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Sample records for undersampled image sequences

  1. Spatiotonal adaptivity in super-resolution of under-sampled image sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.Q.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis concerns the use of spatial and tonal adaptivity in improving the resolution of aliased image sequences under scene or camera motion. Each of the five content chapters focuses on a different subtopic of super-resolution: image registration (chapter 2), image fusion (chapter 3 and 4),

  2. Reconstruction Algorithms in Undersampled AFM Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen

    2016-01-01

    images, our simulations reveal that using a simple raster scanning pattern in combination with conventional image interpolation performs very well. Moreover, this combination enables a reduction by a factor 10 of the scanning time while retaining an average reconstruction quality around 36 dB PSNR......This paper provides a study of spatial undersampling in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging followed by different image reconstruction techniques based on sparse approximation as well as interpolation. The main reasons for using undersampling is that it reduces the path length and thereby...... the scanning time as well as the amount of interaction between the AFM probe and the specimen. It can easily be applied on conventional AFM hardware. Due to undersampling, it is then necessary to further process the acquired image in order to reconstruct an approximation of the image. Based on real AFM cell...

  3. Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Arildsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Jan

    2013-01-01

    , or a special case of compressed sensing. We argue that the preferred approach depends upon the type of image. Of the methods proposed for AFM, images containing high frequencies should be reconstructed using basis pursuit from data collected in a spiral pattern. Images without too much high frequency content...

  4. Structure Assisted Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Undersampled AFM Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The use of compressed sensing in atomic force microscopy (AFM) can potentially speed-up image acquisition, lower probe-specimen interaction, or enable super resolution imaging. The idea in compressed sensing for AFM is to spatially undersample the specimen, i.e. only acquire a small fraction...... of the full image of it, and then use advanced computational techniques to reconstruct the remaining part of the image whenever this is possible. Our initial experiments have shown that it is possible to leverage inherent structure in acquired AFM images to improve image reconstruction. Thus, we have studied...... structure in the discrete cosine transform coefficients of typical AFM images. Based on this study, we propose a generic support structure model that may be used to improve the quality of the reconstructed AFM images. Furthermore, we propose a modification to the established iterative thresholding...

  5. Algorithms for Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images Supplementary Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods.......Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods....

  6. Iterative feature refinement for accurate undersampled MR image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Qiegen; Ying, Leslie; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Accelerating MR scan is of great significance for clinical, research and advanced applications, and one main effort to achieve this is the utilization of compressed sensing (CS) theory. Nevertheless, the existing CSMRI approaches still have limitations such as fine structure loss or high computational complexity. This paper proposes a novel iterative feature refinement (IFR) module for accurate MR image reconstruction from undersampled K-space data. Integrating IFR with CSMRI which is equipped with fixed transforms, we develop an IFR-CS method to restore meaningful structures and details that are originally discarded without introducing too much additional complexity. Specifically, the proposed IFR-CS is realized with three iterative steps, namely sparsity-promoting denoising, feature refinement and Tikhonov regularization. Experimental results on both simulated and in vivo MR datasets have shown that the proposed module has a strong capability to capture image details, and that IFR-CS is comparable and even superior to other state-of-the-art reconstruction approaches.

  7. Iterative feature refinement for accurate undersampled MR image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong; Liu, Qiegen; Ying, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating MR scan is of great significance for clinical, research and advanced applications, and one main effort to achieve this is the utilization of compressed sensing (CS) theory. Nevertheless, the existing CSMRI approaches still have limitations such as fine structure loss or high computational complexity. This paper proposes a novel iterative feature refinement (IFR) module for accurate MR image reconstruction from undersampled K-space data. Integrating IFR with CSMRI which is equipped with fixed transforms, we develop an IFR-CS method to restore meaningful structures and details that are originally discarded without introducing too much additional complexity. Specifically, the proposed IFR-CS is realized with three iterative steps, namely sparsity-promoting denoising, feature refinement and Tikhonov regularization. Experimental results on both simulated and in vivo MR datasets have shown that the proposed module has a strong capability to capture image details, and that IFR-CS is comparable and even superior to other state-of-the-art reconstruction approaches. (paper)

  8. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A singular K-space model for fast reconstruction of magnetic resonance images from undersampled data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianhua; Mou, Zhiying; Qin, Binjie; Li, Wanqing; Ogunbona, Philip; Robini, Marc C; Zhu, Yuemin

    2017-12-09

    Reconstructing magnetic resonance images from undersampled k-space data is a challenging problem. This paper introduces a novel method of image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data based on the concept of singularizing operators and a novel singular k-space model. Exploring the sparsity of an image in the k-space, the singular k-space model (SKM) is proposed in terms of the k-space functions of a singularizing operator. The singularizing operator is constructed by combining basic difference operators. An algorithm is developed to reliably estimate the model parameters from undersampled k-space data. The estimated parameters are then used to recover the missing k-space data through the model, subsequently achieving high-quality reconstruction of the image using inverse Fourier transform. Experiments on physical phantom and real brain MR images have shown that the proposed SKM method constantly outperforms the popular total variation (TV) and the classical zero-filling (ZF) methods regardless of the undersampling rates, the noise levels, and the image structures. For the same objective quality of the reconstructed images, the proposed method requires much less k-space data than the TV method. The SKM method is an effective method for fast MRI reconstruction from the undersampled k-space data. Graphical abstract Two Real Images and their sparsified images by singularizing operator.

  10. Correlated spectroscopic imaging of calf muscle in three spatial dimensions using group sparse reconstruction of undersampled single and multichannel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Neil E; Burns, Brian L; Iqbal, Zohaib; Thomas, M Albert

    2015-11-01

    To implement a 5D (three spatial + two spectral) correlated spectroscopic imaging sequence for application to human calf. Nonuniform sampling was applied across the two phase encoded dimensions and the indirect spectral dimension of an echo planar-correlated spectroscopic imaging sequence. Reconstruction was applied that minimized the group sparse mixed ℓ2,1-norm of the data. Multichannel data were compressed using a sensitivity map-based approach with a spatially dependent transform matrix and utilized the self-sparsity of the individual coil images to simplify the reconstruction. Single channel data with 8× and 16× undersampling are shown in the calf of a diabetic patient. A 15-channel scan with 12× undersampling of a healthy volunteer was reconstructed using 5 virtual channels and compared to a fully sampled single slice scan. Group sparse reconstruction faithfully reconstructs the lipid cross peaks much better than ℓ1 minimization. COSY spectra can be acquired over a 3D spatial volume with scan time under 15 min using echo planar readout with highly undersampled data and group sparse reconstruction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: Application to cardiac cine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P.; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K.; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. Methods A GPU-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions (PSF) and in twelve subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr x Np = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection (FBP), and conjugate gradient SENSE (CG SENSE). Results Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than FBP using 48, 32, and 24 Np, although FBP provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all pparallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to FBP, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. PMID:24753213

  12. Fast undersampled functional magnetic resonance imaging using nonlinear regularized parallel image reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimo Hugger

    Full Text Available In this article we aim at improving the performance of whole brain functional imaging at very high temporal resolution (100 ms or less. This is achieved by utilizing a nonlinear regularized parallel image reconstruction scheme, where the penalty term of the cost function is set to the L(1-norm measured in some transform domain. This type of image reconstruction has gained much attention recently due to its application in compressed sensing and has proven to yield superior spatial resolution and image quality over e.g. Tikhonov regularized image reconstruction. We demonstrate that by using nonlinear regularization it is possible to more accurately localize brain activation from highly undersampled k-space data at the expense of an increase in computation time.

  13. Sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating for image reconstruction from highly undersampled magnetic resonance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinhong; Guo, Li; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Yanqiu

    2015-07-21

    Image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data accelerates magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by exploiting image sparseness in certain transform domains. Employing image patch representation over a learned dictionary has the advantage of being adaptive to local image structures and thus can better sparsify images than using fixed transforms (e.g. wavelets and total variations). Dictionary learning methods have recently been introduced to MRI reconstruction, and these methods demonstrate significantly reduced reconstruction errors compared to sparse MRI reconstruction using fixed transforms. However, the synthesis sparse coding problem in dictionary learning is NP-hard and computationally expensive. In this paper, we present a novel sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating method for efficient image reconstruction from highly undersampled MRI data. The orthogonality imposed on the learned dictionary enables the minimization problem in the reconstruction to be solved by an efficient optimization algorithm which alternately updates representation coefficients, orthogonal dictionary, and missing k-space data. Moreover, both sparsity level and sparse representation contribution using updated dictionaries gradually increase during iterations to recover more details, assuming the progressively improved quality of the dictionary. Simulation and real data experimental results both demonstrate that the proposed method is approximately 10 to 100 times faster than the K-SVD-based dictionary learning MRI method and simultaneously improves reconstruction accuracy.

  14. Sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating for image reconstruction from highly undersampled magnetic resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jinhong; Guo, Li; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Yanqiu

    2015-01-01

    Image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data accelerates magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by exploiting image sparseness in certain transform domains. Employing image patch representation over a learned dictionary has the advantage of being adaptive to local image structures and thus can better sparsify images than using fixed transforms (e.g. wavelets and total variations). Dictionary learning methods have recently been introduced to MRI reconstruction, and these methods demonstrate significantly reduced reconstruction errors compared to sparse MRI reconstruction using fixed transforms. However, the synthesis sparse coding problem in dictionary learning is NP-hard and computationally expensive. In this paper, we present a novel sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating method for efficient image reconstruction from highly undersampled MRI data. The orthogonality imposed on the learned dictionary enables the minimization problem in the reconstruction to be solved by an efficient optimization algorithm which alternately updates representation coefficients, orthogonal dictionary, and missing k-space data. Moreover, both sparsity level and sparse representation contribution using updated dictionaries gradually increase during iterations to recover more details, assuming the progressively improved quality of the dictionary. Simulation and real data experimental results both demonstrate that the proposed method is approximately 10 to 100 times faster than the K-SVD-based dictionary learning MRI method and simultaneously improves reconstruction accuracy. (paper)

  15. Accelerating dual cardiac phase images using undersampled radial phase encoding trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letelier, Karis; Urbina, Jesus; Andía, Marcelo; Tejos, Cristián; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Prieto, Claudia; Uribe, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional dual-cardiac-phase (3D-DCP) scan has been proposed to acquire two data sets of the whole heart and great vessels during the end-diastolic and end-systolic cardiac phases in a single free-breathing scan. This method has shown accurate assessment of cardiac anatomy and function but is limited by long acquisition times. This work proposes to accelerate the acquisition and reconstruction of 3D-DCP scans by exploiting redundant information of the outer k-space regions of both cardiac phases. This is achieved using a modified radial-phase-encoding trajectory and gridding reconstruction with uniform coil combination. The end-diastolic acquisition trajectory was angularly shifted with respect to the end-systolic phase. Initially, a fully-sampled 3D-DCP scan was acquired to determine the optimal percentage of the outer k-space data that can be combined between cardiac phases. Thereafter, prospectively undersampled data were reconstructed based on this percentage. As gold standard images, the undersampled data were also reconstructed using iterative SENSE. To validate the method, image quality assessments and a cardiac volume analysis were performed. The proposed method was tested in thirteen healthy volunteers (mean age, 30years). Prospectively undersampled data (R=4) reconstructed with 50% combination led high quality images. There were no significant differences in the image quality and in the cardiac volume analysis between our method and iterative SENSE. In addition, the proposed approach reduced the reconstruction time from 40min to 1min. In conclusion, the proposed method obtains 3D-DCP scans with an image quality comparable to those reconstructed with iterative SENSE, and within a clinically acceptable reconstruction time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Algebraic reconstruction technique for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: application to cardiac cine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C

    2015-04-01

    To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. A graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions and in 12 subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr × Np  = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection, and conjugate gradient SENSE. Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than filtered back-projection using 48, 32, and 24 Np , although filtered back-projection provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all P parallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to filtered back-projection, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. KIKI-net: cross-domain convolutional neural networks for reconstructing undersampled magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Taejoon; Jun, Yohan; Kim, Taeseong; Jang, Jinseong; Lee, Ho-Joon; Hwang, Dosik

    2018-04-06

    To demonstrate accurate MR image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data using cross-domain convolutional neural networks (CNNs) METHODS: Cross-domain CNNs consist of 3 components: (1) a deep CNN operating on the k-space (KCNN), (2) a deep CNN operating on an image domain (ICNN), and (3) an interleaved data consistency operations. These components are alternately applied, and each CNN is trained to minimize the loss between the reconstructed and corresponding fully sampled k-spaces. The final reconstructed image is obtained by forward-propagating the undersampled k-space data through the entire network. Performances of K-net (KCNN with inverse Fourier transform), I-net (ICNN with interleaved data consistency), and various combinations of the 2 different networks were tested. The test results indicated that K-net and I-net have different advantages/disadvantages in terms of tissue-structure restoration. Consequently, the combination of K-net and I-net is superior to single-domain CNNs. Three MR data sets, the T 2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T 2 FLAIR) set from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and 2 data sets acquired at our local institute (T 2 FLAIR and T 1 weighted), were used to evaluate the performance of 7 conventional reconstruction algorithms and the proposed cross-domain CNNs, which hereafter is referred to as KIKI-net. KIKI-net outperforms conventional algorithms with mean improvements of 2.29 dB in peak SNR and 0.031 in structure similarity. KIKI-net exhibits superior performance over state-of-the-art conventional algorithms in terms of restoring tissue structures and removing aliasing artifacts. The results demonstrate that KIKI-net is applicable up to a reduction factor of 3 to 4 based on variable-density Cartesian undersampling. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Holographic particle image velocimetry: signal recovery from under-sampled CCD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, J. M.

    2004-04-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) has now been demonstrated by several research groups as a method to make three-component velocity measurements from a three-dimensional fluid flow field. More recently digital HPIV has become a hot topic with the promise of near-real-time measurements without the often cumbersome optics and wet processing associated with traditional holographic methods. It is clear, however, that CCD cameras have a limited number of pixels and are not capable of resolving more than a small fraction of the interference pattern that is recorded by a typical particulate hologram. In this paper, we consider under-sampling of the interference pattern to reduce the information content and to allow recordings to be made on a CCD sensor. We describe the basic concept of model fitting to under-sampled data and demonstrate signal recovery through computer simulation. A three-dimensional analysis shows that in general, periodic sampling strategies can result in multiple particle images in the reconstruction. It is shown, however, that the significance of these peaks is reduced in the case of high numerical aperture (NA) reconstruction and can be virtually eliminated by dithering the position of sampling apertures.

  19. A comparison of reconstruction methods for undersampled atomic force microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yufan; Andersson, Sean B

    2015-12-18

    Non-raster scanning and undersampling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images is a technique for improving imaging rate and reducing the amount of tip-sample interaction needed to produce an image. Generation of the final image can be done using a variety of image processing techniques based on interpolation or optimization. The choice of reconstruction method has a large impact on the quality of the recovered image and the proper choice depends on the sample under study. In this work we compare interpolation through the use of inpainting algorithms with reconstruction based on optimization through the use of the basis pursuit algorithm commonly used for signal recovery in compressive sensing. Using four different sampling patterns found in non-raster AFM, namely row subsampling, spiral scanning, Lissajous scanning, and random scanning, we subsample data from existing images and compare reconstruction performance against the original image. The results illustrate that inpainting generally produces superior results when the image contains primarily low frequency content while basis pursuit is better when the images have mixed, but sparse, frequency content. Using support vector machines, we then classify images based on their frequency content and sparsity and, from this classification, develop a fast decision strategy to select a reconstruction algorithm to be used on subsampled data. The performance of the classification and decision test are demonstrated on test AFM images.

  20. A comparison of reconstruction methods for undersampled atomic force microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Yufan; Andersson, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    Non-raster scanning and undersampling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images is a technique for improving imaging rate and reducing the amount of tip–sample interaction needed to produce an image. Generation of the final image can be done using a variety of image processing techniques based on interpolation or optimization. The choice of reconstruction method has a large impact on the quality of the recovered image and the proper choice depends on the sample under study. In this work we compare interpolation through the use of inpainting algorithms with reconstruction based on optimization through the use of the basis pursuit algorithm commonly used for signal recovery in compressive sensing. Using four different sampling patterns found in non-raster AFM, namely row subsampling, spiral scanning, Lissajous scanning, and random scanning, we subsample data from existing images and compare reconstruction performance against the original image. The results illustrate that inpainting generally produces superior results when the image contains primarily low frequency content while basis pursuit is better when the images have mixed, but sparse, frequency content. Using support vector machines, we then classify images based on their frequency content and sparsity and, from this classification, develop a fast decision strategy to select a reconstruction algorithm to be used on subsampled data. The performance of the classification and decision test are demonstrated on test AFM images. (paper)

  1. Evaluation of Variable Density and Data-Driven K-Space Undersampling for Compressed Sensing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Frank; Viergever, Max A; Seevinck, Peter R

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of variable density and data-driven k-space undersampling patterns on reconstruction quality for compressed sensing (CS) magnetic resonance imaging to provide recommendations on how to avoid suboptimal CS reconstructions. MATERIALS

  2. Sparse recovery of undersampled intensity patterns for coherent diffraction imaging at high X-ray energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, S; Calvo-Almazan, I; Almer, J; Kenesei, P; Park, J-S; Harder, R; Nashed, Y; Hruszkewycz, S O

    2018-03-21

    Coherent X-ray photons with energies higher than 50 keV offer new possibilities for imaging nanoscale lattice distortions in bulk crystalline materials using Bragg peak phase retrieval methods. However, the compression of reciprocal space at high energies typically results in poorly resolved fringes on an area detector, rendering the diffraction data unsuitable for the three-dimensional reconstruction of compact crystals. To address this problem, we propose a method by which to recover fine fringe detail in the scattered intensity. This recovery is achieved in two steps: multiple undersampled measurements are made by in-plane sub-pixel motion of the area detector, then this data set is passed to a sparsity-based numerical solver that recovers fringe detail suitable for standard Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) reconstruction methods of compact single crystals. The key insight of this paper is that sparsity in a BCDI data set can be enforced by recognising that the signal in the detector, though poorly resolved, is band-limited. This requires fewer in-plane detector translations for complete signal recovery, while adhering to information theory limits. We use simulated BCDI data sets to demonstrate the approach, outline our sparse recovery strategy, and comment on future opportunities.

  3. Free-breathing dynamic liver examination using a radial 3D T1-weighted gradient echo sequence with moderate undersampling for patients with limited breath-holding capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenbach, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.kaltenbach@kgu.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Roman, Andrei; Polkowski, Christoph; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Divison of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Hammerstingl, Renate; Vogl, Thomas J.; Zangos, Stephan [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Respiratory artifacts are a frequent problem in abdominal MR imaging. • Non-diagnostic examinations could be reduced using free-breathing us-radial-VIBE for dynamic liver examination in challenging patients. • Streak artifacts are characteristic for an undersampled radial acquisition but do not affect diagnostic validity. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare free-breathing radial VIBE with moderate undersampling (us-radial-VIBE) with a standard breathhold T1-weighted volumetric interpolated sequence (3D GRE VIBE) in patients unable to suspend respiration during dynamic liver examination. Material and methods: 23 consecutive patients underwent dynamic liver MR examination using the free-breathing us-radial-VIBE sequence as part of their oncologic follow-up. All patients were eligible for the free-breathing protocol due to severe respiratory artifacts at the planning or precontrast sequences. The us-radial-VIBE acquisitions were compared to the patientś last staging liver MRI including a standard breathhold 3D GRE VIBE. For an objective image evaluation, signal intensity (SI), image noise (IN), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-enhancement ratio (CER) were compared. Representative image quality parameters, including typical artifacts were independently, retrospectively and blindly scored by four readers. Results: Us-radial-VIBE had significant lower SNR (p < 0.0001) and higher IN (p < 0.0001), whereas SI did not differ (p = 0.62). Temporal resolution assessed with CER in the arterial phase showed higher values for us-radial-VIBE (p = 0.028). Subjective image quality parameters received generally slightly higher scores for 3D GRE VIBE. In a smaller subgroup comprising patients with severe respiratory artifacts also at reference breathhold 3D GRE VIBE examination, us-radial-VIBE showed significantly higher image quality scores. Furthermore, there were generally more severe respiratory artifacts in 3D GRE VIBE, whereas streaking was characteristic

  4. Generation of brain pseudo-CTs using an undersampled, single-acquisition UTE-mDixon pulse sequence and unsupervised clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Hu, Lingzhi; Traughber, Melanie; Stehning, Christian; Helle, Michael; Qian, Pengjiang; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Pereira, Gisele C.; Traughber, Bryan J.; Jordan, David W.; Herrmann, Karin A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MR-based pseudo-CT has an important role in MR-based radiation therapy planning and PET attenuation correction. The purpose of this study is to establish a clinically feasible approach, including image acquisition, correction, and CT formation, for pseudo-CT generation of the brain using a single-acquisition, undersampled ultrashort echo time (UTE)-mDixon pulse sequence. Methods: Nine patients were recruited for this study. For each patient, a 190-s, undersampled, single acquisition UTE-mDixon sequence of the brain was acquired (TE = 0.1, 1.5, and 2.8 ms). A novel method of retrospective trajectory correction of the free induction decay (FID) signal was performed based on point-spread functions of three external MR markers. Two-point Dixon images were reconstructed using the first and second echo data (TE = 1.5 and 2.8 ms). R2 ∗ images (1/T2 ∗ ) were then estimated and were used to provide bone information. Three image features, i.e., Dixon-fat, Dixon-water, and R2 ∗ , were used for unsupervised clustering. Five tissue clusters, i.e., air, brain, fat, fluid, and bone, were estimated using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. A two-step, automatic tissue-assignment approach was proposed and designed according to the prior information of the given feature space. Pseudo-CTs were generated by a voxelwise linear combination of the membership functions of the FCM. A low-dose CT was acquired for each patient and was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The contrast and sharpness of the FID images were improved after trajectory correction was applied. The mean of the estimated trajectory delay was 0.774 μs (max: 1.350 μs; min: 0.180 μs). The FCM-estimated centroids of different tissue types showed a distinguishable pattern for different tissues, and significant differences were found between the centroid locations of different tissue types. Pseudo-CT can provide additional skull detail and has low bias and absolute error of estimated CT

  5. Generation of brain pseudo-CTs using an undersampled, single-acquisition UTE-mDixon pulse sequence and unsupervised clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Kuan-Hao [Case Center for Imaging Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Hu, Lingzhi; Traughber, Melanie [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Stehning, Christian; Helle, Michael [Philips Research, Hamburg 22335 (Germany); Qian, Pengjiang [School of Digital Media, Jiangnan University, Jiangsu 214122 (China); Thompson, Cheryl L. [Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Pereira, Gisele C.; Traughber, Bryan J., E-mail: bryan.traughber@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Jordan, David W. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Herrmann, Karin A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Muzic, Raymond F. [Case Center for Imaging Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: MR-based pseudo-CT has an important role in MR-based radiation therapy planning and PET attenuation correction. The purpose of this study is to establish a clinically feasible approach, including image acquisition, correction, and CT formation, for pseudo-CT generation of the brain using a single-acquisition, undersampled ultrashort echo time (UTE)-mDixon pulse sequence. Methods: Nine patients were recruited for this study. For each patient, a 190-s, undersampled, single acquisition UTE-mDixon sequence of the brain was acquired (TE = 0.1, 1.5, and 2.8 ms). A novel method of retrospective trajectory correction of the free induction decay (FID) signal was performed based on point-spread functions of three external MR markers. Two-point Dixon images were reconstructed using the first and second echo data (TE = 1.5 and 2.8 ms). R2{sup ∗} images (1/T2{sup ∗}) were then estimated and were used to provide bone information. Three image features, i.e., Dixon-fat, Dixon-water, and R2{sup ∗}, were used for unsupervised clustering. Five tissue clusters, i.e., air, brain, fat, fluid, and bone, were estimated using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. A two-step, automatic tissue-assignment approach was proposed and designed according to the prior information of the given feature space. Pseudo-CTs were generated by a voxelwise linear combination of the membership functions of the FCM. A low-dose CT was acquired for each patient and was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The contrast and sharpness of the FID images were improved after trajectory correction was applied. The mean of the estimated trajectory delay was 0.774 μs (max: 1.350 μs; min: 0.180 μs). The FCM-estimated centroids of different tissue types showed a distinguishable pattern for different tissues, and significant differences were found between the centroid locations of different tissue types. Pseudo-CT can provide additional skull detail and has low bias and absolute error of

  6. Reconstruction strategy for echo planar spectroscopy and its application to partially undersampled imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Schaumburg, K; Paulson, O B

    2000-01-01

    or fewer interleaves per acquisition. The method is of particular interest when large bandwidths are needed (e.g., for high field scanning) and for scanners with limited gradient performance. The unavoidable artifacts resulting from undersampling are demonstrated to be acceptable for spectroscopy with long...

  7. Accelerating Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Lung Tumor Tracking Based on Low-Rank Decomposition in the Spatial–Temporal Domain: A Feasibility Study Based on Simulation and Preliminary Prospective Undersampled MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Manoj; Hu, Peng; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Ennis, Daniel; Thomas, Albert; Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a low-rank decomposition method to reconstruct down-sampled k-space data for the purpose of tumor tracking. Methods and Materials: Seven retrospective lung cancer patients were included in the simulation study. The fully-sampled k-space data were first generated from existing 2-dimensional dynamic MR images and then down-sampled by 5 × -20 × before reconstruction using a Cartesian undersampling mask. Two methods, a low-rank decomposition method using combined dynamic MR images (k-t SLR based on sparsity and low-rank penalties) and a total variation (TV) method using individual dynamic MR frames, were used to reconstruct images. The tumor trajectories were derived on the basis of autosegmentation of the resultant images. To further test its feasibility, k-t SLR was used to reconstruct prospective data of a healthy subject. An undersampled balanced steady-state free precession sequence with the same undersampling mask was used to acquire the imaging data. Results: In the simulation study, higher imaging fidelity and low noise levels were achieved with the k-t SLR compared with TV. At 10 × undersampling, the k-t SLR method resulted in an average normalized mean square error <0.05, as opposed to 0.23 by using the TV reconstruction on individual frames. Less than 6% showed tracking errors >1 mm with 10 × down-sampling using k-t SLR, as opposed to 17% using TV. In the prospective study, k-t SLR substantially reduced reconstruction artifacts and retained anatomic details. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance reconstruction using k-t SLR on highly undersampled dynamic MR imaging data results in high image quality useful for tumor tracking. The k-t SLR was superior to TV by better exploiting the intrinsic anatomic coherence of the same patient. The feasibility of k-t SLR was demonstrated by prospective imaging acquisition and reconstruction

  8. Restoration of a single superresolution image from several blurred, noisy, and undersampled measured images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, M; Feuer, A

    1997-01-01

    The three main tools in the single image restoration theory are the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator, the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator, and the set theoretic approach using projection onto convex sets (POCS). This paper utilizes the above known tools to propose a unified methodology toward the more complicated problem of superresolution restoration. In the superresolution restoration problem, an improved resolution image is restored from several geometrically warped, blurred, noisy and downsampled measured images. The superresolution restoration problem is modeled and analyzed from the ML, the MAP, and POCS points of view, yielding a generalization of the known superresolution restoration methods. The proposed restoration approach is general but assumes explicit knowledge of the linear space- and time-variant blur, the (additive Gaussian) noise, the different measured resolutions, and the (smooth) motion characteristics. A hybrid method combining the simplicity of the ML and the incorporation of nonellipsoid constraints is presented, giving improved restoration performance, compared with the ML and the POCS approaches. The hybrid method is shown to converge to the unique optimal solution of a new definition of the optimization problem. Superresolution restoration from motionless measurements is also discussed. Simulations demonstrate the power of the proposed methodology.

  9. Reconstruction of dynamic image series from undersampled MRI data using data-driven model consistency condition (MOCCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikina, Julia V; Samsonov, Alexey A

    2015-11-01

    To accelerate dynamic MR imaging through development of a novel image reconstruction technique using low-rank temporal signal models preestimated from training data. We introduce the model consistency condition (MOCCO) technique, which utilizes temporal models to regularize reconstruction without constraining the solution to be low-rank, as is performed in related techniques. This is achieved by using a data-driven model to design a transform for compressed sensing-type regularization. The enforcement of general compliance with the model without excessively penalizing deviating signal allows recovery of a full-rank solution. Our method was compared with a standard low-rank approach utilizing model-based dimensionality reduction in phantoms and patient examinations for time-resolved contrast-enhanced angiography (CE-MRA) and cardiac CINE imaging. We studied the sensitivity of all methods to rank reduction and temporal subspace modeling errors. MOCCO demonstrated reduced sensitivity to modeling errors compared with the standard approach. Full-rank MOCCO solutions showed significantly improved preservation of temporal fidelity and aliasing/noise suppression in highly accelerated CE-MRA (acceleration up to 27) and cardiac CINE (acceleration up to 15) data. MOCCO overcomes several important deficiencies of previously proposed methods based on pre-estimated temporal models and allows high quality image restoration from highly undersampled CE-MRA and cardiac CINE data. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Zero source insertion technique to account for undersampling in GPR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-02-25

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  11. Quantitative study of undersampled recoverability for sparse images in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Sidky, Emil Y.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2012-01-01

    Image reconstruction methods based on exploiting image sparsity, motivated by compressed sensing (CS), allow reconstruction from a significantly reduced number of projections in X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, CS provides neither theoretical guarantees of accurate CT reconstruction, nor...... any relation between sparsity and a sufficient number of measurements for recovery. In this paper, we demonstrate empirically through computer simulations that minimization of the image 1-norm allows for recovery of sparse images from fewer measurements than unknown pixels, without relying...... on artificial random sampling patterns. We establish quantitatively an average-case relation between image sparsity and sufficient number of measurements for recovery, and we show that the transition from non-recovery to recovery is sharp within well-defined classes of simple and semi-realistic test images...

  12. Quantifying Admissible Undersampling for Sparsity-Exploiting Iterative Image Reconstruction in X-Ray CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction with sparsity-exploiting methods, such as total variation (TV) minimization, investigated in compressive sensing claim potentially large reductions in sampling requirements. Quantifying this claim for computed tomography (CT) is nontrivial, because both full sampling...

  13. Sparse recovery of undersampled intensity patterns for coherent diffraction imaging at high X-ray energies

    OpenAIRE

    Maddali, Siddharth; Calvo-Almazan, Irene; Almer, Jonathan; Kenesei, Peter; Park, Jun-Sang; Harder, Ross; Nashed, Youssef; Hruszkewycz, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Coherent X-ray photons with energies higher than 50 keV offer new possibilities for imaging nanoscale lattice distortions in bulk crystalline materials using Bragg peak phase retrieval methods. However, the compression of reciprocal space at high energies typically results in poorly resolved fringes on an area detector, rendering the diffraction data unsuitable for the three-dimensional reconstruction of compact crystals. To address this problem, we propose a method by which to recover fine f...

  14. Scan time reduction in ²³Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence: Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingärtner, Sebastian; Wetterling, Friedrich; Konstandin, Simon; Fatar, Marc; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Schad, Lothar R

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in (23)Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI (23)Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered (1)H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Undersampled radial MR acquisition and highly constrained back projection (HYPR) reconstruction: potential medical imaging applications in the post-Nyquist era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistretta, Charles A

    2009-03-01

    During the past several years there has been extensive study of alternative MR acquisition strategies such as spiral and radial. Vastly undersampled imaging with projections (VIPR) is a three-dimensional (3D) radial acquisition that provides acceptable images while violating the Nyquist theorem by factors of up to several hundred. For applications like magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), VIPR provides sparse data sets with incoherent artifacts that satisfy the requirements of emerging reconstruction approaches like iterative image norm minimization (compressed sensing) and highly constrained back projection (HYPR). All of these tools can be used in combination with parallel imaging to provide extremely high acceleration factors in MRI. In this review we do not attempt to do justice to the many exciting developments in the general field of constrained reconstruction but focus on preliminary results using VIPR and HYPR for non-Cartesian, Nyquist-violating MRI and the extension of HYPR processing to a broad range of medical imaging applications in which the acquisitions satisfy the Nyquist theorem but lack sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), leading to the possibility of radiation reduction, increased ultrasound resolution and field-of-view, and improved dynamic display of radiotracers. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Super-Resolution of Moving Objects in Under-Sampled Image Sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eekeren, A.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    In many applications, such as observation systems, it is important to detect and identify a possible threat as early as possible. Especially the approaching ones are of interest. Such moving threats/objects are often at a very large distance and are observed as very small and unrecognizable objects

  17. Image sequence analysis

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The processing of image sequences has a broad spectrum of important applica­ tions including target tracking, robot navigation, bandwidth compression of TV conferencing video signals, studying the motion of biological cells using microcinematography, cloud tracking, and highway traffic monitoring. Image sequence processing involves a large amount of data. However, because of the progress in computer, LSI, and VLSI technologies, we have now reached a stage when many useful processing tasks can be done in a reasonable amount of time. As a result, research and development activities in image sequence analysis have recently been growing at a rapid pace. An IEEE Computer Society Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varying Imagery was held in Philadelphia, April 5-6, 1979. A related special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Anal­ ysis and Machine Intelligence was published in November 1980. The IEEE Com­ puter magazine has also published a special issue on the subject in 1981. The purpose of this book ...

  18. Highly undersampled MR image reconstruction using an improved dual-dictionary learning method with self-adaptive dictionaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiansen; Song, Ying; Zhu, Zhen; Zhao, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Dual-dictionary learning (Dual-DL) method utilizes both a low-resolution dictionary and a high-resolution dictionary, which are co-trained for sparse coding and image updating, respectively. It can effectively exploit a priori knowledge regarding the typical structures, specific features, and local details of training sets images. The prior knowledge helps to improve the reconstruction quality greatly. This method has been successfully applied in magnetic resonance (MR) image reconstruction. However, it relies heavily on the training sets, and dictionaries are fixed and nonadaptive. In this research, we improve Dual-DL by using self-adaptive dictionaries. The low- and high-resolution dictionaries are updated correspondingly along with the image updating stage to ensure their self-adaptivity. The updated dictionaries incorporate both the prior information of the training sets and the test image directly. Both dictionaries feature improved adaptability. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently and significantly improve the quality and robustness of MR image reconstruction.

  19. Highly undersampled peripheral Time-of-Flight magnetic resonance angiography: optimized data acquisition and iterative image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Jana; Grimm, Robert; Forman, Christoph; Hornegger, Joachim; Schmitt, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acceleration of peripheral Time-of-Flight magnetic resonance angiography using Compressed Sensing and parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while preserving image quality and vascular contrast. An analytical sampling pattern is proposed that combines aspects of parallel MRI and Compressed Sensing. It is used in combination with a dedicated Split Bregman algorithm. This approach is compared with current state-of-the-art patterns and reconstruction algorithms. The acquisition time was reduced from 30 to 2.5 min in a study using ten volunteer data sets, while showing improved sharpness, better contrast and higher accuracy compared to state-of-the-art techniques. This study showed the benefits of the proposed dedicated analytical sampling pattern and Split Bregman algorithm for optimizing the Compressed Sensing reconstruction of highly accelerated peripheral Time-of-Flight data.

  20. Accelerated whole-heart MR angiography using a variable-density poisson-disc undersampling pattern and compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Uecker, Martin; Roujol, Sébastien; Sabbagh, Majid; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2018-02-01

    To accelerate whole-heart three-dimension MR angiography (MRA) by using a variable-density Poisson-disc undersampling pattern and a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction algorithm, and compare the results with sensitivity encoding (SENSE). For whole-heart MRA, a prospective variable-density Poisson-disc k-space undersampling pattern was developed in which 1-2% of central part of k-space was fully sampled, and sampling in the remainder decreased exponentially toward the periphery. The undersampled data were then estimated using CS reconstruction. In patients, images using this sequence with an undersampling rate of ≈6 were compared with those using a SENSE rate of 2 (n = 15) and a SENSE rate of 6 (n = 13). Compared with SENSE rate 2, CS rate 6 images had similar objective border sharpness, significantly lower subjective image quality scores at all four locations (all P < 0.01), and shorter scan times (P < 0.05). Compared with SENSE rate 6, CS rate 6 had similar objective border sharpness at all four locations, significantly better subjective image quality scores at three of four locations (all P < 0.01), and similar scan times (P = 0.24). Compared with SENSE with a comparable acceleration rate, a variable-density Poisson-disc undersampling pattern and CS reconstruction achieved better subjective image quality and similar border sharpness. Magn Reson Med 79:761-769, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. TRIO a technique for reconstruction using intensity order: application to undersampled MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Leonardo; Prieto, Claudia; Sing-Long, Carlos; Uribe, Sergio; Batchelor, Philip; Tejos, Cristian; Irarrazaval, Pablo

    2011-08-01

    Long acquisition times are still a limitation for many applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specially in 3-D and dynamic imaging. Several undersampling reconstruction techniques have been proposed to overcome this problem. These techniques are based on acquiring less samples than specified by the Nyquist criterion and estimating the nonacquired data by using some sort of prior information. Most of these reconstruction methods use prior information based on estimations of the pixel intensities of the images and therefore they are prone to introduce spatial or temporal blurring. Instead of using the pixel intensities, we propose to use information that allows us to sort the pixels of an image from darkest to brightest. The set of order relations which sort the pixels of an image has been called intensity order. The intensity order of an image can be estimated from low-resolution images, adjacent slices in volumetric acquisitions, temporal correlation in dynamic sequences or from prior reconstructions. Our technique for reconstruction using intensity order (TRIO) consists of looking for an image that satisfies the intensity order and minimizes the discrepancy between the acquired and reconstructed data. Results show that TRIO can effectively reconstruct 2-D-cine cardiac MR images (under-sampling factor of 4), estimating correctly the temporal evolution of the objects. Furthermore, TRIO is used as a second stage reconstruction after reconstructing with other techniques, keyhole, sliding window and k-t BLAST, to estimate the order information. In all cases the images are improved by TRIO.

  2. Image analysis for DNA sequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palaniappan, K.; Huang, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that there is a great deal of interest in automating the process of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing to support the analysis of genomic DNA such as the Human and Mouse Genome projects. In one class of gel-based sequencing protocols autoradiograph images are generated in the final step and usually require manual interpretation to reconstruct the DNA sequence represented by the image. The need to handle a large volume of sequence information necessitates automation of the manual autoradiograph reading step through image analysis in order to reduce the length of time required to obtain sequence data and reduce transcription errors. Various adaptive image enhancement, segmentation and alignment methods were applied to autoradiograph images. The methods are adaptive to the local characteristics of the image such as noise, background signal, or presence of edges. Once the two-dimensional data is converted to a set of aligned one-dimensional profiles waveform analysis is used to determine the location of each band which represents one nucleotide in the sequence. Different classification strategies including a rule-based approach are investigated to map the profile signals, augmented with the original two-dimensional image data as necessary, to textual DNA sequence information

  3. Phase Retrieval on Undersampled Data from the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Mentzell, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Phase retrieval was applied to under-sampled data from a thermal infrared imaging system to estimate defocus across the field of view (FOV). We compare phase retrieval estimated values to those obtained using an independent technique.

  4. Digital image sequence processing, compression, and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Todd R

    2004-01-01

    IntroductionTodd R. ReedCONTENT-BASED IMAGE SEQUENCE REPRESENTATIONPedro M. Q. Aguiar, Radu S. Jasinschi, José M. F. Moura, andCharnchai PluempitiwiriyawejTHE COMPUTATION OF MOTIONChristoph Stiller, Sören Kammel, Jan Horn, and Thao DangMOTION ANALYSIS AND DISPLACEMENT ESTIMATION IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAINLuca Lucchese and Guido Maria CortelazzoQUALITY OF SERVICE ASSESSMENT IN NEW GENERATION WIRELESS VIDEO COMMUNICATIONSGaetano GiuntaERROR CONCEALMENT IN DIGITAL VIDEOFrancesco G.B. De NataleIMAGE SEQUENCE RESTORATION: A WIDER PERSPECTIVEAnil KokaramVIDEO SUMMARIZATIONCuneyt M. Taskiran and Edward

  5. Metrics for Diagnosing Undersampling in Monte Carlo Tally Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Div.; Rearden, Bradley T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Div.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the potential of using Markov chain convergence diagnostics to predict the prevalence and magnitude of biases due to undersampling in Monte Carlo eigenvalue and flux tally estimates. Five metrics were applied to two models of pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies and their potential for identifying undersampling biases was evaluated by comparing the calculated test metrics with known biases in the tallies. Three of the five undersampling metrics showed the potential to accurately predict the behavior of undersampling biases in the responses examined in this study.

  6. Realise : reconstruction of reality from image sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leymarie, F.; de la Fortelle, A.; Koenderink, Jan J.; Kappers, A. M L; Stavridi, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Muller, S.; Krake, S.; Faugeras, O.; Robert, L.; Gauclin, C.; Laveau, S.; Zeller, C.; Anon,

    1996-01-01

    REALISE has for principal goals to extract from sequences of images, acquired with a moving camera, information necessary for determining the 3D (CAD-like) structure of a real-life scene together with information about the radiometric signatures of surfaces bounding the extracted 3D objects (e.g.

  7. Hierarchical morphological segmentation for image sequence coding

    OpenAIRE

    Salembier Clairon, Philippe Jean; Pardàs Feliu, Montse

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with a hierarchical morphological segmentation algorithm for image sequence coding. Mathematical morphology is very attractive for this purpose because it efficiently deals with geometrical features such as size, shape, contrast, or connectivity that can be considered as segmentation-oriented features. The algorithm follows a top-down procedure. It first takes into account the global information and produces a coarse segmentation, that is, with a small number of regions. Then...

  8. Accelerated MRI thermometry by direct estimation of temperature from undersampled k-space data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Pooja; Grissom, William A

    2015-05-01

    Acceleration of magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry is desirable for several applications of MR-guided focused ultrasound, such as those requiring greater volume coverage, higher spatial resolution, or higher frame rates. We propose and validate a constrained reconstruction method that estimates focal temperature changes directly from k-space without spatial or temporal regularization. A model comprising fully-sampled baseline images is fit to undersampled k-space data, which removes aliased temperature maps from the solution space. Reconstructed temperature maps are compared to maps reconstructed using parallel imaging (iterative self-consistent parallel imaging reconstruction [SPIRiT]) and conventional hybrid thermometry, and temporally constrained reconstruction thermometry. Temporal step response simulations demonstrate finer temporal resolution and lower error in 4×-undersampled radial k-space reconstructions compared to temporally constrained reconstruction. Simulations show that the k-space method can achieve higher accelerations with multiple receive coils. Phantom heating experiments further demonstrate the algorithm's advantage over reconstructions relying on parallel imaging alone to overcome undersampling artifacts. In vivo model error comparisons show the algorithm achieves low temperature error at higher acceleration factors (up to 32× with a radial trajectory) than compared reconstructions. High acceleration factors can be achieved using the proposed temperature reconstruction algorithm, without sacrificing temporal resolution or accuracy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Estimation of visual motion in image sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1994-01-01

    The problem of estimation of visual motion from sequences of images has been considered within a framework consisting of three stages of processing. First the extraction of motion invariants, secondly a local measurement of visual motion, and third integration of local measurements in conjunction...... with a priori knowledge. We have surveyed a series of attempts to extract motion invariants. Specifically we have illustrate the use of local Fourier phase. The Fourier phase is shown to define the local shape of the signal, thus accurately localizing an event. Different strategies for local measurement...... are given. In particular we have investigated the use of smoothness of the second order derivatives, and the use of edge model and prior destributions for the field that favor discontinuities to characterize the motion field. A succesful implementation of a temporal interpolation in a sequence of weather...

  10. O-space with high resolution readouts outperforms radial imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Tam, Leo; Kopanoglu, Emre; Peters, Dana C; Constable, R Todd; Galiana, Gigi

    2017-04-01

    While O-Space imaging is well known to accelerate image acquisition beyond traditional Cartesian sampling, its advantages compared to undersampled radial imaging, the linear trajectory most akin to O-Space imaging, have not been detailed. In addition, previous studies have focused on ultrafast imaging with very high acceleration factors and relatively low resolution. The purpose of this work is to directly compare O-Space and radial imaging in their potential to deliver highly undersampled images of high resolution and minimal artifacts, as needed for diagnostic applications. We report that the greatest advantages to O-Space imaging are observed with extended data acquisition readouts. A sampling strategy that uses high resolution readouts is presented and applied to compare the potential of radial and O-Space sequences to generate high resolution images at high undersampling factors. Simulations and phantom studies were performed to investigate whether use of extended readout windows in O-Space imaging would increase k-space sampling and improve image quality, compared to radial imaging. Experimental O-Space images acquired with high resolution readouts show fewer artifacts and greater sharpness than radial imaging with equivalent scan parameters. Radial images taken with longer readouts show stronger undersampling artifacts, which can cause small or subtle image features to disappear. These features are preserved in a comparable O-Space image. High resolution O-Space imaging yields highly undersampled images of high resolution and minimal artifacts. The additional nonlinear gradient field improves image quality beyond conventional radial imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hierarchical morphological segmentation for image sequence coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salembier, P; Pardas, M

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with a hierarchical morphological segmentation algorithm for image sequence coding. Mathematical morphology is very attractive for this purpose because it efficiently deals with geometrical features such as size, shape, contrast, or connectivity that can be considered as segmentation-oriented features. The algorithm follows a top-down procedure. It first takes into account the global information and produces a coarse segmentation, that is, with a small number of regions. Then, the segmentation quality is improved by introducing regions corresponding to more local information. The algorithm, considering sequences as being functions on a 3-D space, directly segments 3-D regions. A 3-D approach is used to get a segmentation that is stable in time and to directly solve the region correspondence problem. Each segmentation stage relies on four basic steps: simplification, marker extraction, decision, and quality estimation. The simplification removes information from the sequence to make it easier to segment. Morphological filters based on partial reconstruction are proven to be very efficient for this purpose, especially in the case of sequences. The marker extraction identifies the presence of homogeneous 3-D regions. It is based on constrained flat region labeling and morphological contrast extraction. The goal of the decision is to precisely locate the contours of regions detected by the marker extraction. This decision is performed by a modified watershed algorithm. Finally, the quality estimation concentrates on the coding residue, all the information about the 3-D regions that have not been properly segmented and therefore coded. The procedure allows the introduction of the texture and contour coding schemes within the segmentation algorithm. The coding residue is transmitted to the next segmentation stage to improve the segmentation and coding quality. Finally, segmentation and coding examples are presented to show the validity and interest of

  12. Diagnosing Undersampling in Monte Carlo Eigenvalue and Flux Tally Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the impact of undersampling on the accuracy of tally estimates in Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Steady-state MC simulations were performed for models of several critical systems with varying degrees of spatial and isotopic complexity, and the impact of undersampling on eigenvalue and fuel pin flux/fission estimates was examined. This study observed biases in MC eigenvalue estimates as large as several percent and biases in fuel pin flux/fission tally estimates that exceeded tens, and in some cases hundreds, of percent. This study also investigated five statistical metrics for predicting the occurrence of undersampling biases in MC simulations. Three of the metrics (the Heidelberger-Welch RHW, the Geweke Z-Score, and the Gelman-Rubin diagnostics) are commonly used for diagnosing the convergence of Markov chains, and two of the methods (the Contributing Particles per Generation and Tally Entropy) are new convergence metrics developed in the course of this study. These metrics were implemented in the KENO MC code within the SCALE code system and were evaluated for their reliability at predicting the onset and magnitude of undersampling biases in MC eigenvalue and flux tally estimates in two of the critical models. Of the five methods investigated, the Heidelberger-Welch RHW, the Gelman-Rubin diagnostics, and Tally Entropy produced test metrics that correlated strongly to the size of the observed undersampling biases, indicating their potential to effectively predict the size and prevalence of undersampling biases in MC simulations.

  13. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  14. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences I: Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2016-01-01

    intensity measurement program. The approach can measure and store data for a full imaging sequence in 3.8 to 8.2 s per spatial position. Based on Ispta, MI, and probe surface temperature, the method gives the ability to determine whether a sequence is within US FDA limits, or alternatively indicate how......A method for rapid measurement of intensities (Ispta), mechanical index (MI), and probe surface temperature for any ultrasound scanning sequence is presented. It uses the scanner’s sampling capability to give an accurate measurement of the whole imaging sequence for all emissions to yield the true...... measurement system (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Four different sequences have been measured: a fixed focus emission, a duplex sequence containing B-mode and flow emissions, a vector flow sequence with B-mode and flow emissions in 17 directions, and finally a synthetic aperture (SA) duplex flow...

  15. Motion compensated cine CMR of the fetal heart using radial undersampling and compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Christopher W; Seed, Mike; Kingdom, John C; Macgowan, Christopher K

    2017-03-20

    To develop and evaluate a reconstruction framework for high resolution time-resolved CMR of the fetal heart in the presence of motion. Data were acquired using a golden angle radial trajectory in seven fetal subjects and reconstructed as real-time images to detect fetal movement. Data acquired during through-plane motion were discarded whereas in-plane motion was corrected. A fetal cardiac gating signal was extracted to sort the corrected data by cardiac phase, allowing reconstruction of cine images. The quality of motion corrected images and the effect of data undersampling were quantified using separate expressions for spatial blur and image error. Motion corrected reordered cine reconstructions (127 slices) showed improved image quality relative to both uncorrected cines and corresponding real-time images across a range of root-mean-squared (RMS) displacements (0.3-3.7 mm) and fetal heart rates (119-176 bpm). The relative spatial blur between cines with and without motion correction increased with in-plane RMS displacement leading to an effective decrease in the effective spatial resolution for images without motion correction. Image error between undersampled and reference images was less than 10% for reconstructions using 750 or more spokes, yielding a minimum acceptable scan time of approximately 4 s/slice during quiescent through plane motion. By rejecting data corrupted by through-plane motion, and correcting data corrupted by in-plane translation, the proposed reconstruction framework accounts for common sources of motion artifact (gross fetal movement, maternal respiration, fetal cardiac contraction) to produce high quality images of the fetal heart.

  16. Reducing acquisition time in clinical MRI by data undersampling and compressed sensing reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Kieren Grant

    2015-11-01

    MRI is often the most sensitive or appropriate technique for important measurements in clinical diagnosis and research, but lengthy acquisition times limit its use due to cost and considerations of patient comfort and compliance. Once an image field of view and resolution is chosen, the minimum scan acquisition time is normally fixed by the amount of raw data that must be acquired to meet the Nyquist criteria. Recently, there has been research interest in using the theory of compressed sensing (CS) in MR imaging to reduce scan acquisition times. The theory argues that if our target MR image is sparse, having signal information in only a small proportion of pixels (like an angiogram), or if the image can be mathematically transformed to be sparse then it is possible to use that sparsity to recover a high definition image from substantially less acquired data. This review starts by considering methods of k-space undersampling which have already been incorporated into routine clinical imaging (partial Fourier imaging and parallel imaging), and then explains the basis of using compressed sensing in MRI. The practical considerations of applying CS to MRI acquisitions are discussed, such as designing k-space undersampling schemes, optimizing adjustable parameters in reconstructions and exploiting the power of combined compressed sensing and parallel imaging (CS-PI). A selection of clinical applications that have used CS and CS-PI prospectively are considered. The review concludes by signposting other imaging acceleration techniques under present development before concluding with a consideration of the potential impact and obstacles to bringing compressed sensing into routine use in clinical MRI.

  17. Fat suppression in MR imaging with binomial pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudovin, C.J.; Bryant, D.J.; Bydder, G.M.; Young, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to develop pulse sequences allowing suppression of fat signal on MR images without eliminating signal from other tissues with short T1. They have developed such a technique involving selective excitation of protons in water, based on a binomial pulse sequence. Imaging is performed at 0.15 T. Careful shimming is performed to maximize separation of fat and water peaks. A spin-echo 1,500/80 sequence is used, employing 90 degrees pulse with transit frequency optimized for water with null excitation of 20 H offset, followed by a section-selective 180 degrees pulse. With use of the binomial sequence for imagining, reduction in fat signal is seen on images of the pelvis and legs of volunteers. Patient studies show dramatic improvement in visualization of prostatic carcinoma compared with standard sequences

  18. Image encryption using random sequence generated from generalized information domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xia-Yan; Wu Jie-Hua; Zhang Guo-Ji; Li Xuan; Ren Ya-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    A novel image encryption method based on the random sequence generated from the generalized information domain and permutation–diffusion architecture is proposed. The random sequence is generated by reconstruction from the generalized information file and discrete trajectory extraction from the data stream. The trajectory address sequence is used to generate a P-box to shuffle the plain image while random sequences are treated as keystreams. A new factor called drift factor is employed to accelerate and enhance the performance of the random sequence generator. An initial value is introduced to make the encryption method an approximately one-time pad. Experimental results show that the random sequences pass the NIST statistical test with a high ratio and extensive analysis demonstrates that the new encryption scheme has superior security. (paper)

  19. Automated hippocampal segmentation in 3D MRI using random undersampling with boosting algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglietta, Rosalia; Amoroso, Nicola; Boccardi, Marina; Bruno, Stefania; Chincarini, Andrea; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Inglese, Paolo; Redolfi, Alberto; Tangaro, Sabina; Tateo, Andrea; Bellotti, Roberto

    The automated identification of brain structure in Magnetic Resonance Imaging is very important both in neuroscience research and as a possible clinical diagnostic tool. In this study, a novel strategy for fully automated hippocampal segmentation in MRI is presented. It is based on a supervised algorithm, called RUSBoost, which combines data random undersampling with a boosting algorithm. RUSBoost is an algorithm specifically designed for imbalanced classification, suitable for large data sets because it uses random undersampling of the majority class. The RUSBoost performances were compared with those of ADABoost, Random Forest and the publicly available brain segmentation package, FreeSurfer. This study was conducted on a data set of 50 T1-weighted structural brain images. The RUSBoost-based segmentation tool achieved the best results with a Dice's index of [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) for the left (right) brain hemisphere. An independent data set of 50 T1-weighted structural brain scans was used for an independent validation of the fully trained strategies. Again the RUSBoost segmentations compared favorably with manual segmentations with the highest performances among the four tools. Moreover, the Pearson correlation coefficient between hippocampal volumes computed by manual and RUSBoost segmentations was 0.83 (0.82) for left (right) side, statistically significant, and higher than those computed by Adaboost, Random Forest and FreeSurfer. The proposed method may be suitable for accurate, robust and statistically significant segmentations of hippocampi.

  20. Image ranking in video sequences using pairwise image comparisons and temporal smoothing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the importance of an image is highly desirable in computer vision. This work introduces an image ranking scheme suitable for use in video or image sequences. Pairwise image comparisons are used to determine image ‘interest...

  1. Fast Registration of Terrestrial LIDAR Point Cloud and Sequence Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhu, Y.; Shen, A.

    2017-09-01

    Image has rich color information, and it can help to promote recognition and classification of point cloud. The registration is an important step in the application of image and point cloud. In order to give the rich texture and color information for LiDAR point cloud, the paper researched a fast registration method of point cloud and sequence images based on the ground-based LiDAR system. First, calculating transformation matrix of one of sequence images based on 2D image and LiDAR point cloud; second, using the relationships of position and attitude information among multi-angle sequence images to calculate all transformation matrixes in the horizontal direction; last, completing the registration of point cloud and sequence images based on the collinear condition of image point, projective center and LiDAR point. The experimental results show that the method is simple and fast, and the stitching error between adjacent images is litter; meanwhile, the overall registration accuracy is high, and the method can be used in engineering application.

  2. Infrared thermal facial image sequence registration analysis and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Jian, Bo-Lin

    2015-03-01

    To study the emotional responses of subjects to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), infrared thermal facial image sequence is preprocessed for registration before further analysis such that the variance caused by minor and irregular subject movements is reduced. Without affecting the comfort level and inducing minimal harm, this study proposes an infrared thermal facial image sequence registration process that will reduce the deviations caused by the unconscious head shaking of the subjects. A fixed image for registration is produced through the localization of the centroid of the eye region as well as image translation and rotation processes. Thermal image sequencing will then be automatically registered using the two-stage genetic algorithm proposed. The deviation before and after image registration will be demonstrated by image quality indices. The results show that the infrared thermal image sequence registration process proposed in this study is effective in localizing facial images accurately, which will be beneficial to the correlation analysis of psychological information related to the facial area.

  3. A Bayesian Approach for Segmentation in Stereo Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzovaras Dimitrios

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereoscopic image sequence processing has been the focus of considerable attention in recent literature for videoconference applications. A novel Bayesian scheme is proposed in this paper, for the segmentation of a noisy stereoscopic image sequence. More specifically, occlusions and visible foreground and background regions are detected between the left and the right frame while the uncovered-background areas are identified between two successive frames of the sequence. Combined hypotheses are used for the formulation of the Bayes decision rule which employs a single intensity-difference measurement at each pixel. Experimental results illustrating the performance of the proposed technique are presented and evaluated in videoconference applications.

  4. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  5. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences I: Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Holbek, Simon; Hoyos, Carlos Armando Villagómez; Bradway, David P; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2016-01-01

    A method for rapid measurement of intensities (I(spta)), mechanical index (MI), and probe surface temperature for any ultrasound scanning sequence is presented. It uses the scanner's sampling capability to give an accurate measurement of the whole imaging sequence for all emissions to yield the true distributions. The method is several orders of magnitude faster than approaches using an oscilloscope, and it also facilitates validating the emitted pressure field and the scanner's emission sequence software. It has been implemented using the experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound system (SARUS) scanner and the Onda AIMS III intensity measurement system (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Four different sequences have been measured: a fixed focus emission, a duplex sequence containing B-mode and flow emissions, a vector flow sequence with B-mode and flow emissions in 17 directions, and finally a SA duplex flow sequence. A BK8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array probe is used for the first three sequences and a BK8670 linear array probe for the SA sequence. The method is shown to give the same intensity values within 0.24% of the AIMS III Soniq 5.0 (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) commercial intensity measurement program. The approach can measure and store data for a full imaging sequence in 3.8-8.2 s per spatial position. Based on I(spta), MI, and probe surface temperature, the method gives the ability to determine whether a sequence is within U.S. FDA limits, or alternatively indicate how to scale it to be within limits.

  6. Post-contrast T1-weighted sequences in pediatric abdominal imaging: comparative analysis of three different sequences and imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, Andreia; Ramalho, Miguel; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Heredia, Vasco; Burke, Lauren M.; De Campos, Rafael O.P.; Semelka, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Post-contrast T1-weighted imaging is an essential component of a comprehensive pediatric abdominopelvic MR examination. However, consistent good image quality is challenging, as respiratory motion in sedated children can substantially degrade the image quality. To compare the image quality of three different post-contrast T1-weighted imaging techniques - standard three-dimensional gradient-echo (3-D-GRE), magnetization-prepared gradient-recall echo (MP-GRE) and 3-D-GRE with radial data sampling (radial 3-D-GRE) - acquired in pediatric patients younger than 5 years of age. Sixty consecutive exams performed in 51 patients (23 females, 28 males; mean age 2.5 ± 1.4 years) constituted the final study population. Thirty-nine scans were performed at 3 T and 21 scans were performed at 1.5 T. Two different reviewers independently and blindly qualitatively evaluated all sequences to determine image quality and extent of artifacts. MP-GRE and radial 3-D-GRE sequences had the least respiratory motion (P < 0.0001). Standard 3-D-GRE sequences displayed the lowest average score ratings in hepatic and pancreatic edge definition, hepatic vessel clarity and overall image quality. Radial 3-D-GRE sequences showed the highest scores ratings in overall image quality. Our preliminary results support the preference of fat-suppressed radial 3-D-GRE as the best post-contrast T1-weighted imaging approach for patients under the age of 5 years, when dynamic imaging is not essential. (orig.)

  7. Geometrical primitives reconstruction from image sequence in an interactive context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monchal, L.; Aubry, P.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a method to recover 3D geometrical shape from image sequence, in a context of man machine co-operation. The human operator has to point out the edges of an object in the first image and choose a corresponding geometrical model. The algorithm tracks each relevant 2D segments describing surface discontinuities or limbs, in the images. Then, knowing motion of the camera between images, the positioning and the size of the virtual object are deduced by minimising a function. The function describes how well the virtual objects is linked to the extracted segments of the sequence, its geometrical model and pieces of information given by the operator. (author). 13 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Reconstruction of 3D scenes from sequences of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Bei; Sang, Xinzhu; Chen, Duo; Cai, Yuanfa

    2013-08-01

    Reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) scenes is an active research topic in the field of computer vision and 3D display. It's a challenge to model 3D objects rapidly and effectively. A 3D model can be extracted from multiple images. The system only requires a sequence of images taken with cameras without knowing the parameters of camera, which provide flexibility to a high degree. We focus on quickly merging point cloud of the object from depth map sequences. The whole system combines algorithms of different areas in computer vision, such as camera calibration, stereo correspondence, point cloud splicing and surface reconstruction. The procedure of 3D reconstruction is decomposed into a number of successive steps. Firstly, image sequences are received by the camera freely moving around the object. Secondly, the scene depth is obtained by a non-local stereo matching algorithm. The pairwise is realized with the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. An initial matching is then made for the first two images of the sequence. For the subsequent image that is processed with previous image, the point of interest corresponding to ones in previous images are refined or corrected. The vertical parallax between the images is eliminated. The next step is to calibrate camera, and intrinsic parameters and external parameters of the camera are calculated. Therefore, The relative position and orientation of camera are gotten. A sequence of depth maps are acquired by using a non-local cost aggregation method for stereo matching. Then point cloud sequence is achieved by the scene depths, which consists of point cloud model using the external parameters of camera and the point cloud sequence. The point cloud model is then approximated by a triangular wire-frame mesh to reduce geometric complexity and to tailor the model to the requirements of computer graphics visualization systems. Finally, the texture is mapped onto the wire-frame model, which can also be used for 3

  9. Simulation and Efficient Measurements of Intensities for Complex Imaging Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2014-01-01

    on the sequence to simulate both intensity and mechanical index (MI) according to FDA rules. A 3 MHz BK Medical 8820e convex array transducer is used with the SARUS scanner. An Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone and the Onda AIMS III system measures the pressure field for three imaging schemes: a fixed focus, single...

  10. Face reconstruction from image sequences for forensic face comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, C.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2016-01-01

    The authors explore the possibilities of a dense model-free three-dimensional (3D) face reconstruction method, based on image sequences from a single camera, to improve the current state of forensic face comparison. They propose a new model-free 3D reconstruction method for faces, based on the

  11. Congruence analysis of point clouds from unstable stereo image sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jepping

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the correction of exterior orientation parameters of stereo image sequences over deformed free-form surfaces without control points. Such imaging situation can occur, for example, during photogrammetric car crash test recordings where onboard high-speed stereo cameras are used to measure 3D surfaces. As a result of such measurements 3D point clouds of deformed surfaces are generated for a complete stereo sequence. The first objective of this research focusses on the development and investigation of methods for the detection of corresponding spatial and temporal tie points within the stereo image sequences (by stereo image matching and 3D point tracking that are robust enough for a reliable handling of occlusions and other disturbances that may occur. The second objective of this research is the analysis of object deformations in order to detect stable areas (congruence analysis. For this purpose a RANSAC-based method for congruence analysis has been developed. This process is based on the sequential transformation of randomly selected point groups from one epoch to another by using a 3D similarity transformation. The paper gives a detailed description of the congruence analysis. The approach has been tested successfully on synthetic and real image data.

  12. Studying a free fall experiment using short sequences of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, Francisco; Romanque, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    We discuss a new alternative for obtaining position and time coordinates from a video of a free fall experiment. In our approach, after converting the video to a short sequence of images, the images are analyzed using a web page application developed by the author. The main advantage of the setup explained in this work, is that it is simple to use, no software license fees are necessary, and can be scaled-up to be used by a big number of students in introductory physics courses. The steps involved in the full analysis of a falling object are: we grab a short digital video of the experiment and convert it to a sequence of images, then, using a web page that includes all the necessary javascript, the student can easily click on the object of interest to obtain the (x,y,t) coordinates, finally, the student analyze motion using a spreadsheet.

  13. Thrombus segmentation by texture dynamics from microscopic image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieu, Nicolas; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Cvejic, Ana; Stemple, Derek; Ouwehand, Willem; Navab, Nassir; Groher, Martin

    2010-03-01

    The genetic factors of thrombosis are commonly explored by microscopically imaging the coagulation of blood cells induced by injuring a vessel of mice or of zebrafish mutants. The latter species is particularly interesting since skin transparency permits to non-invasively acquire microscopic images of the scene with a CCD camera and to estimate the parameters characterizing the thrombus development. These parameters are currently determined by manual outlining, which is both error prone and extremely time consuming. Even though a technique for automatic thrombus extraction would be highly valuable for gene analysts, little work can be found, which is mainly due to very low image contrast and spurious structures. In this work, we propose to semi-automatically segment the thrombus over time from microscopic image sequences of wild-type zebrafish larvae. To compensate the lack of valuable spatial information, our main idea consists of exploiting the temporal information by modeling the variations of the pixel intensities over successive temporal windows with a linear Markov-based dynamic texture formalization. We then derive an image from the estimated model parameters, which represents the probability of a pixel to belong to the thrombus. We employ this probability image to accurately estimate the thrombus position via an active contour segmentation incorporating also prior and spatial information of the underlying intensity images. The performance of our approach is tested on three microscopic image sequences. We show that the thrombus is accurately tracked over time in each sequence if the respective parameters controlling prior influence and contour stiffness are correctly chosen.

  14. Sequences for real-time magnetic particle imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI is a new imaging modality with the potential to be a new medical tool for angiographic diagnostics. It is capable of visualizing the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic nanoparticles in high temporal and spatial resolution. Furthermore, the new spatial encoding scheme of a field free line (FFL promises a ten-fold higher sensitivity. So far, all know imaging devices featuring this new technique feature slow data acquisition and thus, are far away from real-time imaging capability. An actual real-time approach requires a complex field generator and an application of currents with very precise amplitude and phase. Here, we present the first implementation and calibration of a dynamic FFL field sequence enabling the acquisition of 50 MPI images per second in a mouse sized scanner.

  15. Towards tracer dose reduction in PET studies: Simulation of dose reduction by retrospective randomized undersampling of list-mode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Würslin, Christian; Seith, Ferdinand; Schäfer, Jürgen F; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schmidt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of tracer dose regimes in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a trade-off between diagnostic image quality and radiation exposure. The challenge lies in defining minimal tracer doses that still result in sufficient diagnostic image quality. In order to find such minimal doses, it would be useful to simulate tracer dose reduction as this would enable to study the effects of tracer dose reduction on image quality in single patients without repeated injections of different amounts of tracer. The aim of our study was to introduce and validate a method for simulation of low-dose PET images enabling direct comparison of different tracer doses in single patients and under constant influencing factors. (18)F-fluoride PET data were acquired on a combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. PET data were stored together with the temporal information of the occurrence of single events (list-mode format). A predefined proportion of PET events were then randomly deleted resulting in undersampled PET data. These data sets were subsequently reconstructed resulting in simulated low-dose PET images (retrospective undersampling of list-mode data). This approach was validated in phantom experiments by visual inspection and by comparison of PET quality metrics contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), background-variability (BV) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of measured and simulated PET images for different activity concentrations. In addition, reduced-dose PET images of a clinical (18)F-FDG PET dataset were simulated using the proposed approach. (18)F-PET image quality degraded with decreasing activity concentrations with comparable visual image characteristics in measured and in corresponding simulated PET images. This result was confirmed by quantification of image quality metrics. CRC, SNR and BV showed concordant behavior with decreasing activity concentrations for measured and for corresponding simulated PET images. Simulation of dose

  16. Compressed Sensing MRI Reconstruction from Highly Undersampled k-Space Data Using Nonsubsampled Shearlet Transform Sparsity Prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing has shown great potential in speeding up MR imaging by undersampling k-space data. Generally sparsity is used as a priori knowledge to improve the quality of reconstructed image. Compressed sensing MR image (CS-MRI reconstruction methods have employed widely used sparsifying transforms such as wavelet or total variation, which are not preeminent in dealing with MR images containing distributed discontinuities and cannot provide a sufficient sparse representation and the decomposition at any direction. In this paper, we propose a novel CS-MRI reconstruction method from highly undersampled k-space data using nonsubsampled shearlet transform (NSST sparsity prior. In particular, we have implemented a flexible decomposition with an arbitrary even number of directional subbands at each level using NSST for MR images. The highly directional sensitivity of NSST and its optimal approximation properties lead to improvement in CS-MRI reconstruction applications. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method results in the high quality reconstruction, which is highly effective at preserving the intrinsic anisotropic features of MRI meanwhile suppressing the artifacts and added noise. The objective evaluation indices outperform all compared CS-MRI methods. In summary, NSST with even number directional decomposition is very competitive in CS-MRI applications as sparsity prior in terms of performance and computational efficiency.

  17. Diagnosing Undersampling Biases in Monte Carlo Eigenvalue and Flux Tally Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.; Marshall, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, this study focuses on understanding the phenomena in Monte Carlo simulations known as undersampling, in which Monte Carlo tally estimates may not encounter a sufficient number of particles during each generation to obtain unbiased tally estimates. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the KENO Monte Carlo tools within the SCALE code system for models of several burnup credit applications with varying degrees of spatial and isotopic complexities, and the incidence and impact of undersampling on eigenvalue and flux estimates were examined. Using an inadequate number of particle histories in each generation was found to produce a maximum bias of ~100 pcm in eigenvalue estimates and biases that exceeded 10% in fuel pin flux tally estimates. Having quantified the potential magnitude of undersampling biases in eigenvalue and flux tally estimates in these systems, this study then investigated whether Markov Chain Monte Carlo convergence metrics could be integrated into Monte Carlo simulations to predict the onset and magnitude of undersampling biases. Five potential metrics for identifying undersampling biases were implemented in the SCALE code system and evaluated for their ability to predict undersampling biases by comparing the test metric scores with the observed undersampling biases. Finally, of the five convergence metrics that were investigated, three (the Heidelberger-Welch relative half-width, the Gelman-Rubin R̂ c diagnostic, and tally entropy) showed the potential to accurately predict the behavior of undersampling biases in the responses examined.

  18. Minimum TE gradient-recalled phosphorus imaging sequence on a whole-body imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listerud, J.; Lenkinski, R.E.; Axel, L.

    1989-01-01

    To define the lower limits of spatial resolution in gradient-recalled echo phosphorus studies at 1.5 T, the authors have implemented a phosphorus gradient-recalled imaging sequence on the Signa imager. All gradient ramps for the section-selective rephasing lobe, the phase-encoding pulse, and the dephasing pulse of the frequency-encoding gradient are slowed at the maximal rate. Consequently, with a field of view of 24 cm, an in-plane resolution of 3 cm, an echo appropriately offset, an RF bandwidth of 1.2 KHz, and a section thickness of 5 cm, the echo time may be reduced to 1.35 msec. The reconstruction algorithm has been modified to support oversampled data of low spatial resolution appropriate for phosphorus imaging. The sequence will acquire H-1 images and supports the automatic and manual prescan features of the commercial instrument. To facilitate setup in the phosphorus imaging mode the sequence supports the product spectroscopic mode with a DRESS (depth recalled surface coil spectroscopy) sequence and a section profile sequence for appropriate shimming, receiver characteristics, and averaging requirements. The suitability for adaptation of this sequence to three-dimensional chemical shift imaging is discussed

  19. OBJECT-SPACE MULTI-IMAGE MATCHING OF MOBILE-MAPPING-SYSTEM IMAGE SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an object-space multi-image matching procedure of terrestrial MMS (Mobile Mapping System image sequences to determine the coordinates of an object point automatically and reliably. This image matching procedure can be applied to find conjugate points of MMS image sequences efficiently. Conventional area-based image matching methods are not reliable to deliver accurate matching results for this application due to image scale variations, viewing angle variations, and object occlusions. In order to deal with these three matching problems, an object space multi-image matching is proposed. A modified NCC (Normalized Cross Correlation coefficient is proposed to measure the similarity of image patches. A modified multi-window matching procedure will also be introduced to solve the problem of object occlusion. A coarse-to-fine procedure with a combination of object-space multi-image matching and multi-window matching is adopted. The proposed procedure has been implemented for the purpose of matching terrestrial MMS image sequences. The ratio of correct matches of this experiment was about 80 %. By providing an approximate conjugate point in an overlapping image manually, most of the incorrect matches could be fixed properly and the ratio of correct matches was improved up to 98 %.

  20. Applications of phase-contrast velocimetry sequences in cardiovascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroff, J; Bière, L; Trebuchet, G; Nedelcu, C; Sibileau, E; Beregi, J-P; Aubé, C; Furber, A; Willoteaux, S

    2012-03-01

    To describe and illustrate the main applications of phase-contrast flow quantification in cardiovascular imaging. Phase-contrast velocimetry sequences provide an accurate, reliable, reproducible and non-invasive study of blood flow, information which is sometimes not available from other investigation methods. The haemodynamic information obtained from these complement MRI angiography images. They appear to have a range of clinical applications, firstly improving pathophysiological understanding but also contributing to the treatment and follow-up strategy after surgical or endovascular treatment. Copyright © 2012 Éditions Françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Segmentation Method for Liver Organ Based on Image Sequence Context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiyun; Fang, Bin; Wang, Yi; Zhong, Nanchang

    2015-10-01

    In view of the problems of more artificial interventions and segmentation defects in existing two-dimensional segmentation methods and abnormal liver segmentation errors in three-dimensional segmentation methods, this paper presents a semi-automatic liver organ segmentation method based on the image sequence context. The method takes advantage of the existing similarity between the image sequence contexts of the prior knowledge of liver organs, and combines region growing and level set method to carry out semi-automatic segmentation of livers, along with the aid of a small amount of manual intervention to deal with liver mutation situations. The experiment results showed that the liver segmentation algorithm presented in this paper had a high precision, and a good segmentation effect on livers which have greater variability, and can meet clinical application demands quite well.

  2. Monitoring carbonate dissolution using spatially resolved under-sampled NMR propagators and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederman, A. J.; Colbourne, A.; Mantle, M. D.; Gladden, L. F.; Oliveira, R.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of a porous rock matrix by an acidic flow causes a change in the pore structure and consequently the pattern of fluid flow and rock permeability. This process is relevant to many areas of practical relevance such as enhanced oil recovery, water contaminant migration and sequestration of supercritical CO2. The most important governing factors for the type of change in the pore space are related by the Péclet (Pe) and Damköhler (Da) dimensionless numbers; these compare the transport properties of the fluid in the porous medium with the reactive properties of the solid matrix and the incident fluid respectively. Variation in Pe and Da can cause very different evolution regimes of the pore space and flow can occur, ranging from a uniform dissolution through different "wormholing" regimes (shown on the left hand side of figure 1) to face dissolution. NMR has a unique capability of measuring both the flow and structural changes during such dissolution whilst the characteristics of flow in the highly heterogeneous matrix that is formed can be predicted by the CTRW modelling approach. Here, NMR measurements of displacement probability distributions, or propagators, have been used to monitor the evolution of fluid flow during a reactive dissolution rock core floods. Developments in the NMR method by undersampling the acquisition data enable spatially resolved measurements of the propagators to be done at sufficient displacement resolution and in a timescale that is short enough to capture the changes in structure and flow. The highly under-sampled (4%) data, which typically reduces the acquisition time from 2 hours to 6 minutes, has been shown to produce equivalent propagator results to the fully sampled experiment. Combining these propagator measurements with quantitative and fast imaging techniques a full time-resolved picture of the dissolution reaction is built up. Experiments have been done for both Ketton and Estaillades carbonate rock cores, which

  3. Fast carotid artery MR angiography with compressed sensing based three-dimensional time-of-flight sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Li, Hao; Dong, Li; Huang, Guofu

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the feasibility of fast carotid artery MR angiography (MRA) by combining three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) with compressed sensing method (CS-3D TOF). A pseudo-sequential phase encoding order was developed for CS-3D TOF to generate hyper-intense vessel and suppress background tissues in under-sampled 3D k-space. Seven healthy volunteers and one patient with carotid artery stenosis were recruited for this study. Five sequential CS-3D TOF scans were implemented at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5-fold acceleration factors for carotid artery MRA. Blood signal-to-tissue ratio (BTR) values for fully-sampled and under-sampled acquisitions were calculated and compared in seven subjects. Blood area (BA) was measured and compared between fully sampled acquisition and each under-sampled one. There were no significant differences between the fully-sampled dataset and each under-sampled in BTR comparisons (P>0.05 for all comparisons). The carotid vessel BAs measured from the images of CS-3D TOF sequences with 2, 3, 4 and 5-fold acceleration scans were all highly correlated with that of the fully-sampled acquisition. The contrast between blood vessels and background tissues of the images at 2 to 5-fold acceleration is comparable to that of fully sampled images. The images at 2× to 5× exhibit the comparable lumen definition to the corresponding images at 1×. By combining the pseudo-sequential phase encoding order, CS reconstruction, and 3D TOF sequence, this technique provides excellent visualizations for carotid vessel and calcifications in a short scan time. It has the potential to be integrated into current multiple blood contrast imaging protocol. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Quality evaluation of edge detection in a road image sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo B. de A. Gallis

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial mobile mapping systems map interest features along roads such as poles, traffic signs, curb lines, garbage cans etc. The lab work, concerned to the object reconstruction, consists of transforming the video into still images on which homologous points and features of the road sequence are selected and measured. By means of photogrammetric intersection the object coordinates of these features and points are computed for 3D reconstruction. Using Canny algorithm for the automatic edge detection in a road image sequence the article initially focuses on the empiric determination of the required parameters (standard deviation s and high Ta and low Tb threshold. Then it presents the quality in terms of displacement of the automatically detected edges similar to those visually (manually selected straight features extracted by a human operator that takes them as correct, therefore, as reference for the automatic extraction comparison and the quality evaluation. The results of the tests are discussed and show that the quality of the automatic detection – measured by a quantity of rights and wrongs – vary accordingly to the empirically determined standard deviation and high and low thresholds and also to the image sequence environment (street or road.

  5. A COMPARISON OF GALAXY COUNTING TECHNIQUES IN SPECTROSCOPICALLY UNDERSAMPLED REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  6. Non-rigid consistent registration of 2D image sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganda-Carreras, I; Sorzano, C O S; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M; Thevenaz, P; Munoz-Barrutia, A; Ortiz-de Solorzano, C; Kybic, J

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the registration of 2D image sequences that combines the principles of multiresolution B-spline-based elastic registration and those of bidirectional consistent registration. In our method, consecutive triples of images are iteratively registered to gradually extend the information through the set of images of the entire sequence. The intermediate results are reused for the registration of the following triple. We choose to interpolate the images and model the deformation fields using B-spline multiresolution pyramids. Novel boundary conditions are introduced to better characterize the deformations at the boundaries. In the experimental section, we quantitatively show that our method recovers from barrel/pincushion and fish-eye deformations with subpixel error. Moreover, it is more robust against outliers-occasional strong noise and large rotations-than the state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we show that our method can be used to realign series of histological serial sections, which are often heavily distorted due to folding and tearing of the tissues.

  7. Non-rigid consistent registration of 2D image sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganda-Carreras, I; Sorzano, C O S; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M [Biocomputing Unit, National Centre for Biotechnology, CSIC, Darwin 3, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Thevenaz, P [Biomedical Imaging Group, Ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland); Munoz-Barrutia, A; Ortiz-de Solorzano, C [Cancer Imaging Laboratory, Centre for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kybic, J, E-mail: iarganda@cnb.csic.e [Center for Machine Perception, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-21

    We present a novel algorithm for the registration of 2D image sequences that combines the principles of multiresolution B-spline-based elastic registration and those of bidirectional consistent registration. In our method, consecutive triples of images are iteratively registered to gradually extend the information through the set of images of the entire sequence. The intermediate results are reused for the registration of the following triple. We choose to interpolate the images and model the deformation fields using B-spline multiresolution pyramids. Novel boundary conditions are introduced to better characterize the deformations at the boundaries. In the experimental section, we quantitatively show that our method recovers from barrel/pincushion and fish-eye deformations with subpixel error. Moreover, it is more robust against outliers-occasional strong noise and large rotations-than the state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we show that our method can be used to realign series of histological serial sections, which are often heavily distorted due to folding and tearing of the tissues.

  8. Silhouette extraction from human gait images sequence using cosegmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyan; Zhang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    Gait based human identification is very useful for automatic person recognize through visual surveillance and has attracted more and more researchers. A key step in gait based human identification is to extract human silhouette from images sequence. Current silhouette extraction methods are mainly based on simple color subtraction. These methods have a very poor performance when the color of some body parts is similar to the background. In this paper a cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction method is proposed. Cosegmentation is typically defined as the task of jointly segmenting "something similar" in a given set of images. We can divide the human gait images sequence into several step cycles and every step cycle consist of 10-15 frames. The frames in human gait images sequence have following similarity: every frame is similar to the next or previous frame; every frame is similar to the corresponding frame in the next or previous step cycle; every pixel can find similar pixel in other frames. The progress of cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction can be described as follows: Initially only points which have high contrast to background are used as foreground kernel points, the points in the background are used as background kernel points, then points similar to foreground points will be added to foreground points set and the points similar to background points will be added to background points set. The definition of the similarity consider the context of the point. Experimental result shows that our method has a better performance comparing to traditional human silhouette extraction methods. Keywords: Human gait

  9. Compression and Processing of Space Image Sequences of Northern Lights and Sprites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Martins, Bo; Jensen, Ole Riis

    1999-01-01

    Compression of image sequences of auroral activity as northern lights and thunderstorms with sprites is investigated.......Compression of image sequences of auroral activity as northern lights and thunderstorms with sprites is investigated....

  10. Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization

  11. A variational reconstruction method for undersampled dynamic x-ray tomography based on physical motion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Dirks, Hendrik; Frerking, Lena; Hauptmann, Andreas; Helin, Tapio; Siltanen, Samuli

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we study the reconstruction of moving object densities from undersampled dynamic x-ray tomography in two dimensions. A particular motivation of this study is to use realistic measurement protocols for practical applications, i.e. we do not assume to have a full Radon transform in each time step, but only projections in few angular directions. This restriction enforces a space-time reconstruction, which we perform by incorporating physical motion models and regularization of motion vectors in a variational framework. The methodology of optical flow, which is one of the most common methods to estimate motion between two images, is utilized to formulate a joint variational model for reconstruction and motion estimation. We provide a basic mathematical analysis of the forward model and the variational model for the image reconstruction. Moreover, we discuss the efficient numerical minimization based on alternating minimizations between images and motion vectors. A variety of results are presented for simulated and real measurement data with different sampling strategy. A key observation is that random sampling combined with our model allows reconstructions of similar amount of measurements and quality as a single static reconstruction.

  12. Superresolution restoration of an image sequence: adaptive filtering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, M; Feuer, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new method based on adaptive filtering theory for superresolution restoration of continuous image sequences. The proposed methodology suggests least squares (LS) estimators which adapt in time, based on adaptive filters, least mean squares (LMS) or recursive least squares (RLS). The adaptation enables the treatment of linear space and time-variant blurring and arbitrary motion, both of them assumed known. The proposed new approach is shown to be of relatively low computational requirements. Simulations demonstrating the superresolution restoration algorithms are presented.

  13. LUM Smoother with Smooth Control for Noisy Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukàč Rastislav

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on adaptive structure of LUM (lower-upper-middle smoothers for noisy image sequences. For the balance between noise suppression and signal-detail preservation, the LUM smoothers are widely used in smoothing applications. The amount of smoothing done by LUM smoothers is controlled by tuning parameter. However, the smoothing level is fixed for whole image. Thus, the excessive or insufficient smoothing can be performed. This problem is solved by a new method based on the adaptive controlled level of smoothing. A new method has excellent performance of the noise reduction in the environments corrupted by the impulse noise. In addition, minimal signal-detail and motion blurring can be observed. The performance of proposed method is evaluated through objective criteria and compared with traditional temporal, spatial, and spatiotemporal LUM smoothers.

  14. A multistage target tracker in IR image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiao; Yang, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust approach for tracking target in forward looking infrared imagery taken from an airborne moving platform. The tracker is proposed in a two stage algorithm with a coarse to fine manner. First, we introduce a coarse but quick algorithm to roughly locate the target, which based on a model matching procedure by computing the SIFT vector of the target. The raw position and the size of the target are then used to initialize the multistage tracking algorithm. Second, the target's position is refined through a dedicated localization algorithm, which based on a HOG feature tracking procedure to overcome the rapid size and angel changes of the dim target in the IR image sequence. Finally, the target's model can automatically been updated and utilized in the first stage. As confirmed by experimental results on a variety of IR image sequences, the proposed approach efficiently and robustly tracks target under challenging environmental conditions. Moreover, the speed of the multistage algorithm is also convincing in the tested IR imagery.

  15. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences II: Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    .6%, when using the impulse response of the probe estimated from an independent measurement. The accuracy is increased to between -22% to 24.5% for MI and between -33.2% to 27.0% for Ispta.3, when using the pressure response measured at a single point to scale the simulation. The spatial distribution of MI...... Mechanical Index (MI) and Ispta.3 as required by FDA. The method is performed on four different imaging schemes and compared to measurements conducted using the SARUS experimental scanner. The sequences include focused emissions with an F-number of 2 with 64 elements that generate highly non-linear fields....... The simulation time is between 0.67 ms to 2.8 ms per emission and imaging point, making it possible to simulate even complex emission sequences in less than 1 s for a single spatial position. The linear simulations yield a relative accuracy on MI between -12.1% to 52.3% and for Ispta.3 between -38.6% to 62...

  16. A phase field method for joint denoising, edge detection, and motion estimation in image sequence processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preusser, T.; Droske, M.; Garbe, C. S.; Telea, A.; Rumpf, M.

    2007-01-01

    The estimation of optical flow fields from image sequences is incorporated in a Mumford-Shah approach for image denoising and edge detection. Possibly noisy image sequences are considered as input and a piecewise smooth image intensity, a piecewise smooth motion field, and a joint discontinuity set

  17. Exome sequencing and diffusion tensor imaging in developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Senthil; Huq, A H M; Hsia, Tammy; Chugani, Harry

    2014-03-01

    We had previously shown that arcuate fasciculus is poorly developed in patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In the present study, we used exome sequencing to identify the candidate variants in IDD patients with and without DTI abnormalities. Eighteen children with IDD (age: 67 ± 36 mo, 9 females) were included in the present study. The DTI was used to determine the integrity of arcuate fasciculus. The next-generation sequencing was performed on the Solid 4 platform. A novel, analytical strategy was developed to identify a set of candidate genes of interest. We then searched for novel, nonsynonymous variants in the patients within this subset of genes and in known IDD genes. Seven novel, nonsynonymous (all of them were heterozygous, missense) variants belonged to ultraconserved genes that are known to cause abnormal brain morphology in mutant mice. Similarly, three novel, nonsynonymous (all of them were heterozygous, missense) variants belonged to known IDD genes. Two patients with underdeveloped arcuate fasciculus had novel, nonsynonymous variants in genes (MID1 and EN2) regulating axon guidance pathway. Exome sequencing identified several new genetic causes of IDD.

  18. AUTOMATIC ORIENTATION OF IMAGE SEQUENCES IN CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Del Pizzo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available role in the field of cultural heritage. Making copies of virtual objects is very significant for their consultation, storage, disclosure and restoration. Nowadays the modeling of a free-form object can be attained both by laser-scanning and by digital photogrammetry. With the use of the last methodology dense point clouds can be obtained through elaborate process steps. The purpose of this study is to provide input to the automation of some phases of these processes. Recent advances in the Structure from Motion community have greatly extended the feature matching and triangulation capabilities to enable significantly larger datasets to be used for the reconstruction of the relative orientation of the cameras and, consequently, of the artefacts. In this paper a methodology to automatically orient a set of images is presented, such methodology makes use of algorithms for feature extraction coming from computer vision community and allows to easily recognize a large amount of homologous points on a set of images in a completely automatic way. The above said methodology has been adopted for the automatic orienting of some sequences of images relative to several interesting sites from the perspective of cultural heritage.

  19. Symbolic representation and visual querying of left ventricular image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, M; Del Bimbo, A; Evangelist, A; Vicario, E

    1999-01-01

    In the evaluation of regional left ventricular function, relevant cardiac disorders manifest themselves not only in static features, such as shape descriptors and motion excursion in end-diastolic and end-systolic frames, but also in their temporal evolution. In common diagnostic practice, such dynamic patterns are analysed by direct inspection of frame sequences through the use of a moviola. This permits only a subjective and poorly defined evaluation of functional parameters, and definitely prevents a systematic and reproducible analysis of large sets of reports. Retrieval by contents techniques may overcome this limitation by permitting the automatic comparison of the reports in a database against queries expressing descriptive properties related to significant pathological conditions. A system is presented which is aimed at investigating the potential of this approach by supporting retrieval by contents from a database of cineangiographic or echocardiographic images. The system relies on a symbolic description of both geometrical and temporal properties of left ventricular contours. This is derived automatically by an image processing and interpretation module and associated with the report at its storage time. In the retrieval stage, queries are expressed by means of an iconic visual language which describes searched content properties over a computer screen. The system automatically interprets iconic statements and compares them against concrete descriptions in the database. This enables medical users to interact with the system to search for motion and shape abnormalities on a regional basis, in single or homogeneous groups of reports, so as to enable both prospective and retrospective diagnosis.

  20. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cardiac cine MR imaging: optimization of image reconstruction and sequence validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Bomas, Bettina; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Improved real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences have currently been introduced, but so far only limited practical experience exists. This study aimed at image reconstruction optimization and clinical validation of a new highly accelerated real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE sequence. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis stacks of a real-time free-breathing SPARSE-SENSE sequence with high spatiotemporal resolution and of a standard segmented cine SSFP sequence were acquired at 1.5 T in 11 volunteers and 15 patients. To determine the optimal iterations, all volunteers' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed using 10-200 iterations, and contrast ratios, image entropies, and reconstruction times were assessed. Subsequently, the patients' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed with the clinically optimal iterations. LV volumetric values were evaluated and compared between both sequences. Sufficient image quality and acceptable reconstruction times were achieved when using 80 iterations. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression showed good agreement for all volumetric parameters. 80 iterations are recommended for iterative SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction in clinical routine. Real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE yielded comparable volumetric results as the current standard SSFP sequence. Due to its intrinsic low image acquisition times, real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE imaging with iterative image reconstruction seems to be an attractive alternative for LV function analysis. • A highly accelerated real-time CMR sequence using SPARSE-SENSE was evaluated. • SPARSE-SENSE allows free breathing in real-time cardiac cine imaging. • For clinically optimal SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction, 80 iterations are recommended. • Real-time SPARSE-SENSE imaging yielded comparable volumetric results as the reference SSFP sequence. • The fast SPARSE-SENSE sequence is an attractive alternative to standard SSFP sequences.

  1. k-space sampling optimization for ultrashort TE imaging of cortical bone: applications in radiation therapy planning and MR-based PET attenuation correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingzhi; Su, Kuan-Hao; Pereira, Gisele C; Grover, Anu; Traughber, Bryan; Traughber, Melanie; Muzic, Raymond F

    2014-10-01

    The ultrashort echo-time (UTE) sequence is a promising MR pulse sequence for imaging cortical bone which is otherwise difficult to image using conventional MR sequences and also poses strong attenuation for photons in radiation therapy and PET imaging. The authors report here a systematic characterization of cortical bone signal decay and a scanning time optimization strategy for the UTE sequence through k-space undersampling, which can result in up to a 75% reduction in acquisition time. Using the undersampled UTE imaging sequence, the authors also attempted to quantitatively investigate the MR properties of cortical bone in healthy volunteers, thus demonstrating the feasibility of using such a technique for generating bone-enhanced images which can be used for radiation therapy planning and attenuation correction with PET/MR. An angularly undersampled, radially encoded UTE sequence was used for scanning the brains of healthy volunteers. Quantitative MR characterization of tissue properties, including water fraction and R2(∗) = 1/T2(∗), was performed by analyzing the UTE images acquired at multiple echo times. The impact of different sampling rates was evaluated through systematic comparison of the MR image quality, bone-enhanced image quality, image noise, water fraction, and R2(∗) of cortical bone. A reduced angular sampling rate of the UTE trajectory achieves acquisition durations in proportion to the sampling rate and in as short as 25% of the time required for full sampling using a standard Cartesian acquisition, while preserving unique MR contrast within the skull at the cost of a minimal increase in noise level. The R2(∗) of human skull was measured as 0.2-0.3 ms(-1) depending on the specific region, which is more than ten times greater than the R2(∗) of soft tissue. The water fraction in human skull was measured to be 60%-80%, which is significantly less than the >90% water fraction in brain. High-quality, bone-enhanced images can be generated

  2. k-space sampling optimization for ultrashort TE imaging of cortical bone: Applications in radiation therapy planning and MR-based PET attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Lingzhi; Traughber, Melanie; Su, Kuan-Hao; Pereira, Gisele C.; Grover, Anu; Traughber, Bryan; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The ultrashort echo-time (UTE) sequence is a promising MR pulse sequence for imaging cortical bone which is otherwise difficult to image using conventional MR sequences and also poses strong attenuation for photons in radiation therapy and PET imaging. The authors report here a systematic characterization of cortical bone signal decay and a scanning time optimization strategy for the UTE sequence through k-space undersampling, which can result in up to a 75% reduction in acquisition time. Using the undersampled UTE imaging sequence, the authors also attempted to quantitatively investigate the MR properties of cortical bone in healthy volunteers, thus demonstrating the feasibility of using such a technique for generating bone-enhanced images which can be used for radiation therapy planning and attenuation correction with PET/MR. Methods: An angularly undersampled, radially encoded UTE sequence was used for scanning the brains of healthy volunteers. Quantitative MR characterization of tissue properties, including water fraction and R2 ∗ = 1/T2 ∗ , was performed by analyzing the UTE images acquired at multiple echo times. The impact of different sampling rates was evaluated through systematic comparison of the MR image quality, bone-enhanced image quality, image noise, water fraction, and R2 ∗ of cortical bone. Results: A reduced angular sampling rate of the UTE trajectory achieves acquisition durations in proportion to the sampling rate and in as short as 25% of the time required for full sampling using a standard Cartesian acquisition, while preserving unique MR contrast within the skull at the cost of a minimal increase in noise level. The R2 ∗ of human skull was measured as 0.2–0.3 ms −1 depending on the specific region, which is more than ten times greater than the R2 ∗ of soft tissue. The water fraction in human skull was measured to be 60%–80%, which is significantly less than the >90% water fraction in brain. High-quality, bone

  3. An Algorithm for Pedestrian Detection in Multispectral Image Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniaz, V. V.; Fedorenko, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The growing interest for self-driving cars provides a demand for scene understanding and obstacle detection algorithms. One of the most challenging problems in this field is the problem of pedestrian detection. Main difficulties arise from a diverse appearances of pedestrians. Poor visibility conditions such as fog and low light conditions also significantly decrease the quality of pedestrian detection. This paper presents a new optical flow based algorithm BipedDetet that provides robust pedestrian detection on a single-borad computer. The algorithm is based on the idea of simplified Kalman filtering suitable for realization on modern single-board computers. To detect a pedestrian a synthetic optical flow of the scene without pedestrians is generated using slanted-plane model. The estimate of a real optical flow is generated using a multispectral image sequence. The difference of the synthetic optical flow and the real optical flow provides the optical flow induced by pedestrians. The final detection of pedestrians is done by the segmentation of the difference of optical flows. To evaluate the BipedDetect algorithm a multispectral dataset was collected using a mobile robot.

  4. Motion Estimation Using the Firefly Algorithm in Ultrasonic Image Sequence of Soft Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Chih-Feng; Horng, Ming-Huwi; Chen, Yu-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic image sequence of the soft tissue is widely used in disease diagnosis; however, the speckle noises usually influenced the image quality. These images usually have a low signal-to-noise ratio presentation. The phenomenon gives rise to traditional motion estimation algorithms that are not suitable to measure the motion vectors. In this paper, a new motion estimation algorithm is developed for assessing the velocity field of soft tissue in a sequence of ultrasonic B-mode images. The p...

  5. A framework for creating realistic synthetic fluorescence microscopy image sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy imaging is an important tool in modern biological research, allowing insights into the processes of biological systems. Automated image analysis algorithms help in extracting information from these images. Validation...

  6. Quantifying the Effect of Undersampling in Monte Carlo Simulations Using SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the effect of undersampling in Monte Carlo calculations on tally estimates and tally variance estimates for burnup credit applications. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were performed for models of several critical systems with varying degrees of spatial and isotopic complexity and the impact of undersampling on eigenvalue and flux estimates was examined. Using an inadequate number of particle histories in each generation was found to produce an approximately 100 pcm bias in the eigenvalue estimates, and biases that exceeded 10% in fuel pin flux estimates.

  7. Analysis of simulated image sequences from sensors for restricted-visibility operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturi, Rangachar

    1991-01-01

    A real time model of the visible output from a 94 GHz sensor, based on a radiometric simulation of the sensor, was developed. A sequence of images as seen from an aircraft as it approaches for landing was simulated using this model. Thirty frames from this sequence of 200 x 200 pixel images were analyzed to identify and track objects in the image using the Cantata image processing package within the visual programming environment provided by the Khoros software system. The image analysis operations are described.

  8. MR imaging of articular cartilage in the ankle: comparison of available imaging sequences and methods of measurement in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, T.C.F.; Wilcox, D.M.; Frank, L.; Shih, C.; Trudell, D.J.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To assess hyaline cartilage of cadaveric ankles using different magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques and various methods of measurement. Design and patients. Cartilage thicknesses of the talus and tibia were measured in ten cadaveric ankles by naked eye and by digitized image analysis from MR images of fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient recalled (FS-SPGR), sequences and pulsed transfer saturation sequences with (FS-STS) and without fat-suppression (STS); these measurements were compared with those derived from direct inspection of cadaveric sections. The accuracy and precision errors were evaluated statistically for each imaging technique as well as measuring method. Contrast-to-noise ratios of cartilage versus joint fluid and marrow were compared for each of the imaging sequences. Results. Statistically, measurements from FS-SPGR images were associated with the smallest estimation error. Precision error of measurements derived from digitized image analysis was found to be smaller than that derived from naked eye measurements. Cartilage thickness measurements in images from STS and FS-STS sequences revealed larger errors in both accuracy and precision. Interobserver variance was larger in naked eye assessment of the cartilage. Contrast-to-noise ratio of cartilage versus joint fluid and marrow was higher with FS-SPGR than with FS-STS or STS sequences. Conclusion. Of the sequences and measurement techniques studied, the FS-SPGR sequence combined with the use of digitized image analysis provides the most accurate method for the assessment of ankle hyaline cartilage. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. MR Image Reconstruction Using Block Matching and Adaptive Kernel Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Johannes F M; Santelli, Claudio; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    An approach to Magnetic Resonance (MR) image reconstruction from undersampled data is proposed. Undersampling artifacts are removed using an iterative thresholding algorithm applied to nonlinearly transformed image block arrays. Each block array is transformed using kernel principal component analysis where the contribution of each image block to the transform depends in a nonlinear fashion on the distance to other image blocks. Elimination of undersampling artifacts is achieved by conventional principal component analysis in the nonlinear transform domain, projection onto the main components and back-mapping into the image domain. Iterative image reconstruction is performed by interleaving the proposed undersampling artifact removal step and gradient updates enforcing consistency with acquired k-space data. The algorithm is evaluated using retrospectively undersampled MR cardiac cine data and compared to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT reconstruction. Evaluation of image quality and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) reveal improved image reconstruction for up to 8-fold undersampled data with the proposed approach relative to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT. In conclusion, block matching and kernel methods can be used for effective removal of undersampling artifacts in MR image reconstruction and outperform methods using standard compressed sensing and ℓ1-regularized parallel imaging methods.

  10. Fast 3D ultrashort echo-time spiral projection imaging using golden-angle: A flexible protocol for in vivo mouse imaging at high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castets, Charles R; Lefrançois, William; Wecker, Didier; Ribot, Emeline J; Trotier, Aurélien J; Thiaudière, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Miraux, Sylvain

    2017-05-01

    To develop a fast three-dimensional (3D) k-space encoding method based on spiral projection imaging (SPI) with an interleaved golden-angle approach and to validate this novel sequence on small animal models. A disk-like trajectory, in which each disk contained spirals, was developed. The 3D encoding was performed by tilting the disks with a golden angle. The sharpness was first calculated at different T2* values. Then, the sharpness was measured on phantom using variable undersampling ratios. Finally, the sampling method was validated by whole brain time-of-flight angiography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) enhanced free-breathing liver angiography on mouse. The in vitro results demonstrated the robustness of the method for short T2* and high undersampling ratios. In vivo experiments showed the ability to properly detect small vessels in the brain with an acquisition time shorter than 1 min. Free-breathing mice liver angiography showed the insensitivity of this protocol toward motions and flow artifacts, and enabled the visualization of liver motion during breathing. The method implemented here allowed fast 3D k-space sampling with a high undersampling ratio. Combining the advantages of center-out spirals with the flexibility of the golden angle approach could have major implications for real-time imaging. Magn Reson Med 77:1831-1840, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. On-board processing of video image sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Dahl; Chanrion, Olivier Arnaud; Forchhammer, Søren

    2008-01-01

    and evaluated. On-board there are six video cameras each capturing images of 1024times1024 pixels of 12 bpp at a frame rate of 15 fps, thus totalling 1080 Mbits/s. In comparison the average downlink data rate for these images is projected to be 50 kbit/s. This calls for efficient on-board processing to select...... and compress the data. Algorithms for on-board processing of the image data are presented as well as evaluation of the performance. The main processing steps are event detection, image cropping and image compression. The on-board processing requirements are also evaluated....... of the mission is to study transient luminous events (TLE) above severe thunderstorms: the sprites, jets and elves. Other atmospheric phenomena are also studied including aurora, gravity waves and meteors. As part of the ASIM Phase B study, on-board processing of data from the cameras is being developed...

  12. MR imaging of osteonecrosis using frequency selective chemical shift sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duda, S.H.; Laniado, M.; Schick, F.

    1993-01-01

    The MR appearance of osteonecrosis was assessed on selective fat- and water images to further evaluate the nature of double-line sign. Conventional T1- and T2-weighted SE and frequency selective chemical shift images of eight patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head and three patients with bone infarcts were retrospectively reviewed. Eight of 11 patients showed a double-line sign on T2-weighted SE images. In these cases, correlation with selective water images revealed that a chemical shift artifact contributed to appearance and location of the hyperintense line. The authors conclude that chemical shift imaging improves our understanding of the nature of the double-line sign. (orig.) [de

  13. Optimal importance sampling for tracking in image sequences: application to point tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud , Elise; Memin , Etienne

    2004-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we propose a particle filtering technique for tracking applications in image sequences. The system we propose combines a measurement equation and a dynamic equation which both depend on the image sequence. Taking into account several possible observations, the peculiar measure model we consider is a linear combination of Gaussian laws. Such a model allows us to infer an analytic expression of the optimal importance function used in the diffusion process ...

  14. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E.; Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I.; Tsagkalis, A.; Dailiana, Z.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  15. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E. [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Greece, Department of Medical Radiological Technologists, Athens (Greece); Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I. [University of Thessaly, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece); Tsagkalis, A. [IASO Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Larissa (Greece); Dailiana, Z. [University of Thessaly, Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  16. Motion estimation using the firefly algorithm in ultrasonic image sequence of soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chih-Feng; Horng, Ming-Huwi; Chen, Yu-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic image sequence of the soft tissue is widely used in disease diagnosis; however, the speckle noises usually influenced the image quality. These images usually have a low signal-to-noise ratio presentation. The phenomenon gives rise to traditional motion estimation algorithms that are not suitable to measure the motion vectors. In this paper, a new motion estimation algorithm is developed for assessing the velocity field of soft tissue in a sequence of ultrasonic B-mode images. The proposed iterative firefly algorithm (IFA) searches for few candidate points to obtain the optimal motion vector, and then compares it to the traditional iterative full search algorithm (IFSA) via a series of experiments of in vivo ultrasonic image sequences. The experimental results show that the IFA can assess the vector with better efficiency and almost equal estimation quality compared to the traditional IFSA method.

  17. Motion Estimation Using the Firefly Algorithm in Ultrasonic Image Sequence of Soft Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Feng Chao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic image sequence of the soft tissue is widely used in disease diagnosis; however, the speckle noises usually influenced the image quality. These images usually have a low signal-to-noise ratio presentation. The phenomenon gives rise to traditional motion estimation algorithms that are not suitable to measure the motion vectors. In this paper, a new motion estimation algorithm is developed for assessing the velocity field of soft tissue in a sequence of ultrasonic B-mode images. The proposed iterative firefly algorithm (IFA searches for few candidate points to obtain the optimal motion vector, and then compares it to the traditional iterative full search algorithm (IFSA via a series of experiments of in vivo ultrasonic image sequences. The experimental results show that the IFA can assess the vector with better efficiency and almost equal estimation quality compared to the traditional IFSA method.

  18. Interframe DPCM with robust median-based predictors for transmission of image sequences over noisy channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X; Viero, T; Neuvo, Y

    1996-01-01

    A new image sequence coding technique based on robust median-based predictors is presented for the transmission of image sequences over noisy channels. We analyze the robustness of median-based predictors against channel errors. A heuristic algorithm for the design of a robust predictor from a given median-based predictor is presented. It is shown that with small modifications in terms of a necessary requirement for a median-based predictor to be robust against channel errors, the robustness of a given median-based predictor can be considerably improved. Simulations on a real image sequence show significant improvement over the conventional differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) at high bit error rate (BER) using this new technique. The technique does not increase the transmission rate. It is shown that the quality of reconstructed images obtained by robust median-based predictors can be further improved by postprocessing the image using a nonlinear detail-preserving noise-smoothing filter.

  19. Spatial regularization applied to factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frouin, F.; Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic image sequences allow physiological mechanisms to be monitored after the injection of a tracer. Factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS) hence creates a synthesis of the information in one image sequence. It estimates a limited number of structures (factor images) assuming that the tracer kinetics (factors) are similar at each point inside the structure. A spatial regularization method for computing factor images (REG-FAMIS) is proposed to remove irregularities due to noise in the original data while preserving discontinuities between structures. REG-FAMIS has been applied to two sets of simulations: (a) dynamic data with Gaussian noise and (b) dynamic studies in emission tomography (PET or SPECT), which respect real tomographic acquisition parameters and noise characteristics. Optimal regularization parameters are estimated in order to minimize the distance between reference images and regularized factor images. Compared with conventional factor images, the root mean square error between regularized images and reference factor images is improved by 3 for the first set of simulations, and by about 1.5 for the second set of simulations. In all cases, regularized factor images are qualitatively and quantitatively improved. (author)

  20. A lossless compression method for medical image sequences using JPEG-LS and interframe coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaou, Shaou-Gang; Ke, Fu-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2009-09-01

    Hospitals and medical centers produce an enormous amount of digital medical images every day, especially in the form of image sequences, which requires considerable storage space. One solution could be the application of lossless compression. Among available methods, JPEG-LS has excellent coding performance. However, it only compresses a single picture with intracoding and does not utilize the interframe correlation among pictures. Therefore, this paper proposes a method that combines the JPEG-LS and an interframe coding with motion vectors to enhance the compression performance of using JPEG-LS alone. Since the interframe correlation between two adjacent images in a medical image sequence is usually not as high as that in a general video image sequence, the interframe coding is activated only when the interframe correlation is high enough. With six capsule endoscope image sequences under test, the proposed method achieves average compression gains of 13.3% and 26.3% over the methods of using JPEG-LS and JPEG2000 alone, respectively. Similarly, for an MRI image sequence, coding gains of 77.5% and 86.5% are correspondingly obtained.

  1. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  2. Parallel MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmane, Anagha; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2012-07-01

    Parallel imaging is a robust method for accelerating the acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and has made possible many new applications of MR imaging. Parallel imaging works by acquiring a reduced amount of k-space data with an array of receiver coils. These undersampled data can be acquired more quickly, but the undersampling leads to aliased images. One of several parallel imaging algorithms can then be used to reconstruct artifact-free images from either the aliased images (SENSE-type reconstruction) or from the undersampled data (GRAPPA-type reconstruction). The advantages of parallel imaging in a clinical setting include faster image acquisition, which can be used, for instance, to shorten breath-hold times resulting in fewer motion-corrupted examinations. In this article the basic concepts behind parallel imaging are introduced. The relationship between undersampling and aliasing is discussed and two commonly used parallel imaging methods, SENSE and GRAPPA, are explained in detail. Examples of artifacts arising from parallel imaging are shown and ways to detect and mitigate these artifacts are described. Finally, several current applications of parallel imaging are presented and recent advancements and promising research in parallel imaging are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Outdoor Illumination Estimation in Image Sequences for Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus B.; Lal, Brajesh Behari

    2011-01-01

    the detected shadows is used to estimate the radiance of the sun. The technique does not require special purpose objects in the scene, nor does it require High Dynamic Range imagery. Results are demonstrated by rendering augmented objects into real images with shading and shadows which are consistent...

  4. EEG Sequence Imaging: A Markov Prior for the Variational Garrote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    We propose the following generalization of the Variational Garrote for sequential EEG imaging: A Markov prior to promote sparse, but temporally smooth source dynamics. We derive a set of modied Variational Garrote updates and analyze the role of the prior's hyperparameters. An experimental...

  5. Note: A simple broad bandwidth undersampling frequency-domain digital diffuse optical spectroscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Justin; Istfan, Raeef; Roblyer, Darren

    2014-07-01

    Near-Infrared frequency-domain technologies, such as Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (DOS), have demonstrated growing potential in a number of clinical applications. The broader dissemination of this technology is limited by the complexity and cost of instrumentation. We present here a simple system constructed with off-the-shelf components that utilizes undersampling for digital frequency-domain dDOS measurements. Broadband RF sweeps (50-300 MHz) were digitally sampled at 25 MSPS; amplitude, phase, and optical property extractions were within 5% of network analyzer derived values. The use of undersampling for broad bandwidth dDOS provides a significant reduction in complexity, power consumption, and cost compared with high-speed ADCs and analog techniques.

  6. Retrieval of Sentence Sequences for an Image Stream via Coherence Recurrent Convolutional Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cesc Chunseong; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Gunhee

    2018-04-01

    We propose an approach for retrieving a sequence of natural sentences for an image stream. Since general users often take a series of pictures on their experiences, much online visual information exists in the form of image streams, for which it would better take into consideration of the whole image stream to produce natural language descriptions. While almost all previous studies have dealt with the relation between a single image and a single natural sentence, our work extends both input and output dimension to a sequence of images and a sequence of sentences. For retrieving a coherent flow of multiple sentences for a photo stream, we propose a multimodal neural architecture called coherence recurrent convolutional network (CRCN), which consists of convolutional neural networks, bidirectional long short-term memory (LSTM) networks, and an entity-based local coherence model. Our approach directly learns from vast user-generated resource of blog posts as text-image parallel training data. We collect more than 22 K unique blog posts with 170 K associated images for the travel topics of NYC, Disneyland , Australia, and Hawaii. We demonstrate that our approach outperforms other state-of-the-art image captioning methods for text sequence generation, using both quantitative measures and user studies via Amazon Mechanical Turk.

  7. Rapid Measurements of Intensities for Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2014-01-01

    FDA requires that intensity and safety parameters are measured for all imaging schemes for clinical imaging. This is often cumbersome, since the scan sequence has to broken apart, measurements conducted for the individually emitted beams, and the nal intensity levels calculated by combining the i...

  8. Improved Pediatric MR Imaging with Compressed Sensing1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Marcus T.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Barth, Richard A.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method that combines parallel imaging and compressed sensing to enable faster and/or higher spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and show its feasibility in a pediatric clinical setting. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant study, and informed consent or assent was given by subjects. A pseudorandom k-space undersampling pattern was incorporated into a three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence; aliasing then has an incoherent noiselike pattern rather than the usual coherent fold-over wrapping pattern. This k-space–sampling pattern was combined with a compressed sensing nonlinear reconstruction method that exploits the assumption of sparsity of medical images to permit reconstruction from undersampled k-space data and remove the noiselike aliasing. Thirty-four patients (15 female and 19 male patients; mean age, 8.1 years; range, 0–17 years) referred for cardiovascular, abdominal, and knee MR imaging were scanned with this 3D gradient-echo sequence at high acceleration factors. Obtained k-space data were reconstructed with both a traditional parallel imaging algorithm and the nonlinear method. Both sets of images were rated for image quality, radiologist preference, and delineation of specific structures by two radiologists. Wilcoxon and symmetry tests were performed to test the hypothesis that there was no significant difference in ratings for image quality, preference, and delineation of specific structures. Results: Compressed sensing images were preferred more often, had significantly higher image quality ratings, and greater delineation of anatomic structures (P < .001) than did images obtained with the traditional parallel reconstruction method. Conclusion: A combination of parallel imaging and compressed sensing is feasible in a clinical setting and may provide higher resolution and/or faster imaging, addressing the challenge of delineating anatomic

  9. Optimal context quantization in lossless compression of image data sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Wu, X.; Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    2004-01-01

    In image compression context-based entropy coding is commonly used. A critical issue to the performance of context-based image coding is how to resolve the conflict of a desire for large templates to model high-order statistic dependency of the pixels and the problem of context dilution due...... to insufficient sample statistics of a given input image. We consider the problem of finding the optimal quantizer Q that quantizes the K-dimensional causal context C/sub t/=(X/sub t-t1/,X/sub t-t2/,...,X/sub t-tK/) of a source symbol X/sub t/ into one of a set of conditioning states. The optimality of context...... quantization is defined to be the minimum static or minimum adaptive code length of given a data set. For a binary source alphabet an optimal context quantizer can be computed exactly by a fast dynamic programming algorithm. Faster approximation solutions are also proposed. In case of m-ary source alphabet...

  10. Estimation of physiological parameters using knowledge-based factor analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine image sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, J.T.; Chen, C.T.; Cooper, M.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have previously developed a knowledge-based method of factor analysis to analyze dynamic nuclear medicine image sequences. In this paper, the authors analyze dynamic PET cerebral glucose metabolism and neuroreceptor binding studies. These methods have shown the ability to reduce the dimensionality of the data, enhance the image quality of the sequence, and generate meaningful functional images and their corresponding physiological time functions. The new information produced by the factor analysis has now been used to improve the estimation of various physiological parameters. A principal component analysis (PCA) is first performed to identify statistically significant temporal variations and remove the uncorrelated variations (noise) due to Poisson counting statistics. The statistically significant principal components are then used to reconstruct a noise-reduced image sequence as well as provide an initial solution for the factor analysis. Prior knowledge such as the compartmental models or the requirement of positivity and simple structure can be used to constrain the analysis. These constraints are used to rotate the factors to the most physically and physiologically realistic solution. The final result is a small number of time functions (factors) representing the underlying physiological processes and their associated weighting images representing the spatial localization of these functions. Estimation of physiological parameters can then be performed using the noise-reduced image sequence generated from the statistically significant PCs and/or the final factor images and time functions. These results are compared to the parameter estimation using standard methods and the original raw image sequences. Graphical analysis was performed at the pixel level to generate comparable parametric images of the slope and intercept (influx constant and distribution volume)

  11. Fat-saturated diffusion-weighted imaging with three-dimensional MP-RAGE sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, Tomokazu; Homma, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Hirose, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Image misrepresentation due to chemical shifts can create image artifacts on MR images. Distinguishing the organization and affected area can be difficult due to the chemical shift artifacts. Chemical shift selective (CHESS) is a method of decreasing chemical shift artifacts. In this study we have developed a new sequence for fat-saturated three-dimensional diffusion weighted MR imaging. This imaging was done during in vivo studies using an animal experiment MR imaging system at 2.0 T. In this sequence a preparation phase with a ''CHESS-90 deg RF-Motion Proving Gradient (MPG-180 deg RF-MPG-90 deg RF pulse train) was used to sensitize the magnetization to fat-saturated diffusion. Centric k-space acquisition order is necessary to minimize saturation effects from tissues with short relaxation times. From experimental results obtained with a phantom, the effect of the diffusion weighting and the effect of the fat-saturation were confirmed. From rat experimental results, fat-saturated diffusion weighted image data (0.55 x 0.55 x 0.55 mm 3 : voxel size) were obtained. This sequence was useful for in vivo imaging. (author)

  12. Shadow Areas Robust Matching Among Image Sequence in Planetary Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoyan, Wei; Xiaogang, Ruan; Naigong, Yu; Xiaoqing, Zhu; Jia, Lin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an approach for robust matching shadow areas in autonomous visual navigation and planetary landing is proposed. The approach begins with detecting shadow areas, which are extracted by Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER). Then, an affine normalization algorithm is applied to normalize the areas. Thirdly, a descriptor called Multiple Angles-SIFT (MA-SIFT) that coming from SIFT is proposed, the descriptor can extract more features of an area. Finally, for eliminating the influence of outliers, a method of improved RANSAC based on Skinner Operation Condition is proposed to extract inliers. At last, series of experiments are conducted to test the performance of the approach this paper proposed, the results show that the approach can maintain the matching accuracy at a high level even the differences among the images are obvious with no attitude measurements supplied.

  13. A novel color image encryption scheme using fractional-order hyperchaotic system and DNA sequence operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li-Min; Sun Ke-Hui; Liu Wen-Hao; He Shao-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, Adomian decomposition method (ADM) with high accuracy and fast convergence is introduced to solve the fractional-order piecewise-linear (PWL) hyperchaotic system. Based on the obtained hyperchaotic sequences, a novel color image encryption algorithm is proposed by employing a hybrid model of bidirectional circular permutation and DNA masking. In this scheme, the pixel positions of image are scrambled by circular permutation, and the pixel values are substituted by DNA sequence operations. In the DNA sequence operations, addition and substraction operations are performed according to traditional addition and subtraction in the binary, and two rounds of addition rules are used to encrypt the pixel values. The simulation results and security analysis show that the hyperchaotic map is suitable for image encryption, and the proposed encryption algorithm has good encryption effect and strong key sensitivity. It can resist brute-force attack, statistical attack, differential attack, known-plaintext, and chosen-plaintext attacks. (paper)

  14. Artificial Intelligence In Processing A Sequence Of Time-Varying Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, W.; Tucker, D.; Buckley, J.; Hess, R. G.; Powell, V. G.

    1985-04-01

    A computer system is described for unsupervised analysis of five sets of ultrasound images of the heart. Each set consists of 24 frames taken at 33 millisecond intervals. The images are acquired in real time with computer control of the ultrasound apparatus. After acquisition the images are segmented by a sequence of image-processing programs; features are extracted and stored in a version of the Carnegie- Mellon Blackboard. Region classification is accomplished by a fuzzy logic expert system FLOPS based on OPS5. Preliminary results are given.

  15. Optimized Bias Voltage Modulation Sequence for cMUT and Nonlinear Contrast Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouan, Damien; Bouakaz, Ayache

    Rationale and aim: In the field of ultrasonic contrast agent imaging, Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer (cMUT) are of great interest because of their wide frequency bandwidth. However, due to their intrinsic nonlinear behaviour, their use with classical nonlinear imaging techniques (pulse inversion, amplitude modulation, harmonic imaging..) is still limited. Different approaches have been proposed to suppress the nonlinear part of the emitting signal from a cMUT. Recently, a new imaging sequence called Bias Voltage Modulation (BVM) has shown very good potential but is limited to the conventional regime of the probe (well below the collapse voltage). Thus the probe's sensitivity is not optimized.

  16. Parry-Romberg syndrome: findings in advanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences - case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Rafael Alfenas de; Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas, E-mail: alfenas85@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de radiologia; Ribeiro, Renato Niemeyer de Freitas [Hospital de Clinica de Jacarepagua, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Lais Balbi de [Universidade Presidente Antonio Carlos (Unipac), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare disease characterized by progressive hemifacial atrophy associated with other systemic changes, including neurological symptoms. Currently, there are few studies exploring the utilization of advanced magnetic resonance sequences in the investigation of this disease. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old patient and describe the findings at structural magnetic resonance imaging and at advanced sequences, correlating them with pathophysiological data. (author)

  17. GPU-based fast cone beam CT reconstruction from undersampled and noisy projection data via total variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xun; Lou Yifei; Li Ruijiang; Song, William Y.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the large radiation dose from serial CBCT scans in most IGRT procedures raises a clinical concern, especially for pediatric patients who are essentially excluded from receiving IGRT for this reason. The goal of this work is to develop a fast GPU-based algorithm to reconstruct CBCT from undersampled and noisy projection data so as to lower the imaging dose. Methods: The CBCT is reconstructed by minimizing an energy functional consisting of a data fidelity term and a total variation regularization term. The authors developed a GPU-friendly version of the forward-backward splitting algorithm to solve this model. A multigrid technique is also employed. Results: It is found that 20-40 x-ray projections are sufficient to reconstruct images with satisfactory quality for IGRT. The reconstruction time ranges from 77 to 130 s on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 (NVIDIA, Santa Clara, CA) GPU card, depending on the number of projections used, which is estimated about 100 times faster than similar iterative reconstruction approaches. Moreover, phantom studies indicate that the algorithm enables the CBCT to be reconstructed under a scanning protocol with as low as 0.1 mA s/projection. Comparing with currently widely used full-fan head and neck scanning protocol of ∼360 projections with 0.4 mA s/projection, it is estimated that an overall 36-72 times dose reduction has been achieved in our fast CBCT reconstruction algorithm. Conclusions: This work indicates that the developed GPU-based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is capable of lowering imaging dose considerably. The high computation efficiency in this algorithm makes the iterative CBCT reconstruction approach applicable in real clinical environments.

  18. Effects of imaging gradients in sequences with varying longitudinal storage time-Case of diffusion exchange imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasic, Samo; Lundell, Henrik; Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    low-pass diffusion filtering during the LS interval, which is more pronounced at lower exchange rates. For a total exchange rate constant larger than 1 s-1, the AXR bias is expected to be negligible when slices thicker than 2.5mm are used. Conclusion: In correlation experiments like FEXI, relying......Purpose: To illustrate the potential bias caused by imaging gradients in correlation MRI sequences using longitudinal magnetization storage (LS) and examine the case of filter exchange imaging (FEXI) yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate (AXR). Methods: The effects of imaging gradients...

  19. Iteration and superposition encryption scheme for image sequences based on multi-dimensional keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Shen, Yuzhen; Ma, Wenlin

    2017-12-01

    An iteration and superposition encryption scheme for image sequences based on multi-dimensional keys is proposed for high security, big capacity and low noise information transmission. Multiple images to be encrypted are transformed into phase-only images with the iterative algorithm and then are encrypted by different random phase, respectively. The encrypted phase-only images are performed by inverse Fourier transform, respectively, thus new object functions are generated. The new functions are located in different blocks and padded zero for a sparse distribution, then they propagate to a specific region at different distances by angular spectrum diffraction, respectively and are superposed in order to form a single image. The single image is multiplied with a random phase in the frequency domain and then the phase part of the frequency spectrums is truncated and the amplitude information is reserved. The random phase, propagation distances, truncated phase information in frequency domain are employed as multiple dimensional keys. The iteration processing and sparse distribution greatly reduce the crosstalk among the multiple encryption images. The superposition of image sequences greatly improves the capacity of encrypted information. Several numerical experiments based on a designed optical system demonstrate that the proposed scheme can enhance encrypted information capacity and make image transmission at a highly desired security level.

  20. Accelerating knee MR imaging: Compressed sensing in isotropic three-dimensional fast spin-echo sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2018-02-01

    To compare image quality between compressed sensing (CS)-3D-fast spin-echo (FSE) and conventional 3D-FSE sequences for knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Knee MRI of 43 patients (male:female, 14:29; mean age, 53years) were acquired using conventional and CS-3D-FSE with an acceleration factor of 1.5. Overall image quality was assessed by correlation coefficient, root-mean-square error (RMSE), and structural similarity (SSIM) index. Regional image quality was evaluated using signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Subjective image quality was evaluated using a four-point scale. Diagnostic agreement for meniscal lesions between the two sequences was evaluated. The scan time was reduced from 7:14-8:08 to 4:53-5:08 with CS. A strong positive correlation was observed between data of the two sequences (mean r=0.880). The RMSE (mean, 126.861) and SSIM index (mean, 0.987) were acceptable. The SNRs and CNRs were not significantly different between the two sequences (P>0.05, each). There were no significant differences in the evaluation of the menisci and cruciate ligaments, while the CS images demonstrated inferior quality of cartilage-subchondral bone delineation. Diagnostic agreement for meniscal lesions between the two sequences was very good (κ=0.943-1). Compressed sensing-3D-FSE knee MRI produces images of acceptable quality while reducing scan time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome sequencing by direct imaging x-ray color holography. Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Rhodes, C.K. [MCR Technology Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Moriarty, R.M. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1989-12-31

    Currently available techniques for sequencing DNA are inadequate for oligonucleotides of length greater than 600 nucleotides and are most effective in the 300 nucleotide range. Automated sequencers are now available which use, basically, the Sanger dideoxy termination method. The sequencing rates of these conventional methods are extremely low and involve very labor intensive procedures, requiring on the order of two man-years of effort for the determination of the sequence of a single 100 kilobase segment. Since the full human genetic complement is of vast size, representing {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup 9} bases, a fast and accurate method for DNA sequencing is needed. Therefore, we set as a goal a sequencing rate in the range of {approximately} 10{sup 2} bp/s with an accuracy of {approximately} 1 error per 10{sup 6} bases, a value exceeding that set by the fidelity of current enzymatic processes. These values would permit the accurate determination of the sequence of the full human genome in one year. An approach involving rapid direct imaging of large segments of DNA is desired. A properly constructed x-ray Fourier-transform holographic microscope appears to combine these features. A basic x-ray holographic instrument has been designed. This concept, with appropriate modifications, and the use of presently available x-ray sources, appears applicable to the task of genome sequencing with a resulting rate of sequence determination in the range of {approximately} 10{sup 2} bp/s.

  2. Denoising time-resolved microscopy image sequences with singular value thresholding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnival, Tom, E-mail: tjof2@cam.ac.uk; Leary, Rowan K., E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk; Midgley, Paul A., E-mail: pam33@cam.ac.uk

    2017-07-15

    Time-resolved imaging in microscopy is important for the direct observation of a range of dynamic processes in both the physical and life sciences. However, the image sequences are often corrupted by noise, either as a result of high frame rates or a need to limit the radiation dose received by the sample. Here we exploit both spatial and temporal correlations using low-rank matrix recovery methods to denoise microscopy image sequences. We also make use of an unbiased risk estimator to address the issue of how much thresholding to apply in a robust and automated manner. The performance of the technique is demonstrated using simulated image sequences, as well as experimental scanning transmission electron microscopy data, where surface adatom motion and nanoparticle structural dynamics are recovered at rates of up to 32 frames per second. - Highlights: • Correlations in space and time are harnessed to denoise microscopy image sequences. • A robust estimator provides automated selection of the denoising parameter. • Motion tracking and automated noise estimation provides a versatile algorithm. • Application to time-resolved STEM enables study of atomic and nanoparticle dynamics.

  3. MR imaging with fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequence of childhood adrenoleukodystrophy : comparison with T2 weighted spin echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Asiry; Seo, Jeong-Jin; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Chung, Tae Woong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kook, Hoon; Woo, Young Jong; Hwang, Tai Joo [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of FLAIR(Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) MR imaging in childhood adrenoleukodystrophy by comparing with those of T2-weighted FSE imaging, and to correlate MRI findings with clinical manifestations. Axial FLAIR images(TR/TE/TI=10004/123/2200) and T2-weighted FSE images(TR/TE=4000/104) of brain in six male patients(age range : 6-17 years, mean age : 10.2 years) with biochemically confirmed adrenoleukodystrophy were compared visually by two radiologists for detection, conspicuity, and the extent of lesion. Quantitatively, we compared lesion/CSF contrast, lesion/CSF contrast to noise ratio(CNR), lesion/white matter(WM) contrast, and lesion/WM CNR between FLAIR and T2 weighted image. We correlated MR findings with clinical manifestations of neurologic symptoms and evaluated whether MRI could detect white matter lesions in neurologically asymptomatic patients. Visual detection of lesions was better with FLAIR images in 2 of the 6 cases and it was equal in the remainders. Visual conspicuity and detection of the extent of lesion were superior on FLAIR images than T2-weighted images in all 6 cases. In the quantitative assessment of lesions, FLAIR was superior to T2-weighted image for lesion/CSF contrast and lesion/CSF CNR, but was inferior to T2 weighted image for lesion/WM contrast and lesion/WM CNR. In one case, FLAIR images distinguished the portion of encephalomalacic change from lesions. MR findings of adrenoleukodystrophy were correlated with clinical manifestations in symptomatic 4 cases, and also detected white matter lesions in asymptomatic 2 cases. MR imaging with FLAIR sequence provided images that were equal or superior to T2-weighted images in the evaluation of childhood adrenoleukodystrophy. MRI findings were well correlated with clinical manifestations and could detect white matter lesions in neurologically asymptomatic adrenoleukodystrophy patients.

  4. Inter frame motion estimation and its application to image sequence compression: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremy, C.

    1996-01-01

    With the constant development of new communication technologies like, digital TV, teleconference, and the development of image analysis applications, there is a growing volume of data to manage. Compression techniques are required for the transmission and storage of these data. Dealing with original images would require the use of expansive high bandwidth communication devices and huge storage media. Image sequence compression can be achieved by means of interframe estimation that consists in retrieving redundant information relative to zones where there is little motion between two frames. This paper is an introduction to some motion estimation techniques like gradient techniques, pel-recursive, block-matching, and its application to image sequence compression. (Author) 17 refs

  5. Rapid 3D Reconstruction for Image Sequence Acquired from UAV Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufu Qu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D structures from an image sequence captured by unmanned aerial vehicles’ camera (UAVs and improve the processing speed, we propose a rapid 3D reconstruction method that is based on an image queue, considering the continuity and relevance of UAV camera images. The proposed approach first compresses the feature points of each image into three principal component points by using the principal component analysis method. In order to select the key images suitable for 3D reconstruction, the principal component points are used to estimate the interrelationships between images. Second, these key images are inserted into a fixed-length image queue. The positions and orientations of the images are calculated, and the 3D coordinates of the feature points are estimated using weighted bundle adjustment. With this structural information, the depth maps of these images can be calculated. Next, we update the image queue by deleting some of the old images and inserting some new images into the queue, and a structural calculation of all the images can be performed by repeating the previous steps. Finally, a dense 3D point cloud can be obtained using the depth–map fusion method. The experimental results indicate that when the texture of the images is complex and the number of images exceeds 100, the proposed method can improve the calculation speed by more than a factor of four with almost no loss of precision. Furthermore, as the number of images increases, the improvement in the calculation speed will become more noticeable.

  6. Rapid 3D Reconstruction for Image Sequence Acquired from UAV Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yufu; Huang, Jianyu; Zhang, Xuan

    2018-01-14

    In order to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) structures from an image sequence captured by unmanned aerial vehicles' camera (UAVs) and improve the processing speed, we propose a rapid 3D reconstruction method that is based on an image queue, considering the continuity and relevance of UAV camera images. The proposed approach first compresses the feature points of each image into three principal component points by using the principal component analysis method. In order to select the key images suitable for 3D reconstruction, the principal component points are used to estimate the interrelationships between images. Second, these key images are inserted into a fixed-length image queue. The positions and orientations of the images are calculated, and the 3D coordinates of the feature points are estimated using weighted bundle adjustment. With this structural information, the depth maps of these images can be calculated. Next, we update the image queue by deleting some of the old images and inserting some new images into the queue, and a structural calculation of all the images can be performed by repeating the previous steps. Finally, a dense 3D point cloud can be obtained using the depth-map fusion method. The experimental results indicate that when the texture of the images is complex and the number of images exceeds 100, the proposed method can improve the calculation speed by more than a factor of four with almost no loss of precision. Furthermore, as the number of images increases, the improvement in the calculation speed will become more noticeable.

  7. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  8. Accelerated two-dimensional cine DENSE cardiovascular magnetic resonance using compressed sensing and parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Cai, Xiaoying; Auger, Daniel A; Meyer, Craig H; Salerno, Michael; Epstein, Frederick H

    2016-06-14

    Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) provides accurate quantitative imaging of cardiac mechanics with rapid displacement and strain analysis; however, image acquisition times are relatively long. Compressed sensing (CS) with parallel imaging (PI) can generally provide high-quality images recovered from data sampled below the Nyquist rate. The purposes of the present study were to develop CS-PI-accelerated acquisition and reconstruction methods for cine DENSE, to assess their accuracy for cardiac imaging using retrospective undersampling, and to demonstrate their feasibility for prospectively-accelerated 2D cine DENSE imaging in a single breathhold. An accelerated cine DENSE sequence with variable-density spiral k-space sampling and golden angle rotations through time was implemented. A CS method, Block LOw-rank Sparsity with Motion-guidance (BLOSM), was combined with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) for the reconstruction of under-sampled multi-coil spiral data. Seven healthy volunteers and 7 patients underwent 2D cine DENSE imaging with fully-sampled acquisitions (14-26 heartbeats in duration) and with prospectively rate-2 and rate-4 accelerated acquisitions (14 and 8 heartbeats in duration). Retrospectively- and prospectively-accelerated data were reconstructed using BLOSM-SENSE and SENSE. Image quality of retrospectively-undersampled data was quantified using the relative root mean square error (rRMSE). Myocardial displacement and circumferential strain were computed for functional assessment, and linear correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to compare accelerated acquisitions to fully-sampled reference datasets. For retrospectively-undersampled data, BLOSM-SENSE provided similar or lower rRMSE at rate-2 and lower rRMSE at rate-4 acceleration compared to SENSE (p cine DENSE provided good image quality and expected values of displacement and strain. BLOSM-SENSE-accelerated spiral cine DENSE imaging with 2D displacement encoding can be

  9. Limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver Hospital and Helath Services Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: schang@vanhosp.bc.ca; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Llewellyn, P.A. [Lion' s Gate Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Bilbey, J.H. [Royal Inland Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kamloops, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elucidation of ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. This study focused only on pelvic masses in which the origin of the mass (uterine v. extrauterine) could not be determined by ultrasonography (US). The origin of a pelvic mass has clinical implications. A mass arising from the uterus is most likely to be a leiomyoma, which is a benign lesion, whereas an extrauterine mass will have a higher likelihood of malignancy and usually requires surgery. Eighty-one female patients whose pelvic mass was of indeterminate origin on US also underwent limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis. Most of the MRI examinations were performed on the same day as the US. Limited-sequence MRI sequences included a quick gradient-echoT{sub 1}-weighted localizer and a fast spin-echoT{sub 2}-weighted sequence. Final diagnoses were established by surgical pathology or by clinical and imaging follow-up. Limited-sequence MRI was helpful in 79 of the 81 cases (98%). Fifty-two of the 81 masses (64%) were leiomyomas. One was a leiomyosarcoma. The extrauterine masses (26/81 [32%]) were identified as 14 ovarian malignancies, 4 endometriomas, 3 dermoids, an ovarian fibroma, an infarcted fibrothecoma, an infarcted hemorrhagic cyst, a sigmoid diverticular abscess and a gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the ileum. In the other 2 cases (2/81 [2%]), the origin of the pelvic mass remained indeterminate. Both of these indeterminate masses showed low signal onT{sub 2}-weighted images and were interpreted as probable leiomyomas. They were not surgically removed but were followed clinically and had a stable course. Limited-sequence MRI is a quick and efficient way to further evaluate ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. Limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis can suffice, in these cases, without requiring a full MRI examination. (author)

  10. Limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Silvia D; Cooperberg, Peter L; Wong, Anthony D; Llewellyn, Patrick A; Bilbey, James H

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elucidation of ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. This study focused only on pelvic masses in which the origin of the mass (uterine v. extrauterine) could not be determined by ultrasonography (US). The origin of a pelvic mass has clinical implications. A mass arising from the uterus is most likely to be a leiomyoma, which is a benign lesion, whereas an extrauterine mass will have a higher likelihood of malignancy and usually requires surgery. Eighty-one female patients whose pelvic mass was of indeterminate origin on US also underwent limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis. Most of the MRI examinations were performed on the same day as the US. Limited-sequence MRI sequences included a quick gradient-echo T1-weighted localizer and a fast spin-echo T2-weighted sequence. Final diagnoses were established by surgical pathology or by clinical and imaging follow-up. Limited-sequence MRI was helpful in 79 of the 81 cases (98%). Fifty-two of the 81 masses (64%) were leiomyomas. One was a leiomyosarcoma. The extrauterine masses (26/81 [32%]) were identified as 14 ovarian malignancies, 4 endometriomas, 3 dermoids, an ovarian fibroma, an infarcted fibrothecoma, an infarcted hemorrhagic cyst, a sigmoid diverticular abscess and a gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the ileum. In the other 2 cases (2/81 [2%]), the origin of the pelvic mass remained indeterminate. Both of these indeterminate masses showed low signal on T2-weighted images and were interpreted as probable leiomyomas. They were not surgically removed but were followed clinically and had a stable course. Limited-sequence MRI is a quick and efficient way to further evaluate ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. Limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis can suffice, in these cases, without requiring a full MRI examination.

  11. Limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.D.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D.; Llewellyn, P.A.; Bilbey, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elucidation of ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. This study focused only on pelvic masses in which the origin of the mass (uterine v. extrauterine) could not be determined by ultrasonography (US). The origin of a pelvic mass has clinical implications. A mass arising from the uterus is most likely to be a leiomyoma, which is a benign lesion, whereas an extrauterine mass will have a higher likelihood of malignancy and usually requires surgery. Eighty-one female patients whose pelvic mass was of indeterminate origin on US also underwent limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis. Most of the MRI examinations were performed on the same day as the US. Limited-sequence MRI sequences included a quick gradient-echoT 1 -weighted localizer and a fast spin-echoT 2 -weighted sequence. Final diagnoses were established by surgical pathology or by clinical and imaging follow-up. Limited-sequence MRI was helpful in 79 of the 81 cases (98%). Fifty-two of the 81 masses (64%) were leiomyomas. One was a leiomyosarcoma. The extrauterine masses (26/81 [32%]) were identified as 14 ovarian malignancies, 4 endometriomas, 3 dermoids, an ovarian fibroma, an infarcted fibrothecoma, an infarcted hemorrhagic cyst, a sigmoid diverticular abscess and a gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the ileum. In the other 2 cases (2/81 [2%]), the origin of the pelvic mass remained indeterminate. Both of these indeterminate masses showed low signal onT 2 -weighted images and were interpreted as probable leiomyomas. They were not surgically removed but were followed clinically and had a stable course. Limited-sequence MRI is a quick and efficient way to further evaluate ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. Limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis can suffice, in these cases, without requiring a full MRI examination. (author)

  12. Spatiotemporal Strategies for Joint Segmentation and Motion Tracking From Cardiac Image Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huafeng; Wang, Ting; Xu, Lei; Shi, Pengcheng

    2017-01-01

    Although accurate and robust estimations of the deforming cardiac geometry and kinematics from cine tomographic medical image sequences remain a technical challenge, they have significant clinical value. Traditionally, boundary or volumetric segmentation and motion estimation problems are considered as two sequential steps, even though the order of these processes can be different. In this paper, we present an integrated, spatiotemporal strategy for the simultaneous joint recovery of these two ill-posed problems. We use a mesh-free Galerkin formulation as the representation and computation platform, and adopt iterative procedures to solve the governing equations. Specifically, for each nodal point, the external driving forces are individually constructed through the integration of data-driven edginess measures, prior spatial distributions of myocardial tissues, temporal coherence of image-derived salient features, imaging/image-derived Eulerian velocity information, and cyclic motion model of myocardial behavior. The proposed strategy is accurate and very promising application results are shown from synthetic data, magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast, tagging image sequences, and gradient echo cine MR image sequences.

  13. Testing the performance of beta diversity measures based on incidence data: the robustness to undersampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondoso Cardoso, Pedro Miguel; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Veech, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    regarding the behaviour of most beta diversity indices when applied to incomplete samples, a situation which is more common than usually recognized. Our objective was to assess the behaviour and robustness of a number of beta diversity measures for incidence data from undersampled communities. Location...... Mainland Portugal and the Azorean archipelago (North Atlantic). Methods Data from intensive sampling of spiders in mainland Portugal and arthropods in Azores were collected. We examined the properties of 15 beta diversity measures developed for incidence data. We simulated varying degrees of completeness, whereas...

  14. Bayesian Estimation of High-Resolution Imagery from Low-Resolution Video Sequences and Multisensor Data Sets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schultz, Richard

    2002-01-01

    .... These individuals appear rather blocky at the coarsest resolution scales because of undersampling by the image sensor array, but they become remarkably clear after zooming in on a particular region-of- interest...

  15. A generative Bezier curve model for surf-zone tracking in coastal image sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces a generative Bezier curve model suitable for surf-zone curve tracking in coastal image sequences. The model combines an adaptive curve parametrised by control points governed by local random walks with a global sinusoidal motion...

  16. No Reference Prediction of Quality Metrics for H.264 Compressed Infrared Image Sequences for UAV Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Kabir; Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2018-01-01

    The framework for this research work is the acquisition of Infrared (IR) images from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). In this paper we consider the No-Reference (NR) prediction of Full Reference Quality Metrics for Infrared (IR) video sequences which are compressed and thus distorted by an H.264...

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging. Theory, sequence optimization and application in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieltjes, B.; Schlueter, M.; Hahn, H.K.; Wilhelm, T.; Essig, M.

    2003-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers an in vivo view into the microarchitecture of the brain. Furthermore it allows a three-dimensional reconstruction of fiber tracts. We will discuss the principles of DTI and possibilities for sequence optimization. Finally we will give an overview of DTI and its application in Alzheimer's disease. (orig.) [de

  18. PETRA, MSVAT-SPACE and SEMAC sequences for metal artefact reduction in dental MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Heil, Alexander; Bendszus, Martin; Prager, Marcel; Heiland, Sabine; Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Rammelsberg, Peter; Nittka, Mathias; Grodzki, David

    2017-01-01

    Dental MRI is often impaired by artefacts due to metallic dental materials. Several sequences were developed to reduce susceptibility artefacts. Here, we evaluated a set of sequences for artefact reduction for dental MRI for the first time. Artefact volume, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality were assessed on a 3-T MRI for pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), multiple-slab acquisition with view angle tilting gradient, based on a sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequence (MSVAT-SPACE), slice-encoding for metal-artefact correction (SEMAC) and compared to a standard SPACE and a standard turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Field-of-view and acquisition times were chosen to enable in vivo application. Two implant-supported prostheses were tested (porcelain fused to metal non-precious alloy and monolithic zirconia). Smallest artefact was measured for TSE sequences with no difference between the standard TSE and the SEMAC. MSVAT-SPACE reduced artefacts about 56% compared to the standard SPACE. Effect of the PETRA was dependent on sample used. Image quality and SNR were comparable for all sequences except PETRA, which yielded poor results. There is no benefit in terms of artefact reduction for SEMAC compared to standard TSE. Usage of MSVAT-SPACE is advantageous since artefacts are reduced and higher resolution is achieved. (orig.)

  19. PETRA, MSVAT-SPACE and SEMAC sequences for metal artefact reduction in dental MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Heil, Alexander; Bendszus, Martin [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Prager, Marcel; Heiland, Sabine [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Section of Experimental Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Rammelsberg, Peter [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Prosthodontics, Heidelberg (Germany); Nittka, Mathias; Grodzki, David [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Dental MRI is often impaired by artefacts due to metallic dental materials. Several sequences were developed to reduce susceptibility artefacts. Here, we evaluated a set of sequences for artefact reduction for dental MRI for the first time. Artefact volume, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality were assessed on a 3-T MRI for pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), multiple-slab acquisition with view angle tilting gradient, based on a sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequence (MSVAT-SPACE), slice-encoding for metal-artefact correction (SEMAC) and compared to a standard SPACE and a standard turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Field-of-view and acquisition times were chosen to enable in vivo application. Two implant-supported prostheses were tested (porcelain fused to metal non-precious alloy and monolithic zirconia). Smallest artefact was measured for TSE sequences with no difference between the standard TSE and the SEMAC. MSVAT-SPACE reduced artefacts about 56% compared to the standard SPACE. Effect of the PETRA was dependent on sample used. Image quality and SNR were comparable for all sequences except PETRA, which yielded poor results. There is no benefit in terms of artefact reduction for SEMAC compared to standard TSE. Usage of MSVAT-SPACE is advantageous since artefacts are reduced and higher resolution is achieved. (orig.)

  20. Common crus aplasia: diagnosis by 3D volume rendering imaging using 3DFT-CISS sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.J. E-mail: hakjink@pusan.ac.kr; Song, J.W.; Chon, K.-M.; Goh, E.-K

    2004-09-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the findings of three-dimensional (3D) volume rendering (VR) imaging in common crus aplasia (CCA) of the inner ear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using 3D VR imaging of temporal bone constructive interference in steady state (CISS) magnetic resonance (MR) images, we retrospectively reviewed seven inner ears of six children who were candidates for cochlear implants and who had been diagnosed with CCA. As controls, we used the same method to examine 402 inner ears of 201 patients who had no clinical symptoms or signs of sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone MR imaging (MRI) was performed with a 1.5 T MR machine using a CISS sequence, and VR of the inner ear was performed on a work station. Morphological image analysis was performed on rotation views of 3D VR images. RESULTS: In all seven cases, CCA was diagnosed by the absence of the common crus. The remaining superior semicircular canal (SCC) was normal in five and hypoplastic in two inner ears, while the posterior SCC was normal in all seven. One patient showed bilateral symmetrical CCA. Complicated combined anomalies were seen in the cochlea, vestibule and lateral SCC. CONCLUSION: 3D VR imaging findings with MR CISS sequence can directly diagnose CCA. This technique may be useful in delineating detailed anomalies of SCCs.

  1. Common crus aplasia: diagnosis by 3D volume rendering imaging using 3DFT-CISS sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Song, J.W.; Chon, K.-M.; Goh, E.-K.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the findings of three-dimensional (3D) volume rendering (VR) imaging in common crus aplasia (CCA) of the inner ear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using 3D VR imaging of temporal bone constructive interference in steady state (CISS) magnetic resonance (MR) images, we retrospectively reviewed seven inner ears of six children who were candidates for cochlear implants and who had been diagnosed with CCA. As controls, we used the same method to examine 402 inner ears of 201 patients who had no clinical symptoms or signs of sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone MR imaging (MRI) was performed with a 1.5 T MR machine using a CISS sequence, and VR of the inner ear was performed on a work station. Morphological image analysis was performed on rotation views of 3D VR images. RESULTS: In all seven cases, CCA was diagnosed by the absence of the common crus. The remaining superior semicircular canal (SCC) was normal in five and hypoplastic in two inner ears, while the posterior SCC was normal in all seven. One patient showed bilateral symmetrical CCA. Complicated combined anomalies were seen in the cochlea, vestibule and lateral SCC. CONCLUSION: 3D VR imaging findings with MR CISS sequence can directly diagnose CCA. This technique may be useful in delineating detailed anomalies of SCCs

  2. MR Imaging with Metal-suppression Sequences for Evaluation of Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Brett S; Weinberg, Eric P

    2016-01-01

    Metallic artifact at orthopedic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging continues to be an important problem, particularly in the realm of total joint arthroplasty. Complications often follow total joint arthroplasty and can be expected for a small percentage of all implanted devices. Postoperative complications involve not only osseous structures but also adjacent soft tissues-a highly problematic area at MR imaging because of artifacts from metallic prostheses. Without special considerations, susceptibility artifacts from ferromagnetic implants can unacceptably degrade image quality. Common artifacts include in-plane distortions (signal loss and signal pileup), poor or absent fat suppression, geometric distortion, and through-section distortion. Basic methods to reduce metallic artifacts include use of spin-echo or fast spin-echo sequences with long echo train lengths, short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences for fat suppression, a high bandwidth, thin section selection, and an increased matrix. With care and attention to the alloy type (eg, titanium, cobalt-chromium, stainless steel), orientation of the implant, and magnetic field strength, as well as use of proprietary and nonproprietary metal-suppression techniques, previously nondiagnostic studies can yield key diagnostic information. Specifically, sequences such as the metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS), WARP (Siemens Healthcare, Munich, Germany), slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), and multiacquisition with variable-resonance image combination (MAVRIC) can be optimized to reveal pathologic conditions previously hidden by periprosthetic artifacts. Complications of total joint arthroplasty that can be evaluated by using MR imaging with metal-suppression sequences include pseudotumoral conditions such as metallosis and particle disease, infection, aseptic prosthesis loosening, tendon injury, and muscle injury. ©RSNA, 2015.

  3. Uncertainty quantification of phase-based motion estimation on noisy sequence of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafi, Aral; Mao, Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Optical measurement and motion estimation based on the acquired sequence of images is one of the most recent sensing techniques developed in the last decade or so. As a modern non-contact sensing technique, motion estimation and optical measurements provide a full-field awareness without any mass loading or change of stiffness in structures, which is unavoidable using other conventional transducers (e.g. accelerometers, strain gauges, and LVDTs). Among several motion estimation techniques prevalent in computer vision, phase-based motion estimation is one of the most reliable and accurate methods. However, contamination of the sequence of images with numerous sources of noise is inevitable, and the performance of the phase-based motion estimation could be affected due to the lighting changes, image acquisition noise, and the camera's intrinsic sensor noise. Within this context, the uncertainty quantification (UQ) of the phase-based motion estimation (PME) has been investigated in this paper. Based on a normality assumption, a framework has been provided in order to characterize the propagation of the uncertainty from the acquired images to the estimated motion. The established analytical solution is validated via Monte-Carlo simulations using a set of simulation data. The UQ model in the paper is able to predict the order statistics of the noise influence, in which the uncertainty bounds of the estimated motion are given, after processing the contaminated sequence of images.

  4. Seven neurons memorizing sequences of alphabetical images via spike-timing dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osogami, Takayuki; Otsuka, Makoto

    2015-09-16

    An artificial neural network, such as a Boltzmann machine, can be trained with the Hebb rule so that it stores static patterns and retrieves a particular pattern when an associated cue is presented to it. Such a network, however, cannot effectively deal with dynamic patterns in the manner of living creatures. Here, we design a dynamic Boltzmann machine (DyBM) and a learning rule that has some of the properties of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which has been postulated for biological neural networks. We train a DyBM consisting of only seven neurons in a way that it memorizes the sequence of the bitmap patterns in an alphabetical image "SCIENCE" and its reverse sequence and retrieves either sequence when a partial sequence is presented as a cue. The DyBM is to STDP as the Boltzmann machine is to the Hebb rule.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the Achilles tendon using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, M.D.; Benjamin, M.; Gishen, P.; Bydder, G.M. E-mail: gbydder@ucsd.edu

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess the potential value of imaging the Achilles tendon with ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four normal controls and four patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were examined in the sagittal and transverse planes. Three of the patients were examined before and after intravenous gadodiamide. RESULTS: The fascicular pattern was clearly demonstrated within the tendon and detail of the three distinct fibrocartilaginous components of an 'enthesis organ' was well seen. T2* measurements showed two short T2* components. Increase in long T2 components with reduction in short T2 components was seen in tendinopathy. Contrast enhancement was much more extensive than with conventional sequences in two cases of tendinopathy but in a third case, there was a region of reduced enhancement. CONCLUSION: UTE pulse sequences provide anatomical detail not apparent with conventional sequences, demonstrate differences in T2* and show patterns of both increased and decreased enhancement in tendinopathy.

  6. Clinical evaluation of time-of-flight MR angiography with sparse undersampling and iterative reconstruction for cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tomohisa; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Okada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Schmidt, Michaela; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-11-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) MRI has just been introduced to research areas as an innovative approach to accelerate MRI. CS is expected to achieve higher k-space undersampling by exploiting the underlying sparsity in an appropriate transform domain. MR angiography (MRA) provides high spatial resolution information on arteries; however, a relatively long acquisition time is necessary to cover a wide volume. Reduction of acquisition time by CS for time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (Sparse-TOF) is beneficial in clinical examinations; therefore, the clinical validity of Sparse-TOF needs to be investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic capability of TOF MRA between parallel imaging (PI)-TOF with an acceleration factor of 3 (annotated as 3×) and Sparse-TOF (3× and 5×) in patients with cerebral aneurysms. PI-TOF (3×) and Sparse-TOF (3× and 5×) imaging were performed in 20 patients using a 3 T MRI system. Aneurysms in PI-TOF (3×) and Sparse-TOF (3× and 5×) were blindly rated as visible or scarcely visible by neuroradiologists. The neck, height and width of aneurysms were also measured. Twenty-six aneurysms were visualized and rated as visible in PI-TOF (3×) and Sparse-TOF (3× and 5×), with excellent agreement between two raters. No significant differences were found in measured neck, height or width of aneurysms among them. Sparse-TOF (3× and 5×) were acquired and reconstructed within 6 min, and cerebral aneurysms were visible in both of them with equivalent quality to PI-TOF (3×). Sparse-TOF (5×) is a good alternative to PI-TOF (3×) to visualize cerebral aneurysms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Development of a method for reconstruction of crowded NMR spectra from undersampled time-domain data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takumi; Yoshiura, Chie; Matsumoto, Masahiko; Kofuku, Yutaka; Okude, Junya; Kondo, Keita; Shiraishi, Yutaro [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Takeuchi, Koh [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (Japan); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    NMR is a unique methodology for obtaining information about the conformational dynamics of proteins in heterogeneous biomolecular systems. In various NMR methods, such as transferred cross-saturation, relaxation dispersion, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments, fast determination of the signal intensity ratios in the NMR spectra with high accuracy is required for analyses of targets with low yields and stabilities. However, conventional methods for the reconstruction of spectra from undersampled time-domain data, such as linear prediction, spectroscopy with integration of frequency and time domain, and analysis of Fourier, and compressed sensing were not effective for the accurate determination of the signal intensity ratios of the crowded two-dimensional spectra of proteins. Here, we developed an NMR spectra reconstruction method, “conservation of experimental data in analysis of Fourier” (Co-ANAFOR), to reconstruct the crowded spectra from the undersampled time-domain data. The number of sampling points required for the transferred cross-saturation experiments between membrane proteins, photosystem I and cytochrome b{sub 6}f, and their ligand, plastocyanin, with Co-ANAFOR was half of that needed for linear prediction, and the peak height reduction ratios of the spectra reconstructed from truncated time-domain data by Co-ANAFOR were more accurate than those reconstructed from non-uniformly sampled data by compressed sensing.

  8. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-10-09

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments.

  9. A Segmentation Method for Lung Parenchyma Image Sequences Based on Superpixels and a Self-Generating Neural Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaolei; Zhao, Juanjuan; Jiao, Cheng; Lei, Lei; Qiang, Yan; Cui, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Lung parenchyma segmentation is often performed as an important pre-processing step in the computer-aided diagnosis of lung nodules based on CT image sequences. However, existing lung parenchyma image segmentation methods cannot fully segment all lung parenchyma images and have a slow processing speed, particularly for images in the top and bottom of the lung and the images that contain lung nodules. Our proposed method first uses the position of the lung parenchyma image features to obtain lung parenchyma ROI image sequences. A gradient and sequential linear iterative clustering algorithm (GSLIC) for sequence image segmentation is then proposed to segment the ROI image sequences and obtain superpixel samples. The SGNF, which is optimized by a genetic algorithm (GA), is then utilized for superpixel clustering. Finally, the grey and geometric features of the superpixel samples are used to identify and segment all of the lung parenchyma image sequences. Our proposed method achieves higher segmentation precision and greater accuracy in less time. It has an average processing time of 42.21 seconds for each dataset and an average volume pixel overlap ratio of 92.22 ± 4.02% for four types of lung parenchyma image sequences.

  10. Compressed sensing based simultaneous black- and gray-blood carotid vessel wall MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Li, Hao; Kong, Hanjing; Dong, Li; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we sought to demonstrate the blood suppression performance, image quality and morphological measurements for compressed sensing (CS) based simultaneous 3D black- and gray-blood imaging sequence (CS-siBLAG) in carotid vessel wall MR imaging. Seven healthy volunteers and five patients were recruited. Healthy subjects underwent five CS-siBLAG scans with 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5-fold accelerations. Signal-to-tissue ratio (STR) and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) were computed as the measures of flowing signal suppression performance and the image quality for black-blood imaging of the technique. Vessel lumen area (LA) and wall area (WA) were compared between fully sampled acquisition and each accelerated acquisition. Patients underwent three CS-siBLAG scans with 1, 3 and 5-fold accelerations as well as a 3D time of flight (3D TOF) scan. Two radiologists reviewed the under-sampled black- and gray-blood image quality. STR and CTR values obtained with 2 to 5-fold accelerations were not significantly different from those with full acquisition. LA and WA measured at 2×, 3×, 4× and 5× were all highly correlated to the corresponding values at 1×. For patients imaging, two radiologists both found that the dual-contrast images at 3× acceleration exhibited comparable image quality to that of the fully sampled acquisition, and that the images at 5× exhibited slightly blurred vessel wall and outer vessel wall boundaries. By combining the CS under-sampling pattern and reconstruction, pseudo-centric phase encoding order and dual blood contrast sequences, this technique provides spatially registered black- and gray-blood images and excellent visualization for vessel wall imaging and gray-blood imaging in a short scan time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis on the dynamic deformations of the images from digital film sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markowski Tomasz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Image sequences, in particular digital video sequences, are characterised by the features which result in their high potential as measurement data. However, as early as at the stage of visual assessment of digital film images, originating, in particular, from amateur cameras, occurrence of some deformations may be observed, which may highly influence the results of measurements performed using these images; such deformations differ from deformations occurred in the case of static photographic images. It results both, by the method of image recording, using an electronic shutter and interlaced or progressive scanning, as well as the method of file recording and compression. It is worth to notice the systematic nature of such deformations, which highly depend on mutual motions of a camera and recorded objects. The objective of presented research works was to develop the mathematical description of image deformations, as a function of motion parameters. This would allow for adaptation of the camera calibration process to the demands of sequential imaging, as well as for modification of algorithms of measurements using self-calibration, and, as a result, minimisation of deformations. Another objective was to analyse the influence of deformations, typical for digital film images, on the results of measurements performed using these images, by means of series of experiments, which were based on multiple calibration of static and a moving camera, also with the use of a spatial test field. The first part was made by developing formulas based on some geometric relations, using some simplifications. On the stage of experimental research a certain degree of compatibility of experimental results and theoretical assumptions were confirmed.

  12. A Priori Knowledge and Probability Density Based Segmentation Method for Medical CT Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly introduces a novel segmentation strategy for CT images sequences. As first step of our strategy, we extract a priori intensity statistical information from object region which is manually segmented by radiologists. Then we define a search scope for object and calculate probability density for each pixel in the scope using a voting mechanism. Moreover, we generate an optimal initial level set contour based on a priori shape of object of previous slice. Finally the modified distance regularity level set method utilizes boundaries feature and probability density to conform final object. The main contributions of this paper are as follows: a priori knowledge is effectively used to guide the determination of objects and a modified distance regularization level set method can accurately extract actual contour of object in a short time. The proposed method is compared to other seven state-of-the-art medical image segmentation methods on abdominal CT image sequences datasets. The evaluated results demonstrate our method performs better and has the potential for segmentation in CT image sequences.

  13. Moving target detection based on temporal-spatial information fusion for infrared image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toing, Wu-qin; Xiong, Jin-yu; Zeng, An-jun; Wu, Xiao-ping; Xu, Hao-peng

    2009-07-01

    Moving target detection and localization is one of the most fundamental tasks in visual surveillance. In this paper, through analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional approaches about moving target detection, a novel approach based on temporal-spatial information fusion is proposed for moving target detection. The proposed method combines the spatial feature in single frame and the temporal properties within multiple frames of an image sequence of moving target. First, the method uses the spatial image segmentation for target separation from background and uses the local temporal variance for extracting targets and wiping off the trail artifact. Second, the logical "and" operator is used to fuse the temporal and spatial information. In the end, to the fusion image sequence, the morphological filtering and blob analysis are used to acquire exact moving target. The algorithm not only requires minimal computation and memory but also quickly adapts to the change of background and environment. Comparing with other methods, such as the KDE, the Mixture of K Gaussians, etc., the simulation results show the proposed method has better validity and higher adaptive for moving target detection, especially in infrared image sequences with complex illumination change, noise change, and so on.

  14. Computationally efficient approach to three-dimensional point cloud reconstruction from video image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a computationally efficient solution to three-dimensional point cloud reconstruction from video image sequences that are captured by a hand-held camera. Our solution starts with a frame selection step to remove frames that cause physically nonrealizable reconstruction outcomes. Then, a computationally efficient approach for obtaining the absolute camera pose is introduced based on pairwise relative camera poses. This is followed by a computationally efficient rotation registration to update the absolute camera pose. The reconstruction results obtained based on actual video sequences indicate lower computation times and lower reprojection errors of the introduced approach compared to the conventional approach.

  15. RECOGNITION OF DRAINAGE TUNNELS DURING GLACIER LAKE OUTBURST EVENTS FROM TERRESTRIAL IMAGE SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schwalbe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many glaciers all over the world have been distinctly retreating and thinning. One of the consequences of this is the increase of so called glacier lake outburst flood events (GLOFs. The mechanisms ruling such GLOF events are still not yet fully understood by glaciologists. Thus, there is a demand for data and measurements that can help to understand and model the phenomena. Thereby, a main issue is to obtain information about the location and formation of subglacial channels through which some lakes, dammed by a glacier, start to drain. The paper will show how photogrammetric image sequence analysis can be used to collect such data. For the purpose of detecting a subglacial tunnel, a camera has been installed in a pilot study to observe the area of the Colonia Glacier (Northern Patagonian Ice Field where it dams the Lake Cachet II. To verify the hypothesis, that the course of the subglacial tunnel is indicated by irregular surface motion patterns during its collapse, the camera acquired image sequences of the glacier surface during several GLOF events. Applying tracking techniques to these image sequences, surface feature motion trajectories could be obtained for a dense raster of glacier points. Since only a single camera has been used for image sequence acquisition, depth information is required to scale the trajectories. Thus, for scaling and georeferencing of the measurements a GPS-supported photogrammetric network has been measured. The obtained motion fields of the Colonia Glacier deliver information about the glacier’s behaviour before during and after a GLOF event. If the daily vertical glacier motion of the glacier is integrated over a period of several days and projected into a satellite image, the location and shape of the drainage channel underneath the glacier becomes visible. The high temporal resolution of the motion fields may also allows for an analysis of the tunnels dynamic in comparison to the changing

  16. Recognition of Drainage Tunnels during Glacier Lake Outburst Events from Terrestrial Image Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, E.; Koschitzki, R.; Maas, H.-G.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, many glaciers all over the world have been distinctly retreating and thinning. One of the consequences of this is the increase of so called glacier lake outburst flood events (GLOFs). The mechanisms ruling such GLOF events are still not yet fully understood by glaciologists. Thus, there is a demand for data and measurements that can help to understand and model the phenomena. Thereby, a main issue is to obtain information about the location and formation of subglacial channels through which some lakes, dammed by a glacier, start to drain. The paper will show how photogrammetric image sequence analysis can be used to collect such data. For the purpose of detecting a subglacial tunnel, a camera has been installed in a pilot study to observe the area of the Colonia Glacier (Northern Patagonian Ice Field) where it dams the Lake Cachet II. To verify the hypothesis, that the course of the subglacial tunnel is indicated by irregular surface motion patterns during its collapse, the camera acquired image sequences of the glacier surface during several GLOF events. Applying tracking techniques to these image sequences, surface feature motion trajectories could be obtained for a dense raster of glacier points. Since only a single camera has been used for image sequence acquisition, depth information is required to scale the trajectories. Thus, for scaling and georeferencing of the measurements a GPS-supported photogrammetric network has been measured. The obtained motion fields of the Colonia Glacier deliver information about the glacier's behaviour before during and after a GLOF event. If the daily vertical glacier motion of the glacier is integrated over a period of several days and projected into a satellite image, the location and shape of the drainage channel underneath the glacier becomes visible. The high temporal resolution of the motion fields may also allows for an analysis of the tunnels dynamic in comparison to the changing water level of the lake.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle imaging by random and maximum length sequences of inhomogeneous activation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Daniel; Eichardt, Roland; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Supriyanto, Eko; Haueisen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles require a precise knowledge of their biodistribution. From multi-channel magnetorelaxometry measurements, this distribution can be determined by means of inverse methods. It was recently shown that the combination of sequential inhomogeneous excitation fields in these measurements is favorable regarding the reconstruction accuracy when compared to homogeneous activation . In this paper, approaches for the determination of activation sequences for these measurements are investigated. Therefor, consecutive activation of single coils, random activation patterns and families of m-sequences are examined in computer simulations involving a sample measurement setup and compared with respect to the relative condition number of the system matrix. We obtain that the values of this condition number decrease with larger number of measurement samples for all approaches. Random sequences and m-sequences reveal similar results with a significant reduction of the required number of samples. We conclude that the application of pseudo-random sequences for sequential activation in the magnetorelaxometry imaging of magnetic nanoparticles considerably reduces the number of required sequences while preserving the relevant measurement information.

  18. Effects of imaging gradients in sequences with varying longitudinal storage time-Case of diffusion exchange imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasič, Samo; Lundell, Henrik; Topgaard, Daniel; Dyrby, Tim B

    2018-04-01

    To illustrate the potential bias caused by imaging gradients in correlation MRI sequences using longitudinal magnetization storage (LS) and examine the case of filter exchange imaging (FEXI) yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate (AXR). The effects of imaging gradients in FEXI were observed on yeast cells. To analyze the AXR bias, signal evolution was calculated by applying matrix exponential operators. A sharp threshold for the slice thickness was identified, below which the AXR is increasingly underestimated. The bias can be understood in terms of an extended low-pass diffusion filtering during the LS interval, which is more pronounced at lower exchange rates. For a total exchange rate constant larger than 1 s -1 , the AXR bias is expected to be negligible when slices thicker than 2.5 mm are used. In correlation experiments like FEXI, relying on LS with variable duration, imaging gradients may cause disrupting effects that cannot be easily mitigated and should be carefully considered for unbiased results. In typical clinical applications of FEXI, the imaging gradients are expected to cause a negligible AXR bias. However, the AXR bias may be significant in preclinical settings or whenever thin imaging slices are used. Magn Reson Med 79:2228-2235, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Accelerating volumetric cine MRI (VC-MRI) using undersampling for real-time 3D target localization/tracking in radiation therapy: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendy; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wang, Chunhao; Zhang, You; Cai, Jing; Ren, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Purpose. To accelerate volumetric cine MRI (VC-MRI) using undersampled 2D-cine MRI to provide real-time 3D guidance for gating/target tracking in radiotherapy. Methods. 4D-MRI is acquired during patient simulation. One phase of the prior 4D-MRI is selected as the prior images, designated as MRIprior. The on-board VC-MRI at each time-step is considered a deformation of the MRIprior. The deformation field map is represented as a linear combination of the motion components extracted by principal component analysis from the prior 4D-MRI. The weighting coefficients of the motion components are solved by matching the corresponding 2D-slice of the VC-MRI with the on-board undersampled 2D-cine MRI acquired. Undersampled Cartesian and radial k-space acquisition strategies were investigated. The effects of k-space sampling percentage (SP) and distribution, tumor sizes and noise on the VC-MRI estimation were studied. The VC-MRI estimation was evaluated using XCAT simulation of lung cancer patients and data from liver cancer patients. Volume percent difference (VPD) and Center of Mass Shift (COMS) of the tumor volumes and tumor tracking errors were calculated. Results. For XCAT, VPD/COMS were 11.93  ±  2.37%/0.90  ±  0.27 mm and 11.53  ±  1.47%/0.85  ±  0.20 mm among all scenarios with Cartesian sampling (SP  =  10%) and radial sampling (21 spokes, SP  =  5.2%), respectively. When tumor size decreased, higher sampling rate achieved more accurate VC-MRI than lower sampling rate. VC-MRI was robust against noise levels up to SNR  =  20. For patient data, the tumor tracking errors in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior and lateral (LAT) directions were 0.46  ±  0.20 mm, 0.56  ±  0.17 mm and 0.23  ±  0.16 mm, respectively, for Cartesian-based sampling with SP  =  20% and 0.60  ±  0.19 mm, 0.56  ±  0.22 mm and 0.42  ±  0.15 mm, respectively, for

  20. New respiratory gating technique for whole heart cine imaging: integration of a navigator slice in steady state free precession sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Sergio; Tejos, Cristian; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the performance of a slice navigator sequence integrated into a b-SSFP sequence for obtaining real time respiratory self-gated whole heart cine imaging. In this work, we present a novel and robust approach for respiratory motion detection by integrating a slice navigator sequence into a balanced steady state free precession (b-SSFP) sequence, while maintaining the steady state. The slice navigator sequence is integrated into consecutive repetition times (TRs) of a b-SSFP sequence to excite and read out a navigator slice. We performed several phantom experiments to test the performance of the slice navigator sequence. Additionally, the method was evaluated in five volunteers and compared with breathing signals obtained from conventional pencil beam navigator sequence. Finally, the navigator slice was used to obtain whole heart MR cine images. The breathing signals detected by the proposed method showed an excellent agreement with those obtained from pencil beam navigators. Moreover, the technique was capable of removing respiratory motion artifacts with minimal distortion of the steady state. Image quality comparison showed a statistical significant improvement from a quality score of 2.1 obtained by the nonrespiratory gated images, compared to a quality score of 3.4 obtained by the respiratory gated images. This novel method represents a robust approach to estimate breathing motion during SSFP imaging. The technique was successfully applied to acquire whole heart artifact-free cine images. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Automatic registration of panoramic image sequence and mobile laser scanning data using semantic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianping; Yang, Bisheng; Chen, Chi; Huang, Ronggang; Dong, Zhen; Xiao, Wen

    2018-02-01

    Inaccurate exterior orientation parameters (EoPs) between sensors obtained by pre-calibration leads to failure of registration between panoramic image sequence and mobile laser scanning data. To address this challenge, this paper proposes an automatic registration method based on semantic features extracted from panoramic images and point clouds. Firstly, accurate rotation parameters between the panoramic camera and the laser scanner are estimated using GPS and IMU aided structure from motion (SfM). The initial EoPs of panoramic images are obtained at the same time. Secondly, vehicles in panoramic images are extracted by the Faster-RCNN as candidate primitives to be matched with potential corresponding primitives in point clouds according to the initial EoPs. Finally, translation between the panoramic camera and the laser scanner is refined by maximizing the overlapping area of corresponding primitive pairs based on the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), resulting in a finer registration between panoramic image sequences and point clouds. Two challenging urban scenes were experimented to assess the proposed method, and the final registration errors of these two scenes were both less than three pixels, which demonstrates a high level of automation, robustness and accuracy.

  2. A long-term target detection approach in infrared image sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Zhang, Qi; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Liqiang

    2015-12-01

    An automatic target detection method used in long term infrared (IR) image sequence from a moving platform is proposed. Firstly, based on non-linear histogram equalization, target candidates are coarse-to-fine segmented by using two self-adapt thresholds generated in the intensity space. Then the real target is captured via two different selection approaches. At the beginning of image sequence, the genuine target with litter texture is discriminated from other candidates by using contrast-based confidence measure. On the other hand, when the target becomes larger, we apply online EM method to iteratively estimate and update the distributions of target's size and position based on the prior detection results, and then recognize the genuine one which satisfies both the constraints of size and position. Experimental results demonstrate that the presented method is accurate, robust and efficient.

  3. Denoising Algorithm for CFA Image Sensors Considering Inter-Channel Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Seok; Park, Sang Wook; Kang, Moon Gi

    2017-05-28

    In this paper, a spatio-spectral-temporal filter considering an inter-channel correlation is proposed for the denoising of a color filter array (CFA) sequence acquired by CCD/CMOS image sensors. Owing to the alternating under-sampled grid of the CFA pattern, the inter-channel correlation must be considered in the direct denoising process. The proposed filter is applied in the spatial, spectral, and temporal domain, considering the spatio-tempo-spectral correlation. First, nonlocal means (NLM) spatial filtering with patch-based difference (PBD) refinement is performed by considering both the intra-channel correlation and inter-channel correlation to overcome the spatial resolution degradation occurring with the alternating under-sampled pattern. Second, a motion-compensated temporal filter that employs inter-channel correlated motion estimation and compensation is proposed to remove the noise in the temporal domain. Then, a motion adaptive detection value controls the ratio of the spatial filter and the temporal filter. The denoised CFA sequence can thus be obtained without motion artifacts. Experimental results for both simulated and real CFA sequences are presented with visual and numerical comparisons to several state-of-the-art denoising methods combined with a demosaicing method. Experimental results confirmed that the proposed frameworks outperformed the other techniques in terms of the objective criteria and subjective visual perception in CFA sequences.

  4. Fast triple-spin-echo Dixon (FTSED) sequence for water and fat imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kořínek, Radim; Bartušek, Karel; Starčuk jr., Zenon

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, APR (2017), s. 164-170 ISSN 0730-725X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : fast triple-spin-echo Dixon * sequence * MRI * fat fraction * water-fat * ultra-high field * 9.4 T * FTSED Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging Impact factor: 2.225, year: 2016

  5. Angular under-sampling effect on VMAT dose calculation: An analysis and a solution strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Li, Feifei; Li, Jonathan; Kahler, Darren; Park, Justin C; Yan, Guanghua; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2017-06-01

    Most VMAT algorithms compute the dose on discretized apertures with small angular separations for practical reasons. However, machines deliver the VMAT dose with a continuously moving MLC and gantry and a continuously changing dose rate. The computed dose can deviate from the delivered dose, especially if no, or loose, MLC movement constraints are applied for the VMAT optimization. The goal of this paper is to establish a simplified mathematical model to analyze the discrepancy between the VMAT plan calculation dose and the delivered dose and to provide a reasonable solution for clinical implementation. A simplified metric is first introduced to describe the discrepancy between doses computed with discretized apertures and a continuous delivery model. The delivery fluences were formed separately for six different leaf movement scenarios. The formula was then rewritten in a more general form. The correlation between discretized and continuous fluence is summarized using this general form. The Fourier analysis for the impacts from three separate factors - dose kernel width, aperture width, aperture distance - to the dose discrepancy is also presented in order to provide insight into the dose discrepancy caused by under-sampling in the frequency domain. Finally, a weighting-based interpolation (WBI) algorithm, which can improve the aperture interpolation efficiency, is proposed. The associated evaluation methods and criteria for the proposed algorithm are also given. The comparisons between the WBI algorithm and the equal angular interpolation (EAI) method suggested that the proposed algorithm has a great advantage with regard to aperture number efficiency. To achieve a 90% gamma passing rate using the dose computed with apertures generated with 0.5° EAI, with the initial optimization apertures as the standard for the comparison, the WBI needs only 66% and 54% of the aperture numbers that the EAI method needs for a 2° and a 4° angular separation of the VMAT

  6. High spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using compressed sensing with magnitude image subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacchi, Stanislas; Han, Fei; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Kroeker, Randall; Plotnik, Adam; Lehrman, Evan; Sayre, James; Laub, Gerhard; Finn, J Paul; Hu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    We propose a compressed-sensing (CS) technique based on magnitude image subtraction for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Our technique integrates the magnitude difference image into the CS reconstruction to promote subtraction sparsity. Fully sampled Cartesian 3D CE-MRA datasets from 6 volunteers were retrospectively under-sampled and three reconstruction strategies were evaluated: k-space subtraction CS, independent CS, and magnitude subtraction CS. The techniques were compared in image quality (vessel delineation, image artifacts, and noise) and image reconstruction error. Our CS technique was further tested on seven volunteers using a prospectively under-sampled CE-MRA sequence. Compared with k-space subtraction and independent CS, our magnitude subtraction CS provides significantly better vessel delineation and less noise at 4× acceleration, and significantly less reconstruction error at 4× and 8× (P MRA with higher spatial and temporal resolution than current clinical TWIST protocol while maintaining comparable image quality (2.8 ± 0.5 vs. 3.0 ± 0.4, P = NS). Our technique is promising for dynamic CE-MRA. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Bayesian framework for human body pose tracking from depth image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Youding; Fujimura, Kikuo

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of accurate and robust tracking of 3D human body pose from depth image sequences. Recovering the large number of degrees of freedom in human body movements from a depth image sequence is challenging due to the need to resolve the depth ambiguity caused by self-occlusions and the difficulty to recover from tracking failure. Human body poses could be estimated through model fitting using dense correspondences between depth data and an articulated human model (local optimization method). Although it usually achieves a high accuracy due to dense correspondences, it may fail to recover from tracking failure. Alternately, human pose may be reconstructed by detecting and tracking human body anatomical landmarks (key-points) based on low-level depth image analysis. While this method (key-point based method) is robust and recovers from tracking failure, its pose estimation accuracy depends solely on image-based localization accuracy of key-points. To address these limitations, we present a flexible Bayesian framework for integrating pose estimation results obtained by methods based on key-points and local optimization. Experimental results are shown and performance comparison is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Fast sequences MR imaging at the investigation of painful skeletal sites in patients with hip osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibis, Aristidis H; Varitimidis, Sokratis E; Dailiana, Zoe H; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2015-01-01

    Multiple osteonecrotic foci can be clinically silent when located in metaphyses and becomes painful when it affects juxta-articular areas. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of fast MR imaging to depict the underlying pathology in cases with skeletal pain other than the already diagnosed hip osteonecrosis. Between 2008 and 2013, 49 patients with already diagnosed hip osteonecrosis reported symptoms of deep skeletal pain in an anatomical site different from the affected hip joint. All patients after thorough history & clinical examination underwent evaluation with x-rays and a single fat suppressed sequence with MR Imaging applying either T2-w TSE or STIR-TSE at the painful site. False positive and false negative findings were recorded for the conventional x-rays and compared to MRI. Forty four (89.8%) patients were positive for osteonecrotic lesions in this study and 76 symptomatic osteonecrosis lesions were revealed at 14 distinct anatomic sites. The agreement between the x-ray findings and the MR imaging regarding osteonecrosis was 46.9%. Plain x-rays showed 43.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value and 10.4% negative predictive value. Fast MR imaging with fat suppressed sequences is necessary and adequate as a single method for the investigation of painful skeletal sites in patients with already diagnosed hip osteonecrosis. It allows early diagnosis of the potentially debilitating multiple juxta-articular lesions and consequently their prompt management.

  9. In vivo quantitative NMR imaging of fruit tissues during growth using Spoiled Gradient Echo sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenouche, S.; Perrier, M.; Bertin, N.

    2014-01-01

    the intrinsic parameters maps M 0 and T 1 of the fruit tissues. Water transport and paths flow were monitored using Gd 3+/[Fe(CN)6]3-/D - mannitol nanoparticles as a tracer. This dynamic study was carried out using a compartmental modeling. The CA was preferentially accumulated in the surrounding tissues...... of this study was to design a robust and accurate quantitative measurement method based on NMR imaging combined with contrast agent (CA) for mapping and quantifying water transport in growing cherry tomato fruits. A multiple flip-angle Spoiled Gradient Echo (SGE) imaging sequence was used to evaluate...... of columella and in the seed envelopes. The total quantities and the average volume flow of water estimated are: 198 mg, 1.76 mm 3/h for the columella and 326 mg, 2.91 mm 3/h for the seed envelopes. We demonstrate in this paper that the NMR imaging technique coupled with efficient and biocompatible CA...

  10. Identification Of Barley Grain Mycoflora By Next Generation Sequencing And Videometer Multispectral Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Johannes Ravn; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Søren, Knudsen

    , Pyrenophora, Epicoccum, Didymella, Alternaria, Bipolaris and Microdochium. The fungal composition and quantities on each seed varied significantly. Some were infected mainly by a single fungus and some were infected by multiple fungi. All seeds were prior to this evaluated by multispectral imaging...... on the dorsal and ventral sides by the VideometerLab multispectral imaging system (Videometer A/S, Hørsholm, Denmark). This system is an instrument equipped with 19 different light emitting diodes at wavelengths ranging from 375 to 970nm (ultraviolet, visual and lower wavelength of the near-infrared region...... for fungal contamination of barley on the fungal species level was investigated by comparing results from the next generation sequencing and multispectral imaging....

  11. Novel gradient echo sequence-based amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in hyperacute cerebral infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUANG, DEXIAO; LI, SHENKAI; DAI, ZHUOZHI; SHEN, ZHIWEI; YAN, GEN; WU, RENHUA

    2015-01-01

    In the progression of ischemia, pH is important and is essential in elucidating the association between metabolic disruption, lactate formation, acidosis and tissue damage. Chemical exchange-dependent saturation transfer (CEST) imaging can be used to detect tissue pH and, in particular, a specific form of CEST magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), termed amide proton transfer (APT) MRI, which is sensitive to pH and can detect ischemic lesions, even prior to diffusion abnormalities. The critical parameter governing the ability of CEST to detect pH is the sequence. In the present study, a novel strategy was used, based on the gradient echo sequence (GRE), which involved the insertion of a magnetization transfer pulse in each repetition time (TR) and minimizing the TR for in vivo APT imaging. The proposed GRE-APT MRI method was initially verified using a tissue-like pH phantom and optimized MRI parameters for APT imaging. In order to assess the range of acute cerebral infarction, rats (n=4) were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and MRI scanning at 7 telsa (T). Hyperacute ischemic tissue damage was characterized using multiparametric imaging techniques, including diffusion, APT and T2-Weighted MRI. By using a magnetization transfer pulse and minimizing TR, GRE-APT provided high spatial resolution and a homogeneous signal, with clearly distinguished cerebral anatomy. The GRE-APT and diffusion MRI were significantly correlated with lactate content and the area of cerebral infarction in the APT and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps matched consistently during the hyperacute period. In addition, compared with the infarction area observed on the ADC MRI map, the APT map contained tissue, which had not yet been irreversibly damaged. Therefore, GRE-APT MRI waa able to detect ischemic lactic acidosis with sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution, suggesting the potential use of pH MRI as a surrogate imaging marker of impaired tissue metabolism for the

  12. A new feedback image encryption scheme based on perturbation with dynamical compound chaotic sequence cipher generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaojun; Cui, Minggen; Wang, Zhu

    2009-07-01

    The design of the new compound two-dimensional chaotic function is presented by exploiting two one-dimensional chaotic functions which switch randomly, and the design is used as a chaotic sequence generator which is proved by Devaney's definition proof of chaos. The properties of compound chaotic functions are also proved rigorously. In order to improve the robustness against difference cryptanalysis and produce avalanche effect, a new feedback image encryption scheme is proposed using the new compound chaos by selecting one of the two one-dimensional chaotic functions randomly and a new image pixels method of permutation and substitution is designed in detail by array row and column random controlling based on the compound chaos. The results from entropy analysis, difference analysis, statistical analysis, sequence randomness analysis, cipher sensitivity analysis depending on key and plaintext have proven that the compound chaotic sequence cipher can resist cryptanalytic, statistical and brute-force attacks, and especially it accelerates encryption speed, and achieves higher level of security. By the dynamical compound chaos and perturbation technology, the paper solves the problem of computer low precision of one-dimensional chaotic function.

  13. Time integration and statistical regulation applied to mobile objects detection in a sequence of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letang, Jean-Michel

    1993-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the detection of moving objects in monocular image sequences. The first section presents the inherent problems of motion analysis in real applications. We propose a method robust to perturbations frequently encountered during acquisition of outdoor scenes. It appears three main directions for investigations, all of them pointing out the importance of the temporal axis, which is a specific dimension for motion analysis. In the first part, the image sequence is considered as a set of temporal signals. The temporal multi-scale decomposition enables the characterization of various dynamical behaviors of the objects being in the scene at a given instant. A second module integrates motion information. This elementary trajectography of moving objects provides a temporal prediction map, giving a confidence level of motion presence. Interactions between both sets of data are expressed within a statistical regularization. Markov random field models supply a formal framework to convey a priori knowledge of the primitives to be evaluated. A calibration method with qualitative boxes is presented to estimate model parameters. Our approach requires only simple computations and leads to a rather fast algorithm, that we evaluate in the last section over various typical sequences. (author) [fr

  14. Evaluation of chirp reversal power modulation sequence for contrast agent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novell, A.; Sennoga, CA; Escoffre, JM; Chaline, J.; Bouakaz, A.

    2014-09-01

    Over the last decade, significant research effort has been focused on the use of chirp for contrast agent imaging because chirps are known to significantly increase imaging contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). New imaging schemes, such as chirp reversal (CR), have been developed to improve contrast detection by increasing non-linear microbubble responses. In this study we evaluated the contrast enhancement efficiency of various chirped imaging sequences in combination with well-established imaging schemes such as power modulation (PM) and pulse inversion (PI). The imaging schemes tested were implemented on a fully programmable open scanner and evaluated by ultrasonically scanning (excitation frequency of 2.5 MHz amplitude of 350 kPa) a tissue-mimicking flow phantom comprising a 4 mm diameter tube through which aqueous dispersions (dilution fraction of 1/2000) of the commercial ultrasound contrast agent, SonoVue® were continuously circulated. The recovery of non-linear microbubble responses after chirp compression requires the development and the optimization of a specific filter. A compression filter was therefore designed and used to compress and extract several non-linear components from the received microbubble responses. The results showed that using chirps increased the image CNR by approximately 10 dB, as compared to conventional Gaussian apodized sine burst excitation but degraded the axial resolution by a factor of 1.4, at -3 dB. We demonstrated that the highest CNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CTR) were achievable when CR was combined with PM as compared to other imaging schemes such as PI.

  15. Managing complex processing of medical image sequences by program supervision techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crubezy, Monica; Aubry, Florent; Moisan, Sabine; Chameroy, Virginie; Thonnat, Monique; Di Paola, Robert

    1997-05-01

    Our objective is to offer clinicians wider access to evolving medical image processing (MIP) techniques, crucial to improve assessment and quantification of physiological processes, but difficult to handle for non-specialists in MIP. Based on artificial intelligence techniques, our approach consists in the development of a knowledge-based program supervision system, automating the management of MIP libraries. It comprises a library of programs, a knowledge base capturing the expertise about programs and data and a supervision engine. It selects, organizes and executes the appropriate MIP programs given a goal to achieve and a data set, with dynamic feedback based on the results obtained. It also advises users in the development of new procedures chaining MIP programs.. We have experimented the approach for an application of factor analysis of medical image sequences as a means of predicting the response of osteosarcoma to chemotherapy, with both MRI and NM dynamic image sequences. As a result our program supervision system frees clinical end-users from performing tasks outside their competence, permitting them to concentrate on clinical issues. Therefore our approach enables a better exploitation of possibilities offered by MIP and higher quality results, both in terms of robustness and reliability.

  16. Detection of windows in building textures from airborne and terrestrial infrared image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaszczuk, D.; Hoegner, L.; Stilla, U.

    2011-12-01

    Infrared (IR) images depict thermal radiation of physical objects. Imaging the building façades and the roofs with an IR camera, thermal inspections of the buildings can be carried out. In such inspections a spatial correspondence between IR-images and the existing 3D building models can be helpful. Texturing 3D building models with IR images this spatial correspondence can be created. Furthermore in textures heat leakages can be detected and the heat bridges can be stored together with 3D building data. However, before extracting leakages, the windows should be located. In IR images glass reflects the surrounding and shows false results for the temperature measurements. Consequently, the windows should be detected in IR images and excluded for the inspection. The most common algorithms for window detection were developed for the images in the visual band. In this paper, an algorithm for window detection in textures extracted from terrestrial IR images is proposed. In the first step, small objects have to be removed by scaling down the image (texture). Then in the scaled image, regions are detected using a local dynamic threshold. Morphological operations are used to remove false detections and unify substructures of the windows. For every extracted region, which is a candidate for a window, the center of gravity is calculated. It is assumed that windows on façades are ordered in regular rows and columns. First the points are grouped into rows using histogram of height created from extracted gravity centers. Then masked correlation is used to detect the position and size of the windows. Finally, the gaps in the grid of windows are completed. For the first experiments we use a dataset from densely build urban area captured in Munich, Germany. The IR image sequences were taken from a vehicle driving on the street around the test area. Camera was directed to the building in oblique view. According to the acquisition geometry, no façade could be completely seen in

  17. High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography (CE-MRA) using Compressed Sensing with Magnitude Image Subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacchi, Stanislas; Han, Fei; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Kroeker, Randall; Plotnik, Adam; Lehman, Evan; Sayre, James; Laub, Gerhard; Finn, J Paul; Hu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We propose a compressed-sensing (CS) technique based on magnitude image subtraction for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Methods Our technique integrates the magnitude difference image into the CS reconstruction to promote subtraction sparsity. Fully sampled Cartesian 3D CE-MRA datasets from 6 volunteers were retrospectively under-sampled and three reconstruction strategies were evaluated: k-space subtraction CS, independent CS, and magnitude subtraction CS. The techniques were compared in image quality (vessel delineation, image artifacts, and noise) and image reconstruction error. Our CS technique was further tested on 7 volunteers using a prospectively under-sampled CE-MRA sequence. Results Compared with k-space subtraction and independent CS, our magnitude subtraction CS provides significantly better vessel delineation and less noise at 4X acceleration, and significantly less reconstruction error at 4X and 8X (pMRA with higher spatial and temporal resolution than current clinical TWIST protocol while maintaining comparable image quality (2.8±0.5 vs. 3.0±0.4, p=NS). Conclusion Our technique is promising for dynamic CE-MRA. PMID:23801456

  18. Rapid acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder using three-dimensional fast spin echo sequence with compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging with compressed sensing (CS) for the assessment of shoulder. Twenty-nine patients who underwent shoulder MRI including image sets of axial 3D-FSE sequence without CS and with CS, using an acceleration factor of 1.5, were included. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Two musculoskeletal radiologists compared image quality of 3D-FSE sequences without CS and with CS, and scored the qualitative agreement between sequences, using a five-point scale. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was evaluated. The acquisition time of 3D-FSE MRI was reduced using CS (3min 23s vs. 2min 22s). Quantitative evaluations showed a significant correlation between the two sequences (r=0.872-0.993, p<0.05) and SSIM was in an acceptable range (0.940-0.993; mean±standard deviation, 0.968±0.018). Qualitative image quality showed good to excellent agreement between 3D-FSE images without CS and with CS. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was very good (κ=0.915-1). The 3D-FSE sequence with CS is feasible in evaluating the shoulder joint with reduced scan time compared to 3D-FSE without CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diuretic-enhanced gadolinium excretory MR urography: comparison of conventional gradient-echo sequences and echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Tacke, J.; Adam, G.B.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W. [Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Jung, P.; Jakse, G. [Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Urology

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of different gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted gradient-echo techniques in excretory MR urography. In 74 urologic patients, excretory MR urography was performed using various T1-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) sequences after injection of gadolinium-DTPA and low-dose furosemide. The examinations included conventional GRE sequences and echo-planar imaging (GRE EPI), both obtained with 3D data sets and 2D projection images. Breath-hold acquisition was used primarily. In 20 of 74 examinations, we compared breath-hold imaging with respiratory gating. Breath-hold imaging was significantly superior to respiratory gating for the visualization of pelvicaliceal systems, but not for the ureters. Complete MR urograms were obtained within 14-20 s using 3D GRE EPI sequences and in 20-30 s with conventional 3D GRE sequences. Ghost artefacts caused by ureteral peristalsis often occurred with conventional 3D GRE imaging and were almost completely suppressed in EPI sequences (p < 0.0001). Susceptibility effects were more pronounced on GRE EPI MR urograms and calculi measured 0.8-21.7% greater in diameter compared with conventional GRE sequences. Increased spatial resolution degraded the image quality only in GRE-EPI urograms. (orig.)

  20. Color Image Encryption Using Three-Dimensional Sine ICMIC Modulation Map and DNA Sequence Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenhao; Sun, Kehui; He, Yi; Yu, Mengyao

    Derived from Sine map and iterative chaotic map with infinite collapse (ICMIC), a three-dimensional hyperchaotic Sine ICMIC modulation map (3D-SIMM) is proposed based on a close-loop modulation coupling (CMC) method. Based on this map, a novel color image encryption algorithm is designed by employing a hybrid model of multidirectional circular permutation and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) masking. In this scheme, the pixel positions of image are scrambled by multidirectional circular permutation, and the pixel values are substituted by DNA sequence operations. The simulation results and security analysis show that the algorithm has good encryption effect and strong key sensitivity, and can resist brute-force, statistical, differential, known-plaintext and chosen-plaintext attacks.

  1. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  2. Digital sequences and a time reversal-based impact region imaging and localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-10-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  3. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Qian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  4. SPIO-enhanced MR imaging for HCC detection in cirrhotic patient : comparison of various techniques for optimal sequence selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Kim, Chong Soo; Yu, Hee Chul; Kim, Tae Kon; Lee Soo Tiek

    2000-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of breathhold and non-breathhold sequences in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced MR imaging, and to determine the optimal sequence combination. By means of unenhanced and iron-oxide-enhanced MRI, 29 patients with 49 nodular HCCs were evaluated for the presence of HCC nodules. Twenty-one were male and eight were female, and their ages ranged from 38 to 71 (mean, 56) years. Eight different MR sequences were used, including four non-breath-hold sequences and four breath-hold, and images were obtained before and after the administration of SPIO particles. Non-breath-hold sequences included T2-, proton density-weighted SE, and TSE imaging, while breath-hold sequences comprised T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (T1w FLASH), half-Fourier acquisition single shot turbo spine echo (HASTE), T2-weighted fast imaging with steady-state free precession (T2 * wFISP) and T2-weighted breath-hold TSE (T2wBHTSE). Image analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The quantitative parameters calculated were signal-to noise (S/N) ratios for livers and tumors, contrast to noise (C/N) ratios for tumors seen on precontrast and postcontrast images, and percentage of signal intensity loss (PSIL) after SPIO injection. Images were analysed qualitatively in terms of image artifacts and lesion conspicuity, and prior to calculating sensitivity, the number of lesions detected using various pulse sequences were counted. SPIO had a marked effect on liver S/N ratio but a minimal effect on tumor S/N ratio. PSIL was best in T2 * wFISP images, while T2wSE images showed the second-best results (p less than 0.05). Tumor-to-liver C/N values were also highest with T2 * wFISP, while T2wTSE and HASTE images were next. Qualitative study showed that non-breath hold images and FISP were better than breath hold images in terms of lesion conspicuity. The latter, however, were much better

  5. Exploring the effects of gravity on tongue motion using ultrasound image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Maureen; Crouse, Ulla; Sutton, Marty

    2002-05-01

    Our goal in the research was to explore the effect that gravity had on the vocal-tract system by using ultrasound data collected in the upright and supine positions. All potential subjects were given an ultrasound pretest to determine whether they could repeat a series of 3-4 words precise enough to allow an accurate series of images to be collected. Out of these potential subjects, approximately 5-7 subjects were eventually used in the research. The method of collecting ultrasound data required the immobilization of the patient by restraining their neck in a custom fitted neck restraint. The neck restraint held an ultrasound transducer positioned at a critical angle underneath the patients' lower jawbone, which served to reduce errors and increase image resolution. To accurately analyze the series of images collected from ultrasound imaging, the surfaces of the tongue were digitized and tongue motion was time-aligned across the upright and supine sequences. Comparisons between the upright and supine data were then made by using L2 norms to determine averages and differences regarding the behavior between the two positions. Curves and locations of the maximum and minimum differences will be discussed.

  6. Novel Spatiotemporal Filter for Dim Point Targets Detection in Infrared Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dim point target detection is of great importance in both civil and military fields. In this paper a novel spatiotemporal filter is proposed to incorporate both the spatial and temporal features of moving dim point targets. Since targets are expected to be detected as far as possible, in this situation, they have no texture features in spatial dimensions, appearing like isolated points. Based on the attributes, potential targets are extracted by searching the local maximum point in a sliding window. And the potential targets are then correlated based on target moving patterns. After combining local maximum points and target moving patterns, structure background in infrared scene is removed. Next, the temporal profiles of infrared sense are reviewed and examined. By a new max-median filter performing on temporal profiles, the intensity of target pulse signal is extracted. Finally, each temporal profile is divided into several pieces to estimate the variance of the temporal profiles, which leads to a new detection metric. The proposed approach is tested via several infrared image sequences. The results show that our proposed method can significantly reduce the complex background in aerial infrared image sequence and have a good detection performance.

  7. A Low-Complexity Algorithm for Static Background Estimation from Cluttered Image Sequences in Surveillance Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For the purposes of foreground estimation, the true background model is unavailable in many practical circumstances and needs to be estimated from cluttered image sequences. We propose a sequential technique for static background estimation in such conditions, with low computational and memory requirements. Image sequences are analysed on a block-by-block basis. For each block location a representative set is maintained which contains distinct blocks obtained along its temporal line. The background estimation is carried out in a Markov Random Field framework, where the optimal labelling solution is computed using iterated conditional modes. The clique potentials are computed based on the combined frequency response of the candidate block and its neighbourhood. It is assumed that the most appropriate block results in the smoothest response, indirectly enforcing the spatial continuity of structures within a scene. Experiments on real-life surveillance videos demonstrate that the proposed method obtains considerably better background estimates (both qualitatively and quantitatively than median filtering and the recently proposed "intervals of stable intensity" method. Further experiments on the Wallflower dataset suggest that the combination of the proposed method with a foreground segmentation algorithm results in improved foreground segmentation.

  8. 3D surface reconstruction based on image stitching from gastric endoscopic video sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Mengyao; Xu, Rong; Ohya, Jun

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a method for reconstructing 3D detailed structures of internal organs such as gastric wall from endoscopic video sequences. The proposed method consists of the four major steps: Feature-point-based 3D reconstruction, 3D point cloud stitching, dense point cloud creation and Poisson surface reconstruction. Before the first step, we partition one video sequence into groups, where each group consists of two successive frames (image pairs), and each pair in each group contains one overlapping part, which is used as a stitching region. Fist, the 3D point cloud of each group is reconstructed by utilizing structure from motion (SFM). Secondly, a scheme based on SIFT features registers and stitches the obtained 3D point clouds, by estimating the transformation matrix of the overlapping part between different groups with high accuracy and efficiency. Thirdly, we select the most robust SIFT feature points as the seed points, and then obtain the dense point cloud from sparse point cloud via a depth testing method presented by Furukawa. Finally, by utilizing Poisson surface reconstruction, polygonal patches for the internal organs are obtained. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves a high accuracy and efficiency for 3D reconstruction of gastric surface from an endoscopic video sequence.

  9. A probabilistic cell model in background corrected image sequences for single cell analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fieguth Paul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods of manual cell localization and outlining are so onerous that automated tracking methods would seem mandatory for handling huge image sequences, nevertheless manual tracking is, astonishingly, still widely practiced in areas such as cell biology which are outside the influence of most image processing research. The goal of our research is to address this gap by developing automated methods of cell tracking, localization, and segmentation. Since even an optimal frame-to-frame association method cannot compensate and recover from poor detection, it is clear that the quality of cell tracking depends on the quality of cell detection within each frame. Methods Cell detection performs poorly where the background is not uniform and includes temporal illumination variations, spatial non-uniformities, and stationary objects such as well boundaries (which confine the cells under study. To improve cell detection, the signal to noise ratio of the input image can be increased via accurate background estimation. In this paper we investigate background estimation, for the purpose of cell detection. We propose a cell model and a method for background estimation, driven by the proposed cell model, such that well structure can be identified, and explicitly rejected, when estimating the background. Results The resulting background-removed images have fewer artifacts and allow cells to be localized and detected more reliably. The experimental results generated by applying the proposed method to different Hematopoietic Stem Cell (HSC image sequences are quite promising. Conclusion The understanding of cell behavior relies on precise information about the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of cells. Such information may play a key role in disease research and regenerative medicine, so automated methods for observation and measurement of cells from microscopic images are in high demand. The proposed method in this paper is capable

  10. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the sellar region: A comparison study of BLADE and single-shot echo planar imaging sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiping, Lu [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hui, Liu [MR Collaboration NE Asia, Siemens Healthcare, Siemens Ltd., China, Shanghai 201318 (China); Kun, Zhou [MR PLM APPL, Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen 518057 (China); Daoying, Geng, E-mail: GengdaoyingGDY@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Bo, Yin, E-mail: yinbo7@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare BLADE diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) DWI on the aspects of feasibility of imaging the sellar region and image quality. Methods: A total of 3 healthy volunteers and 52 patients with suspected lesions in the sellar region were included in this prospective intra-individual study. All exams were performed at 3.0 T with a BLADE DWI sequence and a standard single-shot EP-DWI sequence. Phantom measurements were performed to measure the objective signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Two radiologists rated the image quality according to the visualisation of the internal carotid arteries, optic chiasm, pituitary stalk, pituitary gland and lesion, and the overall image quality. One radiologist measured lesion sizes for detecting their relationship with the image score. Results: The SNR in BLADE DWI sequence showed no significant difference from the single-shot EPI sequence (P > 0.05). All of the assessed regions received higher scores in BLADE DWI images than single-shot EP-DWI.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the rat pelvis using 3D water-excitation MP-RAGE MR sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, Tomokazu; Homma, Kazuhiro; Hyodo, Koji; Nitta, Naotaka; Iwasaki, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    We developed a novel technique for fat-saturated, 3-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequencing based upon the 3D magnetization-prepared, rapid gradient-echo (3D-MP-RAGE) method. We saturated fat using 2 techniques, chemical shift selective (CHESS; FatSat)-3D-DWI sequence versus water excitation (WE)-3D-DWI method, then compared the 2 sequences in terms of degree of fat suppression. In preparing the FatSat-3D-DWI sequence, we used a ''CHESS-90deg radiofrequency (RF)-motion probing gradient (MPG)-180deg RFMPG-90deg RF'' pulse-train, to sensitize the magnetization to fat-saturated diffusion. In contrast, in the WE-3D-DWI sequence, we selected a RAGE-excitation pulse with a binominal-pulse 1-1 or 1-2-1 for water-excited (fat-saturated) diffusion imaging. Experimental results in a phantom confirmed the effects of diffusion weighting and of fat saturation. Fat saturation was much better in the WE-3D-DWI sequence than the CHESS-3D-DWI sequence. From results from animal (rat pelvis) experiments using WE-3D-DWI, we obtained fat-saturated DWI. This sequence was useful for in vivo imaging. (author)

  12. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  13. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-Bing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method. PMID:24696649

  14. Generalized min-max bound-based MRI pulse sequence design framework for wide-range T1 relaxometry: A case study on the tissue specific imaging sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new design strategy for optimizing MRI pulse sequences for T1 relaxometry. The design strategy optimizes the pulse sequence parameters to minimize the maximum variance of unbiased T1 estimates over a range of T1 values using the Cramér-Rao bound. In contrast to prior sequences optimized for a single nominal T1 value, the optimized sequence using our bound-based strategy achieves improved precision and accuracy for a broad range of T1 estimates within a clinically feasible scan time. The optimization combines the downhill simplex method with a simulated annealing process. To show the effectiveness of the proposed strategy, we optimize the tissue specific imaging (TSI sequence. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the optimized TSI sequence yields improved precision and accuracy over the popular driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation of T1 (DESPOT1 approach for normal brain tissues (estimated T1 700-2000 ms at 3.0T. The relative mean estimation error (MSE for T1 estimation is less than 1.7% using the optimized TSI sequence, as opposed to less than 7.0% using DESPOT1 for normal brain tissues. The optimized TSI sequence achieves good stability by keeping the MSE under 7.0% over larger T1 values corresponding to different lesion tissues and the cerebrospinal fluid (up to 5000 ms. The T1 estimation accuracy using the new pulse sequence also shows improvement, which is more pronounced in low SNR scenarios.

  15. Why do I hear but not understand? Stochastic undersampling as a model of degraded neural encoding of speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique A Lopez-Poveda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment is a serious disease with increasing prevalence. It is defined based on increased audiometric thresholds but increased thresholds are only partly responsible for the greater difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments experienced by some older listeners or by hearing-impaired listeners. Identifying the additional factors and mechanisms that impair intelligibility is fundamental to understanding hearing impairment but these factors remain uncertain. Traditionally, these additional factors have been sought in the way the speech spectrum is encoded in the pattern of impaired mechanical cochlear responses. Recent studies, however, are steering the focus toward impaired encoding of the speech waveform in the auditory nerve. In our recent work, we gave evidence that a significant factor might be the loss of afferent auditory nerve fibers, a pathology that comes with aging or noise overexposure. Our approach was based on a signal-processing analogy whereby the auditory nerve may be regarded as a stochastic sampler of the sound waveform and deafferentation may be described in terms of waveform undersampling. We showed that stochastic undersampling simultaneously degrades the encoding of soft and rapid waveform features, and that this degrades speech intelligibility in noise more than in quiet without significant increases in audiometric thresholds. Here, we review our recent work in a broader context and argue that the stochastic undersampling analogy may be extended to study the perceptual consequences of various different hearing pathologies and their treatment.

  16. An examination of the sequence of intersecting lines using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Katherine; Roux, Claude; Reedy, Brian J

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the potential of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectral imaging as a technique to determine the sequence of line crossings was examined. The technique was successful in determining the sequence of heterogeneous line intersections produced using ballpoint pens and laser printers. By imaging at characteristic frequencies, it was possible to form spectral images showing the spatial distribution of the materials. By examining the spectral images from the inks, it was possible to determine whether the ink was above or below the toner. In blind testing, ATR-FTIR spectral imaging results were directly compared to those obtained by eight experienced forensic document examiners using methods regularly employed in casework. ATR-FTIR spectral imaging was shown to achieve a 100% success rate in the blind tests, whereas some incorrect sequence determinations were made by the forensic document examiners when using traditional techniques. The technique was unable to image ink-jet printing, gel pens, roller ball pens, and felt-tip pens, and was also unable to determine the sequence of intersecting ballpoint pen lines.

  17. Optic disc boundary segmentation from diffeomorphic demons registration of monocular fundus image sequences versus 3D visualization of stereo fundus image pairs for automated early stage glaucoma assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Vijay; Hill, Jason; Mitra, Sunanda; Nutter, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Despite the current availability in resource-rich regions of advanced technologies in scanning and 3-D imaging in current ophthalmology practice, world-wide screening tests for early detection and progression of glaucoma still consist of a variety of simple tools, including fundus image-based parameters such as CDR (cup to disc diameter ratio) and CAR (cup to disc area ratio), especially in resource -poor regions. Reliable automated computation of the relevant parameters from fundus image sequences requires robust non-rigid registration and segmentation techniques. Recent research work demonstrated that proper non-rigid registration of multi-view monocular fundus image sequences could result in acceptable segmentation of cup boundaries for automated computation of CAR and CDR. This research work introduces a composite diffeomorphic demons registration algorithm for segmentation of cup boundaries from a sequence of monocular images and compares the resulting CAR and CDR values with those computed manually by experts and from 3-D visualization of stereo pairs. Our preliminary results show that the automated computation of CDR and CAR from composite diffeomorphic segmentation of monocular image sequences yield values comparable with those from the other two techniques and thus may provide global healthcare with a cost-effective yet accurate tool for management of glaucoma in its early stage.

  18. Joint Motion Estimation and Layer Segmentation in Transparent Image Sequences—Application to Noise Reduction in X-Ray Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Liénard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the estimation of the motions and the segmentation of the spatial supports of the different layers involved in transparent X-ray image sequences. Classical motion estimation methods fail on sequences involving transparent effects since they do not explicitly model this phenomenon. We propose a method that comprises three main steps: initial block-matching for two-layer transparent motion estimation, motion clustering with 3D Hough transform, and joint transparent layer segmentation and parametric motion estimation. It is validated on synthetic and real clinical X-ray image sequences. Secondly, we derive an original transparent motion compensation method compatible with any spatiotemporal filtering technique. A direct transparent motion compensation method is proposed. To overcome its limitations, a novel hybrid filter is introduced which locally selects which type of motion compensation is to be carried out for optimal denoising. Convincing experiments on synthetic and real clinical images are also reported.

  19. Stereo and motion cues in preattentive vision processing--some experiments with random-dot stereographic image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pong, T C; Kenner, M A; Otis, J

    1990-01-01

    Low-level preattentive vision processing is of special interest since it seems the logical starting point of all vision processing. Exploration of the human visual processing system at this level is, however, extremely difficult, but can be facilitated by the use of stroboscopic presentation of sequences of random-dot stereograms, which contain only local spatial and temporal information and therefore limit the processing of these images to the low level. Four experiments are described in which such sequences were used to explore the relationships between various cues (optical flow, stereo disparity, and accretion and deletion of image points) at the low level. To study these relationships in more depth, especially the resolution of conflicting information among the cues, some of the image sequences presented information not usually encountered in 'natural' scenes. The results indicate that the processing of these cues is undertaken as a set of cooperative processes.

  20. Undersampling power-law size distributions: effect on the assessment of extreme natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of undersampling on estimating the size of extreme natural hazards from historical data is examined. Tests using synthetic catalogs indicate that the tail of an empirical size distribution sampled from a pure Pareto probability distribution can range from having one-to-several unusually large events to appearing depleted, relative to the parent distribution. Both of these effects are artifacts caused by limited catalog length. It is more difficult to diagnose the artificially depleted empirical distributions, since one expects that a pure Pareto distribution is physically limited in some way. Using maximum likelihood methods and the method of moments, we estimate the power-law exponent and the corner size parameter of tapered Pareto distributions for several natural hazard examples: tsunamis, floods, and earthquakes. Each of these examples has varying catalog lengths and measurement thresholds, relative to the largest event sizes. In many cases where there are only several orders of magnitude between the measurement threshold and the largest events, joint two-parameter estimation techniques are necessary to account for estimation dependence between the power-law scaling exponent and the corner size parameter. Results indicate that whereas the corner size parameter of a tapered Pareto distribution can be estimated, its upper confidence bound cannot be determined and the estimate itself is often unstable with time. Correspondingly, one cannot statistically reject a pure Pareto null hypothesis using natural hazard catalog data. Although physical limits to the hazard source size and by attenuation mechanisms from source to site constrain the maximum hazard size, historical data alone often cannot reliably determine the corner size parameter. Probabilistic assessments incorporating theoretical constraints on source size and propagation effects are preferred over deterministic assessments of extreme natural hazards based on historic data.

  1. Determining cardiac velocity fields and intraventricular pressure distribution from a sequence of ultrafast CT cardiac images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S M; Leahy, R M; Boyd, D P; Brundage, B H; Napel, S

    1994-01-01

    A method of computing the velocity field and pressure distribution from a sequence of ultrafast CT (UFCT) cardiac images is demonstrated. UFCT multi-slice cine imaging gives a series of tomographic slices covering the volume of the heart at a rate of 17 frames per second. The complete volume data set can be modeled using equations of continuum theory and through regularization, velocity vectors of both blood and tissue can be determined at each voxel in the volume. The authors present a technique to determine the pressure distribution throughout the volume of the left ventricle using the computed velocity field. A numerical algorithm is developed by discretizing the pressure Poisson equation (PPE), which Is based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The algorithm is evaluated using a mathematical phantom of known velocity and pressure-Couette flow. It is shown that the algorithm based on the PPE can reconstruct the pressure distribution using only the velocity data. Furthermore, the PPE is shown to be robust in the presence of noise. The velocity field and pressure distribution derived from a UFCT study of a patient are also presented.

  2. Evaluation of bias voltage modulation sequence for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novell, Anthony; Legros, Mathieu; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Dayton, Paul A.; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2014-09-01

    Many clinical diagnoses have now been improved thanks to the development of new techniques dedicated to contrast agent nonlinear imaging. Over the past few years, Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (cMUTs) have emerged as a promising alternative to traditional piezoelectric transducers. One notable advantage of cMUTs is their wide frequency bandwidth. However, their use in nonlinear imaging approaches such as those used to detect contrast agents have been challenging due their intrinsic nonlinear character. We propose a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation (BVM), specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their inherent nonlinear behavior. Theoretical and experimental results show that a complete cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source can be reached when the BVM sequence is implemented. In-vitro validation of the sequence is performed using a cMUT probe connected to an open scanner and a flow phantom setup containing SonoVue microbubbles. Compared to the standard amplitude modulation imaging mode, a 6 dB increase of contrast-to-tissue ratio was achieved when the BVM sequence is applied. These results reveal that the problem of cMUT nonlinearity can be addressed, thus expanding the potential of this new transducer technology for nonlinear contrast agent detection and imaging.

  3. Evaluation of bias voltage modulation sequence for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novell, Anthony; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Bouakaz, Ayache; Legros, Mathieu; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Many clinical diagnoses have now been improved thanks to the development of new techniques dedicated to contrast agent nonlinear imaging. Over the past few years, Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (cMUTs) have emerged as a promising alternative to traditional piezoelectric transducers. One notable advantage of cMUTs is their wide frequency bandwidth. However, their use in nonlinear imaging approaches such as those used to detect contrast agents have been challenging due their intrinsic nonlinear character. We propose a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation (BVM), specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their inherent nonlinear behavior. Theoretical and experimental results show that a complete cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source can be reached when the BVM sequence is implemented. In-vitro validation of the sequence is performed using a cMUT probe connected to an open scanner and a flow phantom setup containing SonoVue microbubbles. Compared to the standard amplitude modulation imaging mode, a 6 dB increase of contrast-to-tissue ratio was achieved when the BVM sequence is applied. These results reveal that the problem of cMUT nonlinearity can be addressed, thus expanding the potential of this new transducer technology for nonlinear contrast agent detection and imaging. (paper)

  4. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshidfar Z.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don’t have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. Results: This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Conclusion: Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  5. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Z; Faeghi, F; Haghighatkhah, H R; Abdolmohammadi, J

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don't have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR) by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  6. Optimization of multi-pulse sequences for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a cMUT array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B.; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-04-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology provides advantages such as wide frequency bandwidth, which can be exploited for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the efficiency of traditional multi-pulse imaging schemes, such as pulse inversion (PI), remains limited because of the intrinsic nonlinear character of cMUTs. Recently, a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation sequence (BVM), has been specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their unwanted nonlinear behavior. In this study, we propose to optimize contrast agent detection by combining the BVM sequence with PI and/or chirp reversal (CR). An aqueous dispersion of lipid encapsulated microbubbles was exposed to several combinations of multi-pulse imaging sequences. Approaches were evaluated in vitro using 9 inter-connected elements of a cMUT linear array (excitation frequency of 4 MHz peak negative pressure of 100 kPa). For sequences using chirp excitations, a specific compression filter was designed to compress and extract several nonlinear components from the received microbubble responses. A satisfactory cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source is achieved when BVM is combined with PI and CR. In comparison with PI and CR imaging modes alone, using sequences incorporating BVM increases the contrast-to-tissue ratio by 10.0 dB and 4.6 dB, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of BVM with CR and PI results in a significant increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio (+29 dB). This enhancement is attributed to the use of chirps as excitation signals and the improved preservation of several nonlinear components contained within the contrast agent response.

  7. Optimization of multi-pulse sequences for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a cMUT array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology provides advantages such as wide frequency bandwidth, which can be exploited for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the efficiency of traditional multi-pulse imaging schemes, such as pulse inversion (PI), remains limited because of the intrinsic nonlinear character of cMUTs. Recently, a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation sequence (BVM), has been specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their unwanted nonlinear behavior. In this study, we propose to optimize contrast agent detection by combining the BVM sequence with PI and/or chirp reversal (CR). An aqueous dispersion of lipid encapsulated microbubbles was exposed to several combinations of multi-pulse imaging sequences. Approaches were evaluated in vitro using 9 inter-connected elements of a cMUT linear array (excitation frequency of 4 MHz; peak negative pressure of 100 kPa). For sequences using chirp excitations, a specific compression filter was designed to compress and extract several nonlinear components from the received microbubble responses. A satisfactory cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source is achieved when BVM is combined with PI and CR. In comparison with PI and CR imaging modes alone, using sequences incorporating BVM increases the contrast-to-tissue ratio by 10.0 dB and 4.6 dB, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of BVM with CR and PI results in a significant increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio (+29 dB). This enhancement is attributed to the use of chirps as excitation signals and the improved preservation of several nonlinear components contained within the contrast agent response. (paper)

  8. Batch-processing of imaging or liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry datasets and De Novo sequencing of polyketide siderophores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jiří; Sokolová, Lucie; Lemr, Karel; Pluháček, Tomáš; Palyzová, Andrea; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1865, č. 7 (2017), s. 768-775 ISSN 1570-9639 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mass spectrometry imaging * De novo sequencing * Siderophores Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.773, year: 2016

  9. PIRPLE: a penalized-likelihood framework for incorporation of prior images in CT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stayman, J Webster; Dang, Hao; Ding, Yifu; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of diagnosis and treatment, it is common for a number of imaging studies to be acquired. Such imaging sequences can provide substantial patient-specific prior knowledge about the anatomy that can be incorporated into a prior-image-based tomographic reconstruction for improved image quality and better dose utilization. We present a general methodology using a model-based reconstruction approach including formulations of the measurement noise that also integrates prior images. This penalized-likelihood technique adopts a sparsity enforcing penalty that incorporates prior information yet allows for change between the current reconstruction and the prior image. Moreover, since prior images are generally not registered with the current image volume, we present a modified model-based approach that seeks a joint registration of the prior image in addition to the reconstruction of projection data. We demonstrate that the combined prior-image- and model-based technique outperforms methods that ignore the prior data or lack a noise model. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of registration for prior-image-based reconstruction methods and show that the prior-image-registered penalized-likelihood estimation (PIRPLE) approach can maintain a high level of image quality in the presence of noisy and undersampled projection data. (paper)

  10. Automatic summarization of changes in biological image sequences using algorithmic information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew R; Bjornsson, Christopher S; Temple, Sally; Banker, Gary; Roysam, Badrinath

    2009-08-01

    An algorithmic information-theoretic method is presented for object-level summarization of meaningful changes in image sequences. Object extraction and tracking data are represented as an attributed tracking graph (ATG). Time courses of object states are compared using an adaptive information distance measure, aided by a closed-form multidimensional quantization. The notion of meaningful summarization is captured by using the gap statistic to estimate the randomness deficiency from algorithmic statistics. The summary is the clustering result and feature subset that maximize the gap statistic. This approach was validated on four bioimaging applications: 1) It was applied to a synthetic data set containing two populations of cells differing in the rate of growth, for which it correctly identified the two populations and the single feature out of 23 that separated them; 2) it was applied to 59 movies of three types of neuroprosthetic devices being inserted in the brain tissue at three speeds each, for which it correctly identified insertion speed as the primary factor affecting tissue strain; 3) when applied to movies of cultured neural progenitor cells, it correctly distinguished neurons from progenitors without requiring the use of a fixative stain; and 4) when analyzing intracellular molecular transport in cultured neurons undergoing axon specification, it automatically confirmed the role of kinesins in axon specification.

  11. a Fast Segmentation Algorithm for C-V Model Based on Exponential Image Sequence Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Lu, L.; Xu, J.; Zhang, J.

    2017-09-01

    For the island coastline segmentation, a fast segmentation algorithm for C-V model method based on exponential image sequence generation is proposed in this paper. The exponential multi-scale C-V model with level set inheritance and boundary inheritance is developed. The main research contributions are as follows: 1) the problems of the "holes" and "gaps" are solved when extraction coastline through the small scale shrinkage, low-pass filtering and area sorting of region. 2) the initial value of SDF (Signal Distance Function) and the level set are given by Otsu segmentation based on the difference of reflection SAR on land and sea, which are finely close to the coastline. 3) the computational complexity of continuous transition are successfully reduced between the different scales by the SDF and of level set inheritance. Experiment results show that the method accelerates the acquisition of initial level set formation, shortens the time of the extraction of coastline, at the same time, removes the non-coastline body part and improves the identification precision of the main body coastline, which automates the process of coastline segmentation.

  12. A FAST SEGMENTATION ALGORITHM FOR C-V MODEL BASED ON EXPONENTIAL IMAGE SEQUENCE GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For the island coastline segmentation, a fast segmentation algorithm for C-V model method based on exponential image sequence generation is proposed in this paper. The exponential multi-scale C-V model with level set inheritance and boundary inheritance is developed. The main research contributions are as follows: 1 the problems of the "holes" and "gaps" are solved when extraction coastline through the small scale shrinkage, low-pass filtering and area sorting of region. 2 the initial value of SDF (Signal Distance Function and the level set are given by Otsu segmentation based on the difference of reflection SAR on land and sea, which are finely close to the coastline. 3 the computational complexity of continuous transition are successfully reduced between the different scales by the SDF and of level set inheritance. Experiment results show that the method accelerates the acquisition of initial level set formation, shortens the time of the extraction of coastline, at the same time, removes the non-coastline body part and improves the identification precision of the main body coastline, which automates the process of coastline segmentation.

  13. INTEGRATED GEOREFERENCING OF STEREO IMAGE SEQUENCES CAPTURED WITH A STEREOVISION MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM – APPROACHES AND PRACTICAL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Eugster

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Stereovision based mobile mapping systems enable the efficient capturing of directly georeferenced stereo pairs. With today's camera and onboard storage technologies imagery can be captured at high data rates resulting in dense stereo sequences. These georeferenced stereo sequences provide a highly detailed and accurate digital representation of the roadside environment which builds the foundation for a wide range of 3d mapping applications and image-based geo web-services. Georeferenced stereo images are ideally suited for the 3d mapping of street furniture and visible infrastructure objects, pavement inspection, asset management tasks or image based change detection. As in most mobile mapping systems, the georeferencing of the mapping sensors and observations – in our case of the imaging sensors – normally relies on direct georeferencing based on INS/GNSS navigation sensors. However, in urban canyons the achievable direct georeferencing accuracy of the dynamically captured stereo image sequences is often insufficient or at least degraded. Furthermore, many of the mentioned application scenarios require homogeneous georeferencing accuracy within a local reference frame over the entire mapping perimeter. To achieve these demands georeferencing approaches are presented and cost efficient workflows are discussed which allows validating and updating the INS/GNSS based trajectory with independently estimated positions in cases of prolonged GNSS signal outages in order to increase the georeferencing accuracy up to the project requirements.

  14. Integrated Georeferencing of Stereo Image Sequences Captured with a Stereovision Mobile Mapping System - Approaches and Practical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, H.; Huber, F.; Nebiker, S.; Gisi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Stereovision based mobile mapping systems enable the efficient capturing of directly georeferenced stereo pairs. With today's camera and onboard storage technologies imagery can be captured at high data rates resulting in dense stereo sequences. These georeferenced stereo sequences provide a highly detailed and accurate digital representation of the roadside environment which builds the foundation for a wide range of 3d mapping applications and image-based geo web-services. Georeferenced stereo images are ideally suited for the 3d mapping of street furniture and visible infrastructure objects, pavement inspection, asset management tasks or image based change detection. As in most mobile mapping systems, the georeferencing of the mapping sensors and observations - in our case of the imaging sensors - normally relies on direct georeferencing based on INS/GNSS navigation sensors. However, in urban canyons the achievable direct georeferencing accuracy of the dynamically captured stereo image sequences is often insufficient or at least degraded. Furthermore, many of the mentioned application scenarios require homogeneous georeferencing accuracy within a local reference frame over the entire mapping perimeter. To achieve these demands georeferencing approaches are presented and cost efficient workflows are discussed which allows validating and updating the INS/GNSS based trajectory with independently estimated positions in cases of prolonged GNSS signal outages in order to increase the georeferencing accuracy up to the project requirements.

  15. Low-Rank and Adaptive Sparse Signal (LASSI) Models for Highly Accelerated Dynamic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Saiprasad; Moore, Brian E; Nadakuditi, Raj Rao; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2017-05-01

    Sparsity-based approaches have been popular in many applications in image processing and imaging. Compressed sensing exploits the sparsity of images in a transform domain or dictionary to improve image recovery fromundersampledmeasurements. In the context of inverse problems in dynamic imaging, recent research has demonstrated the promise of sparsity and low-rank techniques. For example, the patches of the underlying data are modeled as sparse in an adaptive dictionary domain, and the resulting image and dictionary estimation from undersampled measurements is called dictionary-blind compressed sensing, or the dynamic image sequence is modeled as a sum of low-rank and sparse (in some transform domain) components (L+S model) that are estimated from limited measurements. In this work, we investigate a data-adaptive extension of the L+S model, dubbed LASSI, where the temporal image sequence is decomposed into a low-rank component and a component whose spatiotemporal (3D) patches are sparse in some adaptive dictionary domain. We investigate various formulations and efficient methods for jointly estimating the underlying dynamic signal components and the spatiotemporal dictionary from limited measurements. We also obtain efficient sparsity penalized dictionary-blind compressed sensing methods as special cases of our LASSI approaches. Our numerical experiments demonstrate the promising performance of LASSI schemes for dynamicmagnetic resonance image reconstruction from limited k-t space data compared to recent methods such as k-t SLR and L+S, and compared to the proposed dictionary-blind compressed sensing method.

  16. Evaluation of pneumonia in children: comparison of MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T with chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Koc, Ali; Coskun, Abdulhakim (Dept. of Radiology, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Ozturk, Mustafa K (Dept. of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Mulkern, Robert V; Lee, Edward Y (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medicine, Pulmonary Div., Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)), email: Edward.lee@childrens.harvard.edu

    2011-10-15

    Background Although there has been a study aimed at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of pneumonia in children at a low magnetic field (0.2T), there is no study which assessed the efficacy of MRI, particularly with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T, for evaluating pneumonia in children. Purpose To investigate the efficacy of chest MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T for evaluating pneumonia in children by comparing MRI findings with those of chest radiographs. Material and Methods This was an Institutional Review Board-approved, HIPPA-compliant prospective study of 40 consecutive pediatric patients (24 boys, 16 girls; mean age 7.3 years +- 6.6 years) with pneumonia, who underwent PA and lateral chest radiographs followed by MRI within 24 h. All MRI studies were obtained in axial and coronal planes with two different fast imaging sequences: T1-weighted FFE (Fast Field Echo) (TR/TE: 83/4.6) and T2-weighted B-FFE M2D (Balanced Fast Field Echo Multiple 2D Dimensional) (TR/TE: 3.2/1.6). Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed each chest radiograph and MRI for the presence of consolidation, necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion. Chest radiograph and MRI findings were compared with Kappa statistics. Results All consolidation, lung necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion detected with chest radiographs were also detected with MRI. There was statistically substantial agreement between chest radiographs and MRI in detecting consolidation (k = 0.78) and bronchiectasis (k = 0.72) in children with pneumonia. The agreement between chest radiographs and MRI was moderate for detecting necrosis/abscess (k = 0.49) and fair for detecting pleural effusion (k = 0.30). Conclusion MRI with fast imaging sequences is comparable to chest radiographs for evaluating underlying pulmonary consolidation, bronchiectasis, necrosis/abscess, and pleural effusion often associated with pneumonia in children

  17. Validation of the Dominant Sequence Paradigm and Role of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Imaging in PI-RADS Version 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Matthew D; Shih, Joanna H; Lay, Nathan; Barrett, Tristan; Kayat Bittencourt, Leonardo; Borofsky, Samuel; Kabakus, Ismail M; Law, Yan Mee; Marko, Jamie; Shebel, Haytham; Mertan, Francesca V; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Summers, Ronald M; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To validate the dominant pulse sequence paradigm and limited role of dynamic contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2 for prostate multiparametric MR imaging by using data from a multireader study. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant retrospective interpretation of prospectively acquired data was approved by the local ethics committee. Patients were treatment-naïve with endorectal coil 3-T multiparametric MR imaging. A total of 163 patients were evaluated, 110 with prostatectomy after multiparametric MR imaging and 53 with negative multiparametric MR imaging and systematic biopsy findings. Nine radiologists participated in this study and interpreted images in 58 patients, on average (range, 56-60 patients). Lesions were detected with PI-RADS version 2 and were compared with whole-mount prostatectomy findings. Probability of cancer detection for overall, T2-weighted, and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging PI-RADS scores was calculated in the peripheral zone (PZ) and transition zone (TZ) by using generalized estimating equations. To determine dominant pulse sequence and benefit of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging, odds ratios (ORs) were calculated as the ratio of odds of cancer of two consecutive scores by logistic regression. Results A total of 654 lesions (420 in the PZ) were detected. The probability of cancer detection for PI-RADS category 2, 3, 4, and 5 lesions was 15.7%, 33.1%, 70.5%, and 90.7%, respectively. DW imaging outperformed T2-weighted imaging in the PZ (OR, 3.49 vs 2.45; P = .008). T2-weighted imaging performed better but did not clearly outperform DW imaging in the TZ (OR, 4.79 vs 3.77; P = .494). Lesions classified as PI-RADS category 3 at DW MR imaging and as positive at DCE imaging in the PZ showed a higher probability of cancer detection than did DCE-negative PI-RADS category 3 lesions (67.8% vs 40.0%, P = .02). The addition of DCE imaging

  18. Liver T2-weighted MR imaging: assessment of a three-dimensional fast spin-echo with extended echo train acquisition sequence at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoiseux, Céline Cotereau; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Nakache, Jean-Pierre; Claude, Isabelle Dufour; Zins, Marc

    2013-08-01

    To retrospectively compare image quality and lesion detectability with two T2-weighted sequences at 1.5 Tesla (T): respiratory-triggered three-dimensional fat sat fast-spin-echo with extended echo-train acquisition (3D FSE-XETA) and respiratory-triggered two-dimensional fat-sat fast recovery fast-spin-echo (2D FRFSE). MR was performed at 1.5T in 53 consecutive patients. Two radiologists blinded to the sequence details reviewed the studies to determine: (i) signal and contrast to noise ratios, (ii) overall image quality, (iii) sensitivity for focal lesion detection. Image assessment scores for the 2D FRFSE sequence were significantly higher than those for the 3D FSE-XETA sequence for overall image quality (P < 0.01) and artifacts (P < 0.001). Sensitivity for liver lesion detection was higher with the 3D FSE-XETA sequence (69.3% versus 57.3%; P < 0.05) compared with the 2D FRFSE sequence. The 3D FSE-XETA sequence improves the reader confidence score (P < 0.01) for liver lesions detection. Inter-observer correlation was higher with the 3D FSE-XETA sequence. For T2-weighted liver imaging at 1.5T, the 3D FSE-XETA sequence improves sensitivity, reader confidence score and interobserver correlation for focal liver lesion detection, but it suffers from a lower overall image quality and higher artifacts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Performance of Correspondence Algorithms in Vision-Based Driver Assistance Using an Online Image Sequence Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klette, Reinhard; Krüger, Norbert; Vaudrey, Tobi

    2011-01-01

    the classification of recorded video data into situations defined by a cooccurrence of some events in recorded traffic scenes. About 100-400 stereo frames (or 4-16 s of recording) are considered a basic sequence, which will be identified with one particular situation. Future testing is expected to be on data......This paper discusses options for testing correspondence algorithms in stereo or motion analysis that are designed or considered for vision-based driver assistance. It introduces a globally available database, with a main focus on testing on video sequences of real-world data. We suggest...... that report on hours of driving, and multiple hours of long video data may be segmented into basic sequences and classified into situations. This paper prepares for this expected development. This paper uses three different evaluation approaches (prediction error, synthesized sequences, and labeled sequences...

  20. Pulseq-Graphical Programming Interface: Open source visual environment for prototyping pulse sequences and integrated magnetic resonance imaging algorithm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthi Sravan, R; Potdar, Sneha; Poojar, Pavan; Reddy, Ashok Kumar; Kroboth, Stefan; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Zaitsev, Maxim; Venkatesan, Ramesh; Geethanath, Sairam

    2018-03-11

    To provide a single open-source platform for comprehensive MR algorithm development inclusive of simulations, pulse sequence design and deployment, reconstruction, and image analysis. We integrated the "Pulseq" platform for vendor-independent pulse programming with Graphical Programming Interface (GPI), a scientific development environment based on Python. Our integrated platform, Pulseq-GPI, permits sequences to be defined visually and exported to the Pulseq file format for execution on an MR scanner. For comparison, Pulseq files using either MATLAB only ("MATLAB-Pulseq") or Python only ("Python-Pulseq") were generated. We demonstrated three fundamental sequences on a 1.5 T scanner. Execution times of the three variants of implementation were compared on two operating systems. In vitro phantom images indicate equivalence with the vendor supplied implementations and MATLAB-Pulseq. The examples demonstrated in this work illustrate the unifying capability of Pulseq-GPI. The execution times of all the three implementations were fast (a few seconds). The software is capable of user-interface based development and/or command line programming. The tool demonstrated here, Pulseq-GPI, integrates the open-source simulation, reconstruction and analysis capabilities of GPI Lab with the pulse sequence design and deployment features of Pulseq. Current and future work includes providing an ISMRMRD interface and incorporating Specific Absorption Ratio and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation computations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Automated Leaf Tracking using Multi-view Image Sequences of Maize Plants for Leaf-growth Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Choudhury, S.; Awada, T.; Samal, A.; Stoerger, V.; Bashyam, S.

    2017-12-01

    Extraction of phenotypes with botanical importance by analyzing plant image sequences has the desirable advantages of non-destructive temporal phenotypic measurements of a large number of plants with little or no manual intervention in a relatively short period of time. The health of a plant is best interpreted by the emergence timing and temporal growth of individual leaves. For automated leaf growth monitoring, it is essential to track each leaf throughout the life cycle of the plant. Plants are constantly changing organisms with increasing complexity in architecture due to variations in self-occlusions and phyllotaxy, i.e., arrangements of leaves around the stem. The leaf cross-overs pose challenges to accurately track each leaf using single view image sequence. Thus, we introduce a novel automated leaf tracking algorithm using a graph theoretic approach by multi-view image sequence analysis based on the determination of leaf-tips and leaf-junctions in the 3D space. The basis of the leaf tracking algorithm is: the leaves emerge using bottom-up approach in the case of a maize plant, and the direction of leaf emergence strictly alternates in terms of direction. The algorithm involves labeling of the individual parts of a plant, i.e., leaves and stem, following graphical representation of the plant skeleton, i.e., one-pixel wide connected line obtained from the binary image. The length of the leaf is measured by the number of pixels in the leaf skeleton. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, a benchmark dataset is indispensable. Thus, we publicly release University of Nebraska-Lincoln Component Plant Phenotyping dataset-2 (UNL-CPPD-2) consisting of images of the 20 maize plants captured by visible light camera of the Lemnatec Scanalyzer 3D high throughout plant phenotyping facility once daily for 60 days from 10 different views. The dataset is aimed to facilitate the development and evaluation of leaf tracking algorithms and their uniform comparisons.

  2. Automatic delamination defect detection in radiographic sequence of rocket boosters; Determination automatique de defauts de delaminage dans des sequences d'images radiographiques de propulseurs de fusee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebuffel, V.; Pires, S. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique (LETI/DSIS/SSBS), 38 (France); Caplier, A. [Institut National Polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France); Lamarque, P. [SNPE, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    Solid rocket motors are routinely examined in real-time X-ray radioscopic mode. The large and cylindrical boosters are rotating between a high energy source and a two dimensional detector. The purpose of this control is to detect possible defects all through the sample. In the tangential configuration, the part of the object that intersects the X-rays beam is the peripheral one, allowing to detect the delamination defect between the propellant and the external metal envelope. But the defect detectability is very poor due to the strong attenuation of the X-rays through the motors. During the rotation of the booster, the system acquires a sequence of radiographs where the defects are visible over several successive instants. We have previously developed a real-time tomo-synthesis system, processing the radiographs on line, and based on a tomo-synthesis reconstruction algorithm in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. This system is installed at the industrial site of Kourou, and is currently used by the operators in charge of the visual inspection of the boosters. In this paper, we present a method that processes the digital images obtained by the system in the purpose of automatically extracting the delamination defects. Due to the size and the poor contrast of the defects, a single image is not sufficient to perform this detection. A spatio-temporal aspect is required for the algorithm to be robust and efficient. In a first step, the proposed method computes the apparent local displacement between the current radiograph and a reference one. This reference image is acquired at the beginning of the rotation, with few noise, and is supposed to be defect free. The apparent displacement is due to the non-perfect rotation positioning. It may be uniform or not, depending on the deformation of the insulation liner of the metallic wall. The images are then registered and compared. On the resulting difference image we apply a smoothed threshold to obtain an

  3. PET Imaging Stability Measurements During Simultaneous Pulsing of Aggressive MR Sequences on the SIGNA PET/MR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Timothy W; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jansen, Floris P; Glover, Gary H

    2018-01-01

    The recent introduction of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanners has enabled new research taking advantage of the complementary information obtainable with PET and MRI. One such application is kinetic modeling, which requires high levels of PET quantitative stability. To accomplish the required PET stability levels, the PET subsystem must be sufficiently isolated from the effects of MR activity. Performance measurements have previously been published, demonstrating sufficient PET stability in the presence of MR pulsing for typical clinical use; however, PET stability during radiofrequency (RF)-intensive and gradient-intensive sequences has not previously been evaluated for a clinical whole-body scanner. In this work, PET stability of the GE SIGNA PET/MR was examined during simultaneous scanning of aggressive MR pulse sequences. Methods: PET performance tests were acquired with MR idle and during simultaneous MR pulsing. Recent system improvements mitigating RF interference and gain variation were used. A fast recovery fast spin echo MR sequence was selected for high RF power, and an echo planar imaging sequence was selected for its high heat-inducing gradients. Measurements were performed to determine PET stability under varying MR conditions using the following metrics: sensitivity, scatter fraction, contrast recovery, uniformity, count rate performance, and image quantitation. A final PET quantitative stability assessment for simultaneous PET scanning during functional MRI studies was performed with a spiral in-and-out gradient echo sequence. Results: Quantitation stability of a 68 Ge flood phantom was demonstrated within 0.34%. Normalized sensitivity was stable during simultaneous scanning within 0.3%. Scatter fraction measured with a 68 Ge line source in the scatter phantom was stable within the range of 40.4%-40.6%. Contrast recovery and uniformity were comparable for PET images acquired simultaneously with multiple MR conditions. Peak noise equivalent count

  4. Influence of Camera Setting on Vehicle-to-Vehicle VLC Employing Undersampled Phase Shift On-Off Keying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vitek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the performance analysis of a camera based vehicle-to-vehicle visible light communication system employing undersampled phase shift on-off keying modulation under interference scenario. Two Nissan Qashqai front lights with daylight running light emitting diodes based lamps are used for communications. The bit error rate (BER performance of the proposed system is experimentally measured for a transmission span up to 24m focusing mostly on the side interference due to reflections. Based on experimental data we demonstrate reduction of the system performance due to the side reflection and illumination of the detector by other light sources which has to taken into account during further data processing. We provide with further statistics for particular shuter speed and transmitter power setting and discus BER improvement especially to meet FEC via the method of adaptive region of interest.

  5. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adluru, Ganesh, E-mail: gadluru@gmail.com; Anderson, Jeffrey [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Gur, Yaniv [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David [Advanced MRI Technologies, Sebastpool, California, 95472 (United States); DiBella, Edward V. R. [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions.

  6. Detecting protein complexes in living cells from laser scanning confocal image sequences by the cross correlation raster image spectroscopy method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digman, Michelle A; Wiseman, Paul W; Horwitz, Alan R; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    We describe a general method for detecting molecular complexes based on the analysis of single molecule fluorescence fluctuations from laser scanning confocal images. The method detects and quantifies complexes of two different fluorescent proteins noninvasively in living cells. Because in a raster scanned image successive pixels are measured at different times, the spatial correlation of the image contains information about dynamic processes occurring over a large time range, from the microseconds to seconds. The correlation of intensity fluctuations measured simultaneously in two channels detects protein complexes that carry two molecules of different colors. This information is obtained from the entire image. A map of the spatial distribution of protein complexes in the cell and their diffusion and/or binding properties can be constructed. Using this cross correlation raster image spectroscopy method, specific locations in the cell can be visualized where dynamics of binding and unbinding of fluorescent protein complexes occur. This fluctuation imaging method can be applied to commercial laser scanning microscopes thereby making it accessible to a large community of scientists.

  7. Imaging the Structure of Grains, Grain Boundaries, and Stacking Sequences in Single and Multi-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David

    2012-02-01

    Graphene can be produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper substrates on up to meter scales [1, 2], making their polycrystallinity [3,4] almost unavoidable. By combining aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we image graphene grains and grain boundaries across six orders of magnitude. Atomic-resolution images of graphene grain boundaries reveal that different grains can stitch together via pentagon-heptagon pairs. We use diffraction-filtered electron imaging to map the shape and orientation of several hundred grains and boundaries over fields of view of a hundred microns. Single, double and multilayer graphene can be differentiated, and the stacking sequence and relative abundance of sequences can be directly imaged. These images reveal an intricate patchwork of grains with structural details depending strongly on growth conditions. The imaging techniques enabled studies of the structure, properties, and control of graphene grains and grain boundaries [5]. [4pt] [1] X. Li et al., Science 324, 1312 (2009).[0pt] [2] S. Bae et al., Nature Nanotechnol. 5, 574 (2010).[0pt] [3] J. M. Wofford, et al., Nano Lett., (2010).[0pt] [4] P. Y. Huang, et al., Nature 469, 389--392 (2011); arXiv:1009.4714, (2010)[0pt] [5] In collaboration with Pinshane Y. Huang, C. S. Ruiz-Vargas, A. M. van der Zande, A. W. Tsen, L. Brown, R. Hovden, F. Ghahari, W. S. Whitney, M.P. Levendorf, J. W. Kevek, S. Garg, J. S. Alden, C. J. Hustedt, Y. Zhu, N. Petrone, J. Hone, J. Park, P. L. McEuen

  8. Automatic internal crack detection from a sequence of infrared images with a triple-threshold Canny edge detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaochao; Tse, Peter W.; Yuan, Maodan

    2018-02-01

    Visual inspection and assessment of the condition of metal structures are essential for safety. Pulse thermography produces visible infrared images, which have been widely applied to detect and characterize defects in structures and materials. When active thermography, a non-destructive testing tool, is applied, the necessity of considerable manual checking can be avoided. However, detecting an internal crack with active thermography remains difficult, since it is usually invisible in the collected sequence of infrared images, which makes the automatic detection of internal cracks even harder. In addition, the detection of an internal crack can be hindered by a complicated inspection environment. With the purpose of putting forward a robust and automatic visual inspection method, a computer vision-based thresholding method is proposed. In this paper, the image signals are a sequence of infrared images collected from the experimental setup with a thermal camera and two flash lamps as stimulus. The contrast of pixels in each frame is enhanced by the Canny operator and then reconstructed by a triple-threshold system. Two features, mean value in the time domain and maximal amplitude in the frequency domain, are extracted from the reconstructed signal to help distinguish the crack pixels from others. Finally, a binary image indicating the location of the internal crack is generated by a K-means clustering method. The proposed procedure has been applied to an iron pipe, which contains two internal cracks and surface abrasion. Some improvements have been made for the computer vision-based automatic crack detection methods. In the future, the proposed method can be applied to realize the automatic detection of internal cracks from many infrared images for the industry.

  9. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen; Arildsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also...

  10. Enhanced imaging of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis through improved image-reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan Xiaochuan; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop a practical, iterative algorithm for image-reconstruction in undersampled tomographic systems, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Methods: The algorithm controls image regularity by minimizing the image total p variation (TpV), a function that reduces to the total variation when p=1.0 or the image roughness when p=2.0. Constraints on the image, such as image positivity and estimated projection-data tolerance, are enforced by projection onto convex sets. The fact that the tomographic system is undersampled translates to the mathematical property that many widely varied resultant volumes may correspond to a given data tolerance. Thus the application of image regularity serves two purposes: (1) Reduction in the number of resultant volumes out of those allowed by fixing the data tolerance, finding the minimum image TpV for fixed data tolerance, and (2) traditional regularization, sacrificing data fidelity for higher image regularity. The present algorithm allows for this dual role of image regularity in undersampled tomography. Results: The proposed image-reconstruction algorithm is applied to three clinical DBT data sets. The DBT cases include one with microcalcifications and two with masses. Conclusions: Results indicate that there may be a substantial advantage in using the present image-reconstruction algorithm for microcalcification imaging.

  11. An Improved Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Cyclic Rotations and Multiple Chaotic Sequences: Application to Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADANI Mohammed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new satellite image encryption algorithm based on the combination of multiple chaotic systems and a random cyclic rotation technique is proposed. Our contribution consists in implementing three different chaotic maps (logistic, sine, and standard combined to improve the security of satellite images. Besides enhancing the encryption, the proposed algorithm also focuses on advanced efficiency of the ciphered images. Compared with classical encryption schemes based on multiple chaotic maps and the Rubik's cube rotation, our approach has not only the same merits of chaos systems like high sensitivity to initial values, unpredictability, and pseudo-randomness, but also other advantages like a higher number of permutations, better performances in Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR and a Maximum Deviation (MD.

  12. Energy function behavior in optimization based image sequence stabilization in presence of moving objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimi Nejadasl, F.; Gorte, B.G.H.; Snellen, M.M.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we address the registration of two images as an optimization problem within indicated bounds. Our contribution is to identify such situations where the optimum value represents the real transformation parameters between the two images. Consider for example Mean Square Error (MSE) as

  13. A segmentation method for lung nodule image sequences based on superpixels and density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Juanjuan; Qiang, Yan; Tian, Qi; Tang, Xiaoxian

    2017-01-01

    The fast and accurate segmentation of lung nodule image sequences is the basis of subsequent processing and diagnostic analyses. However, previous research investigating nodule segmentation algorithms cannot entirely segment cavitary nodules, and the segmentation of juxta-vascular nodules is inaccurate and inefficient. To solve these problems, we propose a new method for the segmentation of lung nodule image sequences based on superpixels and density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN). First, our method uses three-dimensional computed tomography image features of the average intensity projection combined with multi-scale dot enhancement for preprocessing. Hexagonal clustering and morphological optimized sequential linear iterative clustering (HMSLIC) for sequence image oversegmentation is then proposed to obtain superpixel blocks. The adaptive weight coefficient is then constructed to calculate the distance required between superpixels to achieve precise lung nodules positioning and to obtain the subsequent clustering starting block. Moreover, by fitting the distance and detecting the change in slope, an accurate clustering threshold is obtained. Thereafter, a fast DBSCAN superpixel sequence clustering algorithm, which is optimized by the strategy of only clustering the lung nodules and adaptive threshold, is then used to obtain lung nodule mask sequences. Finally, the lung nodule image sequences are obtained. The experimental results show that our method rapidly, completely and accurately segments various types of lung nodule image sequences.

  14. Extracting a Good Quality Frontal Face Image from a Low-Resolution Video Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Feeding low-resolution and low-quality images, from inexpensive surveillance cameras, to systems like, e.g., face recognition, produces erroneous and unstable results. Therefore, there is a need for a mechanism to bridge the gap between on one hand low-resolution and low-quality images and on the......Feeding low-resolution and low-quality images, from inexpensive surveillance cameras, to systems like, e.g., face recognition, produces erroneous and unstable results. Therefore, there is a need for a mechanism to bridge the gap between on one hand low-resolution and low-quality images...... and second is that its improvement factor is limited by a factor close to two. To deal with the first problem we introduce a three-step approach, which produces a face-log containing images of similar frontal faces of the highest possible quality. To deal with the second problem, limited improvement factor...

  15. Correlation peak analysis applied to a sequence of images using two different filters for eye tracking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrón, Verónica A.; Álvarez Borrego, Josué; Coronel Beltrán, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    Eye tracking has many useful applications that range from biometrics to face recognition and human-computer interaction. The analysis of the characteristics of the eyes has become one of the methods to accomplish the location of the eyes and the tracking of the point of gaze. Characteristics such as the contrast between the iris and the sclera, the shape, and distribution of colors and dark/light zones in the area are the starting point for these analyses. In this work, the focus will be on the contrast between the iris and the sclera, performing a correlation in the frequency domain. The images are acquired with an ordinary camera, which with were taken images of thirty-one volunteers. The reference image is an image of the subjects looking to a point in front of them at 0° angle. Then sequences of images are taken with the subject looking at different angles. These images are processed in MATLAB, obtaining the maximum correlation peak for each image, using two different filters. Each filter were analyzed and then one was selected, which is the filter that gives the best performance in terms of the utility of the data, which is displayed in graphs that shows the decay of the correlation peak as the eye moves progressively at different angle. This data will be used to obtain a mathematical model or function that establishes a relationship between the angle of vision (AOV) and the maximum correlation peak (MCP). This model will be tested using different input images from other subject not contained in the initial database, being able to predict angle of vision using the maximum correlation peak data.

  16. Identifying virus-cell fusion in two-channel fluorescence microscopy image sequences based on a layered probabilistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, William J; Lampe, Marko; Koch, Peter; Eils, Roland; Müller, Barbara; Rohr, Karl

    2012-09-01

    The entry process of virus particles into cells is decisive for infection. In this work, we investigate fusion of virus particles with the cell membrane via time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. To automatically identify fusion for single particles based on their intensity over time, we have developed a layered probabilistic approach. The approach decomposes the action of a single particle into three abstractions: the intensity over time, the underlying temporal intensity model, as well as a high level behavior. Each abstraction corresponds to a layer and these layers are represented via stochastic hybrid systems and hidden Markov models. We use a maxbelief strategy to efficiently combine both representations. To compute estimates for the abstractions we use a hybrid particle filter and the Viterbi algorithm. Based on synthetic image sequences, we characterize the performance of the approach as a function of the image noise. We also characterize the performance as a function of the tracking error. We have also successfully applied the approach to real image sequences displaying pseudotyped HIV-1 particles in contact with host cells and compared the experimental results with ground truth obtained by manual analysis.

  17. Research on lock-in thermography for aerospace materials of nondestructive test based on image sequence processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyan; Dai, Jingmin; Wang, Yang

    2008-11-01

    IR Lock in thermography is an active thermography technology based on thermal wave signal processing, especially, it has many advantages for nondestructive test of composite materials and compound structure application and has been applied on aerospace, automotive, mechanics and electric fields. In lock in thermography, given sufficient time for periodic heating, the surface temperature will evolve periodically in a sinusoidal pattern form the transient state to the steady state. In this paper, the principle of lock in thermography is introduced and the heat transferring process is analyzed by the sinusoidal variation heating flow transferred in materials by means of FEM method. In experiment, the modulating optical stimulation is applied to sample, and image sequences are collected by Jade MWIR 550 FPA IR camera. The digital filter algorithm which is Savitzky-Golay digital smoothness filters is used to remove the effects of high frequency noise. A phase image at the frequency of periodic heating can be calculated using a Fourier transform of the periodic heating frequency in transient state for defect detection. The IR lock in thermography processing software is developed by using of visual C++ programmed based image sequence collected. The experimental results show that the developed system reached up to high level of conventional steady state Lock in method.

  18. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da; Schelin, Hugo R.; Yevseyeva, Olga; Klock, Márgio C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128×128×128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  19. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, E; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts.

  20. Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: Current Efficiency as a Standalone Sequence for an Unenhanced MRI Experience - a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechifor-Boilă I.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI is the main sequence in the multiparametric prostate MRI protocol together with T2 and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1, leading to detection rates up to 60% in prostate cancer diagnosis. However, the use of intravenous contrast can have severe side-effects, making the use of unenhanced MRI sequences essential. The aim of our study was to assess the feasibility and efficiency of DWI as a standalone MRI technique for prostate cancer diagnosis. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study at our department (09.2014-05.2015 and formed a study lot consisting in five prostate cancer patients that were scheduled for radical prostatectomy. Multiparametric MRI was performed (with DWI and T2 sequences and the images were interpreted according to the PI-RADS system. The final histopathological result after prostatectomy served as gold standard. Results: A series of 9 lesions were detected and analyzed on DWI. At qualitative interpretation, DWI had a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 50%. The corresponding positive and negative likelihood ratios were 1.71 and 0.286, respectively (p=0.417. ADC analysis revealed a mean value of 1.2*10-3mm2/s for the benign lesions while the corresponding value was 0.8*10-3 for the malignant ones, regardless of tumor size and Gleason scoring. Conclusion: DWI is a feasible technique in the current clinical environment, with a good sensitivity and a medium specificity. Furthermore, an association to the anatomical T2 sequence could enhance the diagnostic efficiency of DWI and should be assessed in larger studies.

  1. Hepatic adenomatosis: rapid sequence MR imaging following gadolinium enhancement: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brummett, D.; Burton, E.M.; Sabio, H.

    1999-01-01

    Hepatic adenomas are primary liver tumors usually associated with underlying metabolic disease or with anabolic steroid or oral contraceptive use. Hepatic adenomatosis (HA) is defined as the presence of more than four adenomas. Only 13 cases of HA have been reported in patients without glycogen storage disease or steroid use. We report a case of HA imaged by postcontrast T1-weighted images obtained during a breath-holding series. The lesions were most conspicuous 3-4 min after contrast administration; 4 of the 5 tumors were not identified on T2-weighted images. Unlike previous reports of HA in which the lesions remained hyperintense during sequential postcontrast imaging, the smaller lesions in this case demonstrated contrast washout, thereby distinguishing them from hemangiomata. (orig.)

  2. Hepatic adenomatosis: rapid sequence MR imaging following gadolinium enhancement: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummett, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States); Burton, E.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)]|[Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States); Sabio, H. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Hepatic adenomas are primary liver tumors usually associated with underlying metabolic disease or with anabolic steroid or oral contraceptive use. Hepatic adenomatosis (HA) is defined as the presence of more than four adenomas. Only 13 cases of HA have been reported in patients without glycogen storage disease or steroid use. We report a case of HA imaged by postcontrast T1-weighted images obtained during a breath-holding series. The lesions were most conspicuous 3-4 min after contrast administration; 4 of the 5 tumors were not identified on T2-weighted images. Unlike previous reports of HA in which the lesions remained hyperintense during sequential postcontrast imaging, the smaller lesions in this case demonstrated contrast washout, thereby distinguishing them from hemangiomata. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  3. Comparison of GRASE and turbo spin echo sequences in brain MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Youk; Lee, Young Joon; Eun, Choong Ki; Jeon, Young Seup; Kim, Ig Dae; Cha, Seong Sook [Inje Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of GRASE images of the brain, which combine gradient echo-EPI and turbo spin echo, and to compare the results with those of the turbo spin echo (TSE) technique. We analyzed and compared brain MR images obtained in 25 patients between October, 1996 and January, 1997, both TSE and GRASE techniques. Diagnosis was normal (n=5), infarct or ischemia (n=10), intracerebral hemorrhage (n=6), and neoplasm (n=4). TSE and GRASE MR images were obtained using a 1.5 T Gyroscan ACS-NT (Philips, Netherlands). For qualitative assessment, overall image quality, discrimination between cortical gray-white matter and basal ganglia-white matter, lesion conspicuity, and MR artifact were evaluated using a subjective grading system ranging from 1 to 5 (1=TSE better than GRASE, 5=GRASE better than TSE). For quantitative assessment, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated for cortical gray matter, white matter, basal ganglia, and lesions, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for cortical gray-white matter, basal ganglia-white matter and lesions-white matter. We measured image acquisition time and RF specific absorption rate (SAR) on TSE and GRASE. With regard to MR artifact, GRASE is more sensitive than TSE, but as regards image quality and lesion distinction, the two modalities show no distinct difference. Since GRASE is superior to TSE for the detection of hemosiderin, and image acquisition time is three times shorter using GRASE, GRASE might usefully be applied during the evaluation by MR imaging of certain brain conditions. (author). 17 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  4. Short term reproducibility of a high contrast 3-D isotropic optic nerve imaging sequence in healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short- term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON.

  5. DIfferential Subsampling with Cartesian Ordering (DISCO): a high spatio-temporal resolution Dixon imaging sequence for multiphasic contrast enhanced abdominal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranathan, Manojkumar; Rettmann, Dan W; Hargreaves, Brian A; Clarke, Sharon E; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2012-06-01

    To develop and evaluate a multiphasic contrast-enhanced MRI method called DIfferential Sub-sampling with Cartesian Ordering (DISCO) for abdominal imaging. A three-dimensional, variable density pseudo-random k-space segmentation scheme was developed and combined with a Dixon-based fat-water separation algorithm to generate high temporal resolution images with robust fat suppression and without compromise in spatial resolution or coverage. With institutional review board approval and informed consent, 11 consecutive patients referred for abdominal MRI at 3 Tesla (T) were imaged with both DISCO and a routine clinical three-dimensional SPGR-Dixon (LAVA FLEX) sequence. All images were graded by two radiologists using quality of fat suppression, severity of artifacts, and overall image quality as scoring criteria. For assessment of arterial phase capture efficiency, the number of temporal phases with angiographic phase and hepatic arterial phase was recorded. There were no significant differences in quality of fat suppression, artifact severity or overall image quality between DISCO and LAVA FLEX images (P > 0.05, Wilcoxon signed rank test). The angiographic and arterial phases were captured in all 11 patients scanned using the DISCO acquisition (mean number of phases were two and three, respectively). DISCO effectively captures the fast dynamics of abdominal pathology such as hyperenhancing hepatic lesions with a high spatio-temporal resolution. Typically, 1.1 × 1.5 × 3 mm spatial resolution over 60 slices was achieved with a temporal resolution of 4-5 s. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Segmentation of Environmental Time Lapse Image Sequences for the Determination of Shore Lines Captured by Hand-Held Smartphone Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröhnert, M.; Meichsner, R.

    2017-09-01

    The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  7. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalvati, Farzad; Tizhoosh, Hamid R.; Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar; Rodrigues, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability

  8. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

  9. High-accuracy and robust face recognition system based on optical parallel correlator using a temporal image sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Ishikawa, Mami; Ohta, Maiko; Kodate, Kashiko

    2005-09-01

    Face recognition is used in a wide range of security systems, such as monitoring credit card use, searching for individuals with street cameras via Internet and maintaining immigration control. There are still many technical subjects under study. For instance, the number of images that can be stored is limited under the current system, and the rate of recognition must be improved to account for photo shots taken at different angles under various conditions. We implemented a fully automatic Fast Face Recognition Optical Correlator (FARCO) system by using a 1000 frame/s optical parallel correlator designed and assembled by us. Operational speed for the 1: N (i.e. matching a pair of images among N, where N refers to the number of images in the database) identification experiment (4000 face images) amounts to less than 1.5 seconds, including the pre/post processing. From trial 1: N identification experiments using FARCO, we acquired low error rates of 2.6% False Reject Rate and 1.3% False Accept Rate. By making the most of the high-speed data-processing capability of this system, much more robustness can be achieved for various recognition conditions when large-category data are registered for a single person. We propose a face recognition algorithm for the FARCO while employing a temporal image sequence of moving images. Applying this algorithm to a natural posture, a two times higher recognition rate scored compared with our conventional system. The system has high potential for future use in a variety of purposes such as search for criminal suspects by use of street and airport video cameras, registration of babies at hospitals or handling of an immeasurable number of images in a database.

  10. SEGMENTATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TIME LAPSE IMAGE SEQUENCES FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SHORE LINES CAPTURED BY HAND-HELD SMARTPHONE CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kröhnert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  11. Detection of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at Acute and Subacute/Chronic Stages: Comparison of Four Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences and Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kang Yuan

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: FLAIR and GE T2* MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are all statistically significant indicators of acute SAH. GE T2*-weighted images are statistically significant indicators of subacute-to-chronic SAH, whereas other MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are not.

  12. Breast MRI at very short TE (minTE). Image analysis of minTE sequences on non-fat-saturated, subtracted T1-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenkel, Evelyn; Janka, Rolf; Kaemmerer, Nadine; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias; Brand, Michael [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Geppert, Christian [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Hartmann, Arndt [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pathology

    2017-02-15

    The aim was to evaluate a minimum echo time (minTE) protocol for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with breast lesions compared to a standard TE (nTE) time protocol. Breasts of 144 women were examined with a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Additionally to the standard gradient-echo sequence with nTE (4.8 ms), a variant with minimum TE (1.2 ms) was used in an interleaved fashion which leads to a better temporal resolution and should reduce the scan time by approximately 50%. Lesion sizes were measured and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as well as the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective confidence was evaluated using a 3-point scale before looking at the nTE sequences (1 = very sure that I can identify a lesion and classify it, 2 = quite sure that I can identify a lesion and classify it, 3 = definitely want to see nTE for final assessment) and the subjective image quality of all examinations was evaluated using a four-grade scale (1 = sharp, 2 = slight blur, 3 = moderate blur and 4 = severe blur/not evaluable) for lesion and skin sharpness. Lesion morphology and contrast enhancement were also evaluated. With minTE sequences, no lesion was rated with ''definitely want to see nTE sequences for final assessment''. The difference of the longitudinal and transverse diameter did not differ significantly (p>0.05). With minTE, lesions and skin were rated to be significantly more blurry (p<0.01 for lesions and p<0.05 for skin). There was no difference between both sequences with respect to SNR, CNR, lesion morphology, contrast enhancement and detection of multifocal disease. Dynamic breast MRI with a minTE protocol is feasible without a major loss of information (SNR, CNR, lesion morphology, contrast enhancement and lesion sizes) and the temporal resolution can be increased by a factor of 2 using minTE sequences.

  13. Empirical average-case relation between undersampling and sparsity in X-ray CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Sidky, Emil Y.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2015-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) it is generally acknowledged that reconstruction methods exploiting image sparsity allow reconstruction from a significantly reduced number of projections. The use of such reconstruction methods is inspired by recent progress in compressed sensing (CS). However......, the CS framework provides neither guarantees of accurate CT reconstruction, nor any relation between sparsity and a sufficient number of measurements for recovery, i.e., perfect reconstruction from noise-free data. We consider reconstruction through 1-norm minimization, as proposed in CS, from data...... obtained using a standard CT fan-beam sampling pattern. In empirical simulation studies we establish quantitatively a relation between the image sparsity and the sufficient number of measurements for recovery within image classes motivated by tomographic applications. We show empirically that the specific...

  14. Clinical evaluation of fat suppressed fast-SPGR sequence of the breast MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mitsuyuki; Hasegawa, Makoto; Matsubara, Tadashi [Yokohama Sakae Kyosai Hospital (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    MR-mammography by fat suppressed Fast-SPGR was evaluated for diagnosis and determination of invasion of tumor. Dynamic MRIs were performed in 12 phases, such as, before infusion of contrast media, right after and one to ten minutes after infusion with interval of one minute. In 15 patients (breast cancer, fibroadenoma, lymphocytic lobulitits and cystic intraductal papilloma), underwent MRI, the images were compared with pathological findings. Ten cases were confirmed as malignancy among 11 cases of breast cancer (sensitivity 91%). Eleven cases were confirmed as breast cancer among 12 cases diagnosed as breast cancer by MRI (specificity 92%). In 12 of all 15 cases, benignity or malignancy was checked correctly (accuracy 80%). Invasion of breast cancer was defined as the deep color dyeing area which was neighbored with the tumor in early stage of cystography. Eight of 11 cases were diagnosed precisely with fat suppression image, and nine were by subtraction image. Diagnosis was possible only by subtraction image in a case of scirrhous carcinoma accompanied with intradutal invasion. The area of invasion was not defined correctly in the case accompanied by mastopathy. It is difficult to evaluate benignity or malignancy of mammary gland tumor only by dynamic MRI, it is necessary to diagnose the shape and deep color image of tumor generally. (K.H.)

  15. Automatic classification of minimally invasive instruments based on endoscopic image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Stefanie; Benzko, Julia; Krappe, Sebastian; Sudra, Gunther; Azad, Pedram; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Gutt, Carsten; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is nowadays a frequently applied technique and can be regarded as a major breakthrough in surgery. The surgeon has to adopt special operation-techniques and deal with difficulties like the complex hand-eye coordination and restricted mobility. To alleviate these constraints we propose to enhance the surgeon's capabilities by providing a context-aware assistance using augmented reality techniques. To analyze the current situation for context-aware assistance, we need intraoperatively gained sensor data and a model of the intervention. A situation consists of information about the performed activity, the used instruments, the surgical objects, the anatomical structures and defines the state of an intervention for a given moment in time. The endoscopic images provide a rich source of information which can be used for an image-based analysis. Different visual cues are observed in order to perform an image-based analysis with the objective to gain as much information as possible about the current situation. An important visual cue is the automatic recognition of the instruments which appear in the scene. In this paper we present the classification of minimally invasive instruments using the endoscopic images. The instruments are not modified by markers. The system segments the instruments in the current image and recognizes the instrument type based on three-dimensional instrument models.

  16. Clinical evaluation of fat suppressed fast-SPGR sequence of the breast MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mitsuyuki; Hasegawa, Makoto; Matsubara, Tadashi

    1998-01-01

    MR-mammography by fat suppressed Fast-SPGR was evaluated for diagnosis and determination of invasion of tumor. Dynamic MRIs were performed in 12 phases, such as, before infusion of contrast media, right after and one to ten minutes after infusion with interval of one minute. In 15 patients (breast cancer, fibroadenoma, lymphocytic lobulitits and cystic intraductal papilloma), underwent MRI, the images were compared with pathological findings. Ten cases were confirmed as malignancy among 11 cases of breast cancer (sensitivity 91%). Eleven cases were confirmed as breast cancer among 12 cases diagnosed as breast cancer by MRI (specificity 92%). In 12 of all 15 cases, benignity or malignancy was checked correctly (accuracy 80%). Invasion of breast cancer was defined as the deep color dyeing area which was neighbored with the tumor in early stage of cystography. Eight of 11 cases were diagnosed precisely with fat suppression image, and nine were by subtraction image. Diagnosis was possible only by subtraction image in a case of scirrhous carcinoma accompanied with intradutal invasion. The area of invasion was not defined correctly in the case accompanied by mastopathy. It is difficult to evaluate benignity or malignancy of mammary gland tumor only by dynamic MRI, it is necessary to diagnose the shape and deep color image of tumor generally. (K.H.)

  17. Identification Of Barley Grain Mycoflora By Next Generation Sequencing And Videometer Multispectral Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Johannes Ravn; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Søren, Knudsen

    Seeds of Barley (Hordeum vulgare) are infected by a high number of fungi, including pathogens such as Fusarium graminearum, F. culmorum, F. poae, F. avenaceum and Pyrenophora teres. Fusarium spp. is a widely distributed fungus causing yield reduction in a range of agricultural crops and many...... species in the genus produce mycotoxins responsible for serious quality deterioration. In malting barley, Fusarium also has a negative effect by causing gushing in beer. A number of barley seeds (app. 200) assumed to be infected by fungal from different origins and years of cultivation were tested by NGS...... sequencing the ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) region from total DNA. Approximately 2-4000 sequences were obtained from each seed and these were subsequently identified to species level in order to give an exact identification of fungal genera on each seed. The main fungal genera identified were Fusarium...

  18. Three-dimensional gradient echo versus spin echo sequence in contrast-enhanced imaging of the pituitary gland at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakite, Suguru, E-mail: sugkaki@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1, Nishicho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Fujii, Shinya [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1, Nishicho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Kurosaki, Masamichi [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1, Nishicho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Matsusue, Eiji; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1, Nishicho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: To clarify whether a three-dimensional-gradient echo (3D-GRE) or spin echo (SE) sequence is more useful for evaluating sellar lesions on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging at 3.0 Tesla (T). Methods: We retrospectively assessed contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images using 3D-GRE and SE sequences at 3.0 T obtained from 33 consecutive patients with clinically suspected sellar lesions. Two experienced neuroradiologists evaluated the images qualitatively in terms of the following criteria: boundary edge of the cavernous sinus and pituitary gland, border of sellar lesions, delineation of the optic nerve and cranial nerves within the cavernous sinus, susceptibility and flow artifacts, and overall image quality. Results: At 3.0 T, 3D-GRE provided significantly better images than the SE sequence in terms of the border of sellar lesions, delineation of cranial nerves, and overall image quality; there was no significant difference regarding the boundary edge of the cavernous sinus and pituitary gland. In addition, the 3D-GRE sequence showed fewer pulsation artifacts but more susceptibility artifacts. Conclusion: Our results indicate that 3D-GRE is the more suitable sequence for evaluating sellar lesions on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging at 3.0 T.

  19. A flexible new method for 3D measurement based on multi-view image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haihua; Zhao, Zhimin; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Guo, Changye; Jia, Huayu

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional measurement is the base part for reverse engineering. The paper developed a new flexible and fast optical measurement method based on multi-view geometry theory. At first, feature points are detected and matched with improved SIFT algorithm. The Hellinger Kernel is used to estimate the histogram distance instead of traditional Euclidean distance, which is immunity to the weak texture image; then a new filter three-principle for filtering the calculation of essential matrix is designed, the essential matrix is calculated using the improved a Contrario Ransac filter method. One view point cloud is constructed accurately with two view images; after this, the overlapped features are used to eliminate the accumulated errors caused by added view images, which improved the camera's position precision. At last, the method is verified with the application of dental restoration CAD/CAM, experiment results show that the proposed method is fast, accurate and flexible for tooth 3D measurement.

  20. Fire detection system using random forest classification for image sequences of complex background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Onecue; Kang, Dong-Joong

    2013-06-01

    We present a fire alarm system based on image processing that detects fire accidents in various environments. To reduce false alarms that frequently appeared in earlier systems, we combined image features including color, motion, and blinking information. We specifically define the color conditions of fires in hue, saturation and value, and RGB color space. Fire features are represented as intensity variation, color mean and variance, motion, and image differences. Moreover, blinking fire features are modeled by using crossing patches. We propose an algorithm that classifies patches into fire or nonfire areas by using random forest supervised learning. We design an embedded surveillance device made with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene housing for stable fire detection in outdoor environments. The experimental results show that our algorithm works robustly in complex environments and is able to detect fires in real time.

  1. Self-Organization of Spatio-Temporal Hierarchy via Learning of Dynamic Visual Image Patterns on Action Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minju; Hwang, Jungsik; Tani, Jun

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the visual cortex efficiently processes high-dimensional spatial information by using a hierarchical structure. Recently, computational models that were inspired by the spatial hierarchy of the visual cortex have shown remarkable performance in image recognition. Up to now, however, most biological and computational modeling studies have mainly focused on the spatial domain and do not discuss temporal domain processing of the visual cortex. Several studies on the visual cortex and other brain areas associated with motor control support that the brain also uses its hierarchical structure as a processing mechanism for temporal information. Based on the success of previous computational models using spatial hierarchy and temporal hierarchy observed in the brain, the current report introduces a novel neural network model for the recognition of dynamic visual image patterns based solely on the learning of exemplars. This model is characterized by the application of both spatial and temporal constraints on local neural activities, resulting in the self-organization of a spatio-temporal hierarchy necessary for the recognition of complex dynamic visual image patterns. The evaluation with the Weizmann dataset in recognition of a set of prototypical human movement patterns showed that the proposed model is significantly robust in recognizing dynamically occluded visual patterns compared to other baseline models. Furthermore, an evaluation test for the recognition of concatenated sequences of those prototypical movement patterns indicated that the model is endowed with a remarkable capability for the contextual recognition of long-range dynamic visual image patterns.

  2. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Nina F; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A; laFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina

    2016-01-01

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR/PET patients. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus

  3. Diagnosing lung nodules on oncologic MR/PET imaging: Comparison of fast T1-weighted sequences and influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A; LaFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina

    2016-01-01

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR/PET patients. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus

  4. Diagnosing lung nodules on oncologic MR/PET imaging: Comparison of fast T1-weighted sequences and influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A; LaFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR/PET patients. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus

  5. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Brendle, Cornelia [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Fougère, Christian la [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR/PET patients. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, Tabea; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja; Hoevener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Hennig, Juergen; Spittau, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 x 250 x 500 μm 3 , FOV of 64 x 64 x 28 mm 3 and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm 3 and FOV of 34 cm 3 in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm 3 and FOV of 36.5 cm 3 . Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c v ). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Tabea; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Hoevener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Hennig, Juergen [University Medical Center Freiburg, Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Spittau, Bjoern [Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 x 250 x 500 μm{sup 3}, FOV of 64 x 64 x 28 mm{sup 3} and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 34 cm{sup 3} in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 36.5 cm{sup 3}. Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c{sub v}). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. (orig.)

  8. Semiautomatic segmentation of aortic valve from sequenced ultrasound image using a novel shape-constraint GCV model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yiting [Multi-disciplinary Research Center, Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China); Dong, Bin [Hebei University Affiliated Hospital, Hebei Baoding 071000 (China); Wang, Bing [College of Mathematics and Computer Science, Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China); Xie, Hongzhi, E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn, E-mail: gulixu@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Shuyang [Department of Cardiovascular, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing 100005 (China); Gu, Lixu, E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn, E-mail: gulixu@sjtu.edu.cn [Multi-disciplinary Research Center, Hebei University, Baoding 071000, China and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Effective and accurate segmentation of the aortic valve (AV) from sequenced ultrasound (US) images remains a technical challenge because of intrinsic factors of ultrasound images that impact the quality and the continuous changes of shape and position of segmented objects. In this paper, a novel shape-constraint gradient Chan-Vese (GCV) model is proposed for segmenting the AV from time serial echocardiography. Methods: The GCV model is derived by incorporating the energy of the gradient vector flow into a CV model framework, where the gradient vector energy term is introduced by calculating the deviation angle between the inward normal force of the evolution contour and the gradient vector force. The flow force enlarges the capture range and enhances the blurred boundaries of objects. This is achieved by adding a circle-like contour (constructed using the AV structure region as a constraint shape) as an energy item to the GCV model through the shape comparison function. This shape-constrained energy can enhance the image constraint force by effectively connecting separate gaps of the object edge as well as driving the evolution contour to quickly approach the ideal object. Because of the slight movement of the AV in adjacent frames, the initial constraint shape is defined by users, with the other constraint shapes being derived from the segmentation results of adjacent sequence frames after morphological filtering. The AV is segmented from the US images by minimizing the proposed energy function. Results: To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, five assessment parameters were used to compare it with manual delineations performed by radiologists (gold standards). Three hundred and fifteen images acquired from nine groups were analyzed in the experiment. The area-metric overlap error rate was 6.89% ± 2.88%, the relative area difference rate 3.94% ± 2.63%, the average symmetric contour distance 1.08 ± 0.43 mm, the root mean square symmetric

  9. Fat suppression at 2D MR imaging of the hands: Dixon method versus CHESS technique and STIR sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchgesner, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Kirchgesner@uclouvain.be; Perlepe, Vasiliki, E-mail: Vasiliki.Perlepe@uclouvain.be; Michoux, Nicolas, E-mail: Nicolas.Michoux@uclouvain.be; Larbi, Ahmed, E-mail: Ahmed.Larbi@chu-nimes.fr; Vande Berg, Bruno, E-mail: Bruno.VandeBerg@uclouvain.be

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Dixon yields effective fat suppression at 2D MRI of the hands. • CHESS fat suppression is less effective especially in the coronal plane. • SNR is higher with Dixon than with CHESS at T1-weighted MR imaging. • SNR is higher with CHESS than with Dixon and STIR at T2-weighted MR imaging. - Abstract: Objective: To compare the effectiveness of fat suppression and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the Dixon method with those of the CHESS (Chemical Shift-Selective) technique and STIR (Short Tau Inversion Recovery) sequence in hands of normal subjects at 2D MR imaging. Material and methods: 14 healthy volunteers (mean age of 29.4 years) consented to have both hands prospectively imaged with SE T1 Dixon, T1 CHESS, T2 Dixon, T2 CHESS and STIR sequences in a 1.5T MR scanner. Three radiologists scored the effectiveness of fat suppression in bone marrow (EFS{sup BM}) and soft tissues (EFS{sup ST}) in 20 joints per subject. One radiologist measured the SNR in 10 bones per subject. Statistical analysis used two-way ANOVA with random effects, paired t-test and observed agreement to assess differences in effectiveness of fat suppression, differences in SNR and inter-observer agreement. Results: EFS{sup BM} was statistically significantly higher for T1 Dixon than for T1 CHESS and for T2 Dixon than for T2 CHESS (p < 0.0001). EFS{sup BM} was significantly higher for T2 Dixon than for STIR in the coronal plane (p = 0.0020). The SNR was significantly higher for T1 Dixon than for T1 CHESS and for T2 Dixon than for STIR (p < 0.0001). The SNR was significantly lower for T2 Dixon than for T2 CHESS (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The Dixon method yields more effective fat suppression and higher SNR than the CHESS technique at 2D T1-weighted MR imaging of the hands. At T2-weighted MR imaging, fat suppression is more effective with the Dixon method while SNR is higher with the CHESS technique.

  10. Fat suppression at 2D MR imaging of the hands: Dixon method versus CHESS technique and STIR sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgesner, Thomas; Perlepe, Vasiliki; Michoux, Nicolas; Larbi, Ahmed; Vande Berg, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Dixon yields effective fat suppression at 2D MRI of the hands. • CHESS fat suppression is less effective especially in the coronal plane. • SNR is higher with Dixon than with CHESS at T1-weighted MR imaging. • SNR is higher with CHESS than with Dixon and STIR at T2-weighted MR imaging. - Abstract: Objective: To compare the effectiveness of fat suppression and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the Dixon method with those of the CHESS (Chemical Shift-Selective) technique and STIR (Short Tau Inversion Recovery) sequence in hands of normal subjects at 2D MR imaging. Material and methods: 14 healthy volunteers (mean age of 29.4 years) consented to have both hands prospectively imaged with SE T1 Dixon, T1 CHESS, T2 Dixon, T2 CHESS and STIR sequences in a 1.5T MR scanner. Three radiologists scored the effectiveness of fat suppression in bone marrow (EFS BM ) and soft tissues (EFS ST ) in 20 joints per subject. One radiologist measured the SNR in 10 bones per subject. Statistical analysis used two-way ANOVA with random effects, paired t-test and observed agreement to assess differences in effectiveness of fat suppression, differences in SNR and inter-observer agreement. Results: EFS BM was statistically significantly higher for T1 Dixon than for T1 CHESS and for T2 Dixon than for T2 CHESS (p < 0.0001). EFS BM was significantly higher for T2 Dixon than for STIR in the coronal plane (p = 0.0020). The SNR was significantly higher for T1 Dixon than for T1 CHESS and for T2 Dixon than for STIR (p < 0.0001). The SNR was significantly lower for T2 Dixon than for T2 CHESS (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The Dixon method yields more effective fat suppression and higher SNR than the CHESS technique at 2D T1-weighted MR imaging of the hands. At T2-weighted MR imaging, fat suppression is more effective with the Dixon method while SNR is higher with the CHESS technique.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Spittau, Björn; Hennig, Jürgen; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja

    2016-12-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 × 250 × 500 μm 3 , FOV of 64 × 64 × 28 mm 3 and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm 3 and FOV of 34 cm 3 in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm 3 and FOV of 36.5 cm 3 . Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c v ). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. • MRI is a clinically available diagnostic tool in dentistry • Intraoral hard and soft tissues can be imaged with a high resolution with MRI • The dimensional accuracy of MRI is comparable to cone beam CT.

  12. Accelerated whole brain intracranial vessel wall imaging using black blood fast spin echo with compressed sensing (CS-SPACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Tian, Bing; Chen, Luguang; Eisenmenger, Laura; Raithel, Esther; Forman, Christoph; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Jing; Hess, Christopher; Saloner, David

    2017-12-05

    Develop and optimize an accelerated, high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic) 3D black blood MRI technique to reduce scan time for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall imaging. A 3D accelerated T 1 -weighted fast-spin-echo prototype sequence using compressed sensing (CS-SPACE) was developed at 3T. Both the acquisition [echo train length (ETL), under-sampling factor] and reconstruction parameters (regularization parameter, number of iterations) were first optimized in 5 healthy volunteers. Ten patients with a variety of intracranial vascular disease presentations (aneurysm, atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis) were imaged with SPACE and optimized CS-SPACE, pre and post Gd contrast. Lumen/wall area, wall-to-lumen contrast ratio (CR), enhancement ratio (ER), sharpness, and qualitative scores (1-4) by two radiologists were recorded. The optimized CS-SPACE protocol has ETL 60, 20% k-space under-sampling, 0.002 regularization factor with 20 iterations. In patient studies, CS-SPACE and conventional SPACE had comparable image scores both pre- (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 3.54 ± 0.65, p = 0.13) and post-contrast (3.72 ± 0.58 vs. 3.53 ± 0.57, p = 0.15), but the CS-SPACE acquisition was 37% faster (6:48 vs. 10:50). CS-SPACE agreed with SPACE for lumen/wall area, ER measurements and sharpness, but marginally reduced the CR. In the evaluation of intracranial vascular disease, CS-SPACE provides a substantial reduction in scan time compared to conventional T 1 -weighted SPACE while maintaining good image quality.

  13. Motion-compensated visual pattern image sequence coding for full-motion multisession videoconferencing on multimedia workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Barry S.; Bovik, Alan C.

    1996-04-01

    Motion-compensated visual pattern image sequence coding (MCVPISC) is an improved motion-compensated version of the visual pattern image sequence coding (VPISC) encoder. It is a high-performance video codec that is easily implemented in software. The MCVPISC codec is intended for real-time desktop computer applications such as multimedia delivery, local area network and point-to-point (modem) video conferencing. We describe a version of MCVPISC that has achieved bit rates of 0.15 bits/pixel or better for MPEG-2 test sequences (source encoding reduces this bit rate by about half). The computational complexity of the monochrome and color versions of the encoder is less than three integer operations per pixel. The decoder is bounded between 0.016 and 0.125 logical and integer operations per pixel. A prototype video conferencing system based on the MCVPISC codec has been implemented. The system hardware is comprised of two multimedia personal computers, two camcorders, two frame grabbers, and an ethernet connection. The prototype system software has a simple structure and runs under DOS and WindowsTM 3.1. It includes a user interface, a video IIO interface, an event driven network interface, and a free running or frame synchronous video codec that also acts as the controller for the video and network interfaces. We have demonstrated that this prototype can support up to five full duplex full-motion video conferencing sessions. Future work will concentrate on expanding the prototype to support synchronous audio, multiple hardware and software platforms, and network protocols.

  14. Fat-Suppressed T2* Sequences for Routine 3.0-Tesla Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Preliminary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, A. M.; Gadani, S.; Palmer, C. S.; Vidarsson, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Clear depiction of the ligamentum flavum on routine lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential in accurately describing the extent of degenerative disease. In routine, noncontrast evaluations, focal fatty deposition or hemangiomas can be difficult to distinguish from malignant foci on fast spin-echo (FSE) T2-weighted images. Purpose: To describe the use of T2* fast field echo (T2FFE) in combination with spectral presaturation inversion recovery (SPIR) fat suppression for noncontrast, routine lumbar spine outpatient MR imaging at 3.0 Tesla (3T). Material and Methods: An axial gradient echo (GE) T2FFE sequence was combined with SPIR fat suppression (T2FFE-SPIR), via a 3T Philips Intera (Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) scanner, and added to the routine, noncontrast lumbar MRI examinations, which included sagittal FSE T1-weighted (T1WI), T2-weighted (T2WI), short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), and axial FSE T2WI. The sequence was performed in over 500 patients over a 1-year period, without intravenous contrast, and with slice thickness and planes of section identical to the axial FSE T1WI and T2WI images. The sequence typically lasted about 4.5-6 min. Results: The use of T2FFE-SPIR enabled visualization of the ligamentum flavum in degenerative disease, and the exclusion of focal fatty lesions on FSE T2WI. Other benefits included: the identification of malignant foci, the uncommon detection of hemorrhage, and the elimination of spurious flow voids. Several brief examples are provided to demonstrate the utility of this technique. Conclusion: The addition of T2FFE-SPIR to routine, noncontrast protocols in outpatients could provide further confidence in the visualization of the ligamentum flavum in degenerative disease, and can exclude malignancy in T2-bright areas of focal fatty marrow. Larger studies would be helpful to evaluate the accuracy of this technique versus FSE techniques in depicting degenerative, malignant, or inflammatory

  15. Motion compensated cine CMR of the fetal heart using radial undersampling and compressed sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Christopher W.; Seed, Mike; Kingdom, John C.; Macgowan, Christopher K.

    2017-01-01

    Background To develop and evaluate a reconstruction framework for high resolution time-resolved CMR of the fetal heart in the presence of motion. Methods Data were acquired using a golden angle radial trajectory in seven fetal subjects and reconstructed as real-time images to detect fetal movement. Data acquired during through-plane motion were discarded whereas in-plane motion was corrected. A fetal cardiac gating signal was extracted to sort the corrected data by cardiac phase, allowing rec...

  16. Prognostic value of gradient echo T2* sequences for brain MR imaging in preterm infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruine, Francisca T. de; Berg-Huysmans, Annette A. van den; Buchem, Mark A. van; Grond, Jeroen van der; Steggerda, Sylke J.; Leijser, Lara M.; Rijken, Monique; Wezel-Meijler, Gerda van

    2014-01-01

    Gradient echo T2*-W sequences are more sensitive than T2-W spin-echo sequences for detecting hemorrhages in the brain. The aim of this study is to correlate presence of hemosiderin deposits in the brain of very preterm infants (gestational age 6 non-hemorrhagic punctate white matter lesions (PWML), cysts and/or ventricular dilatation. Six infants with post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation detected by US in the neonatal period were excluded. Infants were seen for follow-up at 2 years. Univariate and regression analysis assessed the relation between presence and location of hemosiderin, white matter injury and neurodevelopmental outcome. In 38/95 (40%) of the infants, hemosiderin was detected. Twenty percent (19/95) of the infants were lost to follow-up. There was a correlation between hemosiderin in the ventricular wall with >6 PWML (P < 0.001) and cysts (P < 0.001) at term-equivalent age, and with a lower psychomotor development index (PDI) (P=0.02) at 2 years. After correcting for known confounders (gestational age, gender, intrauterine growth retardation and white matter injury), the correlation with PDI was no longer significant. The clinical importance of detecting small hemosiderin deposits is limited as there is no independent association with neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  17. Micro-motion Recognition of Spatial Cone Target Based on ISAR Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong Shu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accurate micro-motions recognition of spatial cone target is the foundation of the characteristic parameter acquisition. For this reason, a micro-motion recognition method based on the distinguishing characteristics extracted from the Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR sequences is proposed in this paper. The projection trajectory formula of cone node strong scattering source and cone bottom slip-type strong scattering sources, which are located on the spatial cone target, are deduced under three micro-motion types including nutation, precession, and spinning, and the correctness is verified by the electromagnetic simulation. By comparison, differences are found among the projection of the scattering sources with different micro-motions, the coordinate information of the scattering sources in the Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar sequences is extracted by the CLEAN algorithm, and the spinning is recognized by setting the threshold value of Doppler. The double observation points Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filter is used to separate the scattering sources projection of the nutation target or precession target, and the cross point number of each scattering source’s projection track is used to classify the nutation or precession. Finally, the electromagnetic simulation data are used to verify the effectiveness of the micro-motion recognition method.

  18. Bayesian Blind Separation and Deconvolution of Dynamic Image Sequences Using Sparsity Priors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2015), s. 258-266 ISSN 0278-0062 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Keywords : Functional imaging * Blind source separation * Computer-aided detection and diagnosis * Probabilistic and statistical methods Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.756, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/AS/tichy-0431090.pdf

  19. Non-parametric Bayesian models of response function in dynamic image sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 1 (2016), s. 90-100 ISSN 1077-3142 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Response function * Blind source separation * Dynamic medical imaging * Probabilistic models * Bayesian methods Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.498, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/tichy-0456983.pdf

  20. Tendon-motion tracking in an ultrasound image sequence using optical-flow-based block matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Bo-I; Hsu, Jian-Han; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Jou, I-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2017-04-20

    Tendon motion, which is commonly observed using ultrasound imaging, is one of the most important features used in tendinopathy diagnosis. However, speckle noise and out-of-plane issues make the tracking process difficult. Manual tracking is usually time consuming and often yields inconsistent results between users. To automatically track tendon motion in ultrasound images, we developed a new method that combines the advantages of optical flow and multi-kernel block matching. For every pair of adjacent image frames, the optical flow is computed and used to estimate the accumulated displacement. The proposed method selects the frame interval adaptively based on this displacement. Multi-kernel block matching is then computed on the two selected frames, and, to reduce tracking errors, the detailed displacements of the frames in between are interpolated based on the optical flow results. In the experiments, cadaver data were used to evaluate the tracking results. The mean absolute error was less than 0.05 mm. The proposed method also tracked the motion of tendons in vivo, which provides useful information for clinical diagnosis. The proposed method provides a new index for adaptively determining the frame interval. Compared with other methods, the proposed method yields tracking results that are significantly more accurate.

  1. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of motor bearings using undersampled vibration signals from a wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Siliang; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Xiaoxian; Liu, Yongbin; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Jiwen

    2018-02-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) which consist of miscellaneous sensors are used frequently in monitoring vital equipment. Benefiting from the development of data mining technologies, the massive data generated by sensors facilitate condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. However, too much data increase storage space, energy consumption, and computing resource, which can be considered fatal weaknesses for a WSN with limited resources. This study investigates a new method for motor bearings condition monitoring and fault diagnosis using the undersampled vibration signals acquired from a WSN. The proposed method, which is a fusion of the kurtogram, analog domain bandpass filtering, bandpass sampling, and demodulated resonance technique, can reduce the sampled data length while retaining the monitoring and diagnosis performance. A WSN prototype was designed, and simulations and experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Experimental results indicated that the sampled data length and transmission time of the proposed method result in a decrease of over 80% in comparison with that of the traditional method. Therefore, the proposed method indicates potential applications on condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of motor bearings installed in remote areas, such as wind farms and offshore platforms.

  2. MCTP system model based on linear programming optimization of apertures obtained from sequencing patient image data maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ureba, A.; Salguero, F. J.; Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Leal, A.; Miras, H.; Linares, R.; Perucha, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a hybrid direct multileaf collimator (MLC) aperture optimization model exclusively based on sequencing of patient imaging data to be implemented on a Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC-TPS) to allow the explicit radiation transport simulation of advanced radiotherapy treatments with optimal results in efficient times for clinical practice. Methods: The planning system (called CARMEN) is a full MC-TPS, controlled through aMATLAB interface, which is based on the sequencing of a novel map, called “biophysical” map, which is generated from enhanced image data of patients to achieve a set of segments actually deliverable. In order to reduce the required computation time, the conventional fluence map has been replaced by the biophysical map which is sequenced to provide direct apertures that will later be weighted by means of an optimization algorithm based on linear programming. A ray-casting algorithm throughout the patient CT assembles information about the found structures, the mass thickness crossed, as well as PET values. Data are recorded to generate a biophysical map for each gantry angle. These maps are the input files for a home-made sequencer developed to take into account the interactions of photons and electrons with the MLC. For each linac (Axesse of Elekta and Primus of Siemens) and energy beam studied (6, 9, 12, 15 MeV and 6 MV), phase space files were simulated with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code. The dose calculation in patient was carried out with the BEAMDOSE code. This code is a modified version of EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc able to calculate the beamlet dose in order to combine them with different weights during the optimization process. Results: Three complex radiotherapy treatments were selected to check the reliability of CARMEN in situations where the MC calculation can offer an added value: A head-and-neck case (Case I) with three targets delineated on PET/CT images and a demanding dose-escalation; a partial breast

  3. MCTP system model based on linear programming optimization of apertures obtained from sequencing patient image data maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ureba, A. [Dpto. Fisiología Médica y Biofísica. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Salguero, F. J. [Nederlands Kanker Instituut, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis, 1066 CX Ámsterdam, The Nederlands (Netherlands); Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Leal, A., E-mail: alplaza@us.es [Dpto. Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Miras, H. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Linares, R.; Perucha, M. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Infanta Luisa, E-41010 Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The authors present a hybrid direct multileaf collimator (MLC) aperture optimization model exclusively based on sequencing of patient imaging data to be implemented on a Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC-TPS) to allow the explicit radiation transport simulation of advanced radiotherapy treatments with optimal results in efficient times for clinical practice. Methods: The planning system (called CARMEN) is a full MC-TPS, controlled through aMATLAB interface, which is based on the sequencing of a novel map, called “biophysical” map, which is generated from enhanced image data of patients to achieve a set of segments actually deliverable. In order to reduce the required computation time, the conventional fluence map has been replaced by the biophysical map which is sequenced to provide direct apertures that will later be weighted by means of an optimization algorithm based on linear programming. A ray-casting algorithm throughout the patient CT assembles information about the found structures, the mass thickness crossed, as well as PET values. Data are recorded to generate a biophysical map for each gantry angle. These maps are the input files for a home-made sequencer developed to take into account the interactions of photons and electrons with the MLC. For each linac (Axesse of Elekta and Primus of Siemens) and energy beam studied (6, 9, 12, 15 MeV and 6 MV), phase space files were simulated with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code. The dose calculation in patient was carried out with the BEAMDOSE code. This code is a modified version of EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc able to calculate the beamlet dose in order to combine them with different weights during the optimization process. Results: Three complex radiotherapy treatments were selected to check the reliability of CARMEN in situations where the MC calculation can offer an added value: A head-and-neck case (Case I) with three targets delineated on PET/CT images and a demanding dose-escalation; a partial breast

  4. Five-class differential diagnostics of neurodegenerative diseases using random undersampling boosting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Tong; Ledig, Christian; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    -wise grading features) and non-imaging features (CSF measures) were extracted for each subject. In clinical practice, the prevalence of different dementia types is imbalanced, posing challenges for learning an effective classification model. Therefore, we propose the use of the RUSBoost algorithm in order...... and regions. Using a dataset of 500 subjects, the proposed framework achieved a high accuracy of 75.2% with a balanced accuracy of 69.3% for the five-class classification using ten-fold cross validation, which is significantly better than the results using support vector machine or random forest...

  5. Real-time 3D reconstruction of road curvature in far look-ahead distance from analysis of image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Reinhold

    1995-12-01

    A system for visual road recognition in far look-ahead distance, implemented in the autonomous road vehicle VaMP (a passenger car), is described. Visual cues of a road in a video image are the bright lane markings and the edges formed at the road borders. In a distance of more than 100 m, the most relevant road cue is the homogeneous road area, limited by the two border edges. These cues can be detected by the image processing module KRONOS applying edge detection techniques and areal 2D segmentation based on resolution triangles (analogous to a resolution pyramid). An estimation process performs an update of a state vector, which describes spatial road shape and vehicle orientation relative to the road. This state vector is estimated every 40 ms by exploiting knowledge about the vehicle movement (spatio-temporal model of vehicle dynamics) and the road design rules (clothoidal segments). Kalman filter techniques are applied to obtain an optimal estimate of the state vector by evaluating the measurements of the road border positions in the image sequence taken by a set of CCD cameras. The road consists of segments with piecewise constant curvature parameters. The borders between these segments can be detected by applying methods which have been developed for detection of discontinuities during time-discrete measurements. The road recognition system has been tested in autonomous rides with VaMP on public Autobahnen in real traffic at speeds up to 130 km/h.

  6. Two Algorithms for the Detection and Tracking of Moving Vehicle Targets in Aerial Infrared Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutian Cao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, by analyzing the characteristics of infrared moving targets, a Symmetric Frame Differencing Target Detection algorithm based on local clustering segmentation is proposed. In consideration of the high real-time performance and accuracy of traditional symmetric differencing, this novel algorithm uses local grayscale clustering to accomplish target detection after carrying out symmetric frame differencing to locate the regions of change. In addition, the mean shift tracking algorithm is also improved to solve the problem of missed targets caused by error convergence. As a result, a kernel-based mean shift target tracking algorithm based on detection updates is also proposed. This tracking algorithm makes use of the interaction between detection and tracking to correct the tracking errors in real time and to realize robust target tracking in complex scenes. In addition, the validity, robustness and stability of the proposed algorithms are all verified by experiments on mid-infrared aerial sequences with vehicles as targets.

  7. Prognostic value of gradient echo T2* sequences for brain MR imaging in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruine, Francisca T. de; Berg-Huysmans, Annette A. van den; Buchem, Mark A. van; Grond, Jeroen van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Steggerda, Sylke J.; Leijser, Lara M.; Rijken, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, subdivision of Neonatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Wezel-Meijler, Gerda van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, subdivision of Neonatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Isala Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    Gradient echo T2*-W sequences are more sensitive than T2-W spin-echo sequences for detecting hemorrhages in the brain. The aim of this study is to correlate presence of hemosiderin deposits in the brain of very preterm infants (gestational age <32 weeks) detected by T2*-W gradient echo MRI to white matter injury and neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years. In 101 preterm infants, presence and location of hemosiderin were assessed on T2*-W gradient echo MRI performed around term-equivalent age (range: 40-60 weeks). White matter injury was defined as the presence of >6 non-hemorrhagic punctate white matter lesions (PWML), cysts and/or ventricular dilatation. Six infants with post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation detected by US in the neonatal period were excluded. Infants were seen for follow-up at 2 years. Univariate and regression analysis assessed the relation between presence and location of hemosiderin, white matter injury and neurodevelopmental outcome. In 38/95 (40%) of the infants, hemosiderin was detected. Twenty percent (19/95) of the infants were lost to follow-up. There was a correlation between hemosiderin in the ventricular wall with >6 PWML (P < 0.001) and cysts (P < 0.001) at term-equivalent age, and with a lower psychomotor development index (PDI) (P=0.02) at 2 years. After correcting for known confounders (gestational age, gender, intrauterine growth retardation and white matter injury), the correlation with PDI was no longer significant. The clinical importance of detecting small hemosiderin deposits is limited as there is no independent association with neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  8. Prognostic value of gradient echo T2* sequences for brain MR imaging in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruïne, Francisca T; Steggerda, Sylke J; van den Berg-Huysmans, Annette A; Leijser, Lara M; Rijken, Monique; van Buchem, Mark A; van Wezel-Meijler, Gerda; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2014-03-01

    Gradient echo T2*-W sequences are more sensitive than T2-W spin-echo sequences for detecting hemorrhages in the brain. The aim of this study is to correlate presence of hemosiderin deposits in the brain of very preterm infants (gestational age W gradient echo MRI to white matter injury and neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years. In 101 preterm infants, presence and location of hemosiderin were assessed on T2*-W gradient echo MRI performed around term-equivalent age (range: 40-60 weeks). White matter injury was defined as the presence of >6 non-hemorrhagic punctate white matter lesions (PWML), cysts and/or ventricular dilatation. Six infants with post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation detected by US in the neonatal period were excluded. Infants were seen for follow-up at 2 years. Univariate and regression analysis assessed the relation between presence and location of hemosiderin, white matter injury and neurodevelopmental outcome. In 38/95 (40%) of the infants, hemosiderin was detected. Twenty percent (19/95) of the infants were lost to follow-up. There was a correlation between hemosiderin in the ventricular wall with >6 PWML (P < 0.001) and cysts (P < 0.001) at term-equivalent age, and with a lower psychomotor development index (PDI) (P=0.02) at 2 years. After correcting for known confounders (gestational age, gender, intrauterine growth retardation and white matter injury), the correlation with PDI was no longer significant. The clinical importance of detecting small hemosiderin deposits is limited as there is no independent association with neurodevelopmental outcome.

  9. An image encryption scheme based on the MLNCML system using DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Qian; Wang, Xing-Yuan; Liu, Jia; Chi, Ze-Lin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new image scheme based on the spatiotemporal chaos of the Mixed Linear-Nonlinear Coupled Map Lattices (MLNCML). This spatiotemporal chaotic system has more cryptographic features in dynamics than the system of Coupled Map Lattices (CML). In the proposed scheme, we employ the strategy of DNA computing and one time pad encryption policy, which can enhance the sensitivity to the plaintext and resist differential attack, brute-force attack, statistical attack and plaintext attack. Simulation results and theoretical analysis indicate that the proposed scheme has superior high security.

  10. High-quality compressive ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heyan; Zhou, Cheng; Tian, Tian; Liu, Dongqi; Song, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    We propose a high-quality compressive ghost imaging method based on projected Landweber regularization and guided filter, which effectively reduce the undersampling noise and improve the resolution. In our scheme, the original object is reconstructed by decomposing of regularization and denoising steps instead of solving a minimization problem in compressive reconstruction process. The simulation and experimental results show that our method can obtain high ghost imaging quality in terms of PSNR and visual observation.

  11. Gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR of VX2 carcinoma in rabbit liver: usefulness of the delayed phase imaging and optimal pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Il; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of delayed imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) and to determine the optimal pulse sequence for the detection of VX2 carcinoma lesions in the rabbit. Twelve VX2 carcinomas implanted in the livers of eleven New Zealand rabbits were studied. All patients underwent an MR protocal consisting of precontrast T2-and T1-weighted sequences, followed by repetition of the T1-weighted sequence at 0 to 30 (arterial phase). 31-60 (portal phase), and 40 minutes (delayed phase) after the intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the liver and VX2 tumor, and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of precontrast and postcontrast MR images were quantitatively analyzed, and two experienced radiologists evaluated image quality in terms of lesion conspicuity, artifact, mass delineation, and vascular anatomy. Liver SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast, arterial, and portal imaging (p<0.05), while lesion SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast imaging (p<0.05). Lesion CNR was higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast and portal phase imaging (p<0.05), but there was no difference between arterial and delayed imaging. The latter provided better mass delineation than precontrast, arterial and portal phase imaging (p<0.05). While in terms of lesion conspicuity and vascular anatomy, the delayed phase was better than the arterial phase (p<0.05) but similar to the precontrast and portal phase. During the delayed phase, the gradient-echo sequence showed better results than the spin-echo in terms of liver SNR, and lesion SNR and CNR (p<0.05). Because it provides better lesion conspicuity and mass delineation by improving liver SNR and lesion-to-liver CNR, the addition of the delayed phase to a dynamic MRI sequence after gadobenate dimeglumine adminstration facilitates lesion detection. For delayed-phase imaging, the

  12. Gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR of VX2 carcinoma in rabbit liver: usefulness of the delayed phase imaging and optimal pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seung Il; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo

    2002-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of delayed imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) and to determine the optimal pulse sequence for the detection of VX2 carcinoma lesions in the rabbit. Twelve VX2 carcinomas implanted in the livers of eleven New Zealand rabbits were studied. All patients underwent an MR protocal consisting of precontrast T2-and T1-weighted sequences, followed by repetition of the T1-weighted sequence at 0 to 30 (arterial phase). 31-60 (portal phase), and 40 minutes (delayed phase) after the intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the liver and VX2 tumor, and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of precontrast and postcontrast MR images were quantitatively analyzed, and two experienced radiologists evaluated image quality in terms of lesion conspicuity, artifact, mass delineation, and vascular anatomy. Liver SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast, arterial, and portal imaging (p<0.05), while lesion SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast imaging (p<0.05). Lesion CNR was higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast and portal phase imaging (p<0.05), but there was no difference between arterial and delayed imaging. The latter provided better mass delineation than precontrast, arterial and portal phase imaging (p<0.05). While in terms of lesion conspicuity and vascular anatomy, the delayed phase was better than the arterial phase (p<0.05) but similar to the precontrast and portal phase. During the delayed phase, the gradient-echo sequence showed better results than the spin-echo in terms of liver SNR, and lesion SNR and CNR (p<0.05). Because it provides better lesion conspicuity and mass delineation by improving liver SNR and lesion-to-liver CNR, the addition of the delayed phase to a dynamic MRI sequence after gadobenate dimeglumine adminstration facilitates lesion detection. For delayed-phase imaging, the

  13. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.radlbauer@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Lomoschitz, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.lomoschitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Salomonowitz, Erich, E-mail: erich.salomonowitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut E., E-mail: info@mrt-kompetenzzentrum.d [MRT Competence Center Schloss Werneck, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 2, 97440 Werneck (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  14. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf; Lomoschitz, Friedrich; Salomonowitz, Erich; Eberhardt, Knut E.; Stadlbauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  15. Zeolites occurrences prognostic using image spectral analysis in the volcanic sequences of Pequenos Lembombos, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmidio Estévez-Cruz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The research aims at evaluating the mineral potential of the basaltic lavas of the Movene Formation, to host microcrystalline zeolites. In order to attain this goal the methods of digital image processing, geological traversing and mineralogical analysis are used in an integrated approach. Landsat 8 images were processed using standard tools such as color composite, band ratios and supervised classification methods to understand the geology of the area and to identify areas spectrally similar to the minerals studied. The interpretation of the digital elevation model allowed to reveal structures and their combined use with the color compositions facilitated the lithologic discrimination. Fieldworks were carried out in the areas with the highest exposure of the basaltic lavas to identify and sample the zeolites. Finally, the collected samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction in order to determine mineral composition. The study increased the existing geological knowledge about this important industrial mineral, mapping five mineral occurrences and revealing the most promising areas to host this type of deposits. Favorable sectors are circumscribed to the northern part of the working area, and they are generally in the proximity of rhyolites-basalts contact. The following mineral phases were also identified: heulandite-clinoptilolite, mesolite, mordenite, stilbite and laumontite

  16. Interpolated compressed sensing for 2D multiple slice fast MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pang

    Full Text Available Sparse MRI has been introduced to reduce the acquisition time and raw data size by undersampling the k-space data. However, the image quality, particularly the contrast to noise ratio (CNR, decreases with the undersampling rate. In this work, we proposed an interpolated Compressed Sensing (iCS method to further enhance the imaging speed or reduce data size without significant sacrifice of image quality and CNR for multi-slice two-dimensional sparse MR imaging in humans. This method utilizes the k-space data of the neighboring slice in the multi-slice acquisition. The missing k-space data of a highly undersampled slice are estimated by using the raw data of its neighboring slice multiplied by a weighting function generated from low resolution full k-space reference images. In-vivo MR imaging in human feet has been used to investigate the feasibility and the performance of the proposed iCS method. The results show that by using the proposed iCS reconstruction method, the average image error can be reduced and the average CNR can be improved, compared with the conventional sparse MRI reconstruction at the same undersampling rate.

  17. A novel method for detecting and tracking vehicles in traffic-image sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jieqiong; Wang, Guoyu; Sun, Feifei

    2013-07-01

    A novel method for detecting and tracking vehicles is proposed. The method which based on motion object segmentation used Cellular Neural Network (CNN) in the background substraction for motion detection in order to distinguish the vehicles from others of the interested regions. Meanwhile a tracking method based on regional characteristic matching is proposed, by which the distance between characteristic vectors can be used to match current motion regions and track the vehicles. Perceptual grouping refers to the organization ability that visual system detect image features in accordance with certain cues such as proximity, continuity, closure, etc, and attracts wide attentions and high regards in computer vision. In this paper, we proposed a new approach for occlution elimination by combining perceptual grouping with Optical flow field. Experimental results show that the methods can extract traffic information with high accuracy and efficiency.

  18. An efficient sequence for fetal brain imaging at 3T with enhanced T1 contrast and motion robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzi, Giulio; Price, Anthony N; Teixeira, Rui Pedro A G; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Hutter, Jana; Gomes, Ana; Padormo, Francesco; Hughes, Emer; Schneider, Torben; Rutherford, Mary; Kuklisova Murgasova, Maria; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2018-07-01

    Ultrafast single-shot T 2 -weighted images are common practice in fetal MR exams. However, there is limited experience with fetal T 1 -weighted acquisitions. This study aims at establishing a robust framework that allows fetal T 1 -weighted scans to be routinely acquired in utero at 3T. A 2D gradient echo sequence with an adiabatic inversion was optimized to be robust to fetal motion and maternal breathing optimizing grey/white matter contrast at the same time. This was combined with slice to volume registration and super resolution methods to produce volumetric reconstructions. The sequence was tested on 22 fetuses. Optimized grey/white matter contrast and robustness to fetal motion and maternal breathing were achieved. Signal from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and amniotic fluid was nulled and 0.75 mm isotropic anatomical reconstructions of the fetal brain were obtained using slice-to-volume registration and super resolution techniques. Total acquisition time for a single stack was 56 s, all acquired during free breathing. Enhanced sensitivity to normal anatomy and pathology with respect to established methods is demonstrated. A direct comparison with a 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence and a controlled motion experiment run on an adult volunteer are also shown. This paper describes a robust framework to perform T 1 -weighted acquisitions and reconstructions of the fetal brain in utero. Magn Reson Med 80:137-146, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic

  19. Three-Dimensional Constructive Interference in Steady State Sequences and Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Arrested Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafrawy, Fatma; Reda, Ihab; Elsirafy, Mohamed; Gawad, Mohamed Saied Abdel; Elnaggar, Alaa; Khalek Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the role of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state (3D-CISS) sequences and phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) in patients with arrested hydrocephalus. A prospective study of 20 patients with arrested hydrocephalus was carried out. All patients underwent PC-MRI and 3D-CISS for assessment of the aqueduct. Axial (through-plane), sagittal (in-plane) PC-MRI, and sagittal 3D-CISS were applied to assess the cerebral aqueduct and the spontaneous third ventriculostomy if present. Aqueductal patency was graded using 3D-CISS and PC-MRI. Quantitative analysis of flow through the aqueduct was performed using PC-MRI. The causes of obstruction were aqueductal obstruction in 75% (n = 15), third ventricular obstruction in 5% (n = 1), and fourth ventricular obstruction in 20% (n = 4). The cause of arrest of hydrocephalus was spontaneous third ventriculostomy in 65% (n = 13), endoscopic third ventriculostomy in 10% (n = 2), and ventriculoperitoneal shunt in 5% (n = 1), and no cause could be detected in 20% of patients (n = 4). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.80) and moderate agreement (κ = 0.509) of grading with PC-MRI and 3D-CISS sequences. The mean peak systolic velocity of cerebrospinal fluid was 1.86 ± 2.48 cm/second, the stroke volume was 6.43 ± 13.81 μL/cycle, and the mean flow was 0.21 ± 0.32 mL/minute. We concluded that 3D-CISS and PC-MRI are noninvasive sequences for diagnosis of the level and cause of arrested hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of Myocardial Fibrosis in Mice Using a T2*-Weighted 3D Radial Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan J van Nierop

    Full Text Available Myocardial fibrosis is a common hallmark of many diseases of the heart. Late gadolinium enhanced MRI is a powerful tool to image replacement fibrosis after myocardial infarction (MI. Interstitial fibrosis can be assessed indirectly from an extracellular volume fraction measurement using contrast-enhanced T1 mapping. Detection of short T2* species resulting from fibrotic tissue may provide an attractive non-contrast-enhanced alternative to directly visualize the presence of both replacement and interstitial fibrosis.To goal of this paper was to explore the use of a T2*-weighted radial sequence for the visualization of fibrosis in mouse heart.C57BL/6 mice were studied with MI (n = 20, replacement fibrosis, transverse aortic constriction (TAC (n = 18, diffuse fibrosis, and as control (n = 10. 3D center-out radial T2*-weighted images with varying TE were acquired in vivo and ex vivo (TE = 21 μs-4 ms. Ex vivo T2*-weighted signal decay with TE was analyzed using a 3-component model. Subtraction of short- and long-TE images was used to highlight fibrotic tissue with short T2*. The presence of fibrosis was validated using histology and correlated to MRI findings.Detailed ex vivo T2*-weighted signal analysis revealed a fast (T2*fast, slow (T2*slow and lipid (T2*lipid pool. T2*fast remained essentially constant. Infarct T2*slow decreased significantly, while a moderate decrease was observed in remote tissue in post-MI hearts and in TAC hearts. T2*slow correlated with the presence of diffuse fibrosis in TAC hearts (r = 0.82, P = 0.01. Ex vivo and in vivo subtraction images depicted a positive contrast in the infarct co-localizing with the scar. Infarct volumes from histology and subtraction images linearly correlated (r = 0.94, P<0.001. Region-of-interest analysis in the in vivo post-MI and TAC hearts revealed significant T2* shortening due to fibrosis, in agreement with the ex vivo results. However, in vivo contrast on subtraction images was rather poor

  1. A review of techniques for the identification and measurement of fish in underwater stereo-video image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark R.; Ravanbakskh, Mehdi; Shaifat, Faisal; Harvey, Euan S.; Mian, Ajmal; Seager, James W.; Culverhouse, Philip F.; Cline, Danelle E.; Edgington, Duane R.

    2013-04-01

    Underwater stereo-video measurement systems are used widely for counting and measuring fish in aquaculture, fisheries and conservation management. To determine population counts, spatial or temporal frequencies, and age or weight distributions, snout to fork length measurements are captured from the video sequences, most commonly using a point and click process by a human operator. Current research aims to automate the measurement and counting task in order to improve the efficiency of the process and expand the use of stereo-video systems within marine science. A fully automated process will require the detection and identification of candidates for measurement, followed by the snout to fork length measurement, as well as the counting and tracking of fish. This paper presents a review of the techniques used for the detection, identification, measurement, counting and tracking of fish in underwater stereo-video image sequences, including consideration of the changing body shape. The review will analyse the most commonly used approaches, leading to an evaluation of the techniques most likely to be a general solution to the complete process of detection, identification, measurement, counting and tracking.

  2. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, E.; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts

  3. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, E. E-mail: eciftcis7@hotmail.com; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts.

  4. Dynamic MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis using spoiled GRASS sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki; Hamamoto, Sadatoshi; Kawano, Kazunori (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Dental School) (and others)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate contrast enhancement effects of the posterior disk attachment in the temporomandibular joint arthrosis using dynamic MRI with bilateral surface coils. One hundred twenty-four temporomandibular joints in 96 symptomatic patients and 27 control subjects were examined with a spoiled GRASS pulse sequence (TR: 35 ms, TE: 8 ms, flip angle: 60deg). One sagittal scan was performed prior to injection, then 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA was given as a rapid bolus injection, immediately after which scans were performed at 30 seconds intervals for a period of 5 minutes. Signal intensity (SI) was measured from the ROI of the posterior disk attachment region. The contrast enhancement effects may be calculated by SI ratio (SIR) = ( SI[sup post]-SI[sup pre])/SI[sup pre], where SI[sup post] and SI[sup pre] were the signal intensities after and before administration of contrast medium. The time intensity curve of SIR versus time after injection was obtained on each symptoms. Join pain group (85 joints) tended to show a rapid enhancement pattern, while control group (54 joints), joint sound or opening limitation group (39 joints), and asymptomatic group (68 joints) showed a relatively gradual enhancement pattern. The drop of SIR in four groups were hardly observed during examination. Mean peak SIR of control group, joint pain group, joint sound or opening limitation group, and asymptomatic group was 0.62[+-]0.24 (SD), 1.53[+-]0.69, 0.73[+-]0.38 and 0.78[+-]0.44 respectively. The mean SIR of pain group was significantly (P<0.001, t-test) higher than that of other groups. These results suggested that dynamic MRI of the temporomandibular joint may effectively depict the inflammatory changes of the posterior disk attachment. (author).

  5. Dynamic MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint arthrosis using spoiled GRASS sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki; Hamamoto, Sadatoshi; Kawano, Kazunori

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate contrast enhancement effects of the posterior disk attachment in the temporomandibular joint arthrosis using dynamic MRI with bilateral surface coils. One hundred twenty-four temporomandibular joints in 96 symptomatic patients and 27 control subjects were examined with a spoiled GRASS pulse sequence (TR: 35 ms, TE: 8 ms, flip angle: 60deg). One sagittal scan was performed prior to injection, then 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA was given as a rapid bolus injection, immediately after which scans were performed at 30 seconds intervals for a period of 5 minutes. Signal intensity (SI) was measured from the ROI of the posterior disk attachment region. The contrast enhancement effects may be calculated by SI ratio (SIR) = ( SI post -SI pre )/SI pre , where SI post and SI pre were the signal intensities after and before administration of contrast medium. The time intensity curve of SIR versus time after injection was obtained on each symptoms. Join pain group (85 joints) tended to show a rapid enhancement pattern, while control group (54 joints), joint sound or opening limitation group (39 joints), and asymptomatic group (68 joints) showed a relatively gradual enhancement pattern. The drop of SIR in four groups were hardly observed during examination. Mean peak SIR of control group, joint pain group, joint sound or opening limitation group, and asymptomatic group was 0.62±0.24 (SD), 1.53±0.69, 0.73±0.38 and 0.78±0.44 respectively. The mean SIR of pain group was significantly (P<0.001, t-test) higher than that of other groups. These results suggested that dynamic MRI of the temporomandibular joint may effectively depict the inflammatory changes of the posterior disk attachment. (author)

  6. Imaging different components of a tectonic tremor sequence in southwestern Japan using an automatic statistical detection and location method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiata, Natalia; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Satriano, Claudio; Obara, Kazushige

    2018-02-01

    the long-duration energy-release regions, matching the large-scale clustering features evidenced from the low-frequency earthquake's activity analysis. Further examination of the two catalogues showed that the extracted short-duration low-frequency earthquakes activity coincides in space, within about 10-15 km distance, with the longer-duration energy sources during the tectonic tremor sequence. This observation provides a potential constraint on the size of the longer-duration energy-radiating source region in relation with the clustering of low-frequency earthquakes activity during the analysed tectonic tremor sequence. We show that advanced statistical network-based methods offer new capabilities for automatic high-resolution detection, location and monitoring of different scale-components of tectonic tremor activity, enriching existing slow earthquakes catalogues. Systematic application of such methods to large continuous data sets will allow imaging the slow transient seismic energy-release activity at higher resolution, and therefore, provide new insights into the underlying multi-scale mechanisms of slow earthquakes generation.

  7. Pulmonary parenchyma segmentation in thin CT image sequences with spectral clustering and geodesic active contour model based on similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nana; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Juanjuan; Zhao, Huilan; Qiang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    While the popular thin layer scanning technology of spiral CT has helped to improve diagnoses of lung diseases, the large volumes of scanning images produced by the technology also dramatically increase the load of physicians in lesion detection. Computer-aided diagnosis techniques like lesions segmentation in thin CT sequences have been developed to address this issue, but it remains a challenge to achieve high segmentation efficiency and accuracy without much involvement of human manual intervention. In this paper, we present our research on automated segmentation of lung parenchyma with an improved geodesic active contour model that is geodesic active contour model based on similarity (GACBS). Combining spectral clustering algorithm based on Nystrom (SCN) with GACBS, this algorithm first extracts key image slices, then uses these slices to generate an initial contour of pulmonary parenchyma of un-segmented slices with an interpolation algorithm, and finally segments lung parenchyma of un-segmented slices. Experimental results show that the segmentation results generated by our method are close to what manual segmentation can produce, with an average volume overlap ratio of 91.48%.

  8. MR Imaging of the Internal Auditory Canal and Inner Ear at 3T: Comparison between 3D Driven Equilibrium and 3D Balanced Fast Field Echo Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Hyung Jin; Yim, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lee, Ji Won [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To compare the use of 3D driven equilibrium (DRIVE) imaging with 3D balanced fast field echo (bFFE) imaging in the assessment of the anatomic structures of the internal auditory canal (IAC) and inner ear at 3 Tesla (T). Thirty ears of 15 subjects (7 men and 8 women; age range, 22 71 years; average age, 50 years) without evidence of ear problems were examined on a whole-body 3T MR scanner with both 3D DRIVE and 3D bFFE sequences by using an 8-channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil. Two neuroradiologists reviewed both MR images with particular attention to the visibility of the anatomic structures, including four branches of the cranial nerves within the IAC, anatomic structures of the cochlea, vestibule, and three semicircular canals. Although both techniques provided images of relatively good quality, the 3D DRIVE sequence was somewhat superior to the 3D bFFE sequence. The discrepancies were more prominent for the basal turn of the cochlea, vestibule, and all semicircular canals, and were thought to be attributed to the presence of greater magnetic susceptibility artifacts inherent to gradient-echo techniques such as bFFE. Because of higher image quality and less susceptibility artifacts, we highly recommend the employment of 3D DRIVE imaging as the MR imaging choice for the IAC and inner ear

  9. Clinical utility of optimized three-dimensional T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted sequences in spinal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanitame, Nobuko; Tanitame, Keizo; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    This article reviews the clinical utility of 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences optimized for the evaluation of various intraspinal lesions. First, intraspinal tumors with hypervascular components and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are clearly shown on contrast-enhanced (CE)-3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences with high spatial resolution. Second, dynamic CE-3D time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) shows delineated feeding arteries of intraspinal AVM or arteriovenous fistula (AVF), greatly aiding subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Third, 3D multiecho T2*-weighted GE sequences are used to visualize intraspinal structures and spinal cord lesions and are sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility of intraspinal hemorrhages. Three-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) and multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP sequences produce contiguous thin images with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in short scanning times. Intraspinal cystic lesions and small nerve-root tumors in subarachnoid space can be viewed using 3D balanced SSFP. Spinal cord myelomalacia and cord compression can be evaluated on fat-suppressed multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP. Finally, a 3D T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence with variable flip angle (FA) refocusing pulse improves through-plane spatial resolution over conventional 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences while matching image contrast.

  10. Imaging neonates and children with Pierre Robin sequence before and after mandibular distraction osteogenesis: what the craniofacial surgeon wants to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Imaging, Medical College of Wisconsin, P.O. Box 1997, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Zei, Markus G. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); St. Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Denny, Arlen D. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Plastic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Pierre Robin sequence is characterized by micrognathia and glossoptosis causing upper airway obstruction. Mandibular distraction osteogenesis is a mandibular lengthening procedure performed in neonates and children with Pierre Robin sequence to alleviate airway compromise. This pictorial review demonstrates the role of imaging in the preoperative and postoperative assessment of these children. It is important for pediatric radiologists to know what information about the mandible and airway the craniofacial surgeon needs from preoperative imaging and to identify any complications these children may encounter after surgery. (orig.)

  11. Fast l₁-SPIRiT compressed sensing parallel imaging MRI: scalable parallel implementation and clinically feasible runtime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mark; Alley, Marcus; Demmel, James; Keutzer, Kurt; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Lustig, Michael

    2012-06-01

    We present l₁-SPIRiT, a simple algorithm for auto calibrating parallel imaging (acPI) and compressed sensing (CS) that permits an efficient implementation with clinically-feasible runtimes. We propose a CS objective function that minimizes cross-channel joint sparsity in the wavelet domain. Our reconstruction minimizes this objective via iterative soft-thresholding, and integrates naturally with iterative self-consistent parallel imaging (SPIRiT). Like many iterative magnetic resonance imaging reconstructions, l₁-SPIRiT's image quality comes at a high computational cost. Excessively long runtimes are a barrier to the clinical use of any reconstruction approach, and thus we discuss our approach to efficiently parallelizing l₁-SPIRiT and to achieving clinically-feasible runtimes. We present parallelizations of l₁-SPIRiT for both multi-GPU systems and multi-core CPUs, and discuss the software optimization and parallelization decisions made in our implementation. The performance of these alternatives depends on the processor architecture, the size of the image matrix, and the number of parallel imaging channels. Fundamentally, achieving fast runtime requires the correct trade-off between cache usage and parallelization overheads. We demonstrate image quality via a case from our clinical experimentation, using a custom 3DFT spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) sequence with up to 8× acceleration via Poisson-disc undersampling in the two phase-encoded directions.

  12. Low-field MR imaging of the spine. A comparative study of a traditional and a new, completely balanced gradient-echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drejer, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Herlev Hospital, Univ. Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, H.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Herlev Hospital, Univ. Copenhagen (Denmark); Tanttu, J. [Picker Nordstar, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    49 patients underwent 53 examinations with both a traditional T1-weighted gradient-echo (PS) sequence and a new completely balanced steady-state 3-D (CBASS3D) sequence; 20 examinations included the cervical spine, 8 the thoracic spine and 25 the lumbar spine. All 106 examinations were reviewed twice regarding visibility of selected structures in the spinal region and diagnostic usefulness. The CBASS3D sequence delineated the medulla, nerve roots, CSF, the intervertebral discs and the posterior longitudinal ligament significantly better than the PS sequence. Disc hernia was also better visualised (p<0.01). There were significantly more artefacts on images obtained with the CBASS3D sequence, but they were usually outside the region of interest and occurred less frequently over time due to increased experience of the staff. Both reviewers found the diagnostic usefulness of CBASS3D to be superior compared to that of PS and excellent for diagnostic purposes. (orig./MG).

  13. Low-field MR imaging of the spine. A comparative study of a traditional and a new, completely balanced gradient-echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drejer, J.; Thomsen, H.S.; Tanttu, J.

    1995-01-01

    49 patients underwent 53 examinations with both a traditional T1-weighted gradient-echo (PS) sequence and a new completely balanced steady-state 3-D (CBASS3D) sequence; 20 examinations included the cervical spine, 8 the thoracic spine and 25 the lumbar spine. All 106 examinations were reviewed twice regarding visibility of selected structures in the spinal region and diagnostic usefulness. The CBASS3D sequence delineated the medulla, nerve roots, CSF, the intervertebral discs and the posterior longitudinal ligament significantly better than the PS sequence. Disc hernia was also better visualised (p<0.01). There were significantly more artefacts on images obtained with the CBASS3D sequence, but they were usually outside the region of interest and occurred less frequently over time due to increased experience of the staff. Both reviewers found the diagnostic usefulness of CBASS3D to be superior compared to that of PS and excellent for diagnostic purposes. (orig./MG)

  14. Examination of self-navigating MR-sequences for perfusion imaging of the kidneys; Untersuchung von selbstnavigierenden MR-Sequenzen fuer die Perfusionsbildgebung der Nieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietzmann, Florian; Zoellner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin; Michaely, Henrik J. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2010-07-01

    Due to the worldwide increasing number of cases of chronic kidney diseases renal imaging - as a non-invasive technique in magnetic resonance imaging - has become a very important tool for an early diagnosis of probable insufficiencies and malfunction. Especially, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provides a technique to derive physiological parameters like renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate. Similar to the entire field of abdominal imaging, the major problems are motion artifacts that primarily arise from the patient's respiration. The self-navigating BLADE-sequence with a post processing motion correction is an approach that does not require breath holding and is therefore also easily applicable to patients who are not able to undergo multiple breath hold examinations. In this work, a T1-weighted BLADE-sequence was optimized to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique to perfusion imaging. The number of phase-encoding lines of one BLADE has a direct impact on the reduction of motion artifacts. In comparison to standard DCE-MRI sequences, the developed BLADE-sequence with optimized number of phase encoding lines could significantly reduce motion artifacts. A quantitative analysis revealed that up to a 50% displacement of the kidneys could be corrected. Therefore, it was demonstrated that dynamic motion corrected measurements without the need of a breath hold-technique are feasible. (orig.)

  15. Subjective and objective image qualities: a comparison of sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo and turbo-spin-eco sequences in magnetic resonance imaging of the spine by use of a subjective ranking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, G. [Institut fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Departement Radiologie, Universitaetskliniken, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland); Mader, I. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Dres. Siems, Grossmann, Bayreuth (Germany); Proske, M. [Klinikum Rosenheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    1998-12-31

    We evaluated the subjective image impression of two different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences by using a subjective ranking system. This ranking system was based on 20 criteria describing several tissue characteristics such as the signal intensity of normal anatomical structures and the changes of signal intensities and shape of lesions as well as artefacts. MR of the vertebral spine was performed in 48 female and 52 male patients (mean age 44.8 years) referred consecutively for investigation of a back problem. Ninety-six pathologies were found in 82 patients. Sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin-echo before and after administration of Gadolinium (Gd-DOTA), and sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo (T2wSE) and Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequences were performed by means of surface coils. Using the subjective ranking system the sagittal T2wSE and sagittal TSE were compared. Both sequences were suitable for identification of normal anatomy and pathologic changes and there was no trend for increased detection of disease by one imaging sequence over the other. We found that sagittal TSE sequences can replace sagittal T2wSE sequences in spinal MR and that artefacts at the cervical and lumbar spine are less frequent using TSE, thus confirming previous studies. In this study, our ranking system reveiled, that there are differences between the subjective judgement of image qualities and objective measurement of SNR. However, this approach may not be helpful to compare two different MR sequences as it is limited to the anatomical area investigated and is time consuming. The subjective image impression, i.e. the quality of images, may not always be represented by physical parameters such as a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), radiologists should try to define influences of image quality also by subjective parameters. (orig.)

  16. 'Statistical methods for automatic crack detection based on vibrothermography sequence-of-images data' by M. Li,S. D. Holland and W. Q. Meeker: Discussion 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volf, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2010), s. 496-501 ISSN 1524-1904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : image analysis * statistical characteristics * material tests Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.829, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/SI/volf-statistical methods for automatic crack detection based on vibrothermography sequence-of- image s data.pdf

  17. Hybrid PET/MR imaging: an algorithm to reduce metal artifacts from dental implants in Dixon-based attenuation map generation using a multiacquisition variable-resonance image combination sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Irene A; Wurnig, Moritz C; Becker, Anton S; Kenkel, David; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Boss, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to implement an algorithm modifying Dixon-based MR imaging datasets for attenuation correction in hybrid PET/MR imaging with a multiacquisition variable resonance image combination (MAVRIC) sequence to reduce metal artifacts. After ethics approval, in 8 oncologic patients with dental implants data were acquired in a trimodality setup with PET/CT and MR imaging. The protocol included a whole-body 3-dimensional dual gradient-echo sequence (Dixon) used for MR imaging-based PET attenuation correction and a high-resolution MAVRIC sequence, applied in the oral area compromised by dental implants. An algorithm was implemented correcting the Dixon-based μ maps using the MAVRIC in areas of Dixon signal voids. The artifact size of the corrected μ maps was compared with the uncorrected MR imaging μ maps. The algorithm was robust in all patients. There was a significant reduction in mean artifact size of 70.5% between uncorrected and corrected μ maps from 697 ± 589 mm(2) to 202 ± 119 mm(2) (P = 0.016). The proposed algorithm could improve MR imaging-based attenuation correction in critical areas, when standard attenuation correction is hampered by metal artifacts, using a MAVRIC. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Real-time reconstruction of sensitivity encoded radial magnetic resonance imaging using a graphics processing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Atkinson, David; Schaeffter, Tobias; Hansen, Michael Schacht

    2009-12-01

    A barrier to the adoption of non-Cartesian parallel magnetic resonance imaging for real-time applications has been the times required for the image reconstructions. These times have exceeded the underlying acquisition time thus preventing real-time display of the acquired images. We present a reconstruction algorithm for commodity graphics hardware (GPUs) to enable real time reconstruction of sensitivity encoded radial imaging (radial SENSE). We demonstrate that a radial profile order based on the golden ratio facilitates reconstruction from an arbitrary number of profiles. This allows the temporal resolution to be adjusted on the fly. A user adaptable regularization term is also included and, particularly for highly undersampled data, used to interactively improve the reconstruction quality. Each reconstruction is fully self-contained from the profile stream, i.e., the required coil sensitivity profiles, sampling density compensation weights, regularization terms, and noise estimates are computed in real-time from the acquisition data itself. The reconstruction implementation is verified using a steady state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence and quantitatively evaluated. Three applications are demonstrated; real-time imaging with real-time SENSE 1) or k- t SENSE 2) reconstructions, and 3) offline reconstruction with interactive adjustment of reconstruction settings.

  19. Why choose Random Forest to predict rare species distribution with few samples in large undersampled areas? Three Asian crane species models provide supporting evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunrong Mi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models (SDMs have become an essential tool in ecology, biogeography, evolution and, more recently, in conservation biology. How to generalize species distributions in large undersampled areas, especially with few samples, is a fundamental issue of SDMs. In order to explore this issue, we used the best available presence records for the Hooded Crane (Grus monacha, n = 33, White-naped Crane (Grus vipio, n = 40, and Black-necked Crane (Grus nigricollis, n = 75 in China as three case studies, employing four powerful and commonly used machine learning algorithms to map the breeding distributions of the three species: TreeNet (Stochastic Gradient Boosting, Boosted Regression Tree Model, Random Forest, CART (Classification and Regression Tree and Maxent (Maximum Entropy Models. In addition, we developed an ensemble forecast by averaging predicted probability of the above four models results. Commonly used model performance metrics (Area under ROC (AUC and true skill statistic (TSS were employed to evaluate model accuracy. The latest satellite tracking data and compiled literature data were used as two independent testing datasets to confront model predictions. We found Random Forest demonstrated the best performance for the most assessment method, provided a better model fit to the testing data, and achieved better species range maps for each crane species in undersampled areas. Random Forest has been generally available for more than 20 years and has been known to perform extremely well in ecological predictions. However, while increasingly on the rise, its potential is still widely underused in conservation, (spatial ecological applications and for inference. Our results show that it informs ecological and biogeographical theories as well as being suitable for conservation applications, specifically when the study area is undersampled. This method helps to save model-selection time and effort, and allows robust and rapid

  20. Why choose Random Forest to predict rare species distribution with few samples in large undersampled areas? Three Asian crane species models provide supporting evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Chunrong; Huettmann, Falk; Guo, Yumin; Han, Xuesong; Wen, Lijia

    2017-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have become an essential tool in ecology, biogeography, evolution and, more recently, in conservation biology. How to generalize species distributions in large undersampled areas, especially with few samples, is a fundamental issue of SDMs. In order to explore this issue, we used the best available presence records for the Hooded Crane ( Grus monacha , n  = 33), White-naped Crane ( Grus vipio , n  = 40), and Black-necked Crane ( Grus nigricollis , n  = 75) in China as three case studies, employing four powerful and commonly used machine learning algorithms to map the breeding distributions of the three species: TreeNet (Stochastic Gradient Boosting, Boosted Regression Tree Model), Random Forest, CART (Classification and Regression Tree) and Maxent (Maximum Entropy Models). In addition, we developed an ensemble forecast by averaging predicted probability of the above four models results. Commonly used model performance metrics (Area under ROC (AUC) and true skill statistic (TSS)) were employed to evaluate model accuracy. The latest satellite tracking data and compiled literature data were used as two independent testing datasets to confront model predictions. We found Random Forest demonstrated the best performance for the most assessment method, provided a better model fit to the testing data, and achieved better species range maps for each crane species in undersampled areas. Random Forest has been generally available for more than 20 years and has been known to perform extremely well in ecological predictions. However, while increasingly on the rise, its potential is still widely underused in conservation, (spatial) ecological applications and for inference. Our results show that it informs ecological and biogeographical theories as well as being suitable for conservation applications, specifically when the study area is undersampled. This method helps to save model-selection time and effort, and allows robust and rapid

  1. MR imaging of cranial nerve lesions using six different high-resolution T1- and T2(*)-weighted 3D and 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, J.; Held, P.; Strotzer, M.; Voelk, M.; Nitz, W.R.; Dorenbeck, U.; Feuerbach, S. [Univ. Hospital of Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stamato, S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: To find a suitable high-resolution MR protocol for the visualization of lesions of all 12 cranial nerves. Material and Methods: Thirty-eight pathologically changed cranial nerves (17 patients) were studied with MR imaging at 1.5T using 3D T2*-weighted CISS, T1-weighted 3D MP-RAGE (without and with i.v. contrast medium), T2-weighted 3D TSE, T2-weighted 2D TSE and T1-weighted fat saturation 2D TSE sequences. Visibility of the 38 lesions of the 12 cranial nerves in each sequence was evaluated by consensus of two radiologists using an evaluation scale from 1 (excellently visible) to 4 (not visible). Results: The 3D CISS sequence provided the best resolution of the cranial nerves and their lesions when surrounded by CSF. In nerves which were not surrounded by CSF, the 2D T1-weighted contrast-enhanced fat suppression technique was the best sequence. Conclusions: A combination of 3D CISS, the 2D T1-weighted fat suppressed sequence and a 3D contrast-enhanced MP-RAGE proved to be the most useful sequence to visualize all lesions of the cranial nerves. For the determination of enhancement, an additional 3D MP-RAGE sequence without contrast medium is required. This sequence is also very sensitive for the detection of hemorrhage.

  2. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eul Kyu [Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seo Goo [The Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [The Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun [The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development.

  3. Fast ℓ1-SPIRiT Compressed Sensing Parallel Imaging MRI: Scalable Parallel Implementation and Clinically Feasible Runtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mark; Alley, Marcus; Demmel, James; Keutzer, Kurt; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Lustig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We present ℓ1-SPIRiT, a simple algorithm for auto calibrating parallel imaging (acPI) and compressed sensing (CS) that permits an efficient implementation with clinically-feasible runtimes. We propose a CS objective function that minimizes cross-channel joint sparsity in the Wavelet domain. Our reconstruction minimizes this objective via iterative soft-thresholding, and integrates naturally with iterative Self-Consistent Parallel Imaging (SPIRiT). Like many iterative MRI reconstructions, ℓ1-SPIRiT’s image quality comes at a high computational cost. Excessively long runtimes are a barrier to the clinical use of any reconstruction approach, and thus we discuss our approach to efficiently parallelizing ℓ1-SPIRiT and to achieving clinically-feasible runtimes. We present parallelizations of ℓ1-SPIRiT for both multi-GPU systems and multi-core CPUs, and discuss the software optimization and parallelization decisions made in our implementation. The performance of these alternatives depends on the processor architecture, the size of the image matrix, and the number of parallel imaging channels. Fundamentally, achieving fast runtime requires the correct trade-off between cache usage and parallelization overheads. We demonstrate image quality via a case from our clinical experimentation, using a custom 3DFT Spoiled Gradient Echo (SPGR) sequence with up to 8× acceleration via poisson-disc undersampling in the two phase-encoded directions. PMID:22345529

  4. High Field In vivo13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Brain by Random Radiofrequency Heteronuclear Decoupling and Data Undersampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningzhi Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In vivo13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is a unique and effective tool for studying dynamic human brain metabolism and the cycling of neurotransmitters. One of the major technical challenges for in vivo13C-MRS is the high radio frequency (RF power necessary for heteronuclear decoupling. In the common practice of in vivo13C-MRS, alkanyl carbons are detected in the spectra range of 10–65 ppm. The amplitude of decoupling pulses has to be significantly greater than the large one-bond 1H-13C scalar coupling (1JCH = 125–145 Hz. Two main proton decoupling methods have been developed: broadband stochastic decoupling and coherent composite or adiabatic pulse decoupling (e.g., WALTZ; the latter is widely used because of its efficiency and superb performance under inhomogeneous B1 field. Because the RF power required for proton decoupling increases quadratically with field strength, in vivo13C-MRS using coherent decoupling is often limited to low magnetic fields [<=4 Tesla (T] to keep the local and averaged specific absorption rate (SAR under the safety guidelines established by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Alternately, carboxylic/amide carbons are coupled to protons via weak long-range 1H-13C scalar couplings, which can be decoupled using low RF power broadband stochastic decoupling. Recently, the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS technique using low power random RF heteronuclear decoupling was safely applied to human brain studies at 7T. Here, we review the two major decoupling methods and the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS with low power decoupling strategy. Further decreases in RF power deposition by frequency-domain windowing and time-domain random under-sampling are also discussed. Low RF power decoupling opens the possibility of performing in vivo13C experiments of human brain at very high magnetic fields (such as 11.7T, where signal-to-noise ratio as well as spatial and temporal

  5. Investigation of Classical Pulse Sequences for Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging With a cMUT Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouan, Damien; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2016-10-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (cMUTs) provide promising ultrasonic technology that could become an alternative to piezoelectric probes for medical applications. cMUTs could be very valuable for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging based on higher harmonics detection. However, their use is restricted by the intrinsic nonlinearity of the cMUT transmitters themselves, because it is difficult to distinguish between the nonlinearity of the microbubbles and the nonlinearity arising from the emitting transducer. A number of approaches have been proposed in recent years to cancel the nonlinearity of cMUTs. However, these techniques have limitations in terms of implementation with current ultrasound scanner electronics. The solution to be comparable with classical methods should not need precharacterization of the probe or changing the bias voltage (amplitude or polarity) but does need good sensitivity and a high frame rate to avoid motion artifacts. We propose here proof of a concept of an adapted amplitude modulation sequence with cMUT where transmit elements operate alternately. We show that this method, which is currently used with piezoelectric probes, is fully applicable to cMUT probes and the intrinsic nonlinearity of the transmitter is no longer an issue.

  6. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-03-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25-45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets.

  7. The use of phase sequence image sets to reconstruct the total volume occupied by a mobile lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Isabelle M.; Robinson, Don M.; Halperin, Ross; Roa, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The use of phase sequence image (PSI) sets to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target is presented. Isocontrast composite clinical target volumes (CCTVs) may be constructed from PSI sets in order to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target during the course of its travel. The ability of the CCTV technique to properly account for target motion is demonstrated by comparison to contours of the true total volume occupied (TVO) for a number of experimental phantom geometries. Finally, using real patient data, the clinical utility of the CCTV technique to properly account for internal tumor motion while minimizing the volume of healthy lung tissue irradiated is assessed by comparison to the standard approach of applying safety margins. Results of the phantom study reveal that CCTV cross sections constructed at the 20% isocontrast level yield good agreement with the total cross sections (TXO) of mobile targets. These CCTVs conform well to the TVOs of the moving targets examined whereby the addition of small uniform margins ensures complete circumscription of the TVO with the inclusion of minimal amounts of surrounding external volumes. The CCTV technique is seen to be clearly superior to the common practice of the addition of safety margins to individual CTV contours in order to account for internal target motion. Margins required with the CCTV technique are eight to ten times smaller than those required with individual CTVs

  8. Cartilage volume quantification with multi echo data image combination sequence in swine knee at 3.0 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lirong; Wang Dongqing; Wei Chuanshe; Ma Cong; Wang Dehang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of multi echo data imagine combination (MEDIC) sequence with water excitation at 3.0 T in swine knee cartilage. Methods: Sagittal MEDIC sequences (0.6 mm slice thickness, isotropic) were acquired twice at 3.0 T MRI in 30 swine knees. The knee cartilage was then removed and the volume was directly measured with water substitution method. The cartilage volume was also determined with a validated open source image software OsiriX by two observers (A and B). The cartilage volumes obtained by two methods were compared. The reproducibility of MEDIC for quantitative measurement was accessed by the root-mean-square (RMS) of variation coefficient. Interobserver and intraobserver precision errors were compared using a paired students t-test. The accuracy of MEDIC for quantitative measurement was determined by the random pairwise differences, systematic pairwise differences and the Pearson, correlation coefficients. Time of semiautomatic and manual segmentation were recorded. Results: Time was saved about 75% by using semiautomatic segmentation methods [(4.0± 1.5) min] versus manual segmentation [(16.0±0.9) min]. Interobserver precision errors (RMS CV% for paired analysis) between A and B for cartilage volume measurement were (2.66±0.82) ml and(2.61± 0.81) ml, t=0.24, P=0.81 (patella); (2.40±0.69) ml and (2.49±0.85) ml, t=-0.45, P=0.65 (medial femoral condyle); (2.28±0.74) ml and(2.41±0.78) ml, t=-0.66, P=0.51 (lateral femoral condyle); (3.43±1.28) ml and (3.51±1.08) ml, t=-0.26, P=0.79 (femora trochlea) with sagittal MEDIC. Intraobserver precision errors (RMS CV% for paired analysis) of observer A for the first and second cartilage volume measurement were (2.64±0.62) ml and (2.67±0.60) ml, t=-0.19, P=0.85 (patella); (2.43±0.60) ml and (2.39±0.59) ml, t=0.26, P=0.80 (medial femoral condyle); (2.26±0.56) ml and (2.30±0.57) ml, t=-0.27, P=0.78 (lateral femoral condyle); (3.40± 1.20) ml and (3.47±1

  9. TrueFisp versus HASTE sequences in 3T cine MRI: Evaluation of image quality during phonation in patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Czerny, Christian; Weber, Michael; Baumann, Arnulf; Sinko, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality of two fast dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences: True fast imaging with steady state precession (TrueFisp) was compared with half-Fourier acquired single turbo-spin-echo (HASTE) sequence for the characterization of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) in repaired cleft palate patients. Twenty-two patients (10 female and 12 male; mean age, 17.7 ± 10.6 years; range, 9-31) with suspected VPI underwent 3-T MRI using TrueFisp and HASTE sequences. Imaging was performed in the sagittal plane at rest and during phonation of ''ee'' and ''k'' to assess the velum, tongue, posterior pharyngeal wall and a potential VP closure. The results were analysed independently by one radiologist and one orthodontist. HASTE performed better than TrueFisp for all evaluated items, except the tongue evaluation by the orthodontist during phonation of ''k'' and ''ee''. A statistically significant difference in favour of HASTE was observed in assessing the velum at rest and during phonation of ''k'' and ''ee'', and also in assessing VP closure in both raters (p < 0.05). TrueFisp imaging was twice as fast as HASTE (0.36 vs. 0.75 s/image). Dynamic HASTE images were of superior quality to those obtained with TrueFisp, although TrueFisp imaging was twice as fast. (orig.)

  10. Visual image quality assessment with sensor motion : Effect of recording and presentation velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of motion on observer performance with an undersampled uncooled thermal imager, moving imagery from a static scene was recorded at nine different angular velocities ranging from 0 (static) to 1 pixel/frame by use of a tilted rotating mirror. The scene contained a thermal acuity

  11. Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging improves the image quality of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in rectal cancer: Comparison with single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Chun-chao; Liu, Xi; Peng, Wan-lin; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jin-ge [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37# Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Meng, Wen-jian; Deng, Xiang-bing [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37# Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Zuo, Pan-li [Siemens Healthcare, MR Collaborations NE Asia, 100010, Beijing (China); Li, Zhen-lin, E-mail: lzlcd01@126.com [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37# Guo Xue Xiang, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To determine whether readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can improve the image quality in patients with rectal cancer compared with single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) DWI using 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and methods: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Seventy-one patients with rectal cancer were enrolled in this study. For all patients, both rs-EPI and ss-EPI DWI were performed using a 3T MR scanner. Two radiologists independently assessed the overall image quality, lesion conspicuity, geometric distortion and distinction of anatomical structures. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), lesion contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were also measured. Comparisons of the quantitative and qualitative parameters between the two sequences were performed using the paired t-test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: The scores of overall image quality, lesion conspicuity, geometric distortion and distinction of anatomical structures of rs-EPI were all significantly higher than those of ss-EPI (all p < 0.05). The SNR and CNR were higher in rs-EPI than those in ss-EPI (all p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between ss-EPI and rs-EPI with regard to ROI size and mean ADCs of the tumour (p = 0.574 and p = 0.479, respectively), but the mean ADC of the normal tissue was higher in rs-EPI than in ss-EPI (1.73 ± 0.30 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 1.60 ± 0.31 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 0.001). Conclusions: DW imaging based on readout-segmented echo-planar imaging is a clinically useful technique to improve the image quality for the purpose of evaluating lesions in patients with rectal tumours.

  12. High-resolution T2-weighted MR imaging of the inner ear using a long echo-train-length 3D fast spin-echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, S.; Yamakawa, K.; Fukatsu, H.; Ishigaki, T.; Nakashima, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Aoki, I.; Miyazaki, M.; Takai, H.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of a long echo-train-length 3D fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) sequence in visualizing the inner ear structures. Ten normal ears and 50 patient ears were imaged on a 1.5T MR unit using a head coil. Axial high-resolution T2-weighted images of the inner ear and the internal auditory canal (IAC) were obtained in 15 min. In normal ears the reliability of the visualization for the inner ear structures was evaluated on original images and the targeted maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the labyrinth. In ten normal ears, 3D surface display (3D) images were also created and compared with MIP images. On the original images the cochlear aqueduct, the vessels in the vicinity of the IAC, and more than three branches of the cranial nerves were visualized in the IAC in all the ears. The visibility of the endolympathic duct was 80%. On the MIP images the visibility of the three semicircular canals, anterior and posterior ampulla, and of more than two turns of the cochlea was 100%. The MIP images and 3D images were almost comparable. The visibility of the endolymphatic duct was 80% in normal ears and 0% in the affected ears of the patients with Meniere's disease (p<0.001). In one patient ear a small intracanalicular tumor was depicted clearly. In conclusion, the long echo train length T2-weighted 3D-FSE sequence enables the detailed visualization of the tiny structures of the inner ear and the IAC within a clinically acceptable scan time. Furthermore, obtaining a high contrast between the soft/bony tissue and the cerebrospinal/endolymph/perilymph fluid would be of significant value in the diagnosis of the pathologic conditions around the labyrinth and the IAC. (orig.)

  13. Comparing an accelerated 3D fast spin-echo sequence (CS-SPACE) for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with traditional 3D fast spin-echo (SPACE) and routine 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altahawi, Faysal F.; Blount, Kevin J.; Omar, Imran M. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Morley, Nicholas P. [Marshfield Clinic, Department of Radiology, Marshfield, WI (United States); Raithel, Esther [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To compare a faster, new, high-resolution accelerated 3D-fast-spin-echo (3D-FSE) acquisition sequence (CS-SPACE) to traditional 2D and high-resolution 3D sequences for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty patients received knee MRIs that included routine 2D (T1, PD ± FS, T2-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 3 mm{sup 3}; ∝10 min), traditional 3D FSE (SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝7.5 min), and accelerated 3D-FSE prototype (CS-SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝5 min) acquisitions on a 3-T MRI system (Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra). Three musculoskeletal radiologists (MSKRs) prospectively and independently reviewed the studies with graded surveys comparing image and diagnostic quality. Tissue-specific signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also compared. MSKR-perceived diagnostic quality of cartilage was significantly higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE and 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Assessment of diagnostic quality of menisci and synovial fluid was higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE (p < 0.001). CS-SPACE was not significantly different from SPACE but had lower assessments than 2D sequences for evaluation of bones, ligaments, muscles, and fat (p ≤ 0.004). 3D sequences had higher spatial resolution, but lower overall assessed contrast (p < 0.001). Overall image quality from CS-SPACE was assessed as higher than SPACE (p = 0.007), but lower than 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Compared to SPACE, CS-SPACE had higher fluid SNR and CNR against all other tissues (all p < 0.001). The CS-SPACE prototype allows for faster isotropic acquisitions of knee MRIs over currently used protocols. High fluid-to-cartilage CNR and higher spatial resolution over routine 2D sequences may present a valuable role for CS-SPACE in the evaluation of cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  15. Field Measurements of Trace Gases and Aerosols Emitted by Undersampled Combustion Sources Including Wood and Dung Cooking Fires, Garbage and Crop Residue Burning, and Indonesian Peat Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C.; Jayarathne, T. S.; Goetz, D.; Simpson, I. J.; Selimovic, V.; Bhave, P.; Blake, D. R.; Cochrane, M. A.; Ryan, K. C.; Putra, E. I.; Saharjo, B.; Stone, E. A.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Field measurements were conducted in Nepal and in the Indonesian province of Central Kalimantan to improve characterization of trace gases and aerosols emitted by undersampled combustion sources. The sources targeted included cooking with a variety of stoves, garbage burning, crop residue burning, and authentic peat fires. Trace gas and aerosol emissions were studied using a land-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, whole air sampling, photoacoustic extinctiometers (405 and 870nm), and filter samples that were analyzed off-line. These measurements were used to calculate fuel-based emission factors (EFs) for up to 90 gases, PM2.5, and PM2.5 constituents. The aerosol optical data measured included EFs for the scattering and absorption coefficients, the single scattering albedo (at 870 and 405 nm), as well as the absorption Ångström exponent. The emissions varied significantly by source, although light absorption by both brown and black carbon (BrC and BC, respectively) was important for all non-peat sources. For authentic peat combustion, the emissions of BC were negligible and absorption was dominated by organic aerosol. The field results from peat burning were in reasonable agreement with recent lab measurements of smoldering Kalimantan peat and compare well to the limited data available from other field studies. The EFs can be used with estimates of fuel consumption to improve regional emissions inventories and assessments of the climate and health impacts of these undersampled sources.

  16. Molecular and morphological data support recognition of a new genus of New World direct-developing frog (Anura: Terrarana) from an under-sampled region of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Matthew P; Barrio-Amorós, César L; Hedges, S Blair

    2015-07-16

    We describe a new genus of New World direct-developing frog (Terrarana) from the northern Andes of Venezuela and adjacent Colombia. Tachiramantis gen. nov. includes three species formerly placed in the large genus Pristimantis. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of data from five nuclear and mitochondrial genes shows that Tachiramantis is not part of Pristimantis or any other named genus in its family (Craugastoridae or Strabomantidae). Morphological evidence further supports the distinctiveness of Tachiramantis, which has several aspects of skull morphology that are rare or absent in Pristimantis and synapomorphic for Tachiramantis, including frontoparietal-prootic fusion and degree of vomer development. The terminal phalanges, which narrow greatly before expanding at the tips, may represent an additional morphological synapomorphy. One species, T. prolixodiscus, also displays a fenestra between the posterior portions of the frontoparietals, a character state otherwise present in only 1 of 98 other sampled terraranan species. We use mapped ranges of most New World direct-developing frogs to show that Tachiramantis occurs in a geographic region that had been under-sampled in previous molecular studies of New World direct-developing frogs. Other under-sampled regions are identified in western Peru, Colombia, and northern Central America; these regions should provide fruitful target taxa for future phylogenetic studies.

  17. Comparison of a T1-weighted inversion-recovery-, gradient-echo- and spin-echo sequence for imaging of the brain at 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, C.; Niederstadt, T.; Kraemer, S.; Kugel, H.; Schwindt, W.; Heindel, W.; Bachmann, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The increased T1 relaxation times at 3.0 Tesla lead to a reduced T1 contrast, requiring adaptation of imaging protocols for high magnetic fields. This prospective study assesses the performance of three techniques for T1-weighted imaging (T1w) at 3.0 T with regard to gray-white differentiation and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients were examined at a 3.0 T system with axial T1 w inversion recovery (IR), spin-echo (SE) and gradient echo (GE) sequences and after contrast enhancement (CE) with CE-SE and CE-GE sequences. For qualitative analysis, the images were ranked with regard to artifacts, gray-white differentiation, image noise and overall diagnostic quality. For quantitative analysis, the CNR was calculated, and cortex and basal ganglia were compared with the white matter. Results: In the qualitative analysis, IR was judged superior to SE and GE for gray-white differentiation, image noise and overall diagnostic quality, but inferior to the GE sequence with regard to artifacts. CE-GE proved superior to CE-SE in all categories. In the quantitative analysis, CNR of the based ganglia was highest for IR, followed by GE and SE. For the CNR of the cortex, no significant difference was found between IR (16.9) and GE (15.4) but both were superior to the SE (9.4). The CNR of the cortex was significantly higher for CE-GE compared to CE-SE (12.7 vs. 7.6, p<0.001), but the CNR of the basal ganglia was not significantly different. Conclusion: For unenhanced T1w imaging at 3.0 T, the IR technique is, despite increased artifacts, the method of choice due to its superior gray-white differentiation and best overall image quality. For CE-studies, GE sequences are recommended. For cerebral imaging, SE sequences give unsatisfactory results at 3.0 T. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography: Image Quality, Ductal Morphology, and Value of Additional T2- and T1-weighted Sequences for the Assessment of Suspected Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Haenninen, E.; Ricke, H.; Amthauer, H.; Roettgen, R.; Boehmig, M.; Langrehr, J.; Pech, M.; Denecke, T.; Rosewicz, S.; Felix, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess image quality and duct morphology on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and also the value of additional T2- and T1-weighted sequences for differentiation of benignity and malignancy in patients with suspected pancreatic tumors. Material and Methods: One-hundred-and-fourteen patients received MRCP and unenhanced and contrast material-enhanced MR imaging. MR results were analyzed independently by two blinded readers, and subsequently correlated with the results from surgery, biopsy, and follow-up. Assessment included the evaluation of image quality, duct visualization and morphology, and the differentiation of pancreatic lesion status (benign versus malignant).Results: Overall, 49 patients had benign final diagnoses, while 65 had a malignant diagnosis. Image quality of single-shot thick-slab MRCP was rated significantly better than the MIP images of multisection MRCP. With MRCP alone, the two readers' accuracy in the assessment of pancreatic lesion status was 72% (95% CI, 64% to 83%) and 69% (95% CI, 56% to 77%), respectively; with the addition of T2- and T1-weighted images the accuracy significantly improved to 89% (95% CI, 82% to 95%) and 84% (95% CI, 77% to 92%) for readers 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Single-shot thick-slab MRCP and multisection MRCP provide complementary results; however, single-shot MRCP had superior image quality. Moreover, assessment of ductal morphology with MRCP alone facilitated the diagnosis of different pathologic conditions of the pancreatobiliary system in the majority of patients. However, with the addition of T2- and T1-weighted sequences the overall diagnostic accuracy was significantly improved and thus we consider that a comprehensive MR approach should comprise both MRCP techniques and parenchymal sequences

  19. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens, Athens (Greece); Economopoulos, N [General University Hospital ATTIKON, Athens, Athens (Greece); Roka, V [Health Center of Farkadona, Trikala (Greece); Sakkas, G [Center for Research and Technology of Thessaly, Trikala (Greece); Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G [IASO Thessalias Hospital, Larissa (Greece); Statkahis, S [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved.

  20. Navigated three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence for gadoxetic acid liver magnetic resonance imaging in patients with limited breath-holding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Eun Sun; Baek, Jeehyun; Lee, Sangwoo; Iwadate, Yuji; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether a navigator-gated three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence (T1W-GRE, navigated LAVA) can improve diagnostic performance for the detection of focal liver lesions (FLLs) compared to standard breath-hold (BH) T1W-GRE breath-hold LAVA (BH-LAVA) during the hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of gadoxetic acid liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with limited breath-holding capacity. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and the requirement for informed consent was waived. We included 372 patients who underwent liver MRI including both navigated LAVA and BH-LAVA sequences. Overall image quality of the two HBP image sets was compared. In patients with limited breath-holding capacity, diagnostic performances in detecting FLLs on the two HBP images were compared using jackknife-alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis by two reviewers. There were 13 cases (13/372; 3.5%) of image acquisition failure using the navigated LAVA sequence due to severe irregular breathing, and 50 of 359 patients had limited breath-holding capacity. In these patients, overall image quality of navigated LAVA (2.78 ± 0.95) was significantly better than that of BH-LAVA (2.42 ± 0.81, P breath-holding capacity (n = 309, 3.96 ± 0.88, 3.81 ± 0.66, respectively, P breath-holding capacity during HBP of gadoxetic acid MRI.

  1. Comparison of 3D double inversion recovery and 2D STIR FLAIR MR sequences for the imaging of optic neuritis: pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome; Bocher, Anne-Laure; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier [Hopital Roger Salengro, Department of Neuroradiology, Lille (France); Outteryck, Olivier; Zephir, Helene; Vermersch, Patrick [Hopital Roger Salengro, Department of Neurology, Lille (France); Lambert, Oriane [Fondation Ophtalmologique Rothschild, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine [Radiation Epidemiology Team, Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Villejuif (France); Chechin, David [Philips Medical Systems, Suresnes (France)

    2014-12-15

    We compared the three-dimensional (3D) double inversion recovery (DIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence with the coronal two-dimensional (2D) short tau inversion recovery (STIR) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) for the detection of optic nerve signal abnormality in patients with optic neuritis (ON). The study group consisted of 31 patients with ON (44 pathological nerves) confirmed by visual-evoked potentials used as the reference. MRI examinations included 2D coronal STIR FLAIR and 3D DIR with 3-mm coronal reformats to match with STIR FLAIR. Image artefacts were graded for each portion of the optic nerves. Each set of MR images (2D STIR FLAIR, DIR reformats and multiplanar 3D DIR) was examined independently and separately for the detection of signal abnormality. Cisternal portion of optic nerves was better delineated with DIR (p < 0.001), while artefacts impaired analysis in four patients with STIR FLAIR. Inter-observer agreement was significantly improved (p < 0.001) on 3D DIR (κ = 0.96) compared with STIR FLAIR images (κ = 0.60). Multiplanar DIR images reached the best performance for the diagnosis of ON (95 % sensitive and 94 % specific). Our study showed a high sensitivity and specificity of 3D DIR compared with STIR FLAIR for the detection of ON. These findings suggest that the 3D DIR sequence may be more useful in patients suspected of ON. (orig.)

  2. MR Imaging of the Internal Auditory Canal and Inner Ear at 3T: Comparison between 3D Driven Equilibrium and 3D Balanced Fast Field Echo Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Yim, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha; Kim, Sam Soo; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lee, Jiwon

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the use of 3D driven equilibrium (DRIVE) imaging with 3D balanced fast field echo (bFFE) imaging in the assessment of the anatomic structures of the internal auditory canal (IAC) and inner ear at 3 Tesla (T). Materials and Methods Thirty ears of 15 subjects (7 men and 8 women; age range, 22-71 years; average age, 50 years) without evidence of ear problems were examined on a whole-body 3T MR scanner with both 3D DRIVE and 3D bFFE sequences by using an 8-channel sensitivity...

  3. Encoding and recall of finger sequences in experienced pianists compared with musically naïve controls: a combined behavioral and functional imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, S; Jahn, G; Sakreida, K; Domin, M; Lotze, M

    2013-01-01

    Long-term intensive sensorimotor training alters functional representation of the motor and sensory system and might even result in structural changes. However, there is not much knowledge about how previous training impacts learning transfer and functional representation. We tested 14 amateur pianists and 15 musically naïve participants in a short-term finger sequence training procedure, differing considerably from piano playing and measured associated functional representation with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The conditions consisted of encoding a finger sequence indicated by hand symbols ("sequence encoding") and subsequently replaying the sequence from memory, both with and without auditory feedback ("sequence retrieval"). Piano players activated motor areas and the mirror neuron system more strongly than musically naïve participants during encoding. When retrieving the sequence, musically naïve participants showed higher activation in similar brain areas. Thus, retrieval activations of naïve participants were comparable to encoding activations of piano players, who during retrieval performed the sequences more accurately despite lower motor activations. Interestingly, both groups showed primary auditory activation even during sequence retrieval without auditory feedback, supporting previous reports about coactivation of the auditory cortex after learned association with motor performance. When playing with auditory feedback, only pianists lateralized to the left auditory cortex. During encoding activation in left primary somatosensory cortex in the height of the finger representations had a predictive value for increased motor performance later on (error rates). Contrarily, decreased performance was associated with increased visual cortex activation during encoding. Our study extends previous reports about training transfer of motor knowledge resulting in superior training effects in musicians. Performance increase went along with activity in

  4. SEMAC-VAT and MSVAT-SPACE sequence strategies for metal artifact reduction in 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Tao; Padua, Abraham; Goerner, Frank; Nittka, Mathias; Gugala, Zbigniew; Jadhav, Siddharth; Trelles, Miguel; Johnson, Raleigh F; Lindsey, Ronald W; Li, Xiaoming; Runge, Val M

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the ability of four magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to correct for metallic artifacts. These techniques consisted of 3 2D techniques and one 3D technique. In 2D imaging the techniques View Angle Tilting (VAT), Slice Encoding for Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) and a technique that employed a combination of the first two (SEMAC-VAT) were evaluated. In 3D imaging the technique Multiple Slab acquisition with VAT based on a SPACE sequence was evaluated (MSVAT-SPACE). Agarose phantoms and tissue phantoms with two commonly used metal implants (stainless steel and titanium) as well as two volunteers with metal implants were imaged at 1.5T. All phantoms and volunteers were imaged using VAT, SEMAC, SEMAC-VAT and MSVAT-SPACE techniques, as well as 2D and 3D conventional imaging techniques. Each technique was optimized for different image contrast mechanisms. Artifact reduction was quantitatively assessed in the agarose phantoms by volumetric measurement. Image quality was qualitatively assessed by blinded reads employing two readers. Each reader independently viewed the tissue phantom images and in vivo human images. Statistical analysis was performed using a Friedman test, Wilcoxon test and weighted Cohen's kappa test. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, PD-weighted and STIR image contrasts were successfully implemented with the evaluated artifact reduction sequences in both the phantom experiments and in vivo images. For all evaluated image contrasts and both metal implants, a reduction in the volume of metal artifacts was seen when compared with 2D conventional acquisitions. The 2D metal artifact volumes on average were reduced by 49% ± 16%, 56% ± 15% and 63% ± 15% for VAT, SEMAC and SEMAC-VAT acquisitions respectively. When Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were applied the difference in metal artifact volume was found to be statistically significant when VAT, SEMAC and SEMAC-VAT were compared with the 2D conventional techniques. In 3D imaging on average

  5. Thoracic staging of non-small-cell lung cancer using integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging: diagnostic value of different MR sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Buchbender, Christian; Rubbert, Christian; Hild, Florian; Antoch, Gerald; Heusch, Philipp [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt; Ruhlmann, Verena [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Koehler, Jens [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Medical Oncology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes; Wetter, Axel [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Reis, Henning [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Pathology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences in simultaneous PET/MR imaging for T staging in non-small-cell lung cancer in relation to histopathology. The study included 28 patients who underwent dedicated thoracic PET/MR imaging before tumour resection. Local tumour staging was performed separately by three readers with each of the following MR sequences together with PET: transverse T2 BLADE, transverse non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, coronal T2 HASTE, and coronal TrueFISP. The staging results were compared with histopathology after resection as the reference standard. Differences in the accuracy of T staging among the MR sequences were evaluated using McNemar's test. Due to multiple testing, Bonferroni correction was applied to prevent accumulation of α errors; p < 0.0024 was considered statistically significant. Compared with histopathology, T-staging accuracy was 69 % with T2 BLADE, 68 % with T2 HASTE, 59 % with contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, 57 % with TrueFISP, 50 % with non-enhanced T1 FLASH, and 45 % and 48 % with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, respectively. Staging accuracy with T2 BLADE was significantly higher than with non-enhanced T1 FLASH and with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientations (p < 0.0024). T2 HASTE had a significantly higher T-staging accuracy than transverse T1 3D-Dixon-VIBE (p < 0.0024). Transverse T2 BLADE images provide the highest accuracy for local tumour staging and should therefore be included in dedicated thoracic PET/MR protocols. As T1 3D Dixon VIBE images acquired for attenuation correction performed significantly worse, this sequence cannot be considered sufficiently accurate for local tumour staging in the thorax. (orig.)

  6. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...... pathologies in peripheral PsA and suggestions concerning appropriate MRI sequences for use in PsA hands are also provided....

  7. Modelling estimation and analysis of dynamic processes from image sequences using temporal random closed sets and point processes with application to the cell exocytosis and endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Fernández, Ester

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, new models and methodologies are introduced for the analysis of dynamic processes characterized by image sequences with spatial temporal overlapping. The spatial temporal overlapping exists in many natural phenomena and should be addressed properly in several Science disciplines such as Microscopy, Material Sciences, Biology, Geostatistics or Communication Networks. This work is related to the Point Process and Random Closed Set theories, within Stochastic Ge...

  8. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Laura M; Mugera, Charles; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron; del Grande, Filippo

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm(2)). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response.

  9. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Mugera, Charles; Grande, Filippo del; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm 2 ). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response. (orig.)

  10. Nonuniform multiview color texture mapping of image sequence and three-dimensional model for faded cultural relics with sift feature points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Gong, Xingyu; Li, Hongan; Jia, Pengtao

    2018-01-01

    For faded relics, such as Terracotta Army, the 2D-3D registration between an optical camera and point cloud model is an important part for color texture reconstruction and further applications. This paper proposes a nonuniform multiview color texture mapping for the image sequence and the three-dimensional (3D) model of point cloud collected by Handyscan3D. We first introduce nonuniform multiview calibration, including the explanation of its algorithm principle and the analysis of its advantages. We then establish transformation equations based on sift feature points for the multiview image sequence. At the same time, the selection of nonuniform multiview sift feature points is introduced in detail. Finally, the solving process of the collinear equations based on multiview perspective projection is given with three steps and the flowchart. In the experiment, this method is applied to the color reconstruction of the kneeling figurine, Tangsancai lady, and general figurine. These results demonstrate that the proposed method provides an effective support for the color reconstruction of the faded cultural relics and be able to improve the accuracy of 2D-3D registration between the image sequence and the point cloud model.

  11. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique

  12. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  13. Same day injections of Tc-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (hexamibi) for myocardial tomographic imaging: Comparison between rest-stress and stress-rest injection sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillefer, R.; Gagnon, A.; Laflamme, L.; Leveille, J.; Phaneuf, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that both rest and stress 99m Tc-hexamibi myocardial perfusion imaging can be performed on the same day using two different doses injected within few h (the first one at rest followed by a second at stress). In order to evaluate and compare 2 sequences (rest-stress and stress-rest) of 99m Tc-hexamibi injections performed the same day, 18 patients with either abnormal 201 Tl myocardial scan or abnormal coronary angiography were studied with 2 99m Tc-hexamibi injections protocols. The rest-stress study was performed as follows: 7 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi was injected at rest. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 60 min later. Immediately after the rest study, patients were injected at peak stress with 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi. Tomographic imaging was repeated 1 h later. Patients were submitted to the stress-rest protocol within 3 days. Tomographic imaging was done 1 h after a 7 mCi injection at stress. This study was followed by an injection of 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi at rest, a tomographic study was performed 60 min later. Myocardial sections were reconstructed in horizontal long, vertical long, and short axes. Data analysis also included polar map representation. A total of 324 segments were interpreted blind by 3 observers, there was an agreement in 283/324 (87.3%) segments between the 2 protocols. However, 24 segments (7.4%) judged ischemic on rest-stress were called scars on stress-rest. In three patients, myocardial segments were judged normal on the rest image of the rest-stress protocol while they were found abnormal (false positive images) on the stress-rest sequence. Stress images from both protocols were judged similar in 17 patients. In conclusion, when using a short time interval (less than 2 h) between two 99m Tc-hexamibi injections, it is preferable to do a rest-stress sequence since the rest image performed initially represents a true rest study, which is not necessarily the case with the stress-rest sequence

  14. B1 mapping for bias-correction in quantitative T1 imaging of the brain at 3T using standard pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Mathieu; Tardif, Christine L; Stikov, Nikola; Sled, John G; Lee, Wayne; Pike, G Bruce

    2017-12-01

    B 1 mapping is important for many quantitative imaging protocols, particularly those that include whole-brain T 1 mapping using the variable flip angle (VFA) technique. However, B 1 mapping sequences are not typically available on many magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. The aim of this work was to demonstrate that B 1 mapping implemented using standard scanner product pulse sequences can produce B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps comparable in quality and acquisition time to advanced techniques. Six healthy subjects were scanned at 3.0T. An interleaved multislice spin-echo echo planar imaging double-angle (EPI-DA) B 1 mapping protocol, using a standard product pulse sequence, was compared to two alternative methods (actual flip angle imaging, AFI, and Bloch-Siegert shift, BS). Single-slice spin-echo DA B 1 maps were used as a reference for comparison (Ref. DA). VFA flip angles were scaled using each B 1 map prior to fitting T 1 ; the nominal flip angle case was also compared. The pooled-subject voxelwise correlation (ρ) for B 1 maps (BS/AFI/EPI-DA) relative to the reference B 1 scan (Ref. DA) were ρ = 0.92/0.95/0.98. VFA T 1 correlations using these maps were ρ = 0.86/0.88/0.96, much better than without B 1 correction (ρ = 0.53). The relative error for each B 1 map (BS/AFI/EPI-DA/Nominal) had 95 th percentiles of 5/4/3/13%. Our findings show that B 1 mapping implemented using product pulse sequences can provide excellent quality B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps, comparable to other custom techniques. This fast whole-brain measurement (∼2 min) can serve as an excellent alternative for researchers without access to advanced B 1 pulse sequences. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1673-1682. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Intensity-vesselness Gaussian mixture model (IVGMM) for 2D + t segmentation of coronary arteries for X-ray angiography image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunna; Shim, Hackjoon; Chang, Hyuk-Jae

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to propose an intensity-vesselness Gaussian mixture model (IVGMM) tracking for 2D + t segmentation of coronary arteries for X-ray angiography (XA) image sequences. We compose a two dimensional (2D) feature vector of intensity and vesselness to characterize the Gaussian mixture models. In our IVGMM tracking, vessel segmentation is performed for each image frame based on these vessel and background IVGMMs and then the segmentation results of the current image frame is used to update these IVGMMs. The 2D + t segmentation of coronary arteries over the 2D XA image sequence is solved by means of iterating two processes, i.e., segmentation of coronary arteries and update of the IVGMMs. The performance of the proposed IVGMM tracking was evaluated using clinical 2D XA datasets. We evaluated the segmentation accuracy of the IVGMM tracking by comparing with two previous 2D vessel segmentation methods and seven background subtraction (BGS) methods. Of the ten segmentation methods, IVGMM tracking shows the highest similarity to the manual segmentation in terms of precision, recall, Jaccard index (JI), F1 score, and peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). It is concluded that the IVGMM tracking could obtain reasonable segmentation accuracy outperforming conventional vessel enhancement methods and object tracking methods.

  16. Reconstruction of Undersampled Big Dynamic MRI Data Using Non-Convex Low-Rank and Sparsity Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Wen Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been extensively utilized for enhancing medical living environment visualization, however, in clinical practice it often suffers from long data acquisition times. Dynamic imaging essentially reconstructs the visual image from raw (k,t-space measurements, commonly referred to as big data. The purpose of this work is to accelerate big medical data acquisition in dynamic MRI by developing a non-convex minimization framework. In particular, to overcome the inherent speed limitation, both non-convex low-rank and sparsity constraints were combined to accelerate the dynamic imaging. However, the non-convex constraints make the dynamic reconstruction problem difficult to directly solve through the commonly-used numerical methods. To guarantee solution efficiency and stability, a numerical algorithm based on Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM is proposed to solve the resulting non-convex optimization problem. ADMM decomposes the original complex optimization problem into several simple sub-problems. Each sub-problem has a closed-form solution or could be efficiently solved using existing numerical methods. It has been proven that the quality of images reconstructed from fewer measurements can be significantly improved using non-convex minimization. Numerous experiments have been conducted on two in vivo cardiac datasets to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art imaging methods. Experimental results illustrated that the proposed method could guarantee the superior imaging performance in terms of quantitative and visual image quality assessments.

  17. Comprehensive small animal imaging strategies on a clinical 3 T dedicated head MR-scanner; adapted methods and sequence protocols in CNS pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu R Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. CONCLUSIONS: The implemented customizations including extensive

  18. Evaluation of an accelerated 3D SPACE sequence with compressed sensing and free-stop scan mode for imaging of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, B; Raithel, E; Kranewitter, C; Steurer, M; Jaschke, W; Kremser, C

    2018-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate a prototypical 3D turbo-spin-echo proton-density-weighted sequence with compressed sensing and free-stop scan mode for preventing motion artefacts (3D-PD-CS-SPACE free-stop) for knee imaging in a clinical setting. 80 patients underwent 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee with our 2D routine protocol and with 3D-PD-CS-SPACE free-stop. In case of a scan-stop caused by motion (images are calculated nevertheless) the sequence was repeated without free-stop mode. All scans were evaluated by 2 radiologists concerning image quality of the 3D-PD-CS-SPACE (with and without free-stop). Important knee structures were further assessed in a lesion based analysis and compared to our reference 2D-PD-fs sequences. Image quality of the 3D-PD-CS-SPACE free-stop was found optimal in 47/80, slightly compromised in 21/80, moderately in 10/80 and severely in 2/80. In 29/80, the free-stop scan mode stopped the 3D-PD-CS-SPACE due to subject motion with a slight increase of image quality at longer effective acquisition times. Compared to the 3D-PD-CS-SPACE with free-stop, the image quality of the acquired 3D-PD-CS-SPACE without free-stop was found equal in 6/29, slightly improved in 13/29, improved with equal contours in 8/29, and improved with sharper contours in 2/29. The lesion based analysis showed a high agreement between the results from the 3D-PD-CS-SPACE free-stop and our 2D-PD-fs routine protocol (overall agreement 96.25%-100%, Cohen's Kappa 0.883-1, p SPACE free-stop is a reliable alternative for standard 2D-PD-fs protocols with acceptable acquisition times. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-Cartesian parallel imaging reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Katherine L; Hamilton, Jesse I; Griswold, Mark A; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Non-Cartesian parallel imaging has played an important role in reducing data acquisition time in MRI. The use of non-Cartesian trajectories can enable more efficient coverage of k-space, which can be leveraged to reduce scan times. These trajectories can be undersampled to achieve even faster scan times, but the resulting images may contain aliasing artifacts. Just as Cartesian parallel imaging can be used to reconstruct images from undersampled Cartesian data, non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods can mitigate aliasing artifacts by using additional spatial encoding information in the form of the nonhomogeneous sensitivities of multi-coil phased arrays. This review will begin with an overview of non-Cartesian k-space trajectories and their sampling properties, followed by an in-depth discussion of several selected non-Cartesian parallel imaging algorithms. Three representative non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods will be described, including Conjugate Gradient SENSE (CG SENSE), non-Cartesian generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA), and Iterative Self-Consistent Parallel Imaging Reconstruction (SPIRiT). After a discussion of these three techniques, several potential promising clinical applications of non-Cartesian parallel imaging will be covered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Accuracy of the Compressed Sensing Accelerated 3D-FLAIR Sequence for the Detection of MS Plaques at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano-Massiah, S; Sayadi, A; de Boer, R; Gelderblom, J; Mahdjoub, R; Gerber, S; Zuber, M; Zins, M; Hodel, J

    2018-01-18

    The use of 3D FLAIR improves the detection of brain lesions in MS patients, but requires long acquisition times. Compressed sensing reduces acquisition time by using the sparsity of MR images to randomly undersample the k-space. Our aim was to compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of 3D-FLAIR with and without compressed sensing for the detection of multiple sclerosis lesions at 3T. Twenty-three patients with relapsing-remitting MS underwent both conventional 3D-FLAIR and compressed sensing 3D-FLAIR on a 3T scanner (reduction in scan time 1 minute 25 seconds, 27%; compressed sensing factor of 1.3). Two blinded readers independently evaluated both conventional and compressed sensing FLAIR for image quality (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio) and the number of MS lesions visible in the periventricular, intra-juxtacortical, infratentorial, and optic nerve regions. The volume of white matter lesions was measured with automatic postprocessing segmentation software for each FLAIR sequence. Image quality and the number of MS lesions detected by the readers were similar between the 2 FLAIR acquisitions ( P = .74 and P = .094, respectively). Almost perfect agreement was found between both FLAIR acquisitions for total MS lesion count (Lin concordance correlation coefficient = 0.99). Agreement between conventional and compressed sensing FLAIR was almost perfect for periventricular and infratentorial lesions and substantial for intrajuxtacortical and optic nerve lesions. Postprocessing with the segmentation software did not reveal a significant difference between conventional and compressed sensing FLAIR in total MS lesion volume ( P = .63) or the number of MS lesions ( P = .15). With a compressed sensing factor of 1.3, 3D-FLAIR is 27% faster and preserves diagnostic performance for the detection of MS plaques at 3T. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  2. Variability in prostate and seminal vesicle delineations defined on magnetic resonance images, a multi-observer, -center and -sequence study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, Tufve; Jonsson, Joakim; Söderström, Karin

    2013-01-01

    .e. the MR sequence used to acquire the data. RESULTS: The intra-physician variability in different directions was between 1.3 - 1.9 mm and 3 -- 4 mm for the prostate and seminal vesicles respectively (1 std). The inter-physician variability for different directions were between 0.7 -- 1.7 mm...

  3. Brain Arteries Movement Detection With Gated Gradient Echo Sequence: Standardization, Registration and Subtraction of Serial Magnetic Resonance Images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ionescu, Razvan

    2001-01-01

    In order to make evident pulsing brain arteries movements associated with heart activity, intramodality MR registration and subtraction has to be used to detect small differences between serial MR brain images...

  4. Monte Carlo SURE-based parameter selection for parallel magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel S; Ramani, Sathish; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-01

    Regularizing parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction significantly improves image quality but requires tuning parameter selection. We propose a Monte Carlo method for automatic parameter selection based on Stein's unbiased risk estimate that minimizes the multichannel k-space mean squared error (MSE). We automatically tune parameters for image reconstruction methods that preserve the undersampled acquired data, which cannot be accomplished using existing techniques. We derive a weighted MSE criterion appropriate for data-preserving regularized parallel imaging reconstruction and the corresponding weighted Stein's unbiased risk estimate. We describe a Monte Carlo approximation of the weighted Stein's unbiased risk estimate that uses two evaluations of the reconstruction method per candidate parameter value. We reconstruct images using the denoising sparse images from GRAPPA using the nullspace method (DESIGN) and L1 iterative self-consistent parallel imaging (L1 -SPIRiT). We validate Monte Carlo Stein's unbiased risk estimate against the weighted MSE. We select the regularization parameter using these methods for various noise levels and undersampling factors and compare the results to those using MSE-optimal parameters. Our method selects nearly MSE-optimal regularization parameters for both DESIGN and L1 -SPIRiT over a range of noise levels and undersampling factors. The proposed method automatically provides nearly MSE-optimal choices of regularization parameters for data-preserving nonlinear parallel MRI reconstruction methods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. X-ray region of interest imaging system for rapid-sequence angiography and fluoroscopy: The micro-angiographic fluoroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ye

    Neuro-endovascular interventional diagnosis and treatment require high resolution x-ray imaging guidance of fluoroscopy and angiography. Our group has developed a small field of view, 5 frames per second, high-resolution micro-angiographic imager. This imager has demonstrated substantial high-resolution advantages for angiography over the conventional image intensifier. The work of this dissertation is to build a new micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) to expand the capabilities of the micro-angiographic imager to include fluoroscopic imaging over a small field of view. The components of the MAF are all commercially available including CsI (T1) scintillator, fiber-optic taper, light image intensifier (LII), mirror, lens, and CCD camera. The critical component is the microchannel plate based LII with very high spatial resolution. The LII has a large range of gain that can be controlled easily by a 5V to 9V DC voltage. This property enables the MAF to be used for angiography with a low gain of the LII, and for fluoroscopy with a high gain of the LII. This design was justified by the quantum accounting diagram calculation. The preliminary experimental results from the test model MAF demonstrated the feasibility of this design. The improved prototype MAF model demonstrates high-resolution imaging for both fluoroscopy and angiography. The performance descriptors of the prototype MAF such as MTF, NPS, and DQE, were measured in both angiographic mode and fluoroscopic mode. For angiographic mode, at spatial frequencies of 4 and 10 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 14% and 1.5% respectively, the DQE for the MAF was 12% and 1.2% respectively, while the DQE (0) was about 60%. For fluoroscopic mode, at spatial frequency of 4 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 11%, and the DQE for the MAF was 9.5%. The image lag for the MAF in fluoroscopic mode at a rate of 30 fps was measured to be minimal. The allowable maximum entrance exposure rate was found to be related with the maximum LII

  6. Quantitative assessment of hepatic function: modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence for T1 mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Munyoung [Siemens Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To determine whether multislice T1 mapping of the liver using a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a quantitative tool to estimate liver function and predict the presence of oesophageal or gastric varices. Phantoms filled with gadoxetic acid were scanned three times using MOLLI sequence to test repeatability. Patients with chronic liver disease or liver cirrhosis who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI including MOLLI sequence at 3 T were included (n = 343). Pre- and postcontrast T1 relaxation times of the liver (T1liver), changes between pre- and postcontrast T1liver (ΔT1liver), and adjusted postcontrast T1liver (postcontrast T1liver-T1spleen/T1spleen) were compared among Child-Pugh classes. In 62 patients who underwent endoscopy, all T1 parameters and spleen sizes were correlated with varices. Phantom study showed excellent repeatability of MOLLI sequence. As Child-Pugh scores increased, pre- and postcontrast T1liver were significantly prolonged (P < 0.001), and ΔT1liver and adjusted postcontrast T1liver decreased (P< 0.001). Adjusted postcontrast T1liver and spleen size were independently associated with varices (R{sup 2} = 0.29, P < 0.001). T1 mapping of the liver using MOLLI sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI demonstrated potential in quantitatively estimating liver function, and adjusted postcontrast T1liver was significantly associated with varices. (orig.)

  7. Moebius sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2017-01-01

    and photographical evaluation. Five patients maintained the diagnosis of MS according to the diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: All five patients had bilateral facial and abducens paralysis confirmed by ophthalmological examination. Three of five had normal brain MR imaging. Two had missing facial nerves and one had......BACKGROUND: Moebius Sequence (MS) is a rare disorder defined by bilateral congenital paralysis of the abducens and facial nerves in combination with various odontological, craniofacial, ophthalmological and orthopaedic conditions. The aetiology is still unknown; but both genetic (de novo mutations...

  8. Automatic detection of the carotid artery boundary on cross-sectional MR image sequences using a circle model guided dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brambs Hans

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic aerobe training has positive effects on the compliance of dedicated arterial walls. The adaptations of the arterial structure and function are associated with the blood flow-induced changes of the wall shear stress which induced vascular remodelling via nitric oxide delivered from the endothelial cell. In order to assess functional changes of the common carotid artery over time in these processes, a precise measurement technique is necessary. Before this study, a reliable, precise, and quick method to perform this work is not present. Methods We propose a fully automated algorithm to analyze the cross-sectional area of the carotid artery in MR image sequences. It contains two phases: (1 position detection of the carotid artery, (2 accurate boundary identification of the carotid artery. In the first phase, we use intensity, area size and shape as features to discriminate the carotid artery from other tissues and vessels. In the second phase, the directional gradient, Hough transform, and circle model guided dynamic programming are used to identify the boundary accurately. Results We test the system stability using contrast degraded images (contrast resolutions range from 50% to 90%. The unsigned error ranges from 2.86% ± 2.24% to 3.03% ± 2.40%. The test of noise degraded images (SNRs range from 16 to 20 dB shows the unsigned error ranging from 2.63% ± 2.06% to 3.12% ± 2.11%. The test of raw images has an unsigned error 2.56% ± 2.10% compared to the manual tracings. Conclusions We have proposed an automated system which is able to detect carotid artery cross sectional boundary in MRI sequences during heart cycles. The accuracy reaches 2.56% ± 2.10% compared to the manual tracings. The system is stable, reliable and results are reproducible.

  9. Testable uniqueness conditions for empirical assessment of undersampling levels in total variation-regularized X-ray CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Kruschel, C.; Lorenz, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    We study recoverability in fan-beam computed tomography (CT) with sparsity and total variation priors: how many underdetermined linear measurements suffice for recovering images of given sparsity? Results from compressed sensing (CS) establish such conditions for example for random measurements...... by verifying solution uniqueness conditions. Using both reconstruction and uniqueness testing, we empirically study the number of CT measurements sufficient for recovery on new classes of sparse test images. We demonstrate an average-case relation between sparsity and sufficient sampling and observe a sharp...

  10. Optimal MR pulse sequences for hepatic hemangiomas : comparison of T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo, T2-weighted breath-hold turbo-spin-echo, and T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wen Chao; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cho, Soon Gu

    1997-01-01

    To optimize MR imaging pulse sequences in the imaging of hepatic hemangioma and to evaluate on dynamic MR imaging the enhancing characteristics of the lesions. Twenty patients with 35 hemangiomas were studied by using Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence (T2-weighted, T2- and heavily T2-weighted breath-hold) and T1-weighted FLASH imaging acquired before, immediately on, and 1, 3 and 5 minutes after injection of a bolus of Gd-DTPA (0.1mmol/kg). Phased-array multicoil was employed. Images were quantitatively analyzed for lesion-to-liver signal difference to noise ratios (SD/Ns), and lesion-to-liver signal ratios (H/Ls), and qualitatively analyzed for lesion conspicuity. The enhancing characteristics of the hemangiomas were described by measuring the change of signal intensity as a curve in T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging. For T2-weighted images, breath-hold T2-weighted TSE had a slightly higher SD/N than other pulse sequences, but there was no statistical difference in three fast pulse sequences (p=0.211). For lesion conspicuity, heavily T2-weighted breath-hold TSE images was superior to T2-weighted breath-hold or non-breath-hold TSE (H/L, 5.75, 3.81, 2.87, respectively, p<0.05). T2-weighted breath-hold TSE imaging was more effective than T2-weighted TSE imaging in removing lesion blurring or lack of sharpness, and there was a 12-fold decrease in acquisition time (20sec versus 245 sec). T1-weighted FLASH dynamic images of normal liver showed peak enhancement at less than 1 minute, and of hemangioma at more than 3 minutes;the degree of enhancement for hemangioma decreased after a 3 minute delay. T2-weighed breath-hold TSE imaging and Gd-DTPA enhanced FLASH dynamic imaging with 5 minutes delay are sufficient for imaging hepatic hemangiomas

  11. Prenatal imaging of amniotic band sequence: utility and role of fetal MRI as an adjunct to prenatal US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Jeremy [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Staten Island University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Staten Island, NY (United States); Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Bitters, Constance; Merrow, Arnold C.; Guimaraes, Carolina V.A. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lim, Foong-Yen [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Fetal Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Amniotic band sequence and its US manifestations have been well-described. There is little information, however, regarding the accuracy and utility of fetal MRI. To describe the MRI findings in amniotic band sequence and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRI and US. Prenatal MRI and US studies were retrospectively reviewed in 14 consecutive pregnancies with confirmed amniotic band sequence. Both studies were evaluated for amniotic band visualization, body part affected, type of deformity, umbilical cord involvement and vascular abnormality. Amniotic bands were confidently identified with MRI in 8 fetuses (57%), suggested with MRI in 3 fetuses (21%) and confidently seen by US in 13 fetuses (93%). Neither modality detected surgically proven bands on one fetus. Both techniques were equally able to define the body part affected and the type of deformity. At least one limb abnormality was visualized in all cases and truncal involvement was present in two cases. Cord involvement was identified in seven cases, with one case detected only by MRI. Fetal MRI is able to visualize amniotic bands and their secondary manifestations and could be complementary to prenatal US when fetal surgery is contemplated. (orig.)

  12. Contribution to the tracking and the 3D reconstruction of scenes composed of torus from image sequences a acquired by a moving camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, S.

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional perception of the environment is often necessary for a robot to correctly perform its tasks. One solution, based on the dynamic vision, consists in analysing time-varying monocular images to estimate the spatial geometry of the scene. This thesis deals with the reconstruction of torus by dynamic vision. Though this object class is restrictive, it enables to tackle the problem of reconstruction of bent pipes usually encountered in industrial environments. The proposed method is based on the evolution of apparent contours of objects in the sequence. Using the expression of torus limb boundaries, it is possible to recursively estimate the object three-dimensional parameters by minimising the error between the predicted projected contours and the image contours. This process, which is performed by a Kalman filter, does not need a precise knowledge of the camera displacement or any matching of the tow limbs belonging to the same object. To complete this work, temporal tracking of objects which deals with occlusion situations is proposed. The approach consists in modeling and interpreting the apparent motion of objects in the successive images. The motion interpretation, based on a simplified representation of the scene, allows to recover pertinent three-dimensional information which is used to manage occlusion situations. Experiments, on synthetic and real images, proves he validity of the tracking and the reconstruction processes. (author)

  13. Three dimensional and high resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear. Normal ears and anomaly scanned with 3D-CISS sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edamatsu, Hideo [Dokkyo Univ., Saitama (Japan). Koshigaya Hospital; Uechi, Yoko; Honjyo, Shiro; Yamashita, Koichi; Tonami, Hisao

    1997-12-01

    The MRI system used in this study was a new scanning sequence, 3D-CISS (Three dimensional-constructive interference in steady state) with 1.5 Tesla. Ten normal ears and one ear with Mondini type anomaly were scanned and reconstructed. In imagings of normal inner ears, the cochlea has three spiral layers; basal, middle and apical turns. Each turn was separated into three parts; the scala vestibuli, osseous spiral lamina and scala tympani. Three semicircular ducts, utricle and saccule were also reconstructed in one frame. In the inner ear of Mondini anomaly, 3D MRI showed cochlear aplasia, hypoplasia of semicircular ducts and widely dilated vestibule. The imaging was identical with findings of ``common cavity``. The anomaly was easily recognized in 3D MRI more than in 2D imagings. The detailed and cubic imagings of the Mondini anomaly in 3D MRI could not be observed with conventional 2D MRI. 3D MRI is not invasive method and can scan a target very quickly. (author)

  14. 3D double-echo steady-state sequence assessment of hip joint cartilage and labrum at 3 Tesla: comparative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Antoch, Gerald [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hesper, Tobias; Rettegi, Fanni; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Ruediger; Bittersohl, Bernd [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Paradise Valley Hospital, Joint Preservation and Deformity Correction, San Diego, CA (United States); Tri-city Medical Center, Hip Preservation, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of a high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequence with radial imaging at 3 Tesla (T) for evaluating cartilage and labral alterations in the hip. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data obtained at 3 T, including radially reformatted DESS images and intraoperative data of 45 patients (mean age 42 ± 13.7 years) who underwent hip arthroscopy, were compared. The acetabular cartilage and labrum of the upper hemisphere of the acetabulum and the central femoral head cartilage were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and negative and positive predictive values were determined. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the DESS technique were 96.7%, 75% and 93.7% for detecting cartilage lesions and 98%, 76.2% and 95.9% for detecting labral lesions. The positive and negative predictive values for detecting or ruling out cartilage lesions were 96% and 78.9%. For labral lesions, the positive and negative predictive values were 97.5% and 80%. A high-resolution, 3D DESS technique with radial imaging at 3 T demonstrated high accuracy for detecting hip cartilage and labral lesions with excellent interobserver agreement and moderate correlation between MRI and intraoperative assessment. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic entheses - a systematic comparison between short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted, contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klang, Eyal; Aharoni, Dvora; Rimon, Uri; Eshed, Iris [Tel Aviv University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hermann, Kay-Geert [Department of Radiology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Herman, Amir [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Shazar, Nachshon [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    2014-04-15

    To assess the contribution of contrast material in detecting and evaluating enthesitis of pelvic entheses by MRI. Sixty-seven hip or pelvic 1.5-T MRIs (30:37 male:female, mean age: 53 years) were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of hamstring and gluteus medius (GM) enthesitis by two readers (a resident and an experienced radiologist). Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted pre- and post-contrast (T1+Gd) images were evaluated by each reader at two sessions. A consensus reading of two senior radiologists was regarded as the gold standard. Clinical data was retrieved from patients' referral form and medical files. Cohen's kappa was used for intra- and inter-observer agreement calculation. Diagnostic properties were calculated against the gold standard reading. A total of 228 entheses were evaluated. Gold standard analysis diagnosed 83 (36 %) enthesitis lesions. Intra-reader reliability for the experienced reader was significantly (p = 0.0001) higher in the T1+Gd images compared to the STIR images (hamstring: k = 0.84/0.45, GM: k = 0.84/0.47). Sensitivity and specificity increased from 0.74/0.8 to 0.87/0.9 in the STIR images and T1+Gd sequences. Intra-reader reliability for the inexperienced reader was lower (p > 0.05). Evidence showing that contrast material improves the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of detecting enthesitis supports its use in this setting. (orig.)

  16. A Comparison of Black-blood T2 Mapping Sequences for Carotid Vessel Wall Imaging at 3T: An Assessment of Accuracy and Repeatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianmin; Patterson, Andrew J; Ruetten, Pascal P R; Reid, Scott A; Gillard, Jonathan H; Graves, Martin J

    2018-03-08

    This study is to compare the accuracy of four different black-blood T 2 mapping sequences in carotid vessel wall. Four different black-blood T 2 mapping sequences were developed and tested through phantom experiments and 17 healthy volunteers. The four sequences were: 1) double inversion-recovery (DIR) prepared 2D multi-echo spin-echo (MESE); 2) DIR-prepared 2D multi-echo fast spin-echo (MEFSE); 3) improved motion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (iMSDE) prepared 3D FSE and 4) iMSDE prepared 3D fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR). The concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman statistics were used to compare the sequences with a gold-standard 2D MESE, without blood suppression in phantom studies. The volunteers were scanned twice to test the repeatability. Mean and standard deviation of vessel wall T 2 , signal-to-noise (SNR), the coefficient of variance and interclass coefficient (ICC) of the two scans were compared. The phantom study demonstrated that T 2 measurements had high concordance with respect to the gold-standard (all r values >0.9). In the volunteer study, the DIR 2D MEFSE had significantly higher T 2 values than the other three sequences (P 0.05). iMSDE 3D FSE had the highest SNR (P < 0.05) compared with the other three sequences. The 2D DIR MESE has the highest repeatability (ICC: 0.96, [95% CI: 0.88-0.99]). Although accurate T 2 measurements can be achieved in phantom by the four sequences, in vivo vessel wall T 2 quantification shows significant differences. The in vivo images can be influenced by multiple factors including black-blood preparation and acquisition method. Therefore, a careful choice of acquisition methods and analysis of the confounding factors are required for accurate in vivo carotid vessel wall T 2 measurements. From the settings in this study, the iMSDE prepared 3D FSE is preferred for the future volunteer/patient scans.

  17. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C.; Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A.; Ozturk, E.; Karatoprak, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  18. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Bilim Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)); Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A. (Dept. of Radiology of Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Ozturk, E. (Dept. of Radiology, GATA Haydarpasa Teaching Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Karatoprak, O. (Dept. of Orthopeadic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey))

    2009-02-15

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  19. Evaluation of fast highly undersampled contrast-enhanced MR angiography (sparse CE-MRA) in intracranial applications - initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg GmbH, Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Goericke, Sophia [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Maderwald, Stefan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    To assess the image quality of sparsely sampled contrast-enhanced MR angiography (sparse CE-MRA) providing high spatial resolution and whole-head coverage. Twenty-three patients scheduled for contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the head, (N = 19 with intracranial pathologies, N = 9 with vascular diseases), were included. Sparse CE-MRA at 3 Tesla was conducted using a single dose of contrast agent. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated the data regarding vascular visibility and diagnostic value of overall 24 parameters and vascular segments on a 5-point ordinary scale (5 = very good, 1 = insufficient vascular visibility). Contrast bolus timing and the resulting arterio-venous overlap was also evaluated. Where available (N = 9), sparse CE-MRA was compared to intracranial Time-of-Flight MRA. The overall rating across all patients for sparse CE-MRA was 3.50 ± 1.07. Direct influence of the contrast bolus timing on the resulting image quality was observed. Overall mean vascular visibility and image quality across different features was rated good to intermediate (3.56 ± 0.95). The average performance of intracranial Time-of-Flight was rated 3.84 ± 0.87 across all patients and 3.54 ± 0.62 across all features. Sparse CE-MRA provides high-quality 3D MRA with high spatial resolution and whole-head coverage within short acquisition time. Accurate contrast bolus timing is mandatory. (orig.)

  20. Contribution to the reconstruction of scenes made of cylindrical and polyhedral objects from sequences of images obtained by a moving camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, Marc

    1992-01-01

    Environment perception is an important process which enables a robot to perform actions in an unknown scene. Although many sensors exist to 'give sight', the camera seems to play a leading part. This thesis deals with the reconstruction of scenes made of cylindrical and polyhedral objects from sequences of images provided by a moving camera. Two methods are presented. Both are based on the evolution of apparent contours of objects in a sequence. The first approach has been developed considering that camera motion is known. Despite the good results obtained by this method, the specific conditions it requires makes its use limited. In order to avoid an accurate evaluation of camera motion, we introduce another method allowing, at the same time, to estimate the object parameters and camera positions. In this approach, only is needed a 'poor' knowledge of camera displacements supplied by the control system of the robotic platform, in which the camera is embedded. An optimal integration of a priori information, as well as the dynamic feature of the state model to estimate, lead us to use the Kalman filter. Experiments conducted with synthetic and real images proved the reliability of these methods. Camera calibration set-up is also suggested to achieve the most accurate scene models resulting from reconstruction processes. (author) [fr

  1. Delineation of the anatomical relationship of innominate artery and trachea by respiratory-gated MR imaging with true FISP sequence in patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Yoshinao; Sato, Noriko; Sugai, Kenji; Endo, Yusaku; Matsufuji, Hiroki; Oomi, Tsuyoshi; Honzawa, Shiho; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula is a well-known complication that arises on using a cannula. Therefore, routine examination of the anatomical relationship of the innominate artery and trachea should be carried out. We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in 5 patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) using a combination of true-fast imaging of steady-state precession (true-FISP) sequences and two-dimensional prospective acquisition correction (2D-PACE). For all patients, the trachea and the innominate artery were identified without sedation and contrast media. In one patient, the innominate artery was observed to be pressing on the trachea. In three patients, the trachea and innominate artery were brought very close each other, and in the other patient the anatomical relationship of the trachea and surrounding structure was delineated before tracheotomy. The validity of true-FISP sequences combined with the respiratory-gated technique was confirmed useful for the patients who are difficult to lie quietly and to hold their breath voluntarily. (author)

  2. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: value of fat suppression pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, N.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kawahara, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Oda, J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To determine the usefulness of fat-suppressed gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design and patients. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) images were obtained and compared with other standard techniques in 38 wrists of 27 patients (22-77 years) with RA. Scoring based on the degree of synovial enhancement of each joint was developed and the total scores (J-score) were correlated with radiographic stage, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and symptomatic change in the follow-up study. Results. Synovial proliferations showed marked enhancement in all the wrists. In addition, contrast enhancement in the bone marrow and tenosynovium was seen in 36 and eight wrists respectively. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated these abnormalities better than other techniques. The J-scores correlated well with values of CRP (P=0.0034), but not with radiographic stages and ESR. Conclusion. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted SE images can clearly demonstrate most of the essential lesions in RA including the proliferative synovium, bone erosion, bone marrow inflammatory change, and tenosynovitis. Scoring based on the extent of Gd-enhancement of synovium can be useful in the assessment of the inflammatory status. (orig.). With 8 figs

  3. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: value of fat suppression pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, N. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Kawahara, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Matsumoto, T. [Department of Orthopedics, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan); Oda, J. [Department of Orthopedics, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. To determine the usefulness of fat-suppressed gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design and patients. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) images were obtained and compared with other standard techniques in 38 wrists of 27 patients (22-77 years) with RA. Scoring based on the degree of synovial enhancement of each joint was developed and the total scores (J-score) were correlated with radiographic stage, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and symptomatic change in the follow-up study. Results. Synovial proliferations showed marked enhancement in all the wrists. In addition, contrast enhancement in the bone marrow and tenosynovium was seen in 36 and eight wrists respectively. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated these abnormalities better than other techniques. The J-scores correlated well with values of CRP (P=0.0034), but not with radiographic stages and ESR. Conclusion. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted SE images can clearly demonstrate most of the essential lesions in RA including the proliferative synovium, bone erosion, bone marrow inflammatory change, and tenosynovitis. Scoring based on the extent of Gd-enhancement of synovium can be useful in the assessment of the inflammatory status. (orig.). With 8 figs.

  4. High-resolution 3-dimensional T2*-weighted angiography (HR 3-D SWAN): an optimized 3-T magnetic resonance imaging sequence for targeting the subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Michel; Derrey, Stéphane; Merle, Philippe; Tir, Mélissa; Constans, Jean-Marc; Montpellier, Dominique; Macron, Jean Michel; Le Gars, Daniel; Peltier, Johan; Baledentt, Olivier; Krystkowiak, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. To characterize an optimized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence (high-resolution 3-dimensional T2*-weighted angiography [HR 3-D SWAN]) for direct STN targeting. Sequence distortions were measured using the Leksell stereotactic phantom. Eight consecutive candidates for STN-DBS underwent HR 3-D SWAN MRI for direct identification of the 16 STN. Two senior neurosurgeons independently determined the boundaries of STN on a semiquantitative scale (ranging from 1 [identification very easy] to 4 [identification very difficult]) and the anatomic target within the nucleus. The anatomic data were compared with electrophysiological recordings (48 microrecordings). We examined the anatomic location of the active contacts on MRI. The mean distortion error over the phantom was 0.16 mm. For the 16 STNs, identification of the upper, internal, anterior, and external edges was considered to be easy (scores of 1 or 2). The distinction between the substantia nigra and the STN was rated 1 or 2 for all but 6 nuclei. In the mediolateral axis, electrophysiological recordings covered perfectly anatomic data. In the craniocaudal axis, the mean differences between the electrophysiological data and the anatomic data were 0.8 mm and 0.19 mm for the "entry" and "exit" of the STN, respectively. All active contacts were located within the STN on MRI. HR 3-D SWAN allows easy visualization of the STN. Adapted to stereotactic requirement, the sequence simplifies direct targeting in STN-DBS surgery.

  5. Comparison between arthroscopy and 3 dimensional double echo steady state 3D-DESS sequences in magnetic resonance imaging of internal derangements of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongola, Nagwa A.; Gishen, Philip

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed with the aim of evaluating the usefulness of 3 dimensional double-echo steady state sequences in examining the internal derangements of the knee. Arthroscopy was used as a referral standard. The study was performed in the Radiology and Arthroscopy Departments of Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom, during a 6-month period from January 1997 to June 1997. All patients who had knee magnetic resonance imaging within 3 months of arthroscopy were retrospectively studied. Thirty-three patients fulfilled these criteria and were selected. Three dimensional double-echo steady state sequences produced sensitivity for detecting meniscal tears of 87.5% for medial menisci (MM) and 75% for lateral menisci (LM). Specificity was 76% for MM and 96% for LM; positive predictive value (PPV) was 46.1% for MM and 85.7% for LM and negative predictive value (NPV) of 95% for MM and 96% for LM. The sensitivity for the anterior cruciate ligament was 83.3%, specificity was 77.7%, PPV was 45.4% and NPV was 95.4%. Three dimensional double-echo steady state sequences are useful in evaluating internal derangement of the knee, especially in advanced cartilage lesions. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal pituitary gland using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences (REV 1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portman, Olivia; Flemming, Stephen; Cox, Jeremy P.D.; Johnston, Desmond G. [Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, St Mary' s Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Bydder, Graeme M. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the normal pituitary gland in male subjects with ultrashort echo time (TE) pulse sequences, describe its appearance and measure its signal intensity before and after contrast enhancement. Eleven male volunteers (mean age 57.1 years; range 36-81 years) were examined with a fat-suppressed ultrashort TE (= 0.08 ms) pulse sequence. The studies were repeated after the administration of intravenous gadodiamide. The MR scans were examined for gland morphology and signal intensity before and after enhancement. Endocrinological evaluation included baseline pituitary function tests and a glucagon stimulatory test to assess pituitary cortisol and growth hormone reserve. High signal intensity was observed in the anterior pituitary relative to the brain in nine of the 11 subjects. These regions involved the whole of the anterior pituitary in three subjects, were localised to one side in two examples and were seen inferiorly in three subjects. Signal intensities relative to the brain increased with age, with a peak around the sixth or seventh decade and decreasing thereafter. Overall, the pituitary function tests were considered to be within normal limits and did not correlate with pituitary gland signal intensity. The anterior pituitary shows increased signal intensity in normal subjects when examined with T{sub 1}-weighted ultrashort TE pulse sequences. The cause of this increased intensity is unknown, but fibrosis and iron deposition are possible candidates. The variation in signal intensity with age followed the temporal pattern of iron content observed at post mortem. No relationship with endocrine status was observed. (orig.)

  7. The induced earthquake sequence related to the St. Gallen deep geothermal project (Switzerland): Fault reactivation and fluid interactions imaged by microseismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, T.; Kraft, T.; Kissling, E.; Wiemer, S.

    2017-09-01

    In July 2013, a sequence of more than 340 earthquakes was induced by reservoir stimulations and well-control procedures following a gas kick at a deep geothermal drilling project close to the city of St. Gallen, Switzerland. The sequence culminated in an ML 3.5 earthquake, which was felt within 10-15 km from the epicenter. High-quality earthquake locations and 3-D reflection seismic data acquired in the St. Gallen project provide a unique data set, which allows high-resolution studies of earthquake triggering related to the injection of fluids into macroscopic fault zones. In this study, we present a high-precision earthquake catalog of the induced sequence. Absolute locations are constrained by a coupled hypocenter-velocity inversion, and subsequent double-difference relocations image the geometry of the ML 3.5 rupture and resolve the spatiotemporal evolution of seismicity. A joint interpretation of earthquake and seismic data shows that the majority of the seismicity occurred in the pre-Mesozoic basement, hundreds of meters below the borehole and the targeted Mesozoic sequence. We propose a hydraulic connectivity between the reactivated fault and the borehole, likely through faults mapped by seismic data. Despite the excellent quality of the seismic data, the association of seismicity with mapped faults remains ambiguous. In summary, our results document that the actual hydraulic properties of a fault system and hydraulic connections between its fault segments are complex and may not be predictable upfront. Incomplete knowledge of fault structures and stress heterogeneities within highly complex fault systems additionally challenge the degree of predictability of induced seismicity related to underground fluid injections.

  8. Faster pediatric 3-T abdominal magnetic resonance imaging: comparison between conventional and variable refocusing flip-angle single-shot fast spin-echo sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Loening, Andreas M; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Litwiller, Daniel V; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2015-06-01

    Single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) is particularly appealing in pediatric patients because of its motion robustness. However radiofrequency energy deposition at 3 tesla forces long pauses between slices, leading to longer scans, longer breath-holds and more between-slice motion. We sought to learn whether modulation of the SSFSE refocusing flip-angle train could reduce radiofrequency energy deposition without degrading image quality, thereby reducing inter-slice pauses and overall scan times. We modulated the refocusing flip-angle train for SSFSE to minimize energy deposition while minimizing blurring and motion-related signal loss. In a cohort of 50 consecutive patients (25 boys, mean age 5.5 years, range 1 month to 17 years) referred for abdominal MRI we obtained standard SSFSE and variable refocusing flip-angle (vrfSSFSE) images and recorded sequence scan times. Two readers independently scored the images in blinded, randomized order for noise, tissue contrast, sharpness, artifacts and left lobe hepatic signal uniformity on a four-point scale. The null hypothesis of no difference between SSFSE and vrfSSFSE image-quality was assessed with a Mann-Whitney U test, and the null hypothesis of no scan time difference was assessed with the paired t-test. SSFSE and vrfSSFSE mean acquisition times were 54.3 and 26.2 s, respectively (P-value <0.0001). For each reader, SSFSE and vrfSSFSE noise, tissue contrast, sharpness and artifacts were not significantly different (P-values 0.18-0.86). However, SSFSE had better left lobe hepatic signal uniformity (P < 0.01, both readers). vrfSSFSE is twice as fast as SSFSE, with equivalent image quality with the exception of left hepatic lobe signal heterogeneity.

  9. Faster pediatric 3-T abdominal magnetic resonance imaging: comparison between conventional and variable refocusing flip-angle single-shot fast spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Loening, Andreas M.; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Litwiller, Daniel V.

    2015-01-01

    Single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) is particularly appealing in pediatric patients because of its motion robustness. However radiofrequency energy deposition at 3 tesla forces long pauses between slices, leading to longer scans, longer breath-holds and more between-slice motion. We sought to learn whether modulation of the SSFSE refocusing flip-angle train could reduce radiofrequency energy deposition without degrading image quality, thereby reducing inter-slice pauses and overall scan times. We modulated the refocusing flip-angle train for SSFSE to minimize energy deposition while minimizing blurring and motion-related signal loss. In a cohort of 50 consecutive patients (25 boys, mean age 5.5 years, range 1 month to 17 years) referred for abdominal MRI we obtained standard SSFSE and variable refocusing flip-angle (vrfSSFSE) images and recorded sequence scan times. Two readers independently scored the images in blinded, randomized order for noise, tissue contrast, sharpness, artifacts and left lobe hepatic signal uniformity on a four-point scale. The null hypothesis of no difference between SSFSE and vrfSSFSE image-quality was assessed with a Mann-Whitney U test, and the null hypothesis of no scan time difference was assessed with the paired t-test. SSFSE and vrfSSFSE mean acquisition times were 54.3 and 26.2 s, respectively (P-value <0.0001). For each reader, SSFSE and vrfSSFSE noise, tissue contrast, sharpness and artifacts were not significantly different (P-values 0.18-0.86). However, SSFSE had better left lobe hepatic signal uniformity (P < 0.01, both readers). vrfSSFSE is twice as fast as SSFSE, with equivalent image quality with the exception of left hepatic lobe signal heterogeneity. (orig.)

  10. Faster pediatric 3-T abdominal magnetic resonance imaging: comparison between conventional and variable refocusing flip-angle single-shot fast spin-echo sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan [Mahidol University, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Stanford University, LPCH Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Loening, Andreas M.; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Vasanawala, Shreyas S. [Stanford University, LPCH Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Litwiller, Daniel V. [GE Healthcare, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) is particularly appealing in pediatric patients because of its motion robustness. However radiofrequency energy deposition at 3 tesla forces long pauses between slices, leading to longer scans, longer breath-holds and more between-slice motion. We sought to learn whether modulation of the SSFSE refocusing flip-angle train could reduce radiofrequency energy deposition without degrading image quality, thereby reducing inter-slice pauses and overall scan times. We modulated the refocusing flip-angle train for SSFSE to minimize energy deposition while minimizing blurring and motion-related signal loss. In a cohort of 50 consecutive patients (25 boys, mean age 5.5 years, range 1 month to 17 years) referred for abdominal MRI we obtained standard SSFSE and variable refocusing flip-angle (vrfSSFSE) images and recorded sequence scan times. Two readers independently scored the images in blinded, randomized order for noise, tissue contrast, sharpness, artifacts and left lobe hepatic signal uniformity on a four-point scale. The null hypothesis of no difference between SSFSE and vrfSSFSE image-quality was assessed with a Mann-Whitney U test, and the null hypothesis of no scan time difference was assessed with the paired t-test. SSFSE and vrfSSFSE mean acquisition times were 54.3 and 26.2 s, respectively (P-value <0.0001). For each reader, SSFSE and vrfSSFSE noise, tissue contrast, sharpness and artifacts were not significantly different (P-values 0.18-0.86). However, SSFSE had better left lobe hepatic signal uniformity (P < 0.01, both readers). vrfSSFSE is twice as fast as SSFSE, with equivalent image quality with the exception of left hepatic lobe signal heterogeneity. (orig.)

  11. A Pilot Study to Examine Exposure to Residential Radon in Under-Sampled Census Tracts of DeKalb County, Georgia, in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Christine E; Dai, Dajun; Chan, Sydney R; Diem, Jeremy E; Weaver, Scott R; Rothenberg, Richard

    2017-03-22

    While DeKalb County, Georgia, offers free radon screening for all eligible residents, portions of the county remain relatively under-sampled. This pilot study focused on 10% of the census tracts in the county with the lowest proportion of radon testing; most were in southern DeKalb County. In total, 217 households were recruited and homes were tested for indoor radon concentrations on the lowest livable floor over an eight-week period from March-May 2015. Tract-level characteristics were examined to understand the differences in socio-demographic and economic factors between the pilot study area and the rest of the county. The pilot study tracts had a higher proportion of African Americans compared to the rest of DeKalb County (82% versus 47%). Radon was detected above 11.1 Bq/m³ (0.3 pCi/L) in 73% of the indoor samples and 4% of samples were above 148 Bq/m³ (4 pCi/L). Having a basement was the strongest predictive factor for detectable and hazardous levels of radon. Radon screening can identify problems and spur homeowners to remediate but more research should be done to identify why screening rates vary across the county and how that varies with radon levels in homes to reduce radon exposure.

  12. Parallel variable-density spiral imaging using nonlocal total variation reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Sheng; Guo Hua

    2014-01-01

    The relatively long scan time is still a bottleneck for both clinical applications and research of magnetic resonance imaging. To reduce the data acquisition time, we propose a novel fast magnetic resonance imaging method based on parallel variable-density spiral acquisition, which combines undersampling optimization and nonlocal total variation reconstruction. The undersampling optimization promotes the incoherence of resultant aliasing artifact via the ''worst-case'' residual error metric, and thus accelerates the data acquisition. Moreover, nonlocal total variation reconstruction is utilized to remove such an incoherent aliasing artifact and so improve image quality. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by both numerical phantom simulation and in vivo experiment. The experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve high acceleration factor and effectively remove an aliasing artifact from data undersampling with well-preserved image details. The image quality is better than that achieved with the total variation method. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Intensity-based bayesian framework for image reconstruction from sparse projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, E.A.; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Bayesian framework for iterative image reconstruction from projection data measured over a limited number of views. The classical Nyquist sampling rule yields the minimum number of projection views required for accurate reconstruction. However, challenges exist in many medical and industrial imaging applications in which the projection data is undersampled. Classical analytical reconstruction methods such as filtered backprojection (FBP) are not a good choice for use in such cases because the data undersampling in the angular range introduces aliasing and streak artifacts that degrade lesion detectability. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian framework for maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM)-based iterative reconstruction methods that incorporates a priori knowledge obtained from expected intensity information. The proposed framework is based on the fact that, in tomographic imaging, it is often possible to expect a set of intensity values of the reconstructed object with relatively high accuracy. The image reconstruction cost function is modified to include the l 1 norm distance to the a priori known information. The proposed method has the potential to regularize the solution to reduce artifacts without missing lesions that cannot be expected from the a priori information. Numerical studies showed a significant improvement in image quality and lesion detectability under the condition of highly undersampled projection data. (author)

  14. Evaluation of metal artifacts in clinical MR images of patients with total hip arthroplasty using different metal artifact-reducing sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gunilla M; Lundin, Björn; von Schewelov, Thord; Müller, Markus F; Ekberg, Olle; Månsson, Sven

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the distortion and artifact area of metal in MR images and to compare artifact reduction using different metal artifact-reducing sequences in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) and non-MoM total hip prostheses. Thirty-six MoM and 15 non-MoM prostheses were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using T1-weighted (T1-w) sequences: turbo spin echo (TSE) high-readout bandwidth (hiBW), T1-w; TSE view angle tilting (VAT), T1-w; TSE VAT + slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC); short tau inversion recovery (STIR) hiBW or matched RF pulses (mRFp). Distortion was quantified using a new method measuring the acetabular roof angle (ARA). The artifact area was defined in the mid-coronal plane of the artifact. The T1 VAT + SEMAC sequence showed the least distortion compared to T1 VAT and T1-hiBW (150°, 127° and 102°, p < 0.001, in MoM; 152°, 143° and 128°, p ≤ 0.014, in non-MoM). The artifact area was smaller in MoM prostheses using the T1 VAT sequence compared to T1 hiBW and T1 VAT + SEMAC (2506 mm(2), 3160 mm(2) and 3214 mm(2), p < 0.001) and smaller in non-MoM prostheses using T1 VAT compared to T1-hiBW (4296 mm(2) and 4831 mm(2), p = 0.041). STIR-mRFp substantially reduced the artifact size compared with STIR-hiBW (MoM 4559 mm(2) and 6323 mm(2); non-MoM 5625 mm(2) and 8764 mm(2), p < 0.001). Metal artifacts in MR imaging examinations of hip prostheses can be evaluated for distortion using a distortion angle (ARA) and the degree of signal artifact as determined by measuring the largest cross-sectional artifact area. T1 VAT + SEMAC showed the least distortion; T1 VAT and STIR-mRFp were most efficient for reduction of the artifact area.

  15. Study of the voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer's disease imaging sequence after magnetic resonance apparatus replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukagoshi, Yuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Yasui, Gou; Abe, Yuuji; Maemura, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yamaji, Yuugo; Mihara, Ban

    2012-01-01

    In our institute, an MR apparatus, MAGNETOM VISION (Siemens) was replaced by ECHELON Vega (HITACHI). Z-score data acquired by MPRAGE (VISION) was compared with those by radio frequency-spoiled steady-state acquisition with rewinded gradient echo (RSSG) and gradient echo inversion recovery (GEIR) (ECHELON). For this study, ten normal volunteers were recruited and their data ware obtained within two months using both apparatuses. In addition, the difference of the contrasts of the images of these apparatuses was compared. There was a significant difference between Z-scores of MPRAGE and RSSG while there was no difference between MPRAGE and GEIR. As for the contrast, data of MPRAGE were similar to those of GEIR. To compare Z-scores acquired with MAGNTOM VISION (Siemens), it seems appropriate to use GEIR in ECHELON Vega. (author)

  16. Assessment of myocardial infarction in mice by Late Gadolinium Enhancement MR imaging using an inversion recovery pulse sequence at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlihy Amy H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using an inversion recovery pulse sequence and to define the optimal inversion time (TI to assess myocardial infarction in mice by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE MRI at 9.4T, and to obtain the maximal contrast between the infarcted and the viable myocardium. Methods MRI was performed at 9.4T in mice, two days after induction of myocardial infarction (n = 4. For cardiovascular MR imaging, a segmented magnetization-prepared fast low angle shot (MP-FLASH sequence was used with varied TIs ranging from 40 to 420 ms following administration of gadolinium-DTPA at 0.6 mmol/kg. Contrast-to-noise (CNR and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured and compared for each myocardial region of interest (ROI. Results The optimal TI, which corresponded to a minimum SNR in the normal myocardium, was 268 ms ± 27.3. The SNR in the viable myocardium was significantly different from that found in the infarcted myocardium (17.2 ± 2.4 vs 82.1 ± 10.8; p = 0.006 leading to a maximal relative SI (Signal Intensity between those two areas (344.9 ± 60.4. Conclusion Despite the rapid heart rate in mice, our study demonstrates that LGE MRI can be performed at 9.4T using a protocol similar to the one used for clinical MR diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  17. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces imaging using a pulse-triggered three-dimensional turbo spin echo MR sequence with variable flip-angle distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Silvera, Jonathan [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Bekaert, Olivier; Decq, Philippe [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Radiology, Creteil (France); Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Public Health, Creteil (France); Vignaud, Alexandre [Siemens Healthcare, Saint Denis (France); Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno [Laboratoire Images Signaux et Systemes Intelligents, UPEC, Creteil (France)

    2011-02-15

    To assess the three-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip-angle distribution magnetic resonance sequence (SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimised Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution) for the imaging of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces. We prospectively investigated 18 healthy volunteers and 25 patients, 20 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH), five with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), using the SPACE sequence at 1.5T. Volume rendering views of both intracranial and ventricular CSF were obtained for all patients and volunteers. The subarachnoid CSF distribution was qualitatively evaluated on volume rendering views using a four-point scale. The CSF volumes within total, ventricular and subarachnoid spaces were calculated as well as the ratio between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes. Three different patterns of subarachnoid CSF distribution were observed. In healthy volunteers we found narrowed CSF spaces within the occipital aera. A diffuse narrowing of the subarachnoid CSF spaces was observed in patients with NCH whereas patients with CH exhibited narrowed CSF spaces within the high midline convexity. The ratios between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes were significantly different among the volunteers, patients with CH and patients with NCH. The assessment of CSF spaces volume and distribution may help to characterise hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  18. Sparse BLIP: BLind Iterative Parallel imaging reconstruction using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Huajun; Chen, Rong-Rong; Liang, Dong; DiBella, Edward V R; Ying, Leslie

    2014-02-01

    To develop a sensitivity-based parallel imaging reconstruction method to reconstruct iteratively both the coil sensitivities and MR image simultaneously based on their prior information. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction problem can be formulated as a multichannel sampling problem where solutions are sought analytically. However, the channel functions given by the coil sensitivities in parallel imaging are not known exactly and the estimation error usually leads to artifacts. In this study, we propose a new reconstruction algorithm, termed Sparse BLind Iterative Parallel, for blind iterative parallel imaging reconstruction using compressed sensing. The proposed algorithm reconstructs both the sensitivity functions and the image simultaneously from undersampled data. It enforces the sparseness constraint in the image as done in compressed sensing, but is different from compressed sensing in that the sensing matrix is unknown and additional constraint is enforced on the sensitivities as well. Both phantom and in vivo imaging experiments were carried out with retrospective undersampling to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Experiments show improvement in Sparse BLind Iterative Parallel reconstruction when compared with Sparse SENSE, JSENSE, IRGN-TV, and L1-SPIRiT reconstructions with the same number of measurements. The proposed Sparse BLind Iterative Parallel algorithm reduces the reconstruction errors when compared to the state-of-the-art parallel imaging methods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. T2-weighted MR imaging of liver lesions: a prospective evaluation comparing turbo spin-echo, breath-hold turbo spin-echo and half-Fourier turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Villajos, M.; Oses, M. J.; Veintemillas, M.; Rue, M.; Puig, J.; Sentis, M.

    2000-01-01

    To compare turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences quantitatively and qualitatively in T2-weighted images of liver lesions. The authors evaluated prospectively 89 liver lesions in 73 patients using a 1.0-T magnetic resonance system to compare TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences. The quantitative parameters were: lesion-to-liver contrast and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative analysis was performed by two observers in consensus who examined four parameters: respiratory artifacts, lesion edge definition, intrahepatic vessel definition and image quality. Repeated measures analysis of variance was utilized to compare the quantitative variables and Friedman's nonparametric test for the qualitative parameters. In quantitative terms, the lesion-to-liver contrast was similar in TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (2.45±1.44 versus 2.60±1.66), both of which were significantly better than the HASTE sequence (1.12±0.72; p<0.001). The lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher in the TSE sequence (62.60±46.40 versus 40.22±25.35 versus 50.90±32.10 for TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, respectively; p<0.001). In the qualitative comparisons, the HASTE sequence was significantly better than the TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (p<0.001) in terms of artifacts and definition of lesion edge and intrahepatic vessels. Image quality was also significantly greater in the HASTE sequence (p<0.001). In quantitative terms, the TSE sequence is better than the breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, but there are no movement artifacts in the HASTE sequence, which is also significantly superior to TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences in qualitative terms and, thus, can be employed for T2-weighted images in liver studies. (Author) 17 refs

  20. Fast T1 and T2 mapping methods: the zoomed U-FLARE sequence compared with EPI and snapshot-FLASH for abdominal imaging at 11.7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Géraldine; Jiménez-González, María; Plaza-García, Sandra; Beraza, Marta; Reese, Torsten

    2017-06-01

    A newly adapted zoomed ultrafast low-angle RARE (U-FLARE) sequence is described for abdominal imaging applications at 11.7 Tesla and compared with the standard echo-plannar imaging (EPI) and snapshot fast low angle shot (FLASH) methods. Ultrafast EPI and snapshot-FLASH protocols were evaluated to determine relaxation times in phantoms and in the mouse kidney in vivo. Owing to their apparent shortcomings, imaging artefacts, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and variability in the determination of relaxation times, these methods are compared with the newly implemented zoomed U-FLARE sequence. Snapshot-FLASH has a lower SNR when compared with the zoomed U-FLARE sequence and EPI. The variability in the measurement of relaxation times is higher in the Look-Locker sequences than in inversion recovery experiments. Respectively, the average T1 and T2 values at 11.7 Tesla are as follows: kidney cortex, 1810 and 29 ms; kidney medulla, 2100 and 25 ms; subcutaneous tumour, 2365 and 28 ms. This study demonstrates that the zoomed U-FLARE sequence yields single-shot single-slice images with good anatomical resolution and high SNR at 11.7 Tesla. Thus, it offers a viable alternative to standard protocols for mapping very fast parameters, such as T1 and T2, or dynamic processes in vivo at high field.

  1. Three-dimensional surface microtopography recovery from a multifocus image sequence using an omnidirectional modified Laplacian operator with adaptive window size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingzhong; Hu, Huijuan; Cui, Haoyang; Yang, Shouchen; Qi, Ji; Xu, Zhiming; Li, Long

    2017-08-01

    Optical microscopy enables the observation of highly magnified objects and material structures on microsurfaces, but it can only acquire 2D images. In order to observe areal features more accurately and intuitively, 3D surface microtopography recovery has been applied to form a 3D surface model of an object from its 2D image sequence. In the 3D reconstruction of the focus evaluation operator, we have the gray variance operator, the gray-scale difference absolute sum operator, the Roberts gradient operator, the Tenengrad gradient operator, the improved Laplace operator, etc. There are two problems with these operators: one is that there is no difference between (x,y) and the gray scale of the pixel in the diagonal direction in the field and the other is that the window size of the focus evaluation operator is fixed, e.g., 3×3, 5×5, etc. Thus, the size of the window for each pixel in the image is the same, and the small window may not cover enough field information while being vulnerable to noise. Large windows can cover more information, but they may result in a smoothing phenomenon, which affects the accuracy of the model. Different pixels around the field have different pixel colors when the size of the window is not the same. Therefore, this paper proposes a modified omnidirectional Laplacian operator with an adaptive window to automatically adjust the size of the window according to the color difference within the window. This also takes into consideration the pixels in the diagonal direction. In addition, very comprehensive verification experiments proved the conclusions.

  2. SEARCHING FOR YOUNG JUPITER ANALOGS AROUND AP COL: L-BAND HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OF THE CLOSEST PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Meyer, Michael R. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Crepp, Justin R.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Janson, Markus, E-mail: quanz@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The nearby M-dwarf AP Col was recently identified by Riedel et al. as a pre-main-sequence star (age 12-50 Myr) situated only 8.4 pc from the Sun. The combination of its youth, distance, and intrinsically low luminosity make it an ideal target to search for extrasolar planets using direct imaging. We report deep adaptive optics observations of AP Col taken with VLT/NACO and Keck/NIRC2 in the L band. Using aggressive speckle suppression and background subtraction techniques, we are able to rule out companions with mass m {>=} 0.5-1 M{sub Jup} for projected separations a > 4.5 AU, and m {>=} 2 M{sub Jup} for projected separations as small as 3 AU, assuming an age of 40 Myr using the COND theoretical evolutionary models. Using a different set of models, the mass limits increase by a factor of {approx}>2. The observations presented here are the deepest mass-sensitivity limits yet achieved within 20 AU on a star with direct imaging. While Doppler radial velocity surveys have shown that Jovian bodies with close-in orbits are rare around M-dwarfs, gravitational microlensing studies predict that 17{sup +6}{sub -9}% of these stars host massive planets with orbital separations of 1-10 AU. Sensitive high-contrast imaging observations, like those presented here, will help to validate results from complementary detection techniques by determining the frequency of gas giant planets on wide orbits around M-dwarfs.

  3. Inter frame motion estimation and its application to image sequence compression: an introduction; Estimacion del movimiento Interframe y su aplicacion a la compresion de secuencias de imagenes: una introduccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremy, C.

    1996-12-01

    With the constant development of new communication technologies like, digital TV, teleconference, and the development of image analysis applications, there is a growing volume of data to manage. Compression techniques are required for the transmission and storage of these data. Dealing with original images would require the use of expansive high bandwidth communication devices and huge storage media. Image sequence compression can be achieved by means of inter frame estimation that consists in retrieving redundant information relative to zones where there is little motion between two frames. This paper is an introduction to some motion estimation techniques like gradient techniques, pel-recursive, block-matching, and its application to image sequence compression. (Author)

  4. Inter frame motion estimation and its application to image sequence compression: an introduction; Estimacion del movimiento interframe y su aplicacion en la compresion de secuencias de imagenes: una introduccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremy, C.

    1996-07-01

    With the constant development of new communication technologies like, digital TV, teleconference, and the development of image analysis applications, there is a growing volume of data to manage. Compression techniques are required for the transmission and storage of these data. Dealing with original images would require the use of expansive high bandwidth communication devices and huge storage media. Image sequence compression can be achieved by means of interframe estimation that consists in retrieving redundant information relative to zones where there is little motion between two frames. This paper is an introduction to some motion estimation techniques like gradient techniques, pel-recursive, block-matching, and its application to image sequence compression. (Author) 17 refs.

  5. Contribution to the tracking and the 3D reconstruction of scenes composed of torus from image sequences a acquired by a moving camera; Contribution au suivi et a la reconstruction de scenes constituees d`objet toriques a partir de sequences d`images acquises par une camera mobile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudet, S

    1997-01-31

    The three-dimensional perception of the environment is often necessary for a robot to correctly perform its tasks. One solution, based on the dynamic vision, consists in analysing time-varying monocular images to estimate the spatial geometry of the scene. This thesis deals with the reconstruction of torus by dynamic vision. Though this object class is restrictive, it enables to tackle the problem of reconstruction of bent pipes usually encountered in industrial environments. The proposed method is based on the evolution of apparent contours of objects in the sequence. Using the expression of torus limb boundaries, it is possible to recursively estimate the object three-dimensional parameters by minimising the error between the predicted projected contours and the image contours. This process, which is performed by a Kalman filter, does not need a precise knowledge of the camera displacement or any matching of the tow limbs belonging to the same object. To complete this work, temporal tracking of objects which deals with occlusion situations is proposed. The approach consists in modeling and interpreting the apparent motion of objects in the successive images. The motion interpretation, based on a simplified representation of the scene, allows to recover pertinent three-dimensional information which is used to manage occlusion situations. Experiments, on synthetic and real images, proves he validity of the tracking and the reconstruction processes. (author) 127 refs.

  6. Free-breathing radial 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient echo sequence: a viable alternative for contrast-enhanced liver imaging in patients unable to suspend respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Tobias K; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lim, Ruth P; Kim, Danny; Mossa, David J; Babb, James S; Kiefer, Berthold; Lee, Vivian S

    2011-10-01

    : To compare free-breathing radially sampled 3D fat suppressed T1-weighted gradient-echo acquisitions (radial volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination [VIBE]) with breath-hold (BH) and free-breathing conventional (rectilinearly sampled k-space) VIBE acquisitions for postcontrast imaging of the liver. : Eighteen consecutive patients referred for clinically indicated liver magnetic resonance imaging were imaged at 3 T. Three minutes after a single dose of gadolinium contrast injection, free-breathing radial VIBE, BH VIBE, and free-breathing VIBE with 4 averages were acquired in random order with matching sequence parameters. Radial VIBE was acquired with the "stack-of-stars" scheme, which uses conventional sampling in the slice direction and radial sampling in-plane.All image data sets were evaluated independently by 3 radiologists blinded to patient and sequence information. Each reader scored the following parameters: overall image quality, respiratory motion artifact, pulsation artifact, liver edge sharpness, and hepatic vessel clarity using a 5-point scale, with the highest score indicating the most optimum examination. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to compare sequences in terms of each measure of image quality. : When scores were averaged over readers, there was no statistically significant difference between radial VIBE and BH VIBE regarding overall image quality (P = 0.1015), respiratory motion artifact (P = 1.0), and liver edge sharpness (P = 0.2955). Radial VIBE demonstrated significantly lower pulsation artifact (P breathing VIBE (P breathing radial VIBE and conventional VIBE with multiple averages was 56 seconds each. : Radial VIBE can be performed during free breathing for contrast-enhanced imaging of the liver with comparable image quality to BH VIBE. However, further work is necessary to shorten the acquisition time to perform dynamic imaging.

  7. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  8. Advances in non-Cartesian parallel magnetic resonance imaging using the GRAPPA operator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiberlich, Nicole

    2008-07-21

    This thesis has presented several new non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods which simplify both gridding and the reconstruction of images from undersampled data. A novel approach which uses the concepts of parallel imaging to grid data sampled along a non-Cartesian trajectory called GRAPPA Operator Gridding (GROG) is described. GROG shifts any acquired k-space data point to its nearest Cartesian location, thereby converting non-Cartesian to Cartesian data. The only requirements for GROG are a multi-channel acquisition and a calibration dataset for the determination of the GROG weights. Then an extension of GRAPPA Operator Gridding, namely Self-Calibrating GRAPPA Operator Gridding (SC-GROG) is discussed. SC-GROG is a method by which non-Cartesian data can be gridded using spatial information from a multi-channel coil array without the need for an additional calibration dataset, as required in standard GROG. Although GROG can be used to grid undersampled datasets, it is important to note that this method uses parallel imaging only for gridding, and not to reconstruct artifact-free images from undersampled data. Thereafter a simple, novel method for performing modified Cartesian GRAPPA reconstructions on undersampled non-Cartesian k-space data gridded using GROG to arrive at a non-aliased image is introduced. Because the undersampled non-Cartesian data cannot be reconstructed using a single GRAPPA kernel, several Cartesian patterns are selected for the reconstruction. Finally a novel method of using GROG to mimic the bunched phase encoding acquisition (BPE) scheme is discussed. In MRI, it is generally assumed that an artifact-free image can be reconstructed only from sampled points which fulfill the Nyquist criterion. However, the BPE reconstruction is based on the Generalized Sampling Theorem of Papoulis, which states that a continuous signal can be reconstructed from sampled points as long as the points are on average sampled at the Nyquist frequency. A novel

  9. Advances in non-Cartesian parallel magnetic resonance imaging using the GRAPPA operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiberlich, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    This thesis has presented several new non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods which simplify both gridding and the reconstruction of images from undersampled data. A novel approach which uses the concepts of parallel imaging to grid data sampled along a non-Cartesian trajectory called GRAPPA Operator Gridding (GROG) is described. GROG shifts any acquired k-space data point to its nearest Cartesian location, thereby converting non-Cartesian to Cartesian data. The only requirements for GROG are a multi-channel acquisition and a calibration dataset for the determination of the GROG weights. Then an extension of GRAPPA Operator Gridding, namely Self-Calibrating GRAPPA Operator Gridding (SC-GROG) is discussed. SC-GROG is a method by which non-Cartesian data can be gridded using spatial information from a multi-channel coil array without the need for an additional calibration dataset, as required in standard GROG. Although GROG can be used to grid undersampled datasets, it is important to note that this method uses parallel imaging only for gridding, and not to reconstruct artifact-free images from undersampled data. Thereafter a simple, novel method for performing modified Cartesian GRAPPA reconstructions on undersampled non-Cartesian k-space data gridded using GROG to arrive at a non-aliased image is introduced. Because the undersampled non-Cartesian data cannot be reconstructed using a single GRAPPA kernel, several Cartesian patterns are selected for the reconstruction. Finally a novel method of using GROG to mimic the bunched phase encoding acquisition (BPE) scheme is discussed. In MRI, it is generally assumed that an artifact-free image can be reconstructed only from sampled points which fulfill the Nyquist criterion. However, the BPE reconstruction is based on the Generalized Sampling Theorem of Papoulis, which states that a continuous signal can be reconstructed from sampled points as long as the points are on average sampled at the Nyquist frequency. A novel

  10. What Is the Natural History of "Asymptomatic" Pseudotumours in Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasty? Minimum 4-Year Metal Artifact Reduction Sequence Magnetic Resonance Imaging Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Liow, Ming Han Lincoln; Dimitriou, Dimitris; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Freiberg, Andrew A; Rubash, Harry E

    2016-09-01

    Metal Artifact Reduction Sequence Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MARS-MRI) is an important cross-sectional imaging modality in detection of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasty (HA) pseudotumours. Potential evolution of pseudotumours detected by MARS-MRI in "asymptomatic" patients with MoMHA arthroplasty beyond 2 years remains largely unknown. The aims of this longitudinal study were to (1) determine the natural history of pseudotumours in "asymptomatic" MoMHA patients under MARS-MRI surveillance and (2) characterize MRI feature(s) associated with progressive pseudotumours. A total of 37 MoMHA (32 patients, mean 56 years old) with pseudotumours on MARS-MRI were evaluated longitudinally using a standardized MARS-MRI protocol. Serum cobalt and chromium levels, pseudotumour size, thickness of the cyst wall, and MRI signal intensity of the abnormality were recorded and analyzed. At minimum of 4-year follow-up (range 49-54 months), 4 Type II pseudotumours (11%) demonstrated MRI evidence of progression. Five Type I pseudotumours (14%) were found to have "regressed." No measurable MRI progression was detected in remaining patients (75%). MRI features associated with progressive pseudotumours included the presence of increased cystic wall thickness and "atypical" mixed fluid signal. MRI pseudotumour progression was not associated with metal ion levels. The natural history of type I cystic pseudotumours continues to be nonprogressive in most "asymptomatic" MoMHA patients at minimum 4 years, suggesting the importance of patient symptoms and MRI characteristic features in the clinical decision-making process. Routine follow-up MARS-MRI evaluation of "asymptomatic" patients with low-grade cystic pseudotumours in the absence of interval clinical changes may not be indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diffusion-prepared stimulated-echo turbo spin echo (DPsti-TSE): An eddy current-insensitive sequence for three-dimensional high-resolution and undistorted diffusion-weighted imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Qinwei; Coolen, Bram F.; Versluis, Maarten J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we present a new three-dimensional (3D), diffusion-prepared turbo spin echo sequence based on a stimulated-echo read-out (DPsti-TSE) enabling high-resolution and undistorted diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). A dephasing gradient in the diffusion preparation module and rephasing

  12. Considerations in applying compressed sensing to in vivo phosphorus MR spectroscopic imaging of human brain at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatay, Gokce Hale; Yildirim, Muhammed; Ozturk-Isik, Esin

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply compressed sensing method for accelerated phosphorus MR spectroscopic imaging ( 31 P-MRSI) of human brain in vivo at 3T. Fast 31 P-MRSI data of five volunteers were acquired on a 3T clinical MR scanner using pulse-acquire sequence with a pseudorandom undersampling pattern for a data reduction factor of 5.33 and were reconstructed using compressed sensing. Additionally, simulated 31 P-MRSI human brain tumor datasets were created to analyze the effects of k-space sampling pattern, data matrix size, regularization parameters of the reconstruction, and noise on the compressed sensing accelerated 31 P-MRSI data. The 31 P metabolite peak ratios of the full and compressed sensing accelerated datasets of healthy volunteers in vivo were similar according to the results of a Bland-Altman test. The estimated effective spatial resolution increased with reduction factor and sampling more at the k-space center. A lower regularization parameter for both total variation and L1-norm penalties resulted in a better compressed sensing reconstruction of 31 P-MRSI. Although the root-mean-square error increased with noise levels, the compressed sensing reconstruction was robust for up to a reduction factor of 10 for the simulated data that had sharply defined tumor borders. As a result, compressed sensing was successfully applied to accelerate 31 P-MRSI of human brain in vivo at 3T.

  13. MR selective flow-tracking cartography: a postprocessing procedure applied to four-dimensional flow MR imaging for complete characterization of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edjlali, Myriam; Roca, Pauline; Rabrait, Cécile; Trystram, Denis; Rodriguez-Régent, Christine; Johnson, Kevin M; Wieben, Oliver; Turski, Patrick; Meder, Jean-François; Naggara, Olivier; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a selective flow-tracking cartographic procedure applied to four-dimensional (4D) flow imaging and to demonstrate its usefulness in the characterization of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs). Institutional review board approval was obtained, and all patients provided written informed consent. Eight patients (nine DAVFs) underwent 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Imaging examinations were performed within 24 hours of each other. 4D flow MR imaging was performed by using a 4D radial phase-contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction pulse sequence with an isotropic spatial resolution of 0.86 mm (5 minutes 35 seconds). Two radiologists independently reviewed images from MR flow-tracking cartography and reported the location of arterial feeder vessels and the venous drainage type and classified DAVFs according to the risk of rupture (Cognard classification). These results were compared with those at DSA. Quadratic weighted κ statistics with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to test intermodality agreement in the identification of arterial feeder vessels, draining veins, and Cognard classification. Interreader agreement for shunt location on MR images was perfect (κ = 1), with good-to-excellent interreader agreement for arterial feeder vessel identification (κ = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.92, 1.0), and matched in all cases with shunt location defined at DSA. There was good-to-excellent agreement between MR cartography and DSA in the definition of the main feeding arteries (κ = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.83, 1.0), presence of retrograde flow in dural sinuses (κ = 1), presence of retrograde cortical venous drainage (κ = 1), presence of venous ectasia (κ = 1), and final Cognard classification of DAVFs (κ = 1, standard error = 0.35). MR selective flow-tracking cartography enabled the noninvasive characterization of cranial DAVFs. © RSNA, 2013.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: a comparison of four sequences; Valoracion del ligamento cruzado anterior de la rodilla con RM: comparacion de cuatro secuencias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casillas, C.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Molla, E.; Ferrer, P.; Dosda, R. [Clinical Quiron-ATQ. Valencia (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    To compare the diagnostic efficacy of the four magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences that compose the standard protocol for the study of the knee in our center when employed in the examination of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A prospective study was carried out based on MRI findings in the knees of 326 consecutive patients. Sagittal [proton density (PD{sub w}eighted turbo-spin-echo and T2*-weighted gradient echo], coronal (PD-weighted turbo-spin-echo with fat suppression) and transverse (T2*-weighted gradient echo with magnetization transfer) images were evaluated. Each sequence was analyzed independently by two radiologists, while another two assessed all the sequences together with the clinical findings. Four categories were established: normal ACL, partially torn, completely torn and synovialized. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) with respect to the definitive diagnosis were calculated for each sequence. The statistical analysis of the findings for each category was done using the chi-squared test and the Kappa test was employed to assess the degree of agreement. According to the final diagnosis, 263 ACL were normal, 29 were partially torn, 33 were completely torn and there was 1 case of synovialization associated with a completely torn ACL. The relationship between the analysis of the ACL according to each sequence and the definitive diagnosis was very significant (p<0.001) and the agreement was excellent. All the sequences presented similar levels of diagnostic precision. The coronal sequence had least number of diagnostic errors (2.1%). The combinations of imaging techniques that resulted in the lowest error rate with respect to the definitive diagnosis were coronal PD-weighted turbo-spin-echo with fat suppression and sagittal PD-weighted turbo-spin-echo. Coronal images are highly precise in the evaluation of ACL. Sagittal sequences are the most valid for diagnosis of torn ACL

  15. High throughput dual-wavelength temperature distribution imaging via compressive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xu-Ri; Lan, Ruo-Ming; Liu, Xue-Feng; Zhu, Ge; Zheng, Fu; Yu, Wen-Kai; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2018-03-01

    Thermal imaging is an essential tool in a wide variety of research areas. In this work we demonstrate high-throughput double-wavelength temperature distribution imaging using a modified single-pixel camera without the requirement of a beam splitter (BS). A digital micro-mirror device (DMD) is utilized to display binary masks and split the incident radiation, which eliminates the necessity of a BS. Because the spatial resolution is dictated by the DMD, this thermal imaging system has the advantage of perfect spatial registration between the two images, which limits the need for the pixel registration and fine adjustments. Two bucket detectors, which measures the total light intensity reflected from the DMD, are employed in this system and yield an improvement in the detection efficiency of the narrow-band radiation. A compressive imaging algorithm is utilized to achieve under-sampling recovery. A proof-of-principle experiment was presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this structure.

  16. Clinical performance of high-resolution late gadolinium enhancement imaging with compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Liew, Charlene; Tsao, Connie W; Delling, Francesca N; Addae, Gifty; Ngo, Long; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate diagnostic image quality of 3D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) with high isotropic spatial resolution (∼1.4 mm 3 ) images reconstructed from randomly undersampled k-space using LOw-dimensional-structure Self-learning and Thresholding (LOST). We prospectively enrolled 270 patients (181 men; 55 ± 14 years) referred for myocardial viability assessment. 3D LGE with isotropic spatial resolution of 1.4 ± 0.1 mm 3 was acquired at 1.5T using a LOST acceleration rate of 3 to 5. In a subset of 121 patients, 3D LGE or phase-sensitive LGE were acquired with parallel imaging with an acceleration rate of 2 for comparison. Two readers evaluated image quality using a scale of 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent) and assessed for scar presence. The McNemar test statistic was used to compare the proportion of detected scar between the two sequences. We assessed the association between image quality and characteristics (age, gender, torso dimension, weight, heart rate), using generalized linear models. Overall, LGE detection proportions for 3D LGE with LOST were similar between readers 1 and 2 (16.30% vs. 18.15%). For image quality, readers gave 85.9% and 80.0%, respectively, for images categorized as good or excellent. Overall proportion of scar presence was not statistically different from conventional 3D LGE (28% vs. 33% [P = 0.17] for reader 1 and 26% vs. 31% [P = 0.37] for reader 2). Increasing subject heart rate was associated with lower image quality (estimated slope = -0.009 (P = 0.001)). High-resolution 3D LGE with LOST yields good to excellent image quality in >80% of patients and identifies patients with LV scar at the same rate as conventional 3D LGE. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1829-1838. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, Jason A.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Fripp, Jurgen; Menk, Frederick W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  18. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Sun, Jidi [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Richardson, Haylea [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Arm, Jameen [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Best, Leah [Department of Radiology, Hunter New England Health, New Lambton, New South Wales (Australia); Chandra, Shekhar S. [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Fripp, Jurgen [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Menk, Frederick W. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s