WorldWideScience

Sample records for understanding antimicrobial drug

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL HERBAL DRUGS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Nishteswar

    2011-01-01

    An anti-microbial is a substance that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, or protozoans. Antimicrobial drugs either kill microbes (microbiocidal) or prevent the growth of microbes (microbiostatic). Sulphonamide drugs were the first antimicrobial drugs, and paved the way for the antibiotic revolution in medicine. The first sulfonamide, trade named Prontosil, was actually a prodrug. However, with the development of antimicrobials, microorganisms have adapted ...

  2. AMDD: Antimicrobial Drug Database

    OpenAIRE

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Kaushal, Lalima; Hassan Baig, Mohd; Khan, Asad U.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major concerns for antimicrobial chemotherapy against any particular target. Knowledge of the primary structure of antimicrobial agents and their activities is essential for rational drug design. Thus, we developed a comprehensive database, anti microbial drug database (AMDD), of known synthetic antibacterial and antifungal compounds that were extracted from the available literature and other chemical databases, e.g., PubChem, PubChem BioAssay and ZINC, etc. The ...

  3. Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2015-04-01

    Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs are a growing global problem. The most common substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials include beta-lactams (among antibiotics) and chloroquine and artemisin derivatives (among antimalarials). The most common type of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs have a reduced amount of the active drug, and the majority of them are manufactured in Southeast Asia and Africa. Counterfeit antimicrobial drugs may cause increased mortality and morbidity and pose a danger to patients. Here we review the literature with regard to the issue of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials and describe the prevalence of this problem, the different types of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs, and the consequences for the individuals and global public health. Local, national, and international initiatives are required to combat this very important public health issue. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial Drugs in the Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-10-19

    Survey participants in the United Kingdom admitted keeping leftover antimicrobial drugs for future use and taking them without medical advice. Dr. J. Todd Weber, director of CDC's Office of Antimicrobial Resistance, advises against the practice, which can be dangerous and can promote antimicrobial drug resistance.  Created: 10/19/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/26/2006.

  5. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Indran; Shorten, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    As pathology services become more centralized and automated, the measurement of therapeutic antimicrobial drugs concentrations is increasingly performed in clinical biochemistry or 'blood science' laboratories. This review outlines key groups of antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, antifungal agents and antituberculosis agents, their role in managing infectious diseases, and the reasons why serum concentration measurement is important. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason A; Norris, Ross; Paterson, David L; Martin, Jennifer H

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing the prescription of antimicrobials is required to improve clinical outcome from infections and to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance. One such method to improve antimicrobial dosing in individual patients is through application of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). The aim of this manuscript is to review the place of TDM in the dosing of antimicrobial agents, specifically the importance of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) to define the antimicrobial exposures necessary for maximizing killing or inhibition of bacterial growth. In this context, there are robust data for some antimicrobials, including the ratio of a PK parameter (e.g. peak concentration) to the minimal inhibitory concentration of the bacteria associated with maximal antimicrobial effect. Blood sampling of an individual patient can then further define the relevant PK parameter value in that patient and, if necessary, antimicrobial dosing can be adjusted to enable achievement of the target PK/PD ratio. To date, the clinical outcome benefits of a systematic TDM programme for antimicrobials have only been demonstrated for aminoglycosides, although the decreasing susceptibility of bacteria to available antimicrobials and the increasing costs of pharmaceuticals, as well as emerging data on pharmacokinetic variability, suggest that benefits are likely. PMID:21831196

  7. Antimicrobial Drugs in the Home, United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    McNulty, Cliodna A.M.; Boyle, Paul; Nichols, Tom; Clappison, Douglas P.; Davey, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A total of 6% of 6,983 households in the United Kingdom had leftover antimicrobial drugs, and 4% had standby antimicrobial drugs. Respondents with leftover drugs were more educated, more knowledgeable about antimicrobial drugs, younger, and female. Of respondents with leftover drugs, 44% kept them in case of future need, and 18% had taken these drugs without medical advice.

  8. Leading Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supporting research on several organisms that have developed resistance to antimicrobial drug treatment. The institute manages a research portfolio of grants aimed at the problem of antimicrobial resistance and hospital-acquired infections. Here is a list ...

  9. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. Objectives To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are differences between classes of antimicrobials or dosing schedules. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; African Index Medicus; LILACS; Science Citation Index; metaRegister of Controlled Trials; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; conference proceedings; and reference lists to March 2014. Selection criteria Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials in adults and children with cholera that compared: 1) any antimicrobial treatment with placebo or no treatment; 2) different antimicrobials head-to-head; or 3) different dosing schedules or different durations of treatment with the same antimicrobial. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted data from included trials. Diarrhoea duration and stool volume were defined as primary outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) or ratio of means (ROM) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Main results Thirty-nine trials were included in this review with 4623 participants. Antimicrobials versus placebo or no treatment Overall, antimicrobial therapy shortened the mean duration of diarrhoea by about a day and a half compared to placebo or no treatment (MD -36.77 hours, 95% CI -43

  10. Understanding drugs and behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parrott, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix xi Part I Drugs and Their Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psychoactive drugs: introduction and overview . . . . . . . . 2 The brain...

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides: Multifunctional Drugs for Different Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (APs are an important part of the innate immune system in epithelial and non-epithelial surfaces. So far, many different antimicrobial peptides from various families have been discovered in non-vertebrates and vertebrates. They are characterized by antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral activities against a variety of microorganisms. In addition to their role as endogenous antimicrobials, APs participate in multiple aspects of immunity. They are involved in septic and non-septic inflammation, wound repair, angiogenesis, regulation of the adaptive immune system and in maintaining homeostasis. Due to those characteristics AP could play an important role in many practical applications. Limited therapeutic efficiency of current antimicrobial agents and the emerging resistance of pathogens require alternate antimicrobial drugs. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent literature on functions and mechanisms of APs. It also shows their current practical applications as peptide therapeutics and bioactive polymers and discusses the possibilities of future clinical developments.

  12. Campylobacter Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Humans in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Though Campylobacter enteritis is a self-limiting disease, antimicrobial agents are recommended for extraintestinal infections and for treating immunocompromised persons. Erythromycin and ciprofloxacin are drugs of choice. The rate of resistance to these drugs is increasing in both developed and developing ...

  13. Antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Paul S; Apley, Michael D; Besser, Thomas E; Burney, Derek P; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Papich, Mark G; Traub-Dargatz, Josie L; Weese, J Scott

    2005-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of antimicrobial resistance and the need for veterinarians to aid in efforts for maintaining the usefulness of antimicrobial drugs in animals and humans, the Board of Regents of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine charged a special committee with responsibility for drafting this position statement regarding antimicrobial drug use in veterinary medicine. The Committee believes that veterinarians are obligated to balance the well-being of animals under their care with the protection of other animals and public health. Therefore, if an animal's medical condition can be reasonably expected to improve as a result of treatment with antimicrobial drugs, and the animal is under a veterinarian's care with an appropriate veterinarian-client-patient relationship, veterinarians have an obligation to offer antimicrobial treatment as a therapeutic option. Veterinarians also have an obligation to actively promote disease prevention efforts, to treat as conservatively as possible, and to explain the potential consequences associated with antimicrobial treatment to animal owners and managers, including the possibility of promoting selection of resistant bacteria. However, the consequences of losing usefulness of an antimicrobial drug that is used as a last resort in humans or animals with resistant bacterial infections might be unacceptable from a public or population health perspective. Veterinarians could therefore face the difficult choice of treating animals with a drug that is less likely to be successful, possibly resulting in prolonged or exacerbated morbidity, to protect the good of society. The Committee recommends that voluntary actions be taken by the veterinary profession to promote conservative use of antimicrobial drugs to minimize the potential adverse effects on animal or human health. The veterinary profession must work to educate all veterinarians about issues related to conservative antimicrobial drug use and

  14. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance and Gonorrhea

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-12-26

    Dr. Robert Kirkcaldy, a medical officer at CDC, discusses his article on antimicrobial resistance and gonorrhea.  Created: 12/26/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/26/2017.

  15. Prospective approach to managing antimicrobial drug shortages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Milena M; Patel, Jean A; Sutton, Sarah H; Bolon, Maureen K; Esterly, John S; Gross, Alan E; Postelnick, Michael J; Zembower, Teresa R; Scheetz, Marc H

    2012-07-01

    Antimicrobial drug shortages continue to increase, with few new therapeutic options available. Nationally, proposals have been offered to alleviate drug shortages; however, these recommendations are unlikely to effect change in the near future. Thus, antimicrobial stewardship leaders in acute care hospitals must develop a prospective management strategy to lessen the impact of these shortages on patient care. Herein, we describe several resources available to aid professionals in antimicrobial stewardship and healthcare epidemiology to manage drug shortages. An effective approach should include prospectively tracking shortages and maximizing inventory by appropriately managing usage. Several tenets should underpin this management. Alternative agents should be rationally chosen before the inventory of the primary agent has reached zero, ethical considerations should be taken into account, and timely notification and communication with key stakeholders should occur throughout the prescribing and dispensing process.

  16. Patient compliance with antimicrobial drugs: A Chinese survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shuangmei; Pan, Jiaqian; Lu, Shan; Tang, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is among the mainstream treatment modalities employed in clinical settings. Antimicrobial sensitivity of the pathogen and patient compliance are key determinants of the efficacy of antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we sought to investigate the factors that affect patient compliance to antimicrobial therapy in a Chinese teaching hospital to enhance patient compliance and to prevent abuse and misuse of antibiotics by patients. A questionnaire survey was conducted among patients willing to answer all the questions who were prescribed antimicrobial drugs orally, and for whom at least half of the duration of therapy was not under the supervision of a doctor or nurse. Data analyses were performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and multivariate logistic regression. A total of 720 patients participated in the survey; of these, 714 patients provided complete data and were included in the analysis. Up to 86.97% of patients showed noncompliance to antimicrobial therapy (total compliance score compliance (total compliance score = 8). On multivariate analyses, understanding of the treatment was an important factor associated with compliance. A range of factors were associated with compliance to antimicrobial therapy, including understanding of the treatment, gender, age, home address, education level, and family income. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial drug use in a small Indian community hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, M; Jensen, M Blomberg; Henry, A

    2010-01-01

    -trimoxazole, ciprofloxacin and metronidazole were most commonly used and all antimicrobial drugs were given empirically with no confirmation of the infective agent. Reports of increasing resistance to antimicrobial drugs in India, and elsewhere, necessitates a focus on how antimicrobials drugs are used in relation...

  18. Population mobility, globalization, and antimicrobial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Douglas W; Gushulak, Brian D; Baine, William B; Bala, Shukal; Gubbins, Paul O; Holtom, Paul; Segarra-Newnham, Marisel

    2009-11-01

    Population mobility is a main factor in globalization of public health threats and risks, specifically distribution of antimicrobial drug-resistant organisms. Drug resistance is a major risk in healthcare settings and is emerging as a problem in community-acquired infections. Traditional health policy approaches have focused on diseases of global public health significance such as tuberculosis, yellow fever, and cholera; however, new diseases and resistant organisms challenge existing approaches. Clinical implications and health policy challenges associated with movement of persons across barriers permeable to products, pathogens, and toxins (e.g., geopolitical borders, patient care environments) are complex. Outcomes are complicated by high numbers of persons who move across disparate and diverse settings of disease threat and risk. Existing policies and processes lack design and capacity to prevent or mitigate adverse health outcomes. We propose an approach to global public health risk management that integrates population factors with effective and timely application of policies and processes.

  19. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Melou, Alain; Pelligand, Ludovic; Lees, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given that: (1) the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2) the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of animal origin; (3) alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed "green antibiotics," having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes. We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a "turnstile" exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s). For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  20. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Louis TOUTAIN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Given that: (1 the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2 the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR of animal origin; (3 alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed green antibiotics, having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes.We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a turnstile exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s. For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  1. Assessment of drug usage and antimicrobial residues in milk on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Milk samples were also collected for evaluation of antimicrobial drug residues using three tests; the Delvotest® SP, agar well diffusion and agar plate disc assays. On the day of farm visit, 25.4% of study farms had various drugs used to treat animals, categorised as antimicrobials (54.2%), anthelmintics (25.0%), ...

  2. Bacterial proteases, untapped antimicrobial drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Elizabeth; Wright, Gerard D

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial proteases are an extensive collection of enzymes that have vital roles in cell viability, stress response and pathogenicity. Although their perturbation clearly offers the potential for antimicrobial drug development, both as traditional antibiotics and anti-virulence drugs, they are not yet the target of any clinically used therapeutics. Here we describe the potential for and recent progress in the development of compounds targeting bacterial proteases with a focus on AAA+ family proteolytic complexes and signal peptidases (SPs). Caseinolytic protease (ClpP) belongs to the AAA+ family of proteases, a group of multimeric barrel-shaped complexes whose activity is tightly regulated by associated AAA+ ATPases. The opportunity for chemical perturbation of these complexes is demonstrated by compounds targeting ClpP for inhibition, activation or perturbation of its associated ATPase. Meanwhile, SPs are also a proven antibiotic target. Responsible for the cleavage of targeting peptides during protein secretion, both type I and type II SPs have been successfully targeted by chemical inhibitors. As the threat of pan-antibiotic resistance continues to grow, these and other bacterial proteases offer an arsenal of novel antibiotic targets ripe for development.

  3. Understanding Drug Use and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... factors affect drug use trends, when young people view drug use as harmful, they tend to decrease ...

  4. Shigella Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Mechanisms, 2004-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena; Heini, Nicole; Zurfluh, Katrin; Althaus, Denise; Hächler, Herbert; Stephan, Roger

    2016-06-01

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance mechanisms of Shigella spp., we analyzed 344 isolates collected in Switzerland during 2004-2014. Overall, 78.5% of isolates were multidrug resistant; 10.5% were ciprofloxacin resistant; and 2% harbored mph(A), a plasmid-mediated gene that confers reduced susceptibility to azithromycin, a last-resort antimicrobial agent for shigellosis.

  5. Study of antimicrobial property of some hypoglycemic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Dash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a comparative antimicrobial study of different hypoglycemic drugs (Metformin, Phenformin, and Rosiglitazone was carried out. The main objective was to ascertain the antimicrobial activity by using "non-antibiotics" as the test substances. The antimicrobial activity was carried out against different bacteria and fungi namely Bacillus liceniformis, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus subspp., and Staphylococcus epidermidis by using disc diffusion method and agar dilution method. Ciprofloxacin was taken as the standard antibiotic. The entire procedure was carried out in an aseptic area under the laminar flow by inoculating the bacterial strain to the agar media in which the drug solution was added. Different concentrations (300 and 400 μg/ml of the standard antibiotic and selected drugs were subjected for minimum inhibitory concentration, and zone of inhibition tests and the antimicrobial activity of the selected drugs were determined.

  6. Use and Misuse of Antimicrobial Drugs in Poultry and Livestock: Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Poole* and Cynthia Sheffield

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Food safety begins on the farm with management practices that contribute to an abundant, safe, and affordable food supply. To attain this goal antimicrobials have been used in all stages of food animal production in the United States and elsewhere around the world at one time or another. Among food–production animals antimicrobials are used for growth promotion, disease prophylaxis or disease treatment, and are generally administered to the entire flock or herd. Over many decades bacteria have become resistant to multiple antimicrobial classes in a cumulative manner. Bacteria exhibit a number of well characterized mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobials that include: 1 modification of the antimicrobial; 2 alteration of the drug target; 3 decreased access of drug to target; and 4 implementation of an alternative metabolic pathway not affected by the drug. The mechanisms of resistance are complex and depend on the type of bacterium involved (e.g. Gram–positive or Gram–negative and the class of drug. Some bacterial species have accumulated resistance to nearly all antimicrobial classes due to a combination of intrinsic and acquired processes. This has and will continue to lead to clinical failures of antimicrobial treatment in both human and animal medicine.

  7. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility of Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated from carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayamí García

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available When it is necessary to determine the susceptibility of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm strains to antimicrobial drugs, it is important to consider that it should be analyzed in a double context. One of them related to the use of drugs in a specific medical treatment; and the other; to chemoprophylatic drugs, both with the same purpose: the accurate selection of the “in vivo” antimicrobial agent. This requires the study of the sensitivity and resistance of strains isolated in both carriers and patients. With the aim of further studying the behavior of the strains that currently circulate in Cuba, an antimicrobial drug susceptibility study was conducted in 90 strains isolated from carriers during the first half of 1998. The agar dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs to: penicillin, ampicillin, rifampin, sulfadiazine, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime. The study of the three latter drugs was done for the first time in our country. The search for β- lactamase-producer strains was also performed. There was a predominance of penicillin sensitive strains (82,2% with an intermediate sensitivity to ampicillin (57,8%, while 70% of the strains were sensitive to sulfadiazine. Regarding the rest of the antimicrobial drugs, 100% of the strains were sensitive. The paper shows the MICs for each drug as well as the phenotypic characteristics of the strains with the penicillin and sulfadiazine sensitivity and resistance patterns. No β-lactamase-producer strains were found.

  8. Self-medication with antimicrobial drugs in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryan, L; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM; Burgerhof, JGM; Mechtler, R; Deschepper, R; Tambic-Andrasevic, A; Andrajati, R; Monnet, DL; Cunney, R; Di Matteo, A; Edelstein, H; Valinteliene, R; Alkerwi, A; Scicluna, EA; Grzesiowski, P; Bara, AC; Tesar, T; Cizman, M; Campos, J; Lundborg, CS; Birkin, J

    We surveyed the populations of 19 European countries to compare the prevalence of antimicrobial drug self-medication in the previous 12 months and intended self-medication and storage and to identify the associated demographic characteristics. By using a multistage sampling design, 1,000-3,000

  9. Antimicrobial drug usage for poultry production within a local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was carried out to determine the use and misuse of antimicrobial drugs in 1he poultry industry within Ijebu North local Government, Ogun State. A questionnaire to adequately cover all relevant information needed for the study was designed, and depending on the literary level of the respondents an interview ...

  10. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves is associated with antimicrobial drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A.B.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Stegeman, J.A.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; Mevius, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between farm management factors, including antimicrobial drug usage, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the faeces of white veal calves. Ninety E. coli isolates from one pooled sample per farm (n = 48) were tested for

  11. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves is associated with antimicrobial drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A B; Wagenaar, J. A.; Stegeman, J A; Vernooij, J C M; Mevius, D J

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between farm management factors, including antimicrobial drug usage, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the faeces of white veal calves. Ninety E. coli isolates from one pooled sample per farm (n = 48) were tested for

  12. Antimicrobial drug use in food-producing animals and associated human health risks: what, and how strong, is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelzer, Karin; Wong, Nora; Thomas, Joe; Talkington, Kathy; Jungman, Elizabeth; Coukell, Allan

    2017-07-04

    Antimicrobial resistance is a public health threat. Because antimicrobial consumption in food-producing animals contributes to the problem, policies restricting the inappropriate or unnecessary agricultural use of antimicrobial drugs are important. However, this link between agricultural antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance has remained contested by some, with potentially disruptive effects on efforts to move towards the judicious or prudent use of these drugs. The goal of this review is to systematically evaluate the types of evidence available for each step in the causal pathway from antimicrobial use on farms to human public health risk, and to evaluate the strength of evidence within a 'Grades of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation'(GRADE) framework. The review clearly demonstrates that there is compelling scientific evidence available to support each step in the causal pathway, from antimicrobial use on farms to a public health burden caused by infections with resistant pathogens. Importantly, the pathogen, antimicrobial drug and treatment regimen, and general setting (e.g., feed type) can have significant impacts on how quickly resistance emerges or spreads, for how long resistance may persist after antimicrobial exposures cease, and what public health impacts may be associated with antimicrobial use on farms. Therefore an exact quantification of the public health burden attributable to antimicrobial drug use in animal agriculture compared to other sources remains challenging. Even though more research is needed to close existing data gaps, obtain a better understanding of how antimicrobial drugs are actually used on farms or feedlots, and quantify the risk associated with antimicrobial use in animal agriculture, these findings reinforce the need to act now and restrict antibiotic use in animal agriculture to those instances necessary to ensure the health and well-being of the animals.

  13. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno eVale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp, in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs.

  14. Distribution of Putative Virulence Genes and Antimicrobial Drug Resistance in Vibrio harveyi

    OpenAIRE

    Parvathi, Ammini; Mendez, Dafini; Anto, Ciana

    2011-01-01

    The marine-estuarine bacterium Vibrio harveyi is an important pathogen of invertebrates, most significantly, the larvae of commercially important shrimp Penaeus monodon. In this study, we analyzed V. harveyi isolated from shrimp hatchery environments for understanding the distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance. The putative genes targeted for PCR detection included four reversible toxin (Rtx)/hemolysin genes, a gene encoding homologue of Vibriocholerae zonu...

  15. Drug monitoring and individual dose optimization of antimicrobial drugs : oxazolidinones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cattaneo, Dario; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem; Neely, Michael

    INTRODUCTION: Oxazolidinones are synthetic antibiotics with bacteriostatic activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Linezolid, the first marketed oxazolidinone, has shown also activity against Mycobaterium tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains. Recently,

  16. In-home Drug Storage and Self-medication with Antimicrobial Drugs in Basrah, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Mohsin Jassim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antimicrobial drugs and to record the stored medicine at home.Methods: This is a descriptive study involving a questionnaire survey to determine the extent of drug storage and self-medication. A total of 300 household units in Basrah, Iraq were including in this study. A survey was conducted in 300 households in Basrah, southern Iraq to determine the availability, source, and storage conditions of medicinal drugs and the prevalence of self medication with antimicrobials.Results: The majority of households (94% stored drugs at home. A total of 4279 of different types of drug preparations were encountered, the mean being 14.26 products/household. The results also showed that a minority of these drugs (31% were rationally prescribed. Hence only 31% of the total drugs were for current use, while 45% were leftovers and 23% of the drugs were kept for future use.A large proportion of the stored drugs (66% was obtained from private pharmacies. Only 42% of all the drugs were stored appropriately. Antibiotics, as a group was the most common drug stored and used at home (26%. The results indicated that the level of education has influence over dose compliance, storage of expired drugs and drugs exchange.Furthermore, a majority of the families (78% admitted to practicing self-medication. The most common reasons for self-medication with antimicrobial drugs were associated with influenza, upper respiratory tract infections, diarrhea and tonsillitis.Conclusion: There are numerous indications of inappropriate storage, self- medication, poor compliance and use of drugs that have been kept beyond their expiry date in Basrah, Iraq.

  17. In-home Drug Storage and Self-medication with Antimicrobial Drugs in Basrah, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, Abdul-Mohsin

    2010-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antimicrobial drugs and to record the stored medicine at home. This is a descriptive study involving a questionnaire survey to determine the extent of drug storage and self-medication. A total of 300 household units in Basrah, Iraq were including in this study. A survey was conducted in 300 households in Basrah, southern Iraq to determine the availability, source, and storage conditions of medicinal drugs and the prevalence of self medication with antimicrobials. The majority of households (94%) stored drugs at home. A total of 4279 of different types of drug preparations were encountered, the mean being 14.26 products/household. The results also showed that a minority of these drugs (31%) were rationally prescribed. Hence only 31% of the total drugs were for current use, while 45% were leftovers and 23% of the drugs were kept for future use. A large proportion of the stored drugs (66%) was obtained from private pharmacies. Only 42% of all the drugs were stored appropriately. Antibiotics, as a group was the most common drug stored and used at home (26%). The results indicated that the level of education has influence over dose compliance, storage of expired drugs and drugs exchange. Furthermore, a majority of the families (78%) admitted to practicing self-medication. The most common reasons for self-medication with antimicrobial drugs were associated with influenza, upper respiratory tract infections, diarrhea and tonsillitis. There are numerous indications of inappropriate storage, self- medication, poor compliance and use of drugs that have been kept beyond their expiry date in Basrah, Iraq.

  18. Self-medication with Antimicrobial Drugs in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryan, Larissa; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Burgerhof, Johannes G.M.; Mechtler, Reli; Deschepper, Reginald; Tambic-Andrasevic, Arjana; Andrajati, Retnosari; Monnet, Dominique L.; Cunney, Robert; Di Matteo, Antonella; Edelstein, Hana; Valinteliene, Rolanda; Alkerwi, Alaa; Scicluna, Elizabeth A.; Grzesiowski, Pawel

    2006-01-01

    We surveyed the populations of 19 European countries to compare the prevalence of antimicrobial drug self-medication in the previous 12 months and intended self-medication and storage and to identify the associated demographic characteristics. By using a multistage sampling design, 1,000-3,000 adults in each country were randomly selected. The prevalence of actual self-medication varied from 1 to 210 per 1,000 and intended self-medication from 73 to 449 per 1,000; both rates were high in east...

  19. [Sensitivity of bacteria to antimicrobial drugs and interpretation of results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulauzov, Marija; Mihajlović-Ukropina, Mira; Jelesić, Zora; Medić, Deana; Kozoderović, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of antimicrobial drugs was a turning point in the permanent conflict between the mankind and microorganisms. However, due to the wide use and misuse of antibiotics in therapy and prophylaxis of infections the mankind is threatened by an alarming rise in the resistance of bacteria to drugs. Will this phenomenon turn us back to the pre-antibiotic era? The increasing resistance of bacteria has become a global public health problem: bacteria are showing a remarkable capacity to develop different mechanisms and avoid drug effect. Mechanisms of resistance are numerous and various: production of beta-lactamases (Ambler class A): TEM-I, TEM-2 and SHV-1 and mutants of classical enzymes with extended spectrum (ESBL) (e.g. in Klebsiella spp.) which results in the resistance to the 3rd generation cephalosporines and new metallo-beta-lactamases among Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter (resistance to carbapenems). The alteration of the target enzymes (PBP) leads to the Staphylococci resistance to methicillin and the responsible gene is mecA gene). The alteration of DNA gyrase due to the mutations of gyrA, gyrB, parC genes (accumulation of multiple mutations) results in the development of resistance to fluoroquinolones); and the active efflux system - "pumping out" of the drug from the bacterial cell leads to the resistance of a wide spectrum of different antibiotics. In order to choose the most efficient drug for therapy, it is necessary to investigate susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. For that purpose, a disc-diffusion method according to CLSl standard procedure is performed. For invasive strains it is often necessary to determine minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antimicrobials. The methods that are in use are agar-dilution methods, E-test and automated MIC determination by VITEK 2 system. By molecular-biological methods it is possible to identify the mechanisms of resistance and detect the specific genes behind it (mecA gene). The targeted

  20. Understanding Drug Release Data through Thermodynamic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Caroline Liberato Cavalcanti Freire

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors that can modify the drug release profile of a drug from a Drug-Delivery-System (DDS is a mandatory step to determine the effectiveness of new therapies. The aim of this study was to assess the Amphotericin-B (AmB kinetic release profiles from polymeric systems with different compositions and geometries and to correlate these profiles with the thermodynamic parameters through mathematical modeling. Film casting and electrospinning techniques were used to compare behavior of films and fibers, respectively. Release profiles from the DDSs were performed, and the mathematical modeling of the data was carried out. Activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of the drug release process were determined. AmB release profiles showed that the relationship to overcome the enthalpic barrier was PVA-fiber > PVA-film > PLA-fiber > PLA-film. Drug release kinetics from the fibers and the films were better fitted on the Peppas–Sahlin and Higuchi models, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters corroborate these findings, revealing that the AmB release from the evaluated systems was an endothermic and non-spontaneous process. Thermodynamic parameters can be used to explain the drug kinetic release profiles. Such an approach is of utmost importance for DDS containing insoluble compounds, such as AmB, which is associated with an erratic bioavailability.

  1. Understanding Drug Release Data through Thermodynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Marjorie Caroline Liberato Cavalcanti; Alexandrino, Francisco; Marcelino, Henrique Rodrigues; Picciani, Paulo Henrique de Souza; Silva, Kattya Gyselle de Holanda e; Genre, Julieta; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes; do Egito, Eryvaldo Sócrates Tabosa

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the factors that can modify the drug release profile of a drug from a Drug-Delivery-System (DDS) is a mandatory step to determine the effectiveness of new therapies. The aim of this study was to assess the Amphotericin-B (AmB) kinetic release profiles from polymeric systems with different compositions and geometries and to correlate these profiles with the thermodynamic parameters through mathematical modeling. Film casting and electrospinning techniques were used to compare behavior of films and fibers, respectively. Release profiles from the DDSs were performed, and the mathematical modeling of the data was carried out. Activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of the drug release process were determined. AmB release profiles showed that the relationship to overcome the enthalpic barrier was PVA-fiber > PVA-film > PLA-fiber > PLA-film. Drug release kinetics from the fibers and the films were better fitted on the Peppas–Sahlin and Higuchi models, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters corroborate these findings, revealing that the AmB release from the evaluated systems was an endothermic and non-spontaneous process. Thermodynamic parameters can be used to explain the drug kinetic release profiles. Such an approach is of utmost importance for DDS containing insoluble compounds, such as AmB, which is associated with an erratic bioavailability. PMID:28773009

  2. 75 FR 37450 - Draft Guidance: The Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... resistance to this important class of drugs, and the resulting loss of their effectiveness as antimicrobial... to antimicrobial resistance is the use of medically important antimicrobial drugs in food-producing... animals in order to help minimize antimicrobial resistance development. Based on a consideration of the...

  3. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Vibrio cholerae, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwanda, Berthe; Moore, Sandra; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kabangwa, Ickel Kakongo; Ndjakani, Daniel Yassa; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Thefenne, Helene; Garnotel, Eric; Tshapenda, Gaston; Kakongo, Denis Kandolo; Kalambayi, Guy; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed 1,093 Vibrio cholerae isolates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo during 1997-2012 and found increasing antimicrobial drug resistance over time. Our study also demonstrated that the 2011-2012 epidemic was caused by an El Tor variant clonal complex with a single antimicrobial drug susceptibility profile.

  4. Learning from agriculture: understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi eYou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health challenge worldwide, with agricultural use of antimicrobials being one major contributor to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. Globally, most antimicrobials are used in industrial food animal production, a major context for microbiomes encountering low-doses or subtherapeutic-levels of antimicrobial agents from all mechanistic classes. This modern practice exerts broad eco-evolutionary effects on the gut microbiome of food animals, which is subsequently transferred to animal waste. This waste contains complex constituents that are challenging to treat, including antimicrobial resistance determinants and low-dose antimicrobials. Unconfined storage or land deposition of a large volume of animal waste causes its wide contact with the environment and drives the expansion of the environmental resistome through mobilome facilitated horizontal genet transfer. The expanded environmental resistome, which encompasses both natural constituents and anthropogenic inputs, can persist under multiple stressors from agriculture and may re-enter humans, thus posing a public health risk to humans. For these reasons, this review focuses on agricultural antimicrobial use as a laboratory for understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion, briefly summarizes current knowledge on this topic, highlights the importance of research specifically on environmental microbial ecosystems considering antimicrobial resistance as environmental pollution, and calls attention to the needs for longitudinal studies at the systems level.

  5. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry abattoir workers at risk and broilers on antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Oguttu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial usage in food animals increases the prevalence of antimicrobial drug resistance among their enteric bacteria. It has been suggested that this resistance can in turn be transferred to people working with such animals, e.g. abattoir workers. Antimicrobial drug resistance was investigated for Escherichia coli from broilers raised on feed supplemented with antimicrobials, and the people who carry out evisceration, washing and packing of intestines in a high-throughput poultry abattoir in Gauteng, South Africa. Broiler carcasses were sampled from 6 farms, on each of which broilers are produced in a separate 'grow-out cycle'. Per farm, 100 caeca were randomly collected 5 minutes after slaughter and the contents of each were selectively cultured for E. coli. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of each isolate was determined for the following antimicrobials : doxycycline, trimethoprim, sulphamethoxazole, ampicillin, enrofloxacin, fosfomycin, ceftriaxone and nalidixic acid. The same was determined for the faeces of 29 abattoir workers and 28 persons used as controls. The majority of isolates from broilers were resistant, especially to antimicrobials that were used on the farms in the study. Overall median MICs and the number of resistant isolates from abattoir workers (packers plus eviscerators tended to be higher than for the control group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed when the median MICs of antimicrobials used regularly in poultry and percentage resistance were compared, nor could an association between resistance among the enteric E. coli from packers and those from broilers be demonstrated.

  6. Molecular understanding of a potential functional link between antimicrobial and amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Jie

    2014-10-14

    Antimicrobial and amyloid peptides do not share common sequences, typical secondary structures, or normal biological activity but both the classes of peptides exhibit membrane-disruption ability to induce cell toxicity. Different membrane-disruption mechanisms have been proposed for antimicrobial and amyloid peptides, individually, some of which are not exclusive to either peptide type, implying that certain common principles may govern the folding and functions of different cytolytic peptides and associated membrane disruption mechanisms. Particularly, some antimicrobial and amyloid peptides have been identified to have dual complementary amyloid and antimicrobial properties, suggesting a potential functional link between amyloid and antimicrobial peptides. Given that some similar structural and membrane-disruption characteristics exist between the two classes of peptides, this review summarizes major findings, recent advances, and future challenges related to antimicrobial and amyloid peptides and strives to illustrate the similarities, differences, and relationships in the sequences, structures, and membrane interaction modes between amyloid and antimicrobial peptides, with a special focus on direct interactions of the peptides with the membranes. We hope that this review will stimulate further research at the interface of antimicrobial and amyloid peptides - which has been studied less intensively than either type of peptides - to decipher a possible link between both amyloid pathology and antimicrobial activity, which can guide drug design and peptide engineering to influence peptide-membrane interactions important in human health and diseases.

  7. Understanding media publics and the antimicrobial resistance crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark; Whittaker, Andrea; Lindgren, Mia; Djerf-Pierre, Monika; Manderson, Lenore; Flowers, Paul

    2017-06-08

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) imperils health for people across the world. This enormous challenge is being met with the rationalisation of prescription, dispensing and consumption of antimicrobials in clinical settings and in the everyday lives of members of the general population. Individuals need to be reached outside clinical settings to prepare them for the necessary changes to the pharmaceutical management of infections; efforts that depend on media and communications and, therefore, how the AMR message is mediated, received and applied. In 2016, the UK Review on Antimicrobial Resistance called on governments to support intense, worldwide media activity to promote public awareness and to further efforts to rationalise the use of antimicrobial pharmaceuticals. In this article, we consider this communications challenge in light of contemporary currents of thought on media publics, including: the tendency of health communications to cast experts and lay individuals in opposition; the blaming of individuals who appear to 'resist' expert advice; the challenges presented by negative stories of AMR and their circulation in public life, and; the problems of public trust tied to the construction and mediation of expert knowledge on the effective management of AMR.

  8. DNA replication proteins as potential targets for antimicrobials in drug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Erika; Wittekoek, Bert; Kuijper, Ed J; Smits, Wiep Klaas

    2017-05-01

    With the impending crisis of antimicrobial resistance, there is an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobials to combat difficult infections and MDR pathogenic microorganisms. DNA replication is essential for cell viability and is therefore an attractive target for antimicrobials. Although several antimicrobials targeting DNA replication proteins have been developed to date, gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors are the only class widely used in the clinic. Given the numerous essential proteins in the bacterial replisome that may serve as a potential target for inhibitors and the relative paucity of suitable compounds, it is evident that antimicrobials targeting the replisome are underdeveloped so far. In this review, we report on the diversity of antimicrobial compounds targeting DNA replication and highlight some of the challenges in developing new drugs that target this process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  9. Investigation of the antimicrobial activity of soy peptides by developing a high throughput drug screening assay

    OpenAIRE

    Dhayakaran, Rekha; Neethirajan, Suresh; Weng, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance is a great concern in the medical community, as well as food industry. Soy peptides were tested against bacterial biofilms for their antimicrobial activity. A high throughput drug screening assay was developed using microfluidic technology, RAMAN spectroscopy, and optical microscopy for rapid screening of antimicrobials and rapid identification of pathogens. Methods Synthesized PGTAVFK and IKAFKEATKVDKVVVLWTA soy peptides were tested against Pseudomonas aer...

  10. Antimicrobial drug resistance: "Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvalin, Patrice

    2005-10-01

    Evolution of bacteria towards resistance to antimicrobial drugs, including multidrug resistance, is unavoidable because it represents a particular aspect of the general evolution of bacteria that is unstoppable. Therefore, the only means of dealing with this situation is to delay the emergence and subsequent dissemination of resistant bacteria or resistance genes. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs in bacteria can result from mutations in housekeeping structural or regulatory genes. Alternatively, resistance can result from the horizontal acquisition of foreign genetic information. The 2 phenomena are not mutually exclusive and can be associated in the emergence and more efficient spread of resistance. This review discusses the predictable future of the relationship between antimicrobial drugs and bacteria.

  11. Self-medication with antimicrobial drugs in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Larissa; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Mechtler, Reli; Deschepper, Reginald; Tambic-Andrasevic, Arjana; Andrajati, Retnosari; Monnet, Dominique L; Cunney, Robert; Di Matteo, Antonella; Edelsein, Hana; Valinteliene, Rolanda; Alkerwi, Alaa; Scicluna, Elizabeth; Grzesiowski, Powel; Bara, Ana-Claudia; Tesar, Thomas; Cizman, Milan; Campos, Jose; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Birkin, Joan

    2006-03-01

    We surveyed the populations of 19 European countries to compare the prevalence of antimicrobial drug self-medication in the previous 12 months and intended self-medication and storage and to identify the associated demographic characteristics. By using a multistage sampling design, 1,000-3,000 adults in each country were randomly selected. The prevalence of actual self-medication varied from 1 to 210 per 1,000 and intended self-medication from 73 to 449 per 1,000; both rates were high in eastern and southern Europe and low in northern and western Europe. The most common reasons for self-medication were throat symptoms (e.g., dry, inflamed, red, or sore throat, inflamed tonsils, tonsil pain). The main medication sources were pharmacies and medication leftover from previous prescriptions. Younger age, higher education, and presence of a chronic disease were associated with higher rates of self-medication. Attempts to reduce inappropriate self-medication should target prescribers, pharmacists, and the general public.

  12. Genomewide Identification of Genetic Determinants of Antimicrobial Drug Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dötsch, Andreas; Becker, Tanja; Pommerenke, Claudia; Magnowska, Zofia; Jänsch, Lothar; Häussler, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial drug resistance is of enormous public concern due to the increased risk of delayed treatment of infections, the increased length of hospital stays, the substantial increase in the cost of care, and the high risk of fatal outcomes. A prerequisite for the development of effective therapy alternatives is a detailed understanding of the diversity of bacterial mechanisms that underlie drug resistance, especially for problematic gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This pathogen has impressive chromosomally encoded mechanisms of intrinsic resistance, as well as the potential to mutate, gaining resistance to current antibiotics. In this study we have screened the comprehensive nonredundant Harvard PA14 library for P. aeruginosa mutants that exhibited either increased or decreased resistance against 19 antibiotics commonly used in the clinic. This approach identified several genes whose inactivation sensitized the bacteria to a broad spectrum of different antimicrobials and uncovered novel genetic determinants of resistance to various classes of antibiotics. Knowledge of the enhancement of bacterial susceptibility to existing antibiotics and of novel resistance markers or modifiers of resistance expression may lay the foundation for effective therapy alternatives and will be the basis for the development of new strategies in the control of problematic multiresistant gram-negative bacteria. PMID:19332674

  13. Optimizing Antimicrobial Drug Use in Surgery: An Intervention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antimicrobial control programs are widely used to decrease antibiotic utilization, but effects on antimicrobial resistance and outcomes for patients remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of rotation of antibiotic classes used as empirical surgical prophylaxis on the emergence ...

  14. Understanding bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides: From the surface to deep inside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria-Neto, Simone; de Almeida, Keyla Caroline; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2015-11-01

    Resistant bacterial infections are a major health problem in many parts of the world. The major commercial antibiotic classes often fail to combat common bacteria. Although antimicrobial peptides are able to control bacterial infections by interfering with microbial metabolism and physiological processes in several ways, a large number of cases of resistance to antibiotic peptide classes have also been reported. To gain a better understanding of the resistance process various technologies have been applied. Here we discuss multiple strategies by which bacteria could develop enhanced antimicrobial peptide resistance, focusing on sub-cellular regions from the surface to deep inside, evaluating bacterial membranes, cell walls and cytoplasmic metabolism. Moreover, some high-throughput methods for antimicrobial resistance detection and discrimination are also examined. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community.

  16. A Qualitative Analysis of Implementation of Antimicrobial Stewardship at 3 Academic Hospitals: Understanding the Key Influences on Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; Thampi, Nisha; Maione, Maria; Steinberg, Marilyn; Morris, Andrew M; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antimicrobials is linked to the development and spread of drug-resistant pathogens and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, lengths of hospital stay, and health care costs. "Antimicrobial stewardship" is the umbrella term for an evidence-based knowledge translation strategy involving comprehensive quality improvement activities to optimize the use of antimicrobials, improve patient outcomes, reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance and hospital-acquired infections such as Clostridium difficile, and decrease health care costs. To assess the perceptions and experiences of antimicrobial stewardship program leaders in terms of clinicians' attitudes toward and behaviours related to antimicrobial prescribing. In this qualitative study, semistructured interviews were conducted with 6 antimicrobial stewards (2 physicians and 4 pharmacists) at 3 academic hospitals between June and August 2013. The following 3 key themes emerged from the interviews: getting the right people on board, building collegial relationships, and rapidly establishing a track record. The study results elucidated the role and mechanisms that the program leader and other antimicrobial stewards used to influence other clinicians to engage in effective utilization of antimicrobials. The results also highlighted the methods employed by members of the antimicrobial stewardship team to tailor their strategies to the local context and to stakeholders of participating units; to gain credibility by demonstrating the impact of the antimicrobial stewardship program on clinical outcomes and cost; and to engage senior leaders to endorse and invest in the antimicrobial stewardship program, thereby adding to the antimicrobial stewards' credibility and their ability to influence the uptake of effective antimicrobial use. Collectively, these results offer insight into processes and mechanisms of influence employed by antimicrobial stewards to enhance antimicrobial use among

  17. Antidepressants, antimicrobials or both? Gut microbiota dysbiosis in depression and possible implications of the antimicrobial effects of antidepressant drugs for antidepressant effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Danielle; Filho, Adriano José Maia Chaves; Soares de Sousa, Caren Nádia; Quevedo, João; Barichello, Tatiana; Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano Nobre; Freitas de Lucena, David

    2017-01-15

    The first drug repurposed for the treatment of depression was the tuberculostatic iproniazid. At present, drugs belonging to new classes of antidepressants still have antimicrobial effects. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota was implicated in the development or exacerbation of mental disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Based on the current interest in the gut-brain axis, the focus of this narrative review is to compile the available studies regarding the influences of gut microbiota in behavior and depression and to show the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs. A discussion regarding the possible contribution of the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs to its effectiveness/resistance is included. The search included relevant articles from PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge. MDD is associated with changes in gut permeability and microbiota composition. In this respect, antidepressant drugs present antimicrobial effects that could also be related to the effectiveness of these drugs for MDD treatment. Conversely, some antimicrobials present antidepressant effects. Both antidepressants and antimicrobials present neuroprotective/antidepressant and antimicrobial effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate the participation of antimicrobial mechanisms of antidepressants in MDD treatment as well as to determine the contribution of this effect to antidepressant resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL, PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL QUALITIES OF MEDICINAL ANTISEPTIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliy D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our research results of the study of antimicrobial, physical and chemical qualities of antiseptic medicines of decamethoxin (DCM. Antimicrobial activity of DCM, palisan, decasan, deseptol against srains of S.aureus (n 56, S.epidermidis (n 26, E.coli (n 24, P.mirabilis (n 11, P.vulgaris (n 8 was studied by means of method of serial dilutions. Obtained data of mass spectrometry study of antimicrobial compositions with constant concentrations of DCM have shown that medicinal forms of DCM are complex physical and chemical systems, because of different origin and number of adjuvant ingredients used during their fabrication. Among synthetic quaternary ammonium agents there have been found the substance (commercial name of medicine is decamethoxin to have high antimicrobial activity against strains of grampositive and gram-negative microorganisms, an also C.albicans. There was found that antimicrobial activity of antiseptic palisan had been higher comparably to DCM in equivalent concentration. The composition and concentrations of acting agents and the methodology of preparation of palisan have been substantiated on the basis of microbiological, mass spectrometry characteristics of antiseptics DCM, palisan.

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to veterinarians, livestock producers, lawmakers, consumer ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  20. Understanding anti-tuberculosis drug efficacy: rethinking bacterial populations and how we model them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Evangelopoulos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis still remains a global health emergency, claiming 1.5 million lives in 2013. The bacterium responsible for this disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb, has successfully survived within hostile host environments, adapting to immune defence mechanisms, for centuries. This has resulted in a disease that is challenging to treat, requiring lengthy chemotherapy with multi-drug regimens. One explanation for this difficulty in eliminating M.tb bacilli in vivo is the disparate action of antimicrobials on heterogeneous populations of M.tb, where mycobacterial physiological state may influence drug efficacy. In order to develop improved drug combinations that effectively target diverse mycobacterial phenotypes, it is important to understand how such subpopulations of M.tb are formed during human infection. We review here the in vitro and in vivo systems used to model M.tb subpopulations that may persist during drug therapy, and offer aspirations for future research in this field.

  1. Profile of Antimicrobial Drug Use Patterns in a Nigerian Metropolitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate self-medication practices and prescribing patterns of antimicrobial agents. Methods: The study was carried out in Port Harcourt, Nigeria in 6 hospitals/clinics, 4 community pharmacies and the campus of University of Port Harcourt. 1,200 case files or charts of outpatients treated at the selected ...

  2. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance: "Prediction Is Very Difficult, Especially about the Future"1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of bacteria towards resistance to antimicrobial drugs, including multidrug resistance, is unavoidable because it represents a particular aspect of the general evolution of bacteria that is unstoppable. Therefore, the only means of dealing with this situation is to delay the emergence and subsequent dissemination of resistant bacteria or resistance genes. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs in bacteria can result from mutations in housekeeping structural or regulatory genes. Alternatively, resistance can result from the horizontal acquisition of foreign genetic information. The 2 phenomena are not mutually exclusive and can be associated in the emergence and more efficient spread of resistance. This review discusses the predictable future of the relationship between antimicrobial drugs and bacteria. PMID:16318687

  3. Achieving a Predictive Understanding of Antimicrobial Stress Physiology through Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Sean G; Turner, Randi L; Dwyer, Daniel J

    2018-04-01

    The dramatic spread and diversity of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has significantly reduced the efficacy of essentially all antibiotic classes, bringing us ever closer to a postantibiotic era. Exacerbating this issue, our understanding of the multiscale physiological impact of antimicrobial challenge on bacterial pathogens remains incomplete. Concerns over resistance and the need for new antibiotics have motivated the collection of omics measurements to provide systems-level insights into antimicrobial stress responses for nearly 20 years. Although technological advances have markedly improved the types and resolution of such measurements, continued development of mathematical frameworks aimed at providing a predictive understanding of complex antimicrobial-associated phenotypes is critical to maximize the utility of multiscale data. Here we highlight recent efforts utilizing systems biology to enhance our knowledge of antimicrobial stress physiology. We provide a brief historical perspective of antibiotic-focused omics measurements, highlight new measurement discoveries and trends, discuss examples and opportunities for integrating measurements with mathematical models, and describe future challenges for the field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial flow cytometry: An ideal tool for prospective antimicrobial drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthirulan, Pushpanathan; Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    2016-09-15

    Flow cytometry has tremendous applications in qualitative and quantitative analysis of characteristics of single microbial cells. Its ability to efficiently discriminate and quantify multiple parameters of microbial cells has made it a powerful tool to catalog the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) on target cells. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview and strategic design on how multi-parametric analysis of flow cytometry is unsurpassed in studying the antimicrobial process of AMPs in an accurate and rapid way. This strategy provides a conceptual framework for understanding distinct classes of AMPs and getting insights into antimicrobial mechanisms of novel AMPs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Activities and influence of veterinary drug marketers on antimicrobial usage in livestock production in Oyo and Kaduna States, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Ernest Ojo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial usage in animals contributes to the emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains. Investigations were carried out on how the characteristics, knowledge, attitude and practices of antimicrobial marketers influenced antimicrobials usage in animal production in Oyo and Kaduna States, Nigeria. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to gather information about the characteristics and activities of antimicrobial marketers. Overall, 70 (56.9 % of 123 marketers had post-secondary education while 76 (61.8 % were trained on the use of antimicrobials. Eighteen (14.6 % of the marketers were licensed veterinarians. Only 51 (41.5 % marketers displayed adequate knowledge about antimicrobials and antimicrobial usage. Sixty-seven (54.6 % marketers requested a prescription before selling antimicrobials while 113 (91.9 % marketer recommended antimicrobials for use in animals. Two-third of the marketers (66.7 % prescribed antimicrobials without physically examining sick animals but based their prescriptions on verbal reports of clinical signs by farmers and on their personal experience. Marketers with higher educational qualification displayed more adequate knowledge of antimicrobials and antimicrobial usage than those with basic education background only. More years of experience in antimicrobial marketing did not translate to better knowledge on antimicrobial usage. Only 45 (36.6 % respondents were aware of the existence of regulatory agencies monitoring the use of antimicrobials in animals. Farmers ignored the services of veterinarians in the diagnosis and control of animal diseases but resorted to drug marketers for help. Effective communication of existing legislations on antimicrobial usage, improved access to veterinary services and strict enforcement of regulatory policies are recommended for checking non-judicious use of antimicrobial agents in animal production. Sales of

  6. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions between calcineurin inhibitors and proliferation signal inhibitors with anti-microbial agents: implications for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robert L; Mueller, Scott W; Levi, Marilyn E; Lindenfeld, Joann

    2011-02-01

    Infections account for 15% to 20% of deaths in transplant recipients; thus, rapid and appropriate therapeutic intervention is required. However, many anti-microbial agents can interact significantly with a transplant recipient's immunosuppressive regimen, placing them at risk for a potential adverse drug reaction and prolonged hospitalization. This investigation highlights the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions between the calcineurin inhibitors and proliferation signal inhibitors with commonly used anti-microbial agents, specifically addressing mechanism, management, onset of action, magnitude of effect and strength of evidence for each interaction. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of systems pharmacology in understanding drug adverse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Seth I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Systems pharmacology involves the application of systems biology approaches, combining large-scale experimental studies with computational analyses, to the study of drugs, drug targets, and drug effects. Many of these initial studies have focused on identifying new drug targets, new uses of known drugs, and systems-level properties of existing drugs. This review focuses on systems pharmacology studies that aim to better understand drug side effects and adverse events. By studying the drugs in the context of cellular networks, these studies provide insights into adverse events caused by off-targets of drugs as well as adverse events-mediated complex network responses. This allows rapid identification of biomarkers for side effect susceptibility. In this way, systems pharmacology will lead to not only newer and more effective therapies, but safer medications with fewer side effects. PMID:20803507

  8. An Overview on Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Antimicrobial Drug Residues in Animal-Derived Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdinasab, Marjan; Yaqub, Mustansara; Rahim, Abdur; Catanante, Gaelle; Hayat, Akhtar; Marty, Jean Louis

    2017-01-01

    Anti-microbial drugs are widely employed for the treatment and cure of diseases in animals, promotion of animal growth, and feed efficiency. However, the scientific literature has indicated the possible presence of antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food, making it one of the key public concerns for food safety. Therefore, it is highly desirable to design fast and accurate methodologies to monitor antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food. Legislation is in place in many countries to ensure antimicrobial drug residue quantities are less than the maximum residue limits (MRL) defined on the basis of food safety. In this context, the recent years have witnessed a special interest in the field of electrochemical biosensors for food safety, based on their unique analytical features. This review article is focused on the recent progress in the domain of electrochemical biosensors to monitor antimicrobial drug residues in animal-derived food. PMID:28837093

  9. Genome-scale metabolic models as platforms for identification of novel genes as antimicrobial drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienda, Bashir Sajo; Salihu, Rabiu; Adamu, Aliyu; Idris, Shehu

    2018-03-01

    The growing number of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria is becoming a world leading challenge for the scientific community and for public health. However, advances in high-throughput technologies and whole-genome sequencing of bacterial pathogens make the construction of bacterial genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) increasingly realistic. The use of GEMs as an alternative platforms will expedite identification of novel unconditionally essential genes and enzymes of target organisms with existing and forthcoming GEMs. This approach will follow the existing protocol for construction of high-quality GEMs, which could ultimately reduce the time, cost and labor-intensive processes involved in identification of novel antimicrobial drug targets in drug discovery pipelines. We discuss the current impact of existing GEMs of selected multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria for identification of novel antimicrobial drug targets and the challenges of closing the gap between genome-scale metabolic modeling and conventional experimental trial-and-error approaches in drug discovery pipelines.

  10. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from hum...

  11. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...

  12. Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Infections, Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanjana; Mosci, Rebekah E; Anderson, Chase M; Snyder, Brian A; Collins, James; Rudrik, James T; Manning, Shannon D

    2017-09-01

    High frequencies of antimicrobial drug resistance were observed in O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains recovered from patients in Michigan during 2010-2014. Resistance was more common in non-O157 strains and independently associated with hospitalization, indicating that resistance could contribute to more severe disease outcomes.

  13. Triple-acting antimicrobial treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  14. [Potential antimicrobial drug interactions in clinical practice: consequences of polypharmacy and multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Múgica, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Polypharmacy is a growing problem nowadays, which can increase the risk of potential drug interactions, and result in a loss of effectiveness. This is particularly relevant to the anti-infective therapy, especially when infection is produced by resistant bacteria, because therapeutic options are limited and interactions can cause treatment failure. All antimicrobial prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed during a week in the Pharmacy Department, in order to detect potential drug-interactions and analysing their clinical significance. A total of 314 antimicrobial prescriptions from 151 patients were checked. There was at least one potential interaction detected in 40% of patients, being more frequent and severe in those infected with multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Drugs most commonly involved were quinolones, azoles, linezolid and vancomycin. Potential drug interactions with antimicrobial agents are a frequent problem that can result in a loss of effectiveness. This is why they should be detected and avoided when possible, in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy, especially in case of multidrug resistant infections.

  15. Expression of Antimicrobial Drug Tolerance by Attached Communities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackart, David F.; Hascall-Dove, Laurel; Caceres, Silvia M.; Kirk, Natalie M.; Podell, Brendan K.; Melander, Christian; Orme, Ian M.; Leid, Jeff G.; Nick, Jerry A.; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to improve methods used to screen anti-tuberculosis drugs. An in vitro assay was developed to test drug treatment strategies that specifically target drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis survived antimicrobial treatment as attached microbial communities when maintained in tissue culture media (RPMI-1640) with or without lysed human peripheral blood leukocytes. When cultured planktonically in the presence of Tween-80, bacilli failed to form microbial communities or reach logarithmic phase growth yet remained highly susceptible to antimicrobial drugs. In the absence of Tween, bacilli tolerated drug therapy by forming complex microbial communities attached to untreated well surfaces or to the extracellular matrix derived from lysed human leukocytes. Treatment of microbial communities with DNase I or Tween effectively dispersed bacilli and restored drug susceptibility. These data demonstrate that in vitro expression of drug tolerance by M. tuberculosis is linked to the establishment of attached microbial communities and that dispersion of bacilli targeting the extracellular matrix including DNA restores drug susceptibility. Modifications of this in vitro assay may prove beneficial in a high throughput platform to screen new anti-tuberculosis drugs especially those that target drug tolerant bacilli. PMID:24478060

  16. Therapeutic Potential of Plants as Anti-Microbials for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The uses of traditional medicinal plants for primary health care have steadily increased worldwide in recent years. Scientists are in search of new phytochemicals that could be developed as useful anti-microbials for treatment of infectious diseases. Currently, out of 80% of pharmaceuticals derived from plants, very few are now being used as anti-microbials. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites that have found anti-microbial properties. This review highlights the current status of traditional medicine, its contribution to modern medicine, recent trends in the evaluation of anti-microbials with a special emphasis upon some tribal medicine, in vitro and in vivo experimental design for screening, and therapeutic efficacy in safety and human clinical trails for commercial outlet. Many of these commercially available compounds are crude preparations administered without performing human clinical trials. Recent methods are useful to standardize the extraction for scientific investigation of new phytochemicals and anti-microbials of traditionally used plants. It is concluded that once the local ethnomedical preparations of traditional sources are scientifically evaluated before dispensing they should replace existing drugs commonly used for the therapeutic treatment of infection. This method should be put into practice for future investigations in the field of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, ethnobotany and other biological fields for drug discovery.

  17. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    have an effective means of monitoring the quality of generic drug products in the market. This results in widespread ... countries. Marketing of such drugs has been widely reported in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. © CNCS .... three-fourth of the plate. The plate was dried in air for 15 minutes and examined under UV-light,.

  18. Susceptibility of Urinary Tract Bacteria to Newer Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the commonest types of bacterial infections. The antibiotic treatment for UTIs is associated with important medical and economic implications. Many different microorganisms can cause UTIs though the most common pathogens are E. coli and members of family Enterobacteriaceae. The knowledge of etiology and antibiotic resistance pattern of the organisms causing urinary tract infection is essential. The present study was undertaken to evaluate trends of antibiotic susceptibility of commonly isolated uropathogens using newer antimicrobial agents, prulifloxacin, fosfomycin (FOM and doripenem. We conclude that maintaining a record of culture results and the antibiogram may help clinicians to determine the empirical and/or specific treatment based on the antibiogram of the isolate for better therapeutic outcome.

  19. Susceptibility of Aeromonas Hydophila Isolates to Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stojanov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila is a microorganism widely distributed in nature: in water, soil, food. It is also part of the normal bacterial flora of many animals. As an opportune microorganism it is a secondary biological agent that contributes to the occurrence of a fish disease and its deterioration. Frequently, its presence is an indication of bad zoohygiene and zootechnical conditions in fish ponds. Reduced quality and quantity of feed, mechanical injuries, parasitosis, seasonal oscillation in temperature present some of the factors that produce favorable conditions for bacterial proliferation of aeromonas in fish ponds, so clinical symptoms of the disease occur. Aeromonas is almost always present in clinical isolates and may be unjustly accused for bad health of fish. Antibiotic therapy is applied even when the clinical findings are clear, what certainly effects the susceptibility to chemotherapeutics. The subject of our work was bacteriological examination of the material obtained from the carps with the observed skin changes and the carps without these changes. Also, antimicrobial susceptibility of Aeromonas hydrophila was tested. The aim of this research was to determined the presence of Aeromonas hydrophilia in the carp ponds and to test antibiotic susceptibility. The material consisted of the samples from the fish ponds where the carps were with and without changed skin. The method the isolation of Aeromonas hydrophila was used. The diffusion disk technique was used for testing antibiotic susceptibility. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to Florephenikol, Flumequine, Olaqindox and Oxitetracycline. The obtained results point that antimicrobial susceptibility was the same regardless of the origin of the samples, i.e. the resistance was the same for both groups of samples (the strains isolated from the fish with skin changes and the strains from fish without changes on skin. The strains were highly resistant: 35% were resistant to

  20. Routine use of antimicrobial drugs during the 2004 cholera epidemic in Douala, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noeske, J; Guévart, E; Kuaban, C; Solle, J; Fonkoua, M C; Mouangue, A; Fouda, A B

    2006-11-01

    To evaluate routine use of antimicrobial drugs for treatment and prevention of cholera with special regards to the evolution of the antimicrobial drug resistance patterns of V. cholerae strains. Retrospective population-based descriptive study. Four thousand nine hundred and forty one notified cholera cases, their 15,381 patients' guards and their 159,263 household members and close neighbours. A total of 4,941 patients received antibiotic therapy according to the treatment protocols. Prophylactic treatment was administered to 15,381 patients' guards in hospitals and to 159,263 household members and close neighbours during home visits. Over the entire outbreak, the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of V. cholerae strains isolated remained stable. The routine use of antimicrobial therapy for cholera cases associated with simultaneous and large scale chemoprophylaxis of close contacts does not seem in our experience to compromise the stability of V. cholerae susceptibility profiles to drugs when applied within a comprehensive package of rigorously monitored community interventions. The role of therapy and chemoprophylaxis in limiting the extent of a cholera epidemic is however difficult to ascertain from our experience. Field trials need to be designed to elucidate this aspect.

  1. Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Potential of Acyclic Amines and Diamines against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurmeet Kaur

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA remains a great challenge despite a decade of research on antimicrobial compounds against their infections. In the present study, various acyclic amines and diamines were chemically synthesized and tested for their antimicrobial as well as antibiofilm activity against MDRSA. Among all the synthesized compounds, an acyclic diamine, (2,2′-((butane-1,4-diylbis(azanediylbis(methylenediphenol designated as ADM 3, showed better antimicrobial activity (minimum inhibitory concentration at 50 μg/mL and antibiofilm activity (MBIC50 at 5 μg/mL. In addition, ADM 3 was capable of reducing the virulence factors expression (anti-virulence. Confocal laser scanning microscope analysis of the in vitro tested urinary catheters showed biofilm reduction as well as bacterial killing by ADM 3. On the whole, our data suggest that acyclic diamines, especially ADM 3 can be a potent lead for the further studies in alternative therapeutic approaches.

  2. Thiamin (Vitamin B1) Biosynthesis and Regulation: A Rich Source of Antimicrobial Drug Targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qinglin; Wang, Honghai; Xie, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP). Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics. PMID:21234302

  3. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad- Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug- Resistant Wound Infections 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...demonstrated the antimicrobial properties of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) against a broad collection of multi-drug resistant bacterial and...spectrum antimicrobial for drug- resistant wound infections) at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2014

  4. Workshop report: the 2012 antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine: exploring the consequences of antimicrobial drug use: a 3-D approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M; Blondeau, J; Cerniglia, C E; Fink-Gremmels, J; Guenther, S; Hunter, R P; Li, X-Z; Papich, M; Silley, P; Soback, S; Toutain, P-L; Zhang, Q

    2014-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global challenge that impacts both human and veterinary health care. The resilience of microbes is reflected in their ability to adapt and survive in spite of our best efforts to constrain their infectious capabilities. As science advances, many of the mechanisms for microbial survival and resistance element transfer have been identified. During the 2012 meeting of Antimicrobial Agents in Veterinary Medicine (AAVM), experts provided insights on such issues as use vs. resistance, the available tools for supporting appropriate drug use, the importance of meeting the therapeutic needs within the domestic animal health care, and the requirements associated with food safety and food security. This report aims to provide a summary of the presentations and discussions occurring during the 2012 AAVM with the goal of stimulating future discussions and enhancing the opportunity to establish creative and sustainable solutions that will guarantee the availability of an effective therapeutic arsenal for veterinary species. © Published (2014). This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Synergism between plant extract and antimicrobial drugs used on Staphylococcus aureus diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Elaine Cristina Betoni

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent, and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the synergism between 13 antimicrobial drugs and 8 plant extracts - "guaco" (Mikania glomerata, guava (Psidium guajava, clove (Syzygium aromaticum, garlic (Allium sativum, lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus, ginger (Zingiber officinale, "carqueja" (Baccharis trimera, and mint (Mentha piperita - against Staphylococcus aureus strains, and for this purpose, the disk method was the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed. Petri dishes were prepared with or without dilution of plant extracts at sub-inhibitory concentrations in Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA, and the inhibitory zones were recorded in millimeters. In vitro anti-Staphylococcus aureus activities of the extracts were confirmed, and synergism was verified for all the extracts; clove, guava, and lemongrass presented the highest synergism rate with antimicrobial drugs, while ginger and garlic showed limited synergistic capacity.

  6. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of Bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from Brazilian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Paula Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110 and non-diarrheic (n=65 fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic, and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  7. Hybrid combinations containing natural products and antimicrobial drugs that interfere with bacterial and fungal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchino, Susana A; Butassi, Estefanía; Cordisco, Estefanía; Svetaz, Laura A

    2017-12-15

    Biofilms contribute to the pathogenesis of many chronic and difficult-to eradicate infections whose treatment is complicated due to the intrinsic resistance to conventional antibiotics. As a consequence, there is an urgent need for strategies that can be used for the prevention and treatment of biofilm-associated infections. The combination therapy comprising an antimicrobial drug with a low molecular weight (MW) natural product and an antimicrobial drug (antifungal or antibacterial) appeared as a good alternative to eradicate biofilms. The aims of this review were to perform a literature search on the different natural products that have showed the ability of potentiating the antibiofilm capacity of antimicrobial drugs, to analyze which are the antimicrobial drugs most used in combination, and to have a look on the microbial species most used to prepare biofilms. Seventeen papers, nine on combinations against antifungal biofilms and eight against antibacterial biofilms were collected. Within the text, the following topics have been developed: breaf history of the discovery of biofilms; stages in the development of a biofilm; the most used methodologies to assess antibiofilm-activity; the natural products with capacity of eradicating biofilms when acting alone; the combinations of low MW natural products with antibiotics or antifungal drugs as a strategy for eradicating microbial biofilms and a list of the low MW natural products that potentiate the inhibition capacity of antifungal and antibacterial drugs against biofilms. Regarding combinations against antifungal biofilms, eight over the nine collected works were carried out with in vitro studies while only one was performed with in vivo assays by using Caenorhabditis elegans nematode. All studies use biofilms of the Candida genus. A 67% of the potentiators were monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and six over the nine works used FCZ as the antifungal drug. The activity of AmpB and Caspo was enhanced in one and two

  8. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue...

  9. Learning from agriculture: understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Yaqi eYou; Ellen K. Silbergeld

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health challenge worldwide, with agricultural use of antimicrobials being one major contributor to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. Globally, most antimicrobials are used in industrial food animal production, a major context for microbiomes encountering low-doses or subtherapeutic-levels of antimicrobial agents from all mechanistic classes. This modern practice exerts broad eco-evolutionary effects on the gut microbiome ...

  10. Effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kayoko; Ohtori, Akira; Tojo, Kakuji

    2010-10-01

    A diffusion model of ocular pharmacokinetics was used to estimate the effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics. In vivo rabbit data after topical instillation of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were compared with the simulated concentrations in the aqueous and vitreous humors. The barrier capacity of the surrounding membranes such as the retina/choroid/sclera (RCS) membrane and the cornea was characterized by dimensionless Sherwood number derived by the pseudo-steady state approach (PSSA). We assumed the barrier capacity decreased by inflammation; when the barrier capacity of the RCS membrane and the cornea was assumed to be one-tenth for the RCS membrane and a half for the cornea respectively, the in vivo data agreed with the simulated profile without contradiction. The drug concentration gradient simulated in the vitreous body near the RCS membrane was more significant in the inflamed eyes than in the normal eyes, suggesting that the elimination of the drugs from the RCS membrane was enhanced by inflammation. The present diffusion model can better describe the ocular pharmacokinetics in both normal and diseased conditions.

  11. The Road from Host-Defense Peptides to a New Generation of Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Boto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Host-defense peptides, also called antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, whose protective action has been used by animals for millions of years, fulfill many requirements of the pharmaceutical industry, such as: (1 broad spectrum of activity; (2 unlike classic antibiotics, they induce very little resistance; (3 they act synergically with conventional antibiotics; (4 they neutralize endotoxins and are active in animal models. However, it is considered that many natural peptides are not suitable for drug development due to stability and biodisponibility problems, or high production costs. This review describes the efforts to overcome these problems and develop new antimicrobial drugs from these peptides or inspired by them. The discovery process of natural AMPs is discussed, as well as the development of synthetic analogs with improved pharmacological properties. The production of these compounds at acceptable costs, using different chemical and biotechnological methods, is also commented. Once these challenges are overcome, a new generation of versatile, potent and long-lasting antimicrobial drugs is expected.

  12. 77 FR 22328 - Guidance for Industry on the Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0094] Guidance for Industry on the Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  13. Understanding and Diagnosing Antimicrobial Resistance on Social Media: A Yearlong Overview of Data and Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Brittany; Hair, Lee; Groshek, Jacob; Krishna, Arunima; Walker, Dylan

    2017-12-05

    To better understand user conversations revolving around antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) on Twitter, we used an online data collection and analysis toolkit with full firehose access to collect corpuses of tweets with "antibiotic" and "antimicrobial resistance" keyword tracks. The date range included tweets from November 28, 2015, to November 25, 2016, for both datasets. This yearlong date range provides insight into how users have discussed antibiotics and AMR and identifies any spikes in activity during a particular time frame. Overall, we found that discussions about antibiotics and AMR predominantly occur in the United States and the United Kingdom, with roughly equal gender participation. These conversations are influenced by news sources, health professionals, and governmental health organizations. Users will often defer to retweet and recirculate content posted from these official sources and link to external articles instead of posting their own musings on the subjects. Our findings are important benchmarks in understanding the prevalence and reach of potential misinformation about antibiotics and AMR on Twitter.

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains ... human medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. One of the major obstacles to understanding the ... Page Last Updated: 02/23/2018 ...

  15. [Markers of antimicrobial drug resistance in the most common bacteria of normal facultative anaerobic intestinal flora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavsić, Teodora

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of normal intestinal flora are frequent carriers of markers of antimicrobial drug resistance. Resistance genes may be exchanged with other bacteria of normal flora as well as with pathogenic bacteria. The increase in the number of markers of resistance is one of the major global health problems, which induces the emergence of multi-resistant strains. The aim of this study is to confirm the presence of markers of resistance in bacteria of normal facultative anaerobic intestinal flora in our region. The experiment included a hundred fecal specimens obtained from a hundred healthy donors. A hundred bacterial strains were isolated (the most numerous representatives of the normal facultative-anaerobic intestinal flora) by standard bacteriological methods. The bacteria were cultivated on Endo agar and SS agar for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Having been incubated, the selected characteristic colonies were submitted to the biochemical analysis. The susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs was tested by standard disc diffusion method, and the results were interpreted according to the Standard of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute 2010. The marker of resistance were found in 42% of the isolated bacteria. The resistance was the most common to ampicillin (42% of isolates), amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (14% of isolates), cephalexin (14%) and cotrimoxazole (8%). The finding of 12 multiresistant strains (12% of isolates) and resistance to ciprofloxacin were significant. The frequency of resistance markers was statistically higher in Klebsiella pneumoniae compared to Escherichia coli of normal flora. The finding of a large number of markers of antimicrobial drug resistance among bacteria of normal intestinal flora shows that it is necessary to begin with systematic monitoring of their antimicrobial resistance because it is an indicator of resistance in the population.

  16. Patients’ attention to and understanding of adverse drug reaction warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresa Muir McNeal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Tresa Muir McNeal1, Colleen Y Colbert1, Christian Cable1, Curtis R Mirkes1, June G Lubowinski2, John D Myers11Department of Medicine, Texas A&M University System HSC College of Medicine, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USA; 2RD Haynes Medical Library, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USAIntroduction: Medications are critical to the management of patient conditions, and they can have significant effects on the success or failure of medical interventions. Patient perceptions of drug warnings play an important role in medication compliance and ultimately disease management. Several factors may affect patients’ understanding of drug warnings and drug labeling, including health literacy and interactions with physicians and pharmacists.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature related to patient perceptions of drug warnings and drug labeling. Descriptive articles and studies regarding patient perceptions and knowledge of adverse drug reaction warnings were reviewed.Methods: The following databases were utilized to search the literature related to patient perceptions of drug warnings: PubMed, Academic Search Premiere, CINAHL, Medline, Psych Info, Business Source Complete, Alternative Healthwatch, Health Source (both Nursing/Academic and Consumer additions, JSTOR, and Master File Premiere. For the purpose of this review, any peer-reviewed article was eligible. Exclusionary criteria included: articles published in languages other than English, articles/studies on patient perceptions of vaccines and chemotherapy, and articles related to perceptions of medications administered in the inpatient setting. Forty-six articles were included in the review.Results: Health literacy has been shown to have a major impact on patients’ ability to understand potential adverse reactions and instructions on correct dosing of medications. Direct communication with physicians and pharmacists is one of the most important and

  17. Marine sponges: potential sources of new antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, M S; Santos, O C S; Muricy, G

    2009-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are sessile marine filter feeders that have developed efficient defense mechanisms against foreign attackers such as viruses, bacteria, or eukaryotic organisms. Marine sponges are among the richest sources of pharmacologically-active chemicals from marine organisms. It is suggested that (at least) some of the bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from sponges are produced by functional enzyme clusters, which originated from the sponges and their associated microorganisms. More than 5,300 different products are known from sponges and their associated microorganisms, and more than 200 new metabolites from sponges are reported each year. As infectious microorganisms evolve and develop resistance to existing pharmaceuticals, the marine sponge provides novel leads against bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic diseases. Many marine natural products have successfully advanced to the late stages of clinical trials, as for example ara-A (vidarabine), an anti-viral drug used against the herpes simplex encephalitis virus. This substance is in clinical use for many years. Moreover, a growing number of candidates have been selected as promising leads for extended preclinical assessment, including manzamine A (activity against malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and others), lasonolides (antifungal activity) and psammaplin A (antibacterial activity). In this review we have surveyed the discoveries of products derived from marine sponges and associated bacteria that have shown in vivo efficacy or potent in vitro activity against infectious and parasitic diseases, including bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan infections. Our objective was to highlight the substances that have the greatest potential to lead to clinically useful treatments.

  18. [Pilot study evaluating the ratio of adverse drug reactions related to antimicrobials over their consumption in 2012-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérard, C; Cerruti, L; Cotteret, C; Lebel, D; Bussières, J-F

    2016-03-01

    As part of our antimicrobials stewardship program, we were interested in the use of antimicrobials and prevalence of adverse drug reactions associated with the use of these drugs. The retrospective and descriptive study was conducted over a one year-period between April 1st 2012 and March 31st 2013 in a mother-child Hospital. We determined the ratio: number of adverse drug reactions over 10,000 defined daily dose or 10,000days of therapy. We identified the ratios higher than average for which the confidence interval did not cross the calculated average. The severity of the adverse drug reactions was codified using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. We found 570 adverse drug reactions including 100 (17.5%) adverse drug reactions related to antimicrobials during the financial year 2012-2013. It represented 96 patients. Thus, five antimicrobials, for which the confidence interval does not cross the calculated average value, may be targeted in risk management because they have a higher ratio than average: piperacillin (290 [113-722]), valganciclovir (244 [43-1260]), ceftriaxone (114 [56-234]), acyclovir (76 [26-220]) and liposomal amphotericin B (72 [20-258]). In a mother-child university hospital, we calculated a ratios of 19 [15-23] and 13 [10-15], it allows us targeting some antimicrobials in our approach to prevention and management of adverse drug reactions. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeol Ahn

    Full Text Available The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  20. Quorum sensing inhibitory drugs as next generation antimicrobials: worth the effort?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, M.

    2008-01-01

    , elderly, immunocompromised, and hospitalized patients are susceptible to infections caused by bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. These bacteria form chronic, biofilm-based infections, which are challenging because bacterial cells living......Bacterial resistance poses a major challenge to the development of new antimicrobial agents. Conventional antibiotics have an inherent obsolescence because they select for development of resistance. Bacterial infections have again become a serious threat in developed countries. Particularly...... as biofilms are more tolerant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Therefore, research should identify new antimicrobial agents and their corresponding targets to decrease the biofilm-forming capability or persistence of the infectious bacteria. Here, we review one such drug target: bacterial...

  1. Antimicrobial drug resistance among clinically relevant bacterial isolates in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Stije J; van Leth, Frank; Tarekegn, Hayalnesh; Schultsz, Constance

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) amongst bacterial pathogens in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA), despite calls for continent-wide surveillance to inform empirical treatment guidelines. We searched PubMed and additional databases for susceptibility data of key pathogens for surveillance, published between 1990 and 2013. Extracted data were standardized to a prevalence of resistance in populations of isolates and reported by clinical syndrome, microorganism, relevant antimicrobial drugs and region. We identified 2005 publications, of which 190 were analysed. Studies predominantly originated from east sSA (61%), were hospital based (60%), were from an urban setting (73%) and reported on isolates from patients with a febrile illness (42%). Quality procedures for susceptibility testing were described in resistance to chloramphenicol in Enterobacteriaceae, isolated from patients with a febrile illness, ranged between 31.0% and 94.2%, whilst MP of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins ranged between 0.0% and 46.5%. MP of resistance to nalidixic acid in Salmonella enterica Typhi ranged between 15.4% and 43.2%. The limited number of studies providing prevalence data on AMR in Gram-positive pathogens or in pathogens isolated from patients with a respiratory tract infection, meningitis, urinary tract infection or hospital-acquired infection suggested high prevalence of resistance to chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline and low prevalence to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. Our results indicate high prevalence of AMR in clinical bacterial isolates to antimicrobial drugs commonly used in sSA. Enhanced approaches for AMR surveillance are needed to support empirical therapy in sSA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. 'Trafficking' or 'personal use': do people who regularly inject drugs understand Australian drug trafficking laws?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caitlin E; Ritter, Alison; Cowdery, Nicholas; Sindicich, Natasha

    2014-11-01

    Legal thresholds for drug trafficking, over which possession of an illicit drug is deemed 'trafficking' as opposed to 'personal use', are employed in all Australian states and territories excepting Queensland. In this paper, we explore the extent to which people who regularly inject drugs understand such laws. Participants from the seven affected states/territories in the 2012 Illicit Drug Reporting System (n = 823) were asked about their legal knowledge of trafficking thresholds: whether, if arrested, quantity possessed would affect legal action taken; and the quantities of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and cannabis that would constitute an offence of supply. Data were compared against the actual laws to identify the accuracy of knowledge by drug type and state, and sociodemographics, use and purchasing patterns related to knowledge. Most Illicit Drug Reporting System participants (77%) correctly said that quantity possessed would affect charge received. However, only 55.8% nominated any specific quantity that would constitute an offence of supply, and of those 22.6% nominated a wrong quantity, namely a quantity that was larger than the actual quantity for supply (this varied by state and drug). People who regularly inject drugs have significant gaps in knowledge about Australian legal thresholds for drug trafficking, particularly regarding the actual threshold quantities. This suggests that there may be a need to improve education for this population. Necessity for accurate knowledge would also be lessened by better design of Australian drug trafficking laws. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  3. Commercial Carlinae radix herbal drug: botanical identity, chemical composition and antimicrobial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović-Radić, Zorica; Čomić, Ljiljana; Radulović, Niko; Blagojević, Polina; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana; Rajković, Jelena

    2012-08-01

    Carlinae radix is an herbal drug, commonly used by the locals in southeastern Serbia for the treatment of respiratory and urogenital diseases and, externally, for various skin conditions. There still seems to be no detailed studies correlating the chemical composition of this drug and its ethnopharmacological uses. Chemical composition, antimicrobial activity and mode of action of C. radix essential oil, isolated from commercial samples (confirmation of whose true biological identity was also the aim of this work) were analyzed. Antimicrobial potential of decoctions (extracts prepared by boiling plant material in a given solvent), used in ethnomedicine preferentially to the pure essential oil, was also investigated. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation was screened for antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Effects of the oil on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus cells were investigated using turbidimetric measurements and visualized using scanning electron microscopy. Analyses of the chemical composition of the oils were done using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both the essential oil and the decocts exhibited a very high antimicrobial activity against all tested strains, with S. aureus as the most sensitive one [e.g., for the oil sample the values for minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were 0.02, 0.04 µL/mL, respectively]. Growth curves of S. aureus demonstrated a significant decrease in turbidity (for the MIC concentration this amounted to ca. 70%) showing a concentration-dependent lysis of the cells, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Chemical composition, anatomical and morphological features of the sample pointed to Carlina acanthifolia L. (Asteraceae) instead of Carlina acaulis L. (Asteraceae). The results showed significant antimicrobial effect of the essential oil and the decoctions and support the use of this plant in

  4. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  5. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes.

  6. Use of antimicrobial growth promoters in food animals and Enterococcus faecium resistance to therapeutic antimicrobial drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1999-01-01

    Supplementing animal feed with antimicrobial agents to enhance growth has been common practice for more than 30 years and is estimated to constitute more than half the total antimicrobial use worldwide. The potential public health consequences of this use have been debated; however, until recentl...

  7. The measurement of a new antimicrobial quinolone in hair as an index of drug exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, T; Nakano, M; Akiyama, H; Nakashima, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Scalp hair samples were obtained at 1 month intervals up to 5 months from healthy male volunteers participating in a phase I study of a new antimicrobial quinolone, OPC-17116. 2. Hair was sectioned into 1 cm lengths from the scalp end. Corresponding portions from five pieces of hair were dissolved in 1 N NaOH and assayed for OPC-17116 by h.p.l.c. 3. In all subjects taking a single dose (400 mg, n = 5) or repeated doses (400 mg day-1, twice daily, for 6.5 days, n = 6), the drug was detected...

  8. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility of Staphylococcus intermedius clinical isolates from canine pyoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiere, J-P; Medaille, C; Mangion, C

    2005-02-01

    A total of 50 Staphylococcus intermedius strains isolated in France from canine pyodermas in 2002 were investigated for their susceptibility to various antimicrobial drugs. Antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed using a 2-fold serial dilution method in Mueller-Hinton agar, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined. About 62% of the 50 strains tested were producers of beta-lactamase and categorized as penicillin-resistant. About 26% demonstrated resistance to sulphonamides, 46% to oxytetracycline, 30% to chloramphenicol, 28% to streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin or erythromycin, 22% to clindamycin, 6% to doxycycline, 2% to gentamicin, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin or pradofloxacin. Acquired resistance was not observed to a clavulanic acid-amoxicillin combination, oxacillin, cephalosporins (cephalexin, ceftiofur and cefquinome), trimethoprim, a sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim combination and florfenicol. About 42% were simultaneously resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes (multiresistance). All isolates with acquired resistance to erythromycin were also resistant to streptomycin and neomycin/kanamycin. About 22% of isolates exhibited cross-resistance between erythromycin and clindamycin and all clindamycin-resistant isolates also exhibited resistance to erythromycin. Resistance to penicillin, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol was also positively associated with resistance to erythromycin and streptomycin.

  9. Antimicrobial potential of Halophilic actinomycetes against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Sana; Sajid, Imran

    2016-03-01

    A collection of forty halophilic actinomycetes isolated from water and mud samples of the saline lake at Kalar Kahar, salt range, Pakistan, was screened to investigate their antimicrobial potential against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens. The isolates exhibited significant tolerance to alkaline conditions and grew well at pH 9-11. The taxonomic status of the isolated strains was determined by morphological, biochemical and physiological characterization and by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. The results revealed that majority of the isolates (90%) belong to the genus Streptomyces. Most of the isolates exhibited remarkable antimicrobial activity up to 20mm zone of inhibition against MDR ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter and Acinetobacter spp. Additionally the isolates showed moderate to high cytotoxicity in the range of 40 to 80% larval mortality against Artemia salina in a micro well cytotoxicity assay. The chemical screening or the so called metabolic fingerprinting of the methanolic extracts of each isolate, by thin layer chromatography (TLC) using various staining reagents and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), indicated an impressive diversity of the compounds produced by these strains. The study reveals that these halophilic actinomycetes are a promising source of bioactive compounds. The preparative scale fermentation, isolation, purification and structure elucidation of the compounds produced by them may yield novel antimicrobial or chemotherapeutic agents.

  10. Drug release from hydrogel: a new understanding of transport phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perale, G; Rossi, F; Santoro, M; Marchetti, P; Mele, A; Castiglione, F; Raffa, E; Masi, M

    2011-06-01

    In tissue engineering, i.e., in combined advanced technologies to replace damaged or missing parts of living tissues, emerging strategies strongly point toward the use of hydrogels also for their ability of being vehicles for local controlled drug delivery. The investigation of drug release mechanisms in such matrices thus plays a key role in the design of smart system but literature is still very controversial on theoretical interpretations and understanding of available data. In this framework we used the new HRMAS-NMR DOSY technique to study the diffusive motions of sodium fluorescein, a drug mimetic small chromophoric molecule, loaded in a promising hydrogel developed for tissue engineering. While fluorescein behavior in water was as expected, also showing aggregation from mid concentrations, data collected within hydrogel samples surprisingly showed no aggregation and diffusion coefficients were always higher with respect to aqueous solution. Furthermore, the promotion of diffusion increased along with fluorescein concentration. The proportion of this effect was directly linked to hydrogel mesh size, thus carrying intrinsic novelty, but also complexity, and suggesting that not only strictly hydrodynamic effects should be considered but also electrostatic interactions between polymer chains and drug molecules might be key players in avoiding fluorescein aggregation and also affecting diffusivity.

  11. Strategies to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Rajesh R; Kohli, Gurdeep Singh; Katekhaye, Vijay M; Swami, Onkar C

    2014-07-01

    The global burden of antimicrobial resistance is rising and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in clinical and community setting. Spread of antibiotic resistance to different environmental niches and development of superbugs have further complicated the effective control strategies. International, national and local approaches have been advised for control and prevention of antimicrobial resistance. Rational use of antimicrobials, regulation on over-the-counter availability of antibiotics, improving hand hygiene and improving infection prevention and control are the major recommended approaches. Thorough understanding of resistance mechanism and innovation in new drugs and vaccines is the need. A multidisciplinary, collaborative, regulatory approach is demanded for combating antimicrobial resistance.

  12. [Investigation of antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of some preservatives used in drugs, cosmetics and food products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Nihal; Kaynak Onurdağ, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Preservatives are added to food, drugs and other pharmaceutical products to avoid microbial contamination. For antimicrobial activity testing and preservative efficacy testing, vegetative forms of the standard test organisms are used. However, microbial biofilm formation may occur on living tissues, medical implants, industrial or drinking water pipes, natural aquatic systems, glass and plastic surfaces. In our study, it was aimed to determine the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of some preservatives used in drug, cosmetics and food products and to compare the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) of microbial biofilm formed on glass surfaces which are commonly used in those areas and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the planktonic forms. In the study Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Salmonella Thyphimurium SL1344, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Staphylococcus epidermidis NCTC 11047, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were used as the standard strains; sodium nitrate, methylparaben, prophylparaben, potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate as the preservatives; ampicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, amphotericin B and itraconazole as the antimicrobial agents. MIC values were determined through the guidelines of CLSI M100-S18 and M27-A3 protocols. BioTimer method was used to determine the MBIC values. The value of "colony forming unit (CFU)/glass beads" was calculated using the graphics drawn by plotting the time of color change for phenol red or resazurin against log10CFU. All experiments were done with four media at different pH values namely pH: 7, pH: 6.5, pH: 6 and pH: 5.5. According to the results of tests on planktonic forms of the microorganisms, sodium benzoate was determined to be the most effective preservative against all the microorganisms tested except S.aureus and E.faecalis. The most effective preservative against S.aureus and E.faecalis was prophylparaben. Prophylparaben

  13. Campylobacter Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Humans, Broiler Chickens, and Pigs, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Kempf, Isabelle; Lehours, Philippe; Labadi, Leila; Camou, Christine; Denis, Martine; de Valk, Henriette; Desenclos, Jean-Claude; Mégraud, Francis

    2007-01-01

    We describe isolates from human Campylobacter infection in the French population and the isolates' antimicrobial drug resistance patterns since 1986 and compare the trends with those of isolates from broiler chickens and pigs from 1999 to 2004. Among 5,685 human Campylobacter isolates, 76.2% were C. jejuni, 17.2% C. coli, and 5.0% C. fetus. Resistance to nalidixic acid increased from 8.2% in 1990 to 26.3% in 2004 (p<10-3), and resistance to ampicillin was high over time. Nalidixic acid resistance was greater for C. coli (21.3%) than for C. jejuni (14.9%, p<10-3). C. jejuni resistance to ciprofloxacin in broilers decreased from 31.7% in 2002 to 9.0% in 2004 (p = 0.02). The patterns of resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones were similar between 1999 and 2004 in human and broiler isolates for C. jejuni. These results suggest a potential benefit of a regulation policy limiting use of antimicrobial drugs in food animals. PMID:17479889

  14. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  15. Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates to Propolis Extract Alone or in Combination with Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław Sajewicz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess in vitro the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract of Polish propolis (EEPP against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA clinical isolates. The combined effect of EEPP and 10 selected antistaphylococcal drugs on S. aureus clinical cultures was also investigated. EEPP composition was analyzed by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC method. The flavonoid compounds identified in Polish Propolis included flavones, flavonones, flavonolols, flavonols and phenolic acids. EEPP displayed varying effectiveness against twelve S. aureus strains, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC within the range from 0.39 to 0.78 mg/mL, determined by broth microdilution method. The average MIC was 0.54 ± 0.22 mg/mL, while calculated MIC50 and MIC90 were 0.39 mg/mL and 0.78 mg/mL, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of the EEPP ranged from 0.78 to 3.13 mg/mL. The in vitro combined effect of EEPP and 10 antibacterial drugs was investigated using disk diffusion method-based assay. Addition of EEPP to cefoxitin (FOX, clindamycin (DA, tetracycline (TE, tobramycin (TOB, linezolid (LIN, trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole (SXT, penicillin (P, erythromycin (E regimen, yielded stronger, cumulative antimicrobial effect, against all tested S. aureus strains than EEPP and chemotherapeutics alone. In the case of ciprofloxacin (CIP and chloramphenicol (C no synergism with EEPP was observed.

  16. Prospective study on quantitative and qualitative antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory drug use in white veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardon, Bart; Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen; Persoons, Davy; Hostens, Miel; De Bleecker, Koen; Deprez, Piet

    2012-04-01

    To document and quantify drug use in white veal calves, an intensive livestock production system where multidrug resistance is abundantly present. Drug consumption data were prospectively collected on 15 white veal production cohorts (n = 5853 calves) in Belgium (2007-09). Treatment incidences (TIs) based on animal defined daily dose (ADD), prescribed daily dose (PDD) and used daily dose (UDD) were calculated. Risk factors were identified by linear regression. The average TI(ADD) of antimicrobial treatments was 416.8 ADD per 1000 animals at risk. Predominantly, oral group antimicrobial treatments were used (95.8%). Of the oral group antimicrobial treatments, 12% and 88% were used for prophylactic or metaphylactic indications, respectively. The main indication for group and individual drug use was respiratory disease. The most frequently used antimicrobials (group treatments) were oxytetracycline (23.7%), amoxicillin (18.5%), tylosin (17.2%) and colistin (15.2%). Deviations from the leaflet dosage recommendations were frequently encountered, with 43.7% of the group treatments underdosed (often oxytetracycline and tylosin to treat dysbacteriosis). In 33.3% of the oral antimicrobial group treatments a combination of two antimicrobial preparations was used. Smaller integrations used more antimicrobials in group treatments than larger ones (P combines all steps of the production chain by having its own feed plant and slaughterhouse and by placing its calves in veal herds owned by producers that fatten these calves for this integration on contract. Producers used higher dosages than prescribed by the veterinarian in cohorts with a single caretaker (P < 0.01). The present study provided detailed information on the intensive antimicrobial use in the white veal industry. Reduction can only be achieved by reducing the number of oral group treatments.

  17. Effect of Antimicrobial Use in Agricultural Animals on Drug-resistant Foodborne Campylobacteriosis in Humans: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrackin, M A; Helke, Kristi L; Galloway, Ashley M; Poole, Ann Z; Salgado, Cassandra D; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-10-02

    Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada and Denmark from 2010 to July 2014, 195 articles were retained for abstract review, 50 met study criteria for full article review with 36 retained for which data are presented. Two publications reported increase in macrolide resistance of Campylobacter coli isolated from feces of swine receiving macrolides in feed, and one of these described similar findings for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. A study in growing turkeys demonstrated increased macrolide resistance associated with therapeutic dosing with Tylan® in drinking water. One publication linked tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone SA in raw cow's milk to a foodborne outbreak in humans. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter from farm to fork. Recent literature confirms that on farm antibiotic selection pressure can increase colonization of animals with drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. but is inadequately detailed to establish a causal relationship between use of antimicrobials in agricultural animals and prevalence of drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans.

  18. Improved antimicrobial property and controlled drug release kinetics of silver sulfadiazine loaded ordered mesoporous silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Jangra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the loading of silver sulfadiazine into ordered mesoporous silica material by post-impregnation method and its effect on the in vitro release kinetics and antimicrobial property of the drug. The formulated SBA-15 silica material with rope-like morphology and SBA-15-silver sulfadiazine (SBA-AgSD were characterized by UV–visible spectrophotometer, small and wide-angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of SBA-AgSD revealed a high loading amount of 52.87%. Nitrogen adsorption–desorption analysis confirmed the drug entrapment into host material by revealing a reduced surface area (214 m2/g and pore diameter (6.7 nm of the SBA-AgSD. The controlled release of silver sulfadiazine drug from the mesoporous silica to simulated gastric, intestinal and body fluids was evaluated. The Korsmeyer–Peppas model fits the drug release data with the non-Fickian diffusion model and zero order kinetics of SBA-AgSD. The antibacterial performance of the SBA-AgSD was evaluated with respect to Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The controlled drug delivery of the SBA-AgSD revealed improved antibacterial activity, thus endorsing its applicability in effective wound dressing.

  19. Dexamethasone abrogates the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of different drugs against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquila Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are part of the human microbiota and are also important bacterial pathogens, for which therapeutic options are lacking nowadays. The combined administration of corticosteroids and antimicrobials is commonly used in the treatment of infectious diseases to control inflammatory processes and to minimize potential toxicity of antimicrobials, avoiding sequelae. Although different pharmaceutical dosage forms of antimicrobials combined to corticosteroids are available, studies on the interference of corticosteroids on the pharmacological activity of antimicrobials are scarce and controversial. Here, we provide evidence of the interference of dexamethasone on the pharmacological activity of clinically important antimicrobial drugs against biofilms and planktonic cells of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Broth microdilution assays of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC of gentamicin, chloramphenicol, oxacillin, ceftriaxone and meropenem were conducted with and without the addition of dexamethasone. The effect of all drugs was abrogated by dexamethasone in their MIC, MBC, and MBEC, except gentamicin and meropenem, for which the MBC was not affected in some strains. The present study opens doors for more investigations on in vitro and in vivo effects and safety of the combination of antimicrobials and glucocorticoids.

  20. RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRESENCE OF ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG RESIDUES IN MEAT PRODUCTS AND PRODUCTS OF ANIMAL SLAUGHTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Bataeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The risks associated with the presence of antimicrobial drug residues in meat and products of animal slaughter were determined. One of them is the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microorganisms isolated from meat and products of animal slaughter. It was established that Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Pseudomonas were resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline, tylosin and cephalolexin. However, Listeria monocytogenes did not have resistance to these antibiotics. It was also established that when entering an animal body, antimicrobials were accumulated mostly in liver and kidneys of an animal followed by meat and, to the least degree, in fat. It was found that up to 65% of the tested samples were contaminated with antimicrobials to a greater or lesser degree.

  1. Mesobuthus Venom-Derived Antimicrobial Peptides Possess Intrinsic Multifunctionality and Differential Potential as Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Animal venoms are a mixture of peptides and proteins that serve two basic biological functions: predation and defense against both predators and microbes. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a common component extensively present in various scorpion venoms (herein abbreviated as svAMPs. However, their roles in predation and defense against predators and potential as drugs are poorly understood. Here, we report five new venom peptides with antimicrobial activity from two Mesobuthus scorpion species. These α-helical linear peptides displayed highly bactericidal activity toward all the Gram-positive bacteria used here but differential activity against Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. In addition to the antibiotic activity, these AMPs displayed lethality to houseflies and hemotoxin-like toxicity on mice by causing hemolysis, tissue damage and inducing inflammatory pain. Unlike AMPs from other origins, these venom-derived AMPs seem to be unsuitable as anti-infective drugs due to their high hemolysis and low serum stability. However, MeuTXKβ1, a known two-domain Mesobuthus AMP, is an exception since it exhibits high activity toward antibiotic resistant Staphylococci clinical isolates with low hemolysis and high serum stability. The findings that the classical AMPs play predatory and defensive roles indicate that the multifunctionality of scorpion venom components is an intrinsic feature likely evolved by natural selection from microbes, prey and predators of scorpions. This definitely provides an excellent system in which one can study how a protein adaptively evolves novel functions in a new environment. Meantimes, new strategies are needed to remove the toxicity of svAMPs on eukaryotic cells when they are used as leads for anti-infective drugs.

  2. Pull Incentives for Antibacterial Drug Development: An Analysis by the Transatlantic Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne; Opalska, Aleksandra; Van Hengel, Arjon J; Larsen, Joseph

    2017-10-15

    New alternative market models are needed to incentivize companies to invest in developing new antibacterial drugs. In a previous publication, the Transatlantic Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (TATFAR) summarized the key areas of consensus for economic incentives for antibacterial drug development. That work determined that there was substantial agreement on the need for a mixture of push and pull incentives and particularly those that served to delink the revenues from the volumes sold. Pull incentives reward successful development by increasing or ensuring future revenue. Several pull incentives have been proposed that could substantially reward the development of new antibacterial drugs. In this second article authored by representatives of TATFAR, we examine the advantages and disadvantages of different pull incentives for antibacterial drug development. It is TATFAR's hope that this analysis, combined with other related analyses, will provide actionable information that will shape policy makers' thinking on this important issue. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  4. Host-directed antimicrobial drugs with broad-spectrum efficacy against intracellular bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Daniel M; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Riley, Sean P; Martinez, Juan J; Steck, Theodore L; Crosson, Sean; Shuman, Howard A; Gabay, Joëlle E

    2014-07-29

    We sought a new approach to treating infections by intracellular bacteria, namely, by altering host cell functions that support their growth. We screened a library of 640 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds for agents that render THP-1 cells resistant to infection by four intracellular pathogens. We identified numerous drugs that are not antibiotics but were highly effective in inhibiting intracellular bacterial growth with limited toxicity to host cells. These compounds are likely to target three kinds of host functions: (i) G protein-coupled receptors, (ii) intracellular calcium signals, and (iii) membrane cholesterol distribution. The compounds that targeted G protein receptor signaling and calcium fluxes broadly inhibited Coxiella burnetii, Legionella pneumophila, Brucella abortus, and Rickettsia conorii, while those directed against cholesterol traffic strongly attenuated the intracellular growth of C. burnetii and L. pneumophila. These pathways probably support intracellular pathogen growth so that drugs that perturb them may be therapeutic candidates. Combining host- and pathogen-directed treatments is a strategy to decrease the emergence of drug-resistant intracellular bacterial pathogens. Importance: Although antibiotic treatment is often successful, it is becoming clear that alternatives to conventional pathogen-directed therapy must be developed in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance. Moreover, the costs and timing associated with the development of novel antimicrobials make repurposed FDA-approved drugs attractive host-targeted therapeutics. This paper describes a novel approach of identifying such host-targeted therapeutics against intracellular bacterial pathogens. We identified several FDA-approved drugs that inhibit the growth of intracellular bacteria, thereby implicating host intracellular pathways presumably utilized by bacteria during infection. Copyright © 2014 Czyż et al.

  5. Drug policy constellations: A Habermasian approach for understanding English drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Alex; Zampini, Giulia Federica

    2018-04-24

    It is increasingly accepted that a view of policy as a rational process of fitting evidence-based means to rationally justified ends is inadequate for understanding the actual processes of drug policy making. We aim to provide a better description and explanation of recent English drug policy decisions. We develop the policy constellation concept from the work of Habermas, in dialogue with data from two contemporary debates in English policy; on decriminalisation of drug possession and on recovery in drug treatment. We collect data on these debates through long-term participant observation, stakeholder interviews (n = 15) and documentary analysis. We show the importance of social asymmetries in power in enabling structurally advantaged groups to achieve the institutionalisation of their moral preferences as well as the reproduction of their social and economic power through the deployment of policies that reflect their material interests and normative beliefs. The most influential actors in English drug policy come together in a 'medico-penal constellation', in which the aims and practices of public health and social control overlap. Formal decriminalisation of possession has not occurred, despite the efforts of members of a challenging constellation which supports it. Recovery was put forward as the aim of drug treatment by members of a more powerfully connected constellation. It has been absorbed into the practice of 'recovery-oriented' drug treatment in a way that maintains the power of public health professionals to determine the form of treatment. Actors who share interests and norms come together in policy constellations. Strategic action within and between constellations creates policies that may not take the form that was intended by any individual actor. These policies do not result from purely rational deliberation, but are produced through 'systematically distorted communication'. They enable the most structurally favoured actors to institutionalise

  6. Understanding mechanisms of toxicity: Insights from drug discovery research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, Keith A.; Kavlock, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Toxicology continues to rely heavily on use of animal testing for prediction of potential for toxicity in humans. Where mechanisms of toxicity have been elucidated, for example endocrine disruption by xenoestrogens binding to the estrogen receptor, in vitro assays have been developed as surrogate assays for toxicity prediction. This mechanistic information can be combined with other data such as exposure levels to inform a risk assessment for the chemical. However, there remains a paucity of such mechanistic assays due at least in part to lack of methods to determine specific mechanisms of toxicity for many toxicants. A means to address this deficiency lies in utilization of a vast repertoire of tools developed by the drug discovery industry for interrogating the bioactivity of chemicals. This review describes the application of high-throughput screening assays as experimental tools for profiling chemicals for potential for toxicity and understanding underlying mechanisms. The accessibility of broad panels of assays covering an array of protein families permits evaluation of chemicals for their ability to directly modulate many potential targets of toxicity. In addition, advances in cell-based screening have yielded tools capable of reporting the effects of chemicals on numerous critical cell signaling pathways and cell health parameters. Novel, more complex cellular systems are being used to model mammalian tissues and the consequences of compound treatment. Finally, high-throughput technology is being applied to model organism screens to understand mechanisms of toxicity. However, a number of formidable challenges to these methods remain to be overcome before they are widely applicable. Integration of successful approaches will contribute towards building a systems approach to toxicology that will provide mechanistic understanding of the effects of chemicals on biological systems and aid in rationale risk assessments

  7. In vitro and in vivo analysis of antimicrobial agents alone and in combination against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songzhe eHE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of tigecycline and other 13 common antimicrobial agents, alone or in combination, against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.MethodsAn in vitro susceptibility test of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii was used to detect minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs. A mouse lung infection model of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii,established by the ultrasonic atomization method, was used to define in vivo antimicrobial activities.Results Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii showed high sensitivity to tigecycline (98% inhibition, polymyxin B (78.2% inhibition, and minocycline (74.2% inhibition. However, the use of these antimicrobial agents in combination with other antimicrobial agents produced synergistic or additive effects. In vivo data showed that white blood cell (WBC counts in drug combination groups C (minocycline + amikacin and D (minocycline + rifampicin were significantly higher than in groups A (tigecycline and B (polymyxin B (P < 0.05, after administration of the drugs 24h post-infection. Lung tissue inflammation gradually increased in the model group during the first 24h after ultrasonic atomization infection; vasodilation, congestion with hemorrhage were observed 48h post infection. After three days of anti-infective therapy in groups A, B, C and D, lung tissue inflammation in each group gradually recovered with clear structures. The mortality rates in drug combination groups (groups C and D were much lower than in groups A and B.ConclusionThe combination of minocycline with either rifampicin or amikacin is more effective against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii than single-agent tigecycline or polymyxin B. In addition, the mouse lung infection by ultrasonic atomization is a suitable model for drug screening and analysis of infection mechanism.

  8. Penetration of antimicrobials to pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and muscle and impact of drug physicochemical properties determined by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottbøll, Lisa Amanda Holm; Friis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objectives of this study were to characterize antimicrobial drug penetration into the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and extracellular fluid (ECF) of muscle in relation to physicochemical properties of the drugs (molecular mass, Log D, polar surface area and charge......), using intrabronchial microdialysis. The series of drugs tested include gentamicin, sulfadiazine, cefquinome, minocycline and colistin. METHODS: Drug concentrations were measured during 2h of steady state plasma drug concentrations at therapeutic levels in anesthetized pigs. Microdialysis probes were.......7) and colistin (0.26, 0.12). The penetration of drugs into PELF (r(2)=0.55-0.77, p=0.0004-0.0089) and ECF of muscle (r(2)=0.39-0.53, p=0.0108-0.0397) was positively correlated to Log D, whereas molecular mass, polar surface area and charge were negatively correlated to drug penetration. Sulfadiazine, gentamicin...

  9. Combating mutations in genetic disease and drug resistance: understanding molecular mechanisms to guide drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanaz, Amanda T S; Rodrigues, Carlos H M; Pires, Douglas E V; Ascher, David B

    2017-06-01

    Mutations introduce diversity into genomes, leading to selective changes and driving evolution. These changes have contributed to the emergence of many of the current major health concerns of the 21st century, from the development of genetic diseases and cancers to the rise and spread of drug resistance. The experimental systematic testing of all mutations in a system of interest is impractical and not cost-effective, which has created interest in the development of computational tools to understand the molecular consequences of mutations to aid and guide rational experimentation. Areas covered: Here, the authors discuss the recent development of computational methods to understand the effects of coding mutations to protein function and interactions, particularly in the context of the 3D structure of the protein. Expert opinion: While significant progress has been made in terms of innovative tools to understand and quantify the different range of effects in which a mutation or a set of mutations can give rise to a phenotype, a great gap still exists when integrating these predictions and drawing causality conclusions linking variants. This often requires a detailed understanding of the system being perturbed. However, as part of the drug development process it can be used preemptively in a similar fashion to pharmacokinetics predictions, to guide development of therapeutics to help guide the design and analysis of clinical trials, patient treatment and public health policy strategies.

  10. Extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement in antimicrobial drug development research: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Bird, Emma; Gibson, Andy; Grier, Sally; Chin, Teh Li; Stoddart, Margaret; MacGowan, Alasdair

    2018-02-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is increasingly recognized as bringing a range of benefits to clinical and health services research. Recent systematic reviews have identified and synthesized many benefits (eg higher recruitment rates) and some costs (eg extra time need). Much of the literature focuses on PPI in long-term conditions rather than more acute health care in which the majority of microbiological research is undertaken. The aim was to identify the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. Objectives were to identify any relevant reporting of PPI in antimicrobial research; appraise the quality of reporting on PPI using recognized PPI reporting and critical appraisal tools; and extract and synthesize data on the impact of PPI. A systematic review was undertaken with a search strategy based on four word groups (PPI, patients, antimicrobial drug development and outcomes). Eight online databases were searched. English language publication, publication between 1996 and 2016 and studies describing PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. No studies were found through online searching that met the search strategy and inclusion criteria. One relevant protocol paper with a brief mention of PPI was identified through expert recommendation. Commentary papers recommending PPI were identified through website searching and expert opinion. Despite strong policy guidance encouraging PPI at the international and national levels, and anecdotal accounts of PPI taking place, evidence for the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research has not yet appeared in the peer-reviewed literature. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Antimicrobial Action of Water-Soluble β-Chitosan against Clinical Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Cheol Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the number of patients infected by drug-resistant pathogenic microbes has increased remarkably worldwide, and a number of studies have reported new antibiotics from natural sources. Among them, chitosan, with a high molecular weight and α-conformation, exhibits potent antimicrobial activity, but useful applications as an antibiotic are limited by its cytotoxicity and insolubility at physiological pH. In the present study, the antibacterial activity of low molecular weight water-soluble (LMWS α-chitosan (α1k, α5k, and α10k with molecular masses of 1, 5, and 10 kDa, respectively and β-chitosan (β1k, β5k, and β10k was compared using a range of pathogenic bacteria containing drug-resistant bacteria isolated from patients at different pH. Interestingly, β5k and β10k exhibited potent antibacterial activity, even at pH 7.4, whereas only α10k was effective at pH 7.4. The active target of β-chitosan is the bacterial membrane, where the leakage of calcein is induced in artificial PE/PG vesicles, bacterial mimetic membrane. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy showed that they caused significant morphological changes on the bacterial surfaces. An in vivo study utilizing a bacteria-infected mouse model found that LMWS β-chitosan could be used as a candidate in anti-infective or wound healing therapeutic applications.

  12. Understanding sleep-wake mechanisms and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equihua-Benítez, Ana Clementina; Guzmán-Vásquez, Khalil; Drucker-Colín, René

    2017-07-01

    Although not discernible at first glance, sleep is a highly active and regulated brain state. Although we spend practically one third of our lifetimes in this stage, its importance is often taken for granted. Sleep loss can lead to disease, error and economic loss. Our understanding of how sleep is achieved has greatly advanced in recent years, and with that, the management of sleep disorders has improved. There is still room for improvement and recently many new compounds have reached clinical trials with a few being approved for commercial use. Areas covered: In this review, the authors make the case of sleep disorders as a matter of public health. The mechanisms of sleep transition are discussed emphasizing the wake and sleep promoting interaction of different brain regions. Finally, advances in pharmacotherapy are examined in the context of chronic insomnia and narcolepsy. Expert opinion: The orexinergic system is an example of a breakthrough in sleep medicine that has catalyzed drug development. Nevertheless, sleep is a topic still with many unanswered questions. That being said, the melanin-concentrating hormone system is becoming increasingly relevant and we speculate it will be the next target of sleep medication.

  13. Mechanism of activity, biosynthesis and identification of beta-lactam antimicrobial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Sedak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobal drugs are chemotherapeutics with a wide spectrum of use in human and veterinary medicine and livestock practice. Beta-lactams are the most widespread group of antimicrobal drugs and are most often used in human and veterinary medicine in the treatment of bacterial infections due to their powerful antimicrobial activity and very low toxicity. They are divided into the groups of penicillins, cefalosporins and monobactams. Penicillins are obtained from the filtrate of the mould cultures Penicillium notatum and Penicillium chrysogenum, while cefalosporins are obtained from the filtrate of the actinomycete cultures (Cephalosporium acremonium. Research has lead to the discovery of active groups of 6-amino-penicillin acids, whose isolation has made it possible to produce semi-synthetic penicillins that have surpassed the limitations of natural penicillin G. The physico-chemical properties of the beta-lactams can be altered by substituting hydrogen in the carboxyl group of penicillins, i.e. in modifying the side chain of cefalosporin. This increases the resistance to the activity of β-lactamase and expands the spectrum of activity. Beta-lactams, in therapy concentrations, act as a bacteriocide by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls. Penicillins are important for antibacterial chemotherapy, often in combination with other antimicrobal drugs. Cefalosporins are usually used as a replacement for penicillin in treating infections caused by gram-negative bacteria and in prophylaxis for surgery. The use of beta-lactams in animals used for food can result in the residues of these drugs in meat and meat products or milk and eggs. The introduction of antimicrobal drugs in the human body via food is particularly dangerous due to their direct toxicity or carcinogenicity, influences on the composition of the intestinal microflora, possible allergic reactions in sensitive people, and the appearance of resistance of individual pathogenic

  14. Comparison of treatment records and inventory of empty drug containers to quantify antimicrobial usage in dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Diego B; De Buck, Jeroen; Naqvi, S Ali; Liu, Gang; Naushad, Sohail; Saini, Vineet; Barkema, Herman W

    2017-12-01

    Assessment of antimicrobial use (AMU) is vital for interpreting the origin of changes in antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The objectives of the present study were to estimate the association between AMU determined using on-farm treatment records (TR) and inventory of empty drug containers (INV). Herds were selected to represent Canadian dairy farms. Producers were asked to record animal health events and treatments on a standard General Health Event form. For inventory data, 40-L receptacles were placed at various locations considered convenient to deposit all empty drug containers. Antimicrobial defined-daily dosages (ADD) were calculated for 51 Canadian herds using the 2 methods. Estimation of AMU was 31,840 ADD using the INV and 14,487 ADD using the TR, indicating that for every TR entry, 2.20 times more treatments were observed using the INV. Mastitis, reproductive conditions, and dry cow therapy were the most frequent reasons for antimicrobial therapy when assessing TR. For all antimicrobials evaluated, mean ADD was higher using the INV versus TR. Regardless, a strong positive correlation (0.80) was observed between the 2 methods, indicating that herds with increased number of ADD recorded using the INV also had increased number of ADD recorded using TR. Furthermore, a positive association was observed for the 6 most commonly used antimicrobials. In comparison to methods used in surveillance programs on AMU in livestock that assume a constant use in all herds (i.e., sales data), INV provided a herd-level specific quantity of AMU positively correlated with AMU recorded at the animal level in general. The INV was easy to implement and provided a measure of total AMU in the herd. Availability of such information would be valuable for interpreting changes in AMR at the herd level and enabling evaluation of interventions for decreasing AMR. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE IN STRAINS OF Escherichia coli ISOLATED FROM FOOD SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Uddin Rasheed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A variety of foods and environmental sources harbor bacteria that are resistant to one or more antimicrobial drugs used in medicine and agriculture. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli is of particular concern because it is the most common Gram-negative pathogen in humans. Hence this study was conducted to determine the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of E. coli isolated from different types of food items collected randomly from twelve localities of Hyderabad, India. A total of 150 samples comprising; vegetable salad, raw egg-surface, raw chicken, unpasteurized milk, and raw meat were processed microbiologically to isolate E. coli and to study their antibiotic susceptibility pattern by the Kirby-Bauer method. The highest percentages of drug resistance in isolates of E. coli were detected from raw chicken (23.3% followed by vegetable salad (20%, raw meat (13.3%, raw egg-surface (10% and unpasteurized milk (6.7%. The overall incidence of drug resistant E. coli was 14.7%. A total of six (4% Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL producers were detected, two each from vegetable salads and raw chicken, and one each from raw egg-surface and raw meat. Multidrug resistant strains of E. coli are a matter of concern as resistance genes are easily transferable to other strains. Pathogen cycling through food is very common and might pose a potential health risk to the consumer. Therefore, in order to avoid this, good hygienic practices are necessary in the abattoirs to prevent contamination of cattle and poultry products with intestinal content as well as forbidding the use of untreated sewage in irrigating vegetables.

  16. Antimicrobial drug resistance evaluations and monitoring in Escherichia coli isolated from poultry environment at different time intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, R.; Khan, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    A high prevalence of multiple drug resistance was observed in population of E. coli isolated in 1992-93 from poultry carcasses, fluff, hatchery environment and water at different broiler farms in Karachi, Pakistan. Five hundred isolate of E. coli were made of which 375 were tested for their sensitivity of five antimicrobials using the tube dilution method. Similarly, during 1995-1996, 430 E. coli isolates were made (from the same farms) of which 315 were tested for their sensitivity to the same antimicrobials studied in 1992-93. E. coli isolates during 1992-93 and 1995-96 showed increase in resistance from 50 to 56% against amoxicillin, from 62 to 71% against neomycin, from 97 to 100% against oxytetracycline, from 95 to 100% against tetracycline and from 95 to 98% against trimethoprim. It appears that exposure of E. coli of poultry origin in Pakistan to the five studies antimicrobials could well be the cause of increasing antimicrobials resistance. This data supports the growing contention that subtherapeutic doses of antimicrobials should be eliminated as a means of promoting rapid growth. (author)

  17. Application of firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to antimicrobial drug sensitivity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Tuttle, S. A.; Schrock, C. G.; Deming, J. W.; Barza, M. J.; Wienstein, L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a rapid method for determining microbial susceptibilities to antibiotics using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is documented. The reduction of bacterial ATP by an antimicrobial agent was determined to be a valid measure of drug effect in most cases. The effect of 12 antibiotics on 8 different bacterial species gave a 94 percent correlation with the standard Kirby-Buer-Agar disc diffusion method. A 93 percent correlation was obtained when the ATP assay method was applied directly to 50 urine specimens from patients with urinary tract infections. Urine samples were centrifuged first to that bacterial pellets could be suspended in broth. No primary isolation or subculturing was required. Mixed cultures in which one species was predominant gave accurate results for the most abundant organism. Since the method is based on an increase in bacterial ATP with time, the presence of leukocytes did not interfere with the interpretation of results. Both the incubation procedure and the ATP assays are compatible with automation.

  18. Antimicrobial sensitivity and frequency of DRUG resistance among bacterial strains isolated from cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiz, M.; Bashir, T.

    2004-01-01

    Blood stream infections (bacteremia) is potentially life threatening. Concomitant with a change in the incidence and epidemiology of infecting organisms, there has been an increase in resistance to many antibiotic compounds. The widespread emergence of resistance among bacterial pathogens has an impact on our ability to treat patients effectively. The changing spectrum of microbial pathogens and widespread emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotic drugs has emphasized the need to monitor the prevalence of resistance in these strains. In the present study frequency of isolation of clinically significant bacteria and their susceptibility and resistance pattern against a wide range of antimicrobial drugs from positive blood cultures collected during 2001-2003 was studied. A total of 102 consecutive isolates were found with 63% gram positive and 44% gram negative strains. The dominating pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (51%), Streptococci (31%), Pseudomonas (40%), Proteus (13%), Klebsiella (13%). The isolated strains were tested against a wide range of antibiotics belonging to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and quinolone derivative group by disk diffusion method. It has been observed that isolated strains among gram positive and negative strains showed different level of resistance against aminoglycosides and cephalosporin group of antibiotics with gram positives showing highest number and frequency of resistance against aminoglycosides (40-50%) and cephalosporins.(35-45%) whereas cephalosporins were found to be more effective against gram negatives with low frequency of resistant strains. Cabapenem and quinolone derivative drugs were found to be most effective among other groups in both gram positive and negative strains with 23-41% strains found sensitive to these two drugs. The frequency of sensitive strains against aminoglycoside and cephalosporin in gram negative and gram positive strains were found to be decreasing yearwise with a trend towards an

  19. Antimicrobial activity of Eucalyptus camaldulensis essential oils and their interactions with conventional antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Petar; Aleksic, Verica; Simin, Natasa; Svircev, Emilija; Petrovic, Aleksandra; Mimica-Dukic, Neda

    2016-02-03

    Traditional herbal medicine has become an important issue on the global scale during the past decade. Among drugs of natural origin, special place belongs to essential oils, known as strong antimicrobial agents that can be used to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves are traditional herbal remedy used for various purposes, including treatment of infections. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial potential of two E. camaldulensis essential oils against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii wound isolates and to examine possible interactions of essential oils with conventional antimicrobial agents. Chemical composition of essential oils was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS). MIC values of essential oils against A. baumannii strains were estimated by modified broth microdilution method. The components responsible for antimicrobial activity were detected by bioautographic analysis. The potential synergy between the essential oils and antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and polymyxin B) was examined by checkerboard method and time kill curve. The dominant components of both essential oils were spatulenol, cryptone, p-cimene, 1,8-cineole, terpinen-4-ol and β-pinene. The detected MICs for the E. camaldulensis essential oils were in range from 0.5 to 2 μl mL(-1). The bioautographic assay confirmed antibacterial activity of polar terpene compounds. In combination with conventional antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and polymyxin B), the examined essential oils showed synergistic antibacterial effect in most of the cases, while in some even re-sensitized MDR A. baumannii strains. The synergistic interaction was confirmed by time-kill curves for E. camaldulensis essential oil and polymyxin B combination which reduced bacterial count under detection limit very fast, i.e. after 6h of incubation. The detected anti-A. baumannii activity of E. camaldulensis essential oils

  20. Understanding and preventing drug–drug and drug–gene interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Sheehan, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant administration of multiple drugs can lead to unanticipated drug interactions and resultant adverse drug events with their associated costs. A more thorough understanding of the different cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and drug transporters has led to new methods to try to predict and prevent clinically relevant drug interactions. There is also an increased recognition of the need to identify the impact of pharmacogenetic polymorphisms on drug interactions. More stringent regulatory requirements have evolved for industry to classify cytochrome inhibitors and inducers, test the effect of drug interactions in the presence of polymorphic enzymes, and evaluate multiple potentially interacting drugs simultaneously. In clinical practice, drug alert software programs have been developed. This review discusses drug interaction mechanisms and strategies for screening and minimizing exposure to drug interactions. We also provide future perspectives for reducing the risk of clinically significant drug interactions. PMID:24745854

  1. Veterinary drug usage and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animal origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    countries, which leaves room for considerable reductions in some countries. The emergence of resistant bacteria and resistance genes due to the use of antimicrobial agents are well documented. In Denmark it has been possible to reduce the usage of antimicrobial agents for food animals significantly...

  2. Guidelines for peer review. Veterans Administration Ad Hoc Interdisciplinary Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Drug Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-07

    Eigteen guideline-audits of antimicrobial usage have been prepared for use by hospital staffs for peer review. They may also be used as a national standard to assess the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents in hospitals. It is hoped that the guidelines will stimulate wide discussion and national peer review and will ultimately result in improved care of patients with infectious disease.

  3. Antimicrobial drug resistance at the human-animal interface in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, V.T.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and E. coli strains isolated from backyard farm chickens and humans in Vietnam. We found that this prevalence was to some extent related to antimicrobial usage. In particular,

  4. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TB DRUGS AND ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS ON THE EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vasilyeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study: to study the effect of specific TB drugs and antimicrobial agents constituting chemotherapy regimens on the efficiency of treatment of tuberculosis patients with various patterns of multiple drug resistance.Subjects and Methods. 412 pulmonary tuberculosis patients with bacillary excretion and various patterns of multiple drug resistance were enrolled into the study (117 patients with MDR TB (non pre-XDR and non-XDR; 120 patients with pre-XDR TB and 175 with XDR TB. Patients in the subgroups were compatible regarding sex and age. The patients were prescribed regimens including 5-6 drugs in accordance with their drug resistance pattern. The time of sputum conversion (by culture versus the year of treatment was selected as a surrogate endpoint. The effect of specific TB drugs and antimicrobial agents on treatment efficiency was assessed through calculation of odds ratio (OR of achieving a surrogate endpoint in the patients receiving and not receiving a certain drug.Results. In the subgroup of pre-XDR TB, the following drugs demonstrated the valid increase of odds of sputum conversion: ethambutol (OR 11.8, pyrazinamide (OR 10.2, moxifloxacin (OR 7.8, capreomicin (OR 4.41. Sputum conversion was achieved in all 11 patients treated with bedaquiline.In the subgroup of XDR TB, the following drugs provided a positive effect on the achievement of sputum conversion: bedaquiline (OR 9.62, linezolid (OR 8.15, cycloserine (OR 7.88, pyrazinamide (OR 7.29, moxifloxacin (OR 7.08, and ethambutol (OR 6.69. Ofloxacin demonstrated a confident negative effect on achieving sputum conversion (95% CI 0.06-0.32. 

  5. Towards an understanding of drug resistance in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemcke, T; Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1999-01-01

    and structural differences. Based on this analysis the molecular consequences of point mutations known to be involved in drug resistance were discussed. The significance of the most important point mutation causing resistance, S108N, could be explained by the model, whereas the point mutations associated...

  6. Issues In-Depth: Advancing Understanding of Drug Addiction and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    2009-01-01

    While most school districts utilize a drug abuse resistance curriculum, as science teachers, it is our responsibility to understand the science behind drug addiction in order to most effectively educate our students against drug abuse. In the last two decades, increases in scientific technology have permitted significant discoveries surrounding…

  7. 76 FR 28046 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Tots Public-Private Partnership AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0005; FDA 225-09-0014] Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the...

  8. 75 FR 17418 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0004... Human Services and the National Alliance for Hispanic Health AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... understanding (MOU) between the Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and...

  9. 77 FR 16971 - Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Other...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... agreements and MOUs relating to activities of our Office of Criminal Investigations, which are addressed in.... FDA-2012-N-0205] Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration... ``Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Other Departments...

  10. Systematic synergy modeling: understanding drug synergy from a systems biology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Liu, Xi; Yang, Yiping; Yang, Hongjun; Lu, Peng

    2015-09-16

    Owing to drug synergy effects, drug combinations have become a new trend in combating complex diseases like cancer, HIV and cardiovascular diseases. However, conventional synergy quantification methods often depend on experimental dose-response data which are quite resource-demanding. In addition, these methods are unable to interpret the explicit synergy mechanism. In this review, we give representative examples of how systems biology modeling offers strategies toward better understanding of drug synergy, including the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network-based methods, pathway dynamic simulations, synergy network motif recognitions, integrative drug feature calculations, and "omic"-supported analyses. Although partially successful in drug synergy exploration and interpretation, more efforts should be put on a holistic understanding of drug-disease interactions, considering integrative pharmacology and toxicology factors. With a comprehensive and deep insight into the mechanism of drug synergy, systems biology opens a novel avenue for rational design of effective drug combinations.

  11. Prevalence of multi drug antimicrobial resistance in isolated from high-risk stocker cattle at arrival and two weeks after processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, E; Credille, B; Berghaus, R; Giguère, S

    2017-03-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in North American beef cattle. () is the bacterial pathogen most frequently isolated from cattle with BRD and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in this pathogen has been increasing. Administration of antimicrobials to prevent BRD is commonplace in stocker cattle, but the impact of this practice on emergence of resistance in is unknown. High risk, sale barn origin bull and steer calves ( = 169) were transported to a stocker facility in central Georgia and sampled via deep nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) at arrival processing. All calves received the macrolide antimicrobial tulathromycin (2.5 mg/kg subcutaneously) at arrival processing. A second NPS was collected from each calf 10 to 14 d after arrival. The occasional calves diagnosed and treated for BRD prior to 10 to 14 d were swabbed and cultured prior to treatment. Swabs were submitted for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Of the 169 cattle enrolled, 27 (16.0%) were culture positive for at arrival processing and of these, a multi-drug resistant (MDR) strain of was detected in 1 (3.7%). In contrast, 123 (72.8%) cattle were culture positive for at second sampling and of these, a MDR strain of was detected in 122 (99.2%). The proportions of cattle culture positive for and positive for MDR at arrival processing and at second sampling were significantly different ( gamithromycin, tulathromycin) and the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin. In addition, 254 isolates (69.4%) were intermediate or resistant to florfenicol and 4 (1.1%) were intermediate or resistant to ceftiofur. There was a significant difference in the proportion of isolates resistant to all of the drug classes except cephalosporins at arrival processing versus second sampling ( < 0.001). Our results show that there was an increase in the proportion of calves positive for from arrival processing to second sampling, and

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share ...

  14. Comparative molecular study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, in times of antimicrobial drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Varela

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were compared using two DNA fingerprinting techniques: Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP and Double-Repetitive-Element-PCR (DRE-PCR. Two of these strains: IH1 (susceptible to isoniazid and IH2 (resistant to isoniazid were recovered from cases of pulmonary tuberculosis which occurred in two brothers who lived together. The first one was recognized on July 1999, and the second was diagnosed one year later. IH1 and IH2 showed the same pattern of bands with both molecular tests. These results suggest that single drug chemoprophylaxis may occasionally select resistant strains for that drug, which can eventually cause disease and be recognized through these tests. Strains IH3, IH4 and IH5 were obtained from sputum samples of 3 different patients, and intra-laboratory cross-contamination was suspected when it was realized that the 3 positive materials had been consecutively processed the same day by the same worker in the same biological safety cabinet. Again, the 3 strains revealed identical band patterns with RFLP and DRE-PCR, confirming the posed suspicion. The results with DRE-PCR were obtained after only 8 hours of work, without the need for subcultures. This procedure allows quick correction of treatment conducts, avoiding unnecessary exposure of people and bacteria to antimicrobial drugs.Se compararon cepas de Mycobacterium tuberculosis utilizando 2 procedimientos de ADN fingerprinting: polimorfismo de los fragmentos de restricción (RFLP y Double-Repetitive-Element-PCR (DRE-PCR. Dos de las cepas: IH1 (susceptible a isoniazida e IH2 (resistente a isoniazida se recuperaron a partir de casos de tuberculosis pulmonar que ocurrieron en dos hermanos convivientes. La primera fue aislada en julio de 1999 y la segunda un año después. IH1 e IH2 mostraron el mismo patrón de bandas por ambos procedimientos. Estos resultados sugieren que la quimioprofilaxis con una sola droga puede ocasionalmente

  15. Disclosure of pharmacokinetic drug results to understand nonadherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Straten, Ariane; Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Musara, Petina; Etima, Juliane; Naidoo, Sarita; Laborde, Nicole; Hartmann, Miriam; Levy, Lisa; Bennie, Thola; Cheng, Helen; Piper, Jeanna; Grossman, Cynthia I; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Mensch, Barbara

    2015-10-23

    In VOICE, a phase IIB trial of daily oral and vaginal tenofovir for HIV prevention, at least 50% of women receiving active products had undetectable tenofovir in all plasma samples tested. MTN-003D, an ancillary study using in-depth interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs), together with retrospective disclosure of plasma tenofovir pharmacokinetic results, explored adherence challenges during VOICE. We systematically recruited participants with pharmacokinetic data (median six plasma samples), categorized as low (0%, N = 79), inconsistent (1-74%, N = 28) or high (≥75%; N = 20) on the basis of frequency of tenofovir detection. Following disclosure of pharmacokinetic results, reactions were captured and adherence challenges systematically elicited; IDIs and FGDs were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded and thematically analysed. We interviewed 127 participants from South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe. The most common reactions to pharmacokinetic results included surprise (41%; low pharmacokinetic), acceptance (39%; inconsistent pharmacokinetic) and happiness (65%; high pharmacokinetic). On the basis of participants' explanations, we developed a typology of adherence patterns: noninitiation, discontinuation, misimplementation (resulting from visit-driven use, variable taking, modified dosing or regimen) and adherence. Fear of product side effects/harm was a frequent concern, fuelled by stories shared among participants. Although women with high pharmacokinetic levels reported similar concerns, several described strategies to overcome challenges. Women at all pharmacokinetic levels suggested real-time drug monitoring and feedback to improve adherence and reporting. Retrospective provision of pharmacokinetic results seemingly promoted candid discussions around nonadherence and study participation. The effect of real-time drug monitoring and feedback on adherence and accuracy of reporting should be evaluated in trials.

  16. Activities and influence of veterinary drug marketers on antimicrobial usage in livestock production in Oyo and Kaduna States, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ojo, Olufemi Ernest; Awoyomi, Olajoju Jokotola; Fabusoro, Eniola; Dipeolu, Morenike Atinuke

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial usage in animals contributes to the emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains. Investigations were carried out on how the characteristics, knowledge, attitude and practices of antimicrobial marketers influenced antimicrobials usage in animal production in Oyo and Kaduna States, Nigeria. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to gather information about the characteristics and activities of antimicrobial marketers. Overal...

  17. Spectrofluorimetric study on the interaction between antimicrobial drug sulfamethazine and bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawoud Bani-Yaseen, Abdulilah, E-mail: aayaseen@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, Al-MAdinah Al-Munawarah P.O. Box 30002 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-05-15

    The interaction between the antimicrobial drug sulfamethazine (STM) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied using steady state and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission data revealed that BSA (2x10{sup -6} M) fluorescence was statically quenched by STM at various concentrations, which implies that STM-BSA complex has been formed. The fluorescence emission data was analyzed via applying the Stern-Volmer analysis in combination with thermodynamic investigation, where obtained results revealed that quenching is static with quenching constants of 2.371, 1.658, and 0.916x10{sup 5} M{sup -1} at 298, 304, and 310 K, respectively. Binding constants and number of binding sites at different temperatures were also determined by applying the Scatchard method, which in turn were used to construct the van't Hoff plot in order to estimate the enthalpy ({Delta}H) and entropy changes ({Delta}S) for the complexation process. An average of 1.00{+-}0.17 was estimated for the number of sites of BSA, which indicated that STM binds to BSA with stoichiometric ratio of 1:1. The values that were estimated from the van't Hoff plot for {Delta}H and ({Delta}S) were -36.8 kJ mol{sup -1} and -14.9 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively, which indicate that the STM-BSA complex is stabilized with hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. Synchronous fluorescence data was obtained at {Delta}{lambda} of 15 and 60 nm, where obtained results confirmed that STM binds to BSA at the tryptophan residue (Trp. 213). In addition, the distance between STM and the Trp. 213 was estimated via employing the Foerster's non-radiative energy-transfer theory, and was found to be 2.73 nm, which in turn indicated that STM can bind to BSA with high probability. - Research highlights: {yields} Fluorescence data was used to demonstrate that BSA fluorescence can be quenched by STM. {yields} STM can bind to BSA with stoichiometric ratio of 1:1. {yields} STM-BSA complex is

  18. Haemophilus paragallinarum in chickens in Indonesia: III. Antimicrobial drug sensitivity test ofHaemophilus paragallinarum from chickens suffering of coryza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Poernomo

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available An agar disc diffusion method was used to examine the sensitivity of 27 Haemophilus paragallinarum (Hpg isolates consisted of 23 local isolates, 4 standard isolates (serotype A and Escherichia coli ATCC 24922 as a control to eight antimicrobial drugs (ampicillin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, neomycin, streptomycin, colistine and sulphanlethoxazole-trimethoprim . Twenty one out of 23 local isolates of Hpg were sensitive to doxycycline, 19 isolates to ampsllin, 18 isolates to oxytetracycline, 17 isolates to sulphametoxazole-trimethoprim, 16 isolates to erythromycin, and 13 isolates to neomycin, while 13 isolates were resistance to colistine and 11 isolates were also resistance to streptomycin .

  19. Drug use and antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered in Quebec, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Boulianne, Martine; Arsenault, Julie; Daignault, Danielle; Archambault, Marie; Letellier, Ann; Dutil, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted of chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered at federal processing plants in the province of Quebec, Canada. The objectives were to estimate prevalence of drug use at hatchery and on farm and to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in cecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates and factors associated with AMR. Eighty-two chicken flocks and 59 turkey flocks were sampled. At the hatchery, the most used antimicrobial was ceftiofur in chickens (76% of...

  20. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  1. Bacterial profile and patterns of antimicrobial drug resistance in intra-abdominal infections: Current experience in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Shree

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Bacterial isolates from intra-abdominal infections, in particular, peritonitis and their unpredictable antimicrobial resistance patterns, continue to be a matter of concern not only globally but regionally too. Aim: An attempt in the present study was made to study the patterns of drug resistance in bacterial isolates, especially gram negative bacilli in intra-abdominal infections (IAI in our hospital. Materials and Methods: From 100 cases of peritonitis, identification of isolates was done as per recommended methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL testing were performed following the CLSI guidelines. Results: A total of 133 clinical isolates were obtained, of which 108 were aerobes and 22 anaerobes. Fungal isolates were recovered in only three cases. Escherichia coli (47/108 emerged as the most predominant pathogen followed by Klebsiella spp. (27/108, while Bacteroides fragilis emerged as the predominant anaerobe (12/22. Among coliforms, 61.7% E. coli and 74.1% Klebsiella spp. were ESBL positive. A high level of resistance was observed for beta lactams, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ertapenem. Ertapenem resistance (30-41% seen in coliforms, appears as an important issue. Imipenem, tigecycline, and colistin were the most consistently active agents tested against ESBL producers. Conclusion: Drug resistance continues to be a major concern in isolates from intra-abdominal infections. Treatment with appropriate antibiotics preceded by antimicrobial resistance testing aided by early diagnosis, adequate surgical management, and knowledge of antibiotic - resistant organisms appears effective in reducing morbidity and mortality in IAI cases.

  2. Antimicrobial potentials of Helicteres isora silver nanoparticles against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapara, Nikunj; Sharma, Mansi; Shriram, Varsha; Bharadwaj, Renu; Mohite, K C; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading opportunistic pathogen and its expanding drug resistance is a growing menace to public health. Its ubiquitous nature and multiple resistance mechanisms make it a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy and require a fresh approach for developing new antimicrobial agents against it. The broad-spectrum antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) make them an excellent candidate for use in the medical field. However, attempts made to check their potency against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) microbes are meager. This study describes the biosynthesis and biostabilization of SNPs by Helicteres isora aqueous fruit extract and their characterization by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Majority of SNPs synthesized were of 8--20-nm size. SNPs exhibited dose-dependent antibacterial activities against four XDR P. aeruginosa (XDR-PA) clinical isolates as revealed by growth curves, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300 μg/ml. The SNPs exhibited antimicrobial activity against all strains, with maximum zone of inhibition (16.4 mm) in XRD-PA-2 at 1000 μg/ml. Amongst four strains, their susceptibilities to SNPs were in the following order: XDR-PA-2 > XDR-PA-4 > XDR-PA-3 > XDR-PA-1. The exposure of bacterial cells to 300 μg/ml SNPs resulted into a substantial leakage of reducing sugars and proteins, inactivation of respiratory chain dehydrogenases, and eventual cell death. SNPs also induced lipid peroxidation, a possible underlying factor to membrane porosity. The effects were more pronounced in XDR-PA-2 which may be correlated with its higher susceptibility to SNPs. These results are indicative of SNP-induced turbulence of membranous permeability as an important causal factor in XDR-PA growth inhibition and death.

  3. Antimicrobial drug resistance among clinically relevant bacterial isolates in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leopold, Stije J.; van Leth, Frank; Tarekegn, Hayalnesh; Schultsz, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) amongst bacterial pathogens in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA), despite calls for continent-wide surveillance to inform empirical treatment guidelines. We searched PubMed and additional databases for susceptibility data of key pathogens

  4. Factors Related to Increasing Prevalence of Resistance to Ciprofloxacin and Other Antimicrobial Drugs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkcaldy, Robert D.; Reshef, David; Berman, Stuart; Weinstock, Hillard; Sabeti, Pardis; Del Rio, Carlos; Hall, Geraldine; Hook, Edward W.; Lipsitch, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project, we studied changes in ciprofloxacin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates in the United States during 2002–2007. Compared with prevalence in heterosexual men, prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae infections showed a more pronounced increase in men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly through an increase in prevalence of strains also resistant to tetracycline and penicillin. Moreover, that multidrug resistance profile among MSM was negatively associated with recent travel. Across the surveillance project sites, first appearance of ciprofloxacin resistance in heterosexual men was positively correlated with such resistance for MSM. The increase in prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance may have been facilitated by use of fluoroquinolones for treating gonorrhea and other conditions. The prominence of multidrug resistance suggests that using other classes of antimicrobial drugs for purposes other than treating gonorrhea helped increase the prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant strains that are also resistant to those drugs. PMID:22840274

  5. Understanding the interactions of oleic acid with basic drugs in solid lipids on different biopharmaceutical levels.

    OpenAIRE

    Zdravka Misic; Dubravka Šišak Jung; Georg Sydow; Martin Kuentz

    2016-01-01

    There has recently been increasing interest in understanding the impact of intestinal supersaturation on the absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs. Focus has been mostly on the effect of excipients on maintaining drug supersaturation. The aim of the this study was to explore the effects of drug-excipient interactions of an anhydrous formulation, when dispersed in simple buffer media and, in particular, focusing on precipitation kinetics. A solid lipid-based formulation comprising of PEG-32...

  6. 75 FR 17423 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0004] [FDA 225-10-0007] Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of Health and Human Services and the Association of Minority Health Profession Schools, Inc...

  7. New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the Mechanisms of Stress Erythropoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0449 TITLE: New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the Mechanisms of Stress Erythropoiesis...COVERED 1Sep2012 - 31Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the...cell formation in "Nan" (neonatal anemia ) mice, raising the level of red cells to almost normal. It also causes an increase in the numbers of splenic

  8. Understanding the Role of Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets in Tanzania's Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embrey, Martha; Vialle-Valentin, Catherine; Dillip, Angel; Kihiyo, Bernard; Mbwasi, Romuald; Semali, Innocent A; Chalker, John C; Liana, Jafary; Lieber, Rachel; Johnson, Keith; Rutta, Edmund; Kimatta, Suleiman; Shekalaghe, Elizabeth; Valimba, Richard; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    People in many low-income countries access medicines from retail drug shops. In Tanzania, a public-private partnership launched in 2003 used an accreditation approach to improve access to quality medicines and pharmaceutical services in underserved areas. The government scaled up the accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO) program nationally, with over 9,000 shops now accredited. This study assessed the relationships between community members and their sources of health care and medicines, particularly antimicrobials, with a specific focus on the role ADDOs play in the health care system. Using mixed methods, we collected data in four regions. We surveyed 1,185 households and audited 96 ADDOs and 84 public/nongovernmental health facilities using a list of 17 tracer drugs. To determine practices in health facilities, we interviewed 1,365 exiting patients. To assess dispensing practices, mystery shoppers visited 306 ADDOs presenting one of three scenarios (102 each) about a child's respiratory symptoms. Of 614 household members with a recent acute illness, 73% sought outside care-30% at a public facility and 31% at an ADDO. However, people bought medicines more often at ADDOs no matter who recommended the treatment; of the 581 medicines that people had received, 49% came from an ADDO. Although health facilities and ADDOs had similar availability of antimicrobials, ADDOs had more pediatric formulations available (pdrugs from ADDOs are more expensive, but the difference in the median cost to treat pneumonia was relatively minimal (US$0.26 in a public facility and US$0.30 in an ADDO). Over 20% of households said they had someone with a chronic condition, with 93% taking medication, but ADDOs are allowed to sell very few chronic care-related medicines. ADDO dispensers are trained to refer complicated cases to a health facility, and notably, 99% of mystery shoppers presenting a pneumonia scenario received an antimicrobial (54%), a referral (90%), or both (45%), which are

  9. Integrative relational machine-learning for understanding drug side-effect profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresso, Emmanuel; Grisoni, Renaud; Marchetti, Gino; Karaboga, Arnaud Sinan; Souchet, Michel; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Smaïl-Tabbone, Malika

    2013-06-26

    Drug side effects represent a common reason for stopping drug development during clinical trials. Improving our ability to understand drug side effects is necessary to reduce attrition rates during drug development as well as the risk of discovering novel side effects in available drugs. Today, most investigations deal with isolated side effects and overlook possible redundancy and their frequent co-occurrence. In this work, drug annotations are collected from SIDER and DrugBank databases. Terms describing individual side effects reported in SIDER are clustered with a semantic similarity measure into term clusters (TCs). Maximal frequent itemsets are extracted from the resulting drug x TC binary table, leading to the identification of what we call side-effect profiles (SEPs). A SEP is defined as the longest combination of TCs which are shared by a significant number of drugs. Frequent SEPs are explored on the basis of integrated drug and target descriptors using two machine learning methods: decision-trees and inductive-logic programming. Although both methods yield explicit models, inductive-logic programming method performs relational learning and is able to exploit not only drug properties but also background knowledge. Learning efficiency is evaluated by cross-validation and direct testing with new molecules. Comparison of the two machine-learning methods shows that the inductive-logic-programming method displays a greater sensitivity than decision trees and successfully exploit background knowledge such as functional annotations and pathways of drug targets, thereby producing rich and expressive rules. All models and theories are available on a dedicated web site. Side effect profiles covering significant number of drugs have been extracted from a drug ×side-effect association table. Integration of background knowledge concerning both chemical and biological spaces has been combined with a relational learning method for discovering rules which explicitly

  10. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm potential of biosurfactants isolated from lactobacilli against multi-drug-resistant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Biosurfactants (BS) are amphiphilic compounds produced by microbes, either on the cell surface or secreted extracellularly. BS exhibit strong antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties, making them good candidates for applications used to combat infections. In this study, our goal was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm abilities of BS produced by Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus rhamnosus against clinical Multidrug Resistant (MDR) strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Cell-bound BS from both L. jensenii and L. rhamnosus were extracted and isolated. The surface activities of crude BS samples were evaluated using an oil spreading assay. The antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activities of both BS against the above mentioned MDR pathogens were determined. Results Surface activities for both BS ranged from 6.25 to 25 mg/ml with clear zones observed between 7 and 11 cm. BS of both L. jensenii and L. rhamnosus showed antimicrobial activities against A. baumannii, E. coli and S. aureus at 25-50 mg/ml. Anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activities were also observed for the aforementioned pathogens between 25 and 50 mg/ml. Finally, analysis by electron microscope indicated that the BS caused membrane damage for A. baumannii and pronounced cell wall damage in S. aureus. Conclusion Our results indicate that BS isolated from two Lactobacilli strains has antibacterial properties against MDR strains of A. baumannii, E. coli and MRSA. Both BS also displayed anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm abilities against A. baumannii, E. coli and S. aureus. Together, these capabilities may open up possibilities for BS as an alternative therapeutic approach for the prevention and/or treatment of hospital-acquired infections. PMID:25124936

  11. Antimicrobial Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John M

    2017-12-01

    Antimicrobial use in older adults requires working knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these drugs, and the alterations known to occur with these models as patients age. A summary of pharmacokinetic principles relevant to antimicrobials and an overview of published medical literature describing pharmacokinetic changes known to correlate with age are presented. Pharmacodynamic models that apply to antibacterial agents are reviewed, as are likely effects of aging on these models. The understanding of how older adults respond in terms of efficacy and toxicity is increasing but limited. Further research into the effects of aging on the actions of antimicrobials in the elderly is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Antimicrobial susceptibility and drug-resistance genes of Yersinia spp. of retailed poultry in 4 provinces of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z X; Zou, M Y; Xu, J; Guan, W Y; Li, Y; Liu, D R; Zhang, S S; Hao, Q; Yan, S F; Wang, W; Yu, D M; Li, F Q

    2018-04-06

    Objective: To monitor the antimicrobial resistance and drug-resistance genes of Yersinia enterocolitis , Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii recovered from retailed fresh poultry of 4 provinces of China. Methods: The susceptibility of 25 isolated Yersinia spp. to 14 classes and 25 kinds of antibiotics was determined by broth microdilution method according to CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute). The antibiotic resistance genes were predicted with antibiotic resistance genes database (ARDB) using whole genome sequences of Yersinia spp. Results: In all 22 Y. enterocolitis tested, 63.7% (14 isolates), 22.8% (5 isolates), 4.6% and 4.6% of 1 isolates exhibited the resistance to cefoxitin, ampicillin-sulbactam, nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, respectively. All the 25 isolates were multi-drug resistant to more than 3 antibiotics, while 64.0% of isolates were resistant to more than 4 antibiotics. A few Y. enterocolitis isolates of this study were intermediate to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Most Yersinia spp. isolates contained antibiotic resistance genes mdtG, ksgA, bacA, blaA, rosAB and acrB , and 5 isolates recovered from fresh chicken also contained dfrA 1, catB 2 and ant 3 ia . Conclusion: The multi-drug resistant Yersinia spp. isolated from retailed fresh poultry is very serious in the 4 provinces of China, and their contained many kinds of drug-resistance genes.

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. ... concept more understandable to non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All ...

  14. Differences in composition of honey samples and their impact on the antimicrobial activities against drug multiresistant bacteria and pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Yehya; Al-Mubarak, Aarif; Salom, Khelod

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotic multiresistant microbes represent a challenging problem. Because honey has a potent antibacterial property, the antimicrobial effects of different honey samples against multiresistant pathogens and their compositions were investigated. Five honey samples were used: Talah, Dhahian, Sumra-1, Sidr, and Sumra-2. Samples were analyzed to determine chemical composition such as fructose, glucose, sucrose, pH, total flavonoids, total phenolics, hydrogen peroxide concentration, minerals and trace elements. Antimicrobial activities of the samples against 17 (16 were multiresistant) human pathogenic bacteria and three types of fungi were studied. Specimens of the isolates were cultured into 10 mL of 10-100% (volume/volume) honey diluted in broth. Microbial growth was assessed on a solid plate media after 24 h and 72 h incubation. The composition of honey samples varied considerably. Sumra 1 and 2 contained the highest level of flavonoids and phenolics and the lowest level of hydrogen peroxide, whereas Dhahian honey contained the highest level of hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen pathogens were antibiotic multiresistant. A single dose of each honey sample inhibited all the pathogens tested after 24 h and 72 h incubation. The most sensitive pathogens were Aspergillus nidulans, Salmonella typhimurum and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). Although there was no statistically significant difference in the effectiveness of honey samples, the most effective honey against bacteria was Talah and against fungi were Dhahian and Sumra-2. Various honey samples collected from different geographical areas and plant origins showed almost similar antimicrobial activities against multiresistant pathogens despite considerable variation in their composition. Honey may represent an alternative candidate to be tested as part of management of drug multiresistant pathogens. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding the antimicrobial activity of selected disinfectants against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Aboualizadeh

    Full Text Available Disinfectants and biocidal products have been widely used to combat Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections in homes and healthcare environments. Although disruption of cytoplasmic membrane integrity has been documented as the main bactericidal effect of biocides, little is known about the biochemical alterations induced by these chemical agents. In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and chemometric tools as an alternative non-destructive technique to determine the bactericidal effects of commonly used disinfectants against MRSA USA-300. FTIR spectroscopy permits a detailed characterization of bacterial reactivity, allowing an understanding of the fundamental mechanism of action involved in the interaction between bacteria and disinfectants. The disinfectants studied were ethanol 70% (N = 5, isopropanol (N = 5, sodium hypochlorite (N = 5, triclosan (N = 5 and triclocarban (N = 5. Results showed less than 5% colony forming units growth of MRSA treated with triclocarban and no growth in the other groups. Nearly 70,000 mid-infrared spectra from the five treatments and the two control (untreated; N = 4 groups of MRSA (bacteria grown in TSB and incubated at 37°C (Control I / at ambient temperature (Control II, for 24h were pre-processed and analyzed using principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA. Clustering of strains of MRSA belonging to five treatments and the discrimination between each treatment and two control groups in MRSA (untreated were investigated. PCA-LDA discriminatory frequencies suggested that ethanol-treated spectra are the most similar to isopropanol-treated spectra biochemically. Also reported here are the biochemical alterations in the structure of proteins, lipid membranes, and phosphate groups of MRSA produced by sodium hypochlorite, triclosan, and triclocarban treatments. These findings provide mechanistic information involved in the

  16. Economic Incentives for Antibacterial Drug Development: Literature Review and Considerations From the Transatlantic Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarretta, Kimberly; Røttingen, John-Arne; Opalska, Aleksandra; Van Hengel, Arjon J; Larsen, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    The Trans-Atlantic Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (TATFAR) in 2015 was tasked with exploring economic incentives for antibacterial drug development and providing recommendations for potential global implementation. Due to the continual decline of pharmaceutical companies investing in new antibiotic development and the rise in antimicrobial resistance, there is an urgent need to examine market mechanisms that are appropriate to encourage small, medium, and large companies to reinvest in this space. This review provides a summary of the various models that have been proposed and highlights positions posed by several policy documents, peer-reviewed publications, organization proposals, and government-sponsored reviews. The findings support a form of a de-linkage model and a combination of push and pull incentive mechanisms. This level of consensus could culminate in global coordination of incentives that strike a balance of rewarding innovation and ensuring appropriate antibiotic use. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Efflux as a mechanism of antimicrobial drug resistance in clinical relevant microorganisms: the role of efflux inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willers, Clarissa; Wentzel, Johannes Frederik; du Plessis, Lissinda Hester; Gouws, Chrisna; Hamman, Josias Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Microbial resistance against antibiotics is a serious threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases. Several mechanisms exist through which microorganisms can develop resistance against antimicrobial drugs, of which the overexpression of genes to produce efflux pumps is a major concern. Several efflux transporters have been identified in microorganisms, which infer resistance against specific antibiotics and even multidrug resistance. Areas covered: This paper focuses on microbial resistance against antibiotics by means of the mechanism of efflux and gives a critical overview of studies conducted to overcome this problem by combining efflux pump inhibitors with antibiotics. Information was obtained from a literature search done with MEDLINE, Pubmed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, OneSearch and EBSCO host. Expert opinion: Efflux as a mechanism of multidrug resistance has presented a platform for improved efficacy against resistant microorganisms by co-administration of efflux pump inhibitors with antimicrobial agents. Although proof of concept has been shown for this approach with in vitro experiments, further research is needed to develop more potent inhibitors with low toxicity which is clinically effective.

  18. Non-prescribed antimicrobial use and associated factors among customers in drug retail outlet in Central Zone of Tigray, northern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrekirstos, Negash Hadera; Workneh, Birhanu Demeke; Gebregiorgis, Yosef Sibhatu; Misgina, Kebede Haile; Weldehaweria, Negassie Berhe; Weldu, Meresa Gebremedhin; Belay, Hailay Siyum

    2017-01-01

    Non-prescribed antimicrobial use and their resistance are among the main public health problems, worldwide. In Ethiopia, particularly in the northern part, the magnitude of non-prescribed antimicrobial use and its major determinants is not yet well known. Thus, this study was done to assess the magnitude of non-prescribed anti-microbial use and associated factors among customers in drug retail outlet in Central Zone, Tigray, Ethiopia. A drug retail outlet based cross-sectional study was conducted among adults aged 18 years and above. A multistage sampling procedure was used to select study participants. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire by druggists under the supervision of pharmacists. Data were entered into EpiInfo software version 3.5.4. Binary logistic regression was used to identify independently associated variables in bivariate and multivariable analyses using SPSS version 21. Odds Ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated. From 829 study samples, a total of 780 respondents participated in this study with a response rate of 94.1%. Of 367 respondents who received non-prescribed antimicrobial, 249 (67.8%), 121 (33%), and 94 (25.6%) of them were males, secondary school and paid employed respectively. The magnitude of non-prescribed antimicrobial use was 47.1% (95% CI: 43.8, 50.5). The factors which were independently associated with non-prescribed antimicrobial use were male sex [AOR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.21, 2.44], seeking modern health care in private/Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) [AOR =0.47, 95% CI; 0.23, 0.98], moderate waiting time in health care facilities [AOR = 1.92, 95% CI; 1.20, 3.09], delayed waiting time in health care facilities [AOR = 1.56, 95% CI; 1.03, 2.38], ever received antimicrobial [AOR = 3.51, 95% CI; 2.45, 5.02], and frequency of purchasing non-prescribed antimicrobial (1-3 times and 4 times, [AOR = 2.04, 95% CI; 1.36, 3.06] and [AOR = 2.66, 95% CI; 1.24, 5.68] respectively). The magnitude of

  19. Antimicrobial and Herbal Drug Resistance in Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Faecal Droppings of Common House Lizard/Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoj R. Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From 194 faecal dropping samples of common house geckos collected from offices (60, houses (88, integrated farm units (IFS,18 and hostels, guest houses, and dining rooms of different canteen/mess (HGM, 28, 326 bacterial isolates of enteric bacteria belonging to 17 genera and 34 species were detected. Escherichia coli were the most frequently (39 isolated followed by Citrobacter freundii (33, Klebsiella pneumonia (27, Salmonella indica (12, Enterobacter gergoviae (12, and Ent. agglomerans (11. Other important bacteria isolated from gecko droppings were Listonella damsela (2, Raoultella terrigena (3, S. salamae (2, S. houtenae (3, Edwardsiella tarda (4, Edwardsiella hoshinae (1, and Klebsiella oxytoca (2. Of the 223 isolates tested for antimicrobial drug sensitivity, 27 (12.1% had multiple drug resistance (MDR. None of the salmonellae or edwardsiellae had MDR however, MDR strains were significantly more common among Escherichia spp. (P=1.9×10-5 and isolates from IFS units (P=3.58×10-23. The most effective herbal drug, Ageratum conyzoides extract, inhibited growth of only 27.8% of strains tested followed by ethanolic extract of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (13.9%, eucalyptus oil (5.4%, patchouli oil (5.4%, lemongrass oil (3.6%, and sandalwood oil (3.1%, and Artemisia vulgaris essential oil (3.1%.

  20. Model mass spectrometric study of competitive interactions of antimicrobial bisquaternary ammonium drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vekey K.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to reveal molecular mechanisms of possible activity modulation of antimicrobial bis-quaternary ammonium compounds (BQAC and aspirin (ASP through noncovalent competitive complexation under their combined introduction into the model systems with membrane phospholipids. Methods. Binary and triple systems containing either decamethoxinum or ethonium, or thionium and aspirin, as well as dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC have been investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Results. Basing on the analysis of associates recorded in the mass spectra, the types of nonocovalent complexes formed in the systems studied were determined and the supposed role of the complexation in the BQAC and ASP activity modulation was discussed. The formation of associates of BQAC dications with ASP anion is considered as one of the possible ways of deactivation of ionic forms of the medications. The formation of stable complexes of BQAC with DPPC and ASP with DPPC in binary systems as well as the complexes distribution in triple-components systems BQAC:ASP:DPPC point to the existence of competition between drugs of these two types for the binding to DPPC. Conclusions. The results obtained point to the competitive complexation in the model molecular systems containing the BQAC, aspirin and membrane phospholipids. The observed phenomenon testifies to the possibility of modulating the activity of bisquaternary antimicrobial agents and aspirin under their combined usage, due to the competition between the drugs for binding to the target membrane phospholipid molecules and also due to the formation of stable noncovalent complexes between BQAC and ASP.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of novel 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Seok Hyeon; Jeon, Hyejin; Kim, Yoo Jeong; Kwon, Hyo Il; Selasi, Gati Noble; Nicholas, Asiimwe; Yun, Chang-Soo; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Je Chul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen lead compounds exhibiting potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii strains from a library of chemical compounds. In a high-throughput screening analysis of 7520 compounds representative of 340,000 small molecules, two 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds were the most active against A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Subsequent selection and analysis of 70 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds revealed that the top 7 compounds were extremely active against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii isolates. These compounds commonly carried a 1-cyclopropyl-7-fluoro-4-oxo-4H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic acid core structure but had different C-8 and/or C-9 moieties. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the seven compounds against fluoroquinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates were found to be in the range of 0.02-1.70 µg/mL regardless of the mutation types in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of GyrA and ParC. Cytotoxicity of the seven compounds was observed in HeLa and U937 cells at a concentration of 50 µg/mL, which was >32.5- to 119-fold higher than the MIC 90 for A. baumannii isolates. In conclusion, novel 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds represent a promising scaffold on which to develop antimicrobial agents against drug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. A cost-effective smartphone-based antimicrobial susceptibility test reader for drug resistance testing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve W.; Tseng, Derek; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is commonly used for determining microbial drug resistance, but routine testing, which can significantly reduce the spread of multi-drug resistant organisms, is not regularly performed in resource-limited and field-settings due to technological challenges and lack of trained diagnosticians. We developed a portable cost-effective smartphone-based colorimetric 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) reader capable of automated AST without the need for a trained diagnostician. This system is composed of a smartphone used in conjunction with a 3D-printed opto-mechanical attachment, which holds a set of inexpensive light-emitting-diodes and fiber-optic cables coupled to the 96-well MTP for enabling the capture of the transmitted light through each well by the smartphone camera. Images of the MTP plate are captured at multiple exposures and uploaded to a local or remote server (e.g., a laptop) for automated processing/analysis of the results using a custom-designed smartphone application. Each set of images are combined to generate a high dynamic-range image and analyzed for well turbidity (indicative of bacterial growth), followed by interpretative analysis per plate to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and drug susceptibility for the specific bacterium. Results are returned to the originating device within 1 minute and shown to the user in tabular form. We demonstrated the capability of this platform using MTPs prepared with 17 antibiotic drugs targeting Gram-negative bacteria and tested 82 patient isolate MTPs of Klebsiella pneumoniae, achieving well turbidity accuracy of 98.19%, MIC accuracy of 95.15%, and drug susceptibility interpretation accuracy of 99.06%, meeting the FDA defined criteria for AST.

  3. Screening of Three Echinoderm Species as New Opportunity for Drug Discovery: Their Bioactivities and Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Stabili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderms are a renewable resource with an economic value due to their increasing demand as food and/or source of bioactive molecules exerting antitumor, antiviral, anticoagulant, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities. In this framework, the present study is aimed at investigating the antibacterial, antioxidant, and hemolytic activities in the three Echinoderm species Echinaster sepositus, Arbacia lixula, and Sphaerechinus granularis. The sea star E. sepositus showed lysozyme-like activity (mean diameter of lysis of 13.4±0.2 mm, an antimicrobial activity against the human emerging pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida famata, and a strong lytic activity (100±0.05% towards the human red blood cells. Furthermore A. lixula and E. sepositus had the highest antioxidant activity (1792.75±233.7 and 1765.65±484.58 nmolTE/mL, resp.. From toxicological assays, it was shown that E. sepositus was not toxic towards HeLa cells and Vibrio fischeri, encouraging the exploitation of this species in the pharmaceutical field. Therefore, our findings have implications due to the ongoing explosion of antibiotic-resistant infections because of the new opportunistic pathogens and the need to discover antibacterial agents with new modes of action. Also the recorded antioxidant activity taking into account the need to find natural antioxidants useful for human health is intriguing.

  4. Metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial drug gatifloxacin: Synthesis, structure and biological evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-08-01

    Three metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial agent gatifloxacin (GFLX) with Y(ΙΙΙ), Zr(ΙV) and U(VΙ) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, gatifloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry. The kinetic parameters for gatifloxacin and the three prepared complexes have been evaluated from TGA curves by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(U dbnd O), for the UO 2 bond in uranyl complex are 1.7522 Å and 639.46 N m -1. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against microorganisms, three bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and two fungi species, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.), showing that they exhibit higher activity than free ligand.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of PVP from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2, on multi-drug and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jonathan P.

    2012-04-11

    Multiple drug resistant (MDR) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become increasingly prevalent as a community acquired infection. As a result limited treatment options are available with conventional synthetic antibiotics. Bioprospecting natural products with potent antimicrobial activity show promise for developing new drugs against this pathogen. In this study, we have investigated the antimicrobial activity of a purple violet pigment (PVP) from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 on 15 clinical MDR and MRSA strains. The colorimetric resazurin assay was employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) of PVP against MDR and MRSA. The MIC90 ranged between 1.57 µg/mL and 3.13 µg/mL, which are significantly lower than many antimicrobials tested from natural sources against this pathogen. The spectrophotometrically determined growth analysis and total microscopic counts using Live/dead® BacLight™ fluorescent stain exhibited a steady decrease in viability of both MDR and MRSA cultures following treatment with PVP at the MIC levels. In silico predictive molecular docking study revealed that PVP could be a DNA-targeting minor groove binding antimicrobial compound. The continued development of novel antimicrobials derived from natural sources with the combination of a suite of conventional antibiotics could stem the rising pandemic of MDR and MRSA along with other deadly microbial pathogens.

  6. 78 FR 76443 - Safety and Effectiveness of Consumer Antiseptics; Topical Antimicrobial Drug Products for Over...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 310 and 333 Safety and Effectiveness of Consumer Antiseptics... Docket No. 1975N-0183H) RIN 0910-AF69 Safety and Effectiveness of Consumer Antiseptics; Topical... monograph or proposed rule (the 1994 TFM) for over-the-counter (OTC) antiseptic drug products. In this...

  7. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility of Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo isolated from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, J F; Nicholson, V M

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility to commonly used drugs of 18 isolates of Leptospira hardjo from the kidneys of feedlot cattle from different sources was determined quantitatively. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G, ampicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin and streptomycin. Susceptibility to sulphamethazine was ambiguous. No drug resistance was detected and the results were similar to those described for other serovars. PMID:3370565

  8. Understanding the transport properties of metabolites: case studies and considerations for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J; Chu, Xiaoyan; Polli, Joseph W; Paine, Mary F; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Recent analyses demonstrated that metabolites are unlikely to contribute significantly to clinical inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated drug metabolism, and that only ∼2% of this type of drug interaction could not be predicted from the parent drug alone. Due to generally increased polarity and decreased permeability, metabolites are less likely to interact with P450s, but their disposition is instead more likely to involve transporters. This commentary presents case studies illustrating the potential importance of transporters as determinants of metabolite disposition, and as sites of drug interactions, which may alter drug efficacy and safety. Many of these examples are hydrophilic phase II conjugates involved in enterohepatic cycling, where modulation of transporter-dependent disposition may alter pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. The case studies suggest that characterization of metabolite disposition, toxicology, and pharmacology should not focus solely on metabolites with appreciable systemic exposure, but should take into consideration major excretory metabolites. A more thorough understanding of metabolite (phase I and II; circulating and excreted) transport properties during drug development may provide an improved understanding of complex drug-drug interactions (DDIs) that can alter drug and/or metabolite systemic and intracellular exposure. Knowledge and capability gaps remain in clinical translation of in vitro and animal data regarding metabolite disposition. To this end, useful experimental and modeling approaches are highlighted. Application of these tools may lead to a better understanding of metabolite victim and perpetrator DDI potential, and ultimately the establishment of approaches for prediction of pharmacodynamic and toxicodynamic consequences of metabolite transport modulation.

  9. Understanding release kinetics of biopolymer drug delivery microcapsules for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Salil, E-mail: sdesai@ncat.ed [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, North Carolina A and T State University, NC 27411 (United States); Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Wake Forest University Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Perkins, Jessica [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, North Carolina A and T State University, NC 27411 (United States); Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Harrison, Benjamin S. [Wake Forest University Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Sankar, Jag [Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Drug delivery and dosage concentrations are considered as major focal points in conventional as well as battlefield emergency medicine. The concept of localizing drug delivery via microcapsules is an evolving field to confine the adverse side effects of high concentration drug doses. This paper focuses on understanding release kinetics through biopolymer microcapsules for time-dependent drug release. Calcium alginate microcapsules were manufactured using a direct-write inkjet technique. Rhodamine 6G was used as the release agent to observe the release kinetics from calcium alginate beads in distilled water. A design of experiments was constructed to compare the effect of the microcapsule diameter and different concentrations of calcium chloride (M) and sodium alginate (%, w/v) solutions on the release kinetics profiles of the microcapsules. This research gives insight to identify favorable sizes of microcapsules and concentrations of sodium alginate and calcium chloride solutions for controlled release behavior of drug delivery microcapsules.

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary ... both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the ...

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial for treatment. Accordingly, efforts are underway in both veterinary and human medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. ...

  12. Understanding the Role of Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets in Tanzania's Health System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Embrey

    Full Text Available People in many low-income countries access medicines from retail drug shops. In Tanzania, a public-private partnership launched in 2003 used an accreditation approach to improve access to quality medicines and pharmaceutical services in underserved areas. The government scaled up the accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO program nationally, with over 9,000 shops now accredited. This study assessed the relationships between community members and their sources of health care and medicines, particularly antimicrobials, with a specific focus on the role ADDOs play in the health care system.Using mixed methods, we collected data in four regions. We surveyed 1,185 households and audited 96 ADDOs and 84 public/nongovernmental health facilities using a list of 17 tracer drugs. To determine practices in health facilities, we interviewed 1,365 exiting patients. To assess dispensing practices, mystery shoppers visited 306 ADDOs presenting one of three scenarios (102 each about a child's respiratory symptoms.Of 614 household members with a recent acute illness, 73% sought outside care-30% at a public facility and 31% at an ADDO. However, people bought medicines more often at ADDOs no matter who recommended the treatment; of the 581 medicines that people had received, 49% came from an ADDO. Although health facilities and ADDOs had similar availability of antimicrobials, ADDOs had more pediatric formulations available (p<0.001. The common perception was that drugs from ADDOs are more expensive, but the difference in the median cost to treat pneumonia was relatively minimal (US$0.26 in a public facility and US$0.30 in an ADDO. Over 20% of households said they had someone with a chronic condition, with 93% taking medication, but ADDOs are allowed to sell very few chronic care-related medicines. ADDO dispensers are trained to refer complicated cases to a health facility, and notably, 99% of mystery shoppers presenting a pneumonia scenario received an

  13. Resistance to antimicrobials drugs and control measures of Salmonella spp in the poultry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence of multiple resistant Salmonella spp is described. Clonally distributed Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 are among the most pathogenic strains for humans. Recently there have been reports on the prevalence of ST “like” monophasic 4(5,12:i strains in some countries. Vaccination strategy and antimicorbial agent therapy is also briefly discussed. Products of animal origin must be safe and without the risk of antimicrobial resistance. Subsequently, the good management practice at farm level and HACCP in feed factories are required to cope with salmonella infections. Poultry producers in developed countries have been motivated to participate in salmonella control programs, because of public awareness on safe food and risks in the food chain. Export of poultry and poultry products is more successful in the regions where Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium have been eradicated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31071

  14. Analytical method development and validation of spectrofluorimetric and spectrophotometric determination of some antimicrobial drugs in their pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, F.; Wahba, M. E. K.; Magdy, G.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, three novel, sensitive, simple and validated spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods have been proposed for estimation of some important antimicrobial drugs. The first two methods have been proposed for estimation of two important third-generation cephalosporin antibiotics namely, cefixime and cefdinir. Both methods were based on condensation of the primary amino group of the studied drugs with acetyl acetone and formaldehyde in acidic medium. The resulting products were measured by spectrophotometric (Method I) and spectrofluorimetric (Method II) tools. Regarding method I, the absorbance was measured at 315 nm and 403 nm with linearity ranges of 5.0-140.0 and 10.0-100.0 μg/mL for cefixime and cefdinir, respectively. Meanwhile in method II, the produced fluorophore was measured at λem 488 nm or 491 nm after excitation at λex 410 nm with linearity ranges of 0.20-10.0 and 0.20-36.0 μg/mL for cefixime and cefdinir, respectively. On the other hand, method III was devoted to estimate nifuroxazide spectrofluorimetrically depending on formation of highly fluorescent product upon reduction of the studied drug with Zinc powder in acidic medium. Measurement of the fluorescent product was carried out at λem 335 nm following excitation at λex 255 nm with linearity range of 0.05 to 1.6 μg/mL. The developed methods were subjected to detailed validation procedure, moreover they were used for the estimation of the concerned drugs in their pharmaceuticals. It was found that there is a good agreement between the obtained results and those obtained by the reported methods.

  15. A metabolic network approach for the identification and prioritization of antimicrobial drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Arvind K; D'Auria, Kevin M; Hewlett, Erik L; Pearson, Richard D; Papin, Jason A

    2012-03-01

    For many infectious diseases, novel treatment options are needed in order to address problems with cost, toxicity and resistance to current drugs. Systems biology tools can be used to gain valuable insight into pathogenic processes and aid in expediting drug discovery. In the past decade, constraint-based modeling of genome-scale metabolic networks has become widely used. Focusing on pathogen metabolic networks, we review in silico strategies used to identify effective drug targets and highlight recent successes as well as limitations associated with such computational analyses. We further discuss how accounting for the host environment and even targeting the host may offer new therapeutic options. These systems-level approaches are beginning to provide novel avenues for drug targeting against infectious agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Patient and public understanding and knowledge of antimicrobial resistance and stewardship in a UK hospital: should public campaigns change focus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Christianne; Kildonaviciute, Kornelija; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Scibor-Stepien, Aleksandra; Santos, Reem; Aliyu, Sani H; Cooke, Fiona J; Pacey, Sarah; Holmes, Alison H; Enoch, David A

    2017-01-01

    The rising global tide of antimicrobial resistance is a well-described phenomenon. Employing effective and innovative antimicrobial stewardship strategies is an essential approach to combat this public health threat. Education of the public and patients is paramount to enable the success of such strategies. A panel of hospital multidisciplinary healthcare professionals was set up and a short quiz containing true/false statements around antimicrobial stewardship and resistance was designed and piloted. An educational leaflet with the correct replies and supporting information was also produced and disseminated. Participants were recruited on a single day (18 November 2015) from the hospital outpatient clinics and the hospital outpatient pharmacy waiting room. One hundred and forty-five completed quizzes were returned, providing a total of 1450 answers. Overall, 934 of 1450 (64%) statements were scored correctly whilst 481 (33%) were scored incorrectly; 35 (3%) statements were left unscored. We speculate that these results may demonstrate that respondents understood the statements, as only a small proportion of statements were left unanswered. The question dealing with the definition of antimicrobial resistance and the question dealing with the definition of antimicrobial stewardship obtained the most incorrect replies (85% and 72%, respectively). However, a specific factual recall question regarding only one microorganism (MRSA) received the most correct responses (99%). We describe a simple, innovative method of engagement with patients and the general public to help educate and disseminate important public health messages around antimicrobial resistance and stewardship. We also identified the need for public health campaigns to address the knowledge gaps found around this topic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Adverse drug reaction and toxicity caused by commonly used antimicrobials in canine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Arunvikram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An adverse drug reaction (ADR is a serious concern for practicing veterinarians and other health professionals, and refers to an unintended, undesired and unexpected response to a drug that negatively affects the patient's health. It may be iatrogenic or genetically induced, and may result in death of the affected animal. The ADRs are often complicated and unexpected due to myriad clinical symptoms and multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction. Toxicity due to commonly used drugs is not uncommon when they are used injudiciously or for a prolonged period. Licosamides, exclusively prescribed against anaerobic pyoderma, often ends with diarrhoea and vomiting in canines. Treatment with Penicillin and β-lactam antibiotics induces onset of pemphigious vulgare, drug allergy or hypersensitivity. Chloroamphenicol and aminoglycosides causes Gray's baby syndrome and ototoxicity in puppies, respectively. Aminoglycosides are very often associated with nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and neuromuscular blockage. Injudicious use of fluroquinones induces the onset of arthropathy in pups at the weight bearing joints. The most effective therapeutic measure in managing ADR is to treat the causative mediators, followed by supportive and symptomatic treatment. So, in this prospective review, we attempt to bring forth the commonly occurring adverse drug reactions, their classification, underlying mechanism, epidemiology, treatment and management as gleaned from the literature available till date and the different clinical cases observed by the authors.

  18. 76 FR 74791 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural and Marketing Service, Farm Service Agency... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the...

  19. Synthesis of chitosan-g-poly(acrylamide)/ZnS nanocomposite for controlled drug delivery and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Singh, Devender; Kothiyal, N C; Saini, Adesh K; Singh, Virender Partap; Pathania, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Nanocomposite materials are gaining grounds in the fields of medicine, environmental sciences and for basic studies. Herein, we have developed, a novel method for the preparation of chitosan-g-poly(acrylamide)/ZnS (abbreviated as CPAZ) nanocomposite using microwave radiations. The synthesized CPAZ nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FTIR results established the grafting of acrylamide onto chitosan backbone. TEM analysis revealed the size of the CPAZ nanocomposite particles in the range of 19-26 nm. XRD technique predicated the crystalline behavior of the nanocomposite. Therefore, XRD, TEM and FTIR spectrum analysis confirmed the formation of CPAZ nanocomposites. Zeta potential for CPAZ nanocomposite was found to be +28.2 mV which indicated its stability. The CPAZ nanocomposites were investigated for drug release behavior and we found a maximum of 79% drug release at pH 2.2. Moreover, CPAZ nanocomposite was also found to be antimicrobial against Escherichia coli bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica by high-throughput DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Multi drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica is found in food animals and may consequently pose a risk to humans through food borne transmission. To understand the mechanisms that drive this problem, the genetic elements associated with MDR need to be determined. These MDR elements in ...

  1. Blue light irradiation triggers the antimicrobial potential of ZnO nanoparticles on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Yeh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Chen, Liang-Yu; Wang, Po-Ching; Chou, Chih-Chiang; Wu, Zhong-Bin; Hu, Anren

    2018-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a non-invasive and safe therapeutic method for microbial infections. Bacterial antibiotic resistance is caused by antibiotics abuse. Drug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. is a serious problem in hospitals around the world. These pathogens from nosocomial infections have high mortality rates in frailer people, and Acinetobacter spp. is commonly found in immunocompromised patients. Visible light is safer than ultraviolet light (UV) for PDI of nosocomial pathogens with mammalian cells. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were used in this study as an antimicrobial agent and a photosensitizer. ZnO is recognized as safe and has extensive usage in food additives, medical and cosmetic products. In this study, we used 0.125 mg/ml ZnO-NPs combined with 10.8 J/cm 2 blue light (BL) on Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) that could significantly reduce microbial survival. However, individual exposure to ZnO-NPs does not affect the viability of A. baumannii. BL irradiation could trigger the antimicrobial ability of ZnO nanoparticles on A. baumannii. The mechanism of photocatalytic ZnO-NPs treatment for sterilization occurs through bacterial membrane disruptions. Otherwise, the photocatalytic ZnO-NPs treatment showed high microbial eradication in nosocomial pathogens, including colistin-resistant and imipenem-resistant A. baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Based on our results, the photocatalytic ZnO-NPs treatment could support hygiene control and clinical therapies without antibiotics to nosocomial bacterial infections. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Brain Chemistry and Behaviour: An Update on Neuroscience Research and Its Implications for Understanding Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Emma S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as drug addiction represent one of the biggest challenges to society. This article reviews clinical and basic science research to illustrate how developments in research methodology have enabled neuroscientists to understand more about the brain mechanisms involved in addiction biology. Treating addiction represents a…

  3. Understanding policy persistence : The case of police drug detection dog policy in NSW, Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Caitlin E.; Ritter, Alison; Lancaster, Kari; Hoppe, Robert

    Background Significant research attention has been given to understanding the processes of drug policy reform. However, there has been surprisingly little analysis of the persistence of policy in the face of opposition and evidence of ineffectiveness. In this article we analysed just such a case –

  4. Antimicrobial peptide isolated from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens K14 revitalizes its use in combinatorial drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Sudip; Choi, Yun Hee; Choi, Yoon Seok; Kim, Mi Ri; Yoo, Jin Cheol

    2017-03-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of an antimicrobial peptide (CSpK14) and the synergies thereof with β-lactams against vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and Enterococci (VRE). Our strain was isolated from fermented food (kimchi), which is 99.79 % homologous with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42(T). CSpK14 was purified to homogeneity by diammonium sulfate precipitation, concentration, dialysis, and followed by two-stage chromatographic separation, i.e., Sepharose Cl-6B and Sephadex G-25 chromatography, and had a molar mass of ~4.6 kDa via Tricine SDS-PAGE and in situ examination. It was stable at pH 6.0-11.5 and temperature up to 80 °C. In addition, it was also stable with various metal ions, solvents, and proteases. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was H-Y-D-P-G-D-D-S-G-N-T-G and did not show any significant homology with reported peptides. However, it shows some degrees of identity with alpha-2-macroglobulin and ligand-gated channel protein from different microorganisms. CSpK14 significantly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of β-lactams and had no effect on non-β-lactams against VRSA and VRE. MICs of CSpK14/oxacillin and CSpK14/ampicillin were reduced by 8- to 64-fold and 2- to 16-fold, respectively. The time killing assay between CSpK14/oxacillin (2.29-2.37 Δlog 10 CFU/mL at 24 h) and CSpK14/ampicillin (2.30-2.38 Δlog 10 CFU/mL at 24 h) being >2-fold and fractional inhibitory concentration index ˂0.5 revealed synergy. Furthermore, the biofilms formed by VRSA and VRE were reduced completely. CSpK14 was simple to purify, had low molecular mass, was stable over a wide pH range or tested chemicals, had broad inhibitory spectrum, and possessed potent synergistic antimicrobial-antibiofilm properties. CSpK14 synergistically enhanced the efficacy of β-lactams and is therefore suitable for combination therapy.

  5. Understanding epigenetics of schizophrenia in the backdrop of its antipsychotic drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathy, Babu; Banerjee, Moinak

    2017-05-01

    The diatheses of gene and environment interaction in schizophrenia (SCZ) are becoming increasingly evident. Genetic and epigenetic backgrounds are being considered in stratifying and addressing phenotypic variation and drug response in SCZ. But how much of these epigenetic alterations are the primary contributing factor, toward disease pathogenesis and drug response, needs further clarity. Evidence indicates that antipsychotic drugs can also alter the epigenetic homeostasis thereby inducing pharmacoepigenomic effects. We re-examine the context of epigenetics in disease pathogenesis and antipsychotic drug therapy in SCZ to understand how much of these observations act as real indicators of the disease or therapeutic response. We propose that epigenetic viewpoint in SCZ needs to be critically examined under the genetic, epigenetic and pharmacoepigenetic background.

  6. Mechanisms of first-line antimicrobial resistance in multi-drug and extensively drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navisha Dookie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In South Africa, drug resistant tuberculosis is a major public health crisis in the face of the colossal HIV pandemic. Methods In an attempt to understand the distribution of drug resistance in our setting, we analysed the rpoB, katG, inhA, pncA and embB genes associated with resistance to key drugs used in the treatment of tuberculosis in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the KwaZulu-Natal province. Results Classical mutations were detected in the katG, inhA and embB genes associated with resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol. Diverse mutations were recorded in the multidrug resistant (MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR isolates for the rpoB and pncA gene associated with resistance to rifampicin and pyrazinamide. Conclusions M.tuberculosis strains circulating in our setting display a combination of previously observed mutations, each mediating resistance to a different drug. The MDR and XDR TB isolates analysed in this study displayed classical mutations linked to INH and EMB resistance, whilst diverse mutations were linked to RIF and PZA resistance. The similarity of the XDR strains confirms reports of the clonality of the XDR epidemic. The successful dissemination of the drug resistant strains in the province underscores the need for rapid diagnostics to effectively diagnose drug resistance and guide treatment.

  7. Retrospective use of PBPK modelling to understand a clinical drug-drug interaction between dextromethorphan and GSK1034702.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael J; Bloomer, Jackie; Dear, Gordon

    2017-08-01

    1. In a clinical trial, a strong drug-drug interaction (DDI) was observed between dextromethorphan (DM, the object or victim drug) and GSK1034702 (the precipitant or perpetrator drug), following single and repeat doses. This study determined the inhibition parameters of GSK1034702 in vitro and applied PBPK modelling approaches to simulate the clinical observations and provide mechanistic hypotheses to understand the DDI. 2. In vitro assays were conducted to determine the inhibition parameters of human CYP2D6 by GSK1034702. PBPK models were populated with the in vitro parameters and DDI simulations conducted and compared to the observed data from a clinical study with DM and GSK1034702. 3. GSK1034702 was a potent direct and metabolism-dependent inhibitor of human CYP2D6, with inhibition parameters of: IC 50  =   1.6 μM, K inact  = 3.7 h -1 and K I  = 0.8 μM. Incorporating these data into PBPK models predicted a DDI after repeat, but not single, 5 mg doses of GSK1034702. 4. The DDI observed with repeat administration of GSK1034702 (5 mg) can be attributed to metabolism-dependent inhibition of CYP2D6. Further, in vitro data were generated and several potential mechanisms proposed to explain the interaction observed following a single dose of GSK1034702.

  8. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding and characterizing microbial activity reduction in the presence of antimicrobial agents can help in the design and manufacture of antimicrobial drugs. We demonstrate the use of an optical tweezer setup in recording the changes in bacterial activity with time, induced by the presence of foreign bodies in a ...

  9. The human gut microbiota as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bülow, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the emergence and spread of resistant opportunistic pathogens is compromising the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies. Understanding the emergence and global spread of drug-resistant microorganisms is thus crucial to combat antimicrobial resistance. The human gut harbors a

  10. CONTROL OF ANTIMICROBIAL DRUGS: ANALYSIS FROM THE RDC 44 OF OCTOBER 26, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Gonçalves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate use of antibiotics has been reported as an agent for predisposing episodes of bacterial resistance, the bacteria along of the time spent to develop various coping mechanisms. ANVISA considering the increase in cases of hospital infections by antibiotic-resistant microorganisms determined the RDC 44, 2010 which regulates the dispensing of medicines made from classified as antimicrobial substances. This work it is a descriptive literature review that evaluated studies related to prescribing, dispensing and use of antibiotics before and after the RDC 44 of 2010. It was observed that the most of used in therapeutic classes of antibiotics before the current legislation are the same as those after the law. About knowledge and acceptance by the population, 87.2% were satisfied and understood the new regulatory measures, who disagreed (2.4% with such changes, the need for medical consultation to obtain prescription was the point of discontent. There are still some drugstores, where professionals do not require that there be a prescription (25%, analyzing the prescriptions it was noted that 100% contained the prescribing data and 87.7% contained the date of issue. According to the results obtained can be seen that there was rather changes in relation to consumption of antibiotics after the RDC 44, 2010, however, there are still cases where the law is not fully enforced, for this, it is necessary that there is better control by public health managers.

  11. Non-genetic mechanisms communicating antibiotic resistance: rethinking strategies for antimicrobial drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2012-10-01

    Infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria are of great concern worldwide. In many cases, resistance is not due to the presence of specific antibiotic-modifying enzymes, but rather associated with a general impermeability of the bacterial cell envelope. The molecular bases of this intrinsic resistance are not completely understood. Moreover, horizontal gene transfers cannot solely explain the spread of intrinsic resistance among bacterial strains. This review focuses on the increased intrinsic antibiotic resistance mediated by small molecules. These small molecules can either be secreted from bacterial cells of the same or different species (e.g., indole, polyamines, ammonia, and the Pseudomonas quinolone signal) or be present in the bacterial cell milieu, whether in the environment, such as indole acetic acid and other plant hormones, or in human tissues and body fluids, such as polyamines. These molecules are metabolic byproducts that act as infochemicals and modulate bacterial responses toward antibiotics leading to increasing or decreasing resistance levels. The non-genetic mechanisms of antibiotic response modulation and communication discussed in this review should reorient our thinking of the mechanisms of intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and its spread across bacterial cell populations. The identification of chemical signals mediating increased intrinsic antibiotic resistance will expose novel critical targets for the development of new antimicrobial strategies.

  12. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemifloxacin (GMF is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  13. 78 FR 59308 - Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Annual Summary Report Data Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... other data points that would reveal confidential business information. FDA believes the broad... highlights the public health relevance of these data, and is consistent with the FDA's strategy to promote..., or indications, and differentiation between drug classes of human medical importance and those not...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as the name implies are compounds of nonsteroidal origin, with the capability of inhibiting/reducing inflammatory response associated with tissue injury which could be as a result of physical trauma, noxious chemicals or microorganisms. There is however reason to ...

  15. Understanding the Global Problem of Drug Addiction is a Challenge for IDARS Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S F; Onaivi, E S; Dodd, P R; Cadet, J L; Schenk, S; Kuhar, M J; Koob, G F

    2011-03-01

    IDARS is an acronym for the International Drug Abuse Research Society. Apart from our scientific and educational purposes, we communicate information to the general and scientific community about substance abuse and addiction science and treatment potential. Members of IDARS are research scientists and clinicians from around the world, with scheduled meetings across the globe. IDARS is developing a vibrant and exciting international mechanism not only for scientific interactions in the domain of addiction between countries but also ultimately as a resource for informing public policy across nations. Nonetheless, a lot more research needs to be done to better understand the neurobiological basis of drug addiction - A challenge for IDARS scientists.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides: a promising class of antimicrobial compounds against BWA and multi-drug resistant bacteria: in the spotlight: the lactoferrin chimera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, F.J.; Sijbrandij, T.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Jansen, H-J.

    2014-01-01

    Anti-Microbial Peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense system and considered as promising lead compounds for the development of novel anti-bacterial agents. In general, AMPs are simple, short peptides with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, fungi,

  17. Antimicrobial drug use and risk factors associated with treatment incidence and mortality in Swiss veal calves reared under improved welfare conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lava, M; Schüpbach-Regula, G; Steiner, A; Meylan, M

    2016-04-01

    Ninety-one Swiss veal farms producing under a label with improved welfare standards were visited between August and December 2014 to investigate risk factors related to antimicrobial drug use and mortality. All herds consisted of own and purchased calves, with a median of 77.4% of purchased calves. The calves' mean age was 29±15days at purchasing and the fattening period lasted at average 120±28 days. The mean carcass weight was 125±12kg. A mean of 58±33 calves were fattened per farm and year, and purchased calves were bought from a mean of 20±17 farms of origin. Antimicrobial drug treatment incidence was calculated with the defined daily dose methodology. The mean treatment incidence (TIADD) was 21±15 daily doses per calf and year. The mean mortality risk was 4.1%, calves died at a mean age of 94±50 days, and the main causes of death were bovine respiratory disease (BRD, 50%) and gastro-intestinal disease (33%). Two multivariable models were constructed, for antimicrobial drug treatment incidence (53 farms) and mortality (91 farms). No quarantine, shared air space for several groups of calves, and no clinical examination upon arrival at the farm were associated with increased antimicrobial treatment incidence. Maximum group size and weight differences >100kg within a group were associated with increased mortality risk, while vaccination and beef breed were associated with decreased mortality risk. The majority of antimicrobial treatments (84.6%) were given as group treatments with oral powder fed through an automatic milk feeding system. Combination products containing chlortetracycline with tylosin and sulfadimidine or with spiramycin were used for 54.9%, and amoxicillin for 43.7% of the oral group treatments. The main indication for individual treatment was BRD (73%). The mean age at the time of treatment was 51 days, corresponding to an estimated weight of 80-100kg. Individual treatments were mainly applied through injections (88.5%), and included

  18. Differential roles of RND efflux pumps in antimicrobial drug resistance of sessile and planktonic Burkholderia cenocepacia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buroni, Silvia; Matthijs, Nele; Spadaro, Francesca; Van Acker, Heleen; Scoffone, Viola C; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Coenye, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is notorious for causing respiratory tract infections in people with cystic fibrosis. Infections with this organism are particularly difficult to treat due to its high level of intrinsic resistance to most antibiotics. Multidrug resistance in B. cenocepacia can be ascribed to different mechanisms, including the activity of efflux pumps and biofilm formation. In the present study, the effects of deletion of the 16 operons encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia strain J2315 were investigated by determining the MICs of various antibiotics and by investigating the antibiofilm effect of these antibiotics. Finally, the expression levels of selected RND genes in treated and untreated cultures were investigated using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Our data indicate that the RND-3 and RND-4 efflux pumps are important for resistance to various antimicrobial drugs (including tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) in planktonic B. cenocepacia J2315 populations, while the RND-3, RND-8, and RND-9 efflux systems protect biofilm-grown cells against tobramycin. The RND-8 and RND-9 efflux pumps are not involved in ciprofloxacin resistance. Results from the RT-qPCR experiments on the wild-type strain B. cenocepacia J2315 suggest that there is little regulation at the level of mRNA expression for these efflux pumps under the conditions tested. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Bismuth antimicrobial drugs serve as broad-spectrum metallo-β-lactamase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runming; Lai, Tsz-Pui; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Hongmin; Ho, Pak-Leung; Woo, Patrick Chiu-Yat; Ma, Guixing; Kao, Richard Yi-Tsun; Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2018-01-30

    Drug-resistant superbugs pose a huge threat to human health. Infections by Enterobacteriaceae producing metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), e.g., New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) are very difficult to treat. Development of effective MBL inhibitors to revive the efficacy of existing antibiotics is highly desirable. However, such inhibitors are not clinically available till now. Here we show that an anti-Helicobacter pylori drug, colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS), and related Bi(III) compounds irreversibly inhibit different types of MBLs via the mechanism, with one Bi(III) displacing two Zn(II) ions as revealed by X-ray crystallography, leading to the release of Zn(II) cofactors. CBS restores meropenem (MER) efficacy against MBL-positive bacteria in vitro, and in mice infection model, importantly, also slows down the development of higher-level resistance in NDM-1-positive bacteria. This study demonstrates a high potential of Bi(III) compounds as the first broad-spectrum B1 MBL inhibitors to treat MBL-positive bacterial infection in conjunction with existing carbapenems.

  20. Microbiological quality of water from the rivers of Curitiba, Paraná State, Brazil, and the susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs and pathogenicity of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giowanella, Melissa; Bozza, Angela; do Rocio Dalzoto, Patricia; Dionísio, Jair Alves; Andraus, Sumaia; Guimarães, Edson Luiz Gomes; Pimentel, Ida Chapaval

    2015-11-01

    Water safety is determined by several markers, and Escherichia coli is one of the most important indicators of water quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological parameters in environmental samples of fresh water from rivers of Curitiba and its metropolitan area in Paraná State, Brazil. In addition, we evaluated the pathogenicity and susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs in E. coli. These evaluations were performed by quantitative and qualitative methods employing selective media for isolating thermotolerant coliforms and biochemical tests for identifying E. coli. Pathogenic strains of E. coli were detected by PCR multiplex using specific primers. From the water samples, 494 thermotolerant coliforms were obtained, of which 96 (19.43%) isolates were characterized as E. coli. Three isolates were identified as enteroaggregative E. coli, one as enterotoxigenic E. coli, one as enteropathogenic E. coli, and two carried the Eae virulence gene. E. coli susceptibility to commonly employed antimicrobial drugs was analyzed by the disc diffusion method. The results showed 49 (51.04%) isolates resistant to all the drugs assayed, 16 (16.67%) with an intermediate resistance to all drugs, and 31 (32.29%) intermediately or fully resistant to one or more drugs tested. The highest rate of resistance was observed for tetracycline 30 μg, streptomycin 10 μg, and ceftazidime 30 μg. Detection of E. coli is associated with water contamination by fecal material from humans and warm-blooded animals. The occurrence of resistant strains can be the result of the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor sanitation in the areas assayed.

  1. Drug use and antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulianne, Martine; Arsenault, Julie; Daignault, Danielle; Archambault, Marie; Letellier, Ann; Dutil, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted of chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered at federal processing plants in the province of Quebec, Canada. The objectives were to estimate prevalence of drug use at hatchery and on farm and to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in cecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates and factors associated with AMR. Eighty-two chicken flocks and 59 turkey flocks were sampled. At the hatchery, the most used antimicrobial was ceftiofur in chickens (76% of flocks) and spectinomycin in turkeys (42% of flocks). Virginiamycin was the antimicrobial most frequently added to the feed in both chicken and turkey flocks. At least 1 E. coli isolate resistant to third-generation cephalosporins was present in all chicken flocks and in a third of turkey flocks. Resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole was detected in > 90% of flocks for E. coli isolates. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was observed to bacitracin, erythromycin, lincomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and tetracycline in both chicken and turkey flocks for Enterococcus spp. isolates. No resistance to vancomycin was observed. The use of ceftiofur at hatchery was significantly associated with the proportion of ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates in chicken flocks. In turkey flocks, ceftiofur resistance was more frequent when turkeys were placed on litter previously used by chickens. Associations between drug use and resistance were observed with tetracycline (turkey) in E. coli isolates and with bacitracin (chicken and turkey), gentamicin (turkey), and tylosin (chicken) in Enterococcus spp. isolates. Further studies are needed to provide producers and veterinarians with alternative management practices and tools in order to reduce the use of antimicrobial feed additives in poultry.

  2. Ampicillin, gentamicin and teicoplanin as antimicrobial therapy for recurrent Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis in an intravenous drug abuser with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Marinacci, Ginevra; Fortunato, Lorenza; Chiodo, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    Infective endocarditis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection occurs almost exclusively in intravenous (i.v.) drug users and usually involves the tricuspid valve, with an increased mortality rate among patients with a severe degree of immunosuppression. The first reported case of recurrent tricuspid endocarditis sustained by Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis in an i.v. drug addict during HIV infection is presented. Antimicrobial therapy with i.v. ampicillin, gentamicin and teicoplanin led to complete clinical and echocardiographical recovery. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Infections Caused by Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Saprophytic Gram-Negative Bacteria in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Eva; Riley, Lee W

    2017-01-01

    Drug-resistance genes found in human bacterial pathogens are increasingly recognized in saprophytic Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) from environmental sources. The clinical implication of such environmental GNBs is unknown. We conducted a systematic review to determine how often such saprophytic GNBs cause human infections. We queried PubMed for articles published in English, Spanish, and French between January 2006 and July 2014 for 20 common environmental saprophytic GNB species, using search terms "infections," "human infections," "hospital infection." We analyzed 251 of 1,275 non-duplicate publications that satisfied our selection criteria. Saprophytes implicated in blood stream infection (BSI), urinary tract infection (UTI), skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI), post-surgical infection (PSI), osteomyelitis (Osteo), and pneumonia (PNA) were quantitatively assessed. Thirteen of the 20 queried GNB saprophytic species were implicated in 674 distinct infection episodes from 45 countries. The most common species included Enterobacter aerogenes, Pantoea agglomerans , and Pseudomonas putida . Of these infections, 443 (66%) had BSI, 48 (7%) had SSTI, 36 (5%) had UTI, 28 (4%) had PSI, 21 (3%) had PNA, 16 (3%) had Osteo, and 82 (12%) had other infections. Nearly all infections occurred in subjects with comorbidities. Resistant strains harbored extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), carbapenemase, and metallo-β-lactamase genes recognized in human pathogens. These observations show that saprophytic GNB organisms that harbor recognized drug-resistance genes cause a wide spectrum of infections, especially as opportunistic pathogens. Such GNB saprophytes may become increasingly more common in healthcare settings, as has already been observed with other environmental GNBs such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa .

  4. Infections Caused by Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Saprophytic Gram-Negative Bacteria in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Raphael

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDrug-resistance genes found in human bacterial pathogens are increasingly recognized in saprophytic Gram-negative bacteria (GNB from environmental sources. The clinical implication of such environmental GNBs is unknown.ObjectivesWe conducted a systematic review to determine how often such saprophytic GNBs cause human infections.MethodsWe queried PubMed for articles published in English, Spanish, and French between January 2006 and July 2014 for 20 common environmental saprophytic GNB species, using search terms “infections,” “human infections,” “hospital infection.” We analyzed 251 of 1,275 non-duplicate publications that satisfied our selection criteria. Saprophytes implicated in blood stream infection (BSI, urinary tract infection (UTI, skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI, post-surgical infection (PSI, osteomyelitis (Osteo, and pneumonia (PNA were quantitatively assessed.ResultsThirteen of the 20 queried GNB saprophytic species were implicated in 674 distinct infection episodes from 45 countries. The most common species included Enterobacter aerogenes, Pantoea agglomerans, and Pseudomonas putida. Of these infections, 443 (66% had BSI, 48 (7% had SSTI, 36 (5% had UTI, 28 (4% had PSI, 21 (3% had PNA, 16 (3% had Osteo, and 82 (12% had other infections. Nearly all infections occurred in subjects with comorbidities. Resistant strains harbored extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL, carbapenemase, and metallo-β-lactamase genes recognized in human pathogens.ConclusionThese observations show that saprophytic GNB organisms that harbor recognized drug-resistance genes cause a wide spectrum of infections, especially as opportunistic pathogens. Such GNB saprophytes may become increasingly more common in healthcare settings, as has already been observed with other environmental GNBs such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  5. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...

  6. Novel imidazoline antimicrobial scaffold that inhibits DNA replication with activity against mycobacteria and drug resistant Gram-positive cocci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kendra K; Fay, Allison; Yan, Han-Guang; Kunwar, Pratima; Socci, Nicholas D; Pottabathini, Narender; Juventhala, Ramakrishna R; Djaballah, Hakim; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-11-21

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance is an escalating public health threat, yet the current antimicrobial pipeline remains alarmingly depleted, making the development of new antimicrobials an urgent need. Here, we identify a novel, potent, imidazoline antimicrobial compound, SKI-356313, with bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Gram-positive cocci, including vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). SKI-356313 is active in murine models of Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRSA infection and is potently bactericidal for both replicating and nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. Using a combination of genetics, whole genome sequencing, and a novel target ID approach using real time imaging of core macromolecular biosynthesis, we show that SKI-356313 inhibits DNA replication and displaces the replisome from the bacterial nucleoid. These results identify a new antimicrobial scaffold with a novel mechanism of action and potential therapeutic utility against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and antibiotic resistant Gram-positive cocci.

  7. Non-prescribed antimicrobial use and associated factors among customers in drug retail outlet in Central Zone of Tigray, northern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negash Hadera Gebrekirstos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-prescribed antimicrobial use and their resistance are among the main public health problems, worldwide. In Ethiopia, particularly in the northern part, the magnitude of non-prescribed antimicrobial use and its major determinants is not yet well known. Thus, this study was done to assess the magnitude of non-prescribed anti-microbial use and associated factors among customers in drug retail outlet in Central Zone, Tigray, Ethiopia. Methods A drug retail outlet based cross-sectional study was conducted among adults aged 18 years and above. A multistage sampling procedure was used to select study participants. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire by druggists under the supervision of pharmacists. Data were entered into EpiInfo software version 3.5.4. Binary logistic regression was used to identify independently associated variables in bivariate and multivariable analyses using SPSS version 21. Odds Ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated. Results From 829 study samples, a total of 780 respondents participated in this study with a response rate of 94.1%. Of 367 respondents who received non-prescribed antimicrobial, 249 (67.8%, 121 (33%, and 94 (25.6% of them were males, secondary school and paid employed respectively. The magnitude of non-prescribed antimicrobial use was 47.1% (95% CI: 43.8, 50.5. The factors which were independently associated with non-prescribed antimicrobial use were male sex [AOR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.21, 2.44], seeking modern health care in private/Non-Governmental Organization (NGO [AOR =0.47, 95% CI; 0.23, 0.98], moderate waiting time in health care facilities [AOR = 1.92, 95% CI; 1.20, 3.09], delayed waiting time in health care facilities [AOR = 1.56, 95% CI; 1.03, 2.38], ever received antimicrobial [AOR = 3.51, 95% CI; 2.45, 5.02], and frequency of purchasing non-prescribed antimicrobial (1–3 times and 4 times, [AOR = 2.04, 95% CI; 1.36, 3.06] and [AOR = 2

  8. Modulating the properties of sunflower oil based novel emulgels using castor oil fatty acid ester: prospects for topical antimicrobial drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, B; Biswal, D; Uvanesh, K; Srivastava, A K; Bhattacharya, Mrinal K; Paramanik, K; Pal, K

    2015-04-01

    The current study describes the effect of polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) on the properties of sunflower oil and span-40 based emulgels. The prepared emulgels contained PGPR in varied concentrations. The microstructure of the emulgels was characterized by bright-field microscopy. The molecular interactions amongst the components of the emulgels were studied using FTIR spectroscopy. The flow and mechanical behaviors of the emulgels were studied using cone-and-plate viscometer and static mechanical tester, respectively. The efficiency of the metronidazole-loaded emulgels as antimicrobial formulations was tested in vitro. E. coli was used as the model microorganism for the antimicrobial study. The emulgels were also explored for iontophoretic delivery applications. The biocompatibility of the emulgels was tested using human keratinocytes (HaCaT). The microscopic evaluation of the emulgels indicated formation of biphasic formulations. FTIR studies suggested a decrease in the hydrogen bonding amongst the components of the emulgels as the concentration of the PGPR was increased. Viscosity studies indicated shear-thinning property of the emulgels. An increase in the PGPR concentration resulted in the reduction in the mechanical properties of the emulgels. Incorporation of PGPR resulted in the decrease in the drug released (both passive and iontophoresis) from the emulgels. The emulgels were found to be cytocompatible in the presence of keratinocytes. The drug loaded emulgels showed good antimicrobial activity against E. coli. In gist, the developed emulgels can be tried for controlled delivery of antimicrobial drugs. The physical and the release properties of the emulgels can be modulated by incorporating PGPR in varied proportions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulations Suggest Current Chlortetracycline Drug-Residue Based Withdrawal Periods Would Not Control Antimicrobial Resistance Dissemination from Feedlot to Slaughterhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L. Cazer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial use in beef cattle can increase antimicrobial resistance prevalence in their enteric bacteria, including potential pathogens such as Escherichia coli. These bacteria can contaminate animal products at slaughterhouses and cause food-borne illness, which can be difficult to treat if it is due to antimicrobial resistant bacteria. One potential intervention to reduce the dissemination of resistant bacteria from feedlot to consumer is to impose a withdrawal period after antimicrobial use, similar to the current withdrawal period designed to prevent drug residues in edible animal meat. We investigated tetracycline resistance in generic E. coli in the bovine large intestine during and after antimicrobial treatment by building a mathematical model of oral chlortetracycline pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics and E. coli population dynamics. We tracked three E. coli subpopulations (susceptible, intermediate, and resistant during and after treatment with each of three United States chlortetracycline indications (liver abscess reduction, disease control, disease treatment. We compared the proportion of resistant E. coli before antimicrobial use to that at several time points after treatment and found a greater proportion of resistant enteric E. coli after the current withdrawal periods than prior to treatment. In order for the proportion of resistant E. coli in the median beef steer to return to the pre-treatment level, withdrawal periods of 15 days after liver abscess reduction dosing (70 mg daily, 31 days after disease control dosing (350 mg daily, and 36 days after disease treatment dosing (22 mg/kg bodyweight for 5 days are required in this model. These antimicrobial resistance withdrawal periods would be substantially longer than the current U.S. withdrawals of 0–2 days or Canadian withdrawals of 5–10 days. One published field study found similar time periods necessary to reduce the proportion of resistant E. coli following

  10. Understanding the Supersensitive Anti-Drug Antibody Assay: Unexpected High Anti-Drug Antibody Incidence and Its Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numbers of biotherapeutic products in development have increased over past decade. Despite providing significant benefits to patients with unmet needs, almost all protein-based biotherapeutics could induce unwanted immunogenicity, which result in a loss of efficacy and/or increase the risk of adverse reactions, such as infusion reactions, anaphylaxis, and even life-threatening response to endogenous proteins. Recognizing these possibilities, regulatory agencies request that immunogenicity be assessed as part of the approval process for biotherapeutics. Great efforts have been made to reduce drug immunogenicity through protein engineering. Accordingly the immunogenicity incidence has been reduced from around 80% in murine derived products to 0–10% in fully human products. However, recent improvements in immunogenicity assays have led to unexpectedly high immunogenicity rates, even in fully human products, leading to new challenges in assessing immunogenicity and its clinical relevance. These new immunogenicity assays are becoming supersensitive and able to detect more of anti-drug antibodies (ADA than with earlier assays. This paper intends to review and discuss our understanding of the supersensitive ADA assay and the unexpected high ADA incidence and its potential clinical relevance.

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ol Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complex. This video was designed to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to ... audiences. We hope this animation will make the concept more understandable to non-scientists by showing how ...

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  15. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of hetero- and homodimers of ribosome-targeting antibiotics: antimicrobial activity, in vitro inhibition of translation, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov-Zrihen, Yifat; Green, Keith D; Labby, Kristin J; Feldman, Mark; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Fridman, Micha

    2013-07-11

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of a full set of homo- and heterodimers of three intact structures of different ribosome-targeting antibiotics: tobramycin, clindamycin, and chloramphenicol. Several aspects of the biological activity of the dimeric structures were evaluated including antimicrobial activity, inhibition of in vitro bacterial protein translation, and the effect of dimerization on the action of several bacterial resistance mechanisms that deactivate tobramycin and chloramphenicol. This study demonstrates that covalently linking two identical or different ribosome-targeting antibiotics may lead to (i) a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, (ii) improved inhibition of bacterial translation properties compared to that of the parent antibiotics, and (iii) reduction in the efficacy of some drug-modifying enzymes that confer high levels of resistance to the parent antibiotics from which the dimers were derived.

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Adem Bahar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics.

  18. 76 FR 14030 - Extension of Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and Servicio...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of an extension of memorandum of understanding (MOU) between FDA and Servicio Nacional de Sanidad, Inocuidad y Calidad Agroalimentaria of the United Mexican States. The purpose of the MOU is to establish, and build confidence in, a system that increases the likelihood that cantaloupes from Mexico offered for import into the United States comply with U.S. law. This MOU also establishes a risk-based classification system for firms in Mexico producing cantaloupes for import into the United States to protect the public health.

  19. Trends in Drug Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii over a 10-year Period: Nationwide Data from the China Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Lyu, Yuan; Li, Yun

    2017-03-20

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important pathogen causing a variety of infections. Using data from the China Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Program conducted biennially, we investigated the secular changes in the resistance of 2917 isolates of A. baumannii from 2004 to 2014 to differ antimicrobial agents. Pathogen samples were collected from 17 to 20 hospitals located in the eastern, central, and western regions of China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by a 2-fold agar dilution method, and antimicrobial susceptibility was established using the 2014 Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute-approved breakpoints. Isolates not susceptible to all the tested aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, β-lactams, β-lactam/β-lactam inhibitors and carbapenems were defined as extensively drug resistant. The rates of nonsusceptibility to common antimicrobial agents remained high (>65%) over the years with some fluctuations to certain agents. The prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii (IRAB) increased from 13.3% in 2004 to 70.5% in 2014 and that of extensively drug-resistant A. baumannii (XDRAB) increased from 11.1% in 2004 to 60.4% in 2014. The activity of tigecycline was stable with MIC90 ≤4 mg/L against A. baumannii from 2009 to 2014. Susceptibility to colistin remained high (97.0%) from 2009 to 2014. The prevalence of XDRAB increased in all the three surveillance regions over the years and was significantly higher in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) wards than non-ICU wards. This longitudinal multicenter surveillance program revealed the nationwide emergence of A. baumannii in China and showed a significant increase in prevalence from 2004 to 2014. High levels of bacterial resistance were detected among samples collected from clinical settings in China, with IRAB and XDRAB being especially prevalent. This study will help to guide empirical therapy and identify at-risk groups requiring more intense interventional infection control

  20. Contribution of proteomics of Leishmania spp. to the understanding of differentiation, drug resistance mechanisms, vaccine and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paape, Daniel; Aebischer, Toni

    2011-08-24

    Leishmania spp., protozoan parasites with a digenetic life cycle, cause a spectrum of diseases in humans. Recently several Leishmania spp. have been sequenced which significantly boosted the number and quality of proteomic studies conducted. Here a historic review will summarize work of the pre-genomic era and then focus on studies after genome information became available. Firstly works comparing the different life cycle stages, in order to identify stage specific proteins, will be discussed. Identifying post-translational modifications by proteomics especially phosphorylation events will be discussed. Further the contribution of proteomics to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of drug resistance and the investigation of immunogenic proteins for the identification of vaccine candidates will be summarized. Approaches of how potentially secreted proteins were identified are discussed. So far 30-35% of the total predicted proteome of Leishmania spp. have been identified. This comprises mainly the abundant proteins, therefore the last section will look into technological approaches on how this coverage may be increased and what the gel-free and gel-based proteomics have to offer will be compared. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Elevated Risk for Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Shigella Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men, United States, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anna; Grass, Julian; Bicknese, Amelia; Campbell, Davina; Hurd, Jacqueline; Kirkcaldy, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Shigella spp. cause ≈500,000 illnesses in the United States annually, and resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and azithromycin is emerging. We investigated associations between transmission route and antimicrobial resistance among US shigellosis clusters reported during 2011-2015. Of 32 clusters, 9 were caused by shigellae resistant to ciprofloxacin (3 clusters), ceftriaxone (2 clusters), or azithromycin (7 clusters); 3 clusters were resistant to >1 of these drugs. We observed resistance to any of these drugs in all 7 clusters among men who have sex with men (MSM) but in only 2 of the other 25 clusters (p<0.001). Azithromycin resistance was more common among MSM-associated clusters than other clusters (86% vs. 4% of clusters; p<0.001). For adults with suspected shigellosis, clinicians should culture feces; obtain sex histories; discuss shigellosis prevention; and choose treatment, when needed, according to antimicrobial drug susceptibility. Public health interviews for enteric illnesses should encompass sex practices; health messaging for MSM must include shigellosis prevention.

  2. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Help Archive Site Map Información en español Employee Information Connect with NIAID Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google+ Youtube Flickr Instagram Pinterest Email Website Policies & Notices ...

  3. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes of resistance. Learn more about research and investigations currently underway . Clinical Research Clinical research projects related ... Interest for NIAID’s Small Business Program Division of AIDS High-Priority Areas of Interest Division of Allergy, ...

  4. 76 FR 41267 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and MEDSCAPE, LLC and WEBMD LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug... educate and communicate with health care professionals. It will also promote the timely dissemination to...

  5. Application of Hansen solubility parameters for understanding and prediction of drug distribution in microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Kerstin; Scheler, Stefan; Friess, Wolfgang

    2011-09-15

    In an emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation process for the preparation of microspheres the employed solvents have a tremendous influence on the characteristics of the resulting particles. Nevertheless the solvent selection is often based on empirical data rather than on calculated values. The purpose of this investigation was to use the concept of solubility parameters for interpretation and improved understanding of solvent effects in the process of microparticle preparation. Partial solubility parameters of 3-{2-[4-(6-Fluor-1,2-benzisoxazol-3-yl)piperidino]ethyl}-2-methyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-4H-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-on, which was used as a model drug, were determined experimentally using an extended Hansen regression model. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles were prepared with an emulsion solvent removal process employing methylene chloride and its mixtures with benzyl alcohol and n-butanol. It could be shown, that the encapsulation efficiency was influenced by the change of the solvent composition during the extraction process. Furthermore the solvent selection had an essential influence on the morphological state of the drug and it could be shown and explained, that by a decrease of the dissolving power a completely amorphous product was obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacterial strategies of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Fu, Chih-Iung; Otto, Michael

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a key component of the host's innate immune system, targeting invasive and colonizing bacteria. For successful survival and colonization of the host, bacteria have a series of mechanisms to interfere with AMP activity, and AMP resistance is intimately connected with the virulence potential of bacterial pathogens. In particular, because AMPs are considered as potential novel antimicrobial drugs, it is vital to understand bacterial AMP resistance mechanisms. This review gives a comparative overview of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strategies of resistance to various AMPs, such as repulsion or sequestration by bacterial surface structures, alteration of membrane charge or fluidity, degradation and removal by efflux pumps.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Beyond Cue Reactivity: Non-Drug-Related Motivationally Relevant Stimuli Are Necessary to Understand Reactivity to Drug-Related Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Francesco; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Deweese, Menton M; Robinson, Jason D; Green, Charles E; Lam, Cho Y; Minnix, Jennifer A; Karam-Hage, Maher A; Wetter, David W; Schembre, Susan M; Cinciripini, Paul M

    2017-06-01

    Neurobiological models of addiction posit that drug use can alter reward processes in two ways: (1) by increasing the motivational relevance of drugs and drug-related cues and (2) by reducing the motivational relevance of non-drug-related rewards. Here, we discuss the results from a series of neuroimaging studies in which we assessed the extent to which these hypotheses apply to nicotine dependence. In these studies, we recorded smokers’ and nonsmokers’ brain responses to a wide array of motivationally relevant visual stimuli that included pleasant, unpleasant, cigarette-related, and neutral images. Based on these findings, we highlight the flaws of the traditional cue reactivity paradigm and we conclude that responses to non-drug-related motivationally relevant stimuli should be used to appropriately gauge the motivational relevance of cigarette-related cues and to identify smokers attributing higher motivational relevance to drug-related cues than to non-drug-related rewards. Identifying these individuals is clinically relevant as they achieve lower rates of long-term smoking abstinence when attempting to quit. Finally, we show how this approach may be extended beyond nicotine dependence to inform theoretical and clinical research in the study of obesity. The cue reactivity paradigm (ie, comparing responses evoked by drug-related cues to those evoked by neutral cues) cannot provide conclusive information about the motivational relevance of drug-related cues. Responses to non-drug-related motivationally relevant stimuli should be used to appropriately gauge the level of motivational relevance that substance-dependent individuals attribute to drug-related cues. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Antimicrobial drugs for persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause in children under six in low and middle income countries: systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Katharine; Sinfield, Rebecca; Hart, C Anthony; Garner, Paul

    2009-03-03

    A high proportion of children with persistent diarrhoea in middle and low income countries die. The best treatment is not clear. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial drug treatment for persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause. We included randomized comparisons of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause in children under the age of six years in low and middle income countries. We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, WEB OF SCIENCE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) to May 2008 for relevant randomized or quasi randomized controlled trials. We summarised the characteristics of the eligible trials, assessed their quality using standard criteria, and extracted relevant outcomes data. Where appropriate, we combined the results of different trials. Three trials from South East Asia and one from Guatemala were included, all were small, and three had adequate allocation concealment. Two were in patients with diarrhoea of unknown cause, and two were in patients in whom known bacterial or parasitological causes of diarrhoea had been excluded. No difference was demonstrated for oral gentamicin compared with placebo (presence of diarrhoea at 6 or 7 days; 2 trials, n = 151); and for metronidazole compared with placebo (presence of diarrhoea at 3, 5 and 7 days; 1 trial, n = 99). In one small trial, sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim appeared better than placebo in relation to diarrhoea at seven days and total stool volume (n = 55). There is little evidence as to whether or not antimicrobials help treat persistent diarrhoea in young children in low and middle income countries.

  9. Antimicrobial drugs for persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause in children under six in low and middle income countries: systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart C Anthony

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high proportion of children with persistent diarrhoea in middle and low income countries die. The best treatment is not clear. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial drug treatment for persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause. Methods We included randomized comparisons of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of persistent diarrhoea of unknown or non-specific cause in children under the age of six years in low and middle income countries. We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, WEB OF SCIENCE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL to May 2008 for relevant randomized or quasi randomized controlled trials. We summarised the characteristics of the eligible trials, assessed their quality using standard criteria, and extracted relevant outcomes data. Where appropriate, we combined the results of different trials. Results Three trials from South East Asia and one from Guatemala were included, all were small, and three had adequate allocation concealment. Two were in patients with diarrhoea of unknown cause, and two were in patients in whom known bacterial or parasitological causes of diarrhoea had been excluded. No difference was demonstrated for oral gentamicin compared with placebo (presence of diarrhoea at 6 or 7 days; 2 trials, n = 151; and for metronidazole compared with placebo (presence of diarrhoea at 3, 5 and 7 days; 1 trial, n = 99. In one small trial, sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim appeared better than placebo in relation to diarrhoea at seven days and total stool volume (n = 55. Conclusion There is little evidence as to whether or not antimicrobials help treat persistent diarrhoea in young children in low and middle income countries.

  10. Sunlight mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles by a novel actinobacterium (Sinomonas mesophila MPKL 26) and its antimicrobial activity against multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikprabhu, Deene; Cheng, Juan; Chen, Wei; Sunkara, Anil Kumar; Mane, Sunilkumar B; Kumar, Ram; das, Mousumi; N Hozzein, Wael; Duan, Yan-Qing; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using microorganism are many, but there are only scanty reports using actinobacteria. In the present study, the actinobacterium of the genus Sinomonas was reported to synthesis silver nanoparticles for the first time. A photo-irradiation based method was developed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles, which includes two day old cultural supernatant of novel species Sinomonas mesophila MPKL 26 and silver nitrate solution, exposed to sunlight. The preliminary synthesis of silver nanoparticles was noted by the color change of the solution from colorless to brown; the synthesis was further confirmed using UV-visible spectroscopy which shows a peak between 400 and 450nm. Spherical shape silver nanoparticles of size range 4-50nm were synthesized, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy result indicates that, the metabolite produced by the novel species S. mesophila MPKL 26 was the probable reducing/capping agent involved in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The synthesized silver nanoparticles maintained consistent shape with respect to different time periods. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were evaluated for the antimicrobial activity against multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus which show good antimicrobial activity. The method developed for synthesis is easy, requires less time (20min) and produces spherical shape nanoparticles of size as small as 4nm, having good antimicrobial activity. Hence, our study enlarges the scope of actinobacteria for the rapid biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and can be used in formulating remedies for multi drug resistant S. aureus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The antimicrobial effects of cinnamon oil against multi-drug resistant Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is generally no kill-step when preparing salad vegetables, so there is a risk for foodborne illness outbreaks due to consumption of these vegetables. Some essential oils have antimicrobial activities and could provide a natural way to reduce pathogens on fresh produce. The use of a cinnamon ...

  12. Activity of tick antimicrobial peptide from Ixodes persulcatus (persulcatusin) against cell membranes of drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Naruhide; Isogai, Emiko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Sasaki, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Persulcatusin (IP), which is an antimicrobial peptide found in Ixodes persulcatus midgut, is active against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. Multidrug-resistant bacteria in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) are a worldwide clinical concern. In the present study, to explore the potential of IP as a new agent against multidrug-resistant S. aureus infections, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of IP against multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains by MIC 90 , morphological observation with scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the calcein leakage assay of membrane integrity. Among the six antimicrobial peptides used in this study, IP exhibited the lowest MIC 90 values for both vancomycin-susceptible and -resistant S. aureus strains. The IP MIC 90 against a VISA strain was equivalent to vancomycin, while the MIC 90 against VRSA was relatively low. SEM observations indicated that bacterial cells exposed to IP were crumpled and showed prominent structural changes. Moreover, IP influenced the cell membranes of both MRSA and VRSA in a mere 5 min, leading to leakage of the preloaded calcein. Although a VISA strain was resistant to the action of IP on cell membrane, the MIC 90 of IP was lower than that of Nisin, suggesting that IP had another bactericidal mechanism in addition to cell membrane attack. Our results indicate that the synthetic tick antimicrobial peptide, IP exhibits strong antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains, including VRSA, via both cell membrane attack and another unknown mechanism. IP represents a promising candidate for a new anti-VRSA therapy.

  13. Linalool loaded on glutathione-modified gold nanoparticles: a drug delivery system for a successful antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Majid S; Taha, Ali A; Sahib, Usama I

    2018-04-04

    In the present study, antimicrobial activity of Linalool loaded on Glutathione-modified Gold nanoparticles prepared by novel method was investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Linalool-gold nanoparticles (LIN-GNPs) against Gram's positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Gram's negative bacteria Escherichia coli, and against Leishmania tropica. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized using the chemical method. Colour change, UV-Vis spectrum, FTIR and SEM confirmed the characterization of gold nanoparticles and LIN-GNPs. The antibacterial study was including agar well diffusion method, MIC, MBC. The mode of action was determined by cellular material release assay, SEM and AO/EtBr for ROS detection. Anti-parasitic activity was evaluated using MTT assay. FTIR spectral analysis investigated that Linalool was loaded on gold nanoparticles. SEM showed that the Gold nanoparticles and LIN-GNPs were generally found to be spherical in shape and the size was ranged 5-11 nm for GNPs and 15-20 nm for LIN-GNPs. The results of antibacterial activity demonstrated that Linalool alone had low activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. While the results showed that gram-positive bacteria were more effective by LIN-GNPs. LIN-GNPs acted on the bacterial cell membrane, resulting in loss of integrity and increased permeability of cell wall and stimulated ROS production that leads to damage of bacterial nucleic acid. The anti-parasitic activity results indicated the high activity of LIN-GNPs on L. tropica compared with Linalool and Gold nanoparticles. These results proved that LIN-GNPs have great potential as antimicrobial activity and could be used as a developing strategy for a successful antimicrobial therapeutic agent.

  14. Enterococcus spp. Resistant to Multiple Antimicrobial Drugs and Determination of Fecal Contamination Levels in Mangrove Oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Annes Rubião

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine and compare the Most Probable Number (MPN of Total Coliforms (TC, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. and to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Enterococcus spp. isolated from oysters collected in the Barra de Guaratiba Mangrove, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The enumeration of E. coli has been used to indicate fecal contamination and hygienic-sanitary conditions of bivalve molluscs. Enterococci are capable to transfer several antimicrobial resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria, including those from Gram-negative group. The oysters were bought from local fishermen and a total of 123 individuals were analyzed. The TC, E. coli and Enterococcus spp. MPN mean were 26,300/100 g, 3,260/100 g and 2,820/100 g, respectively. The only correlation found was between TC and E. coli. Two strains of Enterococcus spp. were resistant to three different antimicrobial categories, including a high level resistance to streptomycin. One strain presented intermediate resistance to vancomycin. The E. coli levels exceeded the limits established by international legislation. This microbiological contamination in oysters reflects the water pollution and indicates a probable contamination of other seafood species from this mangrove, which can represent a risk for consumers and a threat to the environment and public health.

  15. Understanding Nonprescription and Prescription Drug Misuse in Late Adolescence/Young Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha A. Fleary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the extent to which nonprescription and prescription drugs misuse among adolescents/young adults are related to their perception that it is safer than illicit drugs, ease of access, and lower societal stigma. Adolescents/young adults (; , completed an online survey about their nonprescription and prescription drug misuse, other substance use, and correlates of use. Perceived risk, societal stigma, and access to nonprescription and prescription drugs were predictive of misuse. Results support program planners working towards targeting perceived risk and societal stigma in reducing misuse and the need to restrict and monitor access to nonprescription and prescription drugs for adolescents/young adults.

  16. Emergence of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii complex over 10 years: Nationwide data from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (TSAR program

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    Kuo Shu-Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ABC has emerged as an important pathogen causing a variety of infections. Longitudinal multicenter surveillance data on ABC from different sources in Taiwan have not been published. Using data from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (TSAR conducted biennially, we investigated the secular change in resistance of 1640 ABC from 2002 to 2010 (TSAR period III to VII to different antimicrobial agents and identified factors associated with imipenem-resistant and extensively drug-resistant ABC (IRABC and XDRABC. Methods Isolates were collected by TSAR from the same 26 hospitals located in all 4 regions of Taiwan. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined by reference broth microdilution method. Isolates nonsusceptible to all tested aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, β-lactam, β-lactam/β-lactam inhibitors, and carbapenems were defined as extensively drug-resistant (XDR. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between predictor variables among patients with resistant ABC and patients with non-resistant ABC. Results The prevalence of IRABC increased from 3.4% in 2002 to 58.7% in 2010 (P P 55% over the years with some fluctuations before and after TSAR V (2006 on some agents. Multivariate analysis revealed that recovery from elderly patients, origins other than blood, from ICU settings, or geographic regions are independent factors associated with IRABC and XDRABC. Although the prevalence of XDRABC increased in all four regions of Taiwan over the years, central Taiwan had higher prevalence of XDRABC starting in 2008. Susceptibility to polymyxin remained high (99.8%. Conclusions This longitudinal multicenter surveillance program revealed significant increase and nationwide emergence of IRABC and XDRABC in Taiwan over the years. This study also identified factors associated with IRABC and XDRABC to help guide empirical therapy

  17. Demystifying the U.S. Food and Drug Administration: understanding regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghshineh, Nima; Brown, Spencer; Cederna, Paul S; Levi, Benjamin; Lisiecki, Jeffrey; D'Amico, Richard A; Hume, Keith M; Seward, William; Rubin, J Peter

    2014-09-01

    The field of plastic surgery has been at the forefront of ideation and innovation. Surgeon scientists today continue to develop novel products that fulfill the needs of the medical community and patients. Part of this process requires the approval from various regulatory agencies and offices, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Unfortunately, medical training does not include regulatory knowledge, and many surgeon scientists find the regulatory pathway and U.S. Food and Drug Administration perplexing, overly complicated, and insurmountable. The authors aim to clearly outline the path of the regulatory process as it pertains to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and its various jurisdictions that may relate to the plastic surgeon. The authors aim to demystify the classification system, 510(k), and Premarket Approval processes for devices; clarify the Investigational New Drug and New Drug Application requirements for drugs; and explain how human cells, tissues, and cellular or tissue-based products are classified and approvals obtained. The structure of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, its offices, and their roles are delineated, and the complex process of obtaining approval to market devices, drugs, biologics, and combination products is explained in a manner that is broadly useful to innovators whether new or experienced. The authors provide information for innovators and inventors developing promising technologies to be more knowledgeable and motivated to embrace the process in a fashion that will potentially save time and errors in U.S. Food and Drug Administration submissions.

  18. Effect of a policy for restriction of selected classes of antibiotics on antimicrobial drug cost and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, M E; Bliziotis, I A; Michalopoulos, A; Sermaides, G; Papaioannou, V E; Nikita, D; Choulis, N

    2007-04-01

    Based on the instructions of the National Organization of Pharmaceutical Agents (Greece) from July 1, 2003, quinolones, 3( rd )and 4(th )generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams, glycopeptides, oxazolidinones, and streptogramins were considered as "restricted" antibiotics that could be used only with the approval of an Infectious Disease specialist. We analyzed the effect of the policy on the consumption and cost of antibiotics as a group and of specific classes, adjusted for the patient load, as well as on the antimicrobial resistance of isolated bacteria. We analyzed 5 trimesters (2 prior and 3 after the implementation of the new policy). A 20% and 16% reduction in adjusted consumption [in daily defined doses (DDDs)] and cost, respectively, of the restricted antibiotics was accomplished during the first trimester after implementation of the new policy. However, this was accompanied by a 36% and 56% increase in adjusted consumption and cost, respectively, of unrestricted antibiotics. A logistic regression model that we performed showed that the new policy had an independent positive effect on the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p=0.051) but not of Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli isolates. Our data suggest that there are considerable limitations to the programs aiming to reduce the consumption of restricted antibiotics through the approval of their use by specialists, at least in some settings.

  19. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA, and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels compared to the control. Furthermore, Ag

  20. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-03-06

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus , which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  1. Drug susceptibility testing in microaerophilic parasites: Cysteine strongly affects the effectivities of metronidazole and auranofin, a novel and promising antimicrobial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leitsch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic parasites Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Giardia lamblia annually cause hundreds of millions of human infections which are treated with antiparasitic drugs. Metronidazole is the most often prescribed drug but also other drugs are in use, and novel drugs with improved characteristics are constantly being developed. One of these novel drugs is auranofin, originally an antirheumatic which has been relabelled for the treatment of parasitic infections. Drug effectivity is arguably the most important criterion for its applicability and is commonly assessed in susceptibility assays using in vitro cultures of a given pathogen. However, drug susceptibility assays can be strongly affected by certain compounds in the growth media. In the case of microaerophilic parasites, cysteine which is added in large amounts as an antioxidant is an obvious candidate because it is highly reactive and known to modulate the toxicity of metronidazole in several microaerophilic parasites.In this study, it was attempted to reduce cysteine concentrations as far as possible without affecting parasite viability by performing drug susceptibility assays under strictly anaerobic conditions in an anaerobic cabinet. Indeed, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica could be grown without any cysteine added and the cysteine concentration necessary to maintain G. lamblia could be reduced to 20%. Susceptibilities to metronidazole were found to be clearly reduced in the presence of cysteine. With auranofin the protective effect of cysteine was extreme, providing protection to concentrations up to 100-fold higher as observed in the absence of cysteine. With three other drugs tested, albendazole, furazolidone and nitazoxanide, all in use against G. lamblia, the effect of cysteine was less pronounced. Oxygen was found to have a less marked impact on metronidazole and auranofin than cysteine but bovine bile which is standardly used in growth media for G

  2. Performance-Enhancing Drugs I: Understanding the Basics of Testing for Banned Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwallader, Amy B; Murray, Bob

    2015-08-01

    Whenever athletes willfully or accidentally ingest performance-enhancing drugs or other banned substances (such as drugs of abuse), markers of those drugs can be detected in biological samples (e.g., biofluids: urine, saliva, blood); in the case of some drugs, that evidence can be apparent for many weeks following the last exposure to the drug. In addition to the willful use of prohibited drugs, athletes can accidentally ingest banned substances in contaminated dietary supplements or foods and inadvertently fail a drug test that could mean the end of an athletic career and the loss of a good reputation. The proliferation of performance-enhancing drugs and methods has required a corresponding increase in the analytical tools and methods required to identify the presence of banned substances in biofluids. Even though extraordinary steps have been taken by organizations such as the World Anti-Doping Agency to limit the use of prohibited substances and methods by athletes willing to cheat, it is apparent that some athletes continue to avoid detection by using alternative doping regimens or taking advantage of the limitations in testing methodologies. This article reviews the testing standards and analytical techniques underlying the procedures used to identify banned substances in biological samples, setting the stage for future summaries of the testing required to establish the use of steroids, stimulants, diuretics, and other prohibited substances.

  3. Understanding drug-related mortality in released prisoners: a review of national coronial records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Jessica Y

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prisoner population is characterised by a high burden of disease and social disadvantage, and ex-prisoners are at increased risk of death following release. Much of the excess mortality can be attributed to an increased risk of unnatural death, particularly from drug overdose; however, relatively few studies have investigated the circumstances surrounding drug-related deaths among released prisoners. This study aimed to explore and compare the circumstances of death for those who died from accidental drug-related causes to those who died from all other reportable causes. Methods A nationwide search of the Australian National Coroners Information System (NCIS was conducted to identify reportable deaths among ex-prisoners from 2000 to 2007. Using a structured coding form, NCIS records for these cases were interrogated to explore causes and circumstances of death. Results Coronial records for 388 deceased ex-prisoners were identified. Almost half of these deaths were a result of accidental drug-related causes (45%. The majority of accidental drug-related deaths occurred in a home environment, and poly-substance use at or around the time of death was common, recorded in 72% of drug-related deaths. Ex-prisoners who died of accidental drug-related causes were on average younger and less likely to be Indigenous, born in Australia, married, or living alone at or around the time of death, compared with those who died from all other reportable causes. Evidence of mental illness or self-harm was less common among accidental drug-related deaths, whereas evidence of previous drug overdose, injecting drug use, history of heroin use and history of drug withdrawal in the previous six months were more common. Conclusions Drug-related deaths are common among ex-prisoners and often occur in a home (vs. public setting. They are often associated with use of multiple substances at or around the time of death, risky drug-use patterns, and even

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... least 10 countries (Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden and the United Kingdom ... plan Global report on surveillance Country situation analysis Policy to combat antimicrobial resistance More on antimicrobial resistance ...

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of isolates of Aeromonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of 45 Aeromonas hydrophila isolates (from different sources) to 11 commonly used antimicrobial agents was determined by agar diffusion technique. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antimicrobial drugs were also determined using amylase property of Aeromonas as end-point ...

  6. Alternative Antimicrobial Approach: Nano-Antimicrobial Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Beyth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous existing potent antibiotics and other antimicrobial means, bacterial infections are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the need to develop additional bactericidal means has significantly increased due to the growing concern regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilm associated infections. Consequently, attention has been especially devoted to new and emerging nanoparticle-based materials in the field of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present review discusses the activities of nanoparticles as an antimicrobial means, their mode of action, nanoparticle effect on drug-resistant bacteria, and the risks attendant on their use as antibacterial agents. Factors contributing to nanoparticle performance in the clinical setting, their unique properties, and mechanism of action as antibacterial agents are discussed in detail.

  7. Use of antimicrobial agents in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y H; Hwang, S Y; Hong, M K; Kwon, K H

    2012-04-01

    The aquaculture industry has grown dramatically, and plays an important role in the world's food supply chain. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria associated with food animals receives much attention, and drug use in aquaculture is also an important issue. There are many differences between aquatic and terrestrial management systems, such as the methods used for administration of drugs. Unique problems are related to the application of drugs in aquatic environments. Residual drugs in fish products can affect people who consume them, and antimicrobials released into aquatic environments can select for resistant bacteria. Moreover, these antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, or their resistance genes, can be transferred to humans. To decrease the risks associated with the use of antimicrobials, various regulations have been developed. In addition, it is necessary to prevent bacterial diseases in aquatic animals by vaccination, to improve culture systems, and to monitor the amount of antimicrobial drugs used and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria.

  8. A successful antimicrobial therapeutic strategy for the discitis caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans under unknown drug susceptibility: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Shunsuke; Horiuchi, Yosuke; Uchida, Takae; Yonaha, Akiko; Miyata, Takanori; Nagano, Eiko; Kodama, Takao; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2018-04-20

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is well-known as the pathogen of gingivitis or periodontitis, and discitis or vertebral osteomyelitis cases caused by this organism have rarely been reported. Ampicillin or amoxicillin has been used in the previously reported discitis cases; however, no cases have been reported that is treated with levofloxacin. We report the first published case we chose levofloxacin to treat. We failed to perform the susceptibility testing because of the poor growth and fastidious nature of the organism, and the result of susceptibility of amoxicillin was unclear. Levofloxacin, which A. actinomycetemcomitans is usually susceptible to, can be an effective alternative oral antimicrobial agent in such cases. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of a series of 2-napthamide derivatives as inhibitors of the drug efflux pump AcrB for the reversal of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinhu; Mowla, Rumana; Guo, Liwei; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Rahman, Taufiq; De Barros Lopes, Miguel A; Ma, Shutao; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-15

    Drug efflux pumps confer multidrug resistance to dangerous pathogens which makes these pumps important drug targets. We have synthesised a novel series of compounds based on a 2-naphthamide pharmacore aimed at inhibiting the efflux pumps from Gram-negative bacteria. The archeatypical transporter AcrB from Escherichia coli was used as model efflux pump as AcrB is widely conserved throughout Gram-negative organisms. The compounds were tested for their antibacterial action, ability to potentiate the action of antibiotics and for their ability to inhibit Nile Red efflux by AcrB. None of the compounds were antimicrobial against E. coli wild type cells. Most of the compounds were able to inhibit Nile Red efflux indicating that they are substrates of the AcrB efflux pump. Three compounds were able to synergise with antibiotics and reverse resistance in the resistant phenotype. Compound A3, 4-(isopentyloxy)-2-naphthamide, reduced the MICs of erythromycin and chloramphenicol to the MIC levels of the drug sensitive strain that lacks an efflux pump. A3 had no effect on the MIC of the non-substrate rifampicin indicating that this compound acts specifically through the AcrB efflux pump. A3 also does not act through non-specific mechanisms such as outer membrane or inner membrane permeabilisation and is not cytotoxic against mammalian cell lines. Therefore, we have designed and synthesised a novel chemical compound with great potential to further optimisation as inhibitor of drug efflux pumps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides: an evolving phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleitas, Osmel; Agbale, Caleb M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is currently a real problem all over the world, making novel antimicrobial compounds a real research priority. Some of the most promising compounds found to date are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). The benefits of these drugs include their broad spectrum of activity that affects several microbial processes, making the emergence of resistance less likely. However, bacterial resistance to AMPs is an evolving phenomenon that compromises the therapeutic potential of these compounds. Therefore, it is mandatory to understand bacterial mechanisms of resistance to AMPs in depth, in order to develop more powerful AMPs that overcome the bacterial resistance response.

  11. New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the Mechanisms of Stress Erythropoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    antagonist that inhibits stomach acid production. It is commonly used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease ...mainly used as an over-the-counter drug to treat heartburn and peptic ulcers . 3. Sulfadimethoxine (Albon) is a low-dosage, rapidly absorbed, long...production and that is mainly used as an over-the-counter drug to treat heartburn and peptic ulcers . 2. Figure 16 Nizatidine, a histamine H2-receptor

  12. Fever, rash, and systemic symptoms: understanding the role of virus and HLA in severe cutaneous drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, Rebecca; Mallal, Simon; Ostrov, David; Pompeu, Yuri; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndromes such as abacavir hypersensitivity and the severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions have been associated with significant short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. More recently, these immunologically mediated and previously unpredictable diseases have been shown to be associated with primarily class I but also class II HLA alleles. The case of the association of HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity has created a translational roadmap for how this knowledge can be used in the clinic to prevent severe reactions. Although many hurdles exist to the widespread translation of such HLA screening approaches, our understanding of how drugs interact with the major histocompatibility complex has contributed to the discovery of new models that have provided considerable insights into the immunopathogenesis of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions and other T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity syndromes. Future translation of this knowledge will facilitate the development of preclinical toxicity screening to significantly improve efficacy and safety of drug development and design. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Repeated colonization by multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex and changes in antimicrobial susceptibilities in surgical intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Mao-Wang; Chi, Chih-Yu; Lin, Chia-Der; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Teng, Lee-Jene; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Hui-Lan; Chang, Ya-Fen; Lin, Hsiu-Hsien; Tien, Ni; Lu, Jang-Jih; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2013-02-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (MDR-ACB) complex infection occurred in a newly constructed building at a 2,500-bed tertiary medical center in Taiwan. An investigation was carried out by molecular approaches to trace the bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibilities, risk factors, and the occurrence of nosocomial MDR-ACB infections were investigated. From January to December 2009, 53 patients were infected with MDR-ACB, and 23 environmental surveys were performed in two surgical intensive care units (ICUs) within the new building. Forty-two clinical isolates were obtained from patients and 22 samples from nine environmental surveys. Forty clinical isolates (95.2%) and 18 environmental samples (81.8%) were positive for MDR-ACB of type A, the predominant outbreak strain. This strain was identical to that isolated in an outbreak in the old hospital in 2006, as proved by repetitive extragenic palindromic-based polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Although the outbreak isolates contained blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-51-like genes, analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibilities demonstrated increases in resistance to cefepime and imipenem-cilastatin in MDR-ACB isolated in the later outbreak. Not only patients or healthcare workers, but also medical equipment, might have carried the predominant outbreak strain from the old district to the new building. Therefore, even in a new environment, infection control programs must be enforced continually, and healthcare providers must be educated repeatedly to prevent recurrent outbreaks of MDR-ACB infection in the hospital setting.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  15. Danish integrated antimicrobial in resistance monitoring and research program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Heuer, Ole Eske; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research......Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish...... activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries....

  16. Recent developments in our understanding of the implications of traditional African medicine on drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, Chrisna; Hamman, Josias H

    2018-02-01

    The use of traditional herbal medicines has become increasingly popular globally, but in some countries, it is the main or sometimes even the only healthcare service available in the most rural areas. This is especially true for Africa where herbal medicines form a key component of traditional medicinal practices and there is access to a diversity of medicinal plants. Although many benefits have been derived from the use of traditional herbal medicines, many concerns are associated with their use of which herb-drug interactions have been identified to have a rising impact on patient treatment outcome. One type of pharmacokinetic interaction involves the modulation of drug metabolizing enzymes, which may result in enhanced or reduced bioavailability of co-administered drugs. Areas covered: This review highlights the current information available on drug metabolism-associated information with regards to traditional African medicines related to some of the most prevalent diseases burdening the African continent. Expert opinion: It is clear from previous studies that enzyme modulation by traditional African medicines plays a significant role in the pharmacokinetics of some co-administered drugs, but more research is needed to provide detailed information on these interactions, specifically for treatment of prevalent diseases such as tuberculosis and hypertension.

  17. Understanding private retail drug outlet dispenser knowledge and practices in tuberculosis care in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutta, E; Tarimo, A; Delmotte, E; James, I; Mwakisu, S; Kasembe, D; Konduri, N; Silumbe, R; Kakanda, K; Valimba, R

    2014-09-01

    Private sector accredited drug dispensing outlets in Morogoro and pharmacies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. To assess 1) the level of knowledge about tuberculosis (TB) among dispensers in Tanzania's retail pharmaceutical sector; 2) practices related to identification of patients with suspected TB; 3) the availability of educational materials and training; and 4) the availability of first- and second-line anti-tuberculosis treatment in retail drug outlets. A cross-sectional descriptive study involving the administration of a structured questionnaire among drug dispensers in 122 pharmacies and 173 accredited drug dispensing outlets. Private retail drug outlets are convenient; most are open at least 12 h per day, 7 days/week. Although 95% of dispensers identified persistent cough as a symptom of TB, only 1% had received TB-related training in the previous 3 years; 8% of outlets stocked first-line anti-tuberculosis medicines, which are legally prohibited from being sold at retail outlets. The majority of respondents reported seeing clients with TB-like symptoms, and of these 95% reported frequently referring clients to nearby health facilities. Private retail pharmaceutical outlets can potentially contribute to TB case detection and treatment; however, a coordinated effort is needed to train dispensers and implement appropriate referral procedures.

  18. Toward an understanding of the mode of action of fluoroquinolone drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, U.; Schmid, U.; Baumann, K.; Holzgrabe, U.; Schmitt, M.; Popp, J.

    2007-07-01

    Fluoroquinolones are important antibacterial drugs. They were found to interfere with the gyrase-DNA complex which causes cell death. However, the detailed mode of action on a molecular level is so far not understood. In this contribution Raman spectroscopy is chosen as a non-invasive technique to first characterize the individual involved components: fluoroquinolone drugs, and the biological targets DNA and gyrase; and second to study the influence of the fluoroquinolones on bacteria in in-vivo experiments. The use of UV resonance Raman spectroscopy with excitation at 244 nm allows the investigation of the drugs and the biological targets in aqueous solution at biological low concentrations (a few μM). Raman bands associated with the action of the enzyme gyrase could be identified in in-vitro mixing experiments. In-vivo experiments with bacteria experiencing varying drug concentrations revealed changes in the vibrational bands of the protein and DNA components within the bacterial cell caused by the action of the drug. Due to the complexity of the bacterial spectra advanced multivariate statistics in combination with variable selection methods proved to be useful in the data analysis.

  19. Safety and Effectiveness of Health Care Antiseptics; Topical Antimicrobial Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-20

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the Agency, or we) is issuing this final rule establishing that certain active ingredients used in nonprescription (also known as over-the-counter or OTC) antiseptic products intended for use by health care professionals in a hospital setting or other health care situations outside the hospital are not generally recognized as safe and effective (GRAS/GRAE). FDA is issuing this final rule after considering the recommendations of the Nonprescription Drugs Advisory Committee (NDAC); public comments on the Agency's notices of proposed rulemaking; and all data and information on OTC health care antiseptic products that have come to the Agency's attention. This final rule finalizes the 1994 tentative final monograph (TFM) for OTC health care antiseptic drug products that published in the Federal Register of June 17, 1994 (the 1994 TFM) as amended by the proposed rule published in the Federal Register (FR) of May 1, 2015 (2015 Health Care Antiseptic Proposed Rule (PR)).

  20. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The dr...

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit ... non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All FDA CVM produced material ...

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of ...

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts ... 語 | فارسی | English FDA Accessibility Careers FDA Basics FOIA No FEAR Act Site Map ...

  4. Matricaria recutita extract associated with norfloxacin or cephalexin enhances the antimicrobial activity of these drugs against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rafael Maia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2017v30n2p25 Emergence of bacterial infections, including those associated with Staphylococcus aureus, brings up a need for searching new and more effective strategies for clinical treatment. The use of medicinal plants associated with conventional antibiotics may represent a therapeutic option. Currently, studies evidence the synergistic effect achieved by combining plant extracts with antibiotics. Our objective was evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity and bactericidal kinetics of Matricaria recutita extract (chamomile and its association with cephalexin and norfloxacin on clinical isolates of S. aureus from bovine origin, characterized as resistant. The tests were performed by method of dilution in solid medium to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. In both combinations of M. recutita extract with antibiotics norfloxacin and cephalexin, we observed MIC in dilution 1:64, corresponding to 8μg/mL of the antibiotic and 13.43 μg/mL of extract. Cephalexin associated with chamomile extract produced a effect of the combination in 75% of samples in their MIC. The combination of natural products frequently used by the population with the antibiotics tested in this study, could represent a therapeutic option for treatment of infections caused by S. aureus, as well as the prevention of the increasing development of resistance.

  5. Comparative genomics of a drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa panel and the challenges of antimicrobial resistance prediction from genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeukens, J; Kukavica-Ibrulj, I; Emond-Rheault, J G; Freschi, L; Levesque, R C

    2017-10-02

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is now recognized as a global threat to human health. The accessibility of microbial whole-genome sequencing offers an invaluable opportunity for resistance surveillance via the resistome, i.e. the genes and mutations underlying AMR. Unfortunately, AMR prediction from genomic data remains extremely challenging, especially for species with a large pan-genome. One such organism, for which multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates are frequently encountered in the clinic, is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study focuses on a commercially available panel of seven MDR P. aeruginosa strains. The main goals were to sequence and compare these strains' genomes, attempt to predict AMR from whole genomes using two different methods and determine whether this panel could be an informative complement to the international P. aeruginosa reference panel. As expected, the results highlight the complexity of associating genotype and AMR phenotype in P. aeruginosa, mainly due to the intricate regulation of resistance mechanisms. Our results also urge caution in the interpretation of predicted resistomes regarding the occurrence of gene identity discrepancies between strains. We envision that, in addition to accounting for the genomic diversity of P. aeruginosa, future development of predictive tools will need to incorporate a transcriptomic, proteomic and/or metabolomic component. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides in echinoderm host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Haug, Tor; Stensvåg, Klara

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important effector molecules in innate immunity. Here we briefly summarize characteristic traits of AMPs and their mechanisms of antimicrobial activity. Echinoderms live in a microbe-rich marine environment and are known to express a wide range of AMPs. We address two novel AMP families from coelomocytes of sea urchins: cysteine-rich AMPs (strongylocins) and heterodimeric AMPs (centrocins). These peptide families have conserved preprosequences, are present in both adults and pluteus stage larvae, have potent antimicrobial properties, and therefore appear to be important innate immune effectors. Strongylocins have a unique cysteine pattern compared to other cysteine-rich peptides, which suggests a novel AMP folding pattern. Centrocins and SdStrongylocin 2 contain brominated tryptophan residues in their native form. This review also includes AMPs isolated from other echinoderms, such as holothuroidins, fragments of beta-thymosin, and fragments of lectin (CEL-III). Echinoderm AMPs are crucial molecules for the understanding of echinoderm immunity, and their potent antimicrobial activity makes them potential precursors of novel drug leads. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimicrobial drug resistance and genetic properties of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis circulating in chicken farms in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Rakia; Abbassi, Mohamed S; García, Vanesa; García-Fierro, Raquel; Fernández, Javier; Kilani, Hajer; Jaouani, Imen; Khayeche, Monia; Messadi, Lilia; Rodicio, María R

    This study focused on 77 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis collected during 2009 to 2013 from healthy and sick chickens and environmental farm samples in Tunisia. Resistance to 14 antimicrobials and the encoding genes were analyzed. 66, 26, 6.5, 3.9 and 1.3% were pan-susceptible or showed resistance to nalidixic acid (Asp87 to Tyr and Asp87 to Asn substitutions in GyrA), ampicillin (bla TEM-1-like and bla SHV ), sulfonamides (sul1and sul3) and streptomycin (strB), respectively. A single isolate with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was positive for qnrB, whereas qnrA, qnrS or aac(6')-Ib-cr were not detected. The virulotype of the isolates was established by testing ten virulence genes. The orgA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB genes, located on Salmonella pathogenicity islands, and spvC of the serotype-specific virulence plasmid, were common to all isolates. In contrast, the prophage-associated sopE-1, sodC1 and gipA genes and the fimbrial bcfC gene were variably represented. All isolates except one contained the virulence plasmid, which appeared either alone or together with one or more additional plasmids. One isolate carried a single plasmid of ca. 90Kb which may be derived from the virulence plasmid (60Kb). Overall, seven resistotypes, six virulotypes and six plasmid profiles were identified. XbaI-PFGE revealed four related pulsotypes (X1-X4), with 80% of the isolates sharing the X1 pattern. The latter isolates exhibited different resistance, virulence and plasmid profiles, suggesting that mobile genetic elements, particularly prophages and plasmids, are of central importance for the evolution and adaptation of S. Enteritidis circulating in chicken farms in Tunisia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. The mathematics of random mutation and natural selection for multiple simultaneous selection pressures and the evolution of antimicrobial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Alan

    2016-12-20

    The random mutation and natural selection phenomenon act in a mathematically predictable behavior, which when understood leads to approaches to reduce and prevent the failure of the use of these selection pressures when treating infections and cancers. The underlying principle to impair the random mutation and natural selection phenomenon is to use combination therapy, which forces the population to evolve to multiple selection pressures simultaneously that invoke the multiplication rule of probabilities simultaneously as well. Recently, it has been seen that combination therapy for the treatment of malaria has failed to prevent the emergence of drug-resistant variants. Using this empirical example and the principles of probability theory, the derivation of the equations describing this treatment failure is carried out. These equations give guidance as to how to use combination therapy for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases and prevent the emergence of drug resistance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Role of toxicogenomics in the development of safe, efficacious and novel anti-microbial therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Abu-Zinadah, Osama A; Bora, Roop S; Ahmed, Mohamed M M; Saini, Kulvinder S

    2013-06-01

    Over the last two decades, occurrence of bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics has necessitated the development of safer and more potent anti-microbial drugs. However, the development of novel antibiotics is severely hampered by adverse side effects, such as drug-induced liver toxicity. Several antibacterial drugs are known to have the potential to cause severe liver damage. The major challenge in developing novel anti-microbial drugs is to predict, with certain amount of probability, the drug-induced toxicity during the pre-clinical stages, thus optimizing and reducing the time and cost of drug development. Toxicogenomics approach is generally used to harness the potential of genomic tools and to understand the physiological basis of drug-induced toxicity based on the in-depth analysis of Metagenomic data sets, i.e., transcriptional, translational or metabolomic profiles. Toxicogenomics, therefore, represents a new paradigm in the drug development process, and is anticipated to play an invaluable role in future to develop safe and efficacious medicines, by predicting the toxic potential of a new chemical entity (NCE) in early stages of drug discovery. This review examines the toxicogenomic approach in predicting the safety/toxicity of novel anti-microbial drugs, and analyses the promises, pitfalls and challenges of applying this powerful technology to the drug development process.

  10. Antimicrobial synergy between carprofen and doxycycline against methicill-inresistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius ST71

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochmann, Rikke Prejh; Helmfrid, Linn Alexandra; Jana, Bimal

    2016-01-01

    . Seven non-antimicrobial drugs (bromhexine, acepromazine, amitriptyline, clomipramine, carprofen, fluoxetine and ketoconazole) displayed minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging between 32 and >4096 mg/L, and enhanced antimicrobial activity of one or more antimicrobials. Secondary screening...

  11. Understanding Disparities in Service Seeking Following Forcible Versus Drug-or Alcohol-Facilitated/ Incapacitated Rape

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Kate; Zinzow, Heidi M.; Badour, Christal L.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Resnick, Heidi S.

    2015-01-01

    Victims of drug- or alcohol-facilitated/incapacitated rape (DAFR/IR) are substantially less likely to seek medical, rape crisis, or police services compared with victims of forcible rape (FR); however, reasons for these disparities are poorly understood. The current study examined explanatory mechanisms in the pathway from rape type (FR vs. DAFR/IR) to disparities in post-rape service seeking (medical, rape crisis, criminal justice). Participants were 445 adult women from a nationally represe...

  12. From nose to brain: understanding transport capacity and transport rate of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongbing; Hu, Kaili; Jiang, Xinguo

    2008-10-01

    The unique relationship between nasal cavity and cranial cavity tissues in anatomy and physiology makes intranasal delivery to the brain feasible. An intranasal delivery provides some drugs with short channels to bypass the blood-brain barrier (BBB), especially for those with fairly low brain concentrations after a routine delivery, thus greatly enhancing the therapeutic effect on brain diseases. In the past two decades, a good number of encouraging outcomes have been reported in the treatment of diseases of the brain or central nervous system (CNS) through nasal administration. In spite of the significant merit of bypassing the BBB, direct nose-to-brain delivery still bears the problems of low efficiency and volume for capacity due to the limited volume of the nasal cavity, the small area ratio of olfactory mucosa to nasal mucosa and the limitations of low dose and short retention time of drug absorption. It is crucial that selective distribution and retention time of drugs or preparations on olfactory mucosa should be enhanced so as to increase the direct delivery efficiency. In this article, we first briefly review the nose-to-brain transport pathways, before detailing the impacts on them, followed by a comprehensive summary of effective methods, including formulation modification, agglutinant-mediated transport and a brain-homing, peptide-mediated delivery based on phage display screening technique, with a view to providing a theoretic reference for elevating the therapeutic effects on brain diseases.

  13. Out-patient antimicrobial drug use in dogs and cats for new disease events from community companion animal practices in Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Colleen P.; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Boerlin, Patrick; Weese, J. Scott; Prescott, John F.; Janecko, Nicol; McEwen, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated oral and parenteral antimicrobial use in dogs and cats, and evaluated antimicrobial use in feline upper respiratory tract disease (FURTD), feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD), and canine infectious tracheobronchitis. Study journals (n = 1807) were submitted by 84 veterinarians. Sixty-five percent of the antimicrobials prescribed in dogs and 67% in cats were β-lactams. Most frequently prescribed in dogs were cephalexin (33%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (16%),...

  14. Delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    on the identification such peptides, as well as on their optimization to reach potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects at simultaneously low toxicity against human cells. In comparison, delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerably less interest. However, such delivery systems......, or through achieving co-localization with intracellular pathogens. Here, an overview is provided of the current understanding of delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides, with special focus on AMP-carrier interactions, as well as consequences of these interactions for antimicrobial and related biological...

  15. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collise Njume

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638 using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05 as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05. These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity.

  16. Coordination modes of bidentate lornoxicam drug with some transition metal ions. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro antimicrobial and antibreastic cancer activity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Dessouky, Maher M. I.

    2014-03-01

    The NSAID lornoxicam (LOR) drug was used for complex formation reactions with different metal salts like Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III) and Ni(II) chlorides and Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) borates. Mononuclear complexes of these metals are obtained that coordinated to NO sites of LOR ligand molecule. The nature of bonding and the stereochemistry of the complexes have been deduced from elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, mass, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility and ESR spectral studies, conductivity measurements, thermogravimetric analyses (TG-DTG) and further confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction. The activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The data show that the complexes have composition of ML2 type except for Fe(II) where the type is [ML3]. The electronic absorption spectral data of the complexes suggest an octahedral geometry around the central metal ion for all the complexes. The antimicrobial data reveals that LOR ligand in solution show inhibition capacity less or sometimes more than the corresponding complexes against all the species under study. In order to establish their future potential in biomedical applications, anticancer evaluation studies against standard breast cancer cell lines (MCF7) was performed using different concentrations. The obtained results indicate high inhibition activity for Cr(III), Fe(II) and Cu(II) complexes against breast cancer cell line (MCF7) and recommends them for testing as antitumor agents.

  17. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  18. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Diana; Pires, David; Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  19. Antimicrobial activity of photodynamic therapy in combination with colistin against a pan-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boluki, Ebrahim; Kazemian, Hossein; Peeridogaheh, Hadi; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Shahabi, Sima; Beytollahi, Leili; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh

    2017-06-01

    Nosocomially-acquired multi-, extensively-, and pandrug resistant (MDR, XDR, and PDR) strains of microorganisms such as Acinetobacter baumannii remain a serious cause of infection and septic mortality in burn patients. Treatment of patients with nosocomial burn wound infections is often complicated by drug-resistant strains of A. baumannii. Today, many researchers are focusing on the investigation of novel non-antibiotic strategies such as photodynamic therapy (PDT). We report a new PDT strategy that suppresses colistin resistance in PDR A. baumannii by interfering with the expression of a pmrA/pmrB two-component system. In the current study, A. baumannii with a PDR feature isolated from a burn patient was used as a test strain. PDT was carried out using toluidine blue O (TBO) and light-emitting diode (LED) as a photosensitizer and radiation source, respectively. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were assessed for cells surviving PDT. The effects of sub-lethal PDT (sPDT) on the expression of the pmrA/pmrB two-component signal transduction system were evaluated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results of drug susceptibly testing (DST) in LED and TBO groups separately showed that the bacteria were resistant to all tested antibiotics, while the DST result of the LED+TBO group showed highly declining bacterial growth when compared with the control group. Reduction in the expression of pmrA and pmrB was observed in the treated strains after sPDT. This represents the first conclusive example of a direct role for the PDT in breaking antibiotic resistance by directly modulating two-component system activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Utilizing a Dynamical Description of IspH to Aid in the Development of Novel Antimicrobial Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachly, Patrick G.; de Oliveira, César A. F.; Williams, Sarah L.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The nonmevalonate pathway is responsible for isoprenoid production in microbes, including H. pylori, M. tuberculosis and P. falciparum, but is nonexistent in humans, thus providing a desirable route for antibacterial and antimalarial drug discovery. We coordinate a structural study of IspH, a [4Fe-4S] protein responsible for converting HMBPP to IPP and DMAPP in the ultimate step in the nonmevalonate pathway. By performing accelerated molecular dynamics simulations on both substrate-free and HMBPP-bound [Fe4S4]2+ IspH, we elucidate how substrate binding alters the dynamics of the protein. Using principal component analysis, we note that while substrate-free IspH samples various open and closed conformations, the closed conformation observed experimentally for HMBPP-bound IspH is inaccessible in the absence of HMBPP. In contrast, simulations with HMBPP bound are restricted from accessing the open states sampled by the substrate-free simulations. Further investigation of the substrate-free simulations reveals large fluctuations in the HMBPP binding pocket, as well as allosteric pocket openings – both of which are achieved through the hinge motions of the individual domains in IspH. Coupling these findings with solvent mapping and various structural analyses reveals alternative druggable sites that may be exploited in future drug design efforts. PMID:24367248

  1. Recent advances in the understanding of the interaction of antidepressant drugs with serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Anders Skov; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2009-01-01

    and amphetamine. Seminal advances in the understanding of the structure and function of this transporter family have recently been accomplished by structural studies of a bacterial transporter, as well as medicinal chemistry and pharmacological studies of mammalian transporters. This feature article focuses...

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  5. Challenges with gonorrhea in the era of multi-drug and extensively drug resistance – are we on the right track?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unemo, Magnus; Golparian, Daniel; Shafer, William M

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has retained antimicrobial resistance to drugs previously recommended for first-line empiric treatment of gonorrhea, and resistance to ceftriaxone, the last option for monotherapy, is evolving. Crucial actions to combat this developing situation include implementing response plans; considering use of dual antimicrobial regimens; enhancing surveillance of gonorrhea, gonococcal antimicrobial resistance, treatment failures and antimicrobial use/misuse and improving prevention, early diagnosis, contact tracing and treatment. The ways forward also include an intensified research to identify novel antimicrobial resistance determinants and develop and evaluate appropriate use of molecular antimicrobial resistance testing, ideally point-of-care and with simultaneous detection of gonococci, to supplement culture-based methods and ideally guide tailored treatment. It is crucial with an enhanced understanding of the dynamics of the national and international emergence, transmission and evolution of antimicrobial-resistant gonococcal strains. Genome sequencing combined with epidemiological metadata will detail these issues and might also revolutionize the molecular antimicrobial resistance testing. Ultimately, novel antimicrobials are essential and some antimicrobials in development have shown potent in vitro activity against gonococci. Several of these antimicrobials deserve further attention for potential future treatment of gonorrhea. PMID:24702589

  6. Antimicrobial activity of the bioactive components of essential oils from Pakistani spices against Salmonella and other multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    drug resistant clinical and soil bacterial strains. Cinnamaldehyde was identified as the most active antimicrobial component present in the cinnamon essential oil which acted as a strong inhibitory agent in MIC assay against the tested bacteria. The results indicate that essential oils from Pakistani spices can be pursued against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:24119438

  7. Understanding the nature and threats of drug trafficking to national and regional security in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwesi Aning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Several West African states are threatened by increasingly powerful transnational organised criminal networks. Yet, scholarly work on the nature, characteristics and strength of these groups and how their activities threaten states remains sparse, leading to misunderstandings and inadequate appreciation of the precise nature of the threats they pose to West Africa. This paper seeks to fill these lacunae in our knowledge. It focuses on the nexus between drugs, crime and terrorism. It argues that, the financial spin-offs from criminal activities contribute to the development of opportunistic relationships between criminals and extremist groups that threatens West Africa’s fragile states. The analyses are based on evidence from several West African states, but employ the ongoing crisis in the Sahel, particularly Mali, as an empirical case, to demonstrate how ‘profitable collusion’ among different actors permits hollow states to become edifices that allows corruption, criminality and impunity to flourish.

  8. Out-patient antimicrobial drug use in dogs and cats for new disease events from community companion animal practices in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Colleen P; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Boerlin, Patrick; Weese, J Scott; Prescott, John F; Janecko, Nicol; McEwen, Scott A

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated oral and parenteral antimicrobial use in dogs and cats, and evaluated antimicrobial use in feline upper respiratory tract disease (FURTD), feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD), and canine infectious tracheobronchitis. Study journals (n = 1807) were submitted by 84 veterinarians. Sixty-five percent of the antimicrobials prescribed in dogs and 67% in cats were β-lactams. Most frequently prescribed in dogs were cephalexin (33%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (16%), and in cats, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (40%) and cefovecin (17%); 7% of the prescriptions in dogs and 12% in cats were for fluoroquinolones. Sixty-seven percent of the disease events associated with canine infectious tracheobronchitis, and 70% and 74% associated with FURTD and FLUTD, respectively, were treated with antimicrobials. These results suggest that cefovecin and fluoroquinolones may be over-used and antimicrobial use for the treatment of FURTD, FLUTD, and canine infectious tracheobronchitis could probably be reduced to lessen resistance selection pressure without compromising patient health.

  9. Principles of economics crucial to pharmacy students' understanding of the prescription drug market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattinger, Gail B; Jain, Rahul; Ju, Jing; Mullins, C Daniel

    2008-06-15

    Many pharmacy schools have increased the amount of economics coursework to which pharmacy students are exposed in their prepharmacy and pharmacy curriculums. Students obtain competencies aimed at understanding the basic concepts of microeconomic theory, such as supply and demand. However, pharmacy students often have trouble applying these principles to real world pharmaceuticals or healthcare markets. Our objective is to make economics more relevant for pharmacy students. Specifically, we detail and provide pharmacy-relevant examples of the effects of monopoly power, barriers to marketplace entry, regulatory environment, third party insurance, information asymmetry and unanticipated changes in the marketplace on the supply and demand for pharmaceuticals and healthcare services.

  10. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Polymers: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng-Shiang Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human safety and well-being is threatened by microbes causing numerous infectious diseases resulting in a large number of deaths every year. Despite substantial progress in antimicrobial drugs, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat. Antimicrobial polymers offer a promising antimicrobial strategy for fighting pathogens and have received considerable attention in both academic and industrial research. This mini-review presents the advances made in antimicrobial polymers since 2013. Antimicrobial mechanisms exhibiting either passive or active action and polymer material types containing bound or leaching antimicrobials are introduced. This article also addresses the applications of these antimicrobial polymers in the medical, food, and textile industries.

  11. Understanding Appearance-Enhancing Drug Use in Sport Using an Enactive Approach to Body Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauw, Denis; Bilard, Jean

    2017-01-01

    From an enactive approach to human activity, we suggest that the use of appearance-enhancing drugs is better explained by the sense-making related to body image rather than the cognitive evaluation of social norms about appearance and consequent psychopathology-oriented approach. After reviewing the main psychological disorders thought to link body image issues to the use of appearance-enhancing substances, we sketch a flexible, dynamic and embedded account of body image defined as the individual's propensity to act and experience in specific situations. We show how this enacted body image is a complex process of sense-making that people engage in when they are trying to adapt to specific situations. These adaptations of the enacted body image require effort, perseverance and time, and therefore any substance that accelerates this process appears to be an easy and attractive solution. In this enactive account of body image, we underline that the link between the enacted body image and substance use is also anchored in the history of the body's previous interactions with the world. This emerges during periods of upheaval and hardship, especially in a context where athletes experience weak participatory sense-making in a sport community. We conclude by suggesting prevention and intervention designs that would promote a safe instrumental use of the body in sports and psychological helping procedures for athletes experiencing difficulties with substances use and body image.

  12. Recent Advances in Understanding and Mitigating Adipogenic and Metabolic Effects of Antipsychotic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Julia M.; Dhurandhar, Emily J.; Correll, Christoph U.; Morrato, Elaine H.; Newcomer, John W.; Remington, Gary; Nasrallah, Henry A.; Crystal, Stephen; Nicol, Ginger; Allison, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Although offering many benefits for several psychiatric disorders, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) as a class have a major liability in their tendency to promote adiposity, obesity, and metabolic dysregulation in an already metabolically vulnerable population. The past decade has witnessed substantial research aimed at investigating the mechanisms of these adverse effects and mitigating them. On July 11 and 12, 2011, with support from 2 NIH institutes, leading experts convened to discuss current research findings and to consider future research strategies. Five areas where significant advances are being made emerged from the conference: (1) methodological issues in the study of APD effects; (2) unique characteristics and needs of pediatric patients; (3) genetic components underlying susceptibility to APD-induced metabolic effects; (4) APD effects on weight gain and adiposity in relation to their acute effects on glucose regulation and diabetes risk; and (5) the utility of behavioral, dietary, and pharmacological interventions in mitigating APD-induced metabolic side effects. This paper summarizes the major conclusions and important supporting data from the meeting. PMID:22754543

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Nigerian medicinal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Madubuike Umunna; Okoye, Rosemary Chinazam

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is currently one of the major threats facing mankind. The emergence and rapid spread of multi- and pan-drug-resistant organisms (such as vancomycin-, methicillin-, extended-spectrum β-lactam-, carbapenem- and colistin-resistant organisms) has put the world in a dilemma. The health and economic burden associated with AMR on a global scale are dreadful. Available antimicrobials have been misused and are almost ineffective with some of these drugs associated with dangerous side effects in some individuals. Development of new, effective, and safe antimicrobials is one of the ways by which AMR burden can be reduced. The rate at which microorganisms develop AMR mechanisms outpaces the rate at which new antimicrobials are being developed. Medicinal plants are potential sources of new antimicrobial molecules. There is renewed interest in antimicrobial activities of phytochemicals. Nigeria boasts of a huge heritage of medicinal plants and there is avalanche of researches that have been undertaken to screen antimicrobial activities of these plants. Scientific compilation of these studies could provide useful information on the antimicrobial properties of the plants. This information can be useful in the development of new antimicrobial drugs. This paper reviews antimicrobial researches that have been undertaken on Nigerian medicinal plants. PMID:28512606

  14. Applying a perceptions and practicalities approach to understanding nonadherence to antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sarah C E; Horne, Rob; Eade, Rona; Balestrini, Simona; Rush, Jennifer; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2015-09-01

    Nonadherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common cause of poor seizure control. This study examines whether reported adherence to AEDs is related to variables identified in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Medicines Adherence Guidelines as being important to adherence: perceptual factors (AED necessity beliefs and concerns), practical factors (limitations in capability and resources), and perceptions of involvement in treatment decisions. This was a cross-sectional study of people with epilepsy receiving AEDs. Participants completed an online survey hosted by the Epilepsy Society (n = 1,010), or as an audit during inpatient admission (n = 118). Validated questionnaires, adapted for epilepsy, assessed reported adherence to AEDs (Medication Adherence Report Scale [MARS]), perceptions of AEDs (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire [BMQ]), and patient perceptions of involvement in treatment decisions (Treatment Empowerment Scale [TES]). Low adherence was related to AED beliefs (doubts about necessity: t(577) = 3.90, p < 0.001; and concerns: t(995) = 3.45, p = 0.001), reported limitations in capability and resources (t(589) = 7.78, p < 0.001), and to perceptions of a lack of involvement in treatment decisions (t(623) = 4.48, p < 0.001). In multiple logistic regression analyses, these factors significantly (p < 0.001) increased variance in reported adherence, above that which could be explained by age and clinical variables (seizure frequency, type, epilepsy duration, number of AEDs prescribed). Variables identified in the NICE Medicines Adherence Guidelines as potentially important factors for adherence were found to be related to adherence to AEDs. These factors are potentially modifiable. Interventions to support optimal adherence to AEDs should be tailored to address doubts about AED necessity and concerns about harm, and to overcome practical difficulties, while engaging patients in treatment decisions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Erros de administração de antimicrobianos identificados em estudo multicêntrico brasileiro Antimicrobial drug administration errors identified in Brazilian multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Cristina Marques

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Erros de administração de antimicrobianos são relevantes, pois podem interferir na segurança do paciente e no desenvolvimento de resistência microbiana. O objetivo desse estudo foi identificar os antimicrobianos associados a erros de administração de medicamentos. Estudo multicêntrico, descritivo e exploratório, realizado em unidades de clínica médica de cinco hospitais por meio de técnica observacional, durante 30 dias. Os erros foram classificados em categorias: dose, medicamento não prescrito, via, paciente e horário. A classificação farmacológica dos antimicrobianos foi realizada segundo o Sistema Anatômico Terapêutico Químico (ATC. Os fármacos de intervalo terapêutico estreito foram identificados. A análise estatística descritiva foi realizada no software SPSS 11.5. Foram identificados 1500 erros, sendo 277 (18,5% com antimicrobianos. Os tipos de erros foram: de horário 87,7%; de dose 6,9%; de medicamento não autorizado 3,2%, de via 1,5% e de paciente 0,7%. Foram identificados 36 antimicrobianos e as classes ATC mais freqüentes foram: fluorquinolonas 13,9%, combinações de penicilinas 13,9%, macrolídeos 8,3% e cefalosporina de terceira geração 5,6%. Os fármacos de intervalo terapêutico estreito corresponderam a 16,7% dos antimicrobianos. Os erros com antimicrobianos analisados podem ser fontes de estudo e melhoria no processo de utilização racional de medicamentos e segurança do paciente.Medication administration errors (MAE are the most frequent kind of medication errors. Errors with antimicrobial drugs (AD are relevant because they may interfere in patient safety and in the development of microbial resistance. The aim of this study is to analyze the AD errors detected in a Brazilian multicentric study of MAE. It was a descriptive and exploratory study carried out in clinical units in five Brazilian teaching hospitals. The hospitals were investigated during 30 days. MAE were detected by observation

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  17. Stress, cues, and eating behavior. Using drug addiction paradigms to understand motivation for food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojek, Monika Kardacz; Fischer, Sarah; MacKillop, James

    2015-09-01

    Eating patterns that lead to overconsumption of high fat, high sugar (HFHS) foods share similar features with addictive behaviors. Application of addiction paradigms, such as stress inductions, cue reactivity and behavioral economic assessments, to the study of motivation for HFHS food consumption may be a promising means of understanding food consumption. To date, few studies have investigated the interaction of stress and environmental cues on craving, and no study leveraged the state relative reinforcing value of foods (RRVfood) under varying conditions of affective states, the foci of the current study. This study used a mixed factorial design (Mood Induction: Neutral, Stress; Cues: Neutral, Food) with repeated measures on time (Baseline, Post-Mood Induction, Post-Cue Exposure). Participants (N = 133) were community adults who endorsed liking of HFHS snacks but denied eating pathology. The primary DVs were subjective craving and RRVfood. Negative and positive affect (NA, PA), the amount of food consumed, and latency to first bite were also examined. Participants in the Stress condition reported no change in craving or RRVfood. Exposure to food cues significantly increased participants' craving and RRVfood, but an interaction of stress and cues was not present. Participants did not differ on how many calories they consumed based on exposure to stress or food cues, but participants in the food cues condition had a shorter latency to the first bite of food. This study highlights the importance of environmental cues in food motivation. It also demonstrates the utility of using RRVfood to further characterize food motivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Environmental pollution with antimicrobial agents from bulk drug manufacturing industries in Hyderabad, South India, is associated with dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and carbapenemase-producing pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübbert, Christoph; Baars, Christian; Dayakar, Anil; Lippmann, Norman; Rodloff, Arne C; Kinzig, Martina; Sörgel, Fritz

    2017-08-01

    High antibiotic and antifungal concentrations in wastewater from anti-infective drug production may exert selection pressure for multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. We investigated the environmental presence of active pharmaceutical ingredients and their association with MDR Gram-negative bacteria in Hyderabad, South India, a major production area for the global bulk drug market. From Nov 19 to 28, 2016, water samples were collected from the direct environment of bulk drug manufacturing facilities, the vicinity of two sewage treatment plants, the Musi River, and habitats in Hyderabad and nearby villages. Samples were analyzed for 25 anti-infective pharmaceuticals with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and for MDR Gram-negative bacteria using chromogenic culture media. In addition, specimens were screened with PCR for bla VIM , bla KPC , bla NDM , bla IMP-1 , and bla OXA-48 resistance genes. All environmental specimens from 28 different sampling sites were contaminated with antimicrobials. High concentrations of moxifloxacin, voriconazole, and fluconazole (up to 694.1, 2500, and 236,950 µg/L, respectively) as well as increased concentrations of eight other antibiotics were found in sewers in the Patancheru-Bollaram industrial area. Corresponding microbiological analyses revealed an extensive presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenters (carrying mainly bla OXA-48 , bla NDM , and bla KPC ) in more than 95% of the samples. Insufficient wastewater management by bulk drug manufacturing facilities leads to unprecedented contamination of water resources with antimicrobial pharmaceuticals, which seems to be associated with the selection and dissemination of carbapenemase-producing pathogens. The development and global spread of antimicrobial resistance present a major challenge for pharmaceutical producers and regulatory agencies.

  19. Antimicrobial textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J Vaun; Tuckfield, R C; Baker-Austin, C

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved unique mechanisms that allow them survive in the presence of strong selection pressures. Included in these mechanisms is the ability to share genetic determinants among and between species of bacteria thus spreading metal or antibiotic resistance traits quickly. The textile industry in response to demand has developed antimicrobial fabrics by the addition of bactericidal compounds during production. Some of these antimicrobials include metal nanoparticles, quaternary ammonia compounds, and broad spectrum compounds like triclosan. Bacteria have already expressed resistance to each of these bactericides. Here we discuss the evolutionary and ecological consequences of antimicrobial textiles in terms of co-selection. We predict that continued use of such materials could result in increased and widespread resistance to specific antimicrobials, especially metals, with an increased resistance to antibiotics. Such increases have the potential to find their way into other bacterial populations of human pathogens leading to serious and unintended public health consequences.

  20. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be harboring disease organisms. Determining human and ecological risks from exposure to antimicrobial pesticides requires different ... Open Government Regulations.gov Subscribe USA.gov White House Ask. Contact Us Hotlines FOIA Requests Frequent Questions ...

  1. Antimicrobial Resistance Risks of Cholera Prophylaxis for United Nations Peacekeepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Amber; Lewnard, Joseph A; Pitzer, Virginia E; Cohen, Ted

    2017-08-01

    More than 5 years after a United Nations peacekeeping battalion introduced cholera to Haiti, over 150,000 peacekeepers continue to be deployed annually from countries where cholera is endemic. The United Nations has thus far declined to provide antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis to peacekeepers, a policy based largely on concerns that the risks of drug resistance generation and spread would outweigh the potential benefits of preventing future cholera importations. In this study, we sought to better understand the relative benefits and risks of cholera chemoprophylaxis for peacekeepers in terms of antibiotic resistance. Using a stochastic model to quantify the potential impact of chemoprophylaxis on importation and transmission of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Vibrio cholerae , we found that chemoprophylaxis would decrease the probability of cholera importation but would increase the expected number of drug-resistant infections if an importation event were to occur. Despite this potential increase, we found that at least 10 drug-sensitive infections would likely be averted per excess drug-resistant infection under a wide range of assumptions about the underlying prevalence of drug resistance and risk of acquired resistance. Given these findings, policymakers should reconsider whether the potential resistance risks of providing antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis to peacekeepers are sufficient to outweigh the anticipated benefits. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Implications of survey labels and categorisations for understanding drug use in the context of sex among gay and bisexual men in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kathleen E; Wilkinson, Anna L; Pedrana, Alisa; Quinn, Brendan; Dietze, Paul; Hellard, Margaret; Stoové, Mark

    2018-02-02

    Reliably measuring drug use by gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBM) in the context of sex can inform sexual health service responses. We report changing drug use patterns among GBM testing for HIV at a community-based service in Melbourne in response to behavioural survey modifications. Surveys were completed by GBM prior to all HIV tests. Survey one asked about use of "party drugs for the purpose of sex" and survey two asked about specific drug use (alcohol, amyl nitrate, methamphetamine, cocaine, ecstasy, GHB, Viagra ® /Cialis ® ) before or during sex. Differences in drug use prevalence and demographic and sexual risk correlates are reported. Reported drug use increased from 16.9% in survey one to 54.0% in survey two. Among GBM completing both surveys, 45% who reported no drug use in survey one reported drug use in survey two. Drug use was associated with high HIV risk behaviours across both surveys. Survey modification improved ascertainment of drug use in the context of sex among GBM. Continued monitoring of drug use in this setting will improve our understanding the relationship between use of specific drugs and sexual health and help inform client focused health promotion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Supporting surveillance capacity for antimicrobial resistance: Laboratory capacity strengthening for drug resistant infections in low and middle income countries [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Seale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR threatens our ability to treat common and life threatening infections. Identifying the emergence of AMR requires strengthening of surveillance for AMR, particularly in low and middle-income countries (LMICs where the burden of infection is highest and health systems are least able to respond. This work aimed, through a combination of desk-based investigation, discussion with colleagues worldwide, and visits to three contrasting countries (Ethiopia, Malawi and Vietnam, to map and compare existing models and surveillance systems for AMR, to examine what worked and what did not work. Current capacity for AMR surveillance varies in LMICs, but and systems in development are focussed on laboratory surveillance. This approach limits understanding of AMR and the extent to which laboratory results can inform local, national and international public health policy. An integrated model, combining clinical, laboratory and demographic surveillance in sentinel sites is more informative and costs for clinical and demographic surveillance are proportionally much lower. The speed and extent to which AMR surveillance can be strengthened depends on the functioning of the health system, and the resources available. Where there is existing laboratory capacity, it may be possible to develop 5-20 sentinel sites with a long term view of establishing comprehensive surveillance; but where health systems are weaker and laboratory infrastructure less developed, available expertise and resources may limit this to 1-2 sentinel sites. Prioritising core functions, such as automated blood cultures, reduces investment at each site. Expertise to support AMR surveillance in LMICs may come from a variety of international, or national, institutions. It is important that these organisations collaborate to support the health systems on which AMR surveillance is built, as well as improving technical capacity specifically relating to AMR

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation of Antimicrobial ...

  5. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: ...

  6. Inferring the interaction structure of resistance to antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawack, Kelson; Love, Will; Lanzas, Cristina; Booth, James G; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2018-04-01

    The growth of antimicrobial resistance presents a significant threat to human and animal health. Of particular concern is multi-drug resistance, as this increases the chances an infection will be untreatable by any antibiotic. In order to understand multi-drug resistance, it is essential to understand the association between drug resistances. Pairwise associations characterize the connectivity between resistances and are useful in making decisions about courses of treatment, or the design of drug cocktails. Higher-order associations, interactions, which tie together groups of drugs can suggest commonalities in resistance mechanism and lead to their identification. To capture interactions, we apply log-linear models of contingency tables to analyze publically available data on the resistance of Escheresia coli isolated from chicken and turkey meat by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Standard large sample and conditional exact testing approaches for assessing significance of parameters in these models breakdown due to structured patterns inherent to antimicrobial resistance. To address this, we adopt a Bayesian approach which reveals that E. coli resistance associations can be broken into two subnetworks. The first subnetwork is characterized by a hierarchy of β-lactams which is consistent across the chicken and turkey datasets. Tier one in this hierarchy is a near equivalency between amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone and cefoxitin. Susceptibility to tier one then implies susceptibility to ceftiofur. The second subnetwork is characterized by more complex interactions between a variety of drug classes that vary between the chicken and turkey datasets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Woo; Lee, Joon Ha; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species.

  8. Antimicrobial chemotherapy and Sustainable Development: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is a highly valued medical science which has shaped modern humanity in a phenomenal fashion. Within the past half century, a wide variety of antimicrobial substances have been discovered, designed and synthesized; literally hundreds of drugs have been successfully used in some fashion ...

  9. Associations between Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes, Antimicrobial Resistance Genes, and Virulence Genes of Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Grow-Finish Pigs ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengren, Leigh B.; Waldner, Cheryl L.; Reid-Smith, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli often carries linked antimicrobial resistance genes on transmissible genetic elements. Through coselection, antimicrobial use may select for unrelated but linked resistance or virulence genes. This study used unconditional statistical associations to investigate the relationships between antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and antimicrobial resistance genes in 151 E. coli isolates from healthy pigs. Phenotypic resistance to each drug was significantly associated with phenotyp...

  10. Synthetic peptides derived from human antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin accumulate at sites of infections and eradicate (multi-drug resistant) Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Carlo P J M; Bogaards, Sylvia J P; Wulferink, Marty; Velders, Markwin P; Welling, Mick M

    2006-11-01

    The presence and antimicrobial activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been widely recognized as an evolutionary preserved part of the innate immune system. Based on evidence in animal models and humans, AMPs are now positioned as novel anti-infective agents. The current study aimed to evaluate the potential antimicrobial activity of ubiquicidin and small synthetic fragments thereof towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), as a high priority target for novel antibiotics. In vitro killing of MRSA by synthetic peptides derived from the alpha-helix or beta-sheet domains of the human cationic peptide ubiquicidin (UBI 1-59), allowed selection of AMPs for possible treatment of MRSA infections. The strongest antibacterial activity was observed for the entire peptide UBI 1-59 and for synthetic fragments comprising amino acids 31-38. The availability, chemical synthesis opportunities, and size of these small peptides, combined with their strong antimicrobial activity towards MRSA make these compounds promising candidates for antimicrobial therapy and detection of infections in man.

  11. Neutralization of Bothrops asper venom by antibodies, natural products and synthetic drugs: contributions to understanding snakebite envenomings and their treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonte, Bruno; León, Guillermo; Angulo, Yamileth; Rucavado, Alexandra; Núñez, Vitelbina

    2009-12-01

    Interest in studies on the neutralization of snake venoms and toxins by diverse types of inhibitors is two-fold. From an applied perspective, results enclose the potential to be translated into useful therapeutic products or procedures, to benefit patients suffering from envenomings. From a basic point of view, on the other hand, neutralizing agents may be used as powerful dissecting tools to determine the relative role of toxins within the context of the overall pathology induced by a venom, or to increase our understanding on the molecular mechanisms by which toxins exert their harmful actions upon particular targets. The venom of the snake Bothrops asper has been the subject of a number of experimental studies addressing its neutralization by antibodies, as well as by non-immunologic inhibitors, including natural products derived from plants or animals, or synthetic drugs. As summarized in the present review, neutralization studies on this venom and some of its isolated toxins have contributed to a better understanding of envenomings by this species, and their treatment. In addition, such studies have provided valuable knowledge on the mechanisms of action and the relative functional importance of particular toxins of this venom, especially in the case of its myotoxic phospholipases A(2) and hemorrhagic metalloproteinases.

  12. Understanding drugs and behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parrott, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 6 LSD and Ecstasy/MDMA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 7 Cannabis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 8...

  13. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health challenge, which has accelerated by the overuse of antibiotics worldwide. Increased antimicrobial resistance is the cause of severe infections, complications, longer hospital stays and increased mortality. Overprescribing of antibiotics......-the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...... is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects, more frequent re-attendance and increased medicalization of self-limiting conditions. Antibiotic overprescribing is a particular problem in primary care, where viruses cause most infections. About 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions are issued by general...

  14. Transformation and sorption of illicit drug biomarkers in sewer systems: understanding the role of suspended solids in raw wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Pedram; Brock, Andreas Libonati; Polesel, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    substrates (primary metabolic processes) and transformation of illicit drug biomarkers (secondary metabolic processes) by suspended biomass. Sixteen drug biomarkers were targeted, including mephedrone, methadone, cocaine, heroin, codeine and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and their major human metabolites. Batch...

  15. From understanding cellular function to novel drug discovery: the role of planar patch-clamp array chip technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe ePy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All excitable cell functions rely upon ion channels that are embedded in their plasma membrane. Perturbations of ion channel structure or function result in pathologies ranging from cardiac dysfunction to neurodegenerative disorders. Consequently, to understand the functions of excitable cells and to remedy their pathophysiology, it is important to understand the ion channel functions under various experimental conditions – including exposure to novel drug targets. Glass pipette patch-clamp is the state of the art technique to monitor the intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons. However, this technique is labor-intensive and has low data throughput. Planar patch-clamp chips, integrated into automated systems, offer high throughputs but are limited to isolated cells from suspensions, resulting in questionable models of true physiological function, and are unsuitable for studies involving neuronal communication. Multi-electrode arrays (MEA, in contrast, have the ability to monitor network activity by measuring local field potentials from multiple extracellular sites, but specific ion channel activity is challenging to extract from these multiplexed signals. Here we describe a novel planar patch-clamp chip technology that enables the simultaneous high resolution electrophysiological interrogation of individual neurons at multiple sites in synaptically connected neuronal networks, thereby combining the advantages of MEA and patch-clamp techniques. Each neuron can be probed through an aperture that connects to a dedicated subterranean microfluidic channel. Neurons growing in networks are aligned to the apertures by physisorbed or chemisorbed chemical cues. In this review, we describe the design and fabrication process of these chips, the approach to the chemical patterning for cell placement, and present physiological data from cultured neuronal cells.

  16. 75 FR 31450 - Memorandum of Understanding by and Between the United States Food and Drug Administration and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Administration and the International Anesthesia Research Society for the Safety of Key Inhaled and Intravenous Drugs in Pediatrics Public-Private Partnership AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0004...

  17. Understanding the structure, dynamics, and mass transport properties of self assembling peptide hydrogels for injectable, drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Monica Cristina

    hydrogels as a function of peptide sequence and concentration. Changes in nanoscale dynamics and structure inherently lead to substantial differences in bulk properties, such as the elastic modulus and network mesh size. Learning how the material properties of the gels influence the transport rate of therapeutics through the hydrogel is essential to the development of delivery vehicles. The remainder of the thesis focuses on correlating the mesh sizes of MAX1 and MAX8 gels to the diffusion and mass transport properties of model dextran and protein probes. Here, work is centered on how peptide charge and concentration, as well as probe structure, in particular hydrodynamic diameter and charge, dictate the temporal release of model probes from the peptide hydrogels. Experiments include self diffusion studies and bulk release experiments with model dextrans and proteins from gels before and after syringe delivery. Overall, this thesis will demonstrate the importance of understanding material properties from the nanoscale up to the macroscale for application based design. With this approach, better and specific development of self-assembling peptide materials can be achieved, allowing for the rational engineering of peptide sequences to form hydrogels appropriate for specific drug delivery applications.

  18. Antimicrobial Agents and Catheter Complications in Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sara C; Dzintars, Kathryn; Gorski, Lisa A; Williams, Deborah; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2018-03-01

    Debate about whether certain antimicrobial agents traditionally considered vesicants increase the risk of catheter complications has led to uncertainty in venous catheter placement protocols. To understand whether patients requiring home-based outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) should receive peripheral catheters (e.g., midline catheters) versus central venous catheters, and to understand whether certain antimicrobial agents place home-based OPAT patients at higher risk for catheter complications, we investigated associations between antimicrobial agent(s) and catheter complications. We performed a prospective cohort study of patients requiring home-based OPAT discharged from two urban tertiary care academic medical centers, including telephone surveys and chart abstractions. Multivariable Poisson regressions were used to evaluate: (i) associations between antimicrobial agents traditionally considered vesicants, based on pH or osmolarity, and catheter complication rates, and (ii) associations between antimicrobial agent and rates of catheter complications. Vesicant antimicrobials defined using pH or osmolarity criteria were not associated with an increased rate of catheter complications (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR]: 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89-2.96). Vancomycin was associated with an increased rate of catheter complications, as was daptomycin (aIRR: 2.32 [95% CI: 1.20-4.46] and 4.45 [95% CI: 1.02-19.41], respectively). Staphylococcus aureus infections were also associated with an increased rate of catheter complications (aIRR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.09-4.19), as were midline catheters (aIRR: 9.44, 95% CI: 2.12-41.97). Our study supports recent guidance identifying vancomycin as a vesicant, among a subset of antimicrobial agents, and removal of pH criteria for identification of vesicants. © 2018 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  19. Ruthenium complexes as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfei; Collins, J Grant; Keene, F Richard

    2015-04-21

    One of the major advances in medical science has been the development of antimicrobials; however, a consequence of their widespread use has been the emergence of drug-resistant populations of microorganisms. There is clearly a need for the development of new antimicrobials--but more importantly, there is the need for the development of new classes of antimicrobials, rather than drugs based upon analogues of known scaffolds. Due to the success of the platinum anticancer agents, there has been considerable interest in the development of therapeutic agents based upon other transition metals--and in particular ruthenium(II/III) complexes, due to their well known interaction with DNA. There have been many studies of the anticancer properties and cellular localisation of a range of ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells over the last decade. However, only very recently has there been significant interest in their antimicrobial properties. This review highlights the types of ruthenium complexes that have exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and discusses the relationship between chemical structure and biological processing--including site(s) of intracellular accumulation--of the ruthenium complexes in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  20. Determinants associated with veterinary antimicrobial prescribing in farm animals in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Speksnijder, D.C.; Jaarsma, A.D.C.; Gugten, van der, A.C.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A thorough understanding of veterinarians' current prescribing practices and their reasons to prescribe antimicrobials might offer leads for interventions to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Th...

  1. Antimicrobials and QT prolongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jay W

    2017-05-01

    Solithromycin, a ketolide/macrolide antibiotic, has recently been reported to be free of the expected QT-prolonging effect of macrolides. It appears that its keto substitution provides a structural basis for this observation, as the other two tested ketolides also have minimal QT effect.Among non-cardiovascular therapies, antimicrobials probably carry the greatest potential to cause cardiac arrhythmias. This is a result of their propensity to bind to the delayed rectifier potassium channel, IKr, inducing QT prolongation and risk of torsades de pointes ventricular tachycardia, their frequent interference with the metabolism of other QT prolongers and their susceptibility to metabolic inhibition by numerous commonly used drugs.Unfortunately, there is evidence that medical practitioners do not take account of the QT/arrhythmia risk of antimicrobials in their prescribing practices. Education on this topic is sorely needed. When a macrolide is indicated, a ketolide should be considered in patients with a QT risk. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Antimicrobial properties of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana: a focus on drug resistance with particular reference to quorum sensing-mediated bacterial biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Ratul; Mondal, Chaitali; Bera, Rammohan; Chakraborty, Sumon; Barik, Rajib; Roy, Paramita; Kumar, Alekh; Yadav, Kirendra K; Choudhury, Jayanta; Chaudhary, Sushil K; Samanta, Samir K; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Das, Satadal; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2015-07-01

    This study attempts to investigate the antimicrobial properties of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana with a particular reference to quorum sensing (QS)-mediated biofilm formation. The methanol extract of K. blossfeldiana leaves (MEKB) was evaluated for antimicrobial properties including QS-controlled production of biofilm (including virulence factor, motility and lactone formation) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methanol extract of K. blossfeldiana was also evaluated for anti-cytokine (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 beta) properties in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methanol extract of K. blossfeldiana exhibited antimicrobial effect on clinical isolates, as well as standard reference strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposed to MEKB (subminimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)) displayed reduced biofilm formation, whereas supra-MIC produced destruction of preformed biofilms. Methanol extract of K. blossfeldiana reduced the secretion of virulence factors (protease and pyoverdin) along with generation of acyl homoserine lactone (AHL). Confocal laser scanning microscopy images indicate reduction of biofilm thickness. The extract also reduced cytokine formation in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated PBMC. Kalanchoe blossfeldiana was found to interfere with AHL production, which in turn may be responsible for downregulating QS-mediated production of biofilm and virulence. This first report on the antibiofilm and anticytokine properties of this plant may open up new vistas for future exploration of this plant for combating biofilm-related resistant infections. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. What's in a virus? Folk understandings of hepatitis C infection and infectiousness among injecting drug users in Kings Cross, Sydney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Carolyn

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore folk understandings of blood borne virus infection and infectiousness among injecting drug users in Kings Cross, Sydney. Methods Observational fieldwork was conducted in Kings Cross over a four month period. In-depth interviews with 24 current injectors and 4 key informants recruited from King Cross were undertaken. Results Hepatitis C (HCV generated different meanings from HIV. HIV was considered "the dreaded" and generated fear of infection and dire disease progression. Whereas HCV was considered non-desirable but less threatening than HIV. The risks of transmitting HCV through sharing injecting paraphernalia was poorly understood. Some believed HCV infection was linked to poor hygiene and dirty water. Jaundice was mistakenly thought to indicate HCV infection and was used to gauge infectiousness. Many were confused about their current hepatitis C serostatus. Some participants thought they had a "dormant antibody" or that they had a "mild case" of infection. Participants were unsure what this meant for their own health or for their potential to infect others. Conclusion Participants displayed confusion about transmission risks for hepatitis C, conflating blood awareness and hygiene health promotion messages. Participants' reliance on the symptom of jaundice to gauge serostatus places them at risk of transmitting and contracting HCV. Participants were confused about what a positive HCV diagnosis meant for their own health and their ability to infect others. Education is needed to debunk misconceptions about jaundice and clarify medical terms such as 'antibody' at the time of diagnosis. Further clarification of messages about injecting hygiene and blood awareness are also required.

  4. Antimicrobial potential of the phytoextracts of some Nyctaginaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial potential of the phytoextracts of some Nyctaginaceae members. Mukesh Sharma, Vimal Mohan, Maneesha Abraham, Meenakshi Sharma. Abstract. The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is becoming a serious threat to humanity and has necessitated the search for new antimicrobial drugs. The present ...

  5. Handbook of topical antimicrobials: industrial applications in consumer products and pharmaceuticals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paulson, Daryl S

    2003-01-01

    ... of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officer, and a discussion of healthcare industry regulations. Part II is devoted to describing aspects of the specific antimicrobial compounds used as active drugs in topical antimicrobial products. The third part addresses various medical applications of antimicrobial formulations used as healthcare personnel h...

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  8. Antimicrobial and Biophysical Properties of Surfactant Supplemented with an Antimicrobial Peptide for Treatment of Bacterial Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banaschewski, Brandon J H; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P; Zuo, Yi Y; Yamashita, Cory M; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a "perfect storm" for multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been

  9. Cyclodextrins: A Weapon in the Fight Against Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chew Ee; Dolzhenko, Anton V.; Lee, Sui Mae; Young, David James

    Antimicrobial resistance poses one of the most serious global challenges of our age. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are widely utilized excipients in formulations because of their solubilizing properties, low toxicity, and low inflammatory response. This review summarizes recent investigations of antimicrobial agents involving CDs and CD-based antimicrobial materials. CDs have been employed for antimicrobial applications either through formation of inclusion complexes or by chemical modification of their hydroxyl groups to tailor pharmaceutically active compounds. Applications of these CD inclusion complexes include drug delivery, antimicrobial coatings on materials (e.g., biomedical devices and implants) and antimicrobial dressings that help to prevent wound infections. There are relatively limited studies of chemically modified CDs with antimicrobial activity. The mechanism of action of antimicrobial CD inclusion complexes and derivatives needs further elucidation, but activity of CDs and their derivatives is often associated with their interaction with bacterial cell membranes.

  10. Antibiofilm activity of cashew juice pulp against Staphylococcus aureus, high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses, and interference on antimicrobial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. Dias-Souza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infections has evolved in recent years, as this species is a major Gram-positive pathogen associated with healthcare services. The antimicrobial resistance of this species raises an urgent need for new treatment strategies. Fruits play important nutritional and economic roles in society, but their biological and pharmacological features are poorly explored when compared to nonedible parts of plants such as barks and leaves. In this study, we show that the cashew apple juice [cashew juice pulp (CJP] extract is active against the planktonic cells of S. aureus strains, and for the first time, we show that CJP is also active against S. aureus biofilms. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were conducted to prospect for polyphenols and free carbohydrates, respectively. Cashew apple juice, which is rich in nutrients, is widely consumed in Brazil; therefore, the quality attributes of CJPs were investigated. Samples were evaluated for pH, total titratable acidity, vitamin C levels, and total soluble solids. We also detected an antagonistic interference of CJP when it was combined with different antimicrobial drugs.

  11. Antibiofilm activity of cashew juice pulp against Staphylococcus aureus, high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses, and interference on antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Souza, Marcus V; Dos Santos, Renan M; de Siqueira, Ezequias P; Ferreira-Marçal, Pedro H

    2017-07-01

    The epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infections has evolved in recent years, as this species is a major Gram-positive pathogen associated with healthcare services. The antimicrobial resistance of this species raises an urgent need for new treatment strategies. Fruits play important nutritional and economic roles in society, but their biological and pharmacological features are poorly explored when compared to nonedible parts of plants such as barks and leaves. In this study, we show that the cashew apple juice [cashew juice pulp (CJP)] extract is active against the planktonic cells of S. aureus strains, and for the first time, we show that CJP is also active against S. aureus biofilms. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were conducted to prospect for polyphenols and free carbohydrates, respectively. Cashew apple juice, which is rich in nutrients, is widely consumed in Brazil; therefore, the quality attributes of CJPs were investigated. Samples were evaluated for pH, total titratable acidity, vitamin C levels, and total soluble solids. We also detected an antagonistic interference of CJP when it was combined with different antimicrobial drugs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  14. Antimicrobial resistance of thermophilic Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Engberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    Campylobacter has become the leading cause of zoonotic enteric infections in developed and developing countries world-wide. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged among Campylobacter mainly as a consequence of the use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production. Resistance to drugs of choice...... for the treatment of infections, macrolides and fluoroquinolones has emerged as a clinical problem and interventions to reduce this are recommended. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is mediated by chromosomal mutations. Resistance to other relevant antimicrobial agents, mediated by acquired resistance...... genes, has not become widespread so far. However, resistance genes originating from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species have been found, showing the potential for acquired resistance to emerge in Campylobacter....

  15. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. One of the major obstacles to understanding the issue ... 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332) Contact ...

  16. Understanding the main route of drug entry in adult Fasciola hepatica: Further insights into closantel pharmacological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, L; Canton, C; Cadenazzi, G; Larsen, K; Virkel, G; Moreno, L; Fairweather, I; Lanusse, C; Alvarez, L

    2017-10-01

    Closantel (CLS) is highly effective against adult liver flukes after its oral or subcutaneous (sc) administration in ruminants. Trans-tegumental diffusion and oral ingestion are the two potential routes available for the entry of drugs into Fasciola hepatica. The work reported here contributes to improve the understanding of CLS pharmacology. The main goals of were: I) to determine the pattern of in vivo CLS accumulation into adult F. hepatica and relevant tissues in CLS-treated sheep; II) to investigate the influence of the physicochemical composition of the incubation medium on the CLS diffusion process into adult F. hepatica; III) to assess the ovicidal activity of CLS against F. hepatica eggs; and IV) to investigate the in vivo effect of CLS treatment on glutathione S-transferases activity in adult liver flukes exposed to CLS. Fourteen healthy sheep were each orally infected with 75 F. hepatica metacercariae. Sixteen (16) weeks after infection, animals were treated with CLS by oral (n = 6, 10 mg/kg) or sub-cutaneous (sc) (n = 6, 5 mg/kg) route. At 12, 24 and 36 h post-treatment, animals were sacrificed (n = 2) and samples of blood, bile and adult F. hepatica were collected. In addition, flukes recovered from non-treated sheep (n = 2) were ex vivo incubated (60 min) in the presence of CLS in either RPMI or bile as incubation medium. CLS concentration was measured by HPLC. The ovicidal activity of CLS was investigated using eggs obtained from the bile of untreated sheep. Finally, glutathione S-transferase activity in F. hepatica recovered from untreated and CLS-treated sheep was assessed. In the in vivo studies, the highest CLS concentrations were measured in plasma and adult liver flukes. A positive correlation was observed between CLS concentration in plasma and in F. hepatica. Results obtained in the current work indicate that the in vivo accumulation of CLS into adult liver flukes occurs mainly by the oral route. After ex

  17. Polymyxins: Antimicrobial susceptibility concerns and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Balaji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae poses a great challenge to the treating physicians. The paucity of newer effective antimicrobials has led to renewed interest in the polymyxin group of drugs, as a last resort for treatment of gram-negative bacterial infections. There is a dearth of information on the pharmacological properties of colistin, leading to difficulties in selecting the right dose, dosing interval, and route of administration for treatment, especially in critically-ill patients. The increasing use of colistin over the last few years necessitates the need for accurate and reliable in vitro susceptibility testing methods. Development of heteroresistant strains as a result of colistin monotherapy is also a growing concern. There is a compelling need from the clinicians to provide options for probable and possible colistin combination therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in the ICU setting. Newer combination drug synergy determination tests are being developed and reported. There are no standardized recommendations from antimicrobial susceptibility testing reference agencies for the testing and interpretation of these drug combinations. Comparison and analysis of these reported methodologies may help to understand and assist the microbiologist to choose the best method that produces accurate results at the earliest. This will help clinicians to select the appropriate combination therapy. In this era of multidrug resistance it is important for the microbiology laboratory to be prepared, by default, to provide timely synergistic susceptibility results in addition to routine susceptibility, if warranted. Not as a favour or at request, but as a responsibility.

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance of Faecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Pig Farms with Different Durations of In-feed Antimicrobial Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J F; Boland, F; Egan, J; Fanning, S; Markey, B K; Leonard, F C

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial use and resistance in animal and food production are of concern to public health. The primary aims of this study were to determine the frequency of resistance to 12 antimicrobials in Escherichia coli isolates from 39 pig farms and to identify patterns of antimicrobial use on these farms. Further aims were to determine whether a categorization of farms based on the duration of in-feed antimicrobial use (long-term versus short-term) could predict the occurrence of resistance on these farms and to identify the usage of specific antimicrobial drugs associated with the occurrence of resistance. Escherichia coli were isolated from all production stages on these farms; susceptibility testing was carried out against a panel of antimicrobials. Antimicrobial prescribing data were collected, and farms were categorized as long term or short term based on these. Resistance frequencies and antimicrobial use were tabulated. Logistic regression models of resistance to each antimicrobial were constructed with stage of production, duration of antimicrobial use and the use of 5 antimicrobial classes included as explanatory variables in each model. The greatest frequencies of resistance were observed to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and streptomycin with the highest levels of resistance observed in isolates from first-stage weaned pigs. Differences in the types of antimicrobial drugs used were noted between long-term and short-term use farms. Categorization of farms as long- or short-term use was sufficient to predict the likely occurrence of resistance to 3 antimicrobial classes and could provide an aid in the control of resistance in the food chain. Stage of production was a significant predictor variable in all models of resistance constructed and did not solely reflect antimicrobial use at each stage. Cross-selection and co-selection for resistance was evident in the models constructed, and the use of trimethoprim/sulphonamide drugs in particular was

  19. Transformation and sorption of illicit drug biomarkers in sewer systems: understanding the role of suspended solids in raw wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin, Pedram; Brock, Andreas Libonati; Polesel, Fabio; Causanilles, Ana; Emke, Erik; de Voogt, Pim; Plósz, Benedek G.

    2016-01-01

    Sewer pipelines, although primarily designed for sewage transport, can also be considered as bioreactors. In-sewer processes may lead to significant variations of chemical loadings from source release points to the treatment plant influent. In this study, we assessed in-sewer utilization of growth substrates (primary metabolic processes) and transformation of illicit drug biomarkers (secondary metabolic processes) by suspended biomass. Sixteen drug biomarkers were targeted, including mephedro...

  20. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobials are used for treatment and prevention of disease in food animals and as feed additives for growth promotion. All uses lead to the development of resistant bacteria, some of which are pathogenic to humans. Current main concerns are with resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter...... to fluoroquinolones, which are used for empirical treatment of diarrhea in humans. Resistance to vancomycin and Synercid((R)) in enterococci is associated with use of similar drugs as growth promoters in food animals. Danish food animal producers have terminated the use of antimicrobial growth promoters. This has...... reduced the total use of antimicrobials by more than 50% and markedly reduced levels of resistance. There is an urgent need to implement globally, WHO principles for prudent use of antimicrobials in food animals. Use of antimicrobials as growth promoters could and should be terminated completely....

  1. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Osek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed.

  2. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  3. Bacteriuria and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retrospective analysis of 200 mid-stream urine specimens processed for culture and antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing between January 2007 and December 2009 was ... Low to moderately high level of resistance was found in first line drugs while high level of resistance was found in third generation cephalosporin.

  4. Plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozwandowicz, M.; Brouwer, M.S.M.; Fischer, J.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Gonzalez-Zorn, B.; Guerra, B.; Mevius, D.J.; Hordijk, J.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is constantly evolving and horizontal gene transfer through plasmids plays a major role. The identification of plasmid characteristics and their association with different bacterial hosts provides crucial knowledge that is essential to understand the

  5. Delivering precision antimicrobial therapy through closed-loop control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, T M; O’Hare, D; Herrero, P; Sharma, S; Moore, L S P; de Barra, E; Roberts, J A; Gordon, A C; Hope, W; Georgiou, P; Cass, A E G; Holmes, A H

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Sub-optimal exposure to antimicrobial therapy is associated with poor patient outcomes and the development of antimicrobial resistance. Mechanisms for optimizing the concentration of a drug within the individual patient are under development. However, several barriers remain in realizing true individualization of therapy. These include problems with plasma drug sampling, availability of appropriate assays, and current mechanisms for dose adjustment. Biosensor technology offers a means of providing real-time monitoring of antimicrobials in a minimally invasive fashion. We report the potential for using microneedle biosensor technology as part of closed-loop control systems for the optimization of antimicrobial therapy in individual patients. PMID:29211877

  6. Prevalence of Antimicrobial Use in a Network of Canadian Hospitals in 2002 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing antimicrobial resistance has been identified as an important global health threat. Antimicrobial use is a major driver of resistance, especially in the hospital sector. Understanding the extent and type of antimicrobial use in Canadian hospitals will aid in developing national antimicrobial stewardship priorities.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides: A Promising Therapeutic Strategy in Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Ramya; Goud, Nerella S; Saraswati, A Prasanth; Alvala, Ravi; Alvala, Mallika

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has posed a serious threat to global public health and it requires immediate action, preferably long term. Current drug therapies have failed to curb this menace due to the ability of microbes to circumvent the mechanisms through which the drugs act. From the drug discovery point of view, the majority of drugs currently employed for antimicrobial therapy are small molecules. Recent trends reveal a surge in the use of peptides as drug candidates as they offer remarkable advantages over small molecules. Newer synthetic strategies like organometalic complexes, Peptide-polymer conjugates, solid phase, liquid phase and recombinant DNA technology encouraging the use of peptides as therapeutic agents with a host of chemical functions, and tailored for specific applications. In the last decade, many peptide based drugs have been successfully approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This success can be attributed to their high specificity, selectivity and efficacy, high penetrability into the tissues, less immunogenicity and less tissue accumulation. Considering the enormity of AMR, the use of Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs) can be a viable alternative to current therapeutics strategies. AMPs are naturally abundant allowing synthetic chemists to develop semi-synthetics peptide molecules. AMPs have a broad spectrum of activity towards microbes and they possess the ability to bypass the resistance induction mechanisms of microbes. The present review focuses on the potential applications of AMPs against various microbial disorders and their future prospects. Several resistance mechanisms and their strategies have also been discussed to highlight the importance in the current scenario. Breakthroughs in AMP designing, peptide synthesis and biotechnology have shown promise in tackling this challenge and has revived the interest of using AMPs as an important weapon in fighting AMR. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries

  8. 'Workers', 'clients' and the struggle over needs: understanding encounters between service providers and injecting drug users in an Australian city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David

    2009-03-01

    A feature of contemporary Western, neo-liberal democracies is the frequent interaction between representatives of health and social services and the members of stigmatised and 'unruly' populations, such as injecting drug users. Previous research on drugs has tended to ignore the power relations and cultural dynamics at work in these encounters, and the ways in which they are framed by the wider neo-liberal context. Drawing on an ethnography of street-based heroin use in Melbourne, Australia's second largest city, I show how the discourses of both service providers and injecting drug users draw on wider neo-liberal values of independence, autonomy, rationality and responsibility. Service providers negotiate a framework of needs interpretation that creates and reproduces professional identities, and maintains boundaries between 'workers' and 'clients'. It also includes tensions around the definition of injecting drug users as 'chaotic' (i.e., failed neo-liberal) subjects, and slippage between service philosophies that emphasise a social model of health and forms of service delivery that emphasise the production of responsibilised subjects. For their part, street-based injectors construct an alternative framework of needs interpretation that emphasises their self-reliance, autonomy and independence, attributes and capacities largely denied them in service-provider discourse. In encounters with service providers, street-based injectors respond in various ways that include elements of resistance, strategic accommodation and the incorporation of therapeutic discourse. I conclude by considering the implications of my analysis for the future development of drug policy and practice.

  9. Determination of the Antimicrobial Effects of Hydro-Alcoholic Extract of Cannabis Sativa on Multiple Drug Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Sarmadyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The science of identification and employment of medicinal plants dates back to the early days of man on earth. Cannabis (hashish is the most common illegal substance used in the United States and was subjected to extensive research as a powerful local disinfecting agent for mouth cavity and skin and an anti-tubercular agent in 1950. Methods: Clinical strains were isolated from hospitalized patients in Vali-e-Asr Hospital of Arak. The hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis (5 g was prepared following liquid-liquid method and drying in 45˚C. The antimicrobial properties of the extract were determined through disk diffusion and determination of MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration. Results: First, the sensitivity of bacteria was detected based on disk diffusion method and the zone of inhibition was obtained for MRSA (12 mm, S.aureus 25923 (14 mm, E. coli ESBL+: (10 mm, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7 mm. Disk diffusion for Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter demonstrated no inhibitory zones. Through Broth dilution method, MIC of cannabis extract on the bacteria was determined: E.coli 25922: 50µg/ml, E.coli ESBL+:100 µg/ml, S.aureus 25923:25 µg/ml, MRSA: 50 µg/ml, Pseudomona aeroginosaESBL+> 100 µg/ml, Pseudomonas: 100 µg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae: 100 µg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii> 1000. Conclusion: The maximum anti-microbial effect of the hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis was seen for gram positive cocci, especially S. aureus, whereas non-fermentative gram negatives presented resistance to the extract. This extract had intermediate effect on Enterobacteriacae family. Cannabis components extracted through chemical analysis can perhaps be effective in treatment of nosocomial infections.

  10. Understanding the Black Box of Gang Organization: Implications for Involvement in Violent Crime, Drug Sales, and Violent Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Scott H.; Katz, Charles M.; Webb, Vincent J.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the influence of gang organization on several behavioral measures. Using interview data from juvenile detention facilities in three Arizona sites, this article examines the relationship between gang organizational structure and involvement in violent crime, drug sales, victimization, and arrest. The gang literature suggests…

  11. The preparation, cytocompatibility and antimicrobial property of micro/nano structural titanium loading alginate and antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhong, Mou; Sun, Yuhua; Chen, Junhong; Feng, Bo

    2018-03-01

    Titanium with hybrid microporous/nanotubes (TMNT) structure on its surface was fabricated by acid etching and subsequently anodization at different voltages. Bovine lactoferricin, a kind of antimicrobial peptide, and sodium alginate (NaAlg) were loaded onto titanium surface through layer by layer assembly. The drug release, cytocompatibility and antimicrobial property against S.aureus and E.coil were studied by release experiment, osteoblast and bacterial cultures. Results indicated that samples with nanotubes of bigger diameter carried more drugs and had better biocompatibility, and drug-loaded samples acquired better biocompatibility compared with drug-free samples. Furthermore, the drug-loaded samples exhibited good initial antimicrobial property, but weak long-term antimicrobial property. Therefore, drug-loaded titanium with micro/nano structure, especially, of big diameter nanotubes, could be a promise material for medical implants, such as internal/external fixation devices.

  12. Defining antimicrobial stewardship competencies for undergraduate health professional education in the United Kingdom: A study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtenay, Molly; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Deslandes, Rhian; Hodson, Karen; Lim, Rosemary; Morris, Gary; Reeves, Scott; Weiss, Marjorie

    2018-04-16

    Multi-drug resistant infections have been identified as one of the greatest threats to human health. Healthcare professionals are involved in an array of patient care activities for which an understanding of antimicrobial stewardship is important. Although antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship competencies have been developed for healthcare professionals who adopt the role of a prescriber, competencies do not exist for other medicine-related stewardship activities. Undergraduate education provides an ideal opportunity to prepare healthcare professionals for these roles and activities. This report presents a protocol for a study designed to provide national consensus on antimicrobial stewardship competencies appropriate for undergraduate healthcare professional education. A modified Delphi process will be used in which a panel of Experts, comprising members from across the United Kingdom, with expertise in prescribing and medicines management with regard to the education and practice of healthcare professionals, and antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship, will be invited to take part in two survey rounds. The competencies developed will be applicable to all undergraduate healthcare professional education programmes. They will help to standardise curricula content and enhance the impact of antimicrobial stewardship education.

  13. Role of MRP transporters in regulating antimicrobial drug inefficacy and oxidative stress-induced pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Upal; Barber, Paul; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Batrakova, Elena V; Mondal, Debasis; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB) therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH) conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9) have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function, and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  14. Role of MRP Transporters in Regulating Antimicrobial Drug Inefficacy and Oxidative Stress-induced Pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upal eRoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9 have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  15. Tendencia del perfil de sensibilidad antimicrobiana de los aislamientos de sangre en un hospital oncológico (1998-2003 Trend of antimicrobial drug-susceptibility of blood isolates at an oncological center (1998-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Cornejo-Juárez

    2005-07-01

    oncological hospital. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All strains obtained from blood cultures from 1998 to 2003 were included and processed using the Bactec and Microscan system to determinate isolates and susceptibility to antimicrobials. The percent difference (increase or decrease was obtained by comparing the frequency of resistance at baseline and at the end of the study. RESULTS: A total of 2 071 positive blood cultures were obtained; 59.7% of isolates were Gram negative bacteria, 35.7% Gram-positive bacteria and 4.6% were yeasts. E.coli was the most frequent isolated (18.6%, followed by Staphylococcus. epidermidis (12.7% and Klebsiella spp (9%. Throughout the study the susceptibility of Gram negative bacteria was stable and over 88% for most of the antimicrobials tested (except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility for Escherichia coli stayed around 50%. Susceptibility to amikacin was higher than that to gentamicin. Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility for oxacillin was 96% and that for vancomycin 100%. S. epidermidis susceptibility for oxacillin was 14% and for vancomycin was 98.6%. No strains of vancomycin-resistant enterococci were found. All Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were penicillin susceptible. CONCLUSIONS: The drug-resistance found in this hospital is the result of the control in the use of antimicrobials, the hospital nosocomial infection program and the use of drug combination in all patients with bacteremia.

  16. Using informatics and the electronic medical record to describe antimicrobial use in the clinical management of diarrhea cases at 12 companion animal practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anholt, R Michele; Berezowski, John; Ribble, Carl S; Russell, Margaret L; Stephen, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial drugs may be used to treat diarrheal illness in companion animals. It is important to monitor antimicrobial use to better understand trends and patterns in antimicrobial resistance. There is no monitoring of antimicrobial use in companion animals in Canada. To explore how the use of electronic medical records could contribute to the ongoing, systematic collection of antimicrobial use data in companion animals, anonymized electronic medical records were extracted from 12 participating companion animal practices and warehoused at the University of Calgary. We used the pre-diagnostic, clinical features of diarrhea as the case definition in this study. Using text-mining technologies, cases of diarrhea were described by each of the following variables: diagnostic laboratory tests performed, the etiological diagnosis and antimicrobial therapies. The ability of the text miner to accurately describe the cases for each of the variables was evaluated. It could not reliably classify cases in terms of diagnostic tests or etiological diagnosis; a manual review of a random sample of 500 diarrhea cases determined that 88/500 (17.6%) of the target cases underwent diagnostic testing of which 36/88 (40.9%) had an etiological diagnosis. Text mining, compared to a human reviewer, could accurately identify cases that had been treated with antimicrobials with high sensitivity (92%, 95% confidence interval, 88.1%-95.4%) and specificity (85%, 95% confidence interval, 80.2%-89.1%). Overall, 7400/15,928 (46.5%) of pets presenting with diarrhea were treated with antimicrobials. Some temporal trends and patterns of the antimicrobial use are described. The results from this study suggest that informatics and the electronic medical records could be useful for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use.

  17. Using informatics and the electronic medical record to describe antimicrobial use in the clinical management of diarrhea cases at 12 companion animal practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Michele Anholt

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial drugs may be used to treat diarrheal illness in companion animals. It is important to monitor antimicrobial use to better understand trends and patterns in antimicrobial resistance. There is no monitoring of antimicrobial use in companion animals in Canada. To explore how the use of electronic medical records could contribute to the ongoing, systematic collection of antimicrobial use data in companion animals, anonymized electronic medical records were extracted from 12 participating companion animal practices and warehoused at the University of Calgary. We used the pre-diagnostic, clinical features of diarrhea as the case definition in this study. Using text-mining technologies, cases of diarrhea were described by each of the following variables: diagnostic laboratory tests performed, the etiological diagnosis and antimicrobial therapies. The ability of the text miner to accurately describe the cases for each of the variables was evaluated. It could not reliably classify cases in terms of diagnostic tests or etiological diagnosis; a manual review of a random sample of 500 diarrhea cases determined that 88/500 (17.6% of the target cases underwent diagnostic testing of which 36/88 (40.9% had an etiological diagnosis. Text mining, compared to a human reviewer, could accurately identify cases that had been treated with antimicrobials with high sensitivity (92%, 95% confidence interval, 88.1%-95.4% and specificity (85%, 95% confidence interval, 80.2%-89.1%. Overall, 7400/15,928 (46.5% of pets presenting with diarrhea were treated with antimicrobials. Some temporal trends and patterns of the antimicrobial use are described. The results from this study suggest that informatics and the electronic medical records could be useful for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use.

  18. Understanding the mechanism of drug resistance due to a codon deletion in protoporphyrinogen oxidase through computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Ji, Feng-Qin; Zhang, Li; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2009-04-09

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO; EC 1.3.3.4) is the last common enzyme for the enzymatic transformation of protoporphyrinogen-IX to protoporphyrin-IX, which is the key common intermediate leading to heme and chlorophyll. Hence, PPO has been identified as one of the most importance action targets for the treatment of some important diseases including cancer and variegated porphyria (VP). In the agricultural field, PPO inhibitors have been used as herbicides for many years. Recently, a unique drug resistance was found to be associated with a nonactive site residue (Gly210) deletion rather than substitution in A. tuberculatus PPO. In the present study, extensive computational simulations, including homology modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) calculations, have been carried out to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with Gly210 deletion. Although Gly210 in the wild-type A. tuberculatus PPO has no direct interaction with the inhibitors, all the computational models and energetic results indicated that Gly210 deletion has great effects on the hydrogen-bonding network and the conformational change of the binding pocket. An interchain hydrogen bond between Gly210 with Ser424, playing an important role in stabilizing the local conformation of the wild-type enzyme, disappeared after Gly210 deletion. As a result, the mutant-type PPO has a lower affinity than the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular mechanism of drug resistance. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from the present study provide a new starting point for future rational design of novel PPO inhibitors to overcome drug resistance associated with Gly210 deletion.

  19. Transformation and Sorption of Illicit Drug Biomarkers in Sewer Systems: Understanding the Role of Suspended Solids in Raw Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin, Pedram; Libonati Brock, Andreas; Polesel, Fabio; Causanilles, Ana; Emke, Erik; de Voogt, Pim; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2016-12-20

    Sewer pipelines, although primarily designed for sewage transport, can also be considered as bioreactors. In-sewer processes may lead to significant variations of chemical loadings from source release points to the treatment plant influent. In this study, we assessed in-sewer utilization of growth substrates (primary metabolic processes) and transformation of illicit drug biomarkers (secondary metabolic processes) by suspended biomass. Sixteen drug biomarkers were targeted, including mephedrone, methadone, cocaine, heroin, codeine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and their major human metabolites. Batch experiments were performed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using raw wastewater. Abiotic biomarker transformation and partitioning to suspended solids and reactor wall were separately investigated under both redox conditions. A process model was identified by combining and extending the Wastewater Aerobic/anaerobic Transformations in Sewers (WATS) model and Activated Sludge Model for Xenobiotics (ASM-X). Kinetic and stoichiometric model parameters were estimated using experimental data via the Bayesian optimization method DREAM (ZS) . Results suggest that biomarker transformation significantly differs from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, and abiotic conversion is the dominant mechanism for many of the selected substances. Notably, an explicit description of biomass growth during batch experiments was crucial to avoid significant overestimation (up to 385%) of aerobic biotransformation rate constants. Predictions of in-sewer transformation provided here can reduce the uncertainty in the estimation of drug consumption as part of wastewater-based epidemiological studies.

  20. [NEPHROTOXIC DRUGS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, B; Šutić, I; Marković, N Bašić

    2016-12-01

    Renal tissue is sensitive to the effect of potentially nephrotoxic drugs and other substances that are available over-the-counter or can be purchased at healthy food stores or elsewhere, and harmful substances from the environment. The harmful effects of these substances lead to the development of recognizable clinical syndromes, including acute or chronic renal failure, tubulopathy, and proteinuria. Risk factors that influence the development of kidney disease induced by drugs are divided into those related to patient characteristics, drug characteristics, and renal function. Drugs that commonly exhibit nephrotoxic effects are analgesics, antimicrobials, chemotherapeutics, contrast agents, immunosuppressants, herbal preparations and substances containing heavy metals. Family physician must carefully observe their patients, nurturing individual approach to drug selection and determining the dose. Renal function can quickly return to normal if the damage is recognized on time. Recent research yields insights into the identification of new biomarkers that will contribute to early detection of drug induced kidney damage.

  1. What Is the Addiction World Like? Understanding the Lived Experience of the Individuals' Illicit Drug Addiction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Mei-Hui; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Tsai, Chang-Hsiung; Hsu, Yu-Chien; Hsu, Min-Tao

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the participants' lived experience of addiction. The study presents a qualitative method. The use of the fieldwork-based participant observation and in-depth interviews guided the data collection and analysis. Three major themes of addiction emerge from the analysis: incorrigible conduct, inexcusable compromise, and inevitable corruption. This study provides a better understanding of what the world is like for people struggling with addiction and also enhances the healthcare professionals' knowledge of the individual's experience of addiction. This knowledge is essential for clinicians to understand this experience as a framework for planning and implementing appropriate treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  3. Revisiting Chaos Theorem to Understand the Nature of miRNAs in Response to Drugs of Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Faten A; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Baohong

    2015-12-01

    Just like Matryoshka dolls, biological systems follow a hierarchical order that is based on dynamic bidirectional communication among its components. In addition to the convoluted inter-relationships, the complexity of each component spans several folds. Therefore, it becomes rather challenging to investigate phenotypes resulting from these networks as it requires the integration of reductionistic and holistic approaches. One dynamic system is the transcriptome which comprises a variety of RNA species. Some, like microRNAs, have recently received a lot of attention. miRNAs are very pleiotropic and have been considered as therapeutic and diagnostic candidates in the biomedical fields. In this review, we survey miRNA profiles in response to drugs of abuse (DA) using 118 studies. After providing a summary of miRNAs related to substance use disorders (SUD), general patterns of miRNA signatures are compared among studies for single or multiple drugs of abuse. Then, current challenges and drawbacks in the field are discussed. Finally, we provide support for considering miRNAs as a chaotic system in normal versus disrupted states particularly in SUD and propose an integrative approach for studying and analyzing miRNA data. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Unique structure and regulation of the nematode detoxification gene regulator SKN-1: implications to understanding and controlling drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Keith P.; Leung, Chi K.; Miyamoto, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Nematodes parasitize an alarming number of people and agricultural animals globally and cause debilitating morbidity and mortality. Anthelmintics have been the primary tools used to control parasitic nematodes for the past several decades, but drug resistance is becoming a major obstacle. Xenobiotic detoxification pathways defend against drugs and other foreign chemicals in diverse organisms, and evidence is accumulating that they play a role in mediating resistance to anthelmintics in nematodes. Related anti-oxidation pathways may also provide filarial parasites protection against host free radical-mediated immune responses. Upstream regulatory pathways have received almost no attention in nematode parasites despite their potential to co-regulate multiple detoxification and anti-oxidation genes. The NRF2 transcription factor mediates inducible detoxification and anti-oxidation defenses in mammals and recent studies have demonstrated that it promotes multidrug resistance in some human tumors. Recent studies in the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have defined the homologous transcription factor SKN-1 as a master regulator of detoxification and anti-oxidation genes. Despite similar functions, SKN-1 and NRF2 have important differences in structure and regulatory pathways. Protein alignment and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these differences are shared among many nematodes making SKN-1 a candidate for specifically targeting nematode detoxification and anti-oxidation. PMID:22656429

  5. Understanding the mechanism of atovaquone drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum cytochrome b mutation Y268S using computational methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir A Akhoon

    Full Text Available The rapid appearance of resistant malarial parasites after introduction of atovaquone (ATQ drug has prompted the search for new drugs as even single point mutations in the active site of Cytochrome b protein can rapidly render ATQ ineffective. The presence of Y268 mutations in the Cytochrome b (Cyt b protein is previously suggested to be responsible for the ATQ resistance in Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum. In this study, we examined the resistance mechanism against ATQ in P. falciparum through computational methods. Here, we reported a reliable protein model of Cyt bc1 complex containing Cyt b and the Iron-Sulphur Protein (ISP of P. falciparum using composite modeling method by combining threading, ab initio modeling and atomic-level structure refinement approaches. The molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Y268S mutation causes ATQ resistance by reducing hydrophobic interactions between Cyt bc1 protein complex and ATQ. Moreover, the important histidine contact of ATQ with the ISP chain is also lost due to Y268S mutation. We noticed the induced mutation alters the arrangement of active site residues in a fashion that enforces ATQ to find its new stable binding site far away from the wild-type binding pocket. The MM-PBSA calculations also shows that the binding affinity of ATQ with Cyt bc1 complex is enough to hold it at this new site that ultimately leads to the ATQ resistance.

  6. Molecular characterization and susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs of isolated bacterials from shrimps (“Litopenaeus vannamei” Caracterização molecular e susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos de isolados bacterianos de camarões

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Castelo Branco Albinati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to isolate bacteria from gut of shrimps from Litopenaeus vannamei, by biochemical characterization and molecular identification, inhibition activity in vitro of Bacillus cereus and sensitivity pattern determination. The bacterial species isolated were: Aeromonas caviae (n = 7, Alcaligenes denitrificans (n = 1, Bacillus cereus (n = 1 and Enterobacter spp. (n = 3. Bacillus cereus isolated in this study did not have inhibitory activity to other shrimps isolated bacteria evaluated. In the susceptibility to antimicrobial drug test, it were observed 68,7% to erythromycin, 50% to tetracycline, 81,2% to trimethoprim:sulfamethoxazole, neomycin and estreptomycin, 12,5% to lincomycin and ampicillin, 87,5% to enrofloxacin and nitrofurantoin, 93,7% to ceftriaxone, 100% to norfloxacin and nalidix acid. The characterization molecular is important on identifying the microrganisms studied. The nalidixic acid and norfloxacin are antimicrobial drugs with high sensitivity for bacteria isolated from shrimps.Objetivou-se isolar bactérias provenientes do trato intestinal de camarões da espécie Litopenaeus vannamei, por meio da caracterização bioquímica e molecular, atividade de inibição in vitro do Bacillus cereus e perfil de sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos. As espécies bacterianas identificadas foram Aeromonas caviae (n = 7, Alcaligenes denitrificans (n = 1, Bacillus cereus (n = 1 e Enterobacter spp. (n = 3. Bacillus cereus obtido neste estudo não apresentou atividade de inibição frente às demais bactérias isoladas de camarões. Quanto ao perfil de sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos, foram observados 68,7% de eritromicina, 50% de tetraciclina, 81,2% de sulfametoxazol/trimetoprina, neomicina e estreptomicina, 12,5% de lincomicina e ampicilina, 87,5% de enrofloxacina e nitrofurantoína, 93,7% de ceftriaxona, 100% de norfloxacina e ácido nalidíxico. A caracterização molecular é útil para identificação dos microrganismos estudados

  7. Antimicrobial Prescribing in Dogs and Cats in Australia: Results of the Australasian Infectious Disease Advisory Panel Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardefeldt, L Y; Holloway, S; Trott, D J; Shipstone, M; Barrs, V R; Malik, R; Burrows, M; Armstrong, S; Browning, G F; Stevenson, M

    2017-07-01

    Investigations of antimicrobial use in companion animals are limited. With the growing recognition of the need for improved antimicrobial stewardship, there is urgent need for more detailed understanding of the patterns of antimicrobial use in this sector. To investigate antimicrobial use for medical and surgical conditions in dogs and cats by Australian veterinarians. A cross-sectional study was performed over 4 months in 2011. Respondents were asked about their choices of antimicrobials for empirical therapy of diseases in dogs and cats, duration of therapy, and selection based on culture and susceptibility testing, for common conditions framed as case scenarios: 11 medical, 2 surgical, and 8 dermatological. A total of 892 of the 1,029 members of the Australian veterinary profession that completed the survey satisfied the selection criteria. Empirical antimicrobial therapy was more common for acute conditions (76%) than chronic conditions (24%). Overall, the most common antimicrobial classes were potentiated aminopenicillins (36%), fluoroquinolones (15%), first- and second-generation cephalosporins (14%), and tetracyclines (11%). Third-generation cephalosporins were more frequently used in cats (16%) compared to dogs (2%). Agreement with Australasian Infectious Disease Advisory Panel (AIDAP) guidelines (generated subsequently) was variable ranging from 0 to 69% between conditions. Choice of antimicrobials by Australian veterinary practitioners was generally appropriate, with relatively low use of drugs of high importance, except for the empirical use of fluoroquinolones in dogs, particularly for otitis externa and 3rd-generation cephalosporins in cats. Future surveys will determine whether introduction of the 2013 AIDAP therapeutic guidelines has influenced prescribing habits. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Methanolic Extracts of Sambucus ebulus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increase in the emergence of drug - resistant pathogens led to the development of natural antimicrobials. In this study the antimicrobial effect of methanolic extracts of Sambucus ebulus and Urtica dioica on 16 skin and wound infections isolates of methicillin resistant. S. aureus have been studied. Material and ...

  9. Antimicrobial potentials of silver colloidal (nanorods) on clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial resistance in developing countries has long been an issue of major concern. Nanotechnology has become an eye opener for the intervention on multiple drug resistance organisms. In this study we investigated the antimicrobial potentials of Silver Nitrate (nanorods) solution used in managing infectious ...

  10. Antimicrobial residues screening in pigs and goats slaughtered in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ekene Vivienne Ezenduka

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... 2001; Pavlov et al., 2008). Antimicrobial use in food animals may result to residues in their products (meat, milk and egg) especially when the stipulated withdrawal period of the agent is not observed. This use of antimicrobial drugs in food animals has recently become a very important public health issue ...

  11. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of extracts from Urginea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increasing antibiotic resistance among human pathogenic microorganisms and the failure of conventional cancer therapies attracting great attention among scientists in the field of herbal medicine to develop natural antimicrobial and anticancer drugs. Thus, the antimicrobial and anticancer activities from fruits ...

  12. Antimicrobial resistance in aerobic bacteria isolated from oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reinforces the need for dog bite wound microbial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity test as isolates showed varied antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. The oral cavities of hunting dogs are laden with multi-drug resistant bacteria of significant public health importance that could be transferred to humans through ...

  13. Better understanding of dissolution behaviour of amorphous drugs by in situ solid-state analysis using Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savolainen, M; Kogermann, K; Heinz, A

    2009-01-01

    form. The purpose of this study was to use in situ Raman spectroscopy in combination with either partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) or partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis to monitor as well as quantify the solid-phase transitions that take place during the dissolution...... of two amorphous drugs, indomethacin (IMC) and carbamazepine (CBZ). The dissolution rate was higher from amorphous IMC compared to the crystalline alpha- and gamma-forms. However, the dissolution rate started to slow down during the experiment. In situ Raman analysis verified that at that time point...... the sample started to crystallize to the alpha-form. Amorphous CBZ instantly started to crystallize upon contact with the dissolution medium. The transition from the amorphous form to CBZ dihydrate appears to go through the anhydrate form I. Based on the PLS analysis the amount of form I formed in the sample...

  14. Statistical metamodeling for revealing synergistic antimicrobial interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang Chia Chen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens are becoming drug resistant faster than we can develop new antimicrobials. To address this threat in public health, a metamodel antimicrobial cocktail optimization (MACO scheme is demonstrated for rapid screening of potent antibiotic cocktails using uropathogenic clinical isolates as model systems. With the MACO scheme, only 18 parallel trials were required to determine a potent antimicrobial cocktail out of hundreds of possible combinations. In particular, trimethoprim and gentamicin were identified to work synergistically for inhibiting the bacterial growth. Sensitivity analysis indicated gentamicin functions as a synergist for trimethoprim, and reduces its minimum inhibitory concentration for 40-fold. Validation study also confirmed that the trimethoprim-gentamicin synergistic cocktail effectively inhibited the growths of multiple strains of uropathogenic clinical isolates. With its effectiveness and simplicity, the MACO scheme possesses the potential to serve as a generic platform for identifying synergistic antimicrobial cocktails toward management of bacterial infection in the future.

  15. Antimicrobial profiles of bacterial clinical isolates from the Gabonese National Laboratory of Public Health: data from routine activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léonard Kouegnigan Rerambiah

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The antimicrobial resistance profiles seen here are of concern. To control the spread of drug-resistant bacteria, clinicians should be cognizant of their local antimicrobial resistance patterns.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing as a potential antimicrobial target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger S.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has two complete quorum-sensing systems. Both of these systems have been shown to be important for Pseudomonas virulence in multiple models of infection. Thus, these systems provide unique targets for novel antimicrobial drugs. PMID:14617745

  17. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Donovan, David M; Loessner, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can access the peptidoglycan and destroy these organisms when applied externally, making them interesting antimicrobial candidates, particularly in light of increasing bacterial drug resistance. This article reviews the modular structure of these enzymes, in which cell wall binding and catalytic functions are separated, as well as their mechanism of action, lytic activity and potential as antimicrobials. It particularly focuses on molecular engineering as a means of optimizing endolysins for specific applications, highlights new developments that may render these proteins active against Gram-negative and intracellular pathogens and summarizes the most recent applications of endolysins in the fields of medicine, food safety, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23030422

  18. Assessment of biological half life using in silico QSPkR approach: a self organizing molecular field analysis (SOMFA) on a series of antimicrobial quinolone drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Honey; Sinha, V R; Thareja, Suresh; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-08-30

    The quinolones belong to a family of synthetic potent broad-spectrum antibiotics and particularly active against gram-negative organisms, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A 3D-QSPkR approach has been used to obtain the quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship for a series of quinolone drugs using SOMFA. The series consisting of 28 molecules have been investigated for their pharmacokinetic performance using biological half life (t(1/2)). A statistically validated robust model for a diverse group of quinolone drugs having flexibility in structure and pharmacokinetic profile (t(1/2)) obtained using SOMFA having good cross-validated correlation coefficient r(cv)(2) (0.6847), non cross-validated correlation coefficient r(2) values (0.7310) and high F-test value (33.9663). Analysis of 3D-QSPkR models through electrostatic and shape grids provide useful information about the shape and electrostatic potential contributions on t(1/2). The analysis of SOMFA results provide an insight for the generation of novel molecular architecture of quinolones with optimal half life and improved biological profile. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial efficacy and ocular cell toxicity from silver nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, Colleen M.; Duchsherer, Nicole L.; Grainger, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Silver in various forms has long been recognized for antimicrobial properties, both in biomedical devices and in eyes. However, soluble drugs used on the ocular surface are rapidly cleared through tear ducts and eventually ingested, resulting in decreased efficacy of the drug on its target tissue and potential concern for systemic side effects. Silver nanoparticles were studied as a source of anti-microbial silver for possible controlled-release contact lens controlled delivery formulations. ...

  20. Biofilm disruption with rotating microrods enhances antimicrobial efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mair, Lamar O., E-mail: Lamar.Mair@gmail.com [Weinberg Medical Physics, Inc., North Bethesda, MD (United States); Nacev, Aleksandar; Hilaman, Ryan; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Chowdhury, Sagar; Jafari, Sahar [Weinberg Medical Physics, Inc., North Bethesda, MD (United States); Hausfeld, Jeffrey [School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, WA (United States); Karlsson, Amy J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Shirtliff, Mark E. [School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shapiro, Benjamin [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Weinberg, Irving N. [Weinberg Medical Physics, Inc., North Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are a common and persistent cause of numerous illnesses. Compared to planktonic microbes, biofilm residing cells often demonstrate significant resistance to antimicrobial agents. Thus, methods for dislodging cells from the biofilm may increase the antimicrobial susceptibility of such cells, and serve as a mechanical means of increasing antimicrobial efficacy. Using Aspergillus fumigatus as a model microbe, we magnetically rotate microrods in and around biofilm. We show that such rods can improve the efficacy of antimicrobial Amphotericin B treatments in vitro. This work represents a first step in using kinetic magnetic particle therapy for disrupting fungal biofilms. - Highlights: • Fungal biofilms have been implicated in a variety of medical ailments. • Magnetic microrods, grown via electroplating, were rotated in and around fungal biofilms. • Rotating microrods potentiate the effectiveness of antimicrobial drug. • Antimicrobial efficacy may be enhanced due to increased mixing.

  1. Biofilm disruption with rotating microrods enhances antimicrobial efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, Lamar O.; Nacev, Aleksandar; Hilaman, Ryan; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Chowdhury, Sagar; Jafari, Sahar; Hausfeld, Jeffrey; Karlsson, Amy J.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Shapiro, Benjamin; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are a common and persistent cause of numerous illnesses. Compared to planktonic microbes, biofilm residing cells often demonstrate significant resistance to antimicrobial agents. Thus, methods for dislodging cells from the biofilm may increase the antimicrobial susceptibility of such cells, and serve as a mechanical means of increasing antimicrobial efficacy. Using Aspergillus fumigatus as a model microbe, we magnetically rotate microrods in and around biofilm. We show that such rods can improve the efficacy of antimicrobial Amphotericin B treatments in vitro. This work represents a first step in using kinetic magnetic particle therapy for disrupting fungal biofilms. - Highlights: • Fungal biofilms have been implicated in a variety of medical ailments. • Magnetic microrods, grown via electroplating, were rotated in and around fungal biofilms. • Rotating microrods potentiate the effectiveness of antimicrobial drug. • Antimicrobial efficacy may be enhanced due to increased mixing.

  2. Vigilancia del consumo de antimicrobianos en hospitales de México: situación actual y guía práctica para su implementación Surveillance of antimicrobial drug use in Mexican hospitals: current situation and practical guidelines for its implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalis Rodríguez-Ganen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available En México se han constatado un elevado consumo de antibióticos, su uso irracional en la atención primaria y altas tasas de resistencia en bacterias causantes de infecciones nosocomiales. Se hace necesario revisar la metodología recomendada para informar el consumo de antimicrobianos, de manera que la cuantificación se realice mediante estudios de utilización de medicamentos. Estos estudios, que permiten conocer los medicamentos utilizados en el hospital, requieren de una fuente de datos de consumo de antimicrobianos accesible y con el menor riesgo de sesgos, un sistema de identificación único para los fármacos y la adopción de unidades de medida extrapolables. Se propone usar la metodología elaborada por el Centro Colaborador de la Organización Mundial de la Salud para la Metodología Estadística de Medicamentos, basada en la clasificación anatómica, terapéutica y química (ATC y la dosis diaria definida (DDD. A pesar de sus limitaciones, el empleo de esta metodología para el monitoreo local del consumo de antimicrobianos permite detectar diferencias en los patrones de uso respecto a otras instituciones y, sobre todo, las tendencias dentro de una misma institución. Esto ayudaría a alertar oportunamente sobre posibles problemas en la utilización de antimicrobianos y la necesidad de implementar intervenciones específicas.Antibiotic use in Mexico is characterized by high levels of consumption, irrational use in primary care services, and high rates of bacterial resistance that cause hospital infections. Changes are needed in the recommended method for reporting antimicrobial drug use, so that quantification can be carried out through drug utilization studies. Such studies, which make it possible to know which drugs are used in hospitals, require an accessible source of data on antimicrobial drug use with the least risk of biases, a single drug identification system, and the adoption of units of measure that can be extrapolated

  3. Antimicrobial stewardship: attempting to preserve a strategic resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Van Schooneveld, Md

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobials hold a unique place in our drug armamentarium. Unfortunately the increase in resistance among both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens coupled with a lack of new antimicrobial agents is threatening our ability to treat infections. Antimicrobial use is the driving force behind this rise in resistance and much of this use is suboptimal. Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASP have been advocated as a strategy to improve antimicrobial use. The goals of ASP are to improve patient outcomes while minimizing toxicity and selection for resistant strains by assisting in the selection of the correct agent, right dose, and best duration. Two major strategies for ASP exist: restriction/pre-authorization that controls use at the time of ordering and audit and feedback that reviews ordered antimicrobials and makes suggestions for improvement. Both strategies have some limitations, but have been effective at achieving stewardship goals. Other supplemental strategies such as education, clinical prediction rules, biomarkers, clinical decision support software, and institutional guidelines have been effective at improving antimicrobial use. The most effective antimicrobial stewardship programs have employed multiple strategies to impact antimicrobial use. Using these strategies stewardship programs have been able to decrease antimicrobial use, the spread of resistant pathogens, the incidence of C. difficile infection, pharmacy costs, and improved patient outcomes.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial potential of transition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cu (II) complex showed highest inhibition zone against Shigella dysentriae (22.3 mm), greater than standard drug, while the Zn (II) complex showed maximum antifungal activity against Trichophyton simii (18.7 mm). The antimicrobial activities indicated that metal complexes showed enhanced activity as compared to the ...

  5. The quest for optimal antimicrobial therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Petrus Gerardus Maria

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of sulphonam ides and penicillin in the 1930's, and their widespread use in clinical practice during World War II a plethora of new antimicrobial agents have entered the market. Initial optim ism has faded that these new drugs would eliminate infectious diseases as killer

  6. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These compounds were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against ten bacteria and five fungi by serial plate dilution method using standard drugs, namely, ofloxacin and ketoconazole, respectively, and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were also determined. Results: A total of eighteen new compounds ...

  7. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    to fluoroquinolones, which are used for empirical treatment of diarrhea in humans. Resistance to vancomycin and Synercid((R)) in enterococci is associated with use of similar drugs as growth promoters in food animals. Danish food animal producers have terminated the use of antimicrobial growth promoters. This has...

  8. Drug induced aseptic meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-29

    Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a rare but important and often challenging diagnosis for the physician. Intake of antimicrobials, steroids, anal- gesics amongst others has been implicated. Signs and symptoms generally develop within 24-48 hours of drug ingestion. The pa- tient often ...

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuirulan Pushpanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries.

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of oral Treponema species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto-Shibayama, Kazuko; Sekino, Jin; Yoshikawa, Kouki; Saito, Atsushi; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    Treponemes occur in the microflora of the dental plaque. Certain Treponema species that are frequently isolated from chronic periodontitis lesions are involved in its initiation and progression. In addition to mechanical instrumentation, antimicrobial agents are used as an adjunctive treatment modality for periodontitis. Despite its importance for successful antimicrobial treatment, information about susceptibility is limited for Treponema species. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility of Treponema denticola strains, Treponema socranskii, and Treponema vincentii to eleven antimicrobial agents. The minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations of these antimicrobial agents revealed strain-specific variation. Doxycycline, minocycline, azithromycin, and erythromycin were effective against all Treponema species tested in this study, whereas fluoroquinolones only exhibited an equivalent effectiveness on T. socranskii. The susceptibility of one T. denticola strain, T. socranskii, and T. vincentii to kanamycin was influenced by prior exposure to aerobic conditions. The susceptibility to quinolone drugs varied among strains of T. denticola, although they share an amino acid sequence identity of greater than 99% for DNA gyrase (type II topoisomerase) subunit A. In addition, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter inhibitor assay for T. denticola indicated that the transport of quinolone drugs is partially related to this transporter, although there may be parallel transport mechanisms. Our results provide important insights into antimicrobial agent-Treponema dynamics and establish a basis for developing an appropriate adjunctive therapy for periodontal disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of the selection of antimicrobial resistance in fecal Escherichia coli during enrofloxacin administration with a local drug delivery system or with intramuscular injections in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béraud, Romain; Huneault, Louis; Bernier, Dave; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann; del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated, for the first time, the selection of antibiotic resistance in fecal Escherichia coli, a potential reservoir of genes of resistance, during the prolonged exposure to fluoroquinolones after the implantation of a local drug delivery system (LDDS) in a swine model. Fourteen pigs were randomly assigned to group IM (5 mg/kg/day of intramuscular enrofloxacin--EFX) or LD (surgical implantation of EFX-polymethyl-methacrylate peri-femoral implants). Blood samples were collected daily for determination of plasma EFX and ciprofloxacin (CFX) concentrations. Fecal samples were collected daily to determine the E. coli counts and the susceptibility patterns of its isolates as evaluated by antibiotic disk diffusion tests. In both groups, EFX administration significantly reduced the bacterial counts after 2 days. During recolonization, the bacterial counts remained lower than baseline in group IM but not significantly, and almost reached pre-treatment levels in group LD. Susceptibility to EFX, CFX, and nalidixic acid of recolonizing E. coli in LD pigs slightly decreased but remained within the limit of "susceptible" isolates. In contrast, quinolone susceptibility of recolonizing E. coli in IM pigs dropped dramatically (P intramuscular exposure to fluoroquinolones significantly decreased the susceptibility of E. coli to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P administration of fluoroquinolones.

  12. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in caesarean section delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ronghua; Lin, Lin; Wang, Dujuan

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is used routinely for pre-, intra- and post-operative caesarean section. One of the most important risk factors for postpartum infection is caesarean delivery. Caesarean section shows a higher incidence of infection than vaginal delivery. It is complicated by surgical site infections, endometritis or urinary tract infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the usage of antimicrobials in women undergoing caesarean section at a Tertiary Care Hospital. A prospective study was conducted in 100 women during the period of February 2013 to August 2013 in the inpatient Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. Data collected included the age of the patient, gravidity, and type of caesarean section, which was analyzed for the nature and number of antimicrobials prescribed, duration of treatment, polypharmacy, fixed-dose combinations, generic/brand names used and failure of prophylaxis. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was administered to the patients. The most commonly prescribed antimicrobial was a combination of ceftriaxone and sulbactam. Of 100 patients, 87% were aged 20-35 years. The highest proportion of patients were primigravida 72%. Elective procedure was carried out in 38%, the remaining were emergency C-section in whom intra- and post-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis was given for a duration of 7 days. In total, 27% of patients were reported with infection even after the antimicrobial prophylaxis. In conclusion, pre-operative prophylaxis was given in the early rupture of membranes. Fixed-dose combinations were preferred. Incidence of infection even after antimicrobial prophylaxis was reported due to pre-existing infection, debilitating disease or prolonged rupture of membranes. Patients with recurrent infection were shifted to amoxicillin and clavulinic acid combination. Drugs were prescribed only by brand names which is of concern.

  13. Study of the chemical chelates and anti-microbial effect of some metal ions in nanostructural form on the efficiency of antibiotic therapy "norfloxacin drug"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Mohamed, Mahmoud A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper has reviewed the chemical and biological impact resulting from the interaction between norfloxacin (norH) antibiotic drug and two lanthanide (lanthanum(III) and cerium(III)) metal ions, which prepared in normal and nano-features. La(III) and Ce(III) complexes were synthesized with chemical formulas [La(nor)3]·3H2O and [Ce(nor)3]·2H2O. Lanthanum and cerium(III) ions coordinated toward norH with a hexadentate geometry. The norH acts as deprotonated bidentate ligand through the oxygen atom of carbonyl group and the oxygen atom of carboxylic group. Elemental analysis, FT-IR spectral, electrical conductivity, thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements have been used to characterize the mentioned isolated complexes. The Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger integral methods are used to estimate the kinetic parameters for the major successive steps detectable in the TG curve. The brightness side in this study is to take advantage for the preparation and characterization of single phases of La2O3 and CeO2 nanoparticles using urea as precursors via a solid-state decomposition procedure. The norH ligand in comparison with both cases (normal and nano-particles) of lanthanide complexes were screened against for antibacterial (Escherichia Coli, Staphylococcus Aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Aspergillus Flavus and Candida Albicans) activities. The highest antibacterial and antifungal activities data of the nano-particles complexes were observed with more potent than the free norH and normal lanthanide complexes.

  14. Antimicrobial stewardship programme in critical care medicine: A prospective interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J; Ramirez, P; Gordon, M; Villarreal, E; Frasquet, J; Poveda-Andres, J L; Salavert-Lletí, M; Catellanos, A

    2017-09-04

    Hospital antimicrobial stewardship programmes have achieved savings and a more rational use of antimicrobial treatments in general wards. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the experience of an antimicrobial stewardship programme in an intensive care unit (ICU). Prospective interventional, before-and-after study. 24-bed medical ICU in a tertiary hospital. Prospective audit and feedback antimicrobial stewardship programme. Antimicrobial consumption, antimicrobial related costs, multi-drug resistant microorganisms (MDRM) prevalence, nosocomial infections incidence, ICU length of stay, and ICU mortality rates were compared before and after one-year intervention. A total of 218 antimicrobial episodes of 182 patients were evaluated in 61 team meetings. Antimicrobial stewardship suggestions were accepted in 91.5% of the cases. Total antimicrobial DDD/100 patient-days consumption was reduced from 380.6 to 295.2 (-22.4%; p=0.037). Antimicrobial stewardship programme was associated with a significant decrease in the prescription of penicillins plus b-lactamase inhibitors, linezolid, cephalosporins, and aminoglycosides. Overall antimicrobial spending was reduced by €119,636. MDRM isolation and nosocomial infections per 100 patient-days did not change after the intervention period. No changes in length of stay or mortality rate were observed. An ICU antimicrobial stewardship programme significantly reduced antimicrobial use without affecting inpatient mortality and length of stay. Our results further support the implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship programme in critical care units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Plant Products as Antimicrobial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Marjorie Murphy

    1999-01-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists, and natural-products chemists are combing the Earth for phytochemicals and “leads” which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. While 25 to 50% of current pharmaceuticals are derived from plants, none are used as antimicrobials. Traditional healers have long used plants to prevent or cure infectious conditions; Western medicine is trying to duplicate their successes. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites, such as tannins, terpenoids, alkaloids, and flavonoids, which have been found in vitro to have antimicrobial properties. This review attempts to summarize the current status of botanical screening efforts, as well as in vivo studies of their effectiveness and toxicity. The structure and antimicrobial properties of phytochemicals are also addressed. Since many of these compounds are currently available as unregulated botanical preparations and their use by the public is increasing rapidly, clinicians need to consider the consequences of patients self-medicating with these preparations. PMID:10515903

  16. Understanding API-polymer proximities in amorphous stabilized composite drug products using fluorine-carbon 2D HETCOR solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anuji; Crull, George

    2014-10-06

    A simple and robust method for obtaining fluorine-carbon proximities was established using a (19)F-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) two-dimensional (2D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experiment under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The method was applied to study a crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), avagacestat, containing two types of fluorine atoms and its API-polymer composite drug product. These results provide insight into the molecular structure, aid with assigning the carbon resonances, and probe API-polymer proximities in amorphous spray dried dispersions (SDD). This method has an advantage over the commonly used (1)H-(13)C HETCOR because of the large chemical shift dispersion in the fluorine dimension. In the present study, fluorine-carbon distances up to 8 Å were probed, giving insight into the API structure, crystal packing, and assignments. Most importantly, the study demonstrates a method for probing an intimate molecular level contact between an amorphous API and a polymer in an SDD, giving insights into molecular association and understanding of the role of the polymer in API stability (such as recrystallization, degradation, etc.) in such novel composite drug products.

  17. Implementation of cooperative learning through collaboration with foreign lecturer to improve students' understanding and soft skills in the course of drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syukri, Yandi; Nugroho, Bambang Hernawan

    2017-03-01

    The course of Drug Delivery Systems is an elective that supports the development of new products in pharmaceutical industry. The existing learning process has been in the form of one-direction face-to-face lecturing. During the lecture, students find it difficult to follow or understand the materials, so they become passive. Also, class effectiveness is low because it cannot develop students' active participation during the learning process. To improve the learning outcomes and to achieve the desired competence, innovations in the learning process should be attempted. This learning model aimed to improve students' understanding of and soft skills in the course of Drug Delivery Systems through a cooperative learning method and collaboration with foreign lecturers. The order of cooperative learning included explaining the desired learning outcomes of each topic, providing reading materials for students to learn when preparing their papers, instructing students to work on group assignments and to help each other to master the lesson through question-answer sessions and discussions among group members, encouraging group presentations, and evaluating through quizzes. The foreign lecturers played a role in enriching teaching materials and providing an international class atmosphere. The students' hard skills assessed from the quiz, midterm exam, and final semester exam showed a minimum score of 70 > 80% in the quiz and final semester exam components, while the midterm exam value with a minimum of 70 > 80% was only 6%. The assessment of soft skills obtained from the students' independence in constructing knowledge to complete assignments and resolve problems indicated such outcomes as each group's better ability to access relevant journals, their active participation in group discussions, discipline to submit assignments, discipline to be punctual, and good communication skills. It can be concluded that cooperative learning method could improve the soft skills of students

  18. Variation in Outpatient Oral Antimicrobial Use Patterns among Canadian Provinces, 2000 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiona K Glass-Kaastra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The volume and patterns of antimicrobial drug use are key variables to consider when developing guidelines for prescribing, and programs to address stewardship and combat the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistant pathogens. Because drug programs are regulated at the provincial level, there is an expectation that antibiotic use may vary among provinces.

  19. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications.

  20. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María José; Falqué, Elena; Domínguez, Herminia

    2016-03-09

    Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications.

  1. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María José; Falqué, Elena; Domínguez, Herminia

    2016-01-01

    Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications. PMID:27005637

  2. Optimisation of antimicrobial dosing based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Grace Si Ru; Liew, Yi Xin; Kwa, Andrea Lay-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    While suboptimal dosing of antimicrobials has been attributed to poorer clinical outcomes, clinical cure and mortality advantages have been demonstrated when target pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) indices for various classes of antimicrobials were achieved to maximise antibiotic activity. Dosing optimisation requires a good knowledge of PK/PD principles. This review serves to provide a foundation in PK/PD principles for the commonly prescribed antibiotics (β-lactams, vancomycin, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides), as well as dosing considerations in special populations (critically ill and obese patients). PK principles determine whether an appropriate dose of antimicrobial reaches the intended pathogen(s). It involves the fundamental processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination, and is affected by the antimicrobial's physicochemical properties. Antimicrobial pharmacodynamics define the relationship between the drug concentration and its observed effect on the pathogen. The major indicator of the effect of the antibiotics is the minimum inhibitory concentration. The quantitative relationship between a PK and microbiological parameter is known as a PK/PD index, which describes the relationship between dose administered and the rate and extent of bacterial killing. Improvements in clinical outcomes have been observed when antimicrobial agents are dosed optimally to achieve their respective PK/PD targets. With the rising rates of antimicrobial resistance and a limited drug development pipeline, PK/PD concepts can foster more rational and individualised dosing regimens, improving outcomes while simultaneously limiting the toxicity of antimicrobials.

  3. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of modern topical antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Vorontsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To measure minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values for modern topical antimicrobials against common ocular pathogens.Methods.Antimicrobials most commonly used in ophthalmology (fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are dose-dependent drugs, i.e., the rate of microbial death increases in direct proportion to their concentrations. To determine MICs, we applied Hi Comb MIC Test (E-test. 105 patients aged 2 months through 7 years which were diagnosed with various inflammatory disorders of anterior segment were  xamined. MIC values for most commonly used antimicrobials, i.e., ciprofloxacin / Cipromed (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, ofloxacin / Floxal (Baush & Lomb, Rochester, New-York, levofloxacin / Signicef (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, moxifloxacin / Vigamox (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, gatifloxacin / Zymar (Allergan, Irvine, California, and tobramycin / Tobrex (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, were measured.Results. The analysis revealed that the most effective antibacterial drug against microbial isolates in children (i.e., Staphylococci spp. was levofloxacin. MIC for this agent against Streptococci spp. and Gram-negative microbes was low as well. Moxifloxacin is preferred for the treatment of ocular inflammation provoked by Streptococci spp. as MIC of this antimicrobial against Streptococci spp. was the lowest. MIC of ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative flora was the lowest. These data demonstrate generally recognized high efficacy of this drug. MIC value for tobramycin against all bacterial isolates was the highest.

  4. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of modern topical antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Vorontsova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To measure minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values for modern topical antimicrobials against common ocular pathogens.Methods.Antimicrobials most commonly used in ophthalmology (fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are dose-dependent drugs, i.e., the rate of microbial death increases in direct proportion to their concentrations. To determine MICs, we applied Hi Comb MIC Test (E-test. 105 patients aged 2 months through 7 years which were diagnosed with various inflammatory disorders of anterior segment were  xamined. MIC values for most commonly used antimicrobials, i.e., ciprofloxacin / Cipromed (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, ofloxacin / Floxal (Baush & Lomb, Rochester, New-York, levofloxacin / Signicef (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, moxifloxacin / Vigamox (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, gatifloxacin / Zymar (Allergan, Irvine, California, and tobramycin / Tobrex (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, were measured.Results. The analysis revealed that the most effective antibacterial drug against microbial isolates in children (i.e., Staphylococci spp. was levofloxacin. MIC for this agent against Streptococci spp. and Gram-negative microbes was low as well. Moxifloxacin is preferred for the treatment of ocular inflammation provoked by Streptococci spp. as MIC of this antimicrobial against Streptococci spp. was the lowest. MIC of ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative flora was the lowest. These data demonstrate generally recognized high efficacy of this drug. MIC value for tobramycin against all bacterial isolates was the highest.

  5. Antimicrobials and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein-DeVore, L

    1991-10-01

    Effective control of plaque and gingivitis are among our most important treatment goals. Several antimicrobial products have demonstrated safety and various degrees of effectiveness as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control. Our clinical decisions relating to antimicrobial products should be based on the expanding body of research that documents product safety and effectiveness in reducing both plaque and gingivitis. Antimicrobials present exciting prospects for in-office and home use, but they do not replace thorough root debridement and traditional plaque control. However, when selected based on individual patient needs and used in recommended regimens, antimicrobials can be important additions to both professional treatment and oral hygiene practices.

  6. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of reported cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrate the urgent need for new therapeutics that are effective against such and other multi-drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides have for two decades now been looked upon...... as interesting leads for development of new therapeutics combating these drug resistant microbes. High-throughput screening of peptide libraries have generated large amounts of information on peptide activities. However, scientists still struggle with explaining the specific peptide motifs resulting...... in antimicrobial activity. Consequently, the majority of peptides put into clinical trials have failed at some point, underlining the importance of a thorough peptide optimization. An important tool in peptide design and optimization is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, correlating...

  7. Rational use of antimicrobials in dentistry during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Lodi, Karina Bortolin; das Chagas e Silva de Carvalho, Luis Felipe; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi [UNESP; Pinheiro Carvalho, Valeria Abrantes; da Rocha, Rosilene Fernandes [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    The use of medicines during pregnancy deserves special attention from dentists due to the potential risks to fetal development. The prescription of antimicrobial drugs during this period must be based not only on the etiology of the disease but also on the drug?s effect on the embryo, which may be toxic, possibly leading to irreversible lesions. Interest in studies of the teratogenic effects of drugs increased in response to reports of the high incidence of phocomelia in patients treated ...

  8. Declines in Outpatient Antimicrobial Use in Canada (1995–2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Rita; Glass-Kaastra, Shiona K.; Hutchinson, Jim; Patrick, David M.; Weiss, Karl; Conly, John

    2013-01-01

    Background With rising reports of antimicrobial resistance in outpatient communities, surveillance of antimicrobial use is imperative for supporting stewardship programs. The primary objective of this article is to assess the levels of antimicrobial use in Canada over time. Methods Canadian antimicrobial use data from 1995 to 2010 were acquired and assessed by four metrics: population-adjusted prescriptions, Defined Daily Doses, spending on antimicrobials (inflation-adjusted), and average Defined Daily Doses per prescription. Linear mixed models were built to assess significant differences among years and antimicrobial groups, and to account for repeated measurements over time. Measures were also compared to published reports from European countries. Results Temporal trends in antimicrobial use in Canada vary by metric and antimicrobial grouping. Overall reductions were seen for inflation-adjusted spending, population-adjusted prescription rates and Defined Daily Doses, and increases were observed for the average number of Defined Daily Doses per prescription. The population-adjusted prescription and Defined Daily Doses values for 2009 were comparable to those reported by many European countries, while the average Defined Daily Dose per prescription for Canada ranked high. A significant reduction in the use of broad spectrum penicillins occurred between 1995 and 2004, coupled with increases in macrolide and quinolone use, suggesting that replacement of antimicrobial drugs may occur as new products arrive on the market. Conclusions There have been modest decreases of antimicrobial use in Canada over the past 15 years. However, continued surveillance of antimicrobial use coupled with data detailing antimicrobial resistance within bacterial pathogens affecting human populations is critical for targeting interventions and maintaining the effectiveness of these products for future generations. PMID:24146863

  9. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  10. Deep Learning Improves Antimicrobial Peptide Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Daniel; Kamath, Uday; Shehu, Amarda

    2018-03-24

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a growing concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), natural components of innate immunity, are popular targets for developing new drugs. Machine learning methods are now commonly adopted by wet-laboratory researchers to screen for promising candidates. In this work we utilize deep learning to recognize antimicrobial activity. We propose a neural network model with convolutional and recurrent layers that leverage primary sequence composition. Results show that the proposed model outperforms state-of-the-art classification models on a comprehensive data set. By utilizing the embedding weights, we also present a reduced-alphabet representation and show that reasonable AMP recognition can be maintained using nine amino-acid types. Models and data sets are made freely available through the Antimicrobial Peptide Scanner vr.2 web server at: www.ampscanner.com. amarda@gmu.edu for general inquiries and dan.veltri@gmail.com for web server information. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... topics menu Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  13. Antimicrobial resistance of mastitis pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stephen P; Murinda, Shelton E

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotics are used extensively in the dairy industry to combat disease and to improve animal performance. Antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporin, streptomycin, and tetracycline are used for the treatment and prevention of diseases affecting dairy cows caused by a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotics are often administrated routinely to entire herds to prevent mastitis during the dry period. An increase in the incidence of disease in a herd generally results in increased use of antimicrobials, which in turn increases the potential for antibiotic residues in milk and the potential for increased bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. Continued use of antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of diseases of dairy cows will continue to be scrutinized. It is clear that strategies employing the prudent use of antimicrobials are needed. This clearly illustrates the importance of effective herd disease prevention and control programs. Based on studies published to date, scientific evidence does not support widespread, emerging resistance among mastitis pathogens to antibacterial drugs even though many of these antibiotics have been used in the dairy industry for treatment and prevention of disease for several decades. However, it is clear that use of antibiotics in dairy cows can contribute to increased antimicrobial resistance. While antimicrobial resistance does occur, we are of the opinion that the advantages of using antibiotics for the treatment of mastitis far outweigh the disadvantages. The clinical consequences of antimicrobial resistance of dairy pathogens affecting humans appear small. Antimicrobial resistance among dairy pathogens, particularly those found in milk, is likely not a human health concern as long as the milk is pasteurized. However, there are an increasing number of people who choose to consume raw milk. Transmission of an antimicrobial-resistant mastitis pathogen and/or foodborne pathogen to humans could occur

  14. Archetypal tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides: properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Palombo, Enzo A; Clayton, Andrew H A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant microorganisms ('superbugs') present a serious challenge to the success of antimicrobial treatments. Subsequently, there is a crucial need for novel bio-control agents. Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show a broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi or viruses and are strong candidates to complement or substitute current antimicrobial agents. Some AMPs are also effective against protozoa or cancer cells. The tryptophan (Trp)-rich peptides (TRPs) are a subset of AMPs that display potent antimicrobial activity, credited to the unique biochemical properties of tryptophan that allow it to insert into biological membranes. Further, many Trp-rich AMPs cross bacterial membranes without compromising their integrity and act intracellularly, suggesting interactions with nucleic acids and enzymes. In this work, we overview some archetypal TRPs derived from natural sources, i.e., indolicidin, tritrpticin and lactoferricin, summarising their biochemical properties, structures, antimicrobial activities, mechanistic studies and potential applications.

  15. Spectrum of antimicrobial activity associated with ionic colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Kira; May, Kathleen; Leek, Daniel; Langland, Nicole; Jeane, La Deana; Ventura, Jose; Skubisz, Corey; Scherer, Sean; Lopez, Eric; Crocker, Ephraim; Peters, Rachel; Oertle, John; Nguyen, Krystine; Just, Scott; Orian, Michael; Humphrey, Meaghan; Payne, David; Jacobs, Bertram; Waters, Robert; Langland, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    Silver has historically and extensively been used as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. However, the Food and Drug Administration currently does not recognize colloidal silver as a safe and effective antimicrobial agent. The goal of this study was to further evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of colloidal silver. Several strains of bacteria, fungi, and viruses were grown under multicycle growth conditions in the presence or absence of ionic colloidal silver in order to assess the antimicrobial activity. For bacteria grown under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, significant growth inhibition was observed, although multiple treatments were typically required. For fungal cultures, the effects of ionic colloidal silver varied significantly between different genera. No viral growth inhibition was observed with any strains tested. The study data support ionic colloidal silver as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, while having a more limited and specific spectrum of activity against fungi.

  16. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Root Extracts of Abitulon indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Rao MORTHA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial activity of Abitulon indicum roots was studied against seven pathogenic bacteria and three fungal strains by agar well diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity was recorded for hexane, chloroform, methanol, ethanol and aqueous extracts. Alcohol (ethanol and methanol extracts exhibited the highest degree of antimicrobial activity compared to aqueous, chloroform and hexane extracts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was turned out to be the most susceptible bacterium to the crude root chemical constituents, using the standard Tetracycline and Clotrimazole. Minimum inhibition concentration values of hexane, chloroform, methanol, ethanol and aqueous extracts were determined by the agar dilution method and ranged between 62.5 and 1,000 µg. The study suggested that the root extracts possess bioactive compounds with antimicrobial activity against the tested bacteria and fungi, revealing a significant scope to develop a novel broad spectrum of antimicrobial drug formulation from Abitulon indicum.

  17. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laborato......ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic...... laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data.MethodsWe developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired...... antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de...

  18. Cystic fibrosis microbiology: Advances in antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Valerie; Smyth, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Much of the improvement in the survival of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to advancements in antimicrobial treatments. New aerosolized antibiotic formulations have recently been introduced (such as inhaled aztreonam), and others are in development (inhaled levofloxacin and liposomal amikacin). Licensed dry powder formulations include tobramycin inhalation powder and dry powder colistimethate (available in Europe). Although inhaled antibiotics have the advantage of being able to deliver high intrapulmonary concentrations of drug, antimicrobial resistance can still develop and is a concern in CF. Antimicrobial resistance might be mitigated by using non-antibiotic treatments, antibiotic adjuvants, which have activity against bacteria. Examples include agents such as gallium, antimicrobial peptides and anti-biofilm compounds such as alginate oligosaccharides (OligoG) and garlic. Vaccination strategies and antibody therapy (IgY) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa have also been attempted to prevent initial infection with this organism in CF. Although aggressive and long-term use of antibiotics has been crucial in slowing lung function decline and improving survival in people with CF, it has added a significant burden of care and associated toxicities in these individuals. Careful surveillance and the use of preventative strategies for antibiotic related toxicity (such as nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity) are essential. Continued development of effective antimicrobial agents that can function in the conditions encountered in the CF lung, such as against bacterial biofilm growth and under anaerobic conditions, is needed. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial residues screening in pigs and goats slaughtered in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ekene Vivienne Ezenduka

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... Antimicrobial residue in animal food products is an important index of food safety. Drug residues could result from chemotherapeutic or chemoprophylactic use of drugs in food animals. This occurrence of residue in animal food products has received enormous worldwide attention from some local, ...

  20. Distribution of animal drugs between skim milk and milk fat fractions in spiked whole milk: Understanding the potential impact on commercial milk products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven animal drugs [penicillin G (PENG), sulfadimethoxine (SDMX), oxytetracycline (OTET), erythromycin (ERY), ketoprofen (KETO), thiabendazole (THIA) and ivermectin (IVR)] were used to evaluate drug distribution between milk fat and skim milk fractions of cow milk. Greater than 90% of radioactivity...

  1. Recent advances in screening of natural products for antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meng; Luo, Hao; Li, Zhi; Wu, Feng; Huang, Canhua; Ding, Zhenyu; Li, Rui

    2012-05-01

    It has been a very long history for human to resist diseases. During this period, a large number of drugs that could kill or inhibit the growth of microbe has been discovered, most of which were natural products. However, there may still be a large amount of antimicrobial medicines in natural compounds which have not been found yet. The ways of screening for antimicrobial always cost a long time and need a lot of manpower before. However, in recent years, a lot of new antimicrobial targets, antimicrobial drugs and screening methods which are simpler, faster and more efficient have been invented. In this paper the newly discovered targets, natural products and representative technologies were reviewed, which were expected to make some contributions to the research and development of medicines.

  2. The fight against Antimicrobial Resistance: Important recent publications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    One of my previous blogs discussed the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). I concluded that antimicrobial resistance is a growing and complex threat involving multifaceted legal, socio-economic and scientific aspects. This requires sustained and coordinated action on both global...... to be tackled on a global level. That something is indeed being done to tackle these problems on an international level is documented by the Progress report of the Transatlantic Taskforce on Antimicrobial Resistance (TATFAR), which was published in May 2014. This report summarizes the progress and the outcomes...... with regard to 17 recommendations that were identified in an earlier TATFAR report to strengthen EU and US communication and cooperation in the area of AMR. These recommendations fall into three key areas: (1) appropriate use of antimicrobial drugs in medicine; (2) prevention of drug resistant infections...

  3. Understanding thermodynamics of drug partitioning in micelles and delivery to proteins: Studies with naproxen, diclofenac sodium, tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talele, Paurnima; Choudhary, Sinjan; Kishore, Nand

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Interactions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs studied with TTAB micelles, monomers. • Thermodynamics of drug-surfactant interactions and partitioning in micelles addressed. • Mechanism of drug partitioning addressed based on energetics of interactions. • Partitioning in micelles depends on functional groups on drugs. • Such studies are needed for target oriented synthesis and efficient drug delivery. - Abstract: The use of surfactants in drug delivery has offered several advantages. Quantitative knowledge of the interactions of drugs with micellar systems is essential for deriving guidelines to design efficient drug delivery systems. In this work we have quantitatively addressed the mechanism of interaction of naproxen and diclofenac sodium with the micelles and monomers of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) based on thermodynamic studies by using isothermal titration calorimetry. The mechanism of interaction of the drugs with TTAB is based on identification of the nature of interactions of the former with the surfactant micelles and monomers. The values of partitioning constant (which is same as equilibrium constant for the reaction of drugs with the surfactant micelles), enthalpy, entropy and stoichiometry of partitioning have been determined and discussed in terms of possible intermolecular interactions. Further, the interaction of the drug naproxen with bovine serum albumin, when delivered from the micellar media has also been addressed in terms of binding constant, enthalpy and entropy of binding. The results are important in developing improved strategies for effective drug delivery systems.

  4. Understanding the magnitude of emergent contaminant releases through target screening and metabolite identification using high resolution mass spectrometry: Illicit drugs in raw sewage influents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuett, Nubia V; Batchu, Sudha Rani; Gardinali, Piero R

    2015-01-23

    A QExactive Orbitrap was used for the identification of phase I and II transformation products (TPs) of illicit drugs in raw sewage influents. Two operating modes (targeted MS(2) and Data-dependent screening) were used for data acquisition. Even though, data-dependent scan is a faster route towards the potential identification of metabolites, it suffered from its limitation to provide enough data points across the chromatographic peak during the MS(2) cycle in contrast to targeted MS(2). Therefore, the later technique was implemented as the method of choice in this study for the positive confirmation and quantitation of TPs (n=54). The vast majority of the identified TPs were products of phase I transformation reactions, with the latter being more prevalent in the nature. Estimated mole fractions showed that for a large number of the analytes, TPs must also be monitored in order to fully understand their environmental fate and calculate potential consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Behavioral Approach to Appropriate Antimicrobial Prescribing in Hospitals: The Dutch Unique Method for Antimicrobial Stewardship (DUMAS) Participatory Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkens, Jonne J; van Agtmael, Michiel A; Peters, Edgar J G; Lettinga, Kamilla D; van der Kuip, Martijn; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Wagner, Cordula; Kramer, Mark H H

    2017-08-01

    Inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing leads to antimicrobial resistance and suboptimal clinical outcomes. Changing antimicrobial prescribing is a complex behavioral process that is not often taken into account in antimicrobial stewardship programs. To examine whether an antimicrobial stewardship approach grounded in behavioral theory and focusing on preserving prescriber autonomy and participation is effective in improving appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing in hospitals. The Dutch Unique Method for Antimicrobial Stewardship (DUMAS) study was a prospective, stepped-wedge, participatory intervention study performed from October 1, 2011, through December 31, 2015. Outcomes were measured during a baseline period of 16 months and an intervention period of 12 months. The study was performed at 7 clinical departments (2 medical, 3 surgical, and 2 pediatric) in a tertiary care medical center and a general teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Physicians prescribing systemic antimicrobial drugs for any indication for patients admitted to the participating departments during the study period were included in the study. We offered prescribers a free choice of how to improve their antimicrobial prescribing. Prescribers were stimulated to choose interventions with higher potential for success based on a root cause analysis of inappropriate prescribing. Appropriateness of antimicrobial prescriptions was determined using a validated approach based on guideline adherence and motivated guideline deviation and measured with repeated point prevalence surveys (6 per year). Appropriateness judgment was masked for the study period. Antimicrobial consumption was extracted from pharmacy records and measured as days of therapy per admission. We used linear and logistic mixed-model regression analysis to model outcomes over time. A total of 1121 patient cases with 700 antimicrobial prescriptions were assessed during the baseline period and 882 patient cases with 531

  6. Human Health Consequences of Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Kruse, H.; Grave, K.

    2009-01-01

    Intensive use of antimicrobial agents in aquaculture provides a selective pressure creating reservoirs of drug-resistant bacteria and transferable resistance genes in fish pathogens and other bacteria in the aquatic environment. From these reservoirs, resistance genes may disseminate by horizonta...... industry in many regions of the world and the widespread, intensive, and often unregulated use of antimicrobial agents in this area of animal production, efforts are needed to prevent development and spread of antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture to reduce the risk to human health....

  7. Antimicrobial Compounds from Marine Invertebrates-Derived Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Jung, Jee H; Liu, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    It is known that marine invertebrates, including sponges, tunicates, cnidaria or mollusks, host affluent and various communities of symbiotic microorganisms. The microorganisms associated with the invertebrates metabolized various biologically active compounds, which could be an important resource for the discovery and development of potentially novel drugs. In this review, the new compounds with antimicrobial activity isolated from marine invertebrate-derived microorganisms in the last decade (2004-2014) will be presented, with focus on the relevant antimicrobial activities, origin of isolation, and information of strain species. New compounds without antimicrobial activity were not revealed.

  8. Amino acid–based surfactants: New antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo, A; Manresa, M A; Marques, A M; Bustelo, M; Espuny, M J; Pérez, L

    2016-02-01

    The rapid increase of drug resistant bacteria makes necessary the development of new antimicrobial agents. Synthetic amino acid-based surfactants constitute a promising alternative to conventional antimicrobial compounds given that they can be prepared from renewable raw materials. In this review, we discuss the structural features that promote antimicrobial activity of amino acid-based surfactants. Monocatenary, dicatenary and gemini surfactants that contain different amino acids on the polar head and show activity against bacteria are revised. The synthesis and basic physico-chemical properties have also been included.

  9. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Amino Acids Conjugated Diphenylmethylpiperazine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Shivakumara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of amino acid conjugated diphenylmethylpiperazine derivatives were synthesized by coupling diphenylmethylpiperazine with different Boc-amino acids using EDCI/HOBt as coupling agent and NMM as base. The synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H-NMR and elemental analysis. The Boc-deblocked derivatives were tested for their antimicrobial activity. We are here reporting that Phe and Trp conjugated diphenylmethylpiperazine showed equally good antibacterial activities as that of conventional antimicrobial drugs.

  10. Designing, synthesis, and antimicrobial action of oxazoline and thiazoline derivatives of fatty acid esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Anis; Ahmad, Aiman; Sudhakar, Raja; Varshney, Himani; Subbarao, Naidu; Ansari, Saba; Rauf, Abdul; Khan, Asad U

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a novel series of oxazoline and thiazoline were designed as inhibitors of cytochrome P450 14 alpha-sterol demethylase (CYP51) from Candida albicans and peptide deformylase (PDF) of Escherichia coli. The long chain dibromo derivative of fatty acid esters on reaction with urea and thiourea gave their corresponding oxazolines and thiazolines, respectively. All the compounds were characterized by their spectral data (IR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR and MS) and tested for antibacterial and antifungal activity by disk diffusion assay and minimum inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method against gram-positive and gram-negative strains of bacteria as well as fungus strains. The investigation into antimicrobial screening revealed that all the compounds were found to be potent antimicrobial agents. After calculating likeness drug properties of the compounds by Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances software, ADMET-related descriptors were computed to predict the pharmacokinetic properties for the active and bioavailable compounds by discovery studio 2.5. Molecular docking studies have been performed on PDF of E. coli and CYP 450-14DM of C. albicans to understand the mode of binding of the molecules in the active site of the receptor. Compounds (2-amino-5-(carbomethoxyoctyl)-1,3-oxazoline, 2-amino-5-(carbomethoxyoctyl)-1,3-thiazoline and 2-amino-4-pentyl-5-[(8'R)-8' hydroxy (carbomethoxydecyl)-1,3-oxazoline) showed excellent antimicrobial activity nearly equivalent to the control compounds and compounds, 2-amino-4-octyl-5-(carbomethoxyheptyl)-1,3-oxazolin, 2-amino-4-(2'R)(2'-hydroxy octyl)-5-(carbomethoxyheptyl)-1,3-oxazoline and 2-amino-4-pentyl-5-[(8'R)-8'-hydroxy(carbomethoxy decyl)-1,3-oxazolineshowed vasodilation and antihypertensive properties. Furthermore, a computational analysis of physicochemical parameters revealed that the most of the compounds possessed drug-like attributes. Using Bioinformatics approach, we found a correlation

  11. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  12. Antimicrobials in beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybroeck, Wim; Daeseleire, Els; De Brabander, Hubert F; Herman, Lieve

    2012-07-06

    The bee diseases American and European foulbrood and nosemosis can be treated with anti-infectious agents. However, in the EU and the USA the use of these agents in beekeeping is strictly regulated due to the lack of tolerance (e.g. Maximum Residue Limit) for residues of antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in honey. This article reviews the literature dealing with antimicrobials of interest in apiculture, stability of these antimicrobials in honey, and disposition of the antimicrobials in honeybee hives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials ... Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home ...

  15. What are Antimicrobial Pesticides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial pesticides are substances or mixtures of substances used to destroy or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi on inanimate objects and surfaces.

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issue of antimicrobial resistance is that the subject material appears abstract and is complex. This video was ... can develop and spread. All FDA CVM produced material may be copied, reproduced, and distributed as long ...

  17. SYNTHESIS, STEREOCHEMISTRY AND ANTIMICROBIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    KEY WORDS: 4-Phenylsemicarbazone, Metal complexes, Stereochemistry, Antimicrobial activity. INTRODUCTION ... stereochemistry of semicarbazone metal complexes [8-13], this group of ligands deserve further investigations. ..... The cytotoxicity of tested compounds generally increased with increase concentration and ...

  18. The quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing: A comparison between two areas of northern and southern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Institute for Health Data and Disease Control in Denmark, and from the Aragon Information System of Drug Consumption. The number of Defined Daily Doses (DDD) of the different substances were calculated, and the quality of the antimicrobial prescription was analysed using the 'Drug Utilization 90 %' method...... and the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) quality indicators for outpatient antimicrobial use. RESULTS: The majority of the prescriptions (90 % of total DDD) were comprised of 14 (of 39) different antimicrobials in Denmark, based mainly on narrow spectrum penicillin, and 11 (of 59......) antimicrobials in Aragon, principally broad spectrum penicillins. The quality indicators described an elevated consumption of antimicrobials and an important seasonal variation in Aragon. In Denmark, the values obtained reflected a more moderate use with minor seasonal variation. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed...

  19. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  20. Distribution of Animal Drugs between Skim Milk and Milk Fat Fractions in Spiked Whole Milk: Understanding the Potential Impact on Commercial Milk Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakk, Heldur; Shappell, Nancy W; Lupton, Sara J; Shelver, Weilin L; Fanaselle, Wendy; Oryang, David; Yeung, Chi Yuen; Hoelzer, Karin; Ma, Yinqing; Gaalswyk, Dennis; Pouillot, Régis; Van Doren, Jane M

    2016-01-13

    Seven animal drugs [penicillin G (PENG), sulfadimethoxine (SDMX), oxytetracycline (OTET), erythromycin (ERY), ketoprofen (KETO), thiabendazole (THIA), and ivermectin (IVR)] were used to evaluate the drug distribution between milk fat and skim milk fractions of cow milk. More than 90% of the radioactivity was distributed into the skim milk fraction for ERY, KETO, OTET, PENG, and SDMX, approximately 80% for THIA, and 13% for IVR. The distribution of drug between milk fat and skim milk fractions was significantly correlated to the drug's lipophilicity (partition coefficient, log P, or distribution coefficient, log D, which includes ionization). Data were fit with linear mixed effects models; the best fit was obtained within this data set with log D versus observed drug distribution ratios. These candidate empirical models serve for assisting to predict the distribution and concentration of these drugs in a variety of milk and milk products.

  1. Novel Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Nordahl, Emma

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides serve as a first line of defence against invading microorganisms and are an essential part of our fast innate immune system. They are ancient molecules found in all classes of life. Antimicrobial peptides rapidly kill a broad spectrum of microbes and are immunomodulatory, i.e. having additional actions influencing inflammation and other innate immune responses. Results presented in this thesis demonstrate that proteases of common human pathogens degrade and inactivate t...

  2. Animal venoms as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Stiles, Bradley G; Franco, Octavio L; Sethi, Gautam; Lim, Lina H K

    2017-06-15

    Hospitals are breeding grounds for many life-threatening bacteria worldwide. Clinically associated gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus/methicillin-resistant S. aureus and many others increase the risk of severe mortality and morbidity. The failure of antibiotics to kill various pathogens due to bacterial resistance highlights the urgent need to develop novel, potent, and less toxic agents from natural sources against various infectious agents. Currently, several promising classes of natural molecules from snake (terrestrial and sea), scorpion, spider, honey bee and wasp venoms hold promise as rich sources of chemotherapeutics against infectious pathogens. Interestingly, snake venom-derived synthetic peptide/snake cathelicidin not only has potent antimicrobial and wound-repair activity but is highly stable and safe. Such molecules are promising candidates for novel venom-based drugs against S. aureus infections. The structure of animal venom proteins/peptides (cysteine rich) consists of hydrophobic α-helices or β-sheets that produce lethal pores and membrane-damaging effects on bacteria. All these antimicrobial peptides are under early experimental or pre-clinical stages of development. It is therefore important to employ novel tools for the design and the development of new antibiotics from the untapped animal venoms of snake, scorpion, and spider for treating resistant pathogens. To date, snail venom toxins have shown little antibiotic potency against human pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  4. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  5. Guidelines for the diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of canine superficial bacterial folliculitis (Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Weese, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF) is usually caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and routinely treated with systemic antimicrobial agents. Infection is a consequence of reduced immunity associated with alterations of the skin barrier and underlying diseases that may be di...... will improve antimicrobial use and reduce selection of MRSP and other multidrug-resistant bacteria affecting animal and human health....... of an internationally available resource guiding practitioners in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of SBF. DEVELOPMENT OF THE GUIDELINES: The guidelines were developed by the Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases, with consultation and advice...... on infection control. Guidance is given for topical and systemic modalities, including approaches suitable for MRSP. Systemic drugs are classified in three tiers. Tier one drugs are used when diagnosis is clear cut and risk factors for antimicrobial drug resistance are not present. Otherwise, tier two drugs...

  6. Antimicrobial activity of Rhodobryum ontariense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabovljević Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of dimethyl sulfoxide extract of moss Rhodobryum ontariense (Kindb. Kindb. was evaluated by microdilution method against eight bacterial (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter cloacae, Listeria monocytogens, Bacillus cereus, Micrococcus flavus and Staphylococcus aureus and five fungal species (Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium funiculosum, Penicillium ochrochloron and Trichoderma viride. The extract was proven to be active against all the bacteria and funghi tested but to varying degrees. It showed better inhibitory activity compared to the known antifungal drug against T. viride (MIC 100 and 200 μg/ml, respectively. This finding implies that R. ontariense could be considered as a promising material for natural antifungal products.

  7. Public health risk of antimicrobial resistance transfer from companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomba, Constança; Rantala, Merja; Greko, Christina; Baptiste, Keith Edward; Catry, Boudewijn; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Mateus, Ana; Moreno, Miguel A; Pyörälä, Satu; Ružauskas, Modestas; Sanders, Pascal; Teale, Christopher; Threlfall, E John; Kunsagi, Zoltan; Torren-Edo, Jordi; Jukes, Helen; Törneke, Karolina

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobials are important tools for the therapy of infectious bacterial diseases in companion animals. Loss of efficacy of antimicrobial substances can seriously compromise animal health and welfare. A need for the development of new antimicrobials for the therapy of multiresistant infections, particularly those caused by Gram-negative bacteria, has been acknowledged in human medicine and a future corresponding need in veterinary medicine is expected. A unique aspect related to antimicrobial resistance and risk of resistance transfer in companion animals is their close contact with humans. This creates opportunities for interspecies transmission of resistant bacteria. Yet, the current knowledge of this field is limited and no risk assessment is performed when approving new veterinary antimicrobials. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the use and indications for antimicrobials in companion animals, drug-resistant bacteria of concern among companion animals, risk factors for colonization of companion animals with resistant bacteria and transmission of antimicrobial resistance (bacteria and/or resistance determinants) between animals and humans. The major antimicrobial resistance microbiological hazards originating from companion animals that directly or indirectly may cause adverse health effects in humans are MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, VRE, ESBL- or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Gram-negative bacteria. In the face of the previously recognized microbiological hazards, a risk assessment tool could be applied in applications for marketing authorization for medicinal products for companion animals. This would allow the approval of new veterinary medicinal antimicrobials for which risk levels are estimated as acceptable for public health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For

  8. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AND ITS GLOBAL SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery during the 20th century, antimicrobial agents (antibiotics and related medicinal drugs have substantially reduced the threat posed by infectious diseases. The use of these “wonder drugs”, combined with improvements in sanitation, housing, and nutrition, and the advent of widespread immunization programmes, has led to a dramatic drop in deaths from diseases that were previously widespread, untreatable, and frequently fatal. Over the years, antimicrobials have saved the lives and eased the suffering of millions of people. By helping to bring many serious infectious diseases under control, these drugs hav also contributed to the major gains in life expectancy experienced during the latter part of the last century. These gains are now seriously jeopardized by another recent development: the emergence and spread of microbes that are resistant to cheap and effective first-choice, or “first- line” drugs. The bacterial infections which contribute most to human disease are also those in which emerging microbial resistance is most evident: diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory tract infections, meningitis, sexually transmitted infections, and hospital-acquired infections. Some important examples include penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multi-resistant salmonellae, and multi-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of resistance to drugs commonly used to treat malaria is of particular concern, as is the emerging resistance to anti-HIV drugs. Treatment, resu.lting in prolonged illness and greater risk of death, Treatment failures also lead to longer periods of infectivity, which increase the numbers of infected people moving in the community and thus expose the general population to the risk of contracting a resistant strain of infection. When infections become resistant to first-line antimicrobials, treatment has to be switched

  9. Blood culture-guided de-escalation of empirical antimicrobial regimen for critical patients in an online antimicrobial stewardship programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Yin; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Huang, Ching-Tai; Cheng, Chun-Wen; Lin, Yu-Jr; Hsu, Ying-Jen; Chen, Chi-Hua; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Leu, Hsieh-Shong

    2014-12-01

    A blood culture-guided review strategy was applied to a hospital-wide computerised antimicrobial approval system (HCAAS) at a medical centre in Taiwan. The study aimed to evaluate the impact of this deployment on prescribers' behaviours, antimicrobial consumption, antimicrobial expenditure and healthcare quality in adult intensive care units (ICUs). The HCAAS automatically identifies patients with positive blood cultures and notifies the pre-assigned infectious diseases (ID) physicians for an online second review of the current antimicrobial regimen. Patients from 16 adult ICUs were selected as a focus group. Descriptive analysis, McNemar's test, interrupted time-series analysis and univariate regression analysis were applied. The number of prescriptions assigned for second review increased from 304 in 2010 to 682 in 2012. The approval rate for the antimicrobial regimen in the second review exceeded 70%. In disapproved cases, prescribers accepted the recommendation from ID physicians in 66.1% of cases in the first year; the acceptance rate increased to 80.6% in 2012. Among the restricted antimicrobial agents, consumption gradients decreased for all eight drug classes. The overall antimicrobial expenditure gradient declined significantly following deployment of the second review strategy. The healthcare-associated infection rate continued to decrease over time, and the mortality and ICU re-admission rates remained stable after deployment. A blood culture-guided review of antimicrobial use based on clinical and microbiological evidence improves accuracy in choosing appropriate antimicrobial agents and encourages de-escalation. Consumption and expenditure gradients of antimicrobial agents decreased after the intervention, and healthcare quality was not compromised. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrating tuberculosis and antimicrobial resistance control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Rumina; Shakoor, Sadia; Hanefeld, Johanna; Khan, Mishal

    2018-03-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries facing high levels of antimicrobial resistance, and the associated morbidity from ineffective treatment, also have a high burden of tuberculosis. Over recent decades many countries have developed effective laboratory and information systems for tuberculosis control. In this paper we describe how existing tuberculosis laboratory systems can be expanded to accommodate antimicrobial resistance functions. We show how such expansion in services may benefit tuberculosis case-finding and laboratory capacity through integration of laboratory services. We further summarize the synergies between high-level strategies on tuberculosis and antimicrobial resistance control. These provide a potential platform for the integration of programmes and illustrate how integration at the health-service delivery level for diagnostic services could occur in practice in a low- and middle-income setting. Many potential mutual benefits of integration exist, in terms of accelerated scale-up of diagnostic testing towards rational use of antimicrobial drugs as well as optimal use of resources and sharing of experience. Integration of vertical disease programmes with separate funding streams is not without challenges, however, and we also discuss barriers to integration and identify opportunities and incentives to overcome these.

  11. Antimicrobial compounds from Coleonema album (Rutaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhuizen, Lindy L; Meyer, Riaan; Dubery, Ian A

    2006-01-01

    Coleonema album, a member of the South African fynbos biome, was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity associated with its secondary metabolites. Ethanol- and acetone-based extracts obtained from plants from two different geographical areas were analyzed. A bioassay-guided fractionation methodology was followed for rapid and effective screening for the presence of bioactive compounds. The TLC-bioautographic method, used to screen the plant extracts for antimicrobial activity and localization of the active compounds, indicated the presence of a number of inhibitory compounds with activity against the microorganisms (E. coli, B. subtilis, E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, M. smegmatis, M. tuberculosis, C. albicans, C. cucumerinum) tested. Evaluation of the inhibitory strength of each extract by the serial microdilution assay indicated that the C. album extracts inhibited effectively all the microorganisms, with the minimum inhibitory concentrations in the low mg ml(-1) range. Identification and structural information of the bioactive components were obtained by a combination of preparative TLC and LC-MS. It revealed the presence of coumarin aglycones which were responsible for the observed antimicrobial activities. The results of this study indicate that C. album possesses strong antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that warrants further investigation into the use of the extracts or their active constituents as a potential source for novel drugs.

  12. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System: Two Decades of Advancing Public Health Through Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Beth E; Tate, Heather; Plumblee, Jodie R; Dessai, Uday; Whichard, Jean M; Thacker, Eileen L; Hale, Kis Robertson; Wilson, Wanda; Friedman, Cindy R; Griffin, Patricia M; McDermott, Patrick F

    2017-10-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections pose a serious and growing public health threat globally. In this review, we describe the role of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) in providing data that help address the resistance problem and show how such a program can have broad positive impacts on public health. NARMS was formed two decades ago to help assess the consequences to human health arising from the use of antimicrobial drugs in food animal production in the United States. A collaboration among the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the United States Department of Agriculture, and state and local health departments, NARMS uses an integrated "One Health" approach to monitor antimicrobial resistance in enteric bacteria from humans, retail meat, and food animals. NARMS has adapted to changing needs and threats by expanding surveillance catchment areas, examining new isolate sources, adding bacteria, adjusting sampling schemes, and modifying antimicrobial agents tested. NARMS data are not only essential for ensuring that antimicrobial drugs approved for food animals are used in ways that are safe for human health but they also help address broader food safety priorities. NARMS surveillance, applied research studies, and outbreak isolate testing provide data on the emergence of drug-resistant enteric bacteria; genetic mechanisms underlying resistance; movement of bacterial populations among humans, food, and food animals; and sources and outcomes of resistant and susceptible infections. These data can be used to guide and evaluate the impact of science-based policies, regulatory actions, antimicrobial stewardship initiatives, and other public health efforts aimed at preserving drug effectiveness, improving patient outcomes, and preventing infections. Many improvements have been made to NARMS over time and the program will continue to adapt to address emerging resistance threats, changes in

  13. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    medicine to combat drug-resistant superbugs, fungi, viruses, parasites, or cancer. Alternatively, multiple factors (e.g., albumin, arginine, butyrate, calcium, cyclic AMP, isoleucine, short-chain fatty acids, UV B light, vitamin D, and zinc are able to induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides, opening new avenues to the development of anti-infectious drugs.

  14. In vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of plant extracts from Ruta graveolens and Annona muricata

    OpenAIRE

    Portilla, Y.; Carro Travieso, Mª Dolores; Milian, G.; Camacho, C.; Valdivia, A.; Díaz, A.; Saro, C.; Mateos, I.; Ranilla, María José

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of microorganisms to commercial drugs is increasing worldwide, and therefore the search for new antimicrobial agents is a key issue. The aim of this study was to identify the potential of plant extracts from Ruta graveolens and Annona muricata as candidates for the development of new antimicrobials.

  15. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Some 2-Amino-4-(7 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The synthesized compounds were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against four bacteria and five fungi by serial plate dilution method using ofloxacin and ketoconazole as reference antimicrobial drugs, respectively, and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined. Results: Compounds 1 (p ...

  16. Assessment of antimicrobial usage and residues in commercial chicken eggs from smallholder poultry keepers in Morogoro municipality, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonga, H E; Simon, C; Karimuribo, E D; Mdegela, R H

    2010-08-01

    Occurrence of antimicrobial residues in commercial chicken eggs was determined in Morogoro municipality between January and February 2007. Twenty smallholder farmers were interviewed on the types of antimicrobials, reasons of use and their awareness on antimicrobial withdrawal period. Seventy egg samples were collected for qualitative antimicrobial drug residues analysis by use of agar well diffusion and Delvotest SP assays. It was found that farmers use antimicrobial drugs as prophylaxis and treatment of common chicken diseases namely fowl typhoid (85%), infectious bursa disease (Gumboro) (65%) infectious coryza (65%), collibacilosis (55%), coccidiosis (54%), Newcastle disease (50%), helminthosis (20%) and fowl pox (15%). Antimicrobials accounted for 85% of the drugs commonly used. It was also found that 65% of the farmers treat their chicken themselves. The common drugs were oxytetracycline (75%), egg booster (50%), amprolium (35%), sulphamethoxypyridazine (35%), sulphanilamide (25%), chlortetracyclines (10%), chloramphenicol (10%), sulphadiazine-trimethoprim (20%), duoxycycline (20%), sulphadiazine (25%) and flumequine (10%). Eighty per cent of the farmers had knowledge on antimicrobial withdrawal period sold eggs before withdrawal period and almost 85% were unaware of possible effects of antimicrobial residues in humans. All 70 eggs were positive to antimicrobial residues by Delvotest kit, but 21.4% positive with agar well diffusion test. It was concluded that the presence of antimicrobial residues in table eggs could be of public health significance to the egg consumers in Morogoro municipality.

  17. Rational use of antimicrobials in dentistry during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Karina Bortolin; Carvalho, Luis Felipe das Chagas e Silva de; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Carvalho, Valéria Abrantes Pinheiro; Rocha, Rosilene Fernandes da

    2009-01-01

    The use of medicines during pregnancy deserves special attention from dentists due to the potential risks to fetal development. The prescription of antimicrobial drugs during this period must be based not only on the etiology of the disease but also on the drug's effect on the embryo, which may be toxic, possibly leading to irreversible lesions. Interest in studies of the teratogenic effects of drugs increased in response to reports of the high incidence of phocomelia in patients treated with thalidomide. Although teratogenicity has long been known, pregnant women today are still exposed to this risk. The effects of drugs depend on the level of susceptibility of the fetus and on the period of exposure during pregnancy. In this context, and considering the paucity of studies on this subject in dentistry, the aim of this review was to offer an up-to-date compilation of data on the antimicrobial drugs most frequently used during pregnancy and the effects of their use.

  18. Are the effects of drugs to prevent and to treat heart failure always concordant? The statin paradox and its implications for understanding the actions of antidiabetic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Milton

    2018-03-22

    Most treatments for chronic heart failure are effective both in preventing its onset and reducing its progression. However, statins prevent the development of heart failure, but they do not decrease morbidity and mortality in those with established heart failure. This apparent discordance cannot be explained by an effect to prevent interval myocardial infarctions. Instead, it seems that the disease that statins were preventing in trials of patients with a metabolic disorder was different from the disease that they were treating in trials of chronic heart failure. The most common phenotype of heart failure in patients with obesity and diabetes is heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). In this disorder, the anti-inflammatory effects of statins might ameliorate myocardial fibrosis and cardiac filling abnormalities, but these actions may have little relevance to patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), whose primary derangement is cardiomyocyte loss and stretch. These distinctions may explain why statins were ineffective in trials that focused on HFrEF, but have been reported to produce with favourable effects in observational studies of HFpEF. Similarly, selective cytokine antagonists were ineffective in HFrEF, but have been associated with benefits in HFpEF. These observations may have important implications for our understanding of the effects of antihyperglycaemic medications. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have had neutral effects on heart failure events in people at risk for HFpEF, but have exerted deleterious actions in HFrEF. Similarly, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, which exert anti-inflammatory effects and reduce heart failure events in patients who are prone to HFpEF, may not be effective in HFrEF. The distinctions between HFrEF and HFpEF may explain why the effects of drugs on heart failure events in diabetes trials may not be relevant to their use in patients with systolic dysfunction

  19. Prevalence and pattern of antimicrobial susceptibility in Escherichia coli isolated from pigs reared under antimicrobial-free and conventional production methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunner, Christine A; Norby, Bo; Bartlett, Paul C; Erskine, Ronald J; Downes, Frances P; Kaneene, John B

    2007-07-15

    To determine and compare levels and patterns of antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli isolated from pigs on farms that did not use antimicrobial agents versus pigs produced under conventional methods. Cross-sectional study. Sample Population-35 antimicrobial-free and 60 conventional swine farms. Farms were visited once, and fecal samples were collected from 15 finisher pigs if available. One E coli isolate from each sample was tested for susceptibility pattern to 14 antimicrobial agents by use of microbroth dilution. E coli isolates were recovered from 1,381 (97.1%) of 1,422 fecal samples. Herd size was significantly larger for conventional swine farms. Resistance to ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, or nalidixic acid was not observed on any of the 95 farms. Three isolates from 2 conventional farms were resistant to ceftiofur. Conventional farms had significantly higher levels of resistance to ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol, compared with antimicrobial-free farms. Fourteen percent of E coli isolates were susceptible or had intermediate resistance to all the tested antimicrobial agents. The 3 most frequent patterns of multiple resistance were streptomycin-tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline, and kanamycin-streptomycin-sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline. Cessation of antimicrobial use did not appear to result in an immediate reduction in antimicrobial resistance in swine farms. Prospective studies of long-term antimicrobial usage and cessation are needed to estimate the extent to which food animal production may be contributing to antimicrobial drug resistance and might provide a direct measure of the rates of reversibility of antimicrobial drug resistance that might be achieved by curtailing antimicrobial usage.

  20. Antimicrobial ceramics. Kokinsei ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinari, T.; Uchida, M. (Shinagawa Fuel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    In recent years, the occurrence of infection by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), for which almost all antibiotics do not affect, in facilities such as hospitals is causing trouble. The antimicrobial property of silver has been known empirically since the ancient times. However, since 1985, so called silver zeolite in which zeolite carries silver ions has become utilized as an inorganic antimicrobial agent with silver as its constituent. In this article, the effect of inhibiting MRSA propagation of antimicrobial fibers containing silver zeolite is explained centering around the physical properties of silver zeolite. MRSA has resistance against antibiotics, methicillin which is mainly used at present. When the antimicrobial power of silver zeolite is compared with those of copper zeolite and zinc zeolite, the antimicrobial power of silver zeolite is the strongest and further increases as the silver ion concentration in the zeolite increases. Silver zeolite is safe to use and used for tools and clothes to be used in the fields of food and medical care. 12 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Antimicrobial treatment improves mycobacterial survival in nonpermissive growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W; Butcher, Philip D; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobials targeting cell wall biosynthesis are generally considered inactive against nonreplicating bacteria. Paradoxically, we found that under nonpermissive growth conditions, exposure of Mycobacterium bovis BCG bacilli to such antimicrobials enhanced their survival. We identified a transcriptional regulator, RaaS (for regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by bcg1279 (rv1219c) as being responsible for the observed phenomenon. Induction of this transcriptional regulator resulted in reduced expression of specific ATP-dependent efflux pumps and promoted long-term survival of mycobacteria, while its deletion accelerated bacterial death under nonpermissive growth conditions in vitro and during macrophage or mouse infection. These findings have implications for the design of antimicrobial drug combination therapies for persistent infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis.

  2. Antimicrobial stewardship: Limits for implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Bhanu

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programme (ASP) is a multifaceted approach to improve patients' clinical outcomes, prevent the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, and reduce hospital costs by prudent and focused antimicrobial use. Development of local treatment guidelines according to local ecology, rapid

  3. Relationship between drug discrimination and ratings of subjective effects: implications for assessing and understanding the abuse potential of D-amphetamine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R; Bolin, B Levi; Stoops, William W; Rush, Craig R

    2013-09-01

    The discriminative and subjective effects of drugs in humans are related, but the full extent of this relationship remains to be determined. To further explore this relationship, a retrospective analysis was conducted on data from six studies completed in our laboratory that used identical procedures. The relationship between the discriminative and subjective effects of a range of doses of D-amphetamine (i.e. 2.5-15 mg) was examined using correlational analyses. Significant correlations with discrimination performance were observed on 15 of 20 items from the Drug-Effect Questionnaire across a range of qualities [e.g. Pay For (a positive effect indicative of abuse potential) and Active (a stimulant-like effect)], but the magnitude of these relationships was modest (reffects contribute to the discriminative effects of D-amphetamine and indicate that the former are a more practical means to assess the abuse potential of drugs. Although these procedures are fundamentally related in that they rely on the presence of an interoceptive drug state, they differ in the dimension(s) of the interoceptive effects that participants must quantify. The simultaneous use of drug discrimination and subjective effects may, therefore, reveal complimentary aspects of drug effects that underlie their potential for abuse.

  4. Mitigating risks of students use of study drugs through understanding motivations for use and applying harm reduction theory: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelman, Dor David

    2017-10-06

    As postsecondary students' use of "study drugs" becomes more popular with increasingly reported negative effects on health and academic performance, failing prohibitionist policies to reduce consumption, and ambiguity in literature towards best practices to address this population, we present a literature review that seeks effective solutions educational institutions can apply to improve outcomes for students who use drugs. Motivations for use, effects of the substances, an analysis of efforts to control use from educational institutions, and suggestions on promoting most effective outcomes based on harm reduction, are described. Theory, quantitative, and qualitative works from systematic reviews, cohort studies, and epidemiological assessments are examined on the "study drugs" methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, and amphetamine, also known as Adderall, Ritalin, Focalin, and Concerta. There is a focus on postsecondary students ages 18-25 in North America. Results show important risk factors for drug use including low perceived self-efficacy or enjoyment in courses, poor accommodation of special needs, reliance on external validation, having a low GPA, and experiencing a mental health issue. There is much misconception on the health and academic effects of these drugs in literature, among students, and on online knowledge sources. We suggest these drugs do not improve GPA and learning, while they might temporarily increase memory, but with detrimental negative health effects. Campaigns that address underlying factors of use can be most successful in mitigating harms.

  5. Global trends in antimicrobial use in food animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Brower, Charles; Gilbert, Marius; Grenfell, Bryan T; Levin, Simon A; Robinson, Timothy P; Teillant, Aude; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2015-05-05

    Demand for animal protein for human consumption is rising globally at an unprecedented rate. Modern animal production practices are associated with regular use of antimicrobials, potentially increasing selection pressure on bacteria to become resistant. Despite the significant potential consequences for antimicrobial resistance, there has been no quantitative measurement of global antimicrobial consumption by livestock. We address this gap by using Bayesian statistical models combining maps of livestock densities, economic projections of demand for meat products, and current estimates of antimicrobial consumption in high-income countries to map antimicrobial use in food animals for 2010 and 2030. We estimate that the global average annual consumption of antimicrobials per kilogram of animal produced was 45 mg⋅kg(-1), 148 mg⋅kg(-1), and 172 mg⋅kg(-1) for cattle, chicken, and pigs, respectively. Starting from this baseline, we estimate that between 2010 and 2030, the global consumption of antimicrobials will increase by 67%, from 63,151 ± 1,560 tons to 105,596 ± 3,605 tons. Up to a third of the increase in consumption in livestock between 2010 and 2030 is imputable to shifting production practices in middle-income countries where extensive farming systems will be replaced by large-scale intensive farming operations that routinely use antimicrobials in subtherapeutic doses. For Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa, the increase in antimicrobial consumption will be 99%, up to seven times the projected population growth in this group of countries. Better understanding of the consequences of the uninhibited growth in veterinary antimicrobial consumption is needed to assess its potential effects on animal and human health.

  6. Global trends in antimicrobial use in food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Brower, Charles; Gilbert, Marius; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Levin, Simon A.; Robinson, Timothy P.; Teillant, Aude; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2015-01-01

    Demand for animal protein for human consumption is rising globally at an unprecedented rate. Modern animal production practices are associated with regular use of antimicrobials, potentially increasing selection pressure on bacteria to become resistant. Despite the significant potential consequences for antimicrobial resistance, there has been no quantitative measurement of global antimicrobial consumption by livestock. We address this gap by using Bayesian statistical models combining maps of livestock densities, economic projections of demand for meat products, and current estimates of antimicrobial consumption in high-income countries to map antimicrobial use in food animals for 2010 and 2030. We estimate that the global average annual consumption of antimicrobials per kilogram of animal produced was 45 mg⋅kg−1, 148 mg⋅kg−1, and 172 mg⋅kg−1 for cattle, chicken, and pigs, respectively. Starting from this baseline, we estimate that between 2010 and 2030, the global consumption of antimicrobials will increase by 67%, from 63,151 ± 1,560 tons to 105,596 ± 3,605 tons. Up to a third of the increase in consumption in livestock between 2010 and 2030 is imputable to shifting production practices in middle-income countries where extensive farming systems will be replaced by large-scale intensive farming operations that routinely use antimicrobials in subtherapeutic doses. For Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa, the increase in antimicrobial consumption will be 99%, up to seven times the projected population growth in this group of countries. Better understanding of the consequences of the uninhibited growth in veterinary antimicrobial consumption is needed to assess its potential effects on animal and human health. PMID:25792457

  7. Molecular Design, Structures, and Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruko; Palermo, Edmund F.; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics which are effective against drug-resistant bacteria without contributing to resistance development. We have designed and developed antimicrobial copolymers with cationic amphiphilic structures based on the mimicry of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. These copolymers exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no adverse hemolytic activity. Notably, these polymers also did not result in any measurable resistance development in E. coli. The peptide-mimetic design principle offers significant flexibility and diversity in the creation of new antimicrobial materials and their potential biomedical applications. PMID:23832766

  8. Molecular Binding Mechanism of TtgR Repressor to Antibiotics and Antimicrobials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Fernandez-Escamilla

    Full Text Available A disturbing phenomenon in contemporary medicine is the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Efflux pumps contribute strongly to this antimicrobial drug resistance, which leads to the subsequent failure of clinical treatments. The TtgR protein of Pseudomonas putida is a HTH-type transcriptional repressor that controls expression of the TtgABC efflux pump, which is the main contributor to resistance against several antimicrobials and toxic compounds in this microbe. One of the main strategies to modulate the bacterial resistance is the rational modification of the ligand binding target site. We report the design and characterization of four mutants-TtgRS77A, TtgRE78A, TtgRN110A and TtgRH114A - at the active ligand binding site. The biophysical characterization of the mutants, in the presence and in the absence of different antimicrobials, revealed that TtgRN110A is the variant with highest thermal stability, under any of the experimental conditions tested. EMSA experiments also showed a different dissociation pattern from the operator for TtgRN110A, in the presence of several antimicrobials, making it a key residue in the TtgR protein repression mechanism of the TtgABC efflux pump. We found that TtgRE78A stability is the most affected upon effector binding. We also probe that one mutation at the C-terminal half of helix-α4, TtgRS77A, provokes a severe protein structure distortion, demonstrating the important role of this residue in the overall protein structure and on the ligand binding site. The data provide new information and deepen the understanding of the TtgR-effector binding mechanism and consequently the TtgABC efflux pump regulation mechanism in Pseudomonas putida.

  9. Growing Burkholderia pseudomallei in Biofilm Stimulating Conditions Significantly Induces Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawasdidoln, Chakrit; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Sermswan, Rasana W.; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2010-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, was reported to produce biofilm. As the disease causes high relapse rate when compared to other bacterial infections, it therefore might be due to the reactivation of the biofilm forming bacteria which also provided resistance to antimicrobial agents. However, the mechanism on how biofilm can provide tolerance to antimicrobials is still unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings The change in resistance of B. pseudomallei to doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole during biofilm formation were measured as minimum biofilm elimination concentration (MBEC) in 50 soil and clinical isolates and also in capsule, flagellin, LPS and biofilm mutants. Almost all planktonic isolates were susceptible to all agents studied. In contrast, when they were grown in the condition that induced biofilm formation, they were markedly resistant to all antimicrobial agents even though the amount of biofilm production was not the same. The capsule and O-side chains of LPS mutants had no effect on biofilm formation whereas the flagellin-defective mutant markedly reduced in biofilm production. No alteration of LPS profiles was observed when susceptible form was changed to resistance. The higher amount of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) was detected in the high biofilm-producing isolates. Interestingly, the biofilm mutant which produced a very low amount of biofilm and was sensitive to antimicrobial agents significantly resisted those agents when grown in biofilm inducing condition. Conclusions/Significance The possible drug resistance mechanism of biofilm mutants and other isolates is not by having biofilm but rather from some factors that up-regulated when biofilm formation genes were stimulated. The understanding of genes related to this situation may lead us to prevent B. pseudomallei biofilms leading to the relapse of melioidosis. PMID:20169199

  10. Drug and poison information - the Tygerberg experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    100. TABLE VI. Pharmacotherapy consultations. Drug categories. Antimicrobial. Cardiovascular. Anti-epileptic. Neuroleptic and anti-histamine. Antidepressant. Benzodiazepines, barbiturates and other sedative hypnotics. Respiratory. Miscellaneous. Total. 1986 - 1988. 1990 - 1991. No. %. No. %. Average (%). 312. 29,1.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papanin Putsathit

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to antimicrobials is the major risk factor associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI. Paradoxically, treatment of CDI with antimicrobials remains the preferred option. To date, only three studies have investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility of C. difficile from Thailand, two of which were published in the 1990s. This study aimed to investigate the contemporary antibiotic susceptibility of C. difficile isolated from patients in Thailand. Methods A collection of 105 C. difficile isolated from inpatients admitted at Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok in 2015 was tested for their susceptibility to nine antimicrobials via an agar incorporation method. Results All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin/clavulanate and meropenem. Resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin and moxifloxacin was observed in 73.3%, 35.2% and 21.0% of the isolates, respectively. The in vitro activity of fidaxomicin (MIC50/MIC90 0.06/0.25 mg/L was superior to first-line therapies vancomycin (MIC50/MIC90 1/2 mg/L and metronidazole (MIC50/MIC90 0.25/0.25 mg/L. Rifaximin exhibited potent activity against 85.7% of the isolates (MIC ≤0.03 mg/L, and its MIC50 (0.015 mg/L was the lowest among all antimicrobials tested. The prevalence of multi-drug resistant C. difficile, defined by resistance to ≥3 antimicrobials, was 21.9% (23/105. Conclusions A high level of resistance against multiple classes of antimicrobial was observed, emphasising the need for enhanced antimicrobial stewardship and educational programmes to effectively disseminate information regarding C. difficile awareness and appropriate use of antimicrobials to healthcare workers and the general public.

  12. Antimicrobial use in Chinese swine and broiler poultry production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Vikram; Otte, Joachim; Silbergeld, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial use for growth promotion in food animal production is now widespread. A major concern is the rise of antimicrobial resistance and the subsequent impact on human health. The antimicrobials of concern are used in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) which are responsible for almost all meat production including swine and poultry in the US. With global meat consumption rising, the CAFO model has been adopted elsewhere to meet this demand. One such country where this has occurred is China, and evidence suggests 70% of poultry production now occurs outside of traditional small farms. Moreover, China is now the largest aggregate consumer of meat products in the world. With this rapid rise in consumption, the Chinese production model has changed along with the use of antimicrobials in feeds. However, the specific antibiotic use in the Chinese food animal production sector is unclear. Additionally, we are aware of high quantities of antimicrobial use because of reports of high concentrations of antimicrobials in animal waste and surface waters surrounding animal feeding operations. In this report, we estimate the volume of antibiotics used for swine and poultry production as these are the two meat sources with the highest levels of production and consumption in China. We adopt a model developed by Mellon et al. in the US for estimating drug use in feed for poultry and swine production to estimate overall antimicrobial use as well as antimicrobial use by class. We calculate that 38.5 million kg [84.9 million lbs] were used in 2012 in China's production of swine and poultry. By antibiotic class, the highest weights are tetracyclines in swine and coccidiostats in poultry. The volume of antimicrobial use is alarming. Although there are limitations to these data, we hope our report will stimulate further analysis and a sense of urgency in assessing the consequences of such high levels of utilization in terms of antibiotic resistance in the food supply

  13. Antimicrobials Used in the Fermentation of Fuel Ethanol – Clarification of Jurisdiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has determined that antimicrobials applied to processed food or feed during fermentation of organic material to produce fuel ethanol are outside the scope of EPA’s regulatory authority under FIFRA. The Food and Drug Administration has jurisdiction.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance challenged with metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens the achievements of science and medicine, as it deactivates conventional antimicrobial therapeutics. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial platforms to prevent and treat infections from these resistant strains. Metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules are emerging as an alternative to conventional platforms because they combine multiple mechanisms of action into one platform due to the distinctive properties of metals. For example, metals interact with intracellular proteins and enzymes, and catalyse various intracellular processes. The macromolecular architecture offers a means to enhance antimicrobial activity since several antimicrobial moieties can be conjugated to the scaffold. Further, these macromolecules can be fabricated into antimicrobial materials for contact-killing medical implants, fabrics, and devices. As volatilization or leaching out of the antimicrobial moieties from the macromolecular scaffold is reduced, these medical implants, fabrics, and devices can retain their antimicrobial activity over an extended period. Recent advances demonstrate the potential of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules as effective platforms that prevent and treat infections from resistant strains. In this review these advances are thoroughly discussed within the context of examples of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules, their mechanisms of action and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Drug-resistant Escherichia coli, Rural Idaho

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, Elizabeth L.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Johnson, James R.; Haddadin, Bassam; Williamson, Jacquelyn; Samore, Matthew H.

    2005-01-01

    Stool carriage of drug-resistant Escherichia coli in home-living residents of a rural community was examined. Carriage of nalidixic acid–resistant E. coli was associated with recent use of antimicrobial agents in the household. Household clustering of drug-resistant E. coli was observed. Most carriers of drug-resistant E. coli lacked conventional risk factors.

  16. Daptomycin: the first approved lipopeptide antimicrobial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, David R P

    2004-07-01

    To review the literature concerning the first Food and Drug Administration-approved lipopeptide antimicrobial, daptomycin. A PUBMED search was conducted to identify pertinent English-language journal articles between 1985 and November 2003, and additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of these articles. Abstracts from the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy meetings from 1985 through 2003 also were reviewed. All studies evaluating any aspect of daptomycin. Daptomycin is a semisynthetic lipopeptide, the first such antimicrobial agent to reach the marketplace. Its mechanism of action differs from that of the related agent vancomycin in that much of its effect is not because of inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, but instead is a result of alterations in cell-membrane electrical charge and transport. It exhibits a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive aerobes and anaerobes, including methicillin-, penicillin-, aminoglycoside-, and vancomycin-resistant strains. In subjects with normal renal function, the terminal disposition half-life is about 7 to 10 hours. It is principally eliminated as unchanged drug in the urine. Available clinical trial data demonstrate efficacy in complicated skin and skin-structure infections resulting from susceptible gram-positive pathogens, but not in pneumonia. The principal adverse event of concern, although rare, is myotoxicity, manifested by muscle pain and/or weakness and elevated serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) concentrations. The approved dosage regimen is 4 mg/kg intravenously over 30 minutes once daily for 7 days to 14 days. Studies are underway evaluating doses of up to 8 mg/kg once daily. Daptomycin, the first lipopeptide antimicrobial to be marketed, exhibits activity against multiresistant gram-positive pathogens, including linezolid- and quinupristindalfopristin-resistant strains. As such, it is a potentially valuable agent to treat infections resulting from

  17. Investigation of antimicrobial activities of indole-3-aldehyde hydrazide/hydrazone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkok, Gokce; Altanlar, Nurten; Suzen, Sibel

    2009-01-01

    Indoles and hydrazone-type compounds constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development in order to discover an effective compound against multi-drug-resistant microbial infections. A series of indole-3-aldehyde and 5-bromoindole-3-aldehyde hydrazide and hydrazones was evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities using the 2-fold serial dilution technique against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for test compounds and for the reference standards sultamicillin, ampicillin, fluconazole and ciprofloxacin. Compounds possessed a broad spectrum of activity having MIC values of 6.25-100 mg/ml against the tested microorganisms. Compounds 1a-1j, in particular, displayed better activity against MSRA and significant activity against S. aureus relative to ampicillin. Unexpectedly, indole nicotinic acid hydrazides showed no significant activity while indole anisic acid hydrazides displayed better activity. The results may be instructive to researchers attempting to gain more understanding of the antimicrobial activity of indole hydrazide/hydrazone-type compounds. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: 02/23/2018 Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading Viewers and Players . Language Assistance Available: Español | 繁體ä¸æ–‡ | ...

  19. Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Enzler, Mark J.; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement...

  20. Multifactorial antimicrobial wood protectants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert D. Coleman; Carol A. Clausen

    2008-01-01

    It is unlikely that a single antimicrobial compound, whether synthetic or natural, will provide the ‘magic bullet’ for eliminating multiple biological agents affecting wood products. Development of synergistic combinations of selected compounds, especially those derived from natural sources, is recognized as a promising approach to improved wood protection. Recent...