the dissolution level of aspirin at 30 minutes, but had lower levels of dissolution at the previous time points. Instead, at pH 6.8, most of the formulations approached aspirin dissolution level, but only after 15 minutes. Ibuprofen capsules had the slowest kinetics, with a lag phase the first 6 minutes. Different formulation strategies can lead to great differences in the dissolution rates even among drugs of the same class, suggesting that enhancements in the formulation of painkillers can lead to improvements in drug absorption, and thus in the onset of analgesia.

  4. Switching, Adverse Effects and Use of Over-the-Counter Analgesics among Users of Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Hyllested, Lea Maria Ronneberg; Meegaard, Line

    2017-01-01

    collected information concerning the patients' knowledge of their anticoagulant treatment including prior drug switching. Further, patients were asked about use of over-the-counter analgesics, adverse effects, and how the treatment affected their everyday life. Among 335 eligible patients, 301 (90%) agreed......) to a NOAC. Switching was most frequently caused by inconvenience (34%) and adverse effects (23%). Although half of all patients had recently bought over-the-counter analgesics, purchase of ibuprofen and aspirin was rare (6%). More VKA users than NOAC users felt limited in their everyday life because...... of anticoagulant treatment (18% vs. 9%). Among non-incident NOAC users, 21% had experienced adverse effects during their current treatment. Based on first-hand information from a large sample of anticoagulant users, we conclude that the main drug-related issues leading to anticoagulant switching and perceived...

  5. 21 CFR 310.540 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as stomach...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as stomach acidifiers. 310.540 Section 310.540 Food and Drugs FOOD... ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as stomach acidifiers. (a) Betaine hydrochloride, glutamic...-counter (OTC) drug products for use as stomach acidifiers. Because of the lack of adequate data to...

  6. 76 FR 35619 - Labeling and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ...-AF43 Labeling and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use AGENCY... Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 201, 310, and 352 Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Final Rules and Proposed Rules #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 117 / Friday, June 17, 2011...

  7. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... savings bonds over-the-counter? 351.46 Section 351.46 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT... purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter? You may purchase definitive bonds over-the...

  8. Qualidade de medicamentos isentos de prescrição: um estudo com marcas de dipirona comercializadas em uma drogaria de Cascavel (PR, Brasil Quality of over-the-counter medicines: a study with dipyrone brands commercialized in a drugstore in Cascavel city (Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leandro Knappmann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A dipirona é um fármaco muito utilizado pela população brasileira. É considerado seguro mesmo em gestantes, lactentes e crianças, mas é proibido em alguns países do mundo pelo suposto papel de causar agranulocitose e anemia aplástica. Em 2001, a Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (Anvisa considerou que os medicamentos com esse fármaco apresentavam bom risco-benefício em relação a outros de indicação semelhante. Porém, de nada adianta segurança no uso de um medicamento se este é de baixa qualidade. É comum encontrar no mercado brasileiro medicamentos fora dos padrões, o que se constitui em um risco para a população em geral. Dessa forma, foram analisadas sete amostras de marcas diferentes de dipirona solução oral comercializados em uma farmácia de Cascavel (PR. Os resultados demonstram que a fiscalização quanto à qualidade de medicamentos similares precisa ser aprimorada, pois eles foram os que mais apresentaram desvios de qualidade.Dipyrone is an antipyretic and analgesic medicine very used by the Brazilian population. The administration is considered safe even in pregnant women, nurseling and children, but is forbidden in some countries, as supposedly causes agranulocytosis and aplastic anemia. In 2001, National Health Surveillance Agency (Anvisa approved the commercialization of this medicine in Brazil. However, it does not matter the safeness in the use of a medicine advances, if it does not have quality. Based on this quality, this work was elaborated, that analyzes seven samples of commercialized different marks of dipyrone oral solution in pharmaceutical establishment in the Cascavel city, Paraná, Brazil. The results demonstrate that the quality control of similar drugs must be improved as were the ones that presented quality deviations.

  9. Over-the-counter mouthwash use and risk of pre-diabetes/diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, Kaumudi J; Muñoz-Torres, Francisco J; Morou-Bermudez, Evangelia; Patel, Rakesh P

    2017-12-01

    Over-the-counter mouthwash comprises part of routine oral care for many; however, potential adverse effects of the long-term daily use have not been evaluated. Most mouthwash contain antibacterial ingredients, which could impact oral microbes critical for nitric oxide formation, and in turn predispose to metabolic disorders including diabetes. Our aim was to evaluate longitudinally the association between baseline over-the-counter mouthwash use and development of pre-diabetes/diabetes over a 3-year follow-up. The San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study (SOALS) recruited 1206 overweight/obese individuals, aged 40-65, and free of diabetes and major cardiovascular diseases; 945 with complete follow-up data were included in the analyses. We used Poisson regression models adjusting for baseline age, sex, smoking, physical activity, waist circumference, alcohol consumption, pre-hypertension/hypertension status; time between visits was included in the models as an offset. Many participants (43%) used mouthwash at least once daily and 22% at least twice daily. Participants using mouthwash ≥ twice daily at baseline, had a significantly elevated risk of pre-diabetes/diabetes compared to less frequent users (multivariate IRR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.21-1.99), or non-users of mouthwash (multivariate IRR = 1.49; 95% CI: 1.13-1.95). The effect estimates were similar after adding income, education, oral hygiene, oral conditions, sleep breathing disorders, diet (processed meat, fruit, and vegetable intake), medications, HOMA-IR, fasting glucose, 2hr post load glucose or CRP to the multivariate models. Both associations were also significant among never-smokers and obese individuals. Mouthwash use lower than twice daily showed no association, suggesting a threshold effect at twice or more daily. Frequent regular use of over-the-counter mouthwash was associated with increased risk of developing pre-diabetes/diabetes in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  10. Can over-the-counter antibiotics coerce people for self-medication with antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamapada Mandal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current communication, based upon the previous published papers in various scientific web-based journals, states the scenario of over-the-counter sales of antibiotics, including many other factors, that enhance people practice antibiotic self-medication world-wide, which in the developed countries the situation is little different having some resolution with the antibiotic self-medication problems. This paper also states about the prudent use of antibiotics through medical supervision and prescription in order to combat the unwanted antibiotic side effects including emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria from antibiotic misusage.

  11. Self-medication with over-the-counter drugs and complementary medications in South Australia's elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterman Adrian

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of surveys have examined use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM in Australia. However, there are limited Australian data on use of CAM and over-the-counter (OTC medicines in the elderly population. The main aims of this study were to examine self-medication practices with CAM and OTC medicines among older Australians and variables associated with their use. Methods The Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ALSA is an ongoing multidisciplinary prospective study of the older population which commenced in 1992 in South Australia. Data collected in 4 waves of ALSA between 1992 and 2004 were used in this study with a baseline sample of 2087 adults aged 65 years and over, living in the community or residential aged care. OTC medicines were classified according to the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification. CAM were classified according a modified version of the classification adopted by the Therapeutics Goods Administration (TGA in Australia. Results The prevalence of CAM or OTC use ranged from 17.7% in 2000-2001 to 35.5% in 2003-2004. The top classes of CAM and OTC medicines used remained relatively constant over the study period. The most frequent classes of CAM used were vitamins and minerals, herbal medicines and nutritional supplements while the most commonly used OTC were analgesics, laxatives and low dose aspirin. Females and those of younger age were more likely to be CAM users but no variable was associated with OTC use. Conclusion Participants seemed to self-medicate in accordance with approved indications, suggesting they were informed consumers, actively looking after their own health. However, use of analgesics and aspirin are associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events in the elderly. Future work should examine how self-medication contributes to polypharmacy and increases the risk of adverse drug reactions.

  12. Use of Over-the-Counter Medication among Pregnant Women in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abduelmula R. Abduelkarem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over-the-counter medications are widely available in pharmacies Their safety profile, however, does not extend to pregnant women. Accordingly, there should be educational programs developed for pregnant women to protect them from the harms of the side effects. Aim. This study was planned and designed with the aim of exploring the awareness and assessing the usage of OTC medications among pregnant women in Sharjah, UAE. Method. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire. Results. More than three-quarters (75.7% reported that they are familiar with the term “over-the-counter drugs.” Interestingly, 40% of the respondents reported that they took OTC drugs during pregnancy, and the majority (94.2% agreed with the survey statement “not all OTC medications are safe to be taken during pregnancy.” Constipation was the most frequent side effect that most of the participants reported during the study period. Folic acid (36%, calcium (28.6%, and iron (35.1% were the most common supplements used by the pregnant women responding. Conclusion. The reported 40% usage of OTC medications among pregnant women in this study is worrisome and calls for the need to educate, counsel, and increase awareness among pregnant women regarding the dangers of OTC drugs usage while pregnant in Sharjah, UAE.

  13. The use of over-the-counter drugs among surgical and medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Spang-Hanssen, Eva

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An increasing number of drugs are sold directly to the consumers without a prescription from pharmacies and from non-pharmacies such as supermarkets and gas stations. AIM OF STUDY: To analyse the consumption of over-the-counter drugs (OTCs) among patients recently discharged from two...... hospital departments. Furthermore, to describe where the drugs had been bought and to which extent OTCs used prior to admission were recorded in the hospital files. METHOD: Patients were visited within 1 week after discharge and interviewed about OTC use. Home inventories were inspected. Hospital files...... and discharge letters were examined. RESULTS: In totally, 83 surgical and 117 medical patients were included (n=200). Whereas the home inventories of 187 patients comprised 587 OTCs, 13 patients (7%) stored no OTCs. Of the patients, 134 (67%) used OTCs daily and 132 patients (66%) used OTCs on demand; 79...

  14. A Model of Consumer Response to Over-the-Counter Drug Advertising: Antecedents and Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jisu; Delorme, Denise E; Reid, Leonard N

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs in the health care marketplace and lack of systematic research on OTC drug advertising (OTCA) effects, this study tested a theory-based, product category-specific OTCA effects model. Structural equation modeling analysis of data for 1 OTC drug category, analgesics, supported the proposed model, explaining the OTCA effect process from key consumer antecedents to ad involvement, from ad involvement to ad attention, from ad attention to cognitive responses, then to affective/evaluative responses, leading to the final behavioral outcome. Several noteworthy patterns also emerged: (a) Product involvement was directly linked to ad attention, rather than exerting an indirect influence through ad involvement; (b) ad attention was significantly related to both cognitive and affective/evaluative responses to different degrees, with stronger links to cognitive responses; and (c) ad-prompted actions were influenced by both ad trust and ad attitude.

  15. Potential public sector cost-savings from over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Diana G; Biggs, M Antonia; Phillips, Kathryn A; Grindlay, Kate; Grossman, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    This study estimates how making oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) available without a prescription may affect contraceptive use, unintended pregnancies and associated contraceptive and pregnancy costs among low-income women. Based on published figures, we estimate two scenarios [low over-the-counter (OTC) use and high OTC use] of the proportion of low-income women likely to switch to an OTC pill and predict adoption of OCPs according to the out-of-pocket costs per pill pack. We then estimate cost-savings of each scenario by comparing the total public sector cost of providing OCPs OTC and medical care for unintended pregnancy. Twenty-one percent of low-income women at risk for unintended pregnancy are very likely to use OCPs if they were available without a prescription. Women's use of OTC OCPs varies widely by the out-of-pocket pill pack cost. In a scenario assuming no out-of-pocket costs for the over-the counter pill, an additional 11-21% of low-income women will use the pill, resulting in a 20-36% decrease in the number of women using no method or a method less effective than the pill, and a 7-25% decrease in the number of unintended pregnancies, depending on the level of use and any effect on contraceptive failure rates. If out-of-pocket costs for such pills are low, OTC access could have a significant effect on use of effective contraceptives and unintended pregnancy. Public health plans may reduce expenditures on pregnancy and contraceptive healthcare services by covering oral contraceptives as an OTC product. Interest in OTC access to oral contraceptives is high. Removing the prescription barrier, particularly if pill packs are available at low or zero out-of-pocket cost, could increase the use of effective methods of contraception and reduce unintended pregnancy and healthcare costs for contraceptive and pregnancy care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential impact on cardiovascular public health of over-the-counter statin availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, Eric P; Allen, Shannon E; Melin, Jeffrey M

    2006-03-15

    Over-the-counter (OTC) statin availability has been hypothesized to represent a strategy for treating consumers at moderate risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) who are currently not receiving drug therapy. The viability of this strategy has been questioned, particularly with respect to the public health benefit that can be obtained in an unsupervised treatment environment. The previously reported Consumer Use Study of Over-the-Counter Lovastatin (CUSTOM) examined consumer behavior in a simulated OTC setting in which 20 mg lovastatin could be purchased. Framingham CHD risk scores were calculated for 981 self-selected consumers who used OTC lovastatin in CUSTOM. Overall, this group had a median 10-year CHD risk of 10%, but with significant numbers of consumers with estimated risks of 20%. According to the risk profile of CUSTOM consumers, the use of 20 mg lovastatin for 10 years would be expected to prevent approximately 33,100 CHD events per 1 million users. This represents a 10-year number needed to treat of 30 consumers. This optimal benefit may be reduced because some higher risk consumers in CUSTOM used lovastatin rather than appropriate, more aggressive supervised care. On the basis of the frequencies of diversion from optimal care observed in CUSTOM, the number of events prevented might be reduced to 23,000 (number needed to treat 43 consumers). Sensitivity analyses have demonstrated that these estimates are robust and that the predicted public health benefit likely falls in the range of 23,000 to 33,000 CHD events prevented per 1 million treated for 10 years. In conclusion, on a population basis, OTC statin availability is likely to result in clinically meaningful reductions in CHD morbidity and mortality. The analyses also identified opportunities for optimizing the use of OTC statins in the marketplace.

  17. Use of the over-the-counter drugs by adults and an assessment of the impact of advertisements on consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Szpringer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During the last few years there has been a considerable value growth in the demand for the so-called over-the-counter drugs (OTC, available without doctor’s prescription. Using OTC drugs is related to self-treatment, aimed at mitigating first symptoms of a cold, flu, or various types of pain. The omnipresent advertisements for OTC drugs encourage and contribute to the elevated demand. Unfortunately, the marketing techniques used in advertisements fail to provide reliable and objective information to the viewers about specific products. Aim of the research: To determine the respondents’ opinions on using OTC drugs and to assess how advertisements influence the consumers’ needs. Material and methods : The study was conducted by means of a diagnostic survey using a questionnaire. For the purpose of the study, the authors prepared a survey questionnaire, which was used as a research tool. The study included 114 respondents, falling within an age bracket of 18–66 years. Results : The most frequently used OTC drugs were painkillers and medicines for cold and flu symptoms (68.33% of women and 59.09% of men. The drugs were usually bought in pharmacies and grocery/convenience stores. Conclusions: Taking OTC drugs is a widespread phenomenon, both in women and men. The obtained results clearly indicate that advertisements have a considerable impact upon target groups and contribute to increased consumption of OTC drugs.

  18. Prevalence and predictors of over-the-counter medication use among adolescents in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline; Siddiqua, Ayesha

    2018-01-02

    The patterns of over-the-counter medication (OTC) usage among adolescents living in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) remains largely understudied. The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the profile of OTC use among UAE adolescents; and (2) to determine the biological or physical, psychological or behavioural, and social predictors of OTC use among the UAE adolescent population. Using a cross-sectional study design, data were collected on the prevalence of OTC use for a sample of 6363 adolescents. Overall, 51% of participants in this study reported OTC use. The most common form of OTC used was acetaminophen. Significant predictors of OTC use were: nationality (UAE, GCC, Arab / Middle East, Arab / Africa, Western, other); needed health care but did not receive it; sex (female); age (15-18 years); any medical diagnosis; unconventional drug use; spending more than 5 hours using TV and computer daily; and using prescription medicines. Thus, there is a need to develop public health policies and strategies that promote appropriate use of OTC in the population.

  19. 76 FR 36307 - Guidance for Industry on Topical Acne Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use-Revision of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    .... FDA-2011-D-0404] Guidance for Industry on Topical Acne Drug Products for Over-the- Counter Human Use... entities entitled ``Topical Acne Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use--Revision of Labeling and... recognized as safe and effective (GRASE) active ingredient in over-the-counter (OTC) topical acne drug...

  20. Over-the-counter medication patterns in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaghloul AA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ashraf Ahmad Zaghloull,1 Moetaz Elsergany,2 Nagwa Abou El-Enein,1 Hamda Alsuwaidi,3 Mohamed Ayoub3 1Health Administration and Behavioral Sciences Department, High Institute of Public Health, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt; 2e-School Health and Environmental Studies, Hamdan Bin Mohamed eUniversity, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; 3College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. Background: Self-medication and acquisition of over-the-counter (OTC medications are emerging community health issues. Besides being a cheap alternative for treating common illnesses, the behavior entails serious ramifications, such as medication wastage, increasing pathogen resistance, and adverse drug reactions. The present study was conducted to explore the extent of OTC medications in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (UAE, including native UAE and expatriate families. Methods: The study employed a population-based, cross-sectional, analytical study design. The study population included native and expatriate households residing in the Emirate of Sharjah, UAE. The snowball sampling technique was used, and the sample included a total of 335 households. Results: Expatriate households acquired more OTC medications than did native households (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.7. The demographic determinants for expatriate households were number of family members (aOR=1.6, age of children in the family (aOR=1.8, and annual income (aOR=0.5. Expatriate households purchased more OTC medication practices than did native households (aOR=2.2. In the statistical sense, expatriate household practices were buying medication upon relatives' advice (aOR=0.3, storage condition of medication (aOR=2.4, and disposal of expired medication (aOR=0.6. The highest percentages of OTC medications in native and expatriate households were those related to gastric and ear, nose, and throat illnesses. Conclusion: The presence of OTC medications in expatriate

  1. As They Grow: Teaching Your Children How to Use Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep medicines you will use. Throw away expired medicines at a home hazardous waste disposal site or in a garbage can away from small children and pets. Back to top More in Understanding Over-the-Counter Medicines Medicines in My Home (MIMH) Choosing the right ...

  2. Is crime associated with over-the-counter pharmacy syringe sales? Findings from Los Angeles, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopka, Thomas J; Geraghty, Estella M; Azari, Rahman; Gold, Ellen B; DeRiemer, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    More than 50,000 new HIV infections occur annually in the United States. Injection drug users represent twelve percent of incident HIV infections each year. Pharmacy sales of over-the-counter (OTC) syringes have helped prevent HIV transmission among injection drug users in many states throughout the United States. However, concerns exist among some law enforcement officials, policymakers, pharmacists, and community members about potential links between OTC syringe sales and crime. We used a geographic information system and novel spatial and longitudinal analyses to determine whether implementation of pharmacy-based OTC syringe sales were associated with reported crime between January 2006 and December 2008 in Los Angeles Police Department Reporting Districts. We assessed reported crime pre- and post-OTC syringe sales initiation as well as longitudinal associations between crime and OTC syringe-selling pharmacies. By December 2008, 9.3% (94/1010) of Los Angeles Police Department Reporting Districts had at least one OTC syringe-selling pharmacy. Overall reported crime counts and reported crime rates decreased between 2006 and 2008 in all 1010 Reporting Districts. Using generalized estimating equations and adjusting for potential confounders, reported crime rates were negatively associated with OTC syringe sales (adjusted rate ratio: 0.89; 95% confidence interval: 0.81, 0.99). Our findings demonstrate that OTC pharmacy syringe sales were not associated with increases in reported crime in local communities in Los Angeles during 2006-2008. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical utility of marketing terms used for over-the-counter dermatologic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozalis, Emily; Patel, Shivani

    2018-04-19

    Cosmetic products are commonly marketed using dermatologic terms such as "hypoallergenic," "non-comedogenic," "fragrance-free," etc. The clinical relevance of these claims can be confusing to both patients and clinicians. A systematic review was performed from via a PubMed search of published articles from January 1985 to October 2017 to further describe and elucidate the clinical utility of a predefined list of common dermatologic terms used by pharmaceutical companies to market over the counter products. The terms "fragrance-free," "hypoallergenic," "non-comedogenic," and "oil-free" on cosmetic product labels are not regulated by any governing body and provide varied clinical utility. Products labeled as having "natural ingredients" are not necessarily safer or less irritating to patients with atopy or a history of allergic contact dermatitis. Despite the increasing popularity of "paraben-free" cosmetics, parabens are safe for patients in the quantities used in cosmetic products and can be safely used in patients who don't exhibit contact dermatitis to this preservative. A working knowledge of common cosmetic ingredients may help dermatologists counsel patients on which products to avoid for their specific dermatologic conditions.

  4. Consumer preferences for over-the-counter drug retailers in the reregulated Swedish pharmacy market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkonsen, Helle; Sundell, Karolina Andersson; Martinsson, Johan; Hedenrud, Tove

    2016-03-01

    Following a large regulatory reform in 2009, which ended the state's pharmacy monopoly, non-pharmacy retailers in Sweden today sell certain over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate consumer preferences regarding OTC drug retailers and the reasons for choosing a pharmacy versus non-pharmacy retailer. We conducted a web survey aimed at Swedish adults. Out of a stratified sample of 4058 persons, 2594 agreed to take part (48% women; mean age: 50.3 years). Questions related to OTC drug use, retailer choice and factors affecting the participants' preferences for OTC drug retailers. Logistic regression was conducted to analyse OTC drug use and reasons for retailer choice in relation to sex, age and education. Nine in ten participants reported OTC drug use in the 6 months prior to the study. For their last OTC purchase, 76% had gone to a pharmacy, 20% to a grocery shop and 4% to a convenience store, gas station or online. Geographic proximity, opening hours and product range were reported as the most important factors in retailer choice. Counselling by trained staff was important to 57% of participants. The end of the state's pharmacy monopoly and the increase in number of pharmacies seem to have impacted more on Swedish consumers' purchase behaviours compared with the deregulation of OTC drug sales. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Over-the-counter stimulant, depressant, and nootropic use by veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Muilenburg, Jessica L; Kogan, Lori; Elrod, Susan M

    2010-01-01

    US veterinary students are subject to significant stress throughout their veterinary education. In this article, the authors characterize the use of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and relate their use to stress in a veterinary student population. Of the students sampled, 35% were OTC medication users; 33% of these were regular OTC medication users. Forty-three percent of students were energy drink (ED) users; 45% of these were regular ED users. OTC medication users had significantly higher stress scores than non-OTC medication users, and ED users had significantly higher anxiety scores than non-ED users. The most common reasons for use given by OTC medication users were to help with studying and to fall asleep at night. Depression scores were significantly higher for juniors and sophomores than for freshmen. Depression, stress, and anxiety scores were all lower in the Colorado State University students when compared with the University of Georgia students. OTC medication and ED veterinary student users had distinct characteristics that differed from those of nonusers. Users suffered from more stress and anxiety and had more difficulties with sleep, which may have affected their overall health and academic performance. Educating veterinary students about the consequences of using OTC medication and ED and providing counseling support may be of benefit to veterinary students' psychological well-being.

  6. The risks of do-it-yourself and over-the-counter devices for tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The tattoo removal market has boomed over the years following the increased prevalence of tattooed individuals around the world. Surgery and laser are currently the gold standards for tattoo removal. However, both of them have drawbacks. Surgery is better suited for small tattoos in areas of adequate skin laxity but leave a scar, while laser removal is a long and painful procedure, with no guarantee of a complete efficacy. Both are expensive procedures, and not all individuals are ready to fund them privately. Consequently, some individuals are in the search of faster, easier, and cheaper procedures that can be performed either by themselves or by laypeople. The unregulated market of internet provides a favorable ground for many websites to offer various tattoo removal methods. Besides, some tattooists and other non-medical laypeople have started to get interested by such a growing market, especially as some laser devices manufactured in Asia are now available at competitive prices, and due to weaknesses in the EU legislation regarding the use of lasers for cosmetic procedures by non-medical laypeople. We review here different do-it-yourself and over-the-counter tattoo removal methods. We discuss the potential risks for tattooed individuals and stress the importance of a better regulation of such a market. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids: A Lost Decade for Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Yee Ting Chan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hearing aids sold directly to consumers in retail stores or through the internet, without individual prescription by audiological professionals, are termed over-the-counter (OTC devices. This study aimed to determine whether there was any change in the electroacoustic characteristics of OTC devices compared to research carried out a decade earlier. The previous results indicated that most OTC devices were low-frequency-emphasis devices and were unsuitable for elderly people with presbycusis, who were likely to be the major consumers of these products. Methods. Ten OTC devices were selected and their electroacoustic performance was measured. Appropriate clients for the OTC devices were derived, using four linear prescription formulae, and OTC suitability for elderly persons with presbycusis was investigated. Results. OTC electroacoustic characteristics were similar to those in the earlier study. Most OTC devices were not acoustically appropriate for potential consumers with presbycusis. Although several of the devices could match prescriptive targets for individuals with presbycusis, their poor electroacoustic performance—including ineffective volume control function, high equivalent input noise, and irregular frequency response—may override their potential benefit. Conclusion. The low-cost OTC devices were generally not suitable for the main consumers of these products, and there has been little improvement in the appropriateness of these devices over the past decade.

  8. Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids: A Lost Decade for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zoe Yee Ting; McPherson, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hearing aids sold directly to consumers in retail stores or through the internet, without individual prescription by audiological professionals, are termed over-the-counter (OTC) devices. This study aimed to determine whether there was any change in the electroacoustic characteristics of OTC devices compared to research carried out a decade earlier. The previous results indicated that most OTC devices were low-frequency-emphasis devices and were unsuitable for elderly people with presbycusis, who were likely to be the major consumers of these products. Methods. Ten OTC devices were selected and their electroacoustic performance was measured. Appropriate clients for the OTC devices were derived, using four linear prescription formulae, and OTC suitability for elderly persons with presbycusis was investigated. Results. OTC electroacoustic characteristics were similar to those in the earlier study. Most OTC devices were not acoustically appropriate for potential consumers with presbycusis. Although several of the devices could match prescriptive targets for individuals with presbycusis, their poor electroacoustic performance—including ineffective volume control function, high equivalent input noise, and irregular frequency response—may override their potential benefit. Conclusion. The low-cost OTC devices were generally not suitable for the main consumers of these products, and there has been little improvement in the appropriateness of these devices over the past decade. PMID:26557701

  9. Prescription and over-the-counter drug treatment admissions to the California public treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Rachel; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    Prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drug abuse has become a focal point of public health policy, prevention, and control efforts. Adolescents represent one of the fastest growing segments of the general population abusing prescription and OTC drugs as represented by national surveys. This article reports on treatment admission data to the California addiction public system for prescription and OTC drugs among two age subgroups: adolescents 12-17 years and adults 18 years and older. Of the 6,841 admissions for primary abuse of prescription and OTC drugs in California (during 2006-2007), most adolescent admissions (12-17) were for stimulant prescription and OTC drugs (45.3% and 32.1%, respectively), whereas opioid prescription drugs (88.9%) were most common for adults 18 years and older. Differences in psychosocial, treatment, and substance use characteristics between these two age subgroups are described. Results from this study offer useful treatment admission information about prescription and OTC drug abuse within the California public addiction treatment system. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Paediatric Over-the-Counter (OTC Oral Liquids Can Soften and Erode Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the softening and erosive effects of various paediatric over-the-counter (OTC oral liquids on deciduous teeth. Twenty sectioned and polished deciduous enamel blocks were ground on the buccal surface (2 × 2 mm2 and randomly divided into five groups, immersed into four commercially-available paediatric OTC oral liquids (two for paracetamol, both sugared; and two for chlorpheniramine, one sugared and one sugar-free, with deionized water as control. The pH of the oral liquids ranged from 2.50 to 5.77. Each block was immersed into the test or control groups for 15 s, rinsed with deionized water, and Vickers micro-hardness (n = 5 was measured. After twenty cycles of immersion and hardness measurements, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS were used to evaluate the surface morphology and chemistry of the tooth blocks, respectively. The pH values of the liquids were also recorded. Rapidly descending trends in the micro-hardness ratios of the four test groups were observed that were statistically different from the control group (p < 0.001. EDS showed an increase of Ca/C ratio after drug immersion, whereas SEM showed an enamel loss in all the test groups. Paediatric OTC oral liquids could significantly soften the enamel and render them more susceptible to caries, such that the formulation of the oral liquids is the major factor.

  11. Awareness and use of over-the-counter pain medications: a survey of emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cham, Elaine; Hall, Louise; Ernst, Amy A; Weiss, Steven J

    2002-05-01

    A survey study was done to determine basic knowledge about and use of over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications among patients seen in our emergency department (ED). The hypothesis was that knowledge about OTC pain medications would be correlated with demographic characteristics. The study was a prospective 21-question survey during randomized 4-hour shifts over a 6-week study period. Of the 213 subjects who participated, 143 (67%) reported having used some form of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and 127 (60%) had used acetaminophen products recently. Women were more aware of toxic interactions and gastrointestinal (GI) irritation related to these medications. Ibuprofen use correlated with age (younger individuals used more) and having no primary physician (those without a physician used less). Knowledge about GI effects correlated with age, sex, and education. Knowledge about renal and hepatic problems correlated with age and education. Many patients use OTC pain medications. Many are ill informed about their use and side effects. More education is needed.

  12. Over-the-counter medication patterns in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Ashraf Ahmad; Elsergany, Moetaz; El-Enein, Nagwa Abou; Alsuwaidi, Hamda; Ayoub, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Self-medication and acquisition of over-the-counter (OTC) medications are emerging community health issues. Besides being a cheap alternative for treating common illnesses, the behavior entails serious ramifications, such as medication wastage, increasing pathogen resistance, and adverse drug reactions. The present study was conducted to explore the extent of OTC medications in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (UAE), including native UAE and expatriate families. The study employed a population-based, cross-sectional, analytical study design. The study population included native and expatriate households residing in the Emirate of Sharjah, UAE. The snowball sampling technique was used, and the sample included a total of 335 households. Expatriate households acquired more OTC medications than did native households (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.7). The demographic determinants for expatriate households were number of family members (aOR=1.6), age of children in the family (aOR=1.8), and annual income (aOR=0.5). Expatriate households purchased more OTC medication practices than did native households (aOR=2.2). In the statistical sense, expatriate household practices were buying medication upon relatives' advice (aOR=0.3), storage condition of medication (aOR=2.4), and disposal of expired medication (aOR=0.6). The highest percentages of OTC medications in native and expatriate households were those related to gastric and ear, nose, and throat illnesses. The presence of OTC medications in expatriate households was two-fold more common than in native households in Sharjah, UAE. There were significant associations for behaviors related to the reasons why OTC medications were purchased and stored within the household for both native and expatriate families.

  13. Management of over-the-counter insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies: a standardized patient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Krishneeta C; Nissen, Lisa M; Smith, Simon S; Kyle, Greg

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the current management of over-the-counter (OTC) insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies using standardized patient methodology. Trained standardized patients visited a sample of 100 randomly selected South East Queensland community pharmacies in June 2011. The standardized patients enacted two OTC insomnia scenarios: a direct product request (DPR) (n = 50) and a symptom-based request (SBR) (n = 50). Results of the interactions were documented immediately after each visit and evaluated using the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia's WHAT STOP GO protocol as a standard comparison. Of all DPRs, 30% were handled entirely by the pharmacist, 70% of staff enquired about specific symptoms and 28% investigated the cause of insomnia. No staff investigated the frequency of product use. The DPR scenario resulted in a 92% supply of the requested doxylamine product (Restavit). In the SBR scenario, 18% of requests were handled entirely by the pharmacist, 58% of staff enquired about specific symptoms and 44% investigated the cause of insomnia. Staff recommended medicated products (38%), or herbal (78%) or non-drug techniques (18%). Investigation into smoking and alcohol intake was not undertaken in DPR or SBR interactions, while questioning on caffeine intake was undertaken in 2 and 14% of cases respectively. There were no significant differences found in the handling of sleep requests by pharmacists compared to pharmacy assistants. The standardized patient methodology was a successful way to assess the community pharmacy counselling provided with OTC sleep requests and suboptimal staff responses were found when compared with recommended practice standards. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Swedish teenagers and over-the-counter analgesics - responsible, casual or careless use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmström, Inger K; Bastholm-Rahmner, Pia; Bernsten, Cecilia; Röing, Marta; Björkman, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Teenagers in Sweden were given greater access as consumers of OTC drugs in 2009 after the reregulation of the pharmacy market, which allowed for the establishment of private pharmacies and sale of specific over-the-counter (OTC) drugs in retail stores and gas stations. Increased access to OTC drugs could provide new opportunities for self-care but attenuates the opportunity for the traditional expert surveillance of pharmacists, thus increasing the possibility of inappropriate OTC drug use. Views of 16-19 year old Swedish teenagers on OTC drugs, with special regard to analgesic drugs were explored and described, based on the following questions: How and where did they acquire their knowledge and attitudes regarding OTC drugs? What perceptions did they have about the use of OTC drugs? A qualitative approach with a descriptive design was chosen. Data were collected in 2011 with 10 focus group discussions with high school students aged 16-19 years from different parts of Sweden. A total of 77 teenagers participated, 33 males and 44 females. A manifest qualitative content analysis was performed. While most teenagers appeared to have responsible attitudes toward OTC drugs and their use, some teenagers had attitudes that ranged from casual to careless. The focus group discussions also revealed knowledge gaps among teenagers regarding OTC drugs, and the significant influence of parents and peers on their OTC drug use. This study provides insight into how vulnerable some teenagers could be as new consumers of OTC drugs and suggested that educational efforts could be geared toward parents as well as teenagers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preclinical, clinical, and over-the-counter postmarketing experience with a new vaginal cup: menstrual collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Barbara B; Oldham, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Menstrual cups have been available for decades, but their use is limited by bulky design and the need for multiple sizes. The Softcup® (Instead, Inc., San Diego, CA) is a simple single-size disposable over-the-counter (OTC) menstrual cup that compresses to tampon shape to facilitate insertion and can be worn during coitus. This report describes preclinical evaluation, clinical testing, and postmarketing monitoring of the Softcup. Preclinical testing complied with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and used standard United States Pharmacopoeia methodologies for assessment of potential toxicity. Clinical testing enrolled 406 women in seven U.S. centers. A detailed written questionnaire assessed safety, acceptability, and effectiveness for menstrual collection. Study safety parameters included pelvic examinations, Pap smears, colposcopy, urinalysis, vaginal pH, wet mounts, gram stain, and vaginal microflora cultures. Postmarketing surveillance of over 100 million Softcups has been conducted by the manufacturer and by the FDA Medwatch system. No toxicity or mutagenicity was observed in preclinical evaluations. In clinical testing, after three cycles of cup use, 37% of subjects rated the cup as better than, 29% as worse than, and 34% as equal to pads or tampons. The cup was preferred for comfort, dryness, and less odor. Cups received lower ratings for disposal and convenience. Eighty-one percent of enrolled women were able to insert and remove their first cup using only written instructions. Use difficulties resulting in study discontinuations included cramping (1%), leakage (1%), and improper fit (3%). No safety parameters were adversely affected. No significant health risks were reported during postmarketing surveillance. These results demonstrate that a single-size vaginal device has no significant health risks and is acceptable to many women without the need for fitting or other medical services.

  16. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore N

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Moore,1 Charles Pollack,2 Paul Butkerait2 1Department of Pharmacology, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; 2Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, Madison, NJ, USA Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. Keywords: adverse effects, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal

  17. To the Federal Trade Commission in the Matter of a Trade Regulation Rule on Over-the-Counter Drug Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council on Children, Media, and Merchandising, Washington, DC.

    This report supports amending the proposed Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Rule on Over-the Counter (OTC) Drug Advertising to insure better protection for children, illiterate populations, the deaf and the blind, from advertising on the air-waves. Several points are addressed: (1) the difficulties of combining the rule making schedules of the Food…

  18. 21 CFR 330.13 - Conditions for marketing ingredients recommended for over-the-counter (OTC) use under the OTC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conditions for marketing ingredients recommended... Administrative Procedures § 330.13 Conditions for marketing ingredients recommended for over-the-counter (OTC... and will not await publication of a final monograph. Marketing of such a product with a formulation or...

  19. 21 CFR 310.530 - Topically applied hormone-containing drug products for over-the-counter (OTC) human use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... labeling or in the ingredient statement is an implied drug claim. The claim implied by the use of this term... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Topically applied hormone-containing drug products for over-the-counter (OTC) human use. 310.530 Section 310.530 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  20. 76 FR 56682 - Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Request for Data and Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ...-ZA40 Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Request for Data and Information Regarding... notice of proposed rulemaking; request for data and information; extension of comment period. SUMMARY... proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) that published on June 17, 2011. The ANPRM is requesting data and information...

  1. 21 CFR 201.307 - Sodium phosphates; package size limitation, warnings, and directions for over-the-counter sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphates; package size limitation, warnings, and directions for over-the-counter sale. 201.307 Section 201.307 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products ...

  2. 21 CFR 310.528 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as an aphrodisiac. 310.528 Section 310.528 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... drug product. Anise, cantharides, don qual, estrogens, fennel, ginseng, golden seal, gotu kola, Korean...

  3. 77 FR 27591 - Labeling and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Delay...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Delay of Compliance Dates AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule; delay of compliance dates; request for comments... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 201 and 310...

  4. 76 FR 38975 - Labeling and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 201 [Docket No. FDA-1978-N-0018] (formerly Docket No. 1978N-0038) RIN 0910-AF43 Labeling and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use Correction In rule document 2011-14766 appearing on...

  5. 21 CFR 211.132 - Tamper-evident packaging requirements for over-the-counter (OTC) human drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-counter (OTC) human drug products. 211.132 Section 211.132 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... over-the-counter (OTC) human drug products. (a) General. The Food and Drug Administration has the... package, if this product is accessible to the public while held for sale. A tamper-evident package is one...

  6. 78 FR 68854 - Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products-Emergency Use Eyewash Products; Rescheduling of Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-1038... information on the formulation, manufacturing, and labeling of currently marketed over- the-counter (OTC... hearing will be held on March 7, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Submit electronic or written requests to make...

  7. Impact of over-the-counter restrictions on antibiotic consumption in Brazil and Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yared Santa-Ana-Tellez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Latin American countries over-the-counter (OTC dispensing of antibiotics is common. In 2010, both Mexico and Brazil implemented policies to enforce existing laws of restricting consumption of antibiotics only to patients presenting a prescription. The objective of the present study is therefore to evaluate the impact of OTC restrictions (2010 on antibiotics consumption in Brazil and Mexico. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Retail quarterly sales data in kilograms of oral and injectable antibiotics between January 2007 and June 2012 for Brazil and Mexico were obtained from IMS Health. The unit of analysis for antibiotics consumption was the defined daily dose per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DDD/TID according to the WHO ATC classification system. Interrupted time series analysis was conducted using antihypertensives as reference group to account for changes occurring independently of the OTC restrictions directed at antibiotics. To reduce the effect of (a seasonality and (b autocorrelation, dummy variables and Prais-Winsten regression were used respectively. Between 2007 and 2012 total antibiotic usage increased in Brazil (from 5.7 to 8.5 DDD/TID, +49.3% and decreased in Mexico (10.5 to 7.5 DDD/TID, -29.2%. Interrupted time series analysis showed a change in level of consumption of -1.35 DDD/TID (p<0.01 for Brazil and -1.17 DDD/TID (p<0.00 for Mexico. In Brazil the penicillins, sulfonamides and macrolides consumption had a decrease in level after the intervention of 0.64 DDD/TID (p = 0.02, 0.41 (p = 0.02 and 0.47 (p = 0.01 respectively. While in Mexico it was found that only penicillins and sulfonamides had significant changes in level of -0.86 DDD/TID (p<0.00 and -0.17 DDD/TID (p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: Despite different overall usage patterns of antibiotics in Brazil and Mexico, the effect of the OTC restrictions on antibiotics usage was similar. In Brazil the trend of increased usage of antibiotics was tempered after the OTC restrictions; in

  8. Multimedia educational interventions for consumers about prescribed and over-the-counter medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciriello, Sabina; Johnston, Renea V; Osborne, Richard H; Wicks, Ian; deKroo, Tanya; Clerehan, Rosemary; O'Neill, Clare; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2013-04-30

    Health consumers increasingly want access to accurate, evidence-based information about their medications. Currently, education about medications (that is, information that is designed to achieve health or illness related learning) is provided predominantly via spoken communication between the health provider and consumer, sometimes supplemented with written materials. There is evidence, however, that current educational methods are not meeting consumer needs. Multimedia educational programs offer many potential advantages over traditional forms of education delivery. To assess the effects of multimedia patient education interventions about prescribed and over-the-counter medications in people of all ages, including children and carers. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2011), EMBASE (1974 to June 2011), CINAHL (1982 to June 2011), PsycINFO (1967 to June 2011), ERIC (1966 to June 2011), ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Database (to June 2011) and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of multimedia-based patient education about prescribed or over-the-counter medications in people of all ages, including children and carers, if the intervention had been targeted for their use. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Where possible, we contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We identified 24 studies that enrolled a total of 8112 participants. However, there was significant heterogeneity in the comparators used and the outcomes measured, which limited the ability to pool data. Many of the studies did not report sufficient information in their methods to allow judgment of their risk of bias. From the information that was reported, three of the studies had a high risk of selection bias and one was at high risk of bias due to lack of blinding of the outcome

  9. Interventions to enhance effective communication during over-the-counter consultations in the community pharmacy setting: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seubert, Liza J; Whitelaw, Kerry; Hattingh, Laetitia; Watson, Margaret C; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2017-12-13

    Easy access to effective over-the-counter (OTC) treatments allows self-management of some conditions, however inappropriate or incorrect supply or use of OTC medicines can cause harm. Pharmacy personnel should support consumers in their health-seeking behaviour by utilising effective communication skills underpinned by clinical knowledge. To identify interventions targeted towards improving communication between consumers and pharmacy personnel during OTC consultations in the community pharmacy setting. Systematic review and narrative analysis. Databases searched were MEDLINE, EMBASE, Psycinfo, Cochrane Central Register and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for literature published between 2000 and 30 October 2014, as well as reference lists of included articles. The search was re-run on 18 January 2016 and 25 September 2017 to maximise the currency. Two reviewers independently screened retrieved articles for inclusion, assessed study quality and extracted data. Full publications of intervention studies were included. Participants were community pharmacy personnel and/or consumers involved in OTC consultations. Interventions which aimed to improve communication during OTC consultations in the community pharmacy setting were included if they involved a direct measurable communication outcome. Studies reporting attitudes and measures not quantifiable were excluded. The protocol was published on Prospero Database of Systematic Reviews. Of 4978 records identified, 11 studies met inclusion criteria. Interventions evaluated were: face-to-face training sessions (n = 10); role-plays (n = 9); a software decision making program (n = 1); and simulated patient (SP) visits followed by immediate feedback (n = 1). Outcomes were measured using: SP methodology (n = 10) and a survey (n = 1), with most (n = 10) reporting a level of improvement in some communication behaviours. Empirical evaluation of interventions using active learning techniques

  10. Simple heuristics in over-the-counter drug choices: a new hint for medical education and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Riva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Riva1–3, Marco Monti2, Alessandro Antonietti11Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart of Milan, Milan, Italy; 2Department for Adaptive Behaviour and Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Human Development Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Medicine and Medical Specialities, ABB Centre, University of Milan and IRCCS Ca’ Granda Foundation, Maggiore Hospital, Milan, ItalyIntroduction: Over-the-counter (OTC drugs are widely available and often purchased by consumers without advice from a health care provider. Many people rely on self-management of medications to treat common medical conditions. Although OTC medications are regulated by the National and the International Health and Drug Administration, many people are unaware of proper dosing, side effects, adverse drug reactions, and possible medication interactions.Purpose: This study examined how subjects make their decisions to select an OTC drug, evaluating the role of cognitive heuristics which are simple and adaptive rules that help the decision-making process of people in everyday contexts.Subjects and methods: By analyzing 70 subjects’ information-search and decision-making behavior when selecting OTC drugs, we examined the heuristics they applied in order to assess whether simple decision-making processes were also accurate and relevant. Subjects were tested with a sequence of two experimental tests based on a computerized Java system devised to analyze participants’ choices in a virtual environment.Results: We found that subjects’ information-search behavior reflected the use of fast and frugal heuristics. In addition, although the heuristics which correctly predicted subjects’ decisions implied significantly fewer cues on average than the subjects did in the information-search task, they were accurate in describing order of information search. A simple combination of a fast and frugal tree and a tallying rule predicted more than 78% of subjects

  11. Rheologic Profile, Specific Gravity, Surface Tension, and pH of Fifteen Over-the-Counter Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Baghat, Tushar; Chukwubeze, Onah; Dembla, Ishwin

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the physical characteristics of commercially available over-the-counter preparations can aid the compounding pharmacist in preparing medication. In this study, 15 over-the-counter products were studied with regard to their specific gravity, surface tension, pH, and rheologic profile. The specific gravities of all the products were greater than 1, with the exceptions of Nivea Lotion and rubbing alcohol, which were less than 1. The majority of the products had an acidic pH. With the exception of two products, Citrucel and Chloraseptic, all products demonstrated a surface tension value less than that of water (72.8 dynes/cm). Chloraseptic had the lowest Newtonian viscosity (1.27 cPs), whereas Vicks DayQuil had the highest (098.86 cPs). Citrucel exhibited dilatant-type flow; Suave Shampoo, herbal shampoo, Tangerine Tickle Herbal Shampoo, and Metamucil pseudoplastic flow; the remaining non-Newtonian formulations, plastic flow profiles.

  12. A Guide to the Ingredients and Potential Benefits of Over-the-Counter Cleansers and Moisturizers for Rosacea Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult for rosacea patients to discern which products and ingredients will be beneficial to their skin and which products will lead to an exacerbation of the signs and symptoms of rosacea. In this paper, the authors provide a brief overview of rosacea, its pathogenesis, signs and symptoms, and the management of the two major rosacea subtypes—erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papular pustular rosacea. Reviewed in greater detail are the common ingredients used in over-the-counter cleansers and moisturizers with discussion of how these ingredients potentially benefit or harm the skin of patients with rosacea. Clinical studies investigating the benefits of using certain over-the-counter cleansers and moisturizers in patients with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papular pustular rosacea with or without topical prescription therapy are also reviewed. The specific formulas used in the clinical studies include a sensitive skin synthetic detergent bar, a nonalkaline cleanser and moisturizer, polyhydroxy acid containing cleanser and moisturizer, and a ceramide-based cleanser and moisturizer formulated in a multivesicular emulsion. Based on review of available data, the authors conclude that the use of mild over-the-counter cleansers and moisturizers is beneficial for patients with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea and papular pustular rosacea. The properties of over-the-counter cleansers and moisturizers that contribute to their mildness include an acidic-neutral pH to minimize the flux in skin pH; surfactants or emulsifiers that will not strip the skin of its moisture or strip the lipids and proteins of the stratum corneum; moisturizing ingredients such as emollients, humectants, and occlusives; and formulas without potential irritants and allergens. The most consistent clinical benefits demonstrated in the reviewed studies were a subjectively perceived improvement in subjective symptoms of dryness and irritation as well as an objective improvement in

  13. Analysis of the evidence of efficacy and safety of over-the-counter cough medications registered in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Reis,Adriano Max Moreira; Figueras,Albert

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the level of evidence regarding the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of over-the-counter (OTC) cough medications registered in Brazil. The National Health Surveillance Agency database was used to identify the drugs. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and studies on safety were searched on the Medline baseline, the Cochrane Library and SIETES (System of Essential Information in Therapeutics and Health; database in Spanish). Most dru...

  14. Factors influencing consumers' attitudinal and behavioral responses to direct-to-consumer and over-the-counter drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mina; Whitehill King, Karen; Reid, Leonard N

    2015-04-01

    Using a model developed from the research literature, the authors compared consumers' attitudinal and behavioral responses to direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DCTA) and over-the-counter nonprescription drug advertising (OTCA) of drugs. Adults 18 years of age and older who had taken any prescription drugs in the past 6 months completed online survey questionnaires. Variables measured included demographics (age, gender, race, education, and income), health-related characteristics (health status, prescription and over-the-counter drug use, health consciousness, and involvement with prescription or over-the-counter drugs), perceived amount of attention and exposure to DTCA and OTCA, attitudinal outcomes (skepticism toward DTCA/OTCA and attitude toward DTCA/OTCA), and behavioral outcomes triggered by DTCA and OTCA. The findings indicate that exposure to drug advertising is one of the most significant predictors of attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. Some audience factors such as health status, involvement with drugs, health consciousness, drug use, income, and age also were differentially associated with consumer responses to drug advertising.

  15. Over the counter (OTC) artificial tear drops for dry eye syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucker, Andrew D; Ng, Sueko M; Nichols, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the counter (OTC) artificial tears historically have been the first line of treatment for dry eye syndrome and dry eye-related conditions like contact lens discomfort, yet currently we know little regarding the overall efficacy of individual, commercially available artificial tears. This review provides a much needed meta-analytical look at all randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials that have analyzed head-to-head comparisons of OTC artificial tears. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of OTC artificial tear applications in the treatment of dry eye syndrome compared with another class of OTC artificial tears, no treatment, or placebo. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2015, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to December 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to December 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) and the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) website (www.fda.gov). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 4 December 2015. We searched reference lists of included trials for any additional trials not identified by the electronic searches. Selection criteria This review includes randomized controlled trials with adult participants who were diagnosed with dry eye, regardless of race and gender. We included trials in which the age of participants was not reported, and clinical trials comparing OTC artificial tears with another class of OTC artificial tears, placebo, or no treatment. This review did not

  16. 21 CFR 310.529 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for oral use as insect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for oral use as insect repellents. 310.529 Section 310.529 Food and Drugs... ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for oral use as insect repellents. (a) Thiamine hydrochloride... insect repellent (an orally administered drug product intended to keep insects away). There is a lack of...

  17. [The over the counter drugs reform in Israel--two years later].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Sharona; Abadi-Korek, Ifat; Marom, Eli; Shemer, Joshua; Luxenburg, Osnat

    2011-01-01

    In the last two decades there has been a world wide increase in the number of drugs that are being switched from the prescription-only category to non-prescription categories. In Israel, until recently, non-prescription medicines were only permitted to be sold by a pharmacist in pharmacies. In May 2005, following amendments to the law, several non-prescription medicines which were previously sold under a pharmacist's supervision, were reclassified as general-sales-list (GSL) medicines and permitted to be displayed and sold directly off the shelves in pharmacies and in other places such as grocery stores and petrol stations. To study the change in the patterns of consumption of non-prescription drugs in Israel two years after the reform began. A representative sample of the population of Israel was chosen and interviews were conducted at two time points: before the reform commenced and two years after the beginning of the reform. Statistical processing was performed in order to examine the changes in patterns of consumption of non-prescription drugs in Israel between these two time points. In both surveys it was found that: approximately 70% of the Israeli public buys non-prescription medicines; 70% of the people interviewed said that they had been aware of the reform, but of these, about 75% continued buying nonprescription drugs from the pharmacist while 21% bought medicines off the shelves at the pharmacy and 4% purchased medications at grocery stores. The most common reasons for buying medicines off the shelves without a pharmacist were earlier knowLedge about the medication, convenience and availabiLity when the pharmacies were closed. An insignificant difference was observed for the purchase of non-prescription drugs from the different types of pharmacies: the health maintenance organizations (HMO) pharmacies continue to be the leading pharmacies from which the public purchased their non-prescription medicines, white there was a slight increase in the

  18. Exploration of over the counter sales of antibiotics in community pharmacies of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: pharmacy professionals’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremedhin Beedemariam Gebretekle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the counter sale of antibiotics is a global problem and it is increasingly recognized as a source of antibiotic misuse and is believed to increase treatment costs, adverse effects of treatment and emergence of resistance. The increasing trend of over the counter sale of antibiotics in Ethiopia calls for exploration of why such dispensing is practiced. This study aims to explore reasons for over the counter sale of antibiotics in the community pharmacies of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A phenomenological qualitative study was conducted in five randomly selected community pharmacies of Addis Ababa. One pharmacy professional from each pharmacy were interviewed at the spot using semi-structured, open-ended interview checklist. Besides, observation of professionals’ dispensing practice was made for at least one hour in the same community pharmacies using an observation checklist. Findings were categorized into specific themes that were developed following the objectives. This was facilitated by use of OpenCode 3.6 software. Results All participants pointed out that antibiotics were frequently dispensed without prescription and contend that the trend of such dispensing has been increasing. The findings indicated that the nonprescription sales of antibiotics were common for Amoxicillin, Ciprofloxacin and Cotrimoxazole. The poor, less educated and younger groups of the population were reported to frequently request antibiotics without prescription. The main reasons for nonprescription sale of antibiotics by pharmacy professionals were found to be related to pharmacy owner’s influence to maximize revenue, customer’s pressure, weak regulatory mechanism and professional conflicts of interest. Conclusion The study shows that nonprescription sale of antibiotics was common practice at least in Addis Ababa. The main reasons for this malpractice were the need to maximize revenue and weak regulatory mechanism. Hence, strong

  19. Clinical study of the safety and effectiveness of a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghalili KM

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available K Michael Ghalili,1 Kamal Khawaled,2 Doran Rozen,2 Veda Afsahi3 1Department of Prosthodontics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of R&D; Department of Clinical Affairs, Syneron Beauty, Ltd, Yokneam, Israel; 3Veda Faith Afsahi Inc., Fountain Valley, CA, USA Abstract: We investigated color change, gingival irritation, and tooth sensitivity in patients undergoing at-home vital tooth bleaching with a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system. Tooth color shade in anterior teeth, supragingival plaque and gingivitis in Ramfjord teeth, as well as visual assessment of teeth gingival tissues and mucosa were evaluated in-office prior to treatment, after two consecutive applications of the 9% hydrogen peroxide bleaching product, after eight applications (10 minutes/day for 3 days at home, and after ten applications (50 minutes exposure over 5 days. Color stability was evaluated at 3 months after completing the treatment regimen. Over-the-counter bleaching products can be used by the patient at home without dentist supervision, but are frequently associated with gingival irritation and tooth sensitivity despite low concentrations of peroxide agents. Our investigations showed that the treatment is tolerable and safe with a low incidence of adverse effects. Any adverse effects associated with use of the whitening gel and tray are temporary, easily controlled, and often disappear within minutes of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed significant improvement in teeth whitening following treatment (mean color change of seven shades and at three months after treatment. Keywords: at home tooth-whitening, hydrogen peroxide teeth whitening, over-the-counter tooth-whitening, teeth bleaching

  20. Over the counter sale of drugs for medical abortion- Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of pharmacists of Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Mishra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the well defined law and highly liberal policy Government approved medical facilities are not the leading provider of abortion in Indian Scenario. Whether legally or not Pharmacists are already acting as provider of medical abortion for large number of women in India. Dispense of Medical abortion drugs via pharmacist has the advantages of convenience, relative anonymity, hasty transaction, easy accessibility and saving cost.Aims and Objectives: Objective of present study was to assess the over the counter sale of medical abortion in terms of knowledge, attitude and practices of pharmacists of Delhi, India.Material and Methods: It was a cross sectional interview based study conducted in 110 pharmacies of 6 districts of State of Delhi.Results: A total of 75 pharmacists and 35 pharmacy workers were interviewed. Knowledge and practices of all of them was inadequate in some aspects. 68% knew Medical abortion is legal and 57% thought that over the counter sale of drugs of medical abortion is also legal. Only 40.9% knew the correct regimen of mifepristone + misoprostol combination.Most of them is not aware of any serious side effects and failure rate. Their attitude is indifferent towards the clients but positive towards training in updating knowledge if given option.Conclusion: Their knowledge, attitude and practices while dispensing drugs for medical abortion were inappropriate to qualify them as an independent mid level provider in present scenario. Unregulated OTC sale of abortifacients is responsible for high number of self induced abortion related complications.

  1. Do patients adhere to over-the-counter artemisinin combination therapy for malaria? evidence from an intervention study in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jessica L; Yavuz, Elif; Morris, Alexandra; Arkedis, Jean; Sabot, Oliver

    2012-03-23

    Increasing affordability of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in the African retail sector could be critical to expanding access to effective malaria treatment, but must be balanced by efforts to protect the efficacy of these drugs. Previous research estimates ACT adherence rates among public sector patients, but adherence among retail sector purchasers could differ substantially. This study aimed to estimate adherence rates to subsidized, over-the-counter ACT in rural Uganda. An intervention study was conducted with four licensed drug shops in Eastern Uganda in December 2009. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL) was made available for sale at a 95% subsidy over-the counter. Customers completed a brief survey at the time of purchase and then were randomly assigned to one of three study arms: no follow-up, follow-up after two days or follow-up after three days. Surveyors recorded the number of pills remaining through blister pack observation or through self-report if the pack was unavailable. The purpose of the three-day follow-up arm was to capture non-adherence in the sense of an incomplete treatment course ("under-dosing"). The purpose of the two-day follow-up arm was to capture whether participants completed the full course too soon ("over-dosing"). Of the 106 patients in the two-day follow-up sample, 14 (13.2%) had finished the entire treatment course by the second day. Of the 152 patients in the three-day follow-up sample, 49 (32.2%) were definitely non-adherent, three (2%) were probably non-adherent and 100 (65.8%) were probably adherent. Among the 52 who were non-adherent, 31 (59.6%) had more than a full day of treatment remaining. Overall, adherence to subsidized ACT purchased over-the-counter was found to be moderate. Further, a non-trivial fraction of those who complete treatment are taking the full course too quickly. Strategies to increase adherence in the retail sector are needed in the context of increasing availability and affordability of ACT in this

  2. Do patients adhere to over-the-counter artemisinin combination therapy for malaria? evidence from an intervention study in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Jessica L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing affordability of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT in the African retail sector could be critical to expanding access to effective malaria treatment, but must be balanced by efforts to protect the efficacy of these drugs. Previous research estimates ACT adherence rates among public sector patients, but adherence among retail sector purchasers could differ substantially. This study aimed to estimate adherence rates to subsidized, over-the-counter ACT in rural Uganda. Methods An intervention study was conducted with four licensed drug shops in Eastern Uganda in December 2009. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL was made available for sale at a 95% subsidy over-the counter. Customers completed a brief survey at the time of purchase and then were randomly assigned to one of three study arms: no follow-up, follow-up after two days or follow-up after three days. Surveyors recorded the number of pills remaining through blister pack observation or through self-report if the pack was unavailable. The purpose of the three-day follow-up arm was to capture non-adherence in the sense of an incomplete treatment course ("under-dosing". The purpose of the two-day follow-up arm was to capture whether participants completed the full course too soon ("over-dosing". Results Of the 106 patients in the two-day follow-up sample, 14 (13.2% had finished the entire treatment course by the second day. Of the 152 patients in the three-day follow-up sample, 49 (32.2% were definitely non-adherent, three (2% were probably non-adherent and 100 (65.8% were probably adherent. Among the 52 who were non-adherent, 31 (59.6% had more than a full day of treatment remaining. Conclusions Overall, adherence to subsidized ACT purchased over-the-counter was found to be moderate. Further, a non-trivial fraction of those who complete treatment are taking the full course too quickly. Strategies to increase adherence in the retail sector are needed in the context of

  3. A case report of over-the-counter codeine dependence as consequence of self-medication for premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Sethulakshmi Sreevalsam; Ratnakaran, Badr; Suresh, Nisha

    2017-01-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) opioid abuse, including codeine, has been a growing problem around the world. Although the majority of the abusers use it for recreational purposes, many become dependent on it after having used it a medication for pain or cough. We present a case of codeine dependence where the initial prescribed use had been as a cough medication, but the subsequent abuse of it occurred the following self-medication for premature ejaculation. There is growing need for awareness among doctors and pharmacists of OTC abuse of opioids and for preventive interventions such as restricting supply, audit of pharmacies, training pharmacists, and counter staff and dispensing knowledge about proper use of opioid-containing medications to patients.

  4. A case report of over-the-counter codeine dependence as consequence of self-medication for premature ejaculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethulakshmi Sreevalsam Anil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over-the-counter (OTC opioid abuse, including codeine, has been a growing problem around the world. Although the majority of the abusers use it for recreational purposes, many become dependent on it after having used it a medication for pain or cough. We present a case of codeine dependence where the initial prescribed use had been as a cough medication, but the subsequent abuse of it occurred the following self-medication for premature ejaculation. There is growing need for awareness among doctors and pharmacists of OTC abuse of opioids and for preventive interventions such as restricting supply, audit of pharmacies, training pharmacists, and counter staff and dispensing knowledge about proper use of opioid-containing medications to patients.

  5. INFLUENCE OF ADVERTISING ON THE WAY OF ACTION IN THE ACQUISITION OF OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan-Dragoş CÎRSTEA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Advertising of the Over-the-counter drugs is a growing segment. Our research aims to identify the main factors involved in making decisions for the purchase of OTC drugs and to identify what are the ways of informing consumers for this process. To test the hypotheses, a number of statistical tools such as factor analysis, Shapiro-Wilk and Mann-Whitney U tests have been used. The analyzed factors were: (A doctor’s choice , (b former own experience, (c pharmacist’s advice, (d information stated on the prospectus, (e opinion of people who bought that drug, (f opinion of colleagues, friends, relatives, (g price, (h brand, manufacturer, (i information from advertising, (j quality of advertising. For our analysis, we focused on two main populations: students and employed educated people. The main conclusion of this paper is that recent exposure to OTC advertising is likely to change both related behaviors and decision grids.

  6. Developing Equity Culture and Partnerships in the Investment Market: a Study on Iran’s over the Counter Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi SALEHI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The equity culture has an effective role in developing investment market and represents economic development. In the current study, polling and questionnaire method was used to determine the approach of organizational stockholders and exchange stockbrokers to over the counter market (OTC role in developing partnerships and equity culture in the investment market of Iran. The results demonstrate that the statistical population deems the transparency of Iran’s OTC market favorable and that the OTC market has acceptable trading expenses for investors and company’s involvement. Also, in addition to adequate supporting and educational facilities in Iran’s OTC market, there is the potential for innovation and diversity in trading opportunities for investors and individuals and reduces investor’s risks for investment and involvement in the investment market. Also there is no significant dereference between the approaches of organizational shareholders and exchange stockbrokers with regards to the discussed variables.

  7. Safety and Effectiveness of Health Care Antiseptics; Topical Antimicrobial Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-20

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the Agency, or we) is issuing this final rule establishing that certain active ingredients used in nonprescription (also known as over-the-counter or OTC) antiseptic products intended for use by health care professionals in a hospital setting or other health care situations outside the hospital are not generally recognized as safe and effective (GRAS/GRAE). FDA is issuing this final rule after considering the recommendations of the Nonprescription Drugs Advisory Committee (NDAC); public comments on the Agency's notices of proposed rulemaking; and all data and information on OTC health care antiseptic products that have come to the Agency's attention. This final rule finalizes the 1994 tentative final monograph (TFM) for OTC health care antiseptic drug products that published in the Federal Register of June 17, 1994 (the 1994 TFM) as amended by the proposed rule published in the Federal Register (FR) of May 1, 2015 (2015 Health Care Antiseptic Proposed Rule (PR)).

  8. Patient perceptions of pharmacist roles in guiding self-medication of over-the-counter therapy in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Wilbur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Kerry Wilbur1, Samah El Salam1, Ebrahim Mohammadi21Qatar University College of Pharmacy, Doha, Qatar; 2Qatar Petroleum Medical Services, Doha, QatarBackground: Self-care, including self-medication with over-the-counter (OTC drugs, facilitates the public’s increased willingness to assume greater responsibility for their own health. Direct consultation with pharmacists provides efficient professional guidance for safe and appropriate OTC use.Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize patient perceptions of pharmacists and use of nonprescription therapy in an ambulatory care population in Qatar. Methods: Patients having prescriptions filled at one organization’s private medical clinics during two distinct two-week periods were invited to participate in a short verbal questionnaire. Awareness of pharmacist roles in guiding OTC drug selection was assessed, as were patient preferences for OTC indications. Attitudes towards pharmacist and nurse drug knowledge and comfort with direct dispensing were also evaluated.Results: Five hundred seventy patients participated representing 29 countries. Most respondents were men (92.1% with mean age of 38.3 years. Almost 1 in 7 did not know medical complaints could be assessed by a pharmacist (15.3% and 1 in 5 (21.9% were unaware pharmacists could directly supply OTC therapy. The majority (85.3% would be interested in this service. In general, respondents were more comfortable with medication and related advice supplied by pharmacists as opposed to nursing professionals.Conclusion: Patients were familiar with the roles of pharmacists as they pertain to selfmedication with OTC therapy and described the desire to use such a service within this Qatar ambulatory health care setting.Keywords: patient, self-medication, over-the-counter, pharmacist, Qatar

  9. Attitudes in Australia on the upscheduling of over-the-counter codeine to a prescription-only medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jacqui; Bruno, Raimondo; Nielsen, Suzanne

    2018-02-01

    In December 2016, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration announced that over-the-counter (OTC) codeine would be available by prescription-only in February 2018. Prior to this announcement, the authors aimed to evaluate attitudes among Australian codeine consumers, pharmacists and general medical practitioners (GP) towards the proposed upscheduling of OTC codeine. Public Therapeutic Goods Administration submissions on codeine upscheduling were assessed, and a brief questionnaire was developed to assess the common issues raised. Participants (354 codeine consumers; 220 pharmacists; 120 GPs) completed a web-based questionnaire. Comparisons of attitudes on specific statements related to codeine upscheduling were made between consumers who were in support and those who opposed the proposal and between pharmacists and GPs. Regression models were conducted to examine correlates of attitudes towards codeine restriction. Most consumer, pharmacist and a third of GP respondents opposed the upscheduling of codeine. Consumers, on average, questioned whether the proposed intervention would address the intended targets of minimising codeine-related side effects and risk of codeine dependence. Like consumers, pharmacists indicated concern around whether codeine restriction would address concerns of associated harm and dependence, as well as the burden regular GP appointments would create in terms of finances for consumers and time for GPs. GPs themselves, did not support these views. Consumer responses identify key targets for educational campaigns when codeine is rescheduled, particularly around effective alternatives to OTC codeine. Additionally, contrasting views of pharmacists and GPs reinforce the importance of pharmacovigilance in evaluating the effectiveness of codeine restriction, once implemented. [McCoy J, Bruno R, Nielsen S. Attitudes in Australia on the upscheduling of over-the-counter codeine to a prescription-only medication. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017

  10. [Analysis of the phenomenon of over-the-counter drug abuse and not controlled herbs trade by polish adolescents: Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchecka, Daria; Kucharska-Mazur, Jolanta; Groszewska, Katarzyna; Mak, Monika; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Samochowiec, Agnieszka

    2017-05-16

    The phenomenon of stupefying by the use of available over-the-counter drugs (OTC) among adolescents is an essential problem in both Poland and throughout the world. Popular analgesics, cold medicine and antihistamines contain psychedelic substances, such as dextromethorphan (DXM), pseudoephedrine/ephedrine, codeine (methylmorphine), dimenhydrinate, paracetamol (acetaminophren) and others. Cases of fatal addiction to dextromethorphan, one of the active substances contained in medicines, e.g., the common cold, have been reported. The test results cited by the authors clearly indicate that the use of OTC drugs, whose turnover is not controlled is a domain of females. The extent of use of drugs not prescribed by a doctor has remained for many years at a constant level. The most common poisonings with OTC drugs are caused by those that affect the respiratory system or exert analgesic or antipyretic effects. They are also used in attempted suicides, especially among females. Analyzing poisonings caused by OTC medications their seasonality has been observed. Their number increases during spring-autumn. A territorial differentiation in areas of OTC drug trade in terms of their quantities, with the predominance of southern regions is also noted. Intoxication with psychoactive substances causes the deterioration of relations between young people. In the reviewed studies there is no detailed information on the composition of non-prescription medicines. Moreover, young people have easy access to mushroom fungi, growing in nearby forests and meadows that may have hallucinogenic effects and are available in pharmacies and on the Internet. Med Pr 2017;68(3):413-422. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  11. Analysis of the phenomenon of over-the-counter drug abuse and not controlled herbs trade by polish adolescents: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Suchecka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of stupefying by the use of available over-the-counter drugs (OTC among adolescents is an essential problem in both Poland and throughout the world. Popular analgesics, cold medicine and antihistamines contain psychedelic substances, such as dextromethorphan (DXM, pseudoephedrine/ephedrine, codeine (methylmorphine, dimenhydrinate, paracetamol (acetaminophren and others. Cases of fatal addiction to dextromethorphan, one of the active substances contained in medicines, e.g., the common cold, have been reported. The test results cited by the authors clearly indicate that the use of OTC drugs, whose turnover is not controlled is a domain of females. The extent of use of drugs not prescribed by a doctor has remained for many years at a constant level. The most common poisonings with OTC drugs are caused by those that affect the respiratory system or exert analgesic or antipyretic effects. They are also used in attempted suicides, especially among females. Analyzing poisonings caused by OTC medications their seasonality has been observed. Their number increases during spring–autumn. A territorial differentiation in areas of OTC drug trade in terms of their quantities, with the predominance of southern regions is also noted. Intoxication with psychoactive substances causes the deterioration of relations between young people. In the reviewed studies there is no detailed information on the composition of non-prescription medicines. Moreover, young people have easy access to mushroom fungi, growing in nearby forests and meadows that may have hallucinogenic effects and are available in pharmacies and on the Internet. Med Pr 2017;68(3:413–422

  12. Metabolomics: towards understanding traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Zhigang; Sun, Wenjun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xijun

    2010-12-01

    Metabolomics represent a global understanding of metabolite complement of integrated living systems and dynamic responses to the changes of both endogenous and exogenous factors and has many potential applications and advantages for the research of complex systems. As a systemic approach, metabolomics adopts a "top-down" strategy to reflect the function of organisms from the end products of the metabolic network and to understand metabolic changes of a complete system caused by interventions in a holistic context. This property agrees with the holistic thinking of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a complex medical science, suggesting that metabolomics has the potential to impact our understanding of the theory behind the evidence-based Chinese medicine. Consequently, the development of robust metabolomic platforms will greatly facilitate, for example, the understanding of the action mechanisms of TCM formulae and the analysis of Chinese herbal (CHM) and mineral medicine, acupuncture, and Chinese medicine syndromes. This review summarizes some of the applications of metabolomics in special TCM issues with an emphasis on metabolic biomarker discovery. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Efficacy of a twice-daily, 3-step, over-the-counter skincare regimen for the treatment of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodan K

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Katie Rodan, Kathy Fields, Timothy J Falla Rodan + Fields, San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Acne vulgaris (acne is the most common skin disorder producing physical and emotional scars that can persist for years. An estimated 83% of acne sufferers self-treat, but there is lack of studies documenting the effectiveness of over-the-counter (OTC acne treatment products.Objective: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of an OTC, 3-step, anti-acne skincare regimen in treating acne and improving the appearance of red/inflamed facial skin.Methods: This 6-week, open-label clinical study included both genders aged between 12 and 35 years with mild-to-moderate acne. All subjects were required to have an acne score of 1–3 (Cook’s acne grading scale: 0=clear to 7=very severe and a moderate redness score of ≥2 (0=none and 4=severe. Subjects completed a 3-step facial treatment regimen every morning and evening using an OTC cleanser, toner, and acne treatment. Evaluations for effectiveness and safety were done at baseline and weeks 2, 4, and 6 using digital photographs (Visia-CR® digital imaging system of the face and analyzed using Image-Pro® software for the grading of acne, red/inflamed skin, and the number and type of lesions.Results: Thirty subjects (12 males and 18 females were enrolled (mean age of 19 years; range 12–34 years. This skincare regimen resulted in statistically significant improvements in acne grading scores after 2 weeks of use, with mean scores continuing to improve after 4 and 6 weeks of use (P<0.001. Statistically significant improvements from baseline in red/inflamed skin, open and closed comedones, and papules were detected at all time points and for nodules at week 6, compared to their respective baselines (P<0.05.Conclusion: This clinical study demonstrated the effectiveness of an OTC 3-step, anti-acne skincare regimen in significantly improving acne and the overall appearance of skin in the majority

  14. Analysis of multiple end points in consumer research in support of switching drugs from prescription to over-the-counter status: the concept of end-point hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, E P; Shay, L E; Leonard-Segal, A

    2009-04-01

    Clinical and regulatory decision making concerning over-the-counter (OTC) drugs requires research designed to understand how consumers will self-manage treatment using the candidate OTC drug. Consumer research for an OTC drug may include studies of label comprehension, self-selection, and actual use. Definition and analysis of end points for these trials have varied in the absence of consensus on optimal approaches. Research programs should prospectively prioritize the importance of label messages based on their roles in the safe and effective use of the drug. The assessment of messages for which failure to heed warnings will expose the consumer to increased risk or clinically relevant treatment failure should receive the highest priority as study end points. Based on the consequences of unheeded warnings, message-specific targets for appropriate response rates can be predefined. This prospective, hierarchical approach to end-point definition, combined with prespecification of targeted correct-response rates, has the potential to increase the scientific rigor and regulatory utility of these important research studies.

  15. Over-the-counter vaginal contraceptive and spermicide drug products containing nonoxynol 9; required labeling. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-19

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule establishing new warning statements and other labeling information for all over-the-counter (OTC) vaginal contraceptive drug products (also known as spermicides, hereinafter referred to as vaginal contraceptives or vaginal contraceptives/spermicides) containing nonoxynol 9 (N9). These warning statements will advise consumers that vaginal contraceptives/spermicides containing N9 do not protect against infection from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), or against getting other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The warnings and labeling information will also advise consumers that use of vaginal contraceptives and spermicides containing N9 can irritate the vagina and rectum and may increase the risk of getting the AIDS virus (HIV) from an infected partner. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products. FDA is issuing this final rule after considering public comments on its proposed regulation, and all relevant data and information on N9 that have come to our attention.

  16. Over-the-counter cold medications-postmortem findings in infants and the relationship to cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, Laureen; Lehman, Lee; Casto, Brian; Harshbarger, Kent; Kubiczek, Piotr; Davis, James

    2005-10-01

    The Montgomery County Coroner's Office has encountered a series of 10 infant deaths over an 8-month period in infants under 12 months old with toxicology findings that include a variety of drugs commonly found in over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications. The drugs detected were ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, brompheniramine, ethanol, carbinoxamine, levorphanol, acetaminophen, and the anti-emetic metoclopramide. Toxicology findings were confirmed in 2 different matrices in 9 of the 10 cases and by 2 different analytical methods. The blood concentrations of the drugs and the case histories, as well as the cause of death for each infant, if available, will be given. The majority of these deaths were either toxicity from the OTC cold medications directly or as a contributory factor in the cause of death. Only two of the cases were the result of possible child abuse. Caregivers may be under the mistaken notion that OTC cold medications formulated for children are also safe for use in infants. These cases demonstrate that not only is administration of some OTC cold medications not safe, but use of OTC cold medications in infants can result in toxicity that can lead to death.

  17. Consumption, overdose and death from analgesics during a period of over-the-counter availability of paracetamol in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, P; Dalhoff, K; Hansen, P B

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1978-1986, annual sales of paracetamol in Denmark increased from 1 million defined daily doses (DDD) (3 g) to 47 million DDD, while the number of admissions and deaths from overdose increased from 26 to 202 and from 1 to 3-4, respectively. The corresponding figures for salicylates...... are a decrease in sales from 113 to 94 million DDD, an increase in admissions from 282 to 595, and an increase in deaths from 5 to 22. From 1 January 1984 paracetamol became available on an over-the-counter basis. The figures for 1983 and 1984 were an increase in sales from 14 to 28 million DDD, an increase...... in admissions from 114 to 198, and an increase in deaths from 0 to 4. The number of deaths from opioid overdose remained constant at a value of about fifty during this period, the mortality per dose being about 20-fold higher than for paracetamol and salicylates. Dextropropoxyphene-related deaths increased...

  18. The distribution of animal antimicrobials in British Columbia for over-the-counter and veterinary sales, 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Brian R

    2018-03-01

    Canadian Animal Health Institute (CAHI) data are used for provincial, national, and international comparisons of Canadian animal antimicrobial use. The objectives of this paper were to: i) use CAHI and British Columbia (BC) antimicrobial distribution data to group BC antimicrobial sales into the following BC retail distribution channels: over-the-counter retail outlets, livestock and poultry feed mills, aquaculture feed mills, livestock and poultry veterinarians, and companion animal veterinarians; and ii) to validate the CAHI BC distribution data and BC's antimicrobial distribution data from 2012 to 2014. Annual total antimicrobial distribution and distribution by antimicrobial class were presented for each distribution channel. The distribution of medically important antimicrobials for production animals was validated, the distribution of ionophores was not. A lack of data precluded any attempt to validate the distribution of antimicrobials for companion animals. Each distribution channel typically experienced substantial fluctuations in total antimicrobial use and use by antibiotic class at least once over the 3-year period. The validated data are useful for evidence-based analysis of a proposed Canadian policy requiring a veterinary prescription for all medically important antimicrobials.

  19. Use of over-the-counter analgesics is associated with perceived stress among 25-44-year-olds: a national cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke Jenny; Holstein, Bjørn E; Andersen, Anette

    2010-01-01

    To examine the association between perceived stress and use of over-the-counter analgesics among 25-44-year-olds, and to examine the association across various sociodemographic strata. Furthermore, to examine whether the association attenuates when controlled by stress-related symptoms.......To examine the association between perceived stress and use of over-the-counter analgesics among 25-44-year-olds, and to examine the association across various sociodemographic strata. Furthermore, to examine whether the association attenuates when controlled by stress-related symptoms....

  20. Views of pharmacy graduates and pharmacist tutors on evidence-based practice in relation to over-the-counter consultations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Peter; Hughes, Carmel; Hanna, Lezley-Anne

    2015-12-01

    Health care services offered to the public should be based on the best available evidence. We aimed to explore pharmacy tutors' and trainees' views on the importance of evidence when making decisions about over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and also to investigate whether the tutor influenced the trainee in practice. Following ethical approval and piloting, semi-structured interviews were conducted with pharmacy graduates (trainees) and pharmacist tutors. Transcribed interview data were entered into the NVivo software package (version 10), coded and analysed via thematic analysis. Twelve trainees (five males, seven females) and 11 tutors (five males, six females) participated. Main themes that emerged were (in)consistency and contradiction, confidence, acculturation, and continuation and perpetuation. Despite having an awareness of the importance and potential benefits, an evidence-based approach did not seem to be routinely or consistently implemented in practice. Confidence in products was largely derived from personal use and patient feedback. A lack of discussion about evidence was justified on the basis of not wanting to lessen patient confidence in requested product(s) or possibly negating the placebo effect. Trainees became acculturated to 'real-life' practice; university teaching and evidence was deemed less relevant than meeting customer expectations. The tutor's actions were mirrored by their trainee resulting in continuation and perpetuation of the same professional attitudes and behaviours. Evidence appeared to have limited influence on OTC decision making. The tutor played a key role in the trainee's professional development. More work could be performed to investigate how evidence can be regarded as relevant and something that is consistently implemented in practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Factors associated with the use of dietary supplements and over-the-counter medications in Japanese elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Shoichi; Sato, Mikiya; Maeno, Takami; Ichinohe, Yumiko; Maeno, Tetsuhiro

    2018-01-24

    The use of dietary supplements and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs is increasing, and there is adequate concern about potential harmful effects. However, there are limited reports on the concurrent use of nonprescription medications with prescription medications in elderly patients. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the use of dietary supplements and OTC drugs, and to identify predictors for their use in elderly patients using medications prescribed for chronic diseases. This was a cross-sectional study that enrolled 729 patients aged ≥65 years with chronic diseases, between January and March 2016. Data regarding socio-demographic status, medical condition, number of prescriptions, use of nonprescription medications, and psychological status were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and by review of medical records. Data regarding use of dietary supplements and OTC drugs were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Logistic regression analysis was applied to investigate factors associated with the use of dietary supplements and OTC drugs. The regular use of nonprescription drugs was reported by 32.5% of patients. Vitamins were the most commonly used dietary supplements in elderly patients. Female sex, higher educational qualifications, and good economic status were identified as predictors for the use of nonprescription medications. Concurrent use of nonprescription medications with more than 5 prescription medications was detected in 12.2% of participants. The disclosure rate of the use of nonprescription medications by patients to the physician was 30.3%. The use of dietary supplements and OTC drugs was common in elderly patients with chronic diseases, and its use is associated with sex, education, and economic status. General practitioners (GPs) need to recognize the potential use of nonprescription medications, considering that polypharmacy was common and disclosure rate was low in this study.

  2. Impact of Dry Eye Disease on Work Productivity, and Patients' Satisfaction With Over-the-Counter Dry Eye Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kelly K; Bacharach, Jason; Holland, Edward; Kislan, Thomas; Shettle, Lee; Lunacsek, Orsolya; Lennert, Barb; Burk, Caroline; Patel, Vaishali

    2016-06-01

    To assess the effect of dry eye disease on work productivity and performance of non-work-related activities, and patients' satisfaction with over-the-counter (OTC) dry eye treatments. In this prospective, noninterventional, cross-sectional study, conducted at 10 U.S. optometry/ophthalmology practices, 158 symptomatic dry eye patients naïve to prescription medication underwent standard dry eye diagnostic tests and completed Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaires. Use of OTC dry eye medication, and satisfaction with OTC medication and symptom relief were also assessed. On average, dry eye resulted in loss of 0.36% of work time (∼5 minutes over 7 days) and ∼30% impairment of workplace performance (presenteeism), work productivity, and non-job-related activities. Presenteeism and productivity impairment scores showed significant correlation with OSDI total (r = 0.55) and symptom domain (r = 0.50) scores, but not with dry eye clinical signs. Activity impairment score showed stronger correlation with OSDI total (r = 0.61) and symptom domain (r = 0.53) scores than with clinical signs (r ≤ 0.20). Almost 75% of patients used OTC dry eye medication. Levels of patient satisfaction with OTC medication (64.2%) and symptom relief from OTC (37.3%) were unaffected by administration frequency (≥3 vs. ≤2 times daily). Dry eye causes negligible absenteeism, but markedly reduces workplace and non-job-related performances. Impairment of work performance is more closely linked to dry eye symptoms than to clinical signs. Patients' perceptions of OTC dry eye medication tend to be more positive than their perceptions of symptom relief.

  3. Simple heuristics in over-the-counter drug choices: a new hint for medical education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Silvia; Monti, Marco; Antonietti, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are widely available and often purchased by consumers without advice from a health care provider. Many people rely on self-management of medications to treat common medical conditions. Although OTC medications are regulated by the National and the International Health and Drug Administration, many people are unaware of proper dosing, side effects, adverse drug reactions, and possible medication interactions. This study examined how subjects make their decisions to select an OTC drug, evaluating the role of cognitive heuristics which are simple and adaptive rules that help the decision-making process of people in everyday contexts. By analyzing 70 subjects' information-search and decision-making behavior when selecting OTC drugs, we examined the heuristics they applied in order to assess whether simple decision-making processes were also accurate and relevant. Subjects were tested with a sequence of two experimental tests based on a computerized Java system devised to analyze participants' choices in a virtual environment. We found that subjects' information-search behavior reflected the use of fast and frugal heuristics. In addition, although the heuristics which correctly predicted subjects' decisions implied significantly fewer cues on average than the subjects did in the information-search task, they were accurate in describing order of information search. A simple combination of a fast and frugal tree and a tallying rule predicted more than 78% of subjects' decisions. The current emphasis in health care is to shift some responsibility onto the consumer through expansion of self medication. To know which cognitive mechanisms are behind the choice of OTC drugs is becoming a relevant purpose of current medical education. These findings have implications both for the validity of simple heuristics describing information searches in the field of OTC drug choices and for current medical education, which has to prepare competent health

  4. Life-threatening rupture of a renal angiomyolipoma in a patient taking over-the-counter horse chestnut seed extract.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Snow, Aisling

    2011-02-09

    BACKGROUND: Alternative medical therapies are increasingly being prescribed due to their good safety profile and perceived limited side effects. They are often unregulated and prescribed over the counter. One such medication is horse chestnut seed extract (HCSE), which is used for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency and is known to affect blood coagulation. Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign fat-containing mesenchymal tumor of the kidney. It is often found incidentally and in most cases can be managed conservatively. Rupture of the kidney with hemorrhage is a well-known complication that may be serious and life-threatening. Known risk factors for hemorrhage include anticoagulation as well as pregnancy, increased size of the lesion, high lesion vascularity, and aneurysm formation within the tumor. OBJECTIVES: The aim is to raise awareness of potential HCSE-induced anticoagulation, including, as in the case presented, acute renal AML hemorrhage. CASE REPORT: The case of a patient taking HCSE for venous insufficiency is presented. The patient suffered a life-threatening rupture of the kidney in the presence of known renal AML. She underwent emergency embolization with a successful outcome. Because HCSE-containing products are thought to be generally safe in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, it is important to be mindful of their potential anticoagulant properties and, therefore, their relative contraindication both in patients taking other anticoagulants and those with known renal AML. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate a potentially life-threatening association between HSCE-containing products and renal AML, highlighting the risk associated with HSCE-induced anticoagulation.

  5. Patterns of use and public perception of over-the-counter pain relievers: focus on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, C Mel; Cryer, Byron; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2005-11-01

    To assess the frequency and indications for over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) use and to what degree the public is aware of their side effects. Two surveys totaling 9062 respondents were performed of the American public. The Roper survey, conducted in 1997, and the National Consumers League (NCL) survey, conducted in December 2002, were intended primarily to assess the public's use of and attitudes toward NSAID and OTC analgesics. Ibuprofen based drugs were the most frequently used OTC in both surveys (57% Roper, 33% NCL). In the Roper survey, 17% of respondents used NSAID, with 38% using both prescription and OTC. Forty-six percent of exclusive OTC users believed OTC were safer, while 56% of exclusive users of prescription NSAID believed they were safer. Sixty percent and 29% of exclusive OTC users were neither aware of nor believed they were at risk for side effects from NSAID, respectively. Twenty-six percent of respondents used more than the recommended dose on the label, while 22% believed warning symptoms would always precede any NSAID induced complications. In the NCL survey, 83% had used an OTC agent in the last year, with 15% reporting daily use, and 49% were not concerned about potential side effects. In this survey, 30% believed there was less risk with OTC analgesics, and 44% consumed more than the recommended dosage on the label. OTC analgesics including NSAID are widely used, are frequently taken inappropriately and potentially dangerously, and users are generally unaware of the potential for adverse side effects. Educational intervention directed toward both patients and physicians appears warranted.

  6. 21 CFR 310.547 - Drug products containing quinine offered over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and/or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and/or prevention of malaria. (a) Quinine and quinine salts... quinine drug products for OTC use in the treatment and/or prevention of malaria. Therefore, quinine or quinine salts cannot be safely and effectively used for the treatment and/or prevention of malaria except...

  7. Prevalence and predictors of over-the-counter medication use among pregnant women : a cross-sectional study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, Gwenny Mpj; Smolders, Elise J; Munster, Janna M; Aarnoudse, Jan G; Hak, Eelko

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over-the-counter-medication (OTC-medication) use during pregnancy can be potentially harmful for the fetus. To successfully counsel the patient it is important to know if the patient is at risk. In this study possible predictors for OTC-medication use were identified and a model was

  8. Over-the-Counter Medication and Herbal or Dietary Supplement Use in College: Dose Frequency and Relationship to Self-Reported Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasio, Michael J.; Curry, Kim; Sutton-Skinner, Kelly M.; Glassman, Destinee M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A growing number of researchers have examined the use of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and herbal or dietary supplements among college students. There is concern about the efficacy and safety of these products, particularly because students appear to use them at a higher rate than does the general public. Participants and Methods:…

  9. 21 CFR 201.325 - Over-the-counter drugs for vaginal contraceptive and spermicide use containing nonoxynol 9 as the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and spermicide use containing nonoxynol 9 as the active ingredient; required warnings and labeling... Products § 201.325 Over-the-counter drugs for vaginal contraceptive and spermicide use containing nonoxynol... vaginal contraceptive and spermicide drug products containing nonoxynol 9 as the active ingredient...

  10. Emergency Contraceptive Pill (ECP) Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States: Changes since ECP Went Over-the-Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers since ECP went over-the-counter (OTC) in 2006. Related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved, contraindications, follow-up procedures, methods of advertising, and staff attitudes, were…

  11. Key information providers, channels, and characteristics of Japanese consumers' informed choices of over-the-counter medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Makiko; Masuda, Sachiko; Kimura, Hiromichi

    2015-01-01

    People need reliable information regarding over-the-counter medications (OTCs), so that they can independently make appropriate informed choices. The study aimed to identify the information providers and channels that have an impact on the purchase of OTCs, and to demonstrate the information needs of OTC purchasers, using these providers and channels, from the viewpoint of information characteristics such as specialty, objectivity, concreteness, comprehensiveness, individuality, and availability, focusing on the efficacy of OTCs and related safety information. A questionnaire survey of randomly sampled adults aged ≥20 was conducted at the Japan Drugstore Show 2012, hosted by the Japan Association of Chain Drug Stores. In this questionnaire, information was particularly limited to the efficacy and safety of OTCs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed on data from 1743 respondents (1625 purchasers and 118 non-purchasers of OTCs) who obtained information on OTCs in their daily lives, to demonstrate the associations between the use of information providers and channels (predictor variables) and the purchase of OTCs (outcome variable), as well as between information characteristics valued by purchasers (predictor variables) and their use of these information providers or channels (outcome variables). Both the use of pharmacists as information providers and consultation at pharmacies as an information channel were positively associated with the purchase of OTCs (odds ratio [OR], 3.74; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 2.46-5.68; P < 0.001 and OR, 4.55; 95 % CI 2.92-7.11, P < 0.001, respectively), whereas both the use of family or friends using OTCs as information providers and family or friends as information channels were negatively associated with the purchase of OTCs (OR, 0.60; 95 % CI 0.40-0.90; P = 0.014 and OR, 0.55; 95 % CI 0.36-0.82; P = 0.004, respectively). OTC purchasers who valued individuality of information were more likely to

  12. Effects of over-the-counter analgesic use on reproductive hormones and ovulation in healthy, premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, R A; Mumford, S L; Schliep, K C; Ahrens, K A; Sjaarda, L A; Perkins, N J; Filiberto, A C; Mattison, D; Zarek, S M; Wactawski-Wende, J; Schisterman, E F

    2015-07-01

    Does use of commonly used over-the-counter (OTC) pain medication affect reproductive hormones and ovulatory function in premenopausal women? Few associations were found between analgesic medication use and reproductive hormones, but use during the follicular phase was associated with decreased odds of sporadic anovulation after adjusting for potential confounders. Analgesic medications are the most commonly used OTC drugs among women, but their potential effects on reproductive function are unclear. The BioCycle Study was a prospective, observational cohort study (2005-2007) which followed 259 women for one (n = 9) or two (n = 250) menstrual cycles. Two hundred and fifty-nine healthy, premenopausal women not using hormonal contraception and living in western New York state. Study visits took place at the University at Buffalo. During study participation, 68% (n = 175) of women indicated OTC analgesic use. Among users, 45% used ibuprofen, 33% acetaminophen, 10% aspirin and 10% naproxen. Analgesic use during the follicular phase was associated with decreased odds of sporadic anovulation after adjusting for age, race, body mass index, perceived stress level and alcohol consumption (OR 0.36 [0.17, 0.75]). Results remained unchanged after controlling for potential confounding by indication by adjusting for 'healthy' cycle indicators such as amount of blood loss and menstrual pain during the preceding menstruation. Moreover, luteal progesterone was higher (% difference = 14.0, -1.6-32.1, P = 0.08 adjusted) in cycles with follicular phase analgesic use, but no associations were observed with estradiol, LH or FSH. Self-report daily diaries are not validated measures of medication usage, which could lead to some classification error of medication use. We were also limited in our evaluation of aspirin and naproxen which were used by few women. The observed associations between follicular phase analgesic use and higher progesterone and a lower probability of sporadic

  13. THYROSIM App for Education and Research Predicts Potential Health Risks of Over-the-Counter Thyroid Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Simon X; Eisenberg, Marisa; Larsen, P Reed; DiStefano, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Computer simulation tools for education and research are making increasingly effective use of the Internet and personal devices. To facilitate these activities in endocrinology and metabolism, a mechanistically based simulator of human thyroid hormone and thyrotropin (TSH) regulation dynamics was developed and further validated, and it was implemented as a facile and freely accessible web-based and personal device application: the THYROSIM app. This study elucidates and demonstrates its utility in a research context by exploring key physiological effects of over-the-counter thyroid supplements. THYROSIM has a simple and intuitive user interface for teaching and conducting simulated "what-if" experiments. User-selectable "experimental" test-input dosages (oral, intravenous pulses, intravenous infusions) are represented by animated graphical icons integrated with a cartoon of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Simulations of familiar triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and TSH temporal dynamic responses to these exogenous stimuli are reported graphically, along with normal ranges on the same single interface page; and multiple sets of simulated experimental results are superimposable to facilitate comparative analyses. This study shows that THYROSIM accurately reproduces a wide range of published clinical study data reporting hormonal kinetic responses to large and small oral hormone challenges. Simulation examples of partial thyroidectomies and malabsorption illustrate typical usage by optionally changing thyroid gland secretion and/or gut absorption rates--expressed as percentages of normal--as well as additions of oral hormone dosing, all directly on the interface, and visualizing the kinetic responses to these challenges. Classroom and patient education usage--with public health implications--is illustrated by predictive simulated responses to nonprescription thyroid health supplements analyzed previously for T3 and T4 content. Notably, it was found that

  14. Preferences and attitudes of older adults of Bialystok, Poland toward the use of over-the-counter drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cybulski M

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mateusz Cybulski,1 Lukasz Cybulski,2 Elzbieta Krajewska-Kulak,1 Magda Orzechowska,1 Urszula Cwalina3 1Department of Integrated Medical Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland; 2National Security Student, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Olsztyn, Poland; 3Department of Statistics and Medical Informatics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland Purpose: The aim of the study was to assess preferences and attitudes toward the use of over-the-counter (OTC drugs among residents of Bialystok aged 60 or older. Patients and methods: The study included 170 people, inhabitants of Bialystok aged over 60: 85 students of the University of a Healthy Senior and the University of Psychogeriatric Prophylaxis, and 85 students of the University of the Third Age in Bialystok. The study made use of a diagnostic survey conducted via a questionnaire prepared by the authors. Results: The vast majority of respondents bought OTC drugs for own use. About one-third of the respondents from each analyzed group bought OTC drugs less often than once every 3 months. Over half of the respondents bought OTC drugs due to a cold. A majority of the respondents were of the opinion that OTC drugs should be sold only in pharmacies. Over 40% of seniors took 1 OTC drug regularly. Most respondents also took vitamins and supplements. The main sources of information on OTC drugs for the studied seniors were their doctor and pharmacist. Respondents did not always consult the treatment method with a doctor or pharmacist. Over half of the respondents familiarized themselves with the contents of the OTC drug package leaflet. Over three-quarters of the respondents were familiar with drug disposal methods; however, despite declarations of being familiar with these principles, a significant percentage did not bring back medication to a pharmacy or clinic, or threw the drugs

  15. Analysis of the evidence of efficacy and safety of over-the-counter cough medications registered in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Max Moreira Reis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the level of evidence regarding the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of over-the-counter (OTC cough medications registered in Brazil. The National Health Surveillance Agency database was used to identify the drugs. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and studies on safety were searched on the Medline baseline, the Cochrane Library and SIETES (System of Essential Information in Therapeutics and Health; database in Spanish. Most drugs (62.5% were sold as a fixed-dose combination of two or more drugs. Randomized clinical trials were found for only three drugs: bromhexine, dextromethorphan and guaifenesin. No clinical trials were found for fixed-dose combinations. Systematic reviews on Cochrane did not report any evidence in favor of or against the effectiveness of cough drugs. Efficacy is also unclear, especially regarding fixed-dose combinations. The evidence for the efficacy of OTC cough medications available in Brazil is poor due to the lack of quality studies. Pharmacovigilance of OTC cough medications should be encouraged.O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar o nível de evidências sobre a eficácia, a efetividade e a segurança dos medicamentos para tosse registrados no Brasil. A base de dados da Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária foi empregada para identificar os medicamentos. Os ensaios clínicos, as revisões sistemáticas, as metanálises e os estudos de segurança foram pesquisados no Medline, the Cochrane Library e SIETES (Sistema de Informações Essenciais em Terapêutica e Saúde, base de dados em espanhol. A maioria dos medicamentos (62,5% eram comercializados como associação em dose fixa com dois ou mais fármacos. Ensaios clínicos randomizados foram encontrados apenas para três fármacos: bromexina, dextrometorfano e guaifenesina; para associações a dose fixa não foram encontrados ensaios clínicos. Revisões sistemáticas publicadas pela Cochrane n

  16. Severe central nervous system and cardiovascular toxicity in a pediatric patient after ingestion of an over-the-counter local anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Jamie; Holland, Michael; Dougherty, Michelle; Bernad, Jason; Stork, Christine; Marraffa, Jeanna

    2009-10-01

    Dibucaine is considered one of the most potent and consequently toxic amide anesthetics available, and despite withdrawal from the US market as a spinal anesthetic, it remains accessible as an over-the-counter preparation in the United States. Dibucaine exposures in children are infrequently encountered, but to date, all reported consequential ingestions have resulted in death. We report the first case of a potentially fatal dibucaine-induced wide-complex arrhythmia in a child who survived her clinical course without sequelae. It is our hope that this report will highlight the toxicity of dibucaine and prompt a review of its over-the-counter status. The rationale and success of a new antidote, 20% lipid emulsion, for the management of local anesthetic toxicity is discussed.

  17. A Risk/Benefit Analysis of Central Clearing of Over-the-Counter (OTC) Derivatives and a Chaos Theory-Based Perspective on Clearing Mandates

    OpenAIRE

    Milanesi, Diana

    2017-01-01

    In the aftermaths of the global financial crisis of 2007-2009 (GFC), policymakers and regulators around the world embarked on far-reaching reforms of the over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives market. A key element in their agenda was the introduction of central clearing mandates for OTC derivatives, which was largely driven by the belief shared among policymakers and regulators that central counterparties clearing OTC derivatives (OTC CCPs) could reduce the counterparty risk and mitigate the sys...

  18. Evaluation of marketing claims, ingredients, and nutrient profiles of over-the-counter diets marketed for skin and coat health of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lily N; Heinze, Cailin R; Linder, Deborah E; Freeman, Lisa M

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate marketing claims, ingredients, and nutrient profiles of over-the-counter diets marketed for skin and coat health of dogs. Cross-sectional study. 24 over-the-counter dry and canned diets marketed for skin and coat health of dogs. Data on marketing claims and ingredients were collected from diet packaging and manufacturer websites. Concentrations of selected nutrients were obtained by contacting the manufacturers and were compared against minimum values for Association of American Feed Control Officials Dog Food Nutrient Profiles for adult dog maintenance based on calorie content. Most diets incorporated marketing terms such as digestive health, sensitive, or premium that are poorly defined and may have limited relevance to skin, coat, or general health. The types and numbers of major ingredients (ie, potential to contribute protein to the diet) differed. The total number of unique major ingredients in each diet ranged from 3 to 8 (median, 5.5), but the total number of unique ingredients in each diet ranged from 28 to 68 (median, 38). Concentrations of nutrients associated with skin and coat condition also differed widely. Results indicated that the large variation among over-the-counter diets marketed for skin and coat health may cause confusion for owners during diet selection. Owners of a dog with dermatologic problems should consult their veterinarian to select a good-quality diet that meets specific nutrient goals.

  19. Limited effectiveness of over-the-counter plant preparations used for the treatment of urinary tract infections as inhibitors of the urease activity from Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, C E

    2017-05-01

    Urease is a key virulence factor for the Gram-positive urinary tract pathogen Staphylococcus saprophyticus and a potential target for antimicrobial therapy. The enzyme from S. saprophyticus is unusual in that it does not contain cysteine at the active site. The aims of this study were to test 14 over-the-counter plant preparations as inhibitors of this urease and to determine whether they can prevent the increase in pH that normally occurs in bacterial cultures containing urea. Urease activity was measured colorimetrically by the formation of ammonium ions. The green tea and Uva-Ursi preparations reduced urease activity in a soluble extract of S. saprophyticus by more than 75%. Two herbal mixtures were weakly inhibitory and reduced activity by about 25%, but the other products had little or no effect. The green tea and Uva-Ursi extracts also inhibited urease activity in whole cells by more than 75%. One of the herbal products (WishGarden UTI) showed some inhibition of urease activity but the other (UTI Clear) did not. The green tea and Uva-Ursi preparations prevented the increase in pH that normally occurs when S. saprophyticus is grown in an artificial urine medium, but this was due primarily to bacterial death. The WishGarden UTI preparation could partially delay the pH increase while allowing some cells to remain viable. These results indicate that only a few of the commercially available over-the-counter plant preparations commonly used for the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) can inhibit the urease activity from S. saprophyticus. While over-the-counter plant preparations may be considered an alternative to traditional antibiotics for the treatment of UTIs, they should be used with caution and a product should be matched to the properties of the virulence factors of the bacterial pathogen involved. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Switching, Adverse Effects and Use of Over-the-Counter Analgesics among Users of Oral Anticoagulants: A Pharmacy-based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Hyllested, Lea Maria Rønneberg; Meegaard, Line; Wiberg-Hansen, Alexander; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Pottegård, Anton

    2017-07-01

    Oral anticoagulants are widely used but information on important aspects in that respect is not available from medical registers or clinical databases. Therefore, we conducted a survey including patients filling a prescription for oral anticoagulants at two large Danish community pharmacies. We collected information concerning the patients' knowledge of their anticoagulant treatment including prior drug switching. Further, patients were asked about use of over-the-counter analgesics, adverse effects and how the treatment affected their everyday life. Among 335 eligible patients, 301 (90%) agreed to participate. Atrial fibrillation was the most common indication (65%), and most patients filled a prescription for a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) (58%). Among the 12% (n = 35) of participants who had switched oral anticoagulant treatment, 69% had switched from a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) to a NOAC. Switching was most frequently caused by inconvenience (34%) and adverse effects (23%). Although half of all patients had recently bought over-the-counter analgesics, purchase of ibuprofen and aspirin was rare (6%). More VKA users than NOAC users felt limited in their everyday life because of anticoagulant treatment (18% versus 9%). Among non-incident NOAC users, 21% had experienced adverse effects during their current treatment. Based on first-hand information from a large sample of anticoagulant users, we conclude that the main drug-related issues leading to anticoagulant switching and perceived limitations in everyday life were inconvenience and adverse effects. This varied between drug groups. Further, use of NSAIDs obtained over the counter was rare. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  1. The importance of taking a history of over-the-counter medication use: a brief review and case illustration of "PRN" antihistamine dependence in a hospitalized adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracious, Barbara; Abe, Naomi; Sundberg, Jane

    2010-12-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medication abuse has been rapidly increasing, yet publications on OTC abuse in adolescents are limited. We present a brief literature review and a novel report of antihistamine dependence emerging after admission in an adolescent, subsequently treated with naltrexone. This case highlights the need to take a thorough history of OTC, herbal, and prescription drug use from parents and patients separately and repeatedly, at initial presentation, and again if withdrawal symptoms emerge. General strategies for combating OTC and prescription abuse are given.

  2. Dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products containing coal tar and menthol for over-the-counter human use; amendment to the monograph. Final rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products to include the combination of 1.8 percent coal tar solution and 1.5 percent menthol in a shampoo drug product to control dandruff. FDA did not receive any comments or data in response to its previously proposed rule to include this combination. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  3. Over the Counter Drugs (and Dietary Supplement) Exercise: A Team-based Introduction to Biochemistry for Health Professional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadtare, Sangita; Abali, Emine; Brodsky, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    For successful delivery of basic science topics for health-professional students, it is critical to reduce apprehension and illustrate relevance to clinical settings and everyday life. At the beginning of the Biochemistry course for Physician Assistants, a team-based assignment was designed to develop an understanding of the mechanism of action,…

  4. Cough Medicine: Understanding Your OTC Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CorrectlyPain Relievers: Understanding Your OTC OptionsAntacids and Acid Reducers: OTC Relief for Heartburn and Acid RefluxOTC Cough ... Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics ...

  5. [Self-Medication: A Nationwide Representative Survey on Motives, Reasons and Sources on Consuming Over-the-Counter Medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Christiane; Auersperg, Felicitas; Rusch, Bernd Detlev; Brähler, Elmar

    2015-08-01

    Self-medication, meaning the autonomous treatment of self diagnosed diseases with non-prescription drugs, has become an increasingly relevant topic - not the least because since 2004 most non-prescription drugs were no longer refunded by statutory health insurance, due to the GKV-Modernisierungsgesetz. In light of the above, the central questions that motivate this paper are the following: - Where does the german population obtain information about non-prescription drugs? - Which health impairments are treated with non-prescription drugs before seeing a doctor and for what reasons? - Which habits, experiences and estimates concerning self-medication are shared? To answer these questions the GfK market research institution in Nürnberg conducted a survey treating different topics from 7(th) to 21(st) December 2012. The sample selected by the quota method is considered to be representative for the population of men and women aged 14 and above in Germany and is based on a total of 1 976 personal interviews. 94.9% of those questioned did treat at least one of the 25 symptoms included in the survey with non-prescription medicine before potentially seeing a doctor. The most common place to obtain information about OTC products is pharmacies. The symptoms most commonly treated by oneself are cold symptoms and headaches. The evidence from this study suggests a variety of factors explaining this behavior. Most of the respondents do not want to see a doctor over minor issues, i. e., think their health problems are not severe enough require consulting a doctor. Furthermore long waiting times and limited opening hours are mentioned. The majority of the respondents had good experiences with self-medication. However, some of the participants keep their OTC use from their treating physicians. In conclusion, it becomes evident that both opportunities and risks come with self-medication. Strategies to capitalize those opportunities and mitigate these risks are presented, with

  6. Orlistat for the management of overweight individuals and obesity: a review of potential for the 60-mg, over-the-counter dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James W

    2007-08-01

    Orlistat, in the 60-mg over-the-counter dose, was recently approved by the FDA. This lipase inhibitor blocks absorption of ~25% of ingested fat and has ~85% of the efficacy of the 120-mg dose for weight loss. Over 16 weeks weight loss with diet and orlistat 60 mg averages ~5% of initial body weight. The 60-mg dose is better tolerated than the 120-mg dose and the gastrointestinal side effects are minimal when individuals consume < 30% of their energy from fat. In addition to facilitating modest weight loss, orlistat use decreases serum LDL-cholesterol values by ~10%. When taken three times daily before meals, orlistat 60 mg modifies lifestyle behavior, encourages lower fat-consumption and sets the stage for other healthy lifestyle changes.

  7. Prices of over-the-counter drugs used by 15-year-old adolescents in Germany and their association with socioeconomic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Italia, Salvatore; Wolfenstetter, Silke B; Brüske, Irene; Heinrich, Joachim; Berdel, Dietrich; von Berg, Andrea; Lehmann, Irina; Standl, Marie; Teuner, Christina M

    2017-11-25

    In Germany, over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are normally reimbursed up to the age of 12 years only. The aim of this study was to analyse prices of over-the-counter drugs used by adolescents in Germany and their association with socioeconomic factors. Based on the German GINIplus and LISAplus birth cohorts, data on drug utilization among 15-year-old adolescents (n = 4677) were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. The reported drugs were subdivided into prescription drugs and OTC drugs. The drugs' prices were tracked by the pharmaceutical identification numbers. Overall, 1499 OTC drugs with clearly identifiable prices were eligible for analysis. Their mean price was €9.75 (95% confidence interval: €9.27-10.22). About 75% of the OTC drugs cost less than €10. Higher mean prices were associated with residing in Munich (€10.74; 95% confidence interval: €9.97-11.52) and with higher paternal education (e.g. highest education level: €10.17; 95% confidence interval: €9.47-10.86). Adolescents residing in Munich (in comparison with the less wealthy region of Wesel) and adolescents with higher educated fathers were also significantly more likely to use OTC drugs costing ≥ €10 or ≥ €25, respectively. The price of €10 for non-reimbursable OTC drugs may represent a (psychological) threshold. Higher prices could discourage especially adolescents from a lower socioeconomic background from taking medically advisable but non-reimbursable OTC drugs.

  8. Over the Counter & Complementary Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News & Progress Patient Engagement Research Our research has led to breakthroughs in treatment and improved care that ... you to investigate the credentials and experience of anyone offering advice or recommendations regarding such product. Key ...

  9. Final year medical students’ understanding of family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Petek Šter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice / Family Medicine (EURACT has developed an educational agenda, the key document for teaching family medicine in Europe. The aim of our study was to find out how final year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand the discipline of family medicine. Methods. The attitudes toward family medicine were paraphrased and developed into a 164-item questionnaire, which was administered to 335 final-year medical students at the beginning of their clerkship. Using combinatorial optimization with genetic algorithms we selected 30 items which yielded the highest Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient. Finally, we performed a factor analysis to find which dimensions of family medicine were recognised by the students and compared them with the domains defined in the EURACT definition. Results. The 30-item questionnaire had a Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient of 0.919. The differences between male and female students were not very significant (p=0.061. With the factor analysis we recognised seven factors, belonging to three out of six domains of the EURACT educational agenda: primary care management, personcenteredness and comprehensive approach. Conclusion. Final-year medical students at the beginning of their family medicine clerkship understand some of the dimensions of family medicine rather well, but they are not aware of some important competences of family doctors. There is a necessity to teach students about specific problem solving skills and the importance of balance between the health needs of an individual patient and the community.

  10. Taking Medicines Safely After Alcohol or Drug Abuse Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, Procedures & Devices Over-the-counter Products Procedures & Devices ... for OthersFood PoisoningAcute Bronchitis Home Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Taking Medicines Safely after ...

  11. Antibiotics and over the counter medication use and its correlates among Arab pregnant women visiting a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheel, Hafsa; Alsakran, Sulaiman; Alghamdi, Abdulkhaliq; Ajarem, Majed; Alsulami, Salman; Mahmood, Afzal

    2017-01-01

    The use of over the counter medications (OTCMs) is a common practice globally. OTCMs are of special concern among pregnant women as they pose risk to the mother and fetus. The objective was to assess the use of OTCMs by pregnant woman, and factors associated with it. A cross-sectional study, using a structured self-administrated questionnaire was conducted at the obstetric and antenatal clinics at King Khalid University hospital, Riyadh. 354 pregnant women were surveyed. About 32% of the study participants used OTCMs without prescription at least once during their last pregnancy. The most commonly used OTCM was Paracetamol (22%). Pharmacists were the main source of knowledge (53%) for the participants. Correct knowledge regarding the drugs was associated with the usage of OTCM drug. Use of OTCMs and antibiotics during pregnancy is a common practice among Saudi pregnant women. General awareness regarding OTCMs use during pregnancy without prescription needs to be raised in the community. Pharmacists and media can help in providing accurate knowledge.

  12. Next-day residual sedative effect after nighttime administration of an over-the-counter antihistamine sleep aid, diphenhydramine, measured by positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongying; Tashiro, Manabu; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Funaki, Yoshihito; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Kato, Masato; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Antihistamines often are self-administered at night as over-the-counter (OTC) sleep aids, but their next-day residual sedative effect has never been evaluated using a reliable quantitative method such as positron emission tomography (PET). We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in which we evaluated the residual effect the next day after nighttime administration of diphenhydramine, a commonly used OTC sleep aid, in terms of brain H₁ receptor occupancy (H₁RO) measured using ¹¹C-doxepin-PET. We also compared the results of diphenhydramine with those of bepotastine, a second-generation antihistamine. Eight healthy adult male subjects underwent PET measurement the morning (11:00) after random oral administration of diphenhydramine (50 mg), bepotastine (10 mg), or placebo the night before (23:00). Binding potential ratios and H₁ROs were calculated in different brain regions of interest such as the cingulate gyrus, frontotemporal cortex, and cerebellum. Subjective sleepiness and plasma drug concentration also were measured. Calculation of binding potential ratios revealed significantly lower values for diphenhydramine than for bepotastine or placebo in all regions of interest (P drug or the placebo. In conclusion, the next-day residual sedative effect after nighttime administration of the OTC sleep aid diphenhydramine was verified for the first time by direct PET measurement of H₁RO. Taking into account the possible hangover effect of OTC antihistamine sleep aids, care needs to be taken during their administration.

  13. Will gay and bisexually active men at high risk of infection use over-the-counter rapid HIV tests to screen sexual partners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Frasca, Timothy; Dolezal, Curtis; Balan, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration may license OraQuick™, a rapid HIV test, for over-the-counter (OTC) sale. This study investigated whether HIV-uninfected, non-monogamous, gay and bisexual men who never or rarely use condoms would use the test with partners as a harm-reduction approach. Sixty participants responded to two computer-assisted self-interviews, underwent an in-depth interview, and chose whether to test themselves with OraQuick. Over 80% of the men said they would use the kit to test sexual partners or themselves if it became available OTC. Most participants understood that antibody tests have a window period in which the virus is undetectable, yet saw advantages to using the test to screen partners; 74% tested themselves in our offices. Participants offered several possible strategies to introduce the home-test idea to partners, frequently endorsed mutual testing, and highlighted that home testing could stimulate greater honesty in serostatus disclosure. Participants drew distinctions between testing regular versus occasional partners. Non-monogamous men who have sex with men, who never or rarely use condoms, may nevertheless seek to avoid HIV. Technologies that do not interfere with sexual pleasure are likely to be used when available. Studies are needed to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using OTC rapid HIV tests as one additional harm-reduction tool.

  14. Atmospheric identification of active ingredients in over-the-counter pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse by atmospheric pressure glow discharge mass spectrometry (APGD-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Tim M; Verkouteren, Jennifer R

    2011-09-15

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharge mass spectrometry was used to characterize the active ingredients in pharmaceutical over-the-counter (OTC) drug formulations (Tylenol Allergy, Alka-Seltzer Plus Nighttime, Sudafed, Aleve and Mucinex DM) and drugs of abuse (crack cocaine, methamphetamine, MDMA (ecstasy) and hydrocodone). Material was desorbed and directly ionized under atmospheric conditions by allowing the substance to come in direct contact with the plasma followed by mass spectrometric detection. With this technique, controlled substances and OTC medications were readily distinguished from one another. Characteristic mass spectra were identified for the active ingredients in the OTC and drugs of abuse. Importantly, all drug compounds studied here, both OTC and illicit, demonstrated signals for either molecular ions or protonated molecules as well as fragmentation patterns that are readily identified in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) electron ionization (EI) mass spectral library. It is believed that this technique holds promise for forensic and law enforcement communities for real-time atmospheric analysis of drugs with database-searchable spectra of controlled substances. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Investigating sources of pharmaceutical pollution: Survey of over-the-counter and prescription medication purchasing, use, and disposal practices among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatovec, Christine; Van Wagoner, Emily; Evans, Corey

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceutical pollution in surface waters poses a range of risks to public health and aquatic ecosystems. Consumers contribute to pharmaceutical pollution via use and disposal of medications, though data on such behaviors is limited. This paper investigates the purchasing, use, and disposal practices among a population that has been researched only minimally to date, yet will determine pharmaceutical pollution for decades to come: young adults represented by a university student population. We employed an online, 21-question survey to examine behaviors related to pharmaceuticals among students at the University of Vermont (n = 358). Results indicate that the majority of respondents had purchased medications in the previous 12 months (94%), and had leftover drugs (61%). Contrary to previous studies of older populations, only a small proportion of students had disposed of drugs (18%); municipal trash was the primary route of drug disposal (25%), and very few students disposed drugs via flushing (1%). Less than a quarter of students were aware of drug take-back programs (24%), and only 4% had ever used take-back services. These findings indicate that the university student population may be storing a large volume of unused drugs that will require future disposal. Increasing awareness of, access to, and participation in pro-environment pharmaceutical behaviors, such as purchasing over-the-counter medication in smaller quantities and utilizing drug take-back programs, could minimize future pharmaceutical pollution from this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Comparative Study on the Life-Saving Radioprotective Effects of Vitamins A, E, C and Over-the-Counter Multivitamins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi S. M. J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral intake of vitamins which present antioxidant characteristics can protect living organisms against oxidative damage caused by exposure to ionizing radiation. It was previously reported that administration of high levels of vitamin C can lead to increased DNA damage through production of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide by the Fenton reaction. However, our early experiments did not confirm this hypothesis. The main goal of this study was to determine if high doses of Vit C can show life-saving radioprotective effects. Materials and Methods: Phase I: Seventy two male Balb/c mice weighing 20-25g were randomly divided into six groups of 12 animals each. Group I; Vit E for five days, Groups II and III; Vit C and Vit A. Group 4; all three vitamins. Group V; an over-the-counter multivitamin. Group VI; none of the above. Phase II: 120 male BALB/c mice weighing 20-25g were randomly divided into 12 groups of 10 each. Group I; Vit A for five days. Groups II-IV; Vit C 200 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, 800 mg/kg, respectively. Group V-VII; Vit E at daily doses of 200 iu/kg, 400 iu/kg, 800 iu/kg, respectively. Group VIII and IX; all three vitamins at low and high doses, respectively. Group X; an over-the-counter multivitamin. Group XI; controls group and Group XII; received pure olive oil. All animals (Phases I and II were exposed to a lethal dose of gamma rays and the survival rates of the animals were monitored and recorded continuously for 16 days after exposure. Results: Phase I: 14 days after irradiation the survival rate for control group was 33.33%, while the survival rates for the 1st to 5th groups were 45.45%, 81.81%, 50%, 57.14%, and 9.09% , respectively. Phase II: The survival rates in the control group and the group that only received pure olive oil, were 50% and 60%, respectively. Survival rate in the animals received Vit C at daily doses of 200 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, 800 mg/kg, were 90%, 90% and 90%, respectively. Log rank (Mantel

  17. A Review of the Ingredients Contained in Over the Counter (OTC Cough Syrup Formulations in Kenya. Are They Harmful to Infants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kigen

    Full Text Available Cough syrups are widely used in the developing world, but safety of their use in infants and children less than two years has not been well documented. Some syrups contain multiple combinations of such drugs as promethazine, diphenhydramine and ephedrine; which are individually now contraindicated in children less than two years. Despite this, the syrups are available as over the counter drugs and may be dispensed to mothers who are unaware of the potentially hazardous effects to their infants. A descriptive cross-sectional study was used to investigate suitability of cough syrups sold within Eldoret municipality for use in children less than two years of age based on their formulations and available literature.Two semi-structured questionnaires were administered to pharmacy attendants and mothers attending sick child clinic at a referral hospital to establish whether cough syrups containing more than one active ingredient of compounds, now contraindicated in children are administered to infants, and awareness of potential serious adverse effects. Data from labeled contents of cough syrups from retail pharmacies was recorded and corroborated with information from literature to determine those deemed to contain the ingredients. The second questionnaire was administered to mothers with children less than two years to ascertain whether they had used the identified syrups. A total of 260 mothers and 55 pharmacy attendants were interviewed.There was widespread use of the syrups in children, including infants, with 192 (74% of the respondents having used identified syrups and over 90% of these on children less than 2 years including those less than three months.146 (76% mothers had administered the syrup at double the recommended dose.The regulatory authorities should make concerted efforts to discourage use of cough syrups containing ingredients that pose adverse events to infants, including campaigns to educate pharmacy workers and mothers.

  18. Severe cutaneous reaction to cetuximab with possible association with the use of over-the-counter skin care products in a patient with oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Waris; Naik, Seeta; Idrees, Imran; Taha, Hesham; Camosino, Linda; Mehrishi, Anshu; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2009-01-01

    The management of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge to most oncologists and their patients. Treatment with epithelial growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) is associated with a good response. Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), in combination with radiation therapy is indicated for the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Although a mild acneiform skin rash (Grade 1, 2) is very common in these patients, severe rash (Grade 3) is uncommon. A 61-year-old African American man with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer was treated with cetuximab and radiation. He developed a sudden flare-up of a skin rash after the 5th cycle of cetuximab following use of over-the-counter (OTC) skin care remedies. The rash manifested with severe maculopapular eruption and erythematous rash, along with desquamation and exfoliation of the skin, mainly on the face and neck area. The patient denied any extraordinary sun exposure. Cetuximab and radiation therapy were held for 1 week and the rash was treated with doxycycline, diphenhydramine, and continued use of natural emollient (Vaseline petroleum jelly). After 1 week, a dramatic improvement of the facial rash was noticed. Our report describes a sudden flare-up of a skin rash (Grade 3) after the 5th cycle of cetuximab following use of OTC skin care remedies, which was unusual for this patient, suggesting a possible relation to the therapy. Skin crucially depends on EGFR for its normal function and becomes extremely sensitive during cetuximab therapy. Topical OTC acne and dry skin remedies can suddenly change the mild acneiform rash into severe skin toxicity associated with marked desquamation and exfoliation. Avoidance of further skin damage caused by topical applications and the use of doxycycline and diphenhydramine show a significant success in the management of skin toxicity.

  19. Kuwaiti parent’s knowledge of their children’s fever and their patterns of use of over the counter antipyretics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Ahmed Kamal Badawy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Many parents consider fever a disease with the continuation of fever phobia and overuse of antipyretics to reduce it. Aims Identifying Kuwaiti parent’s knowledge of their children’s fever and determining their patterns of use of Over-the- Counter- Antipyretics. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study in which we have recruited 614 Kuwaiti mothers of well children aged between six months and five years. Data was collected over six-months from September 2015 to March 2016, using a self-administered questionnaire. Results A total of 614 mothers participated in the study, with a response rate of 94.5 per cent. Twenty-seven per cent (166 of them considered a temperature ≤38.5°C to be a high- grade fever, with the level of education significantly influenced mothers’ reports of high-grade fever (F=4.68, df.=4, P=0.001, n=207. Almost all the parents believed that heat could cause harm, and 48 per cent (294 of them stated that fever is very harmful. Fifty-three per cent of mothers (309 would give antipyretic medication when body temperature is ≤38°C. Sixty-one per cent (375 of the mothers had alternated antipyretic paracetamol and ibuprofen. Forty-five per cent (274 of parents think that antipyretics are without potential harm. Level of education had a positive impact on the perception of fever [χ2 (df=8=70.68, p<0.001]. Usual practices targeted temperature reduction using antipyretics by 53.7 per cent. Conclusion Mothers have an imperfect knowledge of fever. Fever phobia is widespread, leading to an overuse of antipyretics.

  20. Association of Risk Perception and Information Provided on the Labels of Over-the-Counter Drugs: Role of Race, Education, Age and Income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Mathur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of over-the-counter (OTC drugs has increased tremendously, however, information on risk perception regarding the use of OTC drugs and their potential toxicity is scarce. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of OTC drug safety and efficacy based on reading product packaging and the effect of race, education, age and income. Methods: We used the HINTS 2012 data set with total sample size of 2,554. Results: OTC drug users having some high school education had a lower chance of frequently reading information included in the product labeling with the OTC medication. OTC drug users less than 50 years of age were always likely to read drug information on the OTC drug labeling. Also, Non-Hispanic blacks were more likely to read OTC drug labeling than Non-Hispanic whites.  OTC drug users less than 50 years of age consider OTC drugs safer than prescription drugs.  Conversely, OTC drug users with a high school, some college or bachelor’s degree consider OTC drugs less safe than prescription drugs.  Non-Hispanic blacks, non-Hispanic whites, and subjects of lower income were less likely to consider OTC drugs safer than prescription drugs.  OTC drug users with a high school education and some college perceive OTC drugs to be less effective than prescription drugs.Conclusion: To conclude, age, education, race, and income affect risk perception on OTC drugs.  Consumer information programs need to be designed so that meaningful results can be incorporated into public policy. Providing information on the labeling of OTC drugs and likelihood of patients reading this information require further study.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Over-the-Counter Drug Use by the Elderly. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document contains the prepared statements and panel testimony from the Congressional hearing on over-the-counter (OTC) drug use by the elderly. Opening statements are given by Representatives Claude Pepper (chairman), Ralph Regula, Mary Rose Oakar, Michael Bilirakis, Tom Lantos, and Hal Daub. Topics which are covered include the incidence and…

  2. Efficacy and safety of over-the-counter whitening strips as compared to home-whitening with 10 % carbamide peroxide gel--systematic review of RCTs and metanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraglio, Carla Regina; Zanella, Luana; Dalla-Vecchia, Karine Battestin; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to compare the efficacy and safety of over-the-counter whitestrips with the American Dental Association (ADA)-recommended home-whitening using the 10 % carbamide peroxide gel. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the clinical efficacy and safety of the whitestrips with the 10 % carbamide peroxide (10 % CP) gel applied on tray for tooth whitening in adults were searched at PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases and selected up to October 2014. Efficacy of the whitening techniques was assessed through ∆E, ∆L, and ∆b parameters, while side effects were analyzed as dichotomous variables. Data was extracted independently by two reviewers. Metanalysis was performed using random- and fixed-effect models (RevMan 5.3). Eight studies were included in the metanalysis. The metanalysis revealed no significant difference between the intervention groups for tooth-whitening efficacy measured as ΔE (mean difference [MD]-0.53; 95 % CI [-1.72;0.66]; Z = 0.88; p = 0.38) and ΔL (MD-0.22; 95 % CI [-0.81;0.36]; z = 0.75; p = 0.45); reduction of yellowing was higher with the whitestrips (MD-0.47; 95 % CI [-0.89; -0.06]; Z = 2.25; p = 0.02). Tooth sensitivity (risk ratio [RR] 1.17; 95 % CI [0.81-1.69]; Z = 0.81; p = 0.42) and gingival sensitivity (RR 0.76; 95 % CI [0.53-1.10]; Z = 1.44; p = 0.15) were similar, regardless of the whitening method used. The observed gingival irritation was higher when the 10 % CP gel was applied on tray (RR 0.43; 95 % CI [0.20-0.93]; Z = 2.14; p = 0.03). The quality of evidence generated was rated very low for all outcomes. There is no sound evidence to support the use of the whitening strips in detriment of the ADA-recommended technique based on the 10 % carbamide peroxide gel applied on tray. To the moment, there is no sound evidence in dental literature to suggest that the ADA-recommended whitening technique based on 10 % carbamide peroxide gel could be substituted by the whitening strips. The

  3. Codeine consumption from over-the-counter anti-cough syrup in Taiwan: A useful indicator for opioid abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ming-Yu; Ong, Ming Wei; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2015-12-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) anti-cough preparations, many of which contain codeine (an opioid) or dextromethorphan (an opioid-like), are widely available in Taiwan and thus susceptible to overuse or abuse. We aimed to investigate whether opioids in the form of OTC antitussives play a significant role in medication abuse in Taiwan. Data on the consumption of codeine and dextromethorphan in antitussives and expectorants from 2011 through 2014 in Taiwan were provided by IMS Health (Intercontinental Marketing Services). These data were then analyzed for trends and variance according to availability, as prescription or OTC, and according to drug type, as codeine or dextromethorphan, in order to form four primary sectors under opioid-containing anti-cough syrup consumption. From 2011 to 2014, use of opioid-containing cough syrup fluctuated between 6% and 9% from year to year for all cough syrup consumption, with an overall declining trend (11.3% per year relative to 2011). Within the underlying sectors, mean consumption for prescription dextromethorphan (61.4%) outstripped the other three sectors, followed in decreasing order by OTC codeine (20.2%), OTC dextromethorphan (10.5%), and prescription codeine (8.0%). However, movement in consumption corresponded mainly with OTC codeine, whose variance greatly exceeded that of the other sectors, which follow in order of decreasing variance as OTC dextromethorphan, prescription dextromethorphan, and prescription codeine. The fairly low and stable consumption of prescription codeine suggested that physicians in Taiwan were careful in prescribing codeine, and that the medical demand for codeine was stable. The large variance in OTC codeine consumption suggested that a minority of consumers purchased significant quantities of codeine for non-medical purposes. Although opioids in cough syrup were not a large part of overall consumption and thus not widely abused, the data revealed that OTC codeine-containing cough syrup may serve as an

  4. Limited output transcranial electrical stimulation (LOTES-2017): Engineering principles, regulatory statutes, and industry standards for wellness, over-the-counter, or prescription devices with low risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikson, Marom; Paneri, Bhaskar; Mourdoukoutas, Andoni; Esmaeilpour, Zeinab; Badran, Bashar W; Azzam, Robin; Adair, Devin; Datta, Abhishek; Fang, Xiao Hui; Wingeier, Brett; Chao, Daniel; Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Lee, Kiwon; Knotkova, Helena; Woods, Adam J; Hagedorn, David; Jeffery, Doug; Giordano, James; Tyler, William J

    We present device standards for low-power non-invasive electrical brain stimulation devices classified as limited output transcranial electrical stimulation (tES). Emerging applications of limited output tES to modulate brain function span techniques to stimulate brain or nerve structures, including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), and transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS), have engendered discussion on how access to technology should be regulated. In regards to legal regulations and manufacturing standards for comparable technologies, a comprehensive framework already exists, including quality systems (QS), risk management, and (inter)national electrotechnical standards (IEC). In Part 1, relevant statutes are described for medical and wellness application. While agencies overseeing medical devices have broad jurisdiction, enforcement typically focuses on those devices with medical claims or posing significant risk. Consumer protections regarding responsible marketing and manufacture apply regardless. In Part 2 of this paper, we classify the electrical output performance of devices cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) including over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription electrostimulation devices, devices available for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes, and devices indicated for stimulation of the body or head. Examples include iontophoresis devices, powered muscle stimulators (PMS), cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) devices. Spanning over 13 FDA product codes, more than 1200 electrical stimulators have been cleared for marketing since 1977. The output characteristics of conventional tDCS, tACS, and tPCS techniques are well below those of most FDA cleared devices, including devices that are available OTC and those intended for stimulation on the head. This engineering analysis demonstrates that with

  5. Understanding Liver Regeneration: From Mechanisms to Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgenkrantz, Hélène; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra

    2018-04-16

    Liver regeneration is a complex and unique process. When two-thirds of a mouse liver is removed, the remaining liver recovers its initial weight in approximately 10 days. The understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver regeneration may help patients needing large liver resections or transplantation and may be applied to the field of regenerative medicine. All differentiated hepatocytes are capable of self-renewal, but different subpopulations of hepatocytes seem to have distinct proliferative abilities. In the setting of chronic liver diseases, a ductular reaction ensues in which liver progenitor cells (LPCs) proliferate in the periportal region. Although these LPCs have the capacity to differentiate into hepatocytes and biliary cells in vitro, their ability to participate in liver regeneration is far from clear. Their expansion has even been associated with increased fibrosis and poorer prognosis in chronic liver diseases. Controversies also remain on their origin: lineage studies in experimental mouse models of chronic injury have recently suggested that these LPCs originate from hepatocyte dedifferentiation, whereas in other situations, they seem to come from cholangiocytes. This review summarizes data published in the past 5 years in the liver regeneration field, discusses the mechanisms leading to regeneration disruption in chronic liver disorders, and addresses the potential use of novel approaches for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring and understanding academic leadership in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oandasan, Ivy; White, David; Hammond Mobilio, Melanie; Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Feldman, Kymm; Kim, Florence; Rouleau, Katherine; Sorensen, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    To explore how family physicians understand the concept of academic leadership. Case study. Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Thirty family physician academic leaders. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with family physicians from a large multisite urban university who were identified by peers as academic leaders at various career stages. Transcripts from the focus groups and interviews were anonymized and themes were analyzed and negotiated among 3 researchers. Participants identified qualities of leadership among academic leaders that align with those identified in the current literature. Despite being identified by others as academic leaders, participants were reluctant to self-identify as such. Participants believed they had taken on early leadership roles by default rather than through planned career development. This study affirms the need to define academic leadership explicitly, advance a culture that supports it, and nurture leaders at all levels with a variety of strategies.

  7. Commercial herbal medicines used as African traditional medicines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The prevalent use of African traditional medicine by the general public has been reported. With commercialisation and marketing, some of the herbal medicines (HMs) used are readily available over the counter, most of them promoted as immune boosters. These commercial HMs have not been taken through ...

  8. A new vision of definition, commentary, and understanding in clinical and translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangdong

    2012-05-03

    There is growing evidence to the importance of translational science and medicine in the improvement of patient outcome, even though the definitions of translational science, translational medicine, and clinical and translational medicine need to be further clarified. In the present perspective, we collected commentaries and descriptions about clinical and translational medicine from some members of Clinical and Translational Medicine editorial board to stimulate the discussion and help the understanding better.

  9. A automedicação e a influência de grupos de referência: aplicação da técnica de análise discriminante no mercado de medicamentos over-the-counter [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2015003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Junior Ladeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available O consumo de remédios sem prescrição médica, over-the-counter (OTC, tem aumentado em vendas no varejo farmacêutico do Brasil. Devido a esse crescimento, o presente artigo procurou analisar este fenômeno através dos estudos de influência interpessoal existente no marketing. Assim sendo, teve-se como objetivo identificar os principais fatores que tornam possível discriminar os consumidores de remédios OTC’s que utilizam ou não a automedicação. Para isto, a automedicação foi estudada como um fenômeno em que o consumidor recebe ou não alguma informação para tomada de decisão e que esta não seja dada por um profissional da saúde. Desse modo, coletou-se dados com dois agrupamentos distintos: pessoas que dizem receber influência interpessoal (1 e pessoas que dizem não receber influência interpessoal (0. Logo após, essas informações foram formatadas em um banco de dados e analisadas dentro do conjunto de técnicas que fez parte da análise discriminante. Como resultado, as variáveis que demonstraram não discriminar estes agrupamentos foram: influência do farmacêutico e atendentes. Por outro lado, as variáveis que discriminam os agrupamentos foram: recomendação de outro remédio, marca (ambos com baixo poder de discriminação o fato de experimentar outros remédios e influência da propaganda (ambos com alto poder de discriminação. Palavras-chave Automedicação; Influência Interpessoal; Análise de discriminante. THE MEDICATION AND THE INFLUENCE OF REFERENCE GROUPS: APPLICATION OF TECHNICAL DISCRIMINANT ANALYSIS IN THE MARKET OF DRUGS KNOWN AS OVER-THE-COUNTER Abstract The consumption of non-prescribed medicines, known as over-the-counter (OTC, has increased the sales in retail pharmacy in Brazil. Due to this growth, this paper tried to analyze this phenomenon through the studies of interpersonal influence that was made so far in marketing. Thus, as objective, it was proposed to identify the key factors that make

  10. Cross-sectional study of availability and pharmaceutical quality of antibiotics requested with or without prescription (Over The Counter in Surabaya, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardjito Widjoseno

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem in developing countries and antibiotic use is widespread. Our previous surveys in Java, Indonesia, revealed that most antibiotic use was probably unnecessary or ineffective. The aim of this study was to explore a potential connection between resistance and substandard antibiotics sold in the area. Methods A cross-sectional field study using the simulated client method was conducted in Surabaya. Five first-line antibiotics were requested with or without prescription (OTC. A certified laboratory analysed the drug content using validated methods. Possible determinants of substandard quality were explored. Results In total, 104 samples from 75 pharmacies, ten drug stores and 39 roadside stalls (kiosks were obtained. Pharmacy employees filled all OTC requests. Three quarters of kiosks sold antibiotics. Antibiotics were dispensed as single blister strips or repackaged (16% without label. Ninety five percent of samples carried the label of 14 Indonesian manufacturers. The pharmaceutical quality did not meet BP standards for 18% of samples. Deviations (less active ingredient were small. There was no association between low content and type of outlet, sold with or without prescription, registration type, price or packaging. Median retail prices of products carrying the same label varied up to 20 fold. Conclusions Antibiotics were available OTC in all visited pharmacies and sold in the streets of an Indonesian city. Most samples contained an active ingredient. We urge to increase enforcement of existing regulations, including legislation that categorizes antibiotics as prescription-only drugs for all types of medicine outlets, to limit further selection of antimicrobial resistance.

  11. A randomized, placebo-controlled double-blinded comparative clinical study of five over-the-counter non-pharmacological topical analgesics for myofascial pain: single session findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avrahami Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate the effects of topical agents for the treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS and Myofascial Trigger Point (MTRP. Methods Subjects with an identifiable trigger point in the trapezius muscle, age 18-80 were recruited for a single-session randomized, placebo-blinded clinical study. Baseline measurements of trapezius muscle pressure pain threshold (PPT: by pressure algometer along with right and left cervical lateral flexion (rangiometer were obtained by a blinded examiner. An assessor blinded to the outcomes assessments applied one of 6 topical formulations which had been placed in identical plastic containers. Five of these topicals were proposed active formulations; the control group was given a non-active formulation (PLA. Five minutes after the application of the formula the outcome measures were re-tested. Data were analyzed with a 5-way ANOVA and Holms-adjusted t-tests with an alpha level of 0.05. Results 120 subjects were entered into the study (63 females; ages 16-82; 20 subjects randomly allocated into each group. The pre- and post-treatment results for pressure threshold did show significant intra-group increases for the Ben-Gay Ultra Strength Muscle Pain Ointment (BG, the Professional Therapy MuscleCare Roll-on (PTMC roll-on and Motion Medicine Cream (MM with an increased threshold of 0.5 kg/cm2 (+/-0.15, 0.72 kg/cm2 (+/-0.17 and 0.47 Kg/cm2 (+/-0.19 respectively. With respect to the inter-group comparisons, PTMC roll-on showed significant increases in pressure threshold compared with Placebo (PLA (p = 0.002 and Icy Hot Extra Strength Cream (IH (p = 0.006. In addition, BG demonstrated significant increases in pressure threshold compared with PLA (p = 0.0003. Conclusions With regards to pressure threshold, PTMC roll-on, BG and MM showed significant increases in pain threshold tolerance after a short-term application on a trigger points located in the trapezius muscle. PTMC roll-on and BG were both

  12. Understanding the concept and challenges of palliative care medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-25

    Jun 25, 2015 ... Financial constraints, need for home visits and hospice were other challenges encountered. Conclusion: Palliative care ... Ojimadu and Okwuonu: Palliative care medicine in a tertiary hospital. Int J Med Biomed Res 2015;4(2):86- ... some challenges in the management of painful crisis associated with sickle ...

  13. Over-the-counter pharmaceutical formulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braun, David B

    1994-01-01

    ... drugs. This book includes the composition of 559 brand name OTC drugs produced by 64 manufacturers. There are also 270 suggested fonnulations contributed by 41 raw material suppliers. There is a total of 829 OTC phannaceutical fonnulations. The brand name products are listed alphabetically in Part I of each chapter, followed by th...

  14. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing: From Understanding Biology to Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Meder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within just a few years, the new methods for high-throughput next-generation sequencing have generated completely novel insights into the heritability and pathophysiology of human disease. In this review, we wish to highlight the benefits of the current state-of-the-art sequencing technologies for genetic and epigenetic research. We illustrate how these technologies help to constantly improve our understanding of genetic mechanisms in biological systems and summarize the progress made so far. This can be exemplified by the case of heritable heart muscle diseases, so-called cardiomyopathies. Here, next-generation sequencing is able to identify novel disease genes, and first clinical applications demonstrate the successful translation of this technology into personalized patient care.

  16. Efficacy and safety of an over-the-counter 1% colloidal oatmeal cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in children: a double-blind, randomized, active-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisante, Toni Anne; Nuñez, Chris; Zhang, Paul

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an over-the-counter (OTC) 1% colloidal oatmeal cream versus a prescription barrier cream in children with mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis (AD). Eligible patients (6 months-18 years) were randomized to OTC or prescription cream. Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) scores, Investigator's Global Atopic Dermatitis Assessment (IGADA) scores, patients' and/or caregivers' assessment of itch using 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) on day 0, weeks 1, 2, and 3 were assessed. The intention to treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) populations were analyzed. Ninety patients (mean [SD] age, 8.1 [4] years; boys, 45.6%; African American, 54.4%) were randomized (OTC cream, 45; prescription cream, 45). At week 3, EASI scores showed that the OTC cream was non-inferior (non-inferiority margin = 1.5) to the prescription cream (adjusted mean change [95% CI] from baseline: ITT, 0.18 [-0.35, 0.70]; PP, 0.14 [-0.42, 0.70]). IGADA (adjusted mean between group difference, 0.106 [-0.130, 0.341]) and VAS itch (0.103 [-0.831, 1.038]) scores improved in both groups. No safety issues were identified. OTC 1% oatmeal cream was equally effective and safe as the prescription barrier cream for the symptomatic treatment of mild-to-moderate AD in children. NCT01326910.

  17. Careful: Acetaminophen in Pain Relief Medicines Can Cause Liver Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pain Relievers and Fever Reducers Careful: Acetaminophen in pain relief medicines can cause liver damage Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin ... ingredient in many over-the-counter and prescription medicines that help relieve pain and reduce fever. More than 600 over-the- ...

  18. Effect of herb drug medicine Treatment for Functional Dyspepsia:Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Jin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Obejective : Functional dyspepsia is a prevalent disease. It impedes subjective quality of life. The purpose of this research is to examine the equivalent effect of herb drug medicine treatment(H-Dand Over the Counter(OTC for functional dyspepsia. Method : In this controlled study, we compared herb drug medicine(H-D with Over the Counter(OTC of functional dyspepsia. 30 volunteers who satisfied the requirements were enrolled in study. Severity of dyspepsia was measured by Nepean Dyspepsia Index(NDI-K before and after treatments. Result : The results are summarized as follows. 1. In Herb drug medicine and Over the Counter groups, total key symptoms score of after treatment were significantly decreased and improve rate of key symptoms was higher than before treatment, but there were no statistical significance between two groups. 2. In Herb drug medicine and Over the Counter groups, each symptoms score of after treatment were significantly decreased and improve rate of key symptoms was higher than before treatment, but there were no statistical significance between two groups. 3. In Herb drug medicine and Over the Counter groups, quality of life score of after treatment were significantly decreased and improve rate of key symptoms was higher than before treatment, but there were no statistical significance between two groups. Conclusion : Herb drug medicine treatment(H-D is effective to improve the symptoms and quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia.

  19. Understanding of family medicine in Africa: a qualitative study of leaders' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Shabir; Downing, Raymond; Mash, Bob; Reid, Steve; Pentz, Stephen; Essuman, Akye

    2013-03-01

    The World Health Organization encourages comprehensive primary care within an ongoing personalised relationship, including family physicians in the primary healthcare team, but family medicine is new in Africa, with doctors mostly being hospital based. African family physicians are trying to define family medicine in Africa, however, there is little clarity on the views of African country leadership and their understanding of family medicine and its place in Africa. To understand leaders' views on family medicine in Africa. Qualitative study with in-depth interviews in nine sub-Saharan African countries. Key academic and government leaders were purposively selected. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide, and thematically analysed. Twenty-seven interviews were conducted with government and academic leaders. Responders saw considerable benefits but also had concerns regarding family medicine in Africa. The benefits mentioned were: having a clinically skilled all-rounder at the district hospital; mentoring team-based care in the community; a strong role in leadership and even management in the district healthcare system; and developing a holistic practice of medicine. The concerns were that family medicine is: unknown or poorly understood by broader leadership; poorly recognised by officials; and struggling with policy ambivalence, requiring policy advocacy championed by family medicine itself. The strong district-level clinical and leadership expectations of family physicians are consistent with African research and consensus. However, leaders' understanding of family medicine is couched in terms of specialties and hospital care. African family physicians should be concerned by high expectations without adequate human resource and implementation policies.

  20. Knowledge and use of unauthorized HIV self-test kits among men who have sex with men in Spain, following approval of an over-the-counter self-test in the U.S: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutentakis, Konstantinos; Rosales-Statkus, María Elena; Hoyos, Juan; Fernández-Balbuena, Sonia; Ruiz, Mónica; Agustí, Cristina; de la Fuente, Luis; Belza, María José

    2016-07-08

    Shortly after the approval of an over-the-counter HIV self-test in the US, we conducted a study to estimate the proportion of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Spain who knew that unauthorized HIV self-tests could be purchased online, and the proportion that had already used these tests, as well as their socio-demographic and behavioural correlates. Between September 2012 and February 2013, MSM users of gay dating websites were invited to complete an online questionnaire. We calculated estimates of the knowledge and use of unauthorized HIV self-testing and assessed the associated factors by rare event logit regression models. Among 8620 participants, 4.2 % (95 % CI:3.8-4.6) knew they could buy an unauthorized HIV self-test kit online, and 12.7 % (95 % CI:12.0-13.4) thought that such a test might exist, although they had never seen one. Only 0.7 % (95 % CI:0.5-0.9) had ever self-tested. In the multivariable analysis, knowledge of online availability of self-tests was associated with being a non-Latin American foreigner, having at least two previous HIV tests, intending to test for HIV in the next year, and knowing about U.S. approval of self-testing. Ever-use of HIV self-testing was associated with being over 34 years of age, living outside Spain during the last 12 months, and knowing about U.S. approval of self-testing. Both knowledge and use of unauthorized HIV self-testing among MSM in Spain was very low among HIV negative or untested MSM in Spain. The recent approval in the United Kingdom and France might increase the number of MSM seeking such testing and possibly using unauthorized test kits not meeting quality standards.

  1. Now you see it. Now you don't: fair balance and adequate provision in advertisements for drugs before and after the switch from prescription to over-the-counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerber, Adrienne E; Kreling, David H

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure differences in fair balance (benefit and risk statements) and adequate provision (toll-free numbers, Internet URLs, print ad references, and medical professional references) in advertising content for drugs that have switched from prescription to over-the-counter (OTC). The Vanderbilt TV News Archive was used to select products to study, to measure the frequency and placement of ads for those products, and to view advertising content for those products. Unique advertisements (n = 108) for loratadine (Claritin), citirizine (Zyrtec), and omeprazole (Prilosec) were analyzed for the presence of adequate provision statements and for the frequency of benefit, risk, and other statements. OTC ads were shorter than prescription ads by 10.6 seconds but contained the same total number of statements. Most prescription ads (n (RX) = 31) contained toll-free numbers (97%), Internet URLs (94%), medical professional references (100%) and print ad references (68%). Few OTC ads (n (OTC) = 77) contained adequate provision statements: 4% contained toll-free numbers and 10% contained Internet URLs. Prescription ads had similar numbers of benefits (1.5) and risks (1.8) per 30 seconds of ad time, and OTC ads had more benefits (6.6) than risks (1.2) per 30 seconds of ad time. Prescription drug ads contained risk statements that listed specific side effects and explicit harms from taking the product, but OTC ads contained nonspecific risk information and statements that implied risk rather than directly identifying risk. Differences in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulation of advertising affected the balance of risk and benefit information that appeared and the specificity of risk information available.

  2. Understanding support for complementary and alternative medicine in general populations: use and perceived efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneman, Paul; Sturgis, Patrick; Allum, Nick

    2013-09-01

    Proponents of complementary and alternative medicine argue that these treatments can be used with great effect in addition to, and sometimes instead of, conventional medicine, a position which has drawn sustained opposition from those who advocate an evidence-based approach to the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Using recent survey data from the United Kingdom, this article seeks to establish a clearer understanding of the nature of the public's relationship with complementary and alternative medicine within the general population by focusing on beliefs about the perceived effectiveness of homeopathy, in addition to its reported use. Using recent data from the United Kingdom, we initially demonstrate that reported use and perceived effectiveness are far from coterminous and argue that for a proper understanding of the motivations underpinning public support of complementary and alternative medicine, consideration of both reported use and perceived effectiveness is necessary. We go on to demonstrate that although the profile of homeopathy users differs from those who support this form of medicine, neither outcome is dependent upon peoples' levels of knowledge about science. Instead, the results suggest a far greater explanatory role for need and concerns about conventional medicine.

  3. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  4. Endoscopic comparison of gastroduodenal injury with over-the-counter doses of new fast-dissolving ibuprofen and paracetamol formulations: a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-way crossover clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanza FL

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Frank L Lanza,1 Agron Collaku,2 Dongzhou J Liu3 1Department of Gastroenterology, Houston Institute for Clinical Research, Houston, TX, USA; 2Biostatistics Department, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare, Parsippany, NJ, USA; 3Global Clinical Development, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA, USA Background: While gastrointestinal (GI effects of standard ibuprofen and N-acetyl-p-­aminophenol (APAP have been reported, upper GI injury following treatment with fast-dissolving (FD formulations of these analgesics has not been investigated. We evaluated upper GI effects of over-the-counter doses of 2 FD ibuprofen products and 1 FD-APAP product. Methods: In a randomized, placebo-controlled, endoscopist-blinded, 4-way crossover study, 28 healthy subjects received FD ibuprofen 2×200 mg liquid capsules 3 times daily (TID, ibuprofen 2×200 mg tablets TID, FD-APAP 2×500 mg tablets 4 times daily (QID, and placebo 2×500 mg tablets QID for 7 days. The primary end point was gastric mucosal damage assessed by endoscopy using the Lanza scale: 0=normal stomach or proximal duodenum, 1=mucosal hemorrhages only, 2=1 or 2 erosions, 3=numerous (3–10 erosions, and 4=large number of erosions (>10 or ulcer. Secondary end points included duodenal mucosal damage (Lanza scale; gastroduodenal mucosal injury, classified as present (gastric and/or duodenal endoscopy score ≥2 or absent (gastric and/or duodenal endoscopy score <2; and number of hemorrhages, erosions, and ulcers counted separately in the stomach and duodenum. Results: Significantly greater gastric mucosal injury was observed after treatment with both ibuprofen products vs FD-APAP (p<0.0001 and p=0.0095, respectively. FD-APAP showed no difference from placebo (p=0.4794. The odds of having an incidence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury were over 6 times greater from FD ibuprofen liquid capsule treatment (odds ratio [OR]=6.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60, 23.97 and over 3 times greater from ibuprofen

  5. Recent progress in understanding activity cliffs and their utility in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Hu, Ye; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-01-09

    The activity cliff concept is of high relevance for medicinal chemistry. Recent studies are discussed that have further refined our understanding of activity cliffs and suggested different ways of exploiting activity cliff information. These include alternative approaches to define and classify activity cliffs in two and three dimensions, data mining investigations to systematically detect all possible activity cliffs, the introduction of computational methods to predict activity cliffs, and studies designed to explore activity cliff progression in medicinal chemistry. The discussion of these studies is complemented with new findings revealing the frequency of activity cliff formation when different molecular representations are used and the distribution of activity cliffs across different targets. Taken together, the results have a number of implications for the practice of medicinal chemistry.

  6. Understanding Mind-Body Interaction from the Perspective of East Asian Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Seul Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Attempts to understand the emotion have evolved from the perspective of an independent cognitive system of the mind to that of an interactive response involving the body. This study aimed to quantify and visualize relationships between different emotions and bodily organ systems from the perspective of East Asian medicine. Methods. Term frequency-inverse document frequency (tf-idf method was used to quantify the significance of Five Viscera and the gallbladder relative to seven different emotions through the classical medical text of DongUiBoGam. Bodily organs that corresponded to different emotions were visualized using a body template. Results. The emotions had superior tf-idf values with the following bodily organs: anger with the liver, happiness with the heart, thoughtfulness with the heart and spleen, sadness with the heart and lungs, fear with the kidneys and the heart, surprise with the heart and the gallbladder, and anxiety with the heart and the lungs. Specific patterns between the emotions and corresponding bodily organ systems were identified. Conclusion. The present findings will further the current understanding of the relationship between the mind and body from the perspective of East Asian medicine. Western medicine characterizes emotional disorders using “neural” language while East Asian medicine uses “somatic” language.

  7. Analysis of Dextromethorphan in Cough Drops and Syrups: A Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Todd M.; Wiseman, Frank L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the quantity of dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DM) in over-the-counter (OTC) cough drops and syrups. This experiment is appropriate for an undergraduate medicinal chemistry laboratory course when studying OTC medicines and active ingredients. Students prepare the cough drops and syrups for analysis,…

  8. Stress and medicine use for headache: does sense of coherence modify the association?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke Jenny; Holstein, Bjørn E; Andersen, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Medicine use as a strategy for coping with daily stressors is an under-studied issue. Studies show that stress is associated with use of over-the-counter medicine, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine whether sense of coherence (SOC) modifies...

  9. Lean Forward and Listen: poetry as a mode of understanding in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Many claims have been made over recent years for the use of poetry (and, more broadly, literature) in the curriculum of medical students. Most often, poetry is put forward as having the potential to humanize medicine by promoting, for example, empathy, ethical sensitivity, and an appreciation for diverging interpretations. While these endpoints are all important, this essay uses the experience of a junior doctor undertaking a degree in creative writing to consider how the poetic way of seeing and thinking differs from clinical thinking, and why that might matter. In particular, the author considers the importance in medicine of the capacity to not know, as well as the possibilities for a deeper understanding of patients offered by thinking in terms of poetic voice.

  10. Traditional Chinese medicine formulas for irritable bowel syndrome: from ancient wisdoms to scientific understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai-Tao; Zhong, Linda; Tsang, Siu-Wai; Lin, Ze-Si; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) serves as the most common alternative therapeutic approach for Western medicine and benefits IBS patients globally. Due to the lack of scientific evidence in the past, TCM formulas were not internationally well recognized as promising IBS remedies. In this review, firstly, we present the etiology and therapy of IBS in terms of traditional Chinese medical theory. Secondly, we summarize the clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TCM formulas for IBS patients that are available in the literature (from 1998 to September 2013), in which 14 RCTs conducted of high quality were discussed in detail. Of the 14 selected trials, 12 of those concluded that TCM formulas provided superior improvement in the global symptoms of IBS patients over the placebo or conventional medicines. As well, all 14 RCTs suggested that TCM formulas have good safety and tolerability. Last but not least, we explore the pharmacological mechanisms of the anti-IBS TCM formulas available in the literature (from 1994 to September, 2013). Collectively, in combating IBS symptoms, most TCM formulas exert multi-targeting actions including the regulation of neurotransmitters and hormones in the enteric nervous system (ENS), modulation of smooth muscle motility in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, attenuation of intestinal inflammation and restoration of intestinal flora, etc. In conclusion, TCM formulas appear to be promising for IBS treatment. This review provides a useful reference for the public in furthering a better understanding and acceptance of TCM formulas as IBS remedies.

  11. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  12. Understanding cancer and its treatment in Thai traditional medicine: An ethnopharmacological-anthropological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumlerdkij, Natchagorn; Tantiwongse, Jaturapat; Booranasubkajorn, Suksalin; Boonrak, Ranida; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Laohapand, Tawee; Heinrich, Michael

    2018-04-24

    Thai traditional medicine (TTM) is widely practiced in Thailand and continues to gain importance in cancer management, but little is known about the TTM practitioners' emic concepts and practice. With this study we firstly aim to document the practice of cancer treatment and prevention by TTM practitioners and, secondly, to evaluate how such traditional concepts and practices are correlated with biomedical ones. This in turn can form the basis for developing novel strategies for designing pharmacological experiments and longer term strategies to develop TTM practice. Semi-structured interviews with 33 TTM practitioners were performed in five provinces in different regions of Thailand. The following information were recorded; basic information of informants, descriptions of cancer (mareng in Thai), causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Plants used in the treatment and prevention of mareng were also collected. Using an in depth ethnographic approach four representative case studies to assist in a better understanding of the characteristics of mareng, its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are reported here. Five characteristics of mareng - waste accumulation (khong sia), chronic illnesses (krasai), inflammation (kan aksep), bad blood (luead) and lymph (namlueang), and the imbalance of four basic elements (dhātu si) - have been identified. Explanatory models of cancer in TTM were linked with biomedical concepts and relevant pharmacological actions. Traditional uses and available scientific evidence of medicinal plants mentioned in the case studies for the treatment or prevention of mareng are presented and discussed. Here for the first time five main characteristics of cancer based on Thai traditional medical concepts are analysed. Our findings are relevant not only for the planning of clinical studies or pharmacological experiment in the search for novel compounds for cancer treatment and prevention, but also for the integration of Thai traditional

  13. Advancing our understanding of religion and spirituality in the context of behavioral medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Crystal L; Masters, Kevin S; Salsman, John M; Wachholtz, Amy; Clements, Andrea D; Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Trevino, Kelly; Wischenka, Danielle M

    2017-02-01

    Recognizing and understanding the potentially powerful roles that religiousness and spirituality (RS) may serve in the prevention and amelioration of disease, as well as symptom management and health related quality of life, significantly enhances research and clinical efforts across many areas of behavioral medicine. This article examines the knowledge established to date and suggests advances that remain to be made. We begin with a brief summary of the current knowledge regarding RS as related to three exemplary health conditions: (a) cardiovascular disease; (b) cancer; and, (c) substance abuse. We then focus on particular concerns for future investigations, emphasizing conceptual issues, possible mediators and moderators of relationships or effects, and methodology. Our discussion is framed by a conceptual model that may serve to guide and organize future investigations. This model highlights a number of important issues regarding the study of links between RS and health: (a) RS comprise many diverse constructs, (b) the mechanisms through which RS may influence health outcomes are quite diverse, and (c) a range of different types of health and health relevant outcomes may be influenced by RS. The multidimensional nature of RS and the complexity of related associations with different types of health relevant outcomes present formidable challenges to empirical study in behavioral medicine. These issues are referred to throughout our review and we suggest several solutions to the presented challenges in our summary. We end with a presentation of barriers to be overcome, along with strategies for doing so, and concluding thoughts.

  14. An evolutionary medicine approach to understanding factors that contribute to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshiba, Kazutetsu; Tsuji, Takao; Itoh, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have been published on the causes and mechanisms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the reason for the existence of COPD and the reasons why COPD develops in humans have hardly been studied. Evolutionary medical approaches are required to explain not only the proximate factors, such as the causes and mechanisms of a disease, but the ultimate (evolutionary) factors as well, such as why the disease is present and why the disease develops in humans. According to the concepts of evolutionary medicine, disease susceptibility is acquired as a result of natural selection during the evolutionary process of traits linked to the genes involved in disease susceptibility. In this paper, we discuss the following six reasons why COPD develops in humans based on current evolutionary medical theories: (1) evolutionary constraints; (2) mismatch between environmental changes and evolution; (3) co-evolution with pathogenic microorganisms; (4) life history trade-off; (5) defenses and their costs, and (6) reproductive success at the expense of health. Our perspective pursues evolutionary answers to the fundamental question, 'Why are humans susceptible to this common disease, COPD, despite their long evolutionary history?' We believe that the perspectives offered by evolutionary medicine are essential for researchers to better understand the significance of their work.

  15. Advancing our understanding of religion and spirituality in the context of behavioral medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Kevin S.; Salsman, John M.; Wachholtz, Amy; Clements, Andrea D.; Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Trevino, Kelly; Wischenka, Danielle M.

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing and understanding the potentially powerful roles that religiousness and spirituality (RS) may serve in the prevention and amelioration of disease, as well as symptom management and health related quality of life, significantly enhances research and clinical efforts across many areas of behavioral medicine. This article examines the knowledge established to date and suggests advances that remain to be made. We begin with a brief summary of the current knowledge regarding RS as related to three exemplary health conditions: (a) cardiovascular disease; (b) cancer; and, (c) substance abuse. We then focus on particular concerns for future investigations, emphasizing conceptual issues, possible mediators and moderators of relationships or effects, and methodology. Our discussion is framed by a conceptual model that may serve to guide and organize future investigations. This model highlights a number of important issues regarding the study of links between RS and health: (a) RS comprise many diverse constructs, (b) the mechanisms through which RS may influence health outcomes are quite diverse, and (c) a range of different types of health and health relevant outcomes may be influenced by RS. The multidimensional nature of RS and the complexity of related associations with different types of health relevant outcomes present formidable challenges to empirical study in behavioral medicine. These issues are referred to throughout our review and we suggest several solutions to the presented challenges in our summary. We end with a presentation of barriers to be overcome, along with strategies for doing so, and concluding thoughts. PMID:27342616

  16. Traditional Herbal Medicine in National Healthcare in Kenya J.W. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the developed countries are derivatives of compounds orignally isolated ... treatment options. In Germany, 80 % of physicians prescribe phytomedicines, which account for 27 % of all over-the-counter medicines and 52 % of adults first turn to natural remedies for .... future, quality and affordability of these community health ...

  17. Understanding recognition and self-assembly in biology using the chemist's toolbox. Insight into medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirolo, Z B; Benedini, L A; Sequeira, M A; Herrera, M G; Veuthey, T V; Dodero, V I

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry is intimately connected with basic science such as organic synthesis, chemical biology and biophysical chemistry among other disciplines. The reason of such connections is due to the power of organic synthesis to provide designed molecules; chemical biology to give tools to discover biological and/or pathological pathways and biophysical chemistry which provides the techniques to characterize and the theoretical background to understand molecular behaviour. The present review provides some selective examples of these research areas. Initially, template dsDNA organic synthesis and the spatio-temporal control of transcription are presenting following by the supramolecular entities used in drug delivery, such as liposomes and liquid crystal among others. Finally, peptides and protein self-assembly is connected with biomaterials and as an important event in the balance between health and disease. The final aim of the present review is to show the power of chemical tools not only for the synthesis of new molecules but also to improve our understanding of recognition and self-assembly in the biological context.

  18. The numeracy understanding in medicine instrument: a measure of health numeracy developed using item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Walker, Cindy M; Cappaert, Kevin J; Ganschow, Pamela S; Fletcher, Kathlyn E; McGinley, Emily L; Del Pozo, Sam; Schauer, Carrie; Tarima, Sergey; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Health numeracy can be defined as the ability to understand and apply information conveyed with numbers, tables and graphs, probabilities, and statistics to effectively communicate with health care providers, take care of one's health, and participate in medical decisions. To develop the Numeracy Understanding in Medicine Instrument (NUMi) using item response theory scaling methods. A 20-item test was formed drawing from an item bank of numeracy questions. Items were calibrated using responses from 1000 participants and a 2-parameter item response theory model. Construct validity was assessed by comparing scores on the NUMi to established measures of print and numeric health literacy, mathematic achievement, and cognitive aptitude. Community and clinical populations in the Milwaukee and Chicago metropolitan areas. Twenty-nine percent of the 1000 respondents were Hispanic, 24% were non-Hispanic white, and 42% were non-Hispanic black. Forty-one percent had no more than a high school education. The mean score on the NUMi was 13.2 (s = 4.6) with a Cronbach α of 0.86. Difficulty and discrimination item response theory parameters of the 20 items ranged from -1.70 to 1.45 and 0.39 to 1.98, respectively. Performance on the NUMi was strongly correlated with the Wide Range Achievement Test-Arithmetic (0.73, P < 0.001), the Lipkus Expanded Numeracy Scale (0.69, P < 0.001), the Medical Data Interpretation Test (0.75, P < 0.001), and the Wonderlic Cognitive Ability Test (0.82, P < 0.001). Performance was moderately correlated to the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy (0.43, P < 0.001). The NUMi was found to be most discriminating among respondents with a lower-than-average level of health numeracy. The NUMi can be applied in research and clinical settings as a robust measure of the health numeracy construct.

  19. Understanding security failures of two authentication and key agreement schemes for telecare medicine information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Dheerendra

    2015-03-01

    Smart card based authentication and key agreement schemes for telecare medicine information systems (TMIS) enable doctors, nurses, patients and health visitors to use smart cards for secure login to medical information systems. In recent years, several authentication and key agreement schemes have been proposed to present secure and efficient solution for TMIS. Most of the existing authentication schemes for TMIS have either higher computation overhead or are vulnerable to attacks. To reduce the computational overhead and enhance the security, Lee recently proposed an authentication and key agreement scheme using chaotic maps for TMIS. Xu et al. also proposed a password based authentication and key agreement scheme for TMIS using elliptic curve cryptography. Both the schemes provide better efficiency from the conventional public key cryptography based schemes. These schemes are important as they present an efficient solution for TMIS. We analyze the security of both Lee's scheme and Xu et al.'s schemes. Unfortunately, we identify that both the schemes are vulnerable to denial of service attack. To understand the security failures of these cryptographic schemes which are the key of patching existing schemes and designing future schemes, we demonstrate the security loopholes of Lee's scheme and Xu et al.'s scheme in this paper.

  20. BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF SOCIAL INTEGRATION AND SOLIDARITY AS PARAMETERS FOR POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM EVALUATION OF MEDICINE III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2015-01-01

    To provide information in the maturation process of the general conception of social inclusion and solidarity. The following official CAPES sources were consulted: resolutions of the Technical-Scientific Council; models of evaluation forms; current legislation and ordinances; relationship with the Great Area courses; Dinter and Minter evaluation projects; and the assessment application. Social inclusion and solidarity are recent and innovative parameters to be developed by postgraduate programs and evaluated by area committees organized by Capes. There is need for better understanding by the postgraduate faculty of Medicine III the characteristics of relevant actions on social inclusion. The basic theme of life support help in understanding how ​​Medicine III can expand its operations in basic education without compromising the innovative and transformer character of postgraduate. Postgraduate must innovate its insertion in teaching processes, managed care or any other field. What is sought is the power of social transformation, inherent to its spirit and exercise. Proporcionar informações que sejam de auxílio no amadurecimento da concepção geral sobre inserção social e solidariedade. Foram consultadas as seguintes fontes oficiais da CAPES: resoluções do Conselho Técnico-Científico; modelos das fichas de avaliação; legislação e portarias vigentes; relação dos cursos da Grande Área; avaliação de projetos Dinter e Minter; e o aplicativo de avaliação. Inserção social e solidariedade são parâmetros recentes e inovadores como ações a serem desenvolvidas por programas de pós-graduação e avaliadas pelos comitês de áreas organizados pela Capes. Há necessidade de melhor compreensão por parte dos professores de pós-graduação da Medicina III das características de ações relevantes de inserção social. O tema de suporte básico de vida ajuda na compreensão de como a área da Medicina III pode ampliar sua atuação em educação b

  1. Research implications of the Institute of Medicine Report, Epilepsy Across the Spectrum: Promoting Health and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Beck, Vicki; Begley, Charles E.; Bishop, Malachy L.; Cushner-Weinstein, Sandra; Holmes, Gregory L.; Shafer, Patricia O.; Sirven, Joseph I.; Austin, Joan K.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2012 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released the report, Epilepsy Across The Spectrum: Promoting Health And Understanding. This report examined the public health dimensions of the epilepsies with a focus on four areas: public health surveillance and data collection and integration; population and public health research; health policy, health care, and human services; and education for providers, people with epilepsy and their families, and the public. The report provided recommendations and research priorities for future work in the field of epilepsy that relate to: increasing the power of data on epilepsy; prevention of epilepsy; improving health care for people with epilepsy; improving health professional education about epilepsy; improving quality of life for people with epilepsy; improving education about epilepsy for people with epilepsy and families; and raising public awareness about epilepsy. For this article, the authors selected one research priority from each of the major chapter themes in the IOM report: expanding and improving the quality of epidemiological surveillance in epilepsy; developing improved interventions for people with epilepsy and depression; expanding early identification/screening for learning impairments in children with epilepsy; evaluating and promoting effective innovative teaching strategies; accelerating research on the identification of risk factors and interventions that increase employment and improve quality of life for people with epilepsy and their families; assessing the information needs of people with epilepsy and their families associated with epilepsy-related risks, specifically sudden unexpected death in epilepsy; and developing and conducting surveys to capture trends in knowledge, awareness, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy over time and in specific population subgroups. For each research priority selected, examples of research are provided that will advance the field of epilepsy and improve the lives

  2. Understanding the microbiome: Emerging biomarkers for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpoot, Meenakshi; Sharma, Anil K; Sharma, Anil; Gupta, Girish Kumar

    2018-02-06

    The human body is a home to more than 1 trillion microbes with a diverse variety of commensal microbes that play a crucial role towards the health of the individual. These microbes occupy different habitats such as gut, skin, vagina, oral etc. Not only the types and abundance of microbes are different in different organs, but also these may differ in different individuals. The genome of these microbiota and their ecosystem constitute to form a microbiome. Factors such as diet, environment, host genetics etc. may be the reason behind the wide microbial diversity. A number of studies performed on human microbiome have revealed that microbiota present in healthy and diseased individuals are distinct. Altered microbiome is many a times the reason behind the overexpression of genes which may cause complex diseases including cancer. Manipulation of the human microbiome can be done by microbial supplements such as probiotics or synbiotics, diet or prebiotics and microbial suppression strategies using antibiotics. Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies and metagenomic analysis provide us the broader understanding of these commensal microbes and highlighting the distinctive features of microbiome during healthy and disease states. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) studies have been very helpful in providing insights into the pathological process behind disease evolution and progression by determining the specific etiological factors. New emerging field of research targets the microbiome for therapeutic purposes by which personalized medicines can be made for treating various types of tumors. Screening programmes might be helpful in identifying patients who are at the verge of developing cancer and in delivering appropriate approaches according to individual risk modes so that disease could be prevented. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analiza nawyków i zachowań związanych ze stosowaniem środków przeciwbólowych dostępnych bez recepty = Analysis of habits and behaviours related to the use of over-the-counter painkillers

    OpenAIRE

    Kozłowski, Piotr; Cuch, Barbara; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Kozłowska, Karolina; Jędrzejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Kozłowski Piotr, Cuch Barbara, Kozłowska Magdalena, Kozłowska Karolina, Jędrzejewska Barbara. Analiza nawyków i zachowań związanych ze stosowaniem środków przeciwbólowych dostępnych bez recepty = Analysis of habits and behaviours related to the use of over-the-counter painkillers. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2015;5(3):174-182. ISSN 2391-8306. DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.16307 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/2015%3B5%283%29%3A174-182 https://pbn.nauka.gov.pl/works...

  4. Recent developments in our understanding of the implications of traditional African medicine on drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, Chrisna; Hamman, Josias H

    2018-02-01

    The use of traditional herbal medicines has become increasingly popular globally, but in some countries, it is the main or sometimes even the only healthcare service available in the most rural areas. This is especially true for Africa where herbal medicines form a key component of traditional medicinal practices and there is access to a diversity of medicinal plants. Although many benefits have been derived from the use of traditional herbal medicines, many concerns are associated with their use of which herb-drug interactions have been identified to have a rising impact on patient treatment outcome. One type of pharmacokinetic interaction involves the modulation of drug metabolizing enzymes, which may result in enhanced or reduced bioavailability of co-administered drugs. Areas covered: This review highlights the current information available on drug metabolism-associated information with regards to traditional African medicines related to some of the most prevalent diseases burdening the African continent. Expert opinion: It is clear from previous studies that enzyme modulation by traditional African medicines plays a significant role in the pharmacokinetics of some co-administered drugs, but more research is needed to provide detailed information on these interactions, specifically for treatment of prevalent diseases such as tuberculosis and hypertension.

  5. A culturally competent education program to increase understanding about medicines among ethnic minorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantarero-Arévalo, Lourdes; Kassem, Dumoue; Traulsen, Janine Marie

    2014-01-01

    shared by the researcher pharmacist and participants enhanced the success of the program. CONCLUSION: The education program may potentially reduce medicine-related problems by providing participants with knowledge and competencies about appropriate medicine use. We recommend implementing education...... minorities regarding medicine use, and (2) to use an education program to enhance the knowledge and competencies of the ethnic minorities about the appropriate use of medicines. SETTINGS: Healthcare in Denmark is a tax-financed public service that provides free access to hospitals and general practitioners....... In contrast to the USA or the UK, serving ethnically diverse populations is still a relatively new phenomenon for the Danish healthcare system. Ethnic minorities with a non-Western background comprised a total of 6.9 % of the Danish population. METHODS: Data were collected through qualitative research. Four...

  6. High prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with genetically proven mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franik, Sebastian; Huidekoper, Hidde H; Visser, Gepke; de Vries, Maaike; de Boer, Lonneke; Hermans-Peters, Marion; Rodenburg, Richard; Verhaak, Chris; Vlieger, Arine M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Janssen, Mirian C H; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2015-05-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases, clinical management of these conditions remains largely supportive, and no effective treatment is available. We therefore assumed that the burden of disease combined with the lack of adequate treatment leaves open a big market for complementary and alternative medicine use. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in children and adults with genetically proven mitochondrial disease. The reported use was surprisingly high, with 88% of children and 91% of adults having used some kind of complementary and alternative medicine in the last 2 years. Also, the mean cost of these treatments was impressive, being 489/year for children and 359/year for adult patients. Over-the-counter remedies (e.g., food supplements, homeopathy) and self-help techniques (e.g., Reiki, yoga) were the most frequently used complementary and alternative therapies in our cohort: 54% of children and 60% of adults reported the various complementary and alternative medicine therapies to be effective. Given the fact that currently no effective treatment exists, further research toward the different therapies is needed, as our study clearly demonstrates that such therapies are highly sought after by affected patients.

  7. A culturally competent education program to increase understanding about medicines among ethnic minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero-Arévalo, Lourdes; Kassem, Dumoue; Traulsen, Janine Marie

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously suggested that the risk of medicine-related problems-i.e., negative clinical outcomes, adverse drug reactions or adverse drug events resulting from the use (or lack of use) of medicines, and human error including that caused by healthcare personnel-is higher among specific ethnic minority groups compared to the majority population. The focus of this study was on reducing medicine-related problems among Arabic-speaking ethnic minorities living in Denmark. The aim was twofold: (1) to explore the perceptions, barriers and needs of Arabic-speaking ethnic minorities regarding medicine use, and (2) to use an education program to enhance the knowledge and competencies of the ethnic minorities about the appropriate use of medicines. Healthcare in Denmark is a tax-financed public service that provides free access to hospitals and general practitioners. In contrast to the USA or the UK, serving ethnically diverse populations is still a relatively new phenomenon for the Danish healthcare system. Ethnic minorities with a non-Western background comprised a total of 6.9 % of the Danish population. Data were collected through qualitative research. Four focus group interviews were conducted before and four after the education program. Thirty Arabic-speaking participants were recruited from language and job centers in Copenhagen. Participants received teaching sessions in Arabic on appropriate medicine use. The education program was evaluated by two methods: a written quiz for knowledge evaluation and focus group interviews for process evaluation. It took place during the first semenester of 2012. Results The majority of the participants were dissatisfied with the knowledge about medicines inherited from their parents. They also expressed their frustrations due to communication problems with Danish doctors. According to the impressions and quiz results of participants, the program was relevant, rich in information and effective. The program helped bridge the

  8. Over-the-counter medication in children: friend or foe?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    ment of dental caries and childhood obe- sity. Some preparations contain excipients which can be harmful to children with inborn errors of metabolism, e.g. phenylketonuria (PKU). Decongestants. There is little evidence for the use of either local or systemic decongestants in the symptomatic relief of viral infections. However ...

  9. Over-the-Counter Acne Products: What Works and Why

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a tighter weave are better at removing dead skin cells. Consider pore-clearing adhesive pads. These products (Biore Deep Cleansing ... intended to remove dirt, oil and plugs from pores. You apply the strip to wet skin, let it dry and then peel it off. ...

  10. Over the Counter Laxatives for Constipation: Use with Caution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diarrhea, nausea, urine discoloration with senna and cascara derivatives Rectal suppositories (Dulcolax, Pedia-Lax) Trigger rhythmic contractions ... use with caution. Interaction with medications. Your medical history and medications you're taking may limit your ...

  11. Sinus Pain: Can Over-the-Counter Medications Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attributes of the individual drug including side effects. Antihistamine Medications Antihistamines combat allergic problems leading to nasal ... after use. Newer non-sedating antihistamines are available. Antihistamine-Decongestant Combination Products Antihistamines and decongestant products are ...

  12. Knowledge Understanding and Utilization of Medicinal Plants by Local Community Tompu District of Kaili, Sigi Biromaru, Central Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Ifandi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kaili is one of the ethnic region in Central Sulawesi which saves a lot of cultural values and traditions. As a traditional community, their life is very dependent upon natural resources contained in the environment. They still have knowledge, traditional culture, treatment and utilization system against various types of plants. The purpose of the study was to examine the knowledge understanding and utilization of medicinal plants by local community Tompu District of Kaili. Data knowledge and utilization were collected through interview, literature study, exploratory survey methods, PEA (participatory ethnobotanical appraisal, questionnaire and from interviews with the informants. The results from interviews showed that of public knowledge is still based on the traditional concept. Based on the results identifications obtained by (90 species. As many as six species medicinal plants to often used the Tompu community are Euphorbia hirta L. Phyllanthus niruri L. Ageratum L. Blumea conyzoides balsaminifera L. (DC. Kleinhovia hospita L and Tabernaemontana pandacaqui. The benefits of this research to the development of science is expected to be complete scientific data regarding the utilization of medicinal plants natural resources on Tribal society Kaili in Tompu.How to CiteIfandi, S., Jumari, J., & Suedy, S. W. A. (2016. Knowledge Understanding and Utilization of Medicinal Plants by Local Community Tompu District of Kaili, Sigi Biromaru, Central Sulawesi. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(1, 1-11.

  13. Cinemedicine: Using movies to improve students' understanding of psychosocial aspects of medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Kadivar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are rising concerns about how to teach psychosocial aspects of medicine to students. The aim of the study was the use of “cinemedicine” as a tool and technique in teaching psychosocial aspects of medicine to medical students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. Methods: This was an educational study with quantitative and qualitative data analysis. Two hundred seventy medical students participated in this study. Nine sessions were held to teach psychosocial subjects in medicine using movies. Each session began with an initial explanation of the program objectives. After the show, medicine related points of the movie were discussed and analyzed by experts and students. In the end, questionnaires were distributed to assess the students' perceptions. Results: The results of our study show that most of the students (84% stated that teaching these subjects through movies was a nice event comparing to usual lectures. 56.5% of the students agreed with the application of points learned in the events in professional performance. The majority of the students (72.8% agreed that participating in those events was useful for them as a physician and they would advise other students to attend to later sessions. Content analysis of the students' notes uncovered three categories of cinemedicine: “learning by observation”, “creation of a supportive and tangible learning” and “motivation for learning”. Conclusion: Cinemedicine provides the opportunity for medical students to learn psychosocial subjects related to medicine through observing and reflecting on movies. Keywords: Films, Undergraduate, Curriculum, Medicine, Teaching

  14. Nanomedicine and personalised medicine: understanding the personalisation of health care in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noury, Mathieu; López, José

    2017-05-01

    Globally supported by public policy and investment, nanomedicine is presented as an ongoing medical revolution that will radically change the practice of health care from diagnostic to therapeutic, and everything in between. One of nanomedicine's major promises is that of personalised medicine, enabling diagnostics and therapeutics tailored to individual needs and developing a truly 'patient-friendly' medical approach. Based on qualitative interviews with nanomedicine researchers in Canada, this article explores the emerging concept of personalised medicine as it becomes entangled with nanomedical research. More precisely, drawing on insights from science studies and the sociology of expectations, it analyses researchers' perceptions of personalised medicine in the cutting edge of current nanomedicine research. Two perceptions of personalisation are identified; a molecular conception of individuality and a technical conception of personalisation. The article concludes by examining the relationship between the two conceptions and contrasts them with the normative reflex of a more expansive conception of personalised medicine. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  15. Understanding how emergency medicine physicians survive and thrive in rural practice: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhatkar, Ashra; Keesey, Andrea; Bluman, Bob; Lynn, Brenna; Wilkinson, Tandi

    2017-11-01

    The challenges facing emergency medicine (EM) services in Canada reflect the limitations of the entire healthcare system. The emergency department (ED) is uniquely situated in the healthcare system such that shortcomings in hospital- and community-based services are often first revealed there. This is especially true in rural settings, where there are additional site-specific barriers to the provision of EM care. Existing studies look at the factors that influence rural EM physicians in isolation. This study uses a qualitative approach and generates a theoretical model that describes the complex interplay between major factors that influence the experience of rural EM physicians. Eight focus groups were conducted with 39 physicians from rural British Columbia, Canada. Semi-structured focus group protocols were designed to leverage the diversity of the focus groups, which included rural generalists, full-time EM practitioners, physicians from very small and remote communities, locums, international medical graduates, physicians new to practice, and physicians who no longer practice rural EM. Following the principles of grounded theory, interview probes were adjusted iteratively to reflect emerging findings. Transcripts were analysed to identify codes and major themes, which served as the basis for the theoretical model. The theoretical model reveals how the causal conditions (a lack of medical and human resources, and the isolation of rural communities due to topography, distance, and inclement weather) contribute to physicians' common experience of feeling fearful and under-supported at work. Two core phenomena emerge as important needs: supportive professional relationships, and healthcare system adaptability. Contextual factors such as remuneration and continuing medical education funding, and the intervening conditions of physicians' rural exposure during formative years, also have an effect. Physicians create innovative solutions to address the challenges that

  16. A method for understanding generic procurement of HIV medicines by developing countries with patent protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Reed F; Attaran, Amir

    2017-07-01

    Patent protection on medicines may frustrate access by blocking generic competition. Nevertheless, circumstances may still allow for generic procurement to occur anyway, especially for humanitarian cause. But to what extent does this occur? And which legal flexibilities may facilitate such procurement? We attempted to design a replicable methodology that involved linking antiretroviral (ARV) patent data (1260 patents for 12 medicines) from a World Intellectual Property Organization patent study on the 2013 World Health Organization's (WHO) Model List of Essential Medicines to all available matching procurement records in the WHO's Global Price Reporting Mechanism. We then cross-referenced these with lists of legal flexibilities which facilitate generic access where patents have been granted (e.g., supplier companies' patent non-enforcement policies, voluntary and compulsory licenses) to estimate plausible relevance. The patent data corresponded to 1924 generic procurement transactions (1.34 billion units) from 85 countries. While patents were relatively less common in these countries (the median coverage was 20%), over half (53%) of the generic procurements nevertheless aligned with patent protection in the exporting and/or importing country. The disproportionately high relevance of patents despite their lower numbers can be explained by their presence in key medicine-exporting countries and/or those with larger populations. We noted, however, that developing countries still seemed able to buy generic versions of these essential ARVs. A combination of legal flexibilities may have played important roles, but voluntary licensing agreements (VLs) between originator companies and generic ones appeared to align with the largest volumes of generic procurement where we estimated patent protection. If true, VLs may warrant proportionate attention from observers as a heavily relied upon international mechanism for facilitating generic access so that the implications can be

  17. Integration and Visualization of Translational Medicine Data for Better Understanding of Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satagopam, Venkata; Gu, Wei; Eifes, Serge; Gawron, Piotr; Ostaszewski, Marek; Gebel, Stephan; Barbosa-Silva, Adriano; Balling, Rudi; Schneider, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    Translational medicine is a domain turning results of basic life science research into new tools and methods in a clinical environment, for example, as new diagnostics or therapies. Nowadays, the process of translation is supported by large amounts of heterogeneous data ranging from medical data to a whole range of -omics data. It is not only a great opportunity but also a great challenge, as translational medicine big data is difficult to integrate and analyze, and requires the involvement of biomedical experts for the data processing. We show here that visualization and interoperable workflows, combining multiple complex steps, can address at least parts of the challenge. In this article, we present an integrated workflow for exploring, analysis, and interpretation of translational medicine data in the context of human health. Three Web services-tranSMART, a Galaxy Server, and a MINERVA platform-are combined into one big data pipeline. Native visualization capabilities enable the biomedical experts to get a comprehensive overview and control over separate steps of the workflow. The capabilities of tranSMART enable a flexible filtering of multidimensional integrated data sets to create subsets suitable for downstream processing. A Galaxy Server offers visually aided construction of analytical pipelines, with the use of existing or custom components. A MINERVA platform supports the exploration of health and disease-related mechanisms in a contextualized analytical visualization system. We demonstrate the utility of our workflow by illustrating its subsequent steps using an existing data set, for which we propose a filtering scheme, an analytical pipeline, and a corresponding visualization of analytical results. The workflow is available as a sandbox environment, where readers can work with the described setup themselves. Overall, our work shows how visualization and interfacing of big data processing services facilitate exploration, analysis, and interpretation of

  18. From Systems Understanding to Personalized Medicine: Lessons and Recommendations Based on a Multidisciplinary and Translational Analysis of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Josep; Cano, Isaac; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine, using and adapting methods and approaches as developed within systems biology, promises to be essential in ongoing efforts of realizing and implementing personalized medicine in clinical practice and research. Here we review and critically assess these opportunities and challenges using our work on COPD as a case study. We find that there are significant unresolved biomedical challenges in how to unravel complex multifactorial components in disease initiation and progression producing different clinical phenotypes. Yet, while such a systems understanding of COPD is necessary, there are other auxiliary challenges that need to be addressed in concert with a systems analysis of COPD. These include information and communication technology (ICT)-related issues such as data harmonization, systematic handling of knowledge, computational modeling, and importantly their translation and support of clinical practice. For example, clinical decision-support systems need a seamless integration with new models and knowledge as systems analysis of COPD continues to develop. Our experience with clinical implementation of systems medicine targeting COPD highlights the need for a change of management including design of appropriate business models and adoption of ICT providing and supporting organizational interoperability among professional teams across healthcare tiers, working around the patient. In conclusion, in our hands the scope and efforts of systems medicine need to concurrently consider these aspects of clinical implementation, which inherently drives the selection of the most relevant and urgent issues and methods that need further development in a systems analysis of disease.

  19. New Zealand patients' understanding of brand substitution and opinions on copayment options for choice of medicine brand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Charon; Ashton, Toni; Davis, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to better understand the views and experiences of New Zealand patients on switching between brands of prescription medicines and on alternative funding options for the provision of medicines, including an increase in copayments. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was offered to selected patients through participating community pharmacies. Pharmacies were stratified according to level of deprivation of the community served before random selection and invitation for involvement in the study. Patient understanding of and rationale for brand substitution was assessed. Preference for different copayment options was elicited, together with demographic and other explanatory information. Results In all, 194 patient-completed questionnaires were returned. Some gaps in patient knowledge and understanding of brand changes were evident. Most respondents indicated a preference for the existing subsidy arrangements with little desire expressed for alternatives. Around half were willing to contribute towards paying for a choice of brand other than the subsidised brand; however, the maximum contribution nominated was disproportionately lower than real cost differences between originator brand and generics. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that although most patients have experienced brand changes without any problems occurring, a lack of knowledge about substitution does persist. There may be some additional gain in ensuring New Zealanders are aware of the full cost of their medicines at the point of dispensing to reinforce the benefits of the Pharmaceutical Management Agency (PHARMAC) purchasing model. What is known about the topic? Generic reference pricing is used as a mechanism to make savings to pharmaceutical budgets; however, reticence to the use of generic medicines persists. What does this paper add? Most New Zealand patients experience brand changes without any problems occurring; however, a lack of

  20. Why we should understand the patient experience: clinical empathy and medicines optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubraj, Barry; Barnett, Nina L; Grimes, Lesley; Varia, Sneha; Chater, Angel; Auyeung, Vivian

    2016-10-01

    To critically discuss the need for pharmacists to underpin their consultations with appropriate 'clinical empathy' as part of effective medicines optimisation. Use of literature around empathy, consultation and pharmacy practice to develop a case for greater clinical empathy in pharmacy consultations. Clinical empathy is defined from the literature and applied to pharmacy consultations, with a comparison to empathy in other clinical professions. Historical barriers to the embedding of clinical empathy into pharmacy consultations are also explored. We challenge the pharmacy profession to consider how clinical empathy should underpin consultations with a series of introspective questions and provide some sample questions to support pharmacy consultations. We also make the case for appropriate education and professional development of consultation skills at undergraduate and postgraduate level. We contend that patients' relationships with practitioners are critical, and a lack of empathy can impact the effectiveness of care. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Modules, networks and systems medicine for understanding disease and aiding diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Mika; Nestor, Colm E.; Zhang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Many common diseases, such as asthma, diabetes or obesity, involve altered interactions between thousands of genes. High-throughput techniques (omics) allow identification of such genes and their products, but functional understanding is a formidable challenge. Network-based analyses of omics dat...

  2. Modules, networks and systems medicine for understanding disease and aiding diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustafsson, Mika; Nestor, Colm E.; Zhang, Huan; Barabási, Albert-László; Baranzini, Sergio; Brunak, Sören; Chung, Kian Fan; Federoff, Howard J.; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Meehan, Richard R.; Picotti, Paola; Pujana, Miguel Àngel; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Smith, Kenneth Gc; Sterk, Peter J.; Villoslada, Pablo; Benson, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Many common diseases, such as asthma, diabetes or obesity, involve altered interactions between thousands of genes. High-throughput techniques (omics) allow identification of such genes and their products, but functional understanding is a formidable challenge. Network-based analyses of omics data

  3. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast…

  4. Omics for Understanding the Gut-Liver-Microbiome Axis and Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human metabolic disease opens a new view to understanding the contribution of the intestinal microbiome to drug metabolism and drug-induced toxicity in gut-liver function. Gut microbiota, a key determinant of intestinal inflammation, also plays a direct role in chronic inflammation and liver disease...

  5. The impact of an immersive elective on learners' understanding of lifestyle medicine and its role in patients' lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Melissa J; Nemec, Eric C

    2014-10-15

    To design an immersive, active learning, lifestyle medicine (LM) elective and evaluate its impact on a pharmacy learners' ability to understand the challenges of implementing lifestyle changes. A 3-credit elective was developed that incorporated goal setting and immersion into the realm of LM as experienced by both the patient and the practitioner. Learners were assessed via a survey instrument, formal assignments, reflections, and the Presidential Fitness Challenge. Learners reported that their ability to initiate LM as a primary intervention within a care plan significantly increased after taking this course. They also improved their overall health. By identifying and implementing self-identified lifestyle modifications, learners increased confidence in their abilities to produce evidence-based outcomes for patients. Learners were able to understand the challenges of trying to change their daily habits as they undertook their own personal goals.

  6. Evaluation of internet-based patient education materials from internal medicine subspecialty organizations: will patients understand them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, David R; Agarwal, Nitin; John, Elizabeth S; John, Ann M; Agarwal, Prateek; Reynolds, James C; Baker, Stephen R

    2017-06-01

    The majority of Americans use the Internet daily, if not more often, and many search online for health information to better understand a diagnosis they have been given or to research treatment options. The average American reads at an eighth-grade level. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the readability of online patient education materials on the websites of 14 professional organizations representing the major internal medicine subspecialties. We used ten well-established quantitative readability scales to assess written text from patient education materials published on the websites of the major professional organizations representing the following subspecialty groups: allergy and immunology, cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, geriatrics, hematology, hospice and palliative care, infectious disease, nephrology, oncology, pulmonology and critical care, rheumatology, sleep medicine, and sports medicine. Collectively the 540 articles analyzed were written at an 11th-grade level (SD 1.4 grade levels). The sleep medicine and nephrology websites had the most readable materials, written at an academic grade level of 8.5 ± 1.5 and 9.0 ± 0.2, respectively. Material at the infectious disease site was written at the most difficult level, with average readability corresponding to grades 13.9 ± 0.3. None of the patient education materials we reviewed conformed to the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines requiring that patient education articles be written at a third- to seventh-grade reading level. If these online resources were rewritten, it is likely that more patients would derive benefit from reading them.

  7. Toward Understanding the Cold, Hot, and Neutral Nature of Chinese Medicines Using in Silico Mode-of-Action Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xianjun; Mervin, Lewis H; Li, Xuebo; Yu, Huayun; Li, Jiaoyang; Mohamad Zobir, Siti Zuraidah; Zoufir, Azedine; Zhou, Yang; Song, Yongmei; Wang, Zhenguo; Bender, Andreas

    2017-03-27

    One important, however, poorly understood, concept of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is that of hot, cold, and neutral nature of its bioactive principles. To advance the field, in this study, we analyzed compound-nature pairs from TCM on a large scale (>23 000 structures) via chemical space visualizations to understand its physicochemical domain and in silico target prediction to understand differences related to their modes-of-action (MoA) against proteins. We found that overall TCM natures spread into different subclusters with specific molecular patterns, as opposed to forming coherent global groups. Compounds associated with cold nature had a lower clogP and contain more aliphatic rings than the other groups and were found to control detoxification, heat-clearing, heart development processes, and have sedative function, associated with "Mental and behavioural disorders" diseases. While compounds associated with hot nature were on average of lower molecular weight, have more aromatic ring systems than other groups, frequently seemed to control body temperature, have cardio-protection function, improve fertility and sexual function, and represent excitatory or activating effects, associated with "endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases" and "diseases of the circulatory system". Compounds associated with neutral nature had a higher polar surface area and contain more cyclohexene moieties than other groups and seem to be related to memory function, suggesting that their nature may be a useful guide for their utility in neural degenerative diseases. We were hence able to elucidate the difference between different nature classes in TCM on the molecular level, and on a large data set, for the first time, thereby helping a better understanding of TCM nature theory and bridging the gap between traditional medicine and our current understanding of the human body.

  8. Development of a Chinese medicine pattern severity index for understanding eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Sarah; Harris, David; Zaslawski, Chris; McAinch, Andrew J; Stojanovska, Lily

    2012-06-01

    Eating disorders commonly affect young girls and women. Four eating disorders are analyzed in this study: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS), and binge eating disorder (BED). Eating disorders are a modern concept and as such there is no critically appraised research on how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) conceptualizes of or treats eating disorders. The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify the TCM patterns relevant to eating disorders based on a systematic evaluation of the results of a self-reported questionnaire. One hundred and ninety-six (196) female participants (142 with a self-reported eating disorder and 54 with no eating disorder) completed an online survey, designed to collect data on their current general health and, where relevant, their eating disorder. The Berle methodology was used to identify TCM patterns involved in eating disorders to tabulate and score the number of signs and symptoms experienced by the participants. For many of the TCM patterns, statistically significant differences were found between presentation severity across the four eating disorders. For the first time, there is evidence-based research to classify the TCM patterns involved in AN, BN, EDNOS, and BED. Evidence is given to support the anecdotal theories of TCM patterns involved in eating disorder presentation. These results have relevance on how eating disorders are treated and viewed by TCM practitioners.

  9. Psychosomatic medicine in the 21st century: understanding mechanisms and barriers to utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Thomas N; Balon, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The psychosomatic approach arose in antiquity as mankind looked for explanations for illness and death. With the rise of modern medicine, the links between emotions and medical conditions, such as cardiac disease and diabetes, were described by astute clinical observers, but the mechanisms for these conditions were based on correlation from observations rather than on experimental design. Psychoanalytic theory was often utilized to explain many common diseases. For example, peptic ulcer disease was blamed upon anger and stress, but scientific methodology discovered Helicobacter pylori to be the significant causal factor of this disease and resulted in the development of more effective treatments. Nevertheless emotional factors are still linked to disease states and morbidity; for example, depression is a risk factor for mortality following myocardial infarction. Advances in neuroscience demonstrate that the reduction of telomere length by anxiety and stress leads to more rapid aging and potential disease vulnerability. Thus, neuroscientific probes may allow for the elucidation of psychosomatic mechanisms. Sadly, clinical barriers, in terms of time pressure upon physicians and the current separation of mental health services from primary care settings, continue the dualistic treatment of many conditions where psychological factors are important. It is not clear whether a mandate for the integration of behavioral health into primary care will remedy this partition and finally maximize a psychosomatic approach to medical care. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. How sociodemographic features impact subjects' opinion on packages leaflets of medicines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Pires

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Packages leaflets (PLs are essential for the safe use and efficacy of medicines. Aims To quantify the opinion of users of medicines on PLs through the application of a self-administered Likert scale, taking into consideration subjects’ sociodemographic data. Methods Participants were enrolled from two Portuguese regions: urban/littoral (Lisbon and rural/interior (Centre. 503 participants were included: 53 per cent males, 45 per cent 12 years of schooling. A questionnaire was used to collect the sociodemographic data. A Likert scale was self-administered to rate the characteristics of 12 randomized PLs (6 from prescription medicines and 6 from over-the-counter medicines (August-December 2014. An invitation was send to several institutions (e.g., municipal councils. The inclusion criteria were: agreeing, be capable of reading/writing, and be more than 17 years old. Results In the Likert scores obtained, no significant differences were found related to region, sex, marital status, age group (≥65 years and other, and employment status of participants. By contrast, significant differences were found related to education (2=42.747; p 12 years of schooling, more regular reading habits (2 or more books/year, higher income and less frequent medicines use, showed a more negative global opinion on PLs. Conclusion Sociodemographic data are important to understand users’ opinion on PLs. It seems that more educated subjects are more demanding. A lower socio-economic status positively influenced the participants’ opinion, with subjects’ poorer education being a relevant factor in this population. A higher frequency of taking medicines also positively contributed to a better opinion, probably due to a greater familiarity with PLs.

  11. Towards a holistic understanding of "cells"- the tools of regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2013-10-01

    phenotypic change during intestinal tumorogenesis. Therefore in addition to routine in vitro and in vivo analysis of cells and stem cells, studying their genotype and phenotype which are the focus of most of the studies being reported recently, analysis of cell behaviour from an holistic approach and development of novel non-invasive imaging and visualization techniques with high resolution could shed more light on the complex biological phenomena surrounding these cells and stem cells thereby contributing to the progress of medicine. References: Preethy S, John S, Saravana Ganesh J, Srinivasan T, Terunuma H, Iwasaki M, Abraham S. Age old wisdom of Cell-based therapies with added knowledge in the stem cell era - Our perspectives. Stem Cells and Cloning: Advances and Applications. 2013; 2013(6: 13 – 18. Mandal PK, Blanpain C, Rossi DJ. DNA damage response in adult stem cells: pathways and consequences. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2011;12(3:198-202. Di Gioacchino M, Petrarca C, Perrone A, Martino S, Esposito DL, Lotti LV, Mariani-Costantini R. Autophagy in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells exposed to heavy metals: Biological implications and toxicological relevance. Autophagy. 2008;4(4:537-9.

  12. Which risk understandings can be derived from the current disharmonized regulation of complementary and alternative medicine in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesener, Solveig; Salamonsen, Anita; Fønnebø, Vinjar

    2018-01-10

    Many European citizens are seeking complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). These treatments are regulated very differently in the EU/EFTA countries. This may demonstrate differences in how risk associated with the use of CAM is perceived. Since most CAM treatments are practiced fairly similarly across Europe, differing risk understandings may influence patient safety for European CAM users. The overall aim of this article is thus to contribute to an overview and awareness of possible differing risk understandings in the field of CAM at a policymaking/structural level in Europe. The study is a re-analysis of data collected in the CAMbrella EU FP7 document and interview study on the regulation of CAM in 39 European countries. The 12 CAM modalities included in the CAMbrella study were ranked with regard to assumed risk potential depending on the number of countries limiting its practice to regulated professions. The 39 countries were ranked according to how many of the included CAM modalities they limit to be practiced by regulated professions. Twelve of 39 countries generally understand the included CAM treatments to represent "high risk", 20 countries "low risk", while the remaining 7 countries understand CAM treatments as carrying "very little or no risk". The CAM modalities seen as carrying a risk high enough to warrant professional regulation in the highest number of countries are chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, homeopathy and osteopathy. The countries understanding most of the CAM modalities in the study as potentially high-risk treatments are with two exceptions (Portugal and Belgium) all concentrated in the southeastern region of Europe. The variation in regulation of CAM may represent a substantial lack of common risk understandings between health policymakers in Europe. We think the discrepancies in regulation are to a considerable degree also based on factors unrelated to patient risk. We argue that it is important for patient safety that policy

  13. Understanding unexpected courses of multiple sclerosis among patients using complementary and alternative medicine: A travel from recipient to explorer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Salamonsen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Some MS patients experience unexpected improvements of symptoms, which they relate to their use of CAM. The aim of this study was to obtain knowledge and develop understandings of such self-defined unexpected improvement of MS symptoms. Two cases were constructed based on documents and 12 qualitative interviews. Our aim was not to make generalisations from the cases, but to transfer knowledge as working hypotheses. We identified four health-related change processes: the process of losing bodily competence; the process of developing responsibility; the process of taking control; and the process of choosing CAM. The patients explained unexpected improvements in their MS symptoms as results of their own efforts including their choice and use of CAM. In our theoretical interpretations, we found the patients’ redefinition of history, the concept of treatment and the importance of conventional health care to be essential, and leading to a change of patients’ position towards conventional health care from recipients to explorers. The explorers can be perceived as boundary walkers reflecting limitations within the conventional health care system and as initiators regarding what MS patients find useful in CAM.

  14. Seeking to understand: using generic qualitative research to explore access to medicines and pharmacy services among resettled refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Kim; Ostini, Remo; Martini, Nataly; Kairuz, Therese

    2016-06-01

    Introduction There are challenges associated with selecting a qualitative research approach. In a field abundant with terminology and theories, it may be difficult for a pharmacist to know where and how to begin a qualitative research journey. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into generic qualitative research and to describe the journey of data collection of a novice qualitative researcher in the quest to answer her research question: 'What are the barriers to accessing medicines and pharmacy services for resettled refugees in Queensland, Australia?' Methodology Generic qualitative research draws on the strengths of one or more qualitative approaches. The aim is to draw out participants' ideas about things that are 'outside themselves'; rather than focussing on their inner feelings the research seeks to understand a phenomenon, a process, or the perspectives of participants. Sampling is designed to obtain a broad range of opinions about events and experiences and data collection includes interviews, questionnaires or surveys; thematic analysis is often used to analyse data. When to use Generic qualitative research provides an opportunity to develop research designs that fit researchers' epistemological stance and discipline, with research choices, including methodology and methods, being informed by the research question. Limitations Generic qualitative research is one of many methodologies that may be used to answer a research question and there is a paucity of literature about how to do it well. There is also debate about its validity as a qualitative methodology.

  15. Understanding access to medicines in low- and middle-income countries through the use of price and availability indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cameron, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: While it is generally understood that large sections of the population in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) lack access to medicines, the concept of access is difficult to define and measure.Data on medicine prices and availability obtained through national facility-based surveys

  16. Pharmaceutical counseling: Between evidence-based medicine and profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, S N; Akhmetova, T

    2015-01-01

    pharmaceutical counseling standards: Article 1.1 "Code of Ethics of the pharmaceutical worker of Russia" states: "The main task of the professional activity of the pharmaceutical worker - protection of human health", Article 1.3 states that a pharmaceutical worker must take professional decisions solely in the interests of a patient [1]. However, the pharmacy is a trade organization, thus as a retailer the pharmacy is directly interested in making profits and increasing sales of pharmaceutical products, including non-prescription medicines. Moreover, while the clinical medicine is monitored for unjustified prescribing and measures are being taken to prevent polypharmacy, for a pharmacist the growing sales of over-the-counter drugs, active promotion of dietary supplements, homeopathic medicines, medical devices, and, consequently, an increase of financial indicators (particularly "average purchase size") - all are characteristics of success [2].Rational use of over-the-counter medicines requires introduction of pharmaceutical counseling standards (pharmaceutical care) according to symptoms - major reasons to visit a pharmacy as part of responsible self-medication (cold, sore throat, headache, diarrhea, etc.). Standards of pharmaceutical counseling should be objective, reliable and up-to-date and contain recommendations for the rational use of over-the-counter drugs as well as indications requiring treatment to the doctor. Standardization of pharmaceutical counseling in terms of Evidence-based Pharmacy would enhance the efficiency, safety and cost-effectiveness of over-the-counter medicines.Currently, the lack of clinical component in the higher pharmaceutical education and the lack of approved standards of pharmaceutical counseling lead to the introduction of cross-selling technologies (which are broadly applied in other areas of trade, for example, the offer of a boot-polish during the sale of shoes) to the pharmaceutical practice [2, 3]. However, drugs belong to a special group

  17. Testing of Candidate Icons to Identify Acetaminophen-Containing Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Cotton, Helene; Jessurun, Christina; Sembower, Mark A; Pype, Steve; Phillips, Jerry

    2016-01-27

    Adding icons on labels of acetaminophen-containing medicines could help users identify the active ingredient and avoid concomitant use of multiple medicines containing acetaminophen. We evaluated five icons for communication effectiveness. Adults ( n = 300) were randomized to view a prescription container label or over-the-counter labels with either one or two icons. Participants saw two icon candidates, and reported their interpretation; experts judged whether these reflected critical confusions that might cause harm. Participants rated how effectively each icon communicated key messages. Icons based on abbreviations of "acetaminophen" ("Ac", "Ace", "Acm") were rated less confusing and more effective in communicating the active ingredient than icons based on "APAP" or an abstract symbol. Icons did not result in critical confusion when seen on a readable medicine label. Icon implementation on prescription labels was more effective at communicating the warning against concomitant use than implementation on over-the-counter (OTC) labels. Adding an icon to a second location on OTC labels did not consistently enhance this communication, but reduced rated effectiveness of acetaminophen ingredient communication among participants with limited health literacy. The abbreviation-based icons seem most suitable for labeling acetaminophen-containing medications to enable users to identify acetaminophen-containing products.

  18. Testing of Candidate Icons to Identify Acetaminophen-Containing Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Shiffman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding icons on labels of acetaminophen-containing medicines could help users identify the active ingredient and avoid concomitant use of multiple medicines containing acetaminophen. We evaluated five icons for communication effectiveness. Adults (n = 300 were randomized to view a prescription container label or over-the-counter labels with either one or two icons. Participants saw two icon candidates, and reported their interpretation; experts judged whether these reflected critical confusions that might cause harm. Participants rated how effectively each icon communicated key messages. Icons based on abbreviations of “acetaminophen” (“Ac”, “Ace”, “Acm” were rated less confusing and more effective in communicating the active ingredient than icons based on “APAP” or an abstract symbol. Icons did not result in critical confusion when seen on a readable medicine label. Icon implementation on prescription labels was more effective at communicating the warning against concomitant use than implementation on over-the-counter (OTC labels. Adding an icon to a second location on OTC labels did not consistently enhance this communication, but reduced rated effectiveness of acetaminophen ingredient communication among participants with limited health literacy. The abbreviation-based icons seem most suitable for labeling acetaminophen-containing medications to enable users to identify acetaminophen-containing products.

  19. A Conceptual Model of Future Volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, California - With an Emphasis on Understanding Local Volcanic Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molisee, D. D.; Germa, A.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.

    2017-12-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV) is most voluminous of all the Cascade Volcanoes ( 600 km3), and has the highest eruption frequency after Mount St. Helens. Detailed mapping by USGS colleagues has shown that during the last 500,000 years MLV erupted >200 lava flows ranging from basalt to rhyolite, produced at least one ash-flow tuff, one caldera forming event, and at least 17 scoria cones. Underlying these units are 23 additional volcanic units that are considered to be pre-MLV in age. Despite the very high likelihood of future eruptions, fewer than 60 of 250 mapped volcanic units (MLV and pre-MLV) have been dated reliably. A robust set of eruptive ages is key to understanding the history of the MLV system and to forecasting the future behavior of the volcano. The goals of this study are to 1) obtain additional radiometric ages from stratigraphically strategic units; 2) recalculate recurrence rate of eruptions based on an augmented set of radiometric dates; and 3) use lava flow, PDC, ash fall-out, and lahar computational simulation models to assess the potential effects of discrete volcanic hazards locally and regionally. We identify undated target units (units in key stratigraphic positions to provide maximum chronological insight) and obtain field samples for radiometric dating (40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar) and petrology. Stratigraphic and radiometric data are then used together in the Volcano Event Age Model (VEAM) to identify changes in the rate and type of volcanic eruptions through time, with statistical uncertainty. These newly obtained datasets will be added to published data to build a conceptual model of volcanic hazards at MLV. Alternative conceptual models, for example, may be that the rate of MLV lava flow eruptions are nonstationary in time and/or space and/or volume. We explore the consequences of these alternative models on forecasting future eruptions. As different styles of activity have different impacts, we estimate these potential effects using simulation

  20. An assessment of the Bhutanese traditional medicine for its ethnopharmacology, ethnobotany and ethnoquality: Textual understanding and the current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Pyne, Stephen G; Keller, Paul A

    2013-06-21

    : This study involves the assessment of the Bhutanese traditional medicine (BTM) which was integrated with the mainstream biomedicine in 1967 to provide primary health care services in the country. It caters to 20-30% of the daily out-patients within 49 traditional medicine units attached to 20 district modern hospitals and 29 Basic Health Units in the country. : This study presents the ethnopharmacological, ethnobotanical and the ethnoquality concepts in relation to mainstream Tibetan medicine and describes the current practices of BTM. : Experienced BTM practitioners (Drung-tshos and Smen-pas) were selected using a convenience sampling method and were interviewed using an open questionnaire followed by informal discussions. The corpus of BTM, Tibetan and scientific literature was obtained and the information on ethnopharmacological, ethnoquality and ethnobotanical concepts and current practices of BTM was extracted. : This study found that the BTM shares many similarities in terms of materia medica, pharmacopoeia and the principles and concepts of ethnopharmacology and ethnobotany with its mainstream Tibetan medicine. However, the resourceful Bhutanese Drung-tshos and Smen-pas have adapted this medical system based on the local language, culture, disease trend, health care needs and their familiarity with the locally available medicinal ingredients making it particular to the country. A number of notable distinctions observed in the current practices include a code of classification of diseases (only 79 of 404 types of disorders recognized), formulations (currently used only 103 of thousands formulation types), usage of medicinal plants (only 229 species of thousands described) and selected treatment procedures (golden needle and water therapy). This BTM was found to cater to 20-30% of daily out-patients visiting 49 modern hospitals and basic health units in the country. : The BTM has been evolved from the Tibetan medicine. While the pharmacopoeia

  1. Natural medicine: the genus Angelica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, S D; Nahar, L

    2004-06-01

    More than 60 species of medicinal plants belong to the genus Angelica (Family: Apiaceae). Many of these species have long been used in ancient traditional medicine systems, especially in the far-east. Various herbal preparations containing Angelica species are available over-the-counter, not only in the far-eastern countries, but also in the western countries like USA, UK, Germany, etc. For centuries, many species of this genus, e.g. A. acutiloba, A. archangelica, A. atropupurea, A. dahurica, A. japonica, A. glauca, A. gigas, A. koreana, A. sinensis, A. sylvestris, etc., have been used traditionally as anti-inflammatory, diuretic, expectorant and diaphoretic, and remedy for colds, flu, influenza, hepatitis, arthritis, indigestion, coughs, chronic bronchitis, pleurisy, typhoid, headaches, wind, fever, colic, travel sickness, rheumatism, bacterial and fungal infections and diseases of the urinary organs. Active principles isolated from these plants mainly include various types of coumarins, acetylenic compounds, chalcones, sesquiterpenes and polysaccharides. This review evaluates the importance of the genus Angelica in relation to its traditional medicinal uses, alternative medicinal uses in the modern society and potential for drug development, and summarises results of various scientific studies on Angelica species or Angelica-containing preparations for their bioactivities including, antimicrobial, anticancer, antitumour, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, etc.

  2. (Re)Acting Medicine: Applying Theatre in Order to Develop a Whole-Systems Approach to Understanding the Healing Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldingay, S.; Dieppe, P.; Mangan, M.; Marsden, D.

    2014-01-01

    This critical reflection is based on the belief that creative practitioners should be using their own well-established approaches to trouble dominant paradigms in health and care provision to both form and inform the future of healing provision and well-being creation. It describes work by a transdisciplinary team (drama and medicine) that is…

  3. Text Mining for Precision Medicine: Bringing Structure to EHRs and Biomedical Literature to Understand Genes and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Michael; Singhal, Ayush; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The key question of precision medicine is whether it is possible to find clinically actionable granularity in diagnosing disease and classifying patient risk. The advent of next-generation sequencing and the widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have provided clinicians and researchers a wealth of data and made possible the precise characterization of individual patient genotypes and phenotypes. Unstructured text-found in biomedical publications and clinical notes-is an important component of genotype and phenotype knowledge. Publications in the biomedical literature provide essential information for interpreting genetic data. Likewise, clinical notes contain the richest source of phenotype information in EHRs. Text mining can render these texts computationally accessible and support information extraction and hypothesis generation. This chapter reviews the mechanics of text mining in precision medicine and discusses several specific use cases, including database curation for personalized cancer medicine, patient outcome prediction from EHR-derived cohorts, and pharmacogenomic research. Taken as a whole, these use cases demonstrate how text mining enables effective utilization of existing knowledge sources and thus promotes increased value for patients and healthcare systems. Text mining is an indispensable tool for translating genotype-phenotype data into effective clinical care that will undoubtedly play an important role in the eventual realization of precision medicine.

  4. Perception, Price and Preference: Consumption and Protection of Wild Animals Used in Traditional Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Liu

    Full Text Available A wide array of wildlife species, including many animals, are used in traditional medicines across many medicinal systems, including in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM. Due to over-exploitation and habitat loss, the populations of many animals commonly used in TCM have declined and are unable to meet market demand. A number of measures have been taken to try to reduce the impact that this large and growing market for TCM may have on wild animal species. Consumer preferences and behavior are known to play an important role in the consumption and protection of wild animals used in traditional medicine, and thus are likely to be an important factor in the success of many of these mechanisms--particularly given the significant percentage of TCMs that are over-the-counter products (access to which is not mediated by practitioners. In this study we conducted questionnaires and designed stated preference experiments embodying different simulation scenarios using a random sample of the population in Beijing to elicit individuals' knowledge, perceptions and preferences toward wild or farmed animal materials and their substitutes used in traditional Chinese medicine. We found that respondents had a stated preference for wild materials over farm-raised and other alternatives because they believe that the effectiveness of wild-sourced materials is more credible than that of other sources. However, we also found that, although respondents used TCM products, they had a poor understanding of the function or composition of either traditional Chinese medicines or proprietary Chinese medicines (PCM, and paid little attention to the composition of products when making purchasing decisions. Furthermore, awareness of the need for species protection, or "conservation consciousness" was found to play an important role in willingness to accept substitutions for wild animal materials, while traditional animal medicinal materials (TAMs derived from well

  5. Perception, Price and Preference: Consumption and Protection of Wild Animals Used in Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Jiang, Zhigang; Fang, Hongxia; Li, Chunwang; Mi, Aizi; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Cui, Shaopeng; Chen, Daiqiang; Ping, Xiaoge; Li, Feng; Li, Chunlin; Tang, Songhua; Luo, Zhenhua; Zeng, Yan; Meng, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    A wide array of wildlife species, including many animals, are used in traditional medicines across many medicinal systems, including in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Due to over-exploitation and habitat loss, the populations of many animals commonly used in TCM have declined and are unable to meet market demand. A number of measures have been taken to try to reduce the impact that this large and growing market for TCM may have on wild animal species. Consumer preferences and behavior are known to play an important role in the consumption and protection of wild animals used in traditional medicine, and thus are likely to be an important factor in the success of many of these mechanisms--particularly given the significant percentage of TCMs that are over-the-counter products (access to which is not mediated by practitioners). In this study we conducted questionnaires and designed stated preference experiments embodying different simulation scenarios using a random sample of the population in Beijing to elicit individuals' knowledge, perceptions and preferences toward wild or farmed animal materials and their substitutes used in traditional Chinese medicine. We found that respondents had a stated preference for wild materials over farm-raised and other alternatives because they believe that the effectiveness of wild-sourced materials is more credible than that of other sources. However, we also found that, although respondents used TCM products, they had a poor understanding of the function or composition of either traditional Chinese medicines or proprietary Chinese medicines (PCM), and paid little attention to the composition of products when making purchasing decisions. Furthermore, awareness of the need for species protection, or "conservation consciousness" was found to play an important role in willingness to accept substitutions for wild animal materials, while traditional animal medicinal materials (TAMs) derived from well-known endangered species, such

  6. On understanding the very different science premises meaningful to CAM versus orthodox medicine: part I--the fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, William A

    2010-03-01

    In previous articles by this author and his colleagues in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, it has been shown that physical reality consists of two uniquely different categories of substance, one being electric charge-based while the other appears to be magnetic charge-based. Normally, only the electric atom/molecule type of substance is accessible by our traditional measurement instruments. We label this condition as the uncoupled state of physical reality that is our long-studied, electric atom/molecule level of nature. The second level of physical reality is invisible to traditional measurement instruments when the system is in the uncoupled state but is accessible to these same instruments when the system is in the coupled state of physical reality. The coupling of these two unique levels has been shown to occur via the application of a sufficient intensity of human consciousness in the form of specific intentions. Part II of this article (in a forthcoming issue) explores the thermodynamics of complementary and 328 alternative medicine (CAM) through five different space-time applications involving coupled state physics to show their relevance to today's medicine: (1) homeopathy; (2) the placebo effect; (3) long-range, room temperature, macroscopic-size-scale, information entanglement; (4) explanation for dark matter/energy plus possible human levitation; and (5) electrodermal diagnostic devices. The purpose is to clearly differentiate the use and limitations of uncoupled state physics in nature and today's traditional medicine from coupled state physics in tomorrow's CAM. Existing orthodox science provides the technical underpinnings and mindset for today's orthodox medicine. Psycho-energetic science will provide the technical underpinnings and mindset for CAM.

  7. Ayurvedic medicine and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer L Pradhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of herbal medicines has increased dramatically over the past few years. The United States alone noted a 380% increase in the consumption of these products. Although the common practice of taking over-the-counter herbal soups, herbal teas and other such prepacked preparations was not associated with adverse events at large, still, some herbs are known to cause problems, especially when large doses are taken. The American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA has taken a conservative stance and recommended that it is prudent to stop these products at least 2-3 weeks prior to anaesthesia and surgery. This advice may be difficult to implement as most preoperative evaluations occur only a few days prior to surgery. Some of the Ayurvedic preparations have shown to improve the patient outcome when taken during the perioperative period. Hence, the conservative stance by ASA may not always benefit the patient. More scientific studies are needed to have more targeted recommendations. This article puts forward the facts that need to be addressed by researchers in the future.

  8. Children's knowledge and beliefs about medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Omar Thanoon; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Abdullah, Anna Christina

    2015-03-01

    Minor illnesses in children are often cured at home with over the counter medicines. Even though there is a wide use of medicines among children, they rarely receive medical advice about their medications from doctors or pharmacists. The aim of this study is to evaluate children's beliefs about medicines as well as to explain what children know about medicines. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data from four primary schools in Penang Island, Malaysia. The target population of this research was schoolchildren of 11 and 12 years old regardless of their gender and social status. A self-administration questionnaire was used to obtain the data from schoolchildren and their parents. After including all schoolchildren in grades five and six, the total sample size was 1000 children in addition to 1000 parents. This study found that most children have inadequate knowledge and false beliefs about the efficacy of medicines. Children's beliefs about the efficacy of medicines were affected by their age group, gender and race (p role of health-care professional should be increased in terms of medicine education. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Using ClinicalTrials.gov to understand the state of clinical research in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jamie L; White, Kyle R; Chiswell, Karen; Tasneem, Asba; Palmer, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov is the largest trial registry in the world. Strengthened registration requirements, including federal mandates in 2007, have increased study representation. A systematic evaluation of all registered studies has been limited by the absence of an aggregate data set and specialty-specific search terms. We leveraged a newly transformed database containing annotated data from ClinicalTrials.gov to define the portfolio of interventional clinical research in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. Analysis was restricted to studies registered after September 2007 through September 2010 and defined as "interventional" (n = 40,970). A specialty-specific study data set (n = 2,226) was created using disease condition terms provided by data submitters and medical subject heading terms generated by a National Library of Medicine algorithm. Trial characteristics were extracted and summarized using descriptive statistics. Pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine trials composed 5.4% of all interventional studies registered over the 3-year period. In contrast, oncology and cardiovascular disease composed 21.9 and 8.4% of trials, respectively. Within pulmonary trials, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most studied conditions (27.4 and 21.8% of studies, respectively), and measures of lung function or safety were the most frequent primary outcomes. Nearly two-thirds of trials indicated enrollment of 100 patients or fewer, and a majority of studies were phase II or III trials. The single largest funding source (43.5%) was industry, and study characteristics varied by funding source. We applied a novel approach to describe the portfolio of interventional clinical research in pulmonary medicine. Our results indicate a disparity between trial representation and the burden of respiratory disease. Resources should be targeted across the spectrum of pulmonary research to address this discrepancy.

  10. An audit on parental attitudes towards medicines used in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukattash, Tareq L; ALGhzawi, Nuha Y; Abu Farha, Rana K; Jarab, Anan S; Hämeen-Anttila, Katri; Vainio, Kristi; Gammoh, Omar S

    2018-01-01

    There is growing concerns regarding the use of medicines in children. Therefore, many strategies were implemented to improve such use and make safe and effective medicines more available for children. Enhancing interaction between parents and health care providers plays an important role in insuring the proper use of medicines. In order to optimize such interaction, the attitudes, beliefs and practices of parents toward medicine use in children need to be explored. A validated questionnaire was administered via face to face interviews to 1000 parents attending pediatric outpatient clinics with their children in order to investigate their attitudes toward children's medicines. The majority of respondents (83.2%) were mothers. The majority participants (84.4%) agreed that medicines are necessary in treating illnesses, 80% of the parents had worries about the side effects and interactions of medicines, and 60% of the parents said they try to avoid giving medicines to their children. Moreover, parents in this study varied considerably in their views toward prescription and over-the- counter medicines. More than half of the participants (55.2%) declared that doctors in Jordan prescribe antibiotics to children too easily. Participants had positive attitudes toward the necessity of medicines for ill children. However, a considerable proportion of the parents had negative attitudes toward children's medicines with respect to their side effects and interactions, their capability of disturbing the body's own capability of healing illnesses, their unnatural characteristic and other aspects related to medicines.

  11. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... in your joints. These two substances come in supplement form and can be bought over-the-counter. ...

  12. Cancer-Related Genetic Testing and Personalized Medicine for Adolescents: A Narrative Review of Impact and Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetsch, Janine; Wakefield, Claire E; Warby, Meera; Tucker, Katherine; Patterson, Pandora; McGill, Brittany C; Metcalfe, Alison; Cohn, Richard J; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-01-16

    Genetic testing is becoming increasingly available for adolescents who are undergoing cancer treatment or at risk of cancer predisposition syndromes. With this narrative review, we aimed to synthesize the evidence on psychosocial outcomes and adolescents' understanding of genetic testing-thus far, an underresearched topic. Both psychological benefits and harms of predictive testing were reported in adolescents from high-risk families. Harms were mainly related to cancer-specific distress and increased worries. Findings on genetic understanding were sparse. Future studies should focus on psychosocial outcomes and adolescents' understanding undergoing genetic testing and enabling access to genetic counseling pre-testing and post-testing.

  13. Understanding and teaching key concepts and tools of evidence-based medicine: perspectives of a clinician-researcher pharmaceutical physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianis, Jamie

    2011-12-01

    Clinical practice benefits from research to inform good decision making. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) helps physicians integrate experience and individual expertise with the best evidence. Various philosophical concepts, including "primum non nocere," are balanced to achieve this. The tools of EBM, such as number needed to treat, are easy to calculate and to use. Other valuable tools include number needed to harm, attributable risk, and likelihood of being helped or harmed. It is also important to distinguish between relative risk and absolute risk to avoid drawing the wrong conclusions. With the right teaching techniques to grab attention and encourage active participation, real examples can be used to impart practical skills that the clinician can employ in translating research findings into something that helps the individual patient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Where sleep medicine meets psychiatry: a recent understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxlade, Robert

    I believe that the results of these sleep studies show that in chronic PTSD, most patients have a significant sleep disorder that is independent of their PTSD, but which provides the vulnerability in which PTSD develops. The utility of these studies lies in the fact that for the most part these sleep disorders can be treated, and the PTSD can then subsequently respond to appropriate treatment, or be resolved as sleep normalizes. There's a lot more that can be done--I'd like to end on some words from the American poet, Robert Frost, whose lines "I have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep; and miles to go before I sleep" seem to herald the current situation in which sleep medicine and psychiatry are making a tentative beginning to explore a new realm of study.

  15. Understanding physicians' acceptance of the Medline system for practicing evidence-based medicine: a decomposed TPB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shin-Yuan; Ku, Yi-Cheng; Chien, Jui-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) supports physicians in their improvement of clinical quality and enhances hospitals' improvement of patient safety. Many health care institutions implement information systems to support physicians practicing EBM. However, studies exploring the antecedent factors of physicians' usage intention of information systems facilitating EBM practice are rare. Hence this study proposed a research model based on the decomposed theory of the planned behavior model (decomposed TPB) to investigate the factors influencing physicians' acceptance of the Medline system. A field survey was conducted in Taiwan to collect data from physicians with experience in using the Medline system. A valid sample of 224 physicians was collected for data analysis. Structural equation modeling using the partial least squares (PLS) method with bootstrap estimate was used to test the research model. The findings of this study show that a physician's usage intention is significantly influenced by three factors, i.e. attitude, the subjective norm, and perceived behavior control. Furthermore, these three factors can be predicted by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, interpersonal influence, personal innovativeness in IT and self-efficacy, respectively. The results of this study indicate that our research model provides an effective prediction of the intention of physicians to use the Medline system and provides valuable implications for academics and practitioners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  17. Undergraduate medical students' perceptions, attitudes, and competencies in evidence-based medicine (EBM), and their understanding of EBM reality in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahdab, Fares; Firwana, Belal; Hasan, Rim; Sonbol, Mohamad Bassam; Fares, Munes; Alnahhas, Iyad; Sabouni, Ammar; Ferwana, Mazen

    2012-08-12

    Teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) should be evaluated and guided by evidence of its own effectiveness. However, no data are available on adoption of EBM by Syrian undergraduate, postgraduate, or practicing physicians. In fact, the teaching of EBM in Syria is not yet a part of undergraduate medical curricula. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course that took place in 2011. The course included didactic lectures as well as interactive hands-on workshops on all topics of EBM. A comprehensive questionnaire, that included the Berlin questionnaire, was used to inspect medical students' awareness of, attitudes toward, and competencies' in EBM. According to students, problems facing proper EBM practice in Syria were the absence of the following: an EBM teaching module in medical school curriculum (94%), role models among professors and instructors (92%), a librarian (70%), institutional subscription to medical journals (94%), and sufficient IT hardware (58%). After the course, there was a statistically significant increase in medical students' perceived ability to go through steps of EBM, namely: formulating PICO questions (56.9%), searching for evidence (39.8%), appraising the evidence (27.3%), understanding statistics (48%), and applying evidence at point of care (34.1%). However, mean increase in Berlin scores after the course was 2.68, a non-statistically significant increase of 17.86%. The road to a better EBM reality in Syria starts with teaching EBM in medical school and developing the proper environment to facilitate transforming current medical education and practice to an evidence-based standard in Syria.

  18. Undergraduate medical students’ perceptions, attitudes, and competencies in evidence-based medicine (EBM), and their understanding of EBM reality in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) should be evaluated and guided by evidence of its own effectiveness. However, no data are available on adoption of EBM by Syrian undergraduate, postgraduate, or practicing physicians. In fact, the teaching of EBM in Syria is not yet a part of undergraduate medical curricula. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course. Methods The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course that took place in 2011. The course included didactic lectures as well as interactive hands-on workshops on all topics of EBM. A comprehensive questionnaire, that included the Berlin questionnaire, was used to inspect medical students’ awareness of, attitudes toward, and competencies’ in EBM. Results According to students, problems facing proper EBM practice in Syria were the absence of the following: an EBM teaching module in medical school curriculum (94%), role models among professors and instructors (92%), a librarian (70%), institutional subscription to medical journals (94%), and sufficient IT hardware (58%). After the course, there was a statistically significant increase in medical students' perceived ability to go through steps of EBM, namely: formulating PICO questions (56.9%), searching for evidence (39.8%), appraising the evidence (27.3%), understanding statistics (48%), and applying evidence at point of care (34.1%). However, mean increase in Berlin scores after the course was 2.68, a non-statistically significant increase of 17.86%. Conclusion The road to a better EBM reality in Syria starts with teaching EBM in medical school and developing the proper environment to facilitate transforming current medical education and practice to an evidence-based standard in Syria. PMID:22882872

  19. Undergraduate medical students’ perceptions, attitudes, and competencies in evidence-based medicine (EBM, and their understanding of EBM reality in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alahdab Fares

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM should be evaluated and guided by evidence of its own effectiveness. However, no data are available on adoption of EBM by Syrian undergraduate, postgraduate, or practicing physicians. In fact, the teaching of EBM in Syria is not yet a part of undergraduate medical curricula. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course. Methods The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course that took place in 2011. The course included didactic lectures as well as interactive hands-on workshops on all topics of EBM. A comprehensive questionnaire, that included the Berlin questionnaire, was used to inspect medical students’ awareness of, attitudes toward, and competencies’ in EBM. Results According to students, problems facing proper EBM practice in Syria were the absence of the following: an EBM teaching module in medical school curriculum (94%, role models among professors and instructors (92%, a librarian (70%, institutional subscription to medical journals (94%, and sufficient IT hardware (58%. After the course, there was a statistically significant increase in medical students' perceived ability to go through steps of EBM, namely: formulating PICO questions (56.9%, searching for evidence (39.8%, appraising the evidence (27.3%, understanding statistics (48%, and applying evidence at point of care (34.1%. However, mean increase in Berlin scores after the course was 2.68, a non-statistically significant increase of 17.86%. Conclusion The road to a better EBM reality in Syria starts with teaching EBM in medical school and developing the proper environment to facilitate transforming current medical education and practice to an evidence-based standard in Syria.

  20. Understanding the implementation and adoption of an information technology intervention to support medicine optimisation in primary care: qualitative study using strong structuration theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Mark; Phipps, Denham; Howard, Rachel L; Avery, Anthony; Rodgers, Sarah; Ashcroft, Darren

    2017-05-10

    Using strong structuration theory, we aimed to understand the adoption and implementation of an electronic clinical audit and feedback tool to support medicine optimisation for patients in primary care. This is a qualitative study informed by strong structuration theory. The analysis was thematic, using a template approach. An a priori set of thematic codes, based on strong structuration theory, was developed from the literature and applied to the transcripts. The coding template was then modified through successive readings of the data. Clinical commissioning group in the south of England. Four focus groups and five semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 participants purposively sampled from a range of stakeholder groups (general practitioners, pharmacists, patients and commissioners). Using the system could lead to improved medication safety, but use was determined by broad institutional contexts; by the perceptions, dispositions and skills of users; and by the structures embedded within the technology. These included perceptions of the system as new and requiring technical competence and skill; the adoption of the system for information gathering; and interactions and relationships that involved individual, shared or collective use. The dynamics between these external, internal and technological structures affected the adoption and implementation of the system. Successful implementation of information technology interventions for medicine optimisation will depend on a combination of the infrastructure within primary care, social structures embedded in the technology and the conventions, norms and dispositions of those utilising it. Future interventions, using electronic audit and feedback tools to improve medication safety, should consider the complexity of the social and organisational contexts and how internal and external structures can affect the use of the technology in order to support effective implementation. © Article author(s) (or their

  1. Older immigrants from the former Soviet Union and their use of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Son, Catherine R; Stasyuk, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    The population of older immigrants in the United States is growing and they bring their health beliefs and practices with them. Older immigrants from the former Soviet Union use a variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) remedies which includes in part: 1) foods to which medicinal properties are attributed, 2) herbs, 3) external treatments, and 4) pharmaceuticals manufactured in the former Soviet Union and available over-the-counter. These remedies vary in their efficacy and are often used in combination with or in lieu of prescribed allopathic (Western) medications. Health beliefs regarding medicine in the United States has led older Slavic immigrant to distrust their US health care providers and system. Nurses are in a key position to inquire and work with older Slavic immigrants to safely use their CAM and provide more information about prescribed allopathic medications and the harmful effects of combining remedies without consultation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  3. 21 CFR 310.519 - Drug products marketed as over-the-counter (OTC) daytime sedatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... been made for daytime sedative products: “occasional simple nervous tension,” “nervous irritability,” “nervous tension headache,” “simple nervousness due to common every day overwork and fatigue,” “a relaxed... chapter is required for marketing. (c) Clinical investigations designed to obtain evidence that any drug...

  4. Analysing policy interventions to prohibit over-the-counter antibiotic sales in four Latin American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, V J; Herrera-Patino, J J; Santa-Ana-Tellez, Y; Dreser, A; Elseviers, M; Vander Stichele, R H

    2013-06-01

    To describe and evaluate policies implemented in Chile, Colombia, Venezuela and Mexico (1995-2009) to prohibit antibiotic OTC sales and explore limitations in available data. We searched and analysed legislation, grey literature and peer-reviewed publications on regulatory interventions and implementation strategies to enforce prohibition of OTC antibiotic sales. We also assessed the impact using private sector retail sales data of antibiotics studying changes in level and consumption trends before and after the policy change using segmented time series analysis. Finally, we assessed the completeness and data quality through an established checklist to test the suitability of the data for analysis of the interventions. Whereas Chile implemented a comprehensive package of interventions to accompany regulation changes, Colombia's reform was limited to the capital district and Venezuela's limited to only some antibiotics and without awareness campaigns. In Mexico, no enforcement was enacted. The data showed a differential effect of the intervention among the countries studied with a significant change in level of consumption in Chile (-5.56 DID) and in Colombia (-1.00DID). In Venezuela and Mexico, no significant change in level and slope was found. Changes in population coverage were identified as principal limitations of using sales data for evaluating the reform impact. Retail sales data can be useful when assessing policy impact but should be supplemented by other data sources such as public sector sales and prescription data. Implementing regulatory enforcement has shown some impact, but a sustainable, concerted approach will be needed to address OTC sales in the future. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. 76 FR 12916 - Benzocaine; Weight Control Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... analysis of covariance excluding subjects that failed to meet either the age or the degree of overweight... reported that the Panel considered a few nonclinical studies (Refs. 11, 12, and 13) on benzocaine for... considered this study to be an objective demonstration of the effectiveness of a local anesthetic on hunger...

  6. Colds, flu and coughing: a review of over-the-counter cold and flu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common cold is the most frequent human illness, and may be caused by several families of viruses, particularly the more than 100 serotypes of rhinoviruses. Inaccurate perceptions that antibiotics improve patient outcomes fuel the number of doctor visits and parental requests for antibiotics. The inappropriate use of ...

  7. Colds, flu and coughing: a review of over-the-counter nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasal congestion due to the common cold occurs because of dilation of the blood vessels, leading to swelling of the nasal mucosal epithelium. This narrows nasal passages, which are further blocked by increased mucus production. Nasal sprays and drops are often recommended for the treatment of rhinorrhoea and nasal ...

  8. Colds, flu and coughing: Over-the-counter products for pharyngitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharyngotonsillitis is an inflammatory condition of the pharyngeal wall. Respiratory viruses are the major causes of pharyngitis, while bacteria account for 5-30% of cases. Once treatment of the underlying aetiology is considered and addressed, management of pharyngotonsillitis focuses on providing symptomatic relief.

  9. Prevalence and factors associated with over-the-counter use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mirambo

    Other fungal infections included vulvo-vaginal candidiasis 55 (20.37%), oral candidiasis 19 (7.04%) and systemic candidiasis 8 (2.96%). In the current study systemic candidiasis was referred to the fungal infections involving blood stream and meninges. Most of the patients with dermatophytes either received fluconazole 46 ...

  10. Acute Therapy: Why Not Over-The-Counter or Other Nonspecific Options?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prescription US, Behind the Counter in some Countries Price Inexpensive Expensive Drowsiness May cause drowsiness Typically do ... by 8 to 9 headache days per month. Knowledge is a powerful tool for migraine management, so ...

  11. 76 FR 35672 - Revised Effectiveness Determination; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... definitions. Some of these firms may be currently marketing products that would have to be relabeled as a... ranges from $140 to $270. Because small manufacturers would on average be marketing few affected UPCs and... Than SPF 50,'' Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 62:348-9, 2010. 4. Eastern Research...

  12. Over-the-Counter Weight-Loss Pills: Do They Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2016;116:129. Feb. 06, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/weight-loss/art-20046409 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  13. Reporting Data with "Over-the-Counter" Data Analysis Supports Improves Educators' Data Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jenny Grant

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of making data-informed decisions to improve learning rely on educators correctly interpreting given data. Many educators routinely misinterpret data, even at districts with proactive support for data use. The tool most educators use for data analyses, which is an information technology data system or its reports, typically reports…

  14. Reporting Data with "Over-the-Counter" Data Analysis Supports Increases Educators' Analysis Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jenny Grant

    2013-01-01

    There is extensive research on the benefits of making data-informed decisions to improve learning, but these benefits rely on the data being effectively interpreted. Despite educators' above-average intellect and education levels, there is evidence many educators routinely misinterpret student data. Data analysis problems persist even at districts…

  15. Novel treatment of onychomycosis using over-the-counter mentholated ointment: a clinical case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Richard; Rohal, Patrick; Jackson, Constance; Beutler, Anthony; Olsen, Cara

    2011-01-01

    current medication treatments for onychomycosis have less than full cure-rate efficacy and have the potential for adverse side effects. Vicks VapoRub (The Proctor & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH) has been advocated in the lay literature as an effective treatment for onychomycosis. This pilot study tested Vicks VapoRub as a safe, cost-effective alternative for treating toenail onychomycosis. eighteen participants were recruited to use Vicks VapoRub as treatment for onychomycosis. Participants were followed at intervals of 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks; digital photographs were obtained during initial and follow-up visits. Primary outcome measures were mycological cure at 48 weeks and clinical cure through subjective assessment of appearance and quantifiable change in the area of affected nail by digital photography analysis. Patient satisfaction was a secondary outcome, measured using a single-item questionnaire scored by a 5-point Likert scale. fifteen of the 18 participants (83%) showed a positive treatment effect; 5 (27.8%) had a mycological and clinical cure at 48 weeks; 10 (55.6%) had partial clearance, and 3 (16.7%) showed no change. All 18 participants rated their satisfaction with the nail appearance at the end of the study as "satisfied" (n = 9) or "very satisfied" (n = 9). Vicks VapoRub seems to have a positive clinical effect in the treatment onychomycosis.

  16. Thin layer chromatographic analysis of some common over the counter (OTC cough–cold preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Kaur Chahal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, potential utility of thin layer chromatography to differentiate some common OTC cough–cold preparations was evaluated. Twenty solvent systems were examined from which a solvent systems A comprising methanol:ammonia in the ratio of 100:1.5 (v/v and B comprising chloroform:methanol in the ratio of 90:10 (v/v were found to be most suitable as it showed a high degree of separation of different components of these preparations. It was also found that iodine fuming technique is the best visualizing method for examining the TLC chromatograms of these drug samples prior to subsequent instrumental analysis.

  17. Modes of hoping: understanding hope and expectation in the context of a clinical trial of complementary and alternative medicine for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Emery R; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Nichter, Mark; Hopkins, Allison L; Sherman, Karen J

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the role of hope in participants' assessments of their expectations, experiences and treatment outcomes. Data analysis focused on semi-structured, open-ended interviews with 44 participants, interviewed 3-5 times each over the course of a study evaluating Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for temporomandibular disorders (TMD), a form of chronic orofacial pain. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using qualitative and ethnographic methods. A "Modes of Hoping" (Webb, 2007)(1) framework informed our analysis. Five modes of hoping emerged from participant narratives: Realistic Hope, Wishful Hope, Utopian Hope, Technoscience Hope, and Transcendent Hope. Using this framework, hope is demonstrated as exerting a profound influence over how participants assess and report their expectations. This suggests that researchers interested in measuring expectations and understanding their role in treatment outcomes should consider hope as exercising a multi-faceted and dynamic influence on participants' reporting of expectations and their experience and evaluation of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Phytochemical-Sensing Strategy Based on Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Metabolic Profiling for Understanding the Functionality of the Medicinal Herb Green Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Fujimura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Low-molecular-weight phytochemicals have health benefits and reduce the risk of diseases, but the mechanisms underlying their activities have remained elusive because of the lack of a methodology that can easily visualize the exact behavior of such small molecules. Recently, we developed an in situ label-free imaging technique, called mass spectrometry imaging, for visualizing spatially-resolved biotransformations based on simultaneous mapping of the major bioactive green tea polyphenol and its phase II metabolites. In addition, we established a mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling technique capable of evaluating the bioactivities of diverse green tea extracts, which contain multiple phytochemicals, by focusing on their compositional balances. This methodology allowed us to simultaneously evaluate the relative contributions of the multiple compounds present in a multicomponent system to its bioactivity. This review highlights small molecule-sensing techniques for visualizing the complex behaviors of herbal components and linking such information to an enhanced understanding of the functionalities of multicomponent medicinal herbs.

  19. Text mining of rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus to understand the mechanisms of Chinese medicine in different diseases with same treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Zheng, Guang; Li, Jian; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Lu, Cheng; Jiang, Miao; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Hong-Tao; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2018-01-09

    To identify the commonalities between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to understand the mechanisms of Chinese medicine (CM) in different diseases with the same treatment. A text mining approach was adopted to analyze the commonalities between RA and DM according to CM and biological elements. The major commonalities were subsequently verifified in RA and DM rat models, in which herbal formula for the treatment of both RA and DM identifified via text mining was used as the intervention. Similarities were identifified between RA and DM regarding the CM approach used for diagnosis and treatment, as well as the networks of biological activities affected by each disease, including the involvement of adhesion molecules, oxidative stress, cytokines, T-lymphocytes, apoptosis, and inflfl ammation. The Ramulus Cinnamomi-Radix Paeoniae Alba-Rhizoma Anemarrhenae is an herbal combination used to treat RA and DM. This formula demonstrated similar effects on oxidative stress and inflfl ammation in rats with collagen-induced arthritis, which supports the text mining results regarding the commonalities between RA and DM. Commonalities between the biological activities involved in RA and DM were identifified through text mining, and both RA and DM might be responsive to the same intervention at a specifific stage.

  20. Occupational Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Learning Objectives are: (1) Understand the unique work environment of astronauts. (2) Understand the effect microgravity has on human physiology (3) Understand how NASA Space Medicine Division is mitigating the health risks of space missions.

  1. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apps skip to content Side Effects of HIV Medicines Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV Medicines ... p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medicines and Side Effects Last Reviewed: October 9, 2017 ...

  2. Evaluating availability and price of essential medicines in Boston area (Massachusetts, USA) using WHO/HAI methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Rorden, Lindsey; Ewen, Margaret; Laing, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Many patients even those with health insurance pay out-of-pocket for medicines. We investigated the availability and prices of essential medicines in the Boston area. Using the WHO/HAI methodology, availability and undiscounted price data for both originator brand (OB) and lowest price generic (LPG) equivalent versions of 25 essential medicines (14 prescription; 11 over-the-counter (OTC)) were obtained from 17 private pharmacies. The inclusion and prices of 26 essential medicines in seven pharmacy discount programs were also studied. The medicine prices were compared with international reference prices (IRPs). In surveyed pharmacies, the OB medicines were less available as compared to the generics. The OB and LPG versions of OTC medicines were 21.33 and 11.53 times the IRP, respectively. The median prices of prescription medicines were higher, with OB and LPG versions at 158.14 and 38.03 times the IRP, respectively. In studied pharmacy discount programs, the price ratios of surveyed medicines varied from 4.4-13.9. While noting the WHO target that consumers should pay no more than four times the IRPs, medicine prices were considerably higher in the Boston area. The prices for medicines included in the pharmacy discount programs were closest to WHO's target. Consumers should shop around, as medicine inclusion and prices vary across discount programs. In order for consumers to identify meaningful potential savings through comparison shopping, price transparency is needed.

  3. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  4. Understanding patient values and the manifestations in clinical research with traditional chinese medicine-with practical suggestions for trial design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To define patient values, identify their manifestations in a randomized clinical trial, and investigate the possible implications for clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine. Methods. We categorized patient values manifestations into patient choice, preference, compliance, and patient-reported outcomes and summarized the underlying personal values through purposeful electronic searches for relevant reports. By hypothesizing a set of positive versus negative circumstances occurring in the enrollment, intervention allocation, treatment, and the follow-up stage of a trial, it is possible to discuss the potential implications of patient values manifestation on a trial with traditional Chinese medicine. Results. Patient values and its manifestations are ubiquitous in the process of clinical research with traditional Chinese medicine. These values may provide motivation for participation or engender the internal and external validity of the study. Conclusions. Trialists should attach sufficient importance to the needs and concerns of individual participant. To incorporate patient values into the design and conduct of a clinical study with traditional Chinese medicine, researchers are recommended to adopt participant-friendly design and use patient-reported outcomes, take convenience-for-patients measures, and help foster rational beliefs and behaviors of trial participants.

  5. Characteristic X-ray imaging for palliative therapy using strontium-89 chloride: understanding the mechanism of nuclear medicine imaging of strontium-89 chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owaki, Yoshiki; Inoue, Kazumasa; Narita, Hiroto; Tsuda, Keisuke; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Strontium-89 (Sr-89) chloride is a targeted palliative therapy used for painful bone metastasis in which repeated doses can be administered, and its usefulness has been reported in the case of bone metastasis of various primary tumors. However, the effectiveness of the pain relief treatment is only described using a subjective index such as the visual analog scale, which lacks objectivity. Although various attempts at quantifying the effectiveness of Sr-89 chloride therapy have been reported using nuclear medicine imaging for energy peaks around 70-80 keV, the principle of Sr-89 chloride imaging has not been explained. In this study, the principle of nuclear medicine imaging for Sr-89 chloride was evaluated using a fundamental study. Additionally, the optimal collimator for acquiring Sr-89 chloride image data was evaluated. Based on the results, the principle of nuclear medicine imaging for Sr-89 chloride could be explained: the energy peaks were characteristic X-rays produced by interactions between gamma rays (514 keV) emitted from Sr-85, which is included during the manufacturing process of the Sr-89 chloride solution, and the lead collimator used in the imaging. The optimal collimator for generating characteristic X-rays efficiently was identified as a middle-to-high energy collimator.

  6. Understanding the medicines information-seeking behaviour and information needs of South African long-term patients with limited literacy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sonal; Dowse, Ros

    2015-10-01

    Although much health information-seeking behaviour (HISB) research has been reported in patients with good literacy skills, little is known about HISB in patients with limited literacy skills served by under-resourced health-care systems. To investigate medicine information-seeking behaviour and information needs in patients with limited literacy. Using a question guide, four focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted to explore themes related to information needs, information-seeking practices and awareness of and ability to utilize information sources. Twenty-two isiXhosa-speaking long-term patients with limited formal education were recruited from a primary health-care clinic in South Africa. Discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. NVivo(®) was used for initial coding of transcripts. Codes were analysed, and potential themes and subthemes in the entire data set were identified and refined. The results of this study reflect a passive, disempowered patient. Poor awareness of information sources, lack of health-related knowledge and stigma contributed to a lack of information-seeking practice, thus potentially adversely influencing patient-provider interactions. Patients neither asked questions nor were encouraged to ask questions. All expressed an unmet need for information and a desire for receiving the illustrated written medicines-related information displayed in the FGDs. The main sources of information were health-care professionals, followed by family and friends. The significant level of patient disempowerment and passivity reported amongst patients underpinned their inability to actively seek information. Neither sources of information nor types of appropriate medicines information could be identified. Unmet information needs and a desire for information were reported. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Ayurgenomics: Understanding human individuality through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mitali

    Ayurgenomics: Understanding human individuality through integration of. Ayurveda and Genomics for stratified medicine. Mitali Mukerji. Programme Director- CSIR-TRISUTRA. (Translational Research and Innovative Science Through Ayurgenomics). & Scientist CSIR-IGIB. Public health Modern medicine. Ayurveda others ...

  8. Marketing Strategies Used to Promote Children's Medicine Sold on Internet Sites of Pharmaceutical Stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Roberts, Katherine J; Zagnit, Emily A; Martinez, Amairany

    2016-12-01

    Retail sales of over the counter (OTC) medications have risen steadily over the years; however, these products are not without potential risk. The aim of this study was to describe the marketing strategies used to promote OTC medicines to children and their parents. Data were collected from 187 product packaging of fever reducer, allergy, and cough medicines posted on the Internet sites of three of the largest pharmacies in the United States. Specific marketing information was collected related to flavorings and pictures appearing on the packaging. There was no significant difference between the type of medicine and whether they were flavored or not, as almost every product (95.7 %) indicated that it resembles a food flavoring. On almost all the packaging (92.5 %) the flavor was also indicated by words in different font sizes. Most of the products (83.4 %) showed a picture of a food product on their packaging. There was a significant difference between the medicine types by picture, with fever medicines having more pictures of food than either cough or allergy medicine. Stronger regulations of marketing strategies of these products are needed.

  9. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  10. The influence of customer-medicine seller transactional dynamics on childhood diarrhoea management: a qualitative study in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosapep, Lauren; Sanders, Emily; Banke, Kathryn

    2017-05-01

    In 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) jointly revised the recommended treatment for acute paediatric diarrhoea to specify supplementing reduced osmolarity oral rehydration salts (ORS) with zinc. In many countries, however, a significant knowledge-practice gap persists in appropriate diarrhoea management among private healthcare providers. For example, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) project recently demonstrated that over-the-counter medicine sellers (MS) in Ghana recommended inappropriate diarrhoea treatments, despite their demonstrated knowledge of appropriate treatment protocols. To explore and explain these results, we conducted 26 focus groups with MS and their customers using an indirect elicitation approach, presenting simulated drug shop transaction scenarios for each group to analyze and discuss. Through inductive and deductive data analysis, we found that the pattern of customer-MS interactions within the transactional context plays a critical role in shaping dispensing outcomes, not only in diarrhoea management but in other contexts as well. MS who engaged and negotiated with their customers were better able to introduce and promote the appropriate diarrhoea treatment protocol. Several factors hinder optimal interactions. Although MS in fact serve as frontline medical providers, they lack the perceived status of a clinician. Moreover, the need to maintain their customer base creates a power imbalance that favours accommodating customer requests and discourages educational interaction. Finally, many MS lack a complete understanding of the recommended treatment, limiting their ability to educate and negotiate. These findings have important implications for efforts to position community-level private providers to improve outcomes across a number of health areas; the study recommends three broad approaches

  11. Imaging and development of medicines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.

    2000-01-01

    The last developments in medical imaging allow visualization of medicines in organism. Today, these techniques: positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) play an essential role in the production and the development of new medicines. The medicinal substances labelled with radioisotopes permit to improve the understanding of medicines' action mode. The spectacular advances were observed in the field of medicines acting on the brain (F.M.)

  12. Essential travel medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This 1st edition of Essential Travel Medicine provides an excellent concise introduction to the specialty of Travel Medicine. This core text will enable health care practitioners particularly those new to the clinical practice of Travel Medicine, to gain a fundamental understanding of the diverse and complex issues which can potentially affect the health of the many millions of people who undertake international travel. Jane N Zuckerman is joined by Gary W Brunette from CDC and Peter A Leggat from Australia as Editors. Leading international specialists in their fields have contributed authoritative chapters reflecting current knowledge to facilitate best clinical practice in the different aspects of travel medicine. The aim of Essential Travel Medicine is to provide a comprehensive guide to Travel Medicine as well as a fundamental knowledge base to support international undergraduate and postgraduate specialty training programmes in the discipline of Travel Medicine. The 1st edition of Essential Travel ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  14. The medicine from behind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, Van Tinde; Onselen, Van Sabine; Myren, Britt; Towns, Alexandra; Quiroz, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Purgative enemas form an integral part of African traditional medicine. Besides possible benefits, serious health risks of rectal herbal therapy have been described in literature. To design appropriate health education programs, it is essential to understand

  15. Antioxidant Potential of Different Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanthi P; Parameswari CS

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are the resource of new drug. Most of the modern medicines are produced indirectly from medicinal plants. Plants are directly used as medicines by a majority of cultures around the world. Studying medicinal plants helps to understand plant toxicity and protect human and animals from natural poisons. Medicinal plants are the important sources for pharmaceutical manufacturing. In developing countries, herbal medicines are considered to be readily available, accessible, affordab...

  16. Supporting shared decision-making and people’s understanding of medicines: An exploration of the acceptability and comprehensibility of patient information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Smith K

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient information may assist in promoting shared decision-making, however it is imperative that the information presented is comprehensible and acceptable to the target audience. Objective: This study sought to explore the acceptability and comprehensibility of the ‘Medicines in Scotland: What’s the right treatment for you?’ factsheet to the general public. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with members of the public. An interview schedule was developed to explore the acceptability and comprehensibility of the factsheet. Participants were recruited by a researcher who distributed information packs to attendees (n=70 of four community pharmacies. Interviews, (12-24 minutes duration, were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a framework approach. Results: Nineteen participants returned a consent form (27.1%, twelve were interviewed. Six themes were identified: formatting of the factsheet and interpretation; prior health knowledge and the factsheet; information contained in the factsheet; impact of the factsheet on behaviour; uses for the factsheet; and revisions to the factsheet. Conclusions: The factsheet was generally perceived as helpful and comprehensive. It was highlighted that reading the leaflet may generate new knowledge and may have a positive impact on behaviour.

  17. Understanding cancer survivors' information needs and information-seeking behaviors for complementary and alternative medicine from short- to long-term survival: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarton, Lou Ann; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Gibson, Bryan; Logan, Robert; Workman, T Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The research examined complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) information-seeking behaviors and preferences from short- to long-term cancer survival, including goals, motivations, and information sources. A mixed-methods approach was used with cancer survivors from the "Assessment of Patients' Experience with Cancer Care" 2004 cohort. Data collection included a mail survey and phone interviews using the critical incident technique (CIT). Seventy survivors from the 2004 study responded to the survey, and eight participated in the CIT interviews. Quantitative results showed that CAM usage did not change significantly between 2004 and 2015. The following themes emerged from the CIT: families' and friends' provision of the initial introduction to a CAM, use of CAM to manage the emotional and psychological impact of cancer, utilization of trained CAM practitioners, and online resources as a prominent source for CAM information. The majority of participants expressed an interest in an online information-sharing portal for CAM. Patients continue to use CAM well into long-term cancer survivorship. Finding trustworthy sources for information on CAM presents many challenges such as reliability of source, conflicting information on efficacy, and unknown interactions with conventional medications. Study participants expressed interest in an online portal to meet these needs through patient testimonials and linkage of claims to the scientific literature. Such a portal could also aid medical librarians and clinicians in locating and evaluating CAM information on behalf of patients.

  18. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  19. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  20. The role of the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Medicine and Medical Devices Safety Authority in evaluating complementary and alternative medicines in Australia and New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dilip; Skinner, Margot; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, the regulation of complementary and alternative medicines and related health claims in Australia and New Zealand is managed in a number of ways. Complementary medicines, including herbal, minerals, nutritional/dietary supplements, aromatherapy oils and homeopathic medicines are regulated under therapeutic goods/products legislation. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), a division of the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing is responsible for administering the provisions of the legislation in Australia. The New Zealand Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Authority (Medsafe) administers the provision of legislation in New Zealand. In December 2003 the Australian and New Zealand governments signed a Treaty to establish a single, bi-national agency to regulate therapeutic products, including medical devices prescription, over-the-counter and complementary medicines. A single agency will replace the Australian TGA and the New Zealand Medsafe. The role of the new agency will be to safeguard public health through regulation of the quality, safety and efficacy or performance of therapeutic products in both Australia and New Zealand. The major activities of the new joint Australia New Zealand therapeutic products agency are in product licensing, specifying labelling standards and setting the advertising scheme, together with determining the risk classes of medicines and creating an expanded list of ingredients permitted in Class I medicines. A new, expanded definition of complementary medicines is proposed and this definition is currently under consultation. Related Australian and New Zealand legislation is being developed to implement the joint scheme. Once this legislation is passed, the Treaty will come into force and the new joint regulatory scheme will begin. The agency is expected to commence operation no later than 1 July 2006 and will result in a single agency to regulate complementary and alternative medicines

  1. Traditional medicine and genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ′Omics′ developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  2. Traditional medicine and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kalpana; Ghodke, Yogita; Shintre, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    'Omics' developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  3. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  4. Medicines discarded in household garbage: analysis of a pharmaceutical waste sample in Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Sabine; Leopold, Christine; Zuidberg, Christel; Habl, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    To analyze a sample of pharmaceutical waste drawn from household garbage in Vienna, with the aim to learn whether and which medicines end up unused in normal household waste. We obtained a pharmaceutical waste sample from the Vienna Municipal Waste Department. This was drawn by their staff in a representative search in October and November 2009. We did a manual investigation of the sample which contained packs and loose blisters, excluded medical devices and traced loose blisters back to medicines packs. We reported information on the prescription status, origin, therapeutic group, dose form, contents and expiry date. We performed descriptive statistics for the total data set and for sub-groups (e.g. items still containing some of original content). In total, 152 packs were identified, of which the majority was prescription-only medicines (74%). Cardiovascular medicines accounted for the highest share (24%). 87% of the packs were in oral form. 95% of the packs had not expired. 14.5% of the total data set contained contents but the range of content left in the packs varied. Results on the packs with contents differed from the total: the shares of Over-the Counter medicines (36%), of medicines of the respiratory system (18%) and of the musculo-skeletal system (18%), for dermal use (23%) and of expired medicines (19%) were higher compared to the full data set. The study showed that some medicines end up unused or partially used in normal household garbage in Vienna. Our results did not confirm speculations about a high percentage of unused medicines improperly discarded. There is room for improved patient information and counseling to enhance medication adherence and a proper discharge of medicines.

  5. Hands in medicine: understanding the impact of competency-based education on the formation of medical students’ identities in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gonsalves

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose There have been critiques that competency training, which defines the roles of a physician by simple, discrete tasks or measurable competencies, can cause students to compartmentalize and focus mainly on being assessed without understanding how the interconnected competencies help shape their role as future physicians. Losing the meaning and interaction of competencies can result in a focus on ‘doing the work of a physician’ rather than identity formation and ‘being a physician.’ This study aims to understand how competency-based education impacts the development of a medical student’s identity. Methods Three ceramic models representing three core competencies ‘medical knowledge,’ ‘patient care,’ and ‘professionalism’ were used as sensitizing objects, while medical students reflected on the impact of competency-based education on identity formation. Qualitative analysis was used to identify common themes. Results Students across all four years of medical school related to the ‘professionalism’ competency domain (50%. They reflected that ‘being an empathetic physician’ was the most important competency. Overall, students agreed that competency-based education played a significant role in the formation of their identity. Some students reflected on having difficulty in visualizing the interconnectedness between competencies, while others did not. Students reported that the assessment structure deemphasized ‘professionalism’ as a competency. Conclusion Students perceive ‘professionalism’ as a competency that impacts their identity formation in the social role of ‘being a doctor,’ albeit a competency they are less likely to be assessed on. High-stakes exams, including the United States Medical Licensing Exam clinical skills exam, promote this perception.

  6. [Technical medicine in ancient comedy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Alfageme, I

    1995-01-01

    The texts of Greek comedy offer a panoramic vision of the evolution of medicine between the fifth and the third centuries. They provide an excellent way to understand the prejudices and the bases of technical medicine and its relationship with popular medicine. Comedy also shows us a vivid portrait of the physician and his position in Greek society.

  7. Weather and headache onset: a large-scale study of headache medicine purchases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Kayoko; Noda, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Mieko; Ojima, Toshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    It is widely recognized that weather changes can trigger headache onset. Most people who develop headaches choose to self-medicate rather than visit a hospital or clinic. We investigated the association between weather and headache onset using large-sample sales of the headache medicine, loxoprofen. We collected daily sales figures of loxoprofen and over-the-counter drugs over a 1-year period from a drugstore chain in western Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. To adjust for changes in daily sales of loxoprofen due to social environmental factors, we calculated a proportion of loxoprofen daily sales to over-the-counter drug daily sales. At the same time, we obtained weather data for the study region from the website of the Japan Meteorological Agency. We performed linear regression analysis to ascertain the association between weather conditions and the loxoprofen daily sales proportion. We also conducted a separate questionnaire survey at the same drugstores to determine the reason why people purchased loxoprofen. Over the study period, we surveyed the sale of hundreds of thousands of loxoprofen tablets. Most people purchased loxoprofen because they had a headache. We found that the sales proportion of loxoprofen increased when average barometric pressure decreased, and that precipitation, average humidity, and minimum humidity increased on loxoprofen purchase days compared to the previous day of purchases. This study, performed using a large dataset that was easy-to-collect and representative of the general population, revealed that sales of loxoprofen, which can represent the onset and aggravation of headache, significantly increased with worsening weather conditions.

  8. Arts and Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azmeh, Zeina Hazem; Du, Xiangyun

    2018-01-01

    The paper describes the design, delivery and student engagement with a course on Medicine and the Arts offered at a College of Medicine in a Middle Eastern country. The paper shows how the course tries to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to develop an appreciation...... for the Arts, and an understanding of their connection to medicine. Literature shows that such an understanding contributes to sharpening students’ social skills, highlighting focus on the humane aspects of medical practice, and linking professional and ethical behavior with an understanding of human essence...... to disease, death and dying, pain, empathy, and influence the way in which they practice medicine, manage their own emotions, and communicate with patients. 2) Honed their critical thinking skills, creative aptitudes and emotional intelligence. 3) Helped them appreciate the move beyond the binaries that have...

  9. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  10. I shouldn't talk of medicine only: Biomedical and religious frameworks for understanding antiretroviral therapies, their invention and their effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Aggleton, Peter; Shih, Patti

    2017-09-16

    Medical pluralism offers a long-standing means of analysing the different ways in which health and illness can be interpreted and responded to. It is not unusual for multiple health systems and meanings to co-exist at any one moment in time, offering different ways of understanding and responding to illness and disease. In addition to biomedical frameworks, religious beliefs offer another important means of facilitating healing. Based on qualitative interviews with 36 people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapies (ART) in Papua New Guinea (PNG), this paper examines the ways in which people bring together and synthesise religious and biomedical therapeutic approaches to the treatment and management of HIV. For most, ART is viewed as a divine gift to complement a regime of spiritual salvation, and adherence to treatment carries with it strong religious undertones. At the same time, ART provides a sense of hope for those living with a virus that was previously associated only with death. Brought together, these narratives provide important insights into the meanings of ART and the role of religion, prayer and repentance for people in PNG. The study also provides new insight into how people with HIV actively synthesise different approaches to health and healing.

  11. Understanding the productive author who published papers in medicine using National Health Insurance Database: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Chang, Yu; Wang, Hsien-Yi

    2018-02-01

    Many researchers used National Health Insurance database to publish medical papers which are often retrospective, population-based, and cohort studies. However, the author's research domain and academic characteristics are still unclear.By searching the PubMed database (Pubmed.com), we used the keyword of [Taiwan] and [National Health Insurance Research Database], then downloaded 2913 articles published from 1995 to 2017. Social network analysis (SNA), Gini coefficient, and Google Maps were applied to gather these data for visualizing: the most productive author; the pattern of coauthor collaboration teams; and the author's research domain denoted by abstract keywords and Pubmed MESH (medical subject heading) terms.Utilizing the 2913 papers from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database, we chose the top 10 research teams shown on Google Maps and analyzed one author (Dr. Kao) who published 149 papers in the database in 2015. In the past 15 years, we found Dr. Kao had 2987 connections with other coauthors from 13 research teams. The cooccurrence abstract keywords with the highest frequency are cohort study and National Health Insurance Research Database. The most coexistent MESH terms are tomography, X-ray computed, and positron-emission tomography. The strength of the author research distinct domain is very low (Gini < 0.40).SNA incorporated with Google Maps and Gini coefficient provides insight into the relationships between entities. The results obtained in this study can be applied for a comprehensive understanding of other productive authors in the field of academics.

  12. The 'third class' of medications: Sales and purchasing behavior are associated with pharmacist only and pharmacy medicine classifications in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerton, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Nonprescription (over-the-counter) medications in Australia are classified as Pharmacist Only Medicines, Pharmacy Medicines, or unscheduled medications. This report characterizes these medication classifications using key sales and purchasing behavior variables. Descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study. 15 pharmacies in southeast Queensland, Australia, with data recorded over 36 hours per pharmacy in mid-August, 2006. Eligible purchasers (n = 3,470 medication purchases) of all nonprescription medications (including nutritional supplements). Researchers documented details of all observed nonprescription medication sales and interviewed all available patients following the transaction. Incidence of product-related consultation, products purchased (brand, dosage form, classification), and purchasing behavior data (including previous purchase, intended use, intended user, and intention to purchase a particular brand). More restrictive classification of the purchased medication was significantly (P purchasers, purchase of a single nonprescription medication, intent to self-use the medication, intent to purchase a particular brand, repeat purchase, brand-switching interventions by pharmacy staff, pharmacy staff influence on first-time purchases, and observed consultation by pharmacists. Legislative compliance issues were identified: Pharmacists consulted in only 54.7% of Pharmacist Only Medicine sales and 13 cases (1.7% of observed sales) occurred in which Pharmacist Only and Pharmacy Medicines had been sourced from publicly accessible areas of the store. Pharmacist Only Medicines received greater levels of professional involvement during their sale than Pharmacy Medicines and unscheduled medications, despite higher levels of product familiarity among patients. To optimize the benefits of this classification system, emphasis on professional guidelines is recommended.

  13. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  14. Young adults' medicine use for headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Andersen, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Over-the-counter analgesic (OTCA) use is increasingly common and may have potential harmful side effects. The primary reason for using analgesics is headache symptoms. Whether OTCA use for headache is sensitive to psychosocial and social circumstances is an understudied topic.......Over-the-counter analgesic (OTCA) use is increasingly common and may have potential harmful side effects. The primary reason for using analgesics is headache symptoms. Whether OTCA use for headache is sensitive to psychosocial and social circumstances is an understudied topic....

  15. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an 'editing approach' within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences. This study highlights several

  16. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. Methods The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an ‘editing approach’ within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Results Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences

  17. Personalized medicine: Striding from genes to medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita R Nair

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential of revolutionizing patient care. This treatment modality prescribes therapies specific to individual patients based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information. The mapping of the human genome has been an important milestone in understanding the interindividual differences in response to therapy. These differences are attributed to genotypic differences, with consequent phenotypic expression. It is important to note that targeted therapies should...

  18. Effect of a Multi-Nutrient Over-the-Counter Supplement on Changes in Metabolic Rate and Markers of Lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Lopez, Hector L; Sandrock, Jennifer E; Kedia, A William; Habowski, Scott; Kerksick, Chad

    2017-05-04

    Using a prospective, randomized, double-blind, crossover study design, fifteen healthy male (n = 8) and female (n = 7) participants (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 28.3 ± 6.1 yr, 176.3 ± 11.4 cm, 89.8 ± 21.7 kg, 28.5 ± 4.8 kg/m 2 ) completed this study. Two testing sessions occurred after an overnight fast and refraining from physical exercise. Prior to and 60, 120, and 180 minutes after single dose ingestion of placebo (PLA) or a Thermogenic Supplement (TS), visual analog scales (VAS), resting metabolic rate (VO 2 ), and venous blood were collected. Resting heart rate and blood pressures were collected before, and 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 minutes after PLA or TS ingestion. Significant group × time interactions were found for VO 2 with TS experiencing significant (p rate or blood pressure. Significant within-group reductions in systolic blood pressure were noted for PLA, while resting heart rates were significantly lower in TS 30 and 60 minutes after ingestion. An interaction for epinephrine (p = 0.02) was found, while no changes were reported for norepinephrine and dopamine. Dependent t-tests using area under the curve calculations revealed higher AUC values for epinephrine in TS compared to PLA (p = 0.001). In conclusion, ingestion of a single dose of TS increased oxygen consumption, epinephrine and energy levels, while substrate oxidation tended to change in comparison to a placebo. No adverse responses were reported.

  19. One fourth of acutely admitted patients use over-the-counter-drugs 24 hours prior to hospitalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Magnus; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    to hospitalisation and the effects of this intake. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Junior physicians on call interviewed patients admitted to the medical admission unit at South-West Jutland Hospital in Esbjerg using a modified chart template. Adult patients aged 15 and older admitted during a two-week period in August 2012...... were included. Patients were asked about consumed OTC drugs, dosage, indication and effect. RESULTS: From a total of 349 admissions, 188 usable chart templates were registered (54%), and information on OTC usage was registered on 165 of these (88%). The patients where elderly (median: 70 years) and 43......, 60% felt an effect of the intake and the majority felt an effect on pain symptoms. CONCLUSION: One in four patients used OTC drugs 24 hours prior to hospitalisation and primarily analgesics were used. Most patients used OTC drugs relevantly and half with a positive effect. The intake is poorly...

  20. 21 CFR 310.531 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... subnitrate, calomel, camphor, cholesterol, ergot fluid extract, hexachlorophene, ichthammol, isobutamben..., hexachlorophene, isobutamben, juniper tar (oil of cade), lanolin, magnesium sulfate, menthol, methyl salicylate...

  1. 78 FR 57397 - Over-the-Counter Ophthalmic Drug Products-Emergency Use Eyewash Products; Announcement of Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... EE products that require mixing a concentrate with potable water. As noted in the PR, FDA may... establish final marketing requirements for EE products as part of the OTC ophthalmic drug product monograph... (Refs. 1 and 2). 4. Is there evidence that solutions made from EE products mixed with potable water are...

  2. 76 FR 35669 - Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Request for Data and Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Human Use; Request for Data and Information Regarding Dosage Forms AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking; request for data and information. SUMMARY: We... its intended OTC use (21 CFR 330.14(f)). V. Submission of Data and Information Interested persons may...

  3. 21 CFR 310.527 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for external use as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... all other B-vitamins, dexpanthenol, estradiol and other topical hormones, jojoba oil, lanolin, nucleic... paraffinic hydrocarbons, tetracaine hydrochloride, urea, and wheat germ oil have been marketed as ingredients...

  4. 77 FR 35986 - Guidance for Industry on Toll-Free Number Labeling and Related Requirements for Over-the-Counter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, Rm. 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self... that the toll-free number and reporting information be: Included in all FDA-approved Medication Guides... entitled ``Medication Guides--Adding a Toll-Free Number for Reporting Adverse Events'' (June 2009) to...

  5. 75 FR 7606 - Safety and Efficacy Review for Additional Ingredients in Over-the-Counter Drug Products for Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... inclusion in an OTC drug monograph under the TEA process on the basis of foreign marketing experience... aquatic environment or active ingredients that naturally occur in the environment and do not alter... the environment. In order to determine whether any of the active ingredients found eligible for...

  6. 21 CFR 201.322 - Over-the-counter drug products containing internal analgesic/antipyretic active ingredients...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consumers with a history of heavy alcohol use to consult a physician. Accordingly, any OTC drug product... not limited to, acetaminophen, aspirin, carbaspirin calcium, choline salicylate, ibuprofen, ketoprofen... anti-inflammatory analgesic/antipyretic active ingredients—including but not limited to aspirin...

  7. Modeling the Social Dynamics of Moral Enhancement: Social Strategies Sold Over the Counter and the Stability of Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Anders; Fabiano, Joao

    2017-07-01

    How individuals tend to evaluate the combination of their own and other's payoffs-social value orientations-is likely to be a potential target of future moral enhancers. However, the stability of cooperation in human societies has been buttressed by evolved mildly prosocial orientations. If they could be changed, would this destabilize the cooperative structure of society? We simulate a model of moral enhancement in which agents play games with each other and can enhance their orientations based on maximizing personal satisfaction. We find that given the assumption that very low payoffs lead agents to be removed from the population, there is a broadly stable prosocial attractor state. However, the balance between prosociality and individual payoff-maximization is affected by different factors. Agents maximizing their own satisfaction can produce emergent shifts in society that reduce everybody's satisfaction. Moral enhancement considerations should take the issues of social emergence into account.

  8. 78 FR 19718 - Modifications To Labeling of Nicotine Replacement Therapy Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... Cigarette Smoking by High-Dose Transdermal Nicotine,'' Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics... smoking cessation. We encourage the submission of supplemental new drug applications (labeling supplements.... Smoking and Tobacco Dependence Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and disease in the...

  9. Consumption, overdose and death from analgesics during a period of over-the-counter availability of paracetamol in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, P; Dalhoff, K; Hansen, P B

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1978-1986, annual sales of paracetamol in Denmark increased from 1 million defined daily doses (DDD) (3 g) to 47 million DDD, while the number of admissions and deaths from overdose increased from 26 to 202 and from 1 to 3-4, respectively. The corresponding figures for salicylat...

  10. 76 FR 7743 - Professional Labeling for Laxative Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... sodium phosphates is given in a 24-hour period. Provides recommendations for the treatment of electrolyte... injury in two patients (75-year old male and an 80-year old female) who had a history of diabetes mellitus (Ref. 32). Baseline serum creatinine was within normal limits, but one patient had...

  11. 76 FR 35665 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Enforcement Policy for Over-the-Counter Sunscreen Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Register that would, if finalized, limit the maximum labeled sun protection factor (SPF) value for OTC... policy guidance, labeling bearing a previously derived SPF value will have to be discontinued and...

  12. 21 CFR 201.66 - Format and content requirements for over-the-counter (OTC) drug product labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the substances (e.g., alcohol) or activities (e.g., operating machinery, driving a car, warnings set...., through the use of brackets, dot leaders, or other graphical features). The information described in... safety. Requests for exemptions shall be submitted in three copies in the form of an “Application for...

  13. 21 CFR 201.308 - Ipecac syrup; warnings and directions for use for over-the-counter sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... result in approximately 1,500 deaths, of which over 400 are children. In the emergency treatment of these... in such situations is critical, since rapid treatment may be the difference between life and death... ounce (30 milliliters), and its label bears, in addition to other required label information, the...

  14. 21 CFR 310.545 - Drug products containing certain active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for certain uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Ethohexadiol Eucalyptol Juniper tar Lauryl isoquinolinium bromide Menthol Mercury oleate Methylbenzethonium... seed including, but not limited to, any granules that are: (1) Swallowed dry prior to drinking liquid... of swimmer's ear and for the drying of water-clogged ears, approved as of May 7, 1991. Acetic acid...

  15. Risk perception of the self-prescribed use of Over the Counter (OTC) cold/flu medications

    OpenAIRE

    Mariano A. Lechuga-Besné; Angélica Riveros-Rosas; Juan José Sánchez-Sosa

    2009-01-01

    Con objeto de examinar la percepción de riesgo del uso autoprescrito de antigripales que se venden sin prescripción médica, se recolectaron datos sobre variables cognitivas, actitudinales e intencionales en el contexto de la Teoría de la Acción Razonada (TAR). Esta propuesta de Fishbein y Azjen permite el análisis de las relaciones entre el comportamiento y varios antecedentes psicosociales. En el presente estudio ex post facto participaron un total de 900 mujeres de edades entre los 20 y los...

  16. 21 CFR 201.326 - Over-the-counter drug products containing internal analgesic/antipyretic active ingredients...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... higher if you [bullet] are age 60 or older [bullet] have had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems [bullet... stomach ulcers or bleeding problems [bullet] takes a blood thinning (anticoagulant) or steroid drug... bleeding. The chance is higher if the user [bullet] has had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems [bullet...

  17. Understanding ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Vaidya Dilip

    2010-01-01

    Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda's power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  18. Understanding Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya Dilip Gadgil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda needs to achieve its full potential both in India and globally. This requires imparting to its students full appreciation of Ayurveda′s power and strength, particularly proper understanding of the advantages of applying it to treat chronic and acute diseases. To this end, we explain the necessity of learning Sanskrit as a medium of study, and the advantages of learning the Texts in the traditional way, rather than relying on translations with all the loss of meaning and precision, which that entails. We emphasize the use of Triskandhakosha as a means to fully understand Ayurveda fundamental concepts and technical terms, so that all their shades of meaning are fully understood, and all their usages given in different places in the texts. Only by such methods can full appreciation of Ayurvedic wisdom be achieved, and the full depth and power of its knowledge be applied. Only then will its true status among systems of medicine come to be appreciated, either in India or more widely in the world as a whole.

  19. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  20. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  1. [Translational dental medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2011-06-01

    Over the last decade, as tremendous innovations have been achieved in scientific technology, translational medicine has come into the focus of academic medicine, and significant intellectual and financial efforts have been made to initiate a multitude of bench-to-bedside projects. The concept of translational medicine is described as the transfer of new understandings of disease mechanisms gained in the laboratory into the development of new methods for diagnosis, therapy, and prevention and their first testing in humans, meanwhile, translational medicine also is described as a patient-oriented population research and the translation of results from clinical studies into everyday clinical practice and health decision making. Translational medicine is a hot spot in recent academic field, and it is crucial for improving the living standard of population and renewing the research idea and technology. It has, however, significant obstacles during the approach of translational medicine. We here review the background, concept, current situation of translational dental medicine, key components and obstacles of translational medicine.

  2. Prevalence and Predictors of Herbal Medicine Use Among Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashrash, Mohamed; Schommer, Jon C; Brown, Lawrence M

    2017-09-01

    To describe the prevalence of herbal medicine use among US adults and to assess factors associated with and predictors of herbal use. The data for herbal products use were collected from the 2015 National Consumer Survey on the Medication Experience and Pharmacists' Roles. Chi-square test was used to analyz factors associated with herbal use, and predictors of herbal use were assessed with logistic regression analysis. Factors associated with herbal supplement use include age older than 70, having a higher than high school education, using prescription medications or over-the-counter (OTC) medications, and using a mail-order pharmacy." All Disease state associated significantly with herbal use. Approximately thirty-eight percent of those who used herbals used prescription medications and 42% of those who used herbals also used an OTC medication. The most frequent conditions associated with herbal supplement use were a stroke (48.7%), cancer (43.1%), and arthritis (43.0%). Among herbal product users, factors that predicted use included having higher than school education, using OTC medications, using mail-order pharmacy, stroke, obesity, arthritis, and breathing problems. More than one-third of respondents reported using herbal supplements. Older age and higher education were associated with a higher use of herbal supplements. People with chronic diseases are more likely to use herbal medicines than others. OTC drug users and patients with stroke are more likely to use herbal medicines than others.

  3. Herbal medicinal products versus botanical-food supplements in the European market: state of art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilia, Anna Rita

    2015-01-01

    Botanical products marketed in Europe are diverse, classified as herbal medicinal products, dietary supplements, cosmetics, foods and beverages depending on the relevant applicable legislation. Many factors are taken into account in the classification of a botanical product (e.g. intended use, labeling, preparations and dosages) according to how it is placed on the market. Herbal medicinal products (HMPs) can only be sold in pharmacies, under the supervision of a pharmacist, and are marketed after full or simplified registration procedures according to their classification, i.e. as over-the-counter drugs (OTC) available without special restrictions and prescription only medicine (POM), which must be prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner. The dietary supplement segment is also sold in the market in dose form (such as capsules, tablets, ampoules of liquids, drops etc) and represents 15-20% of the botanical market at the European level with high variability among each country (i.e. in Italy it reaches up to 80%). In many cases the distinction between medicinal products and food supplements has generated borderline botanical-sourced products, which generally produce confusion and mislead the consumers. As a consequence, there is an urgent need of consumer education and in addition to collect comprehensive data and make this database systematically available to herbalists, nutritionists and medical specialists for a proper classification and harmonization of the use of botanical ingredients, and, as consequence, a correct use of these products.

  4. Choosing wisely in headache medicine: the American Headache Society's list of five things physicians and patients should question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Elizabeth; Weizenbaum, Emma; Frishberg, Benjamin; Silberstein, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to draw attention to tests and procedures associated with low-value care in headache medicine, the American Headache Society (AHS) joined the Choosing Wisely initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation. The AHS president appointed an ad hoc "Choosing Wisely" task force of the AHS. The committee surveyed AHS members to develop a candidate list of items for the AHS "Top 5" list of low-value care in headache medicine. Through a process of literature review and consensus, the final list of five items was chosen. Draft recommendations went through several rounds of revision and a process of outside review. The AHS Board of Directors approved the final list of "Five Things." The five recommendations approved by the AHS Board of Directors are: (1) don't perform neuroimaging studies in patients with stable headaches that meet criteria for migraine; (2) don't perform computed tomography imaging for headache when magnetic resonance imaging is available, except in emergency settings; (3) don't recommend surgical deactivation of migraine trigger points outside of a clinical trial; (4) don't prescribe opioid- or butalbital-containing medications as a first-line treatment for recurrent headache disorders; and (5) don't recommend prolonged or frequent use of over-the-counter pain medications for headache. We recommend that headache medicine specialists and other physicians who evaluate and treat headache disorders should use this list when discussing care with patients. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  5. Does deregulation in community pharmacy impact accessibility of medicines, quality of pharmacy services and costs? Evidence from nine European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Sabine; Habimana, Katharina; Arts, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    To analyse the impact of deregulation in community pharmacy on accessibility of medicines, quality of pharmacy services and costs. We analysed and compared community pharmacy systems in five rather deregulated countries (England, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden) and four rather regulated countries (Austria, Denmark, Finland, Spain). Data were collected by literature review, a questionnaire survey and interviews. Following a deregulation, several new pharmacies and dispensaries of Over-the-Counter (OTC) medicines tended to be established, predominantly in urban areas. Unless prevented by regulation, specific stakeholders, e.g. wholesalers, were seen to gain market dominance which limited envisaged competition. There were indications for an increased workload for pharmacists in some deregulated countries. Economic pressure to increase the pharmacy turnover through the sale of OTC medicines and non-pharmaceuticals was observed in deregulated and regulated countries. Prices of OTC medicines were not found to decrease after a deregulation in pharmacy. Access to pharmacies usually increases after a deregulation but this is likely to favour urban populations with already good accessibility. Policy-makers are recommended to take action to ensure equitable accessibility and sustainable competition in a more deregulated environment. No association between pharmaceutical expenditure and the extent of regulation/deregulation appears to exist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Expedition medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  7. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content Side Effects of HIV Medicines Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact ... and Immunizations What is a Drug Interaction? Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects ...

  8. Anticipation and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    In this book, practicing physicians and experts in anticipation present arguments for a new understanding of medicine. Their contributions make it clear that medicine is the decisive test for anticipation. The reader is presented with a provocative hypothesis: If medicine will align itself with the anticipatory condition of life, it can prompt the most important revolution in our time. To this end, all stakeholders—medical practitioners, patients, scientists, and technology developers—will have to engage in the conversation. The book makes the case for the transition from expensive, and only marginally effective, reactive treatment through “spare parts” (joint replacements, organ transplants) and reliance on pharmaceuticals (antibiotics, opiates) to anticipation-informed healthcare. Readers will understand why the current premise of treating various behavioral conditions (attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, schizophrenia) through drugs has to be re-evaluated from the perspective of anticipation...

  9. Ayurvedic medicine in Mauritius: Profile of Ayurvedic outlet, use, sale, distribution, regulation and importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaheebocus, Naailah; Mahomoodally, M Fawzi

    2017-02-02

    and over-the-counter where consultation was not mandatory. The remaining three outlets, where no Ayurvedic practitioner was employed, did not offer consultation at any time and dispensed the medicines over-the-counter most of the time. There is currently no such legal framework that acknowledges the existence of an Ayurvedic pharmacy in Mauritius and no trained Ayurvedic pharmacist was recruited in any of the outlets. It was also found that no specific requirements were in place to establish an Ayurvedic outlet in Mauritius. A wide variety of Ayurvedic formulated and single herb products were recorded to be in use against common diseases. Ayurvedic products were imported from India (n=10), purchased from local suppliers (n=6) or locally manufactured (n=1). The Traditional Medicine Board under the aegis of the pharmacy board is a regulatory body which requires Ayurvedic practitioners to be registered so as to practice AM in Mauritius. Additionally, the government has an Ayurvedic committee, under the aegis of the Pharmacy board in the Ministry of Health and Quality of Life to monitor the importation of AM. However, no legal framework has been enacted to regulate the sale of AM under prescription or under the supervision of an Ayurvedic practitioner. The current regulatory framework is such that the sale/use/distribution of AM is not strictly controlled unlike its importation. This has led to a certain form of unregulated practice in the private sector whereby the dispensing and sale of AM are being done over-the-counter without professional recommendations. It is recommended that authorities need to regulate the Ayurvedic medical system in Mauritius by amending stringent laws to ensure safety of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Vulnerable Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  11. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  12. Behavioural aspects surrounding medicine purchases from pharmacies in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmerton L

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to produce current data regarding behavioural aspects of non-prescription (over-the-counter medicine purchases, in light of changes in the pharmaceutical market and increasing provision of professional services in pharmacies.Methods: Data were collected in 15 community pharmacies in South-East Queensland, Australia, over 540 hours in five days in August, 2006. The method, previously validated, involved documentation of both observational and interview data. Fifteen trained researchers were stationed in a selected pharmacy each to unobtrusively observe all eligible sales of non-prescription medicines, and, where possible, interview the purchasers post-sale. Non-response was supplemented by observational data and recall by the salesperson. The data included details of the purchase and purchasing behaviour, while new questions addressed issues of topical importance, including customers’ privacy concerns. A selection of the analyses is reported here.Results: In total, 3470 purchases were documented (135-479 per pharmacy, with customers of 67.5% of purchases (74.7% excluding an outlier pharmacy participating in the survey. Customers averaged 1.2 non-prescription medicines per transaction. Two-thirds (67.2% of customers were female, and 38.8% of the customers were aged 31-45 years. Analgesics and respiratory medicines accounted for two-thirds of the sales data (33.4% and 32.4%, respectively. Intended-brand purchases comprised 71% of purchases (2004/2824; in-store substitution then occurred in 8.8% of these cases, mainly following recommendations by pharmacy staff. Medicines intended for self-use comprised 62.9% of purchases (1752/2785. First-time purchases (30.8%, 799/2594 were more commonly influenced by pharmacy staff than by advertising.Conclusions: This study used validated methods adapted to a changing marketplace, thus providing data that both confirm and add to knowledge surrounding medicine purchases. Despite the

  13. Use Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  14. The Society for Translational Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shugeng; Zhang, Zhongheng; Aragón, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy. Recommendati......The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy...

  15. Informa(ction: How to do things with medicine information leaflets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vita Bianco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – This paper analyses how Patient Information Leaflets (PILs of over-the-counter medical products convey information. More precisely, the article focuses on “instructions” on how to use medicines and related “instructional information” (Trimble 1985. The latter is used in PILs to explain why consumers should follow the instructions. The aim is to show, then, how and whether the PILs sampled help consumers to translate effectively the information contained into actions. The first part of the article examines the deontic devices employed in 8 English and Italian PILs of the most common over-the-counter medicines for human consumption used to relieve the same symptoms. The second part, instead, analyses whether and how the eight leaflets sampled followed the ‘instructions’ contained in one of the authoritative works by Sless and Shrensky in this field (2006. Both Australian authors, indeed, provide useful advice on how to write directives and related explanations in PILs.Riassunto – Questo lavoro si propone di analizzare come i foglietti illustrativi dei medicinali da banco veicolano le informazioni. Nel caso specifico, l’attenzione è rivolta alle “istruzioni” per l’uso (dei medicinali e alle “informazioni sulle istruzioni” (Trimble 1985. Quest’ultime vengono utilizzate nei foglietti illustrativi per spiegare ai consumatori perché seguire specifiche istruzioni. L’intento è quello di mostrare, quindi, come e se i foglietti illustrativi dei medicinali presi a campione aiutino i consumatori a tradurre in modo efficace le informazioni in azioni. La prima parte dell’articolo è incentrata sulle strategie deontiche utilizzate in 8 foglietti illustrativi di medicinali da banco inglesi e italiani per uso umano, usati comunemente per curare la stessa tipologia di sintomi. La seconda parte, invece, analizza se e come gli otto foglietti illustrativi presi a campione hanno seguito, a loro volta, le

  16. Worldwide withdrawal of medicinal products because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Heneghan, Carl J; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    We have systematically identified medicinal products withdrawn worldwide because of adverse drug reactions, assessed the level of evidence used for making the withdrawal decisions, and explored the patterns of withdrawals over time. We searched PubMed, the WHO database of withdrawn products, and selected texts. We included products that were withdrawn after launch from 1950 onwards, excluding non-human and over-the-counter medicines. We assessed the levels of evidence on which withdrawals were based using the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. Of 353 medicinal products withdrawn from any country, only 40 were withdrawn worldwide. Anecdotal reports were cited as evidence for withdrawal in 30 (75%) and deaths occurred in 27 (68%). Hepatic, cardiac, and nervous system toxicity accounted for over 60% of withdrawals. In 28 cases, the first withdrawal was initiated by the manufacturer. The median interval between the first report of an adverse drug reaction that led to withdrawal and the first withdrawal was 1 year (range 0-43 years). Worldwide withdrawals occurred within 1 year after the first withdrawal in any country. In conclusion, the time it takes for drugs to be withdrawn worldwide after reports of adverse drug reactions has shortened over time. However, there are inconsistencies in current withdrawal procedures when adverse drug reactions are suspected. A uniform method for establishing worldwide withdrawal of approved medicinal products when adverse drug reactions are suspected should be developed, to facilitate global withdrawals. Rapid synthesis of the evidence on harms should be a priority when serious adverse reactions are suspected.

  17. Inorganic chemistry and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, P.J.; Guo, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Inorganic chemistry is beginning to have a major impact on medicine. Not only does it offer the prospect of the discovery of truly novel drugs and diagnostic agents, but it promises to make a major contribution to our understanding of the mechanism of action of organic drugs too. Most of this article is concerned with recent developments in medicinal coordination chemistry. The role of metal organic compounds of platinum, titanium, ruthenium, gallium, bismuth, gold, gadolinium, technetium, silver, cobalt in the treatment or diagnosis of common diseases are briefly are examined

  18. Two cases of gastric Anisakiasis for which oral administration of a medicine containing wood creosote (Seirogan) was effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Nagano, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Taro; Katsu, Kenichi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Anisakiasis is a disease characterized by an abrupt onset of sharp epigastric pain, which occurs typically a few hours after eating raw or undercooked seafood. Anisakiasis was a Japanese localized disease in the past, however has become an illness of concern in many countries where eating Japanese style raw or undercooked seafood has become popular. At present, the only effective treatment is an endoscopic removal of the nematode. Development of an effective medicine is expected. We report two cases of Anisakiasis, the symptoms of which were ameliorated after the administration of an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine containing wood creosote (Seirogan). Also, we examined the in vitro effect of the Seirogan on the viability of the nematode. In the two cases, the strong epigastric pain was subdued promptly after oral intake of the Seirogan. The exposure of Seirogan suppressed the viability of Anisakis Larva in vitro dose dependently. The oral administration of medicine containing wood creosote might be effective as a first aid to ameliorate the symptoms of Anisakiasis.

  19. Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valid therapies, delaying proven treatment for serious conditions. Holistic Treatments Holistic medicine is a system of health care ... techniques including meditation, biofeedback and relaxation training. While holistic treatments can be part of a good physical regimen, ...

  20. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  1. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, Paul; Blanc, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of radioisotopes in medical diagnostics are briefly reviewed. Each organ system is considered and the Nuclear medicine procedures pertinent to that system are discussed. This includes, the principle of the test, the detector and the radiopharmaceutical used, the procedure followed and the clinical results obtained. The various types of radiation detectors presently employed in Nuclear Medicine are surveyed, including scanners, gamma cameras, positron cameras and procedures for obtaining tomographic presentation of radionuclide distributions [fr

  2. Patients' intention to consume prescribed and non-prescribed medicines: A study based on the theory of planned behaviour in selected European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamekis, A; Bertsias, A; Moschandreas, J; Petelos, E; Papadakaki, M; Tsiantou, V; Saridaki, A; Symvoulakis, E K; Souliotis, K; Papadakis, N; Faresjö, T; Faresjö, A; Martinez, L; Agius, D; Uncu, Y; Sengezer, T; Samoutis, G; Vlcek, J; Abasaeed, A; Merkouris, B; Lionis, C

    2018-02-01

    Polypharmacy has a significant impact on patients' health with overall expenditure on over-the-counter (OTC) medicines representing a substantial burden in terms of cost of treatment. The aim of this study, which was conducted within the framework of a European Project funded by the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme and was entitled OTC-SOCIOMED, was to report on possible determinants of patient behaviour regarding the consumption of medicines, and particularly OTCs, in the context of primary care. A multicentre, cross-sectional study was designed and implemented in well-defined primary healthcare settings in Cyprus, the Czech Republic, France, Greece, Malta and Turkey. Patients completed a questionnaire constructed on the basis of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), which was administered via face-to-face interviews. The percentage of patients who had consumed prescribed medicines over a 6-month period was consistently high, ranging from 79% in the Czech Republic and 82% in Turkey to 97% in Malta and 100% in Cyprus. Reported non-prescribed medicine consumption ranged from 33% in Turkey to 92% in the Czech Republic and 97% in Cyprus. TPB behavioural antecedents explained 43% of the variability of patients' intention to consume medicines in Malta and 24% in Greece, but only 3% in Turkey. Subjective norm was a significant predictor of the intention to consume medicines in all three countries (Greece, Malta and Turkey), whereas attitude towards consumption was a significant predictor of the expectation to consume medicines, if needed. This study shows that parameters such as patients' beliefs and influence from family and friends could be determining factors in explaining the high rates of medicine consumption. Factors that affect patients' behavioural intention towards medicine consumption may assist in the formulation of evidence-based policy proposals and inform initiatives and interventions aimed at increasing the appropriate use of medicines

  3. Narrative medicine and healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradley E

    2011-03-01

    Narrative medicine is one of medicine's most important internal reforms, and it should be a critical dimension of healthcare debate. Healthcare reform must eventually ask not only how do we pay for healthcare and how do we distribute it, but more fundamentally, what kind of healthcare do we want? It must ask, in short, what are the goals of medicine? Yet, even though narrative medicine is crucial to answering these pivotal and inescapable questions, it is not easy to describe. Many of its core claims go against the grain of common sense thinking about medicine. This article argues that the best way to understand narrative medicine is to tell a story that puts its emergence in historical context.

  4. Medicinal chemistry for 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D; Hill, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances in our collective understanding of biomolecular structure and, in concert, of biochemical systems, coupled with developments in computational methods, have massively impacted the field of medicinal chemistry over the past two decades, with even greater changes appearing on the horizon. In this perspective, we endeavor to profile some of the most prominent determinants of change and speculate as to further evolution that may consequently occur during the next decade. The five main angles to be addressed are: protein–protein interactions; peptides and peptidomimetics; molecular diversity and pharmacological space; molecular pharmacodynamics (significance, potential and challenges); and early-stage clinical efficacy and safety. We then consider, in light of these, the future of medicinal chemistry and the educational preparation that will be required for future medicinal chemists. PMID:22004084

  5. New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the Mechanisms of Stress Erythropoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    antagonist that inhibits stomach acid production. It is commonly used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease ...mainly used as an over-the-counter drug to treat heartburn and peptic ulcers . 3. Sulfadimethoxine (Albon) is a low-dosage, rapidly absorbed, long...production and that is mainly used as an over-the-counter drug to treat heartburn and peptic ulcers . 2. Figure 16 Nizatidine, a histamine H2-receptor

  6. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  7. Views and experiences of healthcare professionals towards the use of African traditional, complementary and alternative medicines among patients with HIV infection: the case of eThekwini health district, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nlooto, Manimbulu

    2015-06-06

    Many patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection use traditional, complementary, and alternative medicines and other practices to combat the disease, with some also using prescribed antiretroviral therapy provided by the public health sector. This study aimed to establish the awareness of public sector biomedical health care providers on the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines by HIV-infected patients who also used highly active antiretroviral therapy, and to determine whether this was based on patients seen or cases being reported to them. Potential risks of interactions between the prescribed antiretroviral and non-prescribed medication therapies may pose safety and effectiveness issues in patients using both types of treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional study, using a researcher administered semi-structured questionnaire, was conducted from June to August 2013 at ten public sector antiretroviral clinics in five regional, three specialised and two district hospitals in eThekwini Health District, South Africa. Questionnaires were administered through face-to face interview to 120 eligible participants consisting of doctors, nurses, pharmacists and post-basic pharmacist assistants in HIV clinical practice. The results are presented as percent or proportion with standard error (SE), or as frequency. Ninety-four respondents completed the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 78.3 %. Almost half (48/94) were aware of patients using African traditional herbal medicines, over-the-counter supplements, unnamed complementary Ayurveda medicines and acupuncture. Twenty-three of the 94 respondents (24.4 %) said they had consulted patients who were using both antiretroviral therapy and certain types of non-prescribed medication in the previous three months. Awareness among healthcare providers on patient use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines was relatively high. Few respondents had seen patients who used mostly

  8. Constipation and Herbal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio eIizuka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is characterized by a variety of bowel symptoms such as difficulty passing stool, hard stool, and a feeling of incomplete evacuation. The multifactorial causes of constipation limit the clinical efficacy of current conventional treatments that use a single drug that acts through only one pathway. To complement the shortcomings of the current Western medical model and provide a complete holistic approach, herbal medicines capable of targeting multiple organs and cellular sites may be used. In Japan, many herbs and herbal combinations have traditionally been used as foods and medicines. Currently, Japanese physicians use standardized herbal combinations that provide consistent and essential quality and quantity.This review highlights representative Japanese herbal medicines (JHMs, Rhei rhizoma-based JHMs including Daiokanzoto and Mashiningan, and Kenchuto-based JHMs including Keishikashakuyakuto and Daikenchuto, which coordinate the motility of the alimentary tract. This review provides a framework to better understand the clinical and pharmacological efficacies of JHMs on constipation according to the unique theory of Japanese traditional medicine, known as Kampo medicine.

  9. Trends and challenges toward integration of traditional medicine in formal health-care system: Historical perspectives and appraisal of education curricula in Sub-Sahara Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocent, Ester

    2016-01-01

    The population residing Sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) continues to suffer from communicable health problems such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and various neglected tropical as well as non-communicable diseases. The disease burden is aggravated by shortage of medical personnel and medical supplies such as medical devices and minimal access to essential medicine. For long time, human beings through observation and practical experiences learned to use different plant species that led to the emergence of traditional medicine (TM) systems. The ancient Pharaonic Egyptian TM system is one of the oldest documented forms of TM practice in Africa and the pioneer of world’s medical science. However, the medical practices diffused very fast to other continents being accelerated by advancement of technologies while leaving Africa lagging behind in the integration of the practice in formal health-care system. Challenging issues that drag back integration is the development of education curricula for training TM experts as the way of disseminating the traditional medical knowledge and practices imbedded in African culture. The few African countries such as Ghana managed to integrate TM products in the National Essential Medicine List while South Africa, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania have TM products being sold over the counters due to the availability of education training programs facilitated by research. This paper analyses the contribution of TM practice and products in modern medicine and gives recommendations that Africa should take in the integration process to safeguard the SSA population from disease burdens. PMID:27366358

  10. Trends and challenges toward integration of traditional medicine in formal health-care system: Historical perspectives and appraisal of education curricula in Sub-Sahara Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocent, Ester

    2016-01-01

    The population residing Sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) continues to suffer from communicable health problems such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and various neglected tropical as well as non-communicable diseases. The disease burden is aggravated by shortage of medical personnel and medical supplies such as medical devices and minimal access to essential medicine. For long time, human beings through observation and practical experiences learned to use different plant species that led to the emergence of traditional medicine (TM) systems. The ancient Pharaonic Egyptian TM system is one of the oldest documented forms of TM practice in Africa and the pioneer of world's medical science. However, the medical practices diffused very fast to other continents being accelerated by advancement of technologies while leaving Africa lagging behind in the integration of the practice in formal health-care system. Challenging issues that drag back integration is the development of education curricula for training TM experts as the way of disseminating the traditional medical knowledge and practices imbedded in African culture. The few African countries such as Ghana managed to integrate TM products in the National Essential Medicine List while South Africa, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania have TM products being sold over the counters due to the availability of education training programs facilitated by research. This paper analyses the contribution of TM practice and products in modern medicine and gives recommendations that Africa should take in the integration process to safeguard the SSA population from disease burdens.

  11. Trends and challenges towards integration of traditional medicine in formal health care system: Historical perspectives and An Appraisal of education curricula in Sub-Sahara Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Innocent

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The population residing Sub Sahara Africa (SSA continues to suffer from communicable health problems such as HIV/AIDS, Malaria, Tuberculosis, various Neglected Tropical as well as Non-Communicable Diseases. The disease burden is aggravated by shortage of medical personnel and medical supplies such as medicine and medical devices. Also, the population in most countries in this region still and has minimal access to essential medicine. For long time, human beings through observation and practical experiences learned to use different plant species that led to the emergence of traditional medicine (TM systems. The ancient Pharaonic Egyptian traditional medicine system is one of the oldest documented form of traditional medicine practice in Africa and the pioneer of world’s medical science. However, the medical practices diffused very fast to other continents being accelerated by advancement of technologies while leaving Africa lagging behind in the integration of the practice in formal health care system. Challenging issues that drags back integration is the development of education curricula for training Traditional medicine experts as the way of disseminating the traditional medical knowledge and practices imbedded in African culture. The few African countries such as Ghana has managed to integrate TM products in the National Essential Medicine List while South Africa, Sierra Leone and Tanzania have traditional medicine products being sold over the counters due to availability of education training programs facilitated by research. This paper analyses the contribution of TM practice and products in modern medicine and gives recommendations that Africa should taken in the integration process in order to safeguard the Sub-Sahara Africa population from disease burdens [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(3.000: 312-316

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  16. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  18. Medicinal smokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Faridi, Pouya; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Ghasemi, Younes

    2006-11-24

    All through time, humans have used smoke of medicinal plants to cure illness. To the best of our knowledge, the ethnopharmacological aspects of natural products' smoke for therapy and health care have not been studied. Mono- and multi-ingredient herbal and non-herbal remedies administered as smoke from 50 countries across the 5 continents are reviewed. Most of the 265 plant species of mono-ingredient remedies studied belong to Asteraceae (10.6%), followed by Solanaceae (10.2%), Fabaceae (9.8%) and Apiaceae (5.3%). The most frequent medical indications for medicinal smoke are pulmonary (23.5%), neurological (21.8%) and dermatological (8.1%). Other uses of smoke are not exactly medical but beneficial to health, and include smoke as a preservative or a repellent and the social use of smoke. The three main methods for administering smoke are inhalation, which accounts for 71.5% of the indications; smoke directed at a specific organ or body part, which accounts for 24.5%; ambient smoke (passive smoking), which makes up the remaining 4.0%. Whereas inhalation is typically used in the treatment of pulmonary and neurological disorders and directed smoke in localized situations, such as dermatological and genito-urinary disorders, ambient smoke is not directed at the body at all but used as an air purifier. The advantages of smoke-based remedies are rapid delivery to the brain, more efficient absorption by the body and lower costs of production. This review highlights the fact that not enough is known about medicinal smoke and that a lot of natural products have potential for use as medicine in the smoke form. Furthermore, this review argues in favor of medicinal smoke extended use in modern medicine as a form of drug delivery and as a promising source of new active natural ingredients.

  19. Efficacy, safety, quality control, marketing and regulatory guidelines for herbal medicines (phytotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Calixto

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the current advances in knowledge about the safety, efficacy, quality control, marketing and regulatory aspects of botanical medicines. Phytotherapeutic agents are standardized herbal preparations consisting of complex mixtures of one or more plants which contain as active ingredients plant parts or plant material in the crude or processed state. A marked growth in the worldwide phytotherapeutic market has occurred over the last 15 years. For the European and USA markets alone, this will reach about $7 billion and $5 billion per annum, respectively, in 1999, and has thus attracted the interest of most large pharmaceutical companies. Insufficient data exist for most plants to guarantee their quality, efficacy and safety. The idea that herbal drugs are safe and free from side effects is false. Plants contain hundreds of constituents and some of them are very toxic, such as the most cytotoxic anti-cancer plant-derived drugs, digitalis and the pyrrolizidine alkaloids, etc. However, the adverse effects of phytotherapeutic agents are less frequent compared with synthetic drugs, but well-controlled clinical trials have now confirmed that such effects really exist. Several regulatory models for herbal medicines are currently available including prescription drugs, over-the-counter substances, traditional medicines and dietary supplements. Harmonization and improvement in the processes of regulation is needed, and the general tendency is to perpetuate the German Commission E experience, which combines scientific studies and traditional knowledge (monographs. Finally, the trend in the domestication, production and biotechnological studies and genetic improvement of medicinal plants, instead of the use of plants harvested in the wild, will offer great advantages, since it will be possible to obtain uniform and high quality raw materials which are fundamental to the efficacy and safety of herbal drugs.

  20. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  1. Nuclear Medicine week in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    During the week of 6-12 October 2003 the IAEA organized a Research Coordination Meeting on 'Relationship between lower Respiratory Tract Infection, Gastroesophageal reflux and bronchial Asthma in children' at Hospital San Ignacio in Bogota. Besides there were four workshops in Bogota; workshops on Bone infection and Bone scan in Pediatric ortopaedics at Hospital Militar and Fundacion CardioInfantil, a workshop for Nuclear Medicine Technologists and a workshop on Sentinel Lymph Node mapping and Surgical Gamma Probe Application at Institute of Oncology. A nuclear cardiology workshop was organized in Medellin, and finally crowning them all was the 9th Congress of the Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine at Cali from 10-12 October, 2003; probably the largest and best Colombian nuclear medicine congress every held in the country. A workshop was also organized in Cali for nuclear medicine technologists in conjunction with the Annual Convention. It was a mix of IAEA's Technical Cooperation and Regular Budget activities along with the activities of Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine, bringing in absolute synergy to galvanize the entire nuclear medicine community of the country. The week saw nuclear medicine scientists from more than 20 IAEA Member States converging on Colombia to spread the message of nuclear medicine, share knowledge and to foster International understanding and friendship among the nuclear medicine people of the world

  2. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies.

  3. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  4. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  5. Predictive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, Marianne; ten Have, Henk

    2015-01-01

    In the last part of the twentieth century, predictive medicine has gained currency as an important ideal in biomedical research and health care. Research in the genetic and molecular basis of disease suggested that the insights gained might be used to develop tests that predict the future health

  6. Bioenergetic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-01-01

    Here we discuss a specific therapeutic strategy we call ‘bioenergetic medicine’. Bioenergetic medicine refers to the manipulation of bioenergetic fluxes to positively affect health. Bioenergetic medicine approaches rely heavily on the law of mass action, and impact systems that monitor and respond to the manipulated flux. Since classically defined energy metabolism pathways intersect and intertwine, targeting one flux also tends to change other fluxes, which complicates treatment design. Such indirect effects, fortunately, are to some extent predictable, and from a therapeutic perspective may also be desirable. Bioenergetic medicine-based interventions already exist for some diseases, and because bioenergetic medicine interventions are presently feasible, new approaches to treat certain conditions, including some neurodegenerative conditions and cancers, are beginning to transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24004341

  7. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...

  8. Nuclear medicine in developing nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nofal, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Agency activities in nuclear medicine are directed towards effectively applying techniques to the diagnosis and management of patients attending nuclear medicine units in about 60 developing countries. A corollary purpose is to use these techniques in investigations related to control of parasitic diseases distinctive to some of these countries. Through such efforts, the aim is to improve health standards through better diagnosis, and to achieve a better understanding of disease processes as well as their prevention and management. Among general trends observed for the region: Clinical nuclear medicine; Radiopharmaceuticals; Monoclonal antibodies; Radioimmunoassay (RIA); Nuclear imaging

  9. Environmental medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steneberg, A.

    1996-01-01

    'Environmental medicine' deals with the manifold health problems from environmental factors of chemical, physical and psychosocial origin that are possible or have been observed. The book gives insight into the current state of knowledge of environmental medicine institutions, possibilities of diagnosis and therapeutic methods. It offers a systematic overview of pollutant sources and pollutant effects and points out, inter alia, syndromes that are discussed in connection with environmental factors: not only allergies and carcinogenous diseases but also symptom complexes that are hard to diagnose by ordinary methods such as the sick-building syndrome, multiple sensitivity to chemicals, electrosensitivity, amalgam intoxications, disorders due to wood preservatives and fungal diseases. The lingering course of a disease and a set of symptoms varying from one patient to another are the rule, not the exception, because environmental diseases are due above all to the chronic uptake of low pollutant doses (orig./MG) [de

  10. Strategic Medicines Planning in Primary Health Care | Adindu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategic medicines planning requires broad understanding of health and medicines realities within a context. Pharmacists viewing the community from a holistic perspective promote effectiveness in pharmacy, and facilitate synergy among the various groups to solve intractable medicines problems. Strategic medicines ...

  11. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  12. ENERGY MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, T. M.

    1987-01-01

    Energy medicine is the most comprehensive concept introduced in medical diagnostics and therapy to account for a whole range of phenomena and methods available to help an individual proceed from sickness to health. The modern medical theories do not account for, much less accept many traditional therapies due to deep suspicion that the older methods are not scientific. However, the Holistic Health groups around the world have now created an environment for therapies which work at subtle energ...

  13. Transfusion medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application

  14. In Silico Risk Assessment of HLA-A*02:06-Associated Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Caused by Cold Medicine Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto Isogai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are severe drug hypersensitivities with high mortality. Typical over-the-counter drugs of cold medicines are suggested to be causative. As multiple ingredients are generally contained in cold medicines, it is of particular interest to investigate which ingredients are responsible for SJS/TEN. However, experimental examination of causal relationships between SJS/TEN and a particular drug molecule is not straightforward. Significant association between HLA-A*02:06 and SJS/TEN with severe ocular surface complications has been observed in the Japanese. In the present study, we have undertaken in silico docking simulations between various ingredients contained in cold medicines available in Japan and the HLA-A*02:06 molecule. We use the composite risk index (CRI that is the absolute value of the binding affinity multiplied by the daily dose to assess the potential risk of the adverse reactions. The drugs which have been recognized as causative drugs of SJS/TEN in Japan have revealed relatively high CRI, and the association between SJS/TEN and HLA-A*02:06 has been qualitatively verified. The results have also shown that some drugs whose links to SJS/TEN have not been clinically recognized in Japan show the high CRI and suggested that attention should be paid to their adverse drug reactions.

  15. Understanding classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subianto, M.

    2009-01-01

    In practical data analysis, the understandability of models plays an important role in their acceptance. In the data mining literature, however, understandability plays is hardly ever mentioned. If it is mentioned, it is interpreted as meaning that the models have to be simple. In this thesis we

  16. Embodied understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Western culture has inherited a view of understanding as an intellectual cognitive operation of grasping of concepts and their relations. However, cognitive science research has shown that this received intellectualist conception is substantially out of touch with how humans actually make and experience meaning. The view emerging from the mind sciences recognizes that understanding is profoundly embodied, insofar as our conceptualization and reasoning recruit sensory, motor, and affective patterns and processes to structure our understanding of, and engagement with, our world. A psychologically realistic account of understanding must begin with the patterns of ongoing interaction between an organism and its physical and cultural environments and must include both our emotional responses to changes in our body and environment, and also the actions by which we continuously transform our experience. Consequently, embodied understanding is not merely a conceptual/propositional activity of thought, but rather constitutes our most basic way of being in, and engaging with, our surroundings in a deep visceral manner.

  17. Pregnancy and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the- ... care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be ...

  18. Buying & Using Medicine Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health professionals to make the best medicine choices, buy safely, and use medicine so it's as safe ... Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Buying Medicines Over the Internet BeSafeRx: Know Your Online Pharmacy Buying Medicine from ...

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth / For Teens / Complementary and Alternative Medicine What's ... a replacement. How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  20. Medicines out of use and waste of medicines in a northern city of Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Isabel C.; Nascimento, Luís; Guilherme, M.; Magalhães, A.; Santos, E.; Vasques, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, it’s important to understand waste of medicines, destination of medicines out of use and knowledge that people have about it, since the lack of information can lead to serious consequences for public health and environment. This study aims to determine the proportion of waste of medicines in population of a northern city of Portugal and related factors and verify the knowledge and behavior about the destination of medicines out of use, like the Valormed. This cross-sectional a...

  1. [Enlightenment of drug application and evaluation procedures of medicines registered (listed) in Australia on studies of new traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-Xun; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2014-11-01

    Modern and international studies on new traditional Chinese medicines are the main trend of the development of traditional Chinese medicines at present. In Australia, new traditional Chinese medicines refer to complementary medicines, which are mainly registered and launched as listed medicines. The application documents of registered (listed) medicines in Australia mainly cover detailed description of active pharmaceutical ingredients, pharmacological and toxicological studies, dosage form and adverse effects. Each part has detailed specifications and instructions, which helps ensure that applicants could accurately understand the requirements in application for registering (listing) medicines, and provides very important reference to the studies and development of new traditional Chinese medicines in China.

  2. Systems Medicine: Sketching the Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Marc

    2016-01-01

    To understand the meaning of the term Systems Medicine and to distinguish it from seemingly related other expressions currently in use, such as precision, personalized, -omics, or big data medicine, its underlying history and development into present time needs to be highlighted. Having this development in mind, it becomes evident that Systems Medicine is a genuine concept as well as a novel way of tackling the manifold complexity that occurs in nowadays clinical medicine-and not just a rebranding of what has previously been done in the past. So looking back it seems clear to many in the field that Systems Medicine has its origin in an integrative method to unravel biocomplexity, namely, Systems Biology. Here scientist by now gained useful experience that is on the verge toward implementation in clinical research and practice.Systems Medicine and Systems Biology have the same underlying theoretical principle in systems-based thinking-a methodology to understand complexity that can be traced back to ancient Greece. During the last decade, however, and due to a rapid methodological development in the life sciences and computing/IT technologies, Systems Biology has evolved from a scientific concept into an independent discipline most competent to tackle key questions of biocomplexity-with the potential to transform medicine and how it will be practiced in the future. To understand this process in more detail, the following section will thus give a short summary of the foundation of systems-based thinking and the different developmental stages including systems theory, the development of modern Systems Biology, and its transition into clinical practice. These are the components to pave the way toward Systems Medicine.

  3. Commercial herbal medicines used as African traditional medicines: Ngoma Herbal Tonic Immune Booster interferes with a rapid urine drug screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothibe, M E; Osuch, E; Kahler-Venter, C P

    2017-08-25

    The prevalent use of African traditional medicine by the general public has been reported. With commercialisation and marketing, some of the herbal medicines (HMs) used are readily available over the counter, most of them promoted as immune boosters. These commercial HMs have not been taken through clinical trials and other tests that would validate their composition and safety, and other properties such as their effect on laboratory diagnostic tests. To investigate the cross-reactivity of selected HMs with commonly tested drugs of abuse (DoA) using a qualitative rapid urinalysis assay. The six HMs selected were bought from local pharmacies. A rapid urinalysis screening test was performed with the Instant View Multi-Drug of Abuse Test kit from Labstix Diagnostics. Drug-free urine (DFU) was pooled from samples donated by healthy volunteers. Urine samples that had tested positive for DoA were obtained from a pharmacology laboratory. Aliquots of the urine samples were spiked with the HMs in neat and diluted form, and tested at various time intervals. The results for the DFU samples spiked with the HMs remained negative. There were no significant changes in pH or specific gravity of the samples. The results of samples that had tested positive for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were not altered by five of the HMs when spiked at 40% v/v. The HM Ngoma Herbal Tonic Immune Booster caused false-negative results for the THC test. An important finding is that the herbal mixture Ngoma Herbal Tonic Immune Booster caused false-negative results for the cannabinoid screening test. It adds to the list of substances that may be potential adulterants of urine for screening tests.

  4. Precision medicine, an approach for development of the future medicine technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Nabipour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Precision medicine is an approach in medicine that takes into account individual differences in people's genes, environments, and lifestyle. This field of medicine redefines our understanding of disease onset and progression, treatment response, and health outcomes through the more precise measurement of molecular, environmental, and behavioral factors that contribute to health and disease. Undoubtedly, the advances in omics technologies including genomics, data collection and storage, computational analysis, and mobile health applications over the last decade produced significant progress for precision medicine. In fact, precision medicine is a platform for the growth of personalized medicine, wearable biosensors, mobile health, computational sciences, genomic singularity, and other omics technologies. In the pathway of precision medicine, mathematics and computational sciences will be revolutionized to overcome the challenges in Big Data. By the birth of precision medicine, novel therapeutic strategies for chronic complex diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancers would be designed in Systems Medicine.

  5. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casier, Ph.; Lepage, B.

    1998-01-01

    Except for dedicated devices for mobile nuclear cardiology for instance, the market is set on variable angulation dual heads cameras. These cameras are suited for all general applications and their cost effectiveness is optimized. Now, all major companies have such a camera in their of products. But, the big question in nuclear medicine is about the future of coincidence imaging for the monitoring of treatments in oncology. Many companies are focused on WIP assessments to find out the right crustal thickness to perform both high energy FDG procedures and low energy Tc procedures, with the same SPECT camera. The classic thickness is 3/8''. Assessments are made with 1/2'', 5/8'' or 3/4'' crystals. If FDG procedures proved to be of great interest in oncology, it may lead to the design of a dedicated SPECT camera with a 1'' crustal. Due to the short half of FDG, it may be the dawning of slip ring technology. (e.g. Varicam from Elscint). The three small heads camera market seems to be depressed. Will the new three large heads camera unveiled by Picker, reverse that trend? The last important topic in nuclear medicine is the emergence of new flat digital detectors to get rid of the old bulky ones. Digirad is the first company to manufacture a commercial product based on that technology. Bichron, Siemens and General Electric are working on that development, too. But that technology is very expensive and the market for digital detection in nuclear medicine is not as large as the market in digital detection in radiology. (author)

  6. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...... of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists...

  7. Mountain medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen

    2016-01-01

    Travelling to high altitudes is an increasingly popular form of recreational holiday. Individual medical advice may be essential for certain groups of individuals such as patients with chronic disorders, pregnant women or children. This is the second part in a series of two articles on mountain...... medicine. The first part covered high-altitude physiology and medical aspects of objective alpine dangers and the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This part covers altitude sickness, fluid balance, nutrition, and precautions for patients with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnant women...

  8. Deadly medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the methods the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum used to make an exhibition on the complex history of Nazi eugenics accessible to the museum's mass public and at the same time, provocative for special audiences consisting of professionals and students from the biomedical fields. Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race showed how both eugenics and related "euthanasia" programs in Nazi Germany helped pave the road to the Holocaust. The exhibition implicitly evoked the present-day appeal of biological explanations for human behavior and of new visions of human perfection. Educational programs used the exhibition as a springboard for discussions of bioethics and medical ethics.

  9. Clinical holistic medicine: holistic adolescent medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Morad, Mohammed; Press, Joseph; Merrick, Joav; Shek, Daniel T L

    2004-08-04

    The holistic medical approach seems to be efficient and can also be used in adolescent medicine. Supporting the teenager to grow and develop is extremely important in order to prevent many of the problems they can carry into adulthood. The simple consciousness-based, holistic medicine--giving love, winning trust, giving holding, and getting permission to help the patient feel, understand, and let go of negative beliefs--is easy for the physician interested in this kind of practice and it requires little previous training for the physician to be able to care for his/her patient. A deeper insight into the principles of holistic treatment and a thorough understanding of our fellow human beings are making it work even better. Holistic medicine is not a miracle cure, but rather a means by which the empathic physician can support the patient in improving his/her future life in respect to quality of life, health, and functional capacity--through coaching the patient to work on him/herself in a hard and disciplined manner. When the patient is young, this work is so much easier. During our lifetime, we have several emotional traumas arranged in the subconscious mind with the smallest at the top, and it is normal for the person to work on a large number of traumatic events that have been processed to varying degrees. Some traumas have been acknowledged, some are still being explored by the person, and yet others are still preconscious, which can be seen for example in the form of muscle tension. Sometimes the young dysfunctional patient carries severe traumas of a violent or sexual nature, but the physician skilled in the holistic medical toolbox can help the patient on his/her way to an excellent quality of life, full self-expression, a love and sex life, and a realization of his/her talents--all that a young patient is typically dreaming about. Biomedicine is not necessary or even recommended when the physical or mental symptoms are caused by disturbances in the personal

  10. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Adolescent Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The holistic medical approach seems to be efficient and can also be used in adolescent medicine. Supporting the teenager to grow and develop is extremely important in order to prevent many of the problems they can carry into adulthood. The simple consciousness-based, holistic medicine — giving love, winning trust, giving holding, and getting permission to help the patient feel, understand, and let go of negative beliefs — is easy for the physician interested in this kind of practice and it requires little previous training for the physician to be able to care for his/her patient. A deeper insight into the principles of holistic treatment and a thorough understanding of our fellow human beings are making it work even better. Holistic medicine is not a miracle cure, but rather a means by which the empathic physician can support the patient in improving his/her future life in respect to quality of life, health, and functional capacity — through coaching the patient to work on him/herself in a hard and disciplined manner. When the patient is young, this work is so much easier. During our lifetime, we have several emotional traumas arranged in the subconscious mind with the smallest at the top, and it is normal for the person to work on a large number of traumatic events that have been processed to varying degrees. Some traumas have been acknowledged, some are still being explored by the person, and yet others are still preconscious, which can be seen for example in the form of muscle tension. Sometimes the young dysfunctional patient carries severe traumas of a violent or sexual nature, but the physician skilled in the holistic medical toolbox can help the patient on his/her way to an excellent quality of life, full self-expression, a love and sex life, and a realization of his/her talents — all that a young patient is typically dreaming about. Biomedicine is not necessary or even recommended when the physical or mental symptoms are caused

  11. Understanding semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    1997-01-01

    Understanding natural language is a cognitive, information-driven process. Discussing some of the consequences of this fact, the paper offers a novel look at the semantic effect of lexical nouns and the identification of reference types....

  12. Understanding Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  13. Understanding homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on understanding homelessness. It criticizes approaches that ignore, distort or diminish the humanity of homeless people, or else, add little to our understanding of that humanity. In particular, it rejects what it calls “epidemiological” approaches, which deny the possibility of agency for homeless people, insofar as those approaches view the situation of those people largely as a “social fact”, to be explained in terms of causal variables or “risk factors” ...

  14. Sasang Constitutional Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Comparative Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghee Yoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM is a holistic typological constitution medicine which balances psychological, social, and physical aspects of an individual to achieve wellness and increase longevity. SCM has the qualities of preventative medicine, as it emphasizes daily health management based on constitutionally differentiated regimens and self-cultivation of the mind and body. This review's goal is to establish a fundamental understanding of SCM and to provide a foundation for further study. It compares the similarities and differences of philosophical origins, perspectives on the mind (heart, typological systems, pathology, and therapeutics between SCM and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. TCM is based on the Taoist view of the universe and humanity. The health and longevity of an individual depends on a harmonious relationship with the universe. On the other hand, SCM is based on the Confucian view of the universe and humanity. SCM focuses on the influence of human affairs on the psyche, physiology, and pathology.

  15. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.E. Jr.; Squire, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    The book presents a number of fundamental imaging principles in nuclear medicine. The fact that low radiation doses are sufficient for the study of normal and changed physiological functions of the body is an important advancement brought about by nuclear medicine. The possibility of quantitative investigations of organs and organ regions and of an assessment of their function as compared to normal values is a fascinating new diagnostic dimension. The possibility of comparing the findings with other pathological findings and of course control in the same patient lead to a dynamic continuity with many research possibilities not even recognized until now. The limits of nuclear scanning methods are presented by the imprecise structural information of the images. When scintiscans are compared with X-ray images or contrast angiography, the great difference in the imaging of anatomical details is clearly seen. But although the present pictures are not optimal, they are a great improvement on the pictures that were considered clinically valuable a few years ago. (orig./AJ) [de

  16. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apps skip to content Side Effects of HIV Medicines Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV and ... Latent HIV Reservoir? HIV Testing FDA-Approved HIV Medicines What is an Investigational HIV Drug? What is ...

  17. Regulatory problems in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergrift, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Governmental involvement in the practice of medicine has increased sharply within the past few years. The impact on health care has, for the most part, been in terms of financial interactions between health care facilities and federally funded health services programs. One might say that this type of governmental involvement has indirect impact on the medical and/or technical decisions in the practice of nuclear medicine. In other areas, however, governmental policies and regulations have had a more direct and fundamental impact on nuclear medicine than on any other medical specialty. Without an understanding and acceptance of this situation, the practice of nuclear medicine can be very frustrating. This chapter is thus written in the hope that potential frustration can be reduced or eliminated

  18. Interpretive Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the

  19. Understanding Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Maple is a powerful symbolic computation system that is widely used in universities around the world. This short introduction gives readers an insight into the rules that control how the system works, and how to understand, fix, and avoid common problems. Topics covered include algebra, calculus, linear algebra, graphics, programming, and procedures. Each chapter contains numerous illustrative examples, using mathematics that does not extend beyond first-year undergraduate material. Maple worksheets containing these examples are available for download from the author's personal website. The book is suitable for new users, but where advanced topics are central to understanding Maple they are tackled head-on. Many concepts which are absent from introductory books and manuals are described in detail. With this book, students, teachers and researchers will gain a solid understanding of Maple and how to use it to solve complex mathematical problems in a simple and efficient way.

  20. Marketing medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellsop, G

    1988-02-10

    Medical etiquette has always discouraged advertising. Indeed, the profession as a whole has tended to view the idea of marketing medicine as at best, a trifle infra dig. Maintenance of this attitude has been helped by an ostrich like approach to the realities of private practice, and to the activities of drug companies, which have contributed significantly to our therapeutic abilities. The moves to corporatise and privatise institutions have raised the level of concern of our New Zealand medical profession. It is not self evident that the marketing concept as currently understood by the business community and by politicians is familiar to the medical profession. There must also be at least a level of suspicion that the business and financial world is insufficiently sensitive to the nuances and complexities of health service delivery. This paper will briefly explore those two viewpoints and consider the feasibility of any attempt to marry them.

  1. Narrativ medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte; Getz, Linn

    2015-01-01

    Dagens allmänmedicin påverkas av ett växande managementtänkandetillsammans med fragmenterande ekonomiska incitament.Vårdens kvaliteter evalueras med nya metoder som ”värdebaseradvård” där värde räknas i kronor och ören. Produktion går före etik,och det intersubjektiva mötet mellan patient och läk...... läkare håller påatt nedvärderas. Perspektiven från narrativ medicin kan bidra tillatt visa vad som står på spel. Vilken blir annars berättelsen omallmänmedicinen?...

  2. Understanding physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Understanding Physics - Second edition is a comprehensive, yet compact, introductory physics textbook aimed at physics undergraduates and also at engineers and other scientists taking a general physics course. Written with today's students in mind, this text covers the core material required by an introductory course in a clear and refreshing way. A second colour is used throughout to enhance learning and understanding. Each topic is introduced from first principles so that the text is suitable for students without a prior background in physics. At the same time the book is designed to enable

  3. Personalized Medicine and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, and more than 1.5 million new cases and more than 0.5 million deaths were reported during 2010 in the United States alone. Following completion of the sequencing of the human genome, substantial progress has been made in characterizing the human epigenome, proteome, and metabolome; a better understanding of pharmacogenomics has been developed, and the potential for customizing health care for the individual has grown tremendously. Recently, personalized medicine has mainly involved the systematic use of genetic or other information about an individual patient to select or optimize that patient’s preventative and therapeutic care. Molecular profiling in healthy and cancer patient samples may allow for a greater degree of personalized medicine than is currently available. Information about a patient’s proteinaceous, genetic, and metabolic profile could be used to tailor medical care to that individual’s needs. A key attribute of this medical model is the development of companion diagnostics, whereby molecular assays that measure levels of proteins, genes, or specific mutations are used to provide a specific therapy for an individual’s condition by stratifying disease status, selecting the proper medication, and tailoring dosages to that patient’s specific needs. Additionally, such methods can be used to assess a patient’s risk factors for a number of conditions and to tailor individual preventative treatments. Recent advances, challenges, and future perspectives of personalized medicine in cancer are discussed.

  4. Understanding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Shelby, Blake; Mattingly, Christine

    2016-01-01

    "Energy" is a term often used in everyday language. Even young children associate energy with the food they eat, feeling tired after playing soccer, or when asked to turn the lights off to save light energy. However, they may not have the scientific conceptual understanding of energy at this age. Teaching energy and matter could be…

  5. Milestones in Health and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Anne S.

    This book includes more than 500 entries describing advances in the treatment of disease and the understanding of human health. The emphasis is on significant advances in diseases, treatments, and health issues. Topics included are: alternative or nonwestern medicine; anesthesia and analgesia; antibiotics; cancer; cell biology and physiology;…

  6. Core principles of evolutionary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunspan, Daniel Z; Nesse, Randolph M; Barnes, M Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives Evolutionary medicine is a rapidly growing field that uses the principles of evolutionary biology to better understand, prevent and treat disease, and that uses studies of disease to advance basic knowledge in evolutionary biology. Over-arching principles of evolutionary medicine have been described in publications, but our study is the first to systematically elicit core principles from a diverse panel of experts in evolutionary medicine. These principles should be useful to advance recent recommendations made by The Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to make evolutionary thinking a core competency for pre-medical education. Methodology The Delphi method was used to elicit and validate a list of core principles for evolutionary medicine. The study included four surveys administered in sequence to 56 expert panelists. The initial open-ended survey created a list of possible core principles; the three subsequent surveys winnowed the list and assessed the accuracy and importance of each principle. Results Fourteen core principles elicited at least 80% of the panelists to agree or strongly agree that they were important core principles for evolutionary medicine. These principles over-lapped with concepts discussed in other articles discussing key concepts in evolutionary medicine. Conclusions and implications This set of core principles will be helpful for researchers and instructors in evolutionary medicine. We recommend that evolutionary medicine instructors use the list of core principles to construct learning goals. Evolutionary medicine is a young field, so this list of core principles will likely change as the field develops further. PMID:29493660

  7. Access to Medicines and Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oehlke, Krista; Perehudoff, Katrina; Geddes, Katrina; Ruiz Mancera, Silvia; Fuller, Arlan

    This chapter will introduce you to key issues and resources in access to medicines and human rights. In addition, this chapter will help you understand why, more now than ever, access to medicines must be understood and approached as a human rights issue. Some of these issues are also addressed in

  8. Central African Journal of Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Aims and scope. The Central African Journal of Medicine is a refereed journal which seeks to promote the practice and science of medicine in Zimbabwe, in other parts of Africa, and the rest of the world in general. Original articles are accepted for publication on the understanding that they are contributed ...

  9. Access to medicines: cost as an influence on the views and behaviour of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafheutle, Ellen I; Hassell, Karen; Noyce, Peter R; Weiss, Marjorie C

    2002-05-01

    The present paper explores how charges for medicines incurred by patients influence their decisions for managing acute or chronic conditions, and whether prescription cost and affordability issues are discussed in the general practitioner (GP)-patient encounter. People suffering from dyspepsia, hay fever or hypertension, or those taking hormone replacement therapy, were recruited through three community pharmacies in the North-west of England. Six focus groups were conducted with a total of 31 participants, the majority of whom were non-exempt from prescription charges. The management behaviour of those participants who had to pay for their prescriptions, particularly those from less-affluent or deprived backgrounds, was influenced by cost. However, cost was not the overriding influence, with other factors, such as symptom or disease severity, effectiveness, or necessity of treatment, playing a more important part in participants' management decisions. Cost as an issue was reflected in the various strategies used by participants to reduce medication cost, such as not having some prescribed items dispensed, taking a smaller dose or buying a cheaper over-the-counter product. Despite the use of numerous strategies, participants did not talk to their GPs about issues of cost and affordability. Participants felt that paying for prescriptions was their problem. There was a belief that discussing cost issues could jeopardise the doctor-patient relationship. Although not the dominant factor, medication cost nevertheless influenced participants when deciding how to manage their condition. Awareness of the existence of prepayment certificates, which can be bought by patients who require regular medication, was low, and this should be addressed through improved information/dissemination. Despite the high level of prescription items exempt, the current level of the prescription charge is still a barrier to obtaining prescription medicines under the National Health Service to

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  11. Customers' perceptions of and satisfaction with medicine retail outlet services in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregeorgise, Dawit T; Mohammed, Tofik A; Redi, Zebiba S; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2017-07-24

    The aim of this study was to assess customers' perceptions of and satisfaction with MRO services in Addis Ababa and to explore factors associated with their satisfaction and reasons for visits. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among customers selected from 28 MROs in Addis Ababa, using multi-stage sampling techniques. Simple descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression at 95% confidence interval were used for the analysis. Of 396 respondents, 324 (81.8%) visited MROs to purchase prescription medicines. A majority (338/396; 85.4%) of them perceived that pharmacists and druggists (pharmacy professionals) play a major role in healthcare delivery. A third (140/396; 35.4%) of the respondents agreed with the statement that pharmacy professionals are more concerned about patient care than about their business. Regarding reasons for visiting, being married was positively associated with buying over-the-counter, higher educational status was linked with more satisfaction. Overall, 56.8% (225/396) of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the service provided by MROs. Customers of MROs had mixed perceptions of and satisfaction with the current service. Marital status and age were associated with the reason for visiting, while the educational level was associated with the level of satisfaction. The overall positive perceptions and satisfaction about MROs should be taken as an opportunity to promote and improve pharmaceutical services rendered in MROs, to ensure that the public is receiving maximum benefit. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Physician perspectives on education, training, and implementation of complementary and alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel SJ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sejal J Patel,1 Kathi J Kemper,2 Joseph P Kitzmiller3 1College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, 2Center for Integrative Health and Wellness, The Ohio State Wexner University Medical Center, 3Department of Biological Chemistry and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Over recent decades, the demand for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has continued to rise in the US. Like the practice of traditional Western medicine, CAM is associated with not only significant health benefits but also significant risks. Unlike traditional Western medicine, however, much of CAM use is less regulated and often occurs unbeknownst to a patient’s medical doctor. The use of herbals, dietary supplements, and over-the-counter (OTC medications can result in adverse effects, and many significant interactions can occur when their use is combined with allopathic medications. Even the more peripheral CAM practices (eg, acupuncture, massage, yoga, and Reiki have associated risk (eg, adverse effects or worsening of physical injury and conditions. There is, however, impetus for change: both patients and physicians favor increasing physician knowledge of CAM and the synergistic implementation of CAM into routine clinical practice. Although improvement has been achieved from contemporary physician educational efforts, recently published results from patient and physician surveys strongly indicate that additional effort to increase physician knowledge of CAM is needed. Utilizing a 37-item survey and convenience-sampling methodology, we collected detailed information from 114 physicians, fellows, and residents from the Ohio State University Medical Center regarding impediments to increasing physician knowledge of CAM and its implementation in routine clinical practice. The aggregate results of our survey data showed that most physicians 1 desired to increase their knowledge of CAM, 2 believed that less

  13. Understanding translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  14. Understanding Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eWu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is the ability to adapt successfully in the face of stress and adversity. Stressful life events, trauma and chronic adversity can have a substantial impact on brain function and structure, and can result in the development of PTSD, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, most individuals do not develop such illnesses after experiencing stressful life events, and are thus thought to be resilient. Resilience as successful adaptation relies on effective responses to environmental challenges and ultimate resistance to the deleterious effects of stress, therefore a greater understanding of the factors that promote such effects is of great relevance. This review focuses on recent findings regarding genetic, epigenetic, developmental, psychosocial and neurochemical factors that are considered essential contributors to the development of resilience. Neural circuits and pathways involved in mediating resilience are also discussed. The growing understanding of resilience factors will hopefully lead to the development of new pharmacological and psychological interventions for enhancing resilience and mitigating the untoward consequences.

  15. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  16. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  17. Understanding unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Rocheteau

    2006-01-01

    Modern economists have built models of the labor market, which isolate the market’s key drivers and describe the way these interact to produce particular levels of unemployment. One of the most popular models used by macroeconomists today is the search-matching model of equilibrium unemployment. We explain this model, and show how it can be applied to understand the way various policies, such as unemployment benefits, taxes, or technological changes, can affect the unemployment rate.

  18. Personalized medicine: Striding from genes to medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sunita R

    2010-10-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential of revolutionizing patient care. This treatment modality prescribes therapies specific to individual patients based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information. The mapping of the human genome has been an important milestone in understanding the interindividual differences in response to therapy. These differences are attributed to genotypic differences, with consequent phenotypic expression. It is important to note that targeted therapies should ideally be accompanied by a diagnostic marker. However, most efforts are being directed toward developing both these separately; the former by pharmaceutical companies and the later by diagnostic companies. Further, this companion strategy will be successful only when the biomarkers assayed are differentiated on a value-based approach rather than a cost-based approach, especially in countries that reimburse disease management costs. The advantages of using personalized therapies are manifold: targeted patient population; avoidance of drug-related toxicities and optimization of costs in nonresponder patients; reduction in drug development costs, and fewer patients to be tested in clinical trials. The success of personalized therapy in future will depend on a better understanding of pharmacogenomics and the extension of these scientific advances to all countries.

  19. Understanding Technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Bendtsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We are facing radical changes in our ways of living in the nearest future. Not necessarily of our own choice, but because tchnological development is moving so fast, that it will have still greater impact on many aspects of our lives. We have seen the beginnings of that change within the latest 35 years or so, but according to newest research that change will speed up immensely in the nearest years to come. The impact of that change or these changes will affect our working life immensely as a consequence of automation. How these changes are brought about and which are their consequences in a broad sense is being attempted to be understood and guessed by researchers. No one knows for sure, but specific patterns are visible. This paper will not try to guess, what will come, but will rather try to understand the deepest ”nature” of technology in order to understand the driving factors in this development: the genesis of technology in a broad sense in order to contibute to the understanding of the basis for the expected development.

  20. Research medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    In Section I of this annual report, a brief summary of work is presented by the Research Medicine Group. The major emphasis has been the study of the blood system in man with a special emphasis on the examination of platelet abnormalities in human disease. New programs of major importance include the study of aging or dementia of the Alzheimer's type. A differential diagnosis technique has been perfected using positron emission tomography. Studies on the biochemical basis of schizophrenia have proceeded using radioisotope studies which image physiological and biochemical processes. In the investigation of atherosclerosis, techniques have been developed to measure blood perfusion of the heart muscle by labelling platelets and lipoproteins. Progress is reported in a new program which uses NMR for both imaging and spectroscopic studies in humans. The group has determined through an epidemiological study that bubble chamber and cyclotron workers who have been exposed to high electromagnetic fields for two decades have no significant increases in the prevalence of 21 diseases as compared with controls

  1. Diving medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Alfred A

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to the undersea environment has unique effects on normal physiology and can result in unique disorders that require an understanding of the effects of pressure and inert gas supersaturation on organ function and knowledge of the appropriate therapies, which can include recompression in a hyperbaric chamber. The effects of Boyle's law result in changes in volume of gas-containing spaces when exposed to the increased pressure underwater. These effects can cause middle ear and sinus injury and lung barotrauma due to lung overexpansion during ascent from depth. Disorders related to diving have unique presentations, and an understanding of the high-pressure environment is needed to properly diagnose and manage these disorders. Breathing compressed air underwater results in increased dissolved inert gas in tissues and organs. On ascent after a diving exposure, the dissolved gas can achieve a supersaturated state and can form gas bubbles in blood and tissues, with resulting tissue and organ damage. Decompression sickness can involve the musculoskeletal system, skin, inner ear, brain, and spinal cord, with characteristic signs and symptoms. Usual therapy is recompression in a hyperbaric chamber following well-established protocols. Many recreational diving candidates seek medical clearance for diving, and healthcare providers must be knowledgeable of the environmental exposure and its effects on physiologic function to properly assess individuals for fitness to dive. This review provides a basis for understanding the diving environment and its accompanying disorders and provides a basis for assessment of fitness for diving.

  2. Toward a New Natural Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckel, Peter

    Treatments summarized under the term "natural medicine," i.e., those offered as an alternative or in addition to conventional medicine, have enjoyed a surge in popularity in recent years. The "natural" descriptor employed in connection with these healing methods is frequently misunderstood, leading to underestimation of the risks arising from incorrect use. However, the essential principle underlying traditional natural medicine, mobilization of the body's own forces against disease, is increasingly being employed in a new, rational form of medicine: molecular medicine. A range of natural endogenous substances for medical use are already available. Human proteins such as erythropoietin can now be produced as medicines in highly pure form with the aid of genetic engineering techniques. Our increasing understanding of the function of our genes and the resulting descriptions of molecular mechanisms underlying disease are also helping us to utilize the body's own construction set. New techniques such as gene therapy will in future enable us to reproduce the natural conditions in the healthy body with increasing specificity in our attempts to cure illnesses. One such application will be the activation of the immune system to combat cancer. The complete decoding of the human genome will not only allow illnesses to be described, and possibly prevented, at an earlier stage. Illnesses will also be able to described more precisely and individually at the molecular level, opening up the possibility of targeted, patient-specific cures.

  3. Transfusion medicine on American television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J K

    2014-02-01

    Television is a beloved American pastime and a frequent American export. As such, American television shapes how the global public views the world. This study examines how the portrayal of blood transfusion and blood donation on American television may influence how domestic and international audiences perceive the field of transfusion medicine. American television programming of the last quarter-century was reviewed to identify programmes featuring topics related to blood banking/transfusion medicine. The included television episodes were identified through various sources. Twenty-seven television episodes airing between 1991 and 2013 were identified as featuring blood bank/transfusion medicine topics. Although some accurate representations of the field were identified, most television programmes portrayed blood banking/transfusion medicine inaccurately. The way in which blood banking/transfusion medicine is portrayed on American television may assist clinicians in understanding their patient's concerns about blood safety and guide blood collection organisations in improving donor recruitment. © 2013 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  4. Taking Bioinformatics to Systems Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, Antoine H C; Moerland, Perry D

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine promotes a range of approaches and strategies to study human health and disease at a systems level with the aim of improving the overall well-being of (healthy) individuals, and preventing, diagnosing, or curing disease. In this chapter we discuss how bioinformatics critically contributes to systems medicine. First, we explain the role of bioinformatics in the management and analysis of data. In particular we show the importance of publicly available biological and clinical repositories to support systems medicine studies. Second, we discuss how the integration and analysis of multiple types of omics data through integrative bioinformatics may facilitate the determination of more predictive and robust disease signatures, lead to a better understanding of (patho)physiological molecular mechanisms, and facilitate personalized medicine. Third, we focus on network analysis and discuss how gene networks can be constructed from omics data and how these networks can be decomposed into smaller modules. We discuss how the resulting modules can be used to generate experimentally testable hypotheses, provide insight into disease mechanisms, and lead to predictive models. Throughout, we provide several examples demonstrating how bioinformatics contributes to systems medicine and discuss future challenges in bioinformatics that need to be addressed to enable the advancement of systems medicine.

  5. Medicines by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Search the NIGMS Website Search the NIGMS Website NIGMS Home Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Medicines By Design Medicines By Design Spotlight Nature's Medicine Cabinet A ...

  6. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth / For Teens / Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is ... this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's ( ...

  8. Taking multiple medicines safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000883.htm Taking multiple medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... directed. Why You May Need More Than One Medicine You may take more than one medicine to ...

  9. Managing Your Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing Your Medicines Updated:Mar 8,2018 If you have heart ... Weight • Tools & Resources Heart Insight Supplement: Know Your Medicines Keeping track of your medicines can be overwhelming. ...

  10. Cold medicines and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000942.htm Cold medicines and children To use the sharing features on ... children younger than age 4. About OTC Cold Medicines Cold medicines do not cure or shorten a ...

  11. Medicine safety and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drain. Also, DO NOT toss medicines in the trash. DO NOT take your medicine in front of ... Accessed January 13, 2017. US Food and Drug Administration. How to dispose of unused medicines. FDA.gov. ...

  12. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  13. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  14. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public–Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21st Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public–private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%–80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States. PMID:27195965

  15. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public-Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21(st) Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, Lotte M

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public-private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%-80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States.

  16. Understanding uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Lindley, Dennis V

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition ""...a reference for everyone who is interested in knowing and handling uncertainty.""-Journal of Applied Statistics The critically acclaimed First Edition of Understanding Uncertainty provided a study of uncertainty addressed to scholars in all fields, showing that uncertainty could be measured by probability, and that probability obeyed three basic rules that enabled uncertainty to be handled sensibly in everyday life. These ideas were extended to embrace the scientific method and to show how decisions, containing an uncertain element, could be rationally made.

  17. Ethnoveterinary Medicine: The prospects of integrating medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal plants products are part of the natural products that have been in use in traditional medicine and also a source of novel drugs. Therefore, the use of medicinal plant products would be a rational alternative to synthetic drugs. Ethnobotanical surveys carried out in many parts of Kenya have revealed a lot of plants ...

  18. Obstetric medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Balbi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obstetric assistance made major advances in the last 20 years: improved surgical technique allows quicker caesarean sections, anaesthesiology procedures such as peripheral anaesthesia and epidural analgesia made safer operative assistance, remarkably reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, neonatology greatly improved the results of assistance to low birth weight newborns. A new branch of medicine called “obstetric medicine” gained interest and experience after the lessons of distinguished physicians like Michael De Swiet in England. All together these advances are making successful pregnancies that 20 years ago would have been discouraged or even interrupted: that’s what we call high risk pregnancy. High risk of what? Either complications of pregnancy on pre-existing disease or complications of pre-existing disease on pregnancy. Nowadays, mortality in pregnancy has a medical cause in 80% of cases in Western countries (Confidential Enquiry on Maternal Deaths, UK, 2004. DISCUSSION The background is always changing and we have to take in account of: increase of maternal age; widespread use of assisted fertilization techniques for treatment of infertility; social feelings about maternity desire with increasing expectations from medical assistance; immigration of medically “naive” patients who don’t know to have a chronic disease, but apt and ready to conceive; limited knowledge of feasibility of drug use in pregnancy which may induce both patients and doctors to stopping appropriate drug therapy in condition of severe disease. Preconception counseling, planning the pregnancy, wise use of drugs, regular follow-up throughout the pregnancy and, in selected cases, preterm elective termination of pregnancy may result in excellent outcome both for mother and foetus. CONCLUSIONS Highly committed and specifically trained physicians are required to counsel these patients and to plan their treatment before and during pregnancy.

  19. Understanding analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This lively introductory text exposes the student to the rewards of a rigorous study of functions of a real variable. In each chapter, informal discussions of questions that give analysis its inherent fascination are followed by precise, but not overly formal, developments of the techniques needed to make sense of them. By focusing on the unifying themes of approximation and the resolution of paradoxes that arise in the transition from the finite to the infinite, the text turns what could be a daunting cascade of definitions and theorems into a coherent and engaging progression of ideas. Acutely aware of the need for rigor, the student is much better prepared to understand what constitutes a proper mathematical proof and how to write one. Fifteen years of classroom experience with the first edition of Understanding Analysis have solidified and refined the central narrative of the second edition. Roughly 150 new exercises join a selection of the best exercises from the first edition, and three more project-sty...

  20. Mitochondria in biology and medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2012-01-01

    pathologies (Luft, 1994). Since 1959, the understanding of mitochondrial cytopathies has evolved immensely and mitochondrial cytopathies are now known to be the largest group of metabolic diseases and to be resulting in a wide variety of pathologies. "Mitochondria in Biology and Medicine" was the title...... of the first annual conference of Society of Mitochondrial Research and Medicine - India. The conference was organized by A. S. Sreedhar, Keshav Singh and Kumarasamy Thangaraj, and was held at The Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) Hyderabad, India, during 9-10 December 2011. The conference...